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Sample records for rethinking crop-disease management

  1. Rethinking crop-disease management in fungus-growing ants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, J.J.; Aanen, D.K.

    2009-01-01

    Ant fungus farming has become a prominent model for studying the evolution of mutualistic cooperation, with recent advances in reconstructing the evolutionary origin and elaborations of the symbiosis (1, 2), discovering additional partners and clarifying their interactions (3, 4), and analyzing

  2. Rethinking Project Management in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per

    2012-01-01

    . The chapter argues for a rethinking process due to pervasiveness and complexity in the contemporary project environment where rethinking is needed in order to stay competitive. The suggested approach for the rethinking project management is a framing process where body of ideas is established......Projects are everywhere across different sectors, industries and countries. Project management is no longer a sub-discipline of engineering and other rather technical disciplines but is also used for many other purposes. Even though practice has changed dramatically over the years, the models...... and methodologies for project management has been fairly static and has therefore received substantial criticism for a lack of relevance to practice. Several scholars have therefore started to think more widely about projects and project management conceptualized as rethinking project management. However this theme...

  3. Towards rethinking Project portfolio management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kristian; Svejvig, Per

    the last five years. Utilizing the theoretical lens proposed by Svejvig and Andersen (2015), we apply two complementary analytical perspectives to classify and analyze the stocks. One perspective, denoted as classical project management (CPM), highlights key characteristics of conventional research....... A second perspective, denoted as rethinking project management (RPM), highlights characteristics of progressive research. Not surprisingly, characteristics from CPM are very dominant in the stock of most cited publications of all years — instrumentality and controllability in particular. In the newest...

  4. Rethinking risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloman, H.F.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to bring together the ideas of those who currently practice the many different forms of risk management on a global basis. These forms include guidance of public policy on macro risks, risk financing and insurance for many larger commercial organizations, managing credit, currency and interest rate risks for financial institutions, plus other extensions of risk management including security, quality control, and quality assurance in a health-care environment

  5. Farm Management: rethinking directions?

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, David R.; Girdwood, John; Parton, Kevin A.; Charry, Al A.

    2004-01-01

    Farms and farming are major contributors to the world economy, directly responsible for a large part of GDP. These achievements are not trivial and imply that farms are being managed in reasonably effective ways, else agricultural industries would not be sustained. However has the study of Farm Management within Australia made significant contributions to agriculture or lagged in the background. Is it contributing to better Farm Management or merely cataloguing what has happened? Is it leadin...

  6. The Danish Agenda for Rethinking Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per; Grex, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze the similarities and differences between the Danish Re-thinking Project Management initiative named Project Half Double (PHD) and the rethinking project man-agement (RPM) research stream. The paper furthermore discusses how PHD and RPM can inspire...... ideas and local implementations. Findings – RPM and PHD share a focus on value creation, social processes, learning and complexity while PHD also focuses on lean thinking, agile thinking, front-end loading and leadership, which are largely topics beyond the RPM research stream. Originality...... a foundation for further development of both rethinking project management and Project Half Double....

  7. The Danish Agenda for Rethinking Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per; Grex, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze the similarities and differences between the Danish Re-thinking Project Management initiative named Project Half Double (PHD) and the rethinking project man-agement (RPM) research stream. The paper furthermore discusses how PHD and RPM can inspire...... a foundation for further development of both rethinking project management and Project Half Double....... each other in research and practice. Design/methodology/approach – This is an empirical paper based on collaborative research between in-dustry and researchers. PHD has developed principles and practices driven by industry consisting of 10 leading stars and the impact, leadership and flow (ILF) method...

  8. Rethinking Study and Management of Agricultural Systems for Policy Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Baumgärtner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a concern that agriculture will no longer be able to meet, on a global scale, the growing demand for food. Facing such a challenge requires new patterns of thinking in the context of complexity and sustainability sciences. This paper, focused on the social dimension of the study and management of agricultural systems, suggests that rethinking the study of agricultural systems entails analyzing them as complex socio-ecological systems, as well as considering the differing thinking patterns of diverse stakeholders. The intersubjective nature of knowledge, as studied by different philosophical schools, needs to be better integrated into the study and management of agricultural systems than it is done so far, forcing us to accept that there are no simplistic solutions, and to seek a better understanding of the social dimension of agriculture. Different agriculture related problems require different policy and institutional approaches. Finally, the intersubjective nature of knowledge asks for the visualization of different framings and the power relations taking place in the decision-making process. Rethinking management of agricultural systems implies that policy making should be shaped by different principles: learning, flexibility, adaptation, scale-matching, participation, diversity enhancement and precaution hold the promise to significantly improve current standard management procedures.

  9. Rethinking Social Barriers to Effective Adaptive Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Simon; Schultz, Lisen; Bekessy, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to environmental management based on learning-by-doing, where complexity, uncertainty, and incomplete knowledge are acknowledged and management actions are treated as experiments. However, while adaptive management has received significant uptake in theory, it remains elusively difficult to enact in practice. Proponents have blamed social barriers and have called for social science contributions. We address this gap by adopting a qualitative approach to explore the development of an ecological monitoring program within an adaptive management framework in a public land management organization in Australia. We ask what practices are used to enact the monitoring program and how do they shape learning? We elicit a rich narrative through extensive interviews with a key individual, and analyze the narrative using thematic analysis. We discuss our results in relation to the concept of `knowledge work' and Westley's 2002) framework for interpreting the strategies of adaptive managers—`managing through, in, out and up.' We find that enacting the program is conditioned by distinct and sometimes competing logics—scientific logics prioritizing experimentation and learning, public logics emphasizing accountability and legitimacy, and corporate logics demanding efficiency and effectiveness. In this context, implementing adaptive management entails practices of translation to negotiate tensions between objective and situated knowledge, external experts and organizational staff, and collegiate and hierarchical norms. Our contribution embraces the `doing' of learning-by-doing and marks a shift from conceptualizing the social as an external barrier to adaptive management to be removed to an approach that situates adaptive management as social knowledge practice.

  10. Re-thinking urban flood management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sörensen, Johanna; Persson, Andreas; Sternudd, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    -term flood risk and harm the riverine ecosystems in urban as well as rural areas. In the present paper, we depart from resilience theory and suggest a concept to improve urban flood resilience. We identify areas where contemporary challenges call for improved collaborative urban flood management. The concept...... emphasizes resiliency and achieved synergy between increased capacity to handle stormwater runoff and improved experiential and functional quality of the urban environments. We identify research needs as well as experiments for improved sustainable and resilient stormwater management namely, flexibility...

  11. Electronic government: Rethinking channel management strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebbers, Wolfgang E.; Pieterson, Willem Jan; Noordman, H.N.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores how an alternative multichannel management strategy can improve the way governments and citizens interact. Improvement is necessary because, based on empirical data from various sources, the conclusion can be drawn that there is a gap between the communication channels

  12. Rethinking project management: A structured literature review with a critical look at the brave new world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per; Andersen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a structured review of the rethinking project management (RPM) literature based on the classification and analysis of 74 contributions and in addition takes a critical look at this brave new world. Through the analysis, a total of 6 overarching categories emerged......: contextualization, social and political aspects, rethinking practice, complexity and uncertainty, actuality of projects and broader conceptualization. These categories cover a broad range of different contributions with diverse and alternative perspectives on project management. The early RPM literature dates back...

  13. A new future for business? Rethinking management theory and business strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hahn, T.; Kolk, A.; Winn, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this introductory article, we discuss the need for a rethinking of the theoretical foundations of management and the practice of business strategy in view of a range of social, environmental and ethical challenges that highlight the limits of ‘business as usual’. Calls for a reconsideration of

  14. Climate-Agriculture-Modeling and Decision Tool for Disease (CAMDT-Disease) for seasonal climate forecast-based crop disease risk management in agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K. H.; Lee, S.; Han, E.; Ines, A. V. M.

    2017-12-01

    Climate-Agriculture-Modeling and Decision Tool (CAMDT) is a decision support system (DSS) tool that aims to facilitate translations of probabilistic seasonal climate forecasts (SCF) to crop responses such as yield and water stress. Since CAMDT is a software framework connecting different models and algorithms with SCF information, it can be easily customized for different types of agriculture models. In this study, we replaced the DSSAT-CSM-Rice model originally incorporated in CAMDT with a generic epidemiological model, EPIRICE, to generate a seasonal pest outlook. The resulting CAMDT-Disease generates potential risks for selected fungal, viral, and bacterial diseases of rice over the next months by translating SCFs into agriculturally-relevant risk information. The integrated modeling procedure of CAMDT-Disease first disaggregates a given SCF using temporal downscaling methods (predictWTD or FResampler1), runs EPIRICE with the downscaled weather inputs, and finally visualizes the EPIRICE outputs as disease risk compared to that of the previous year and the 30-year-climatological average. In addition, the easy-to-use graphical user interface adopted from CAMDT allows users to simulate "what-if" scenarios of disease risks over different planting dates with given SCFs. Our future work includes the simulation of the effect of crop disease on yields through the disease simulation models with the DSSAT-CSM-Rice model, as disease remains one of the most critical yield-reducing factors in the field.

  15. FCDD: A Database for Fruit Crops Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Rupal; Jasrai, Yogesh; Pandya, Himanshu; Chaudhari, Suman; Samota, Chand Mal

    2014-01-01

    Fruit Crops Diseases Database (FCDD) requires a number of biotechnology and bioinformatics tools. The FCDD is a unique bioinformatics resource that compiles information about 162 details on fruit crops diseases, diseases type, its causal organism, images, symptoms and their control. The FCDD contains 171 phytochemicals from 25 fruits, their 2D images and their 20 possible sequences. This information has been manually extracted and manually verified from numerous sources, including other electronic databases, textbooks and scientific journals. FCDD is fully searchable and supports extensive text search. The main focus of the FCDD is on providing possible information of fruit crops diseases, which will help in discovery of potential drugs from one of the common bioresource-fruits. The database was developed using MySQL. The database interface is developed in PHP, HTML and JAVA. FCDD is freely available. http://www.fruitcropsdd.com/

  16. Rethinking project portfolio management: A case study of a public organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kristian; Svejvig, Per

    2018-01-01

    analytical perspectives. One perspective, denoted as classical project management (CPM), highlights key characteristics of traditional PPM research. A second perspective, denoted as rethinking project management (RPM), highlights characteristics of progressive PPM research. Against this background, we...... diagnose PPM practices in a large public organization and find that organizational top management use the vocabulary and request the values emphasized by the CPM perspective, such as executability, controllability, instrumentality and linearity. However, below top management level, we find managers...... practices. Taking into account the limitations of our single case study design, our research shows how an organization, which differs considerably from advise provided by the conventional CPM perspective, and best PPM practices, may be well functioning – or at least, in large, meets the organization’ PPM...

  17. Rethinking 'risk' and self-management for chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morden, Andrew; Jinks, Clare; Ong, Bie Nio

    2012-02-01

    Self-management for chronic illness is a current high profile UK healthcare policy. Policy and clinical recommendations relating to chronic illnesses are framed within a language of lifestyle risk management. This article argues the enactment of risk within current UK self-management policy is intimately related to neo-liberal ideology and is geared towards population governance. The approach that dominates policy perspectives to 'risk' management is critiqued for positioning people as rational subjects who calculate risk probabilities and act upon them. Furthermore this perspective fails to understand the lay person's construction and enactment of risk, their agenda and contextual needs when living with chronic illness. Of everyday relevance to lay people is the management of risk and uncertainty relating to social roles and obligations, the emotions involved when encountering the risk and uncertainty in chronic illness, and the challenges posed by social structural factors and social environments that have to be managed. Thus, clinical enactments of self-management policy would benefit from taking a more holistic view to patient need and seek to avoid solely communicating lifestyle risk factors to be self-managed.

  18. Rethinking Teacher Workforce Development: A Strategic Human Resource Management Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smylie, Mark A.; Miretzky, Debra; Konkol, Pamela

    2004-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors focus on teacher development as a collective and organizational issue. They begin with a brief review of conventional approaches to teacher workforce development and management, including current critiques of these efforts, their possible consequences, and an overview of the recent calls for more comprehensive,…

  19. Rethinking Value in the Bio-economy: Finance, Assetization, and the Management of Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Kean

    2017-05-01

    Current debates in science and technology studies emphasize that the bio-economy-or, the articulation of capitalism and biotechnology-is built on notions of commodity production, commodification, and materiality, emphasizing that it is possible to derive value from body parts, molecular and cellular tissues, biological processes, and so on. What is missing from these perspectives, however, is consideration of the political-economic actors, knowledges, and practices involved in the creation and management of value. As part of a rethinking of value in the bio-economy, this article analyzes three key political-economic processes: financialization, capitalization, and assetization. In doing so, it argues that value is managed as part of a series of valuation practices, it is not inherent in biological materialities.

  20. Rethinking the relationship between flood risk perception and flood management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholz, S; Muro, M; Jeffrey, P; Smith, H M

    2014-04-15

    Although flood risk perceptions and their concomitant motivations for behaviour have long been recognised as significant features of community resilience in the face of flooding events, there has, for some time now, been a poorly appreciated fissure in the accompanying literature. Specifically, rationalist and constructivist paradigms in the broader domain of risk perception provide different (though not always conflicting) contexts for interpreting evidence and developing theory. This contribution reviews the major constructs that have been applied to understanding flood risk perceptions and contextualises these within broader conceptual developments around risk perception theory and contemporary thinking around flood risk management. We argue that there is a need to re-examine and re-invigorate flood risk perception research, in a manner that is comprehensively underpinned by more constructivist thinking around flood risk management as well as by developments in broader risk perception research. We draw attention to an historical over-emphasis on the cognitive perceptions of those at risk to the detriment of a richer understanding of a wider range of flood risk perceptions such as those of policy-makers or of tax-payers who live outside flood affected areas as well as the linkages between these perspectives and protective measures such as state-supported flood insurance schemes. Conclusions challenge existing understandings of the relationship between risk perception and flood management, particularly where the latter relates to communication strategies and the extent to which those at risk from flooding feel responsible for taking protective actions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Rethinking blood components and patients: Patient blood management. Possible ways for development in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folléa, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    As any therapeutic means, blood transfusion requires regular evaluation, particularly for its indications, effectiveness and risks. A better awareness of the risks of blood transfusion, the availability of randomized clinical trials, the evolution of the quality of blood components, and the economic constraints shared by all countries, all have led to rethink both transfusion therapy as a whole and the organization of the transfusion chain from donor to recipient. In this context, patient blood management (PBM) appears as an evidence-based, patient centred, multidisciplinary approach, aiming to optimise the care of patients who might need transfusion and consequently the use of blood products. This paper presents updated scientific bases of PBM and the three pillars founding it. As PBM is developing fast in other European countries, this review proposes ways to explore for its development in France. It finally proposes to integrate PBM in a wider and coordinated approach of the blood supply management, with tools to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the transfusion chain, starting with the needs of the patients and ending with an optimum treatment of the patient, including the appropriate number of blood components of the required quality. A better understanding, implementation and assessment of this coordinated global approach, allowing to adapt donor collections to the patients' needs in compliance with safety requirements for patients and donors, in a coordinated way, will certainly be a major challenge for transfusion medicine in the near future, for the benefit of patients, donors and all other stakeholders involved in the transfusion chain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Rethinking Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996

    These three papers were presented at a symposium on rethinking diversity in human resource development (HRD) moderated by Neal Chalofsky at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Diversity: A Double-Edged Sword" (Sally F. Angus) presents the notion of work force diversity through two differing perspectives in order to…

  3. Managing the crowd rethinking records management for the web 2.0 world

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Challenges records managers to find time to debate the issues thrown up by the technological paradigm and the threat it poses to established theory and practice. This book poses a range of ideas for discussion such as why not adopt a ranking system that encourages users to rate how useful they found content as part of the appraisal process?

  4. HMIS and decision-making in Zambia: re-thinking information solutions for district health management in decentralized health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutemwa, Richard I

    2006-01-01

    to the need for a radical re-think of district health management information solutions in ways that account for the existence of other information forms outside the formal HMIS in the district health system.

  5. Rethinking the Risk Management Process for Genetically Engineered Crop Varieties in Small-scale, Traditionally Based Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Cleveland

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Proponents of genetically engineered (GE crops often assume that the risk management used in the industrial world is appropriate for small-scale, traditionally based agriculture in the Third World. Opponents of GE crops often assume that risk management is inappropriate for the Third World, because it is inherently biased in favor of the industrial world. We examine both of these assumptions, by rethinking risk management for GE crops and transgenes, using the example of maize transgene flow from the U.S. to Mexico. Risk management for the Third World is a necessary first step of a broader benefit-cost analysis of GE crops, which would include comparisons with existing varieties and with alternative varieties such as transgenic farmer varieties and organic varieties. Our goal is to use existing information on GE crops and on the social and biological characteristics of Third World agriculture to identify key processes that need to be considered in risk management, and the additional research required to adequately understand them. The four main steps in risk management are hazard identification, risk analysis (exposure x harm, risk evaluation, and risk treatment. We use informal event trees to identify possible exposure to GE crops and transgenes, and resulting biological and social harm; give examples of farmers' ability to evaluate social harm; and discuss the possibilities for risk treatment. We conclude that risk management is relevant for Third World agriculture, but needs to be based on the unique biological and social characteristics of small-scale, traditionally based agriculture, including the knowledge and values of Third World farmers and consumers.

  6. Rethinking macroeconomic policies for development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Nayyar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The global economic crisis has created an opportunity to rethink macroeconomics for development. Such rethinking is both necessary and desirable. It is essential to redefine macroeconomic objectives so that the emphasis is on fostering employment creation and supporting economic growth instead of the focus on price stability alone. It is just as important to rethink macroeconomic policies which cannot simply be used for the management of inflation and the elimination of macroeconomic imbalances, since fiscal and monetary policies are powerful and versatile instruments in the pursuit of development objectives. In doing so, it is essential to the overcome the constraints embedded in orthodox economic thinking and recognize the constraints implicit in the politics of ideology and interests.

  7. Rethinking schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insel, Thomas R

    2010-11-11

    How will we view schizophrenia in 2030? Schizophrenia today is a chronic, frequently disabling mental disorder that affects about one per cent of the world's population. After a century of studying schizophrenia, the cause of the disorder remains unknown. Treatments, especially pharmacological treatments, have been in wide use for nearly half a century, yet there is little evidence that these treatments have substantially improved outcomes for most people with schizophrenia. These current unsatisfactory outcomes may change as we approach schizophrenia as a neurodevelopmental disorder with psychosis as a late, potentially preventable stage of the illness. This 'rethinking' of schizophrenia as a neurodevelopmental disorder, which is profoundly different from the way we have seen this illness for the past century, yields new hope for prevention and cure over the next two decades.

  8. Rethinking Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Despite more than half a century of psychological research on creativity we are still far from a clear understanding of the creative process, its antecedents and consequences and, most of all, the ways in which we can effectively support creativity. This is primarily due to a narrow focus...... on creative individuals isolated from culture and society. Rethinking Creativity proposes a fundamental review of this position and argues that creativity is not only a psychological but a sociocultural phenomenon. This edited volume aims to relocate creativity from inside individual minds to the material......, symbolic and social world of culture. It brings together eminent social and cultural psychologists who study dynamic, transformative and emergent phenomena, and invites them to conceptualise creativity in ways that depart from mainstream definitions and theoretical models existing in past and present...

  9. Adolescent Views of Time Management: Rethinking the School Day in Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Paris S.; Strom, Robert D.; Sindel-Arrington, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    Junior high school presents a significant increase in time demands both for study and for social relationships. The students (N = 240) in grades 7 and 8 at a junior high school anonymously completed online the Time Management Poll concerning their own use of time and the way their school managed time. The 20 items in the poll allowed them to…

  10. Rethinking Knowledge Management: Strategies for Enhancing District-Level Teacher and Leader Tacit Knowledge Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Grounded within knowledge management (KM) theory and conceptions of tacit and explicit knowledge, this article draws on historical evidence from the Early Years Literacy Project (EYLP), a four-year instructional renewal strategy implemented across 100 schools in a large Canadian school district. The EYLP management approach included a series of…

  11. Three-step management of pneumothorax: time for a re-think on initial management†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Takahito; Taniguchi, Yohei; Saito, Tomohito; Konobu, Toshifumi; Saito, Yukihito

    2013-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a common disease worldwide, but surprisingly, its initial management remains controversial. There are some published guidelines for the management of spontaneous pneumothorax. However, they differ in some respects, particularly in initial management. In published trials, the objective of treatment has not been clarified and it is not possible to compare the treatment strategies between different trials because of inappropriate evaluations of the air leak. Therefore, there is a need to outline the optimal management strategy for pneumothorax. In this report, we systematically review published randomized controlled trials of the different treatments of primary spontaneous pneumothorax, point out controversial issues and finally propose a three-step strategy for the management of pneumothorax. There are three important characteristics of pneumothorax: potentially lethal respiratory dysfunction; air leak, which is the obvious cause of the disease; frequent recurrence. These three characteristics correspond to the three steps. The central idea of the strategy is that the lung should not be expanded rapidly, unless absolutely necessary. The primary objective of both simple aspiration and chest drainage should be the recovery of acute respiratory dysfunction or the avoidance of respiratory dysfunction and subsequent complications. We believe that this management strategy is simple and clinically relevant and not dependent on the classification of pneumothorax. PMID:23117233

  12. Rethinking Social Desirability Scales: From Impression Management to Interpersonally Oriented Self-Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uziel, Liad

    2010-05-01

    Social desirability (specifically, impression management) scales are widely used by researchers and practitioners to screen individuals who bias self-reports in a self-favoring manner. These scales also serve to identify individuals at risk for psychological and health problems. The present review explores the evidence with regard to the ability of these scales to achieve these objectives. In the first part of the review, I present six criteria to evaluate impression management scales and conclude that they are unsatisfactory as measures of response style. Next, I explore what individual differences in impression management scores actually do measure. I compare two approaches: a defensiveness approach, which argues that these scales measure defensiveness that stems from vulnerable self-esteem, and an adjustment approach, which suggests that impression management is associated with personal well-being and interpersonal adjustment. Data from a wide variety of fields including social behavior, affect and well-being, health, and job performance tend to favor the adjustment approach. Finally, I argue that scales measuring impression management should be redefined as measures of interpersonally oriented self-control that identify individuals who demonstrate high levels of self-control, especially in social contexts. © The Author(s) 2010.

  13. Rethinking Academic Reform and Encouraging Organizational Innovation: Implications for Stakeholder Management in College Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeaux, Eddie

    2013-01-01

    There are increasing concerns about the educational experiences of Division I student-athletes in big-time college sports. Calls for reform have come from within colleges and universities and beyond. The literature of innovative management offers ideas that can help mitigate the academic and athletic divide and offer new ideas for athletic…

  14. A Decision Support System for integrated tourism development: Rethinking tourism policies and management strategies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bousset, J. P.; Skuras, D.; Těšitel, Jan; Marsat, J. B.; Petrou, A.; Fiallo-Pantziou, E.; Kušová, Drahomíra; Bartoš, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2007), s. 387-404 ISSN 1461-6688 Grant - others:-(XE) QLK5-CT-2000-01211-SPRITE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Integrated tourism * policy formulation * participatory approaches * simulation models * decision support system Subject RIV: AE - Management ; Administration

  15. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  16. Re-thinking incentives and penalties: Economic aspects of waste management in Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cossu, R. [IMAGE, Department of Hydraulic, Maritime, Environmental and Geotechnical Engineering, University of Padua, Via Loredan, 35131 Padua (Italy); Masi, S., E-mail: salvatore.masi@unibas.it [DIFA, Department of Environmental Engineering and Physics, University of Basilicata, Via dell’Ateneo 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • We focused on the dynamics the formation of operational costs of waste management. • We provide the basic elements to compose a picture of economic management. • We present a reflection on the last hidden costs associated with the consumption of goods and packaging. • Reduction of waste production. - Abstract: This paper focuses on the dynamics the formation of operational costs of waste management in Italy and the effect of economic measures. Currently incentives and penalties have been internalized by the system no differently from other cost items and revenues. This has greatly influenced the system directing it towards solutions that are often distant from the real environmental objectives. Based on an analysis of disaggregated costs of collection treatment and recovery, we provide the basic elements to compose a picture of economic management in various technical–organizational scenarios. In the light of the considerations contained in the paper it is proposed, e.g. for controlled landfills, that the ecotax, currently based on weight, could be replaced by one based on the volume consumption. Likewise, for tax reduction on disposal system, instead a pre-treatment might ask an environmental balance of the overall system. The article presents a reflection on the last hidden costs associated with the consumption of goods and packaging, and how to reduce waste production is the necessary path to be followed in ecological and economic perspectives.

  17. Alternative Work Arrangements among Professionals and Managers: Rethinking Career Development and Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDermid, Shelley M.; Lee, Mary Dean; Buck, Michelle; Williams, Margaret L.

    2001-01-01

    A study of 78 women professionals/managers working reduced hours for family or personal reasons showed that less successful arrangements were associated with lack of upward mobility, underemployment, pressure to work full time, and difficult relations with co-workers. Career development was a concern for those in both more and less successful…

  18. Water: Rethinking Management in an Age of Scarcity. Worldwatch Paper 62.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postel, Sandra

    This document, which examines various topics and issues related to the management of freshwater supplies, is organized into 6 main sections. These sections include: (1) the water cycle and renewable supplies, providing data on distribution of such supplies by continent and average annual per capita runoff produced in selected countries with…

  19. Re-thinking incentives and penalties: Economic aspects of waste management in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossu, R.; Masi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We focused on the dynamics the formation of operational costs of waste management. • We provide the basic elements to compose a picture of economic management. • We present a reflection on the last hidden costs associated with the consumption of goods and packaging. • Reduction of waste production. - Abstract: This paper focuses on the dynamics the formation of operational costs of waste management in Italy and the effect of economic measures. Currently incentives and penalties have been internalized by the system no differently from other cost items and revenues. This has greatly influenced the system directing it towards solutions that are often distant from the real environmental objectives. Based on an analysis of disaggregated costs of collection treatment and recovery, we provide the basic elements to compose a picture of economic management in various technical–organizational scenarios. In the light of the considerations contained in the paper it is proposed, e.g. for controlled landfills, that the ecotax, currently based on weight, could be replaced by one based on the volume consumption. Likewise, for tax reduction on disposal system, instead a pre-treatment might ask an environmental balance of the overall system. The article presents a reflection on the last hidden costs associated with the consumption of goods and packaging, and how to reduce waste production is the necessary path to be followed in ecological and economic perspectives

  20. Rethinking Project Management, old wines in new bottles or new insights?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter; Svejvig, Per

    2013-01-01

    has changed dramatically over the years, and has therefore received substantial criti-cism for a lack of relevance to practice (Koskela & Howell 2002) However, several scholars have started to think more widely about projects and project management as a reaction to the technocratic and rationalistic...... view, but also as a response to the challenges of carrying out projects in practice and the poor track record of previous projects (Morris et al. 2011b). This wider thinking has developed many new insights over the years, such as moving from the “project as a tool” approach to the idea of the “project...... as a tool” approach to the idea of the “project as temporary organization” (Packendorff 1995) and understanding project management as a holistic discipline for achieving organizational efficiency, effectiveness and innovation (Jugdev et al. 2001). This more holistic and pluralistic understanding of project...

  1. Rethinking Potentials of Public Space and its Management Through Placemaking in Kuala Lumpur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Normah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Public space takes many spatial forms, including parks, the streets, sidewalks and footpaths that connect an edge of a space between buildings or roadsides, hence are important spaces in an urban setting. In a city context, the public space frames the city image. Kuala Lumpur’s public spaces are typically made up of shopping streets. It allows an ambivalent space that encourages more activities and interactions through the continuity of the street. For that reason, street that brings out life and movement in an urban space is an ideal type of street. In maintaining public spaces and reinventing it, placemaking is a quest for engagement tool to help strengthening legal frameworks in order to protect the public space which is seen viable at a city level. This paper therefore, explores the potentials of public spaces and its management. It applies the case study method by means of investigating two areas in the city encompassing similar characteristics. Generally, the research is designed to test the theoretical framework in managing the public space and its key dimensions in shaping the quality of public space. The researcher then synthesizes the broad range of development of placemaking and the changing uses of public space. The findings will advance further understanding of a suitable application thus intensify the legal framework that shapes the quality of space and its management.

  2. Mapping crop diseases using survey data: The case of bacterial wilt in bananas in the East African highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, H.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.; Stoorvogel, J.J.

    2016-01-01

    Globally, crop diseases result in significant losses in crop yields. To properly target interventions to control crop diseases, it is important to map diseases at a high resolution. However, many surveys of crop diseases pose challenges to mapping because available observations are only proxies of

  3. Goals, objectives and criteria for the management of nuclear wastes: rethinking the problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, W.P.; Frazier, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    The question of the management of nuclear wastes in a perpetually safe manner transcends the usual bounds of technology and encompasses social, political and even ethical issues. It needs no breakthrough in nuclear physics nor even the development of a radically new engineering technology. What is required is the application of common sense in identifying and balancing the various facets of the issue. The interweaving of the technical, social, political and ethical facets of the issue is explored in this paper. The system for the management of the wastes (the technology plus institutions and organizations required) is not self-implementing. Action is required, and the time for that action is now. The decision as to what system to deploy is, by its very complex nature, a societal decision. Finally, of course, there is no one best way to handle the wastes. We would be naive to believe that there are not a large number of systems which will prove on careful analysis more than adequate. From such a common sense discussion, and not from high technological achievements, arises a set of goals or guiding principles for the waste management system and for the implementation of that system. These are outlined in the paper in some detail. They fall into three important time frames: 1) the period of active use of fission nuclear power; 2) the period of active societal involvement in waste management (which may extend beyond the life of the industry); and 3) the entire period over which the waste management system must operate (which can extend beyond the time of active societal involvement). The goals call for action now with full treatment of all the relevant issues in the decision process. We who derive the benefits of nuclear power should accept the costs of managing the wastes, now. In the longer term, organizational and technical systems should have certain ''fail-safe'' features, and should protect options and societal values. And in the longest term, the system should

  4. Rethinking the Galapagos Islands as a Complex Social-Ecological System: Implications for Conservation and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. González

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Galapagos Islands are among the most renowned natural sites in the world. Unlike other oceanic archipelagos, the ecological and evolutionary processes characteristic of Galapagos have been minimally affected by human activities, and the archipelago still retains most of its original, unique biodiversity. However, several recent reports suggest that the development model has turned unsustainable and that the unique values of the archipelago might be seriously at risk. In response to international concern, UNESCO added Galapagos to the list of World Heritage in Danger in 2007. Our goal was to provide new insights into the origins of the present-day crisis and suggest possible management alternatives. To this end, we re-examined the Galapagos situation from a broad systems perspective, conceptualizing the archipelago as a complex social-ecological system. Past, present, and possible future trends were explored using the resilience theory as a perspective for understanding the dynamics of the system. Four major historical periods were characterized and analyzed using Holling's adaptive cycle metaphor. The current Galapagos situation was characterized as a prolonged series of crisis events followed by renewal attempts that have not yet been completed. Three plausible future scenarios were identified, with tourism acting as the primary driver of change. The current tourism model reduces the system's resilience through its effects on the economy, population growth, resource consumption, invasive species arrival, and lifestyle of the island residents. Opportunities to reorganize and maintain a desirable state do exist. However, strong political and management decisions are urgently needed to avoid an irreversible shift to a socially and environmentally undesirable regime. Key measures to achieve a new sustainability paradigm for Galapagos include modifying traditional practices to produce a more adaptive resilience-based co-management model

  5. Rethinking attitudes to student clinical supervision and patient care: a change management success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Maree; Wade, Victoria; McAllister, Sue; Stupans, Ieva; Miller, Jennifer; Burgess, Teresa; LeCouteur, Amanda; Starr, Linda

    2014-08-30

    The aim of this project was to explore the process of change in a busy community dental clinic following a team development intervention designed to improve the management of student supervision during clinical placements. An action research model was used. Seven members of a community dental clinic team (three dentists, two dental therapists, one dental assistant and the clinic manager), together with the university clinical placement supervisor participated in the team development intervention. The intervention consisted of two profiling activities and associated workshops spread six months apart. These activities focused on individual work preferences and overall team performance with the aim of improving the functioning of the clinic as a learning environment for dental students. Evaluation data consisted of 20 participant interviews, fourteen hours of workplace observation and six sets of field notes. Following initial thematic analysis, project outcomes were re-analysed using activity theory and expansive learning as a theoretical framework. At project commencement students were not well integrated into the day-to-day clinic functioning. Staff expressed a general view that greater attention to student supervision would compromise patient care. Following the intervention greater clinical team cohesion and workflow changes delivered efficiencies in practice, enhanced relationships among team members, and more positive attitudes towards students. The physical layout of the clinic and clinical workloads were changed to achieve greater involvement of all team members in supporting student learning. Unexpectedly, these changes also improved clinic functioning and increased the number of student placements available. In navigating the sequential stages of the expansive learning cycle, the clinical team ultimately redefined the 'object' of their activity and crossed previously impervious boundaries between healthcare delivery and student supervision with benefits to

  6. Dictating participation? Rethinking the adaptive co-management of socio-ecological systems in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Vilaly, Audra; Abd salam El Vilaly, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    In the face of environmental change, enhancing adaptive capacity relies on stakeholder engagement. But the participatory process, while critical to the translation, transfer, and application of scientific knowledge to society, is not without its own contradictions. These include the asymmetrical relations of power that prevail between environmental scientists, managers, and local users; discrepant understandings of knowledge and its appropriate uses; and conflicting social, economic, and ecological values, to name only a few. Our research examines five major transboundary river basin organizations in West Africa and their efforts to improve adaptive basin management via stakeholder collaboration. In particular, we evaluate the participatory strategies of these organizations to measure non-linear, multi-directional feedbacks between the social and biophysical factors of land use/land cover change, as well as the impacts of this change on basins and their dependent populations. Our research suggests that oftentimes, these methods paradoxically produce a hierarchical and marginalizing effect on local stakeholders in relation to the scientists that study them. In seeking to address these limitations, we assess the potential costs and benefits of integrating select components of a Participatory Action Research (PAR) framework (see, for example, Reason & Bradbury-Huang, 2007) into studies of complex socio-ecological problems. This approach, used widely in the social sciences, promotes critical reflection on and minimization of the power inequities inherent in science-society collaborations. It instead favors more horizontal forms of knowledge co-production that support and foster the expansion of local, existing movements for social and environmental justice. A PAR framework may therefore improve the efficiency, sustainability, and equitability of land-based adaptation to environmental change; further research is thus recommended to test this hypothesis. References

  7. Rethinking image indexing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hans Dam

    2017-01-01

    Hans Dam Christensen, ”Rethinking image indexing?”, in: Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, vol. 68, no. 7, 2017, 1782-1785......Hans Dam Christensen, ”Rethinking image indexing?”, in: Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, vol. 68, no. 7, 2017, 1782-1785...

  8. Rethinking trait conceptions of social desirability scales: impression management as an expression of honesty-humility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Reinout E; Zettler, Ingo; Hilbig, Benjamin E

    2014-06-01

    Numerous researchers have noted that, instead of response sets or styles, most social desirability scales seem to measure personality traits instead. In two studies, we investigated the substantive interpretation of the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding in terms of the HEXACO model of personality. Because of its focus on honesty and integrity, the Impression Management (IM) scale was hypothesized to be mainly related to HEXACO Honesty-Humility. In the main study among 1,106 students and well-acquainted others (friends, family, or partners), positive self-other agreement correlations were found for both IM (r = .45) and Self-Deceptive Enhancement (SDE; r = .34), supporting a trait conception of IM and SDE. In both self- and other ratings, the most important predictors of SDE were (low) Emotionality, Extraversion, and Conscientiousness. IM was associated with Conscientiousness and Agreeableness, but Honesty-Humility was by far its most important predictor. In a subsample (n = 465), Honesty-Humility and IM were unrelated to GPA. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Factors influencing U.S. consumer support for genetic modification to prevent crop disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, Katherine A; Besley, John C; Steinhardt, Joseph

    2014-07-01

    This study examines support for the genetic modification (GM) of crops in the context of preventing "late blight," a devastating potato and tomato disease that caused the Irish Potato Famine in the 1850s and results in substantial crop loss today. We surveyed U.S. adults who do the primary grocery shopping in their household (n = 859). Half of the respondents were randomly assigned to read a vignette describing late blight before responding to questions about GM, whereas the other half read a vignette about generic crop disease before responding to questions. We also examine how the perceived fairness of decision makers relates to GM support and the perceived legitimacy of GM decision making. We found that disease specificity mattered less to support and legitimacy than the perceived fairness of decision makers. The perceived risks of GM to human and environmental health negatively related to GM support and legitimacy, whereas the perceived benefits (e.g. reduced threats to crops and a more secure food supply) positively related to support and legitimacy. Objective knowledge about GM had a small, negative relationship with legitimacy whereas self-assessed familiarity with GM had a positive relationship. Overall, the results offer additional confirmation of past findings from more localized settings that perceived fairness of decision makers matters to support for GM and underscore the importance of considering how risk managers' behaviors and actions are perceived alongside individuals' perceptions about the risks and benefits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Rethinking wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Steven J.; Cao, Long; Caldeira, Ken; Hoffert, Martin I.

    2013-03-01

    stabilization wedges have become a ubiquitous unit in assessing different strategies to mitigate climate change (e.g. [2-5]). But the real and lasting potency of the wedge concept was in dividing the daunting problem of climate change into substantial but tractable portions of mitigation: Pacala and Socolow gave us a way to believe that the energy-carbon-climate problem was manageable. An unfortunate consequence of their paper, however, was to make the solution seem easy (see, e.g. [6, 7]). And in the meantime, the problem has grown. Since 2004, annual emissions have increased and their growth rate has accelerated, so that more than seven wedges would now be necessary to stabilize emissions and—more importantly—stabilizing emissions at current levels for 50 years does not appear compatible with Pacala and Socolow's target of an atmospheric CO2 concentration below 500 ppm nor the international community's goal of limiting the increase in global mean temperature to 2 °C more than the pre-industrial era. Here, we aim to revitalize the wedge concept by redefining what it means to 'solve the carbon and climate problem for the next 50 years'. This redefinition makes clear both the scale and urgency of innovating and deploying carbon-emissions-free energy technologies. 2. Solving the climate problem Stabilizing global climate requires decreasing CO2 emissions to near zero [8-11]. If emissions were to stop completely, global temperatures would quickly stabilize and decrease gradually over time [8, 12, 13]. But socioeconomic demands and dependence on fossil-fuel energy effectively commit us to many billions of tons of CO2 emissions [14], and at the timescale of centuries, each CO2 emission to the atmosphere contributes another increment to global warming: peak warming is proportional to cumulative CO2 emissions [15, 16]. Cumulative emissions, in turn, integrate all past emissions as well as those occurring during three distinct phases of mitigation: (1) slowing growth of

  11. Rethinking Education and Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, William G., Ed.

    2015-01-01

    In "Rethinking Education and Poverty," William G. Tierney brings together scholars from around the world to examine the complex relationship between poverty and education in the twenty first century. International in scope, this book assembles the best contemporary thinking about how education can mediate class and improve the lives of…

  12. Curbing dioxin emissions from municipal solid waste incineration in China: re-thinking about management policies and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hefa; Hu, Yuanan

    2010-09-01

    As one of the countries with large amounts of dioxin releases, the control of dioxins is a major challenge for China. Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration should be considered a high priority source of dioxin emissions because it is playing an increasingly more important role in waste management. MSW incineration in China has much higher emission rates of dioxins than in the developed countries, partially resulting from the gaps in the technologies of incineration and flue gas cleaning. Moreover, the current management policies and practices also contribute significantly to the problem. We recommend lowering dioxin emission standard, strengthening fly ash management, and improving regulation enforcement to reduce dioxin releases into the environment from MSW incineration. We also propose that alternative strategies should be considered on dioxin control and call for an expansion of economic instruments in waste management to reduce waste generation and thus the need for incineration. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Curbing dioxin emissions from municipal solid waste incineration in China: Re-thinking about management policies and practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Hefa, E-mail: hefac@umich.ed [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Hu Yuanan [Education Program for Gifted Youth, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94025 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    As one of the countries with large amounts of dioxin releases, the control of dioxins is a major challenge for China. Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration should be considered a high priority source of dioxin emissions because it is playing an increasingly more important role in waste management. MSW incineration in China has much higher emission rates of dioxins than in the developed countries, partially resulting from the gaps in the technologies of incineration and flue gas cleaning. Moreover, the current management policies and practices also contribute significantly to the problem. We recommend lowering dioxin emission standard, strengthening fly ash management, and improving regulation enforcement to reduce dioxin releases into the environment from MSW incineration. We also propose that alternative strategies should be considered on dioxin control and call for an expansion of economic instruments in waste management to reduce waste generation and thus the need for incineration. - The management policies and practices need to be improved to curb the increasing dioxin releases from municipal solid waste incineration in China.

  14. Curbing dioxin emissions from municipal solid waste incineration in China: Re-thinking about management policies and practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Hefa; Hu Yuanan

    2010-01-01

    As one of the countries with large amounts of dioxin releases, the control of dioxins is a major challenge for China. Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration should be considered a high priority source of dioxin emissions because it is playing an increasingly more important role in waste management. MSW incineration in China has much higher emission rates of dioxins than in the developed countries, partially resulting from the gaps in the technologies of incineration and flue gas cleaning. Moreover, the current management policies and practices also contribute significantly to the problem. We recommend lowering dioxin emission standard, strengthening fly ash management, and improving regulation enforcement to reduce dioxin releases into the environment from MSW incineration. We also propose that alternative strategies should be considered on dioxin control and call for an expansion of economic instruments in waste management to reduce waste generation and thus the need for incineration. - The management policies and practices need to be improved to curb the increasing dioxin releases from municipal solid waste incineration in China.

  15. Rethinking e-learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Jørgen; Dalsgaard, Christian

    2006-01-01

    “Technology alone does not deliver educational success. It only becomes valuable in education if learners and teachers can do something useful with it” (E-Learning: The Partnership Challenge, 2001, p. 24). This quotation could be used as a bon mot for this chapter. Our main goal is to rethink e-learning...... by shifting the focus of attention from learning resources (learning objects) to learning activities, which also implies a refocusing of the pedagogical discussion of the learning process.Firstly, we try to identify why e-learning has not been able to deliver the educational results as expected five years ago...

  16. The role of monumental trees for the preservation of saproxylic biodiversity: re-thinking their management in cultural landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Zapponi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ancient trees present structural and functional characteristics fundamental for sustaining complex and unique assemblages of species. They are a resource globally threatened by both intensive land uses and lack of recruitment. Their disappearance would involve not only the loss of majestic organisms with high intrinsic value, but may also result in the disappearance of rare and endangered species. Italy is currently implementing a new list of noteworthy ancient trees (i.e. monumental trees and the preliminary results of this new inventory have been analysed as a case study of a national initiative. The provisional list included 950 complete records, corresponding to 65 genera and 118 species. The most abundant species was Quercus pubescens Willd while the most common genera were Quercus, Larix, Cedrus, Fagus and Platanus. Age and size were the most used criteria for inclusion of trees in the census. The fundamental novelty of the new inventory is that it is based on a set of well-defined criteria of monumentality and that it clearly recognised the ecological value of ancient trees. Preserving a tree for its ecological role requires a profound cultural shift. The value of microhabitats, structures that have historically been considered defects, should be recognised and managed accordingly. Ancient trees are often part of disappearing cultural landscapes: to preserve the richness and diversity of these habitats, new policies and regulations are needed. The preservation of landscapes, where there is still a high density of ancient trees, should be a priority for all European countries in order to conserve their unique associated fauna and for their irreplaceable functional value for biodiversity conservation.

  17. Rethinking the mathematics curriculum

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyles, Celia; Woodhouse, Geoffrey

    1998-01-01

    At a time when political interest in mathematics education is at its highest, this book demonstrates that the issues are far from straightforward. A wide range of international contributors address such questions as: What is mathematics, and what is it for? What skills does mathematics education need to provide as technology advances? What are the implications for teacher education? What can we learn from past attempts to change the mathematics curriculum? Rethinking the Mathematics Curriculum offers stimulating discussions, showing much is to be learnt from the differences in culture, national expectations, and political restraints revealed in the book. This accessible book will be of particular interest to policy makers, curriculum developers, educators, researchers and employers as well as the general reader.

  18. Rethinking the Enlightenment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehuda Elkana

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this introductory statement, given at the beginning of the Aboagora symposium in Turku in August 2011, Yehuda Elkana highlights the need, in accordance with the title of the conference, to rethink rather than unthink the Enlightenment. Indeed, the Enlightenment remained an unfinished project, but one should never forget that this era formed the basis for the greatest and most important creation of knowledge in all areas for 300 years. Over the last 100 or more years, however, cracks have started to appear in this edifice, Elkana argues: researchers have started to realise that one cannot really distinguish the rational from the irrational and that being contextual does not necessarily mean being relativist.

  19. Rethinking Sexual Citizenship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Diane

    2017-04-01

    Over the last two decades sexuality has emerged as a key theme in debates about citizenship, leading to the development of the concept of sexual citizenship. This article reviews this literature and identifies four main areas of critical framing: work that contests the significance of sexuality to citizenship; critiques that focus on the possibilities and limitations of mobilising the language of citizenship in sexual politics; analyses of sexual citizenship in relation to nationalisms and border making; and literature that critically examines western constructions of sexuality and sexual politics underpinning understandings of sexual citizenship. In order to progress the field theoretically, the article seeks to extend critiques of sexual citizenship focusing on two key aspects of its construction: the sexual citizen-subject and spaces of sexual citizenship. It argues for a critical rethink that encompasses a de-centring of a 'western-centric' focus in order to advance understandings of how sexual citizenship operates both in the Global North and South.

  20. Rethinking collection development and management

    CERN Document Server

    Albitz, Rebecca; Zabel, Diane

    2014-01-01

    This collection of thought-provoking essays by visionary and innovative library practitioners covers theory, research, and best practices in collection development, examining how it has evolved, identifying how some librarians are creatively responding to these changes, and predicting what is coming next.

  1. Genetic Engineering and Sustainable Crop Disease Management: Opportunities for Case-by-Case Decision-Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Vincelli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetic engineering (GE offers an expanding array of strategies for enhancing disease resistance of crop plants in sustainable ways, including the potential for reduced pesticide usage. Certain GE applications involve transgenesis, in some cases creating a metabolic pathway novel to the GE crop. In other cases, only cisgenessis is employed. In yet other cases, engineered genetic changes can be so minimal as to be indistinguishable from natural mutations. Thus, GE crops vary substantially and should be evaluated for risks, benefits, and social considerations on a case-by-case basis. Deployment of GE traits should be with an eye towards long-term sustainability; several options are discussed. Selected risks and concerns of GE are also considered, along with genome editing, a technology that greatly expands the capacity of molecular biologists to make more precise and targeted genetic edits. While GE is merely a suite of tools to supplement other breeding techniques, if wisely used, certain GE tools and applications can contribute to sustainability goals.

  2. Re-thinking residential mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ham, Maarten; Findlay, Allan M.

    2015-01-01

    While researchers are increasingly re-conceptualizing international migration, far less attention has been devoted to re-thinking short-distance residential mobility and immobility. In this paper we harness the life course approach to propose a new conceptual framework for residential mobility research. We contend that residential mobility and immobility should be re-conceptualized as relational practices that link lives through time and space while connecting people to structural conditions. Re-thinking and re-assessing residential mobility by exploiting new developments in longitudinal analysis will allow geographers to understand, critique and address pressing societal challenges. PMID:27330243

  3. Rethink Your Drink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, Phyllis; Patton-Ku, Dana; Fidler, Cheri; Boutelle, Kerri N

    2017-03-01

    Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are linked to obesity; hospitals are a priority setting to reduce intake. This article describes the development, implementation, and results of a focused intervention to reduce SSB sales within a hospital setting. After a formative research process, Rethink Your Drink was launched at a children's hospital in San Diego. The initiative consisted of an educational intervention using the stoplight system to categorize beverages as red, yellow, or green based on sugar content. Beverage sales data were collected for 3 months prior, during the 12-month intervention, and for 4 months after the intervention ended. Monthly red beverage sales decreased from an average of 56% during baseline to 32% at the end of the data collection period (p sales increased from an average of 12.2% during baseline to 38% at the end of the data collection period (p Sales revenue for all drinks remained constant. The intervention resulted in a decrease in SSB sales and an increase in sales of healthier beverage choices. Such interventions can play an important role in obesity prevention and may be more feasible for smaller hospitals with limited resources.

  4. Rethinking language in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterponi, Laura; de Kirby, Kenton; Shankey, Jennifer

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we invite a rethinking of traditional perspectives of language in autism. We advocate a theoretical reappraisal that offers a corrective to the dominant and largely tacitly held view that language, in its essence, is a referential system and a reflection of the individual's cognition. Drawing on scholarship in Conversation Analysis and linguistic anthropology, we present a multidimensional view of language, showing how it also functions as interactional accomplishment, social action, and mode of experience. From such a multidimensional perspective, we revisit data presented by other researchers that include instances of prototypical features of autistic speech, giving them a somewhat different-at times complementary, at times alternative-interpretation. In doing so, we demonstrate that there is much at stake in the view of language that we as researchers bring to our analysis of autistic speech. Ultimately, we argue that adopting a multidimensional view of language has wide ranging implications, deepening our understanding of autism's core features and developmental trajectory. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Rethinking headache chronification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Dana P; Smitherman, Todd A; Penzien, Donald B; Lipton, Richard B; Houle, Timothy T

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this series is to examine several threats to the interpretation of headache chronification studies that arise from methodological issues. The study of headache chronification has extensively used longitudinal designs with 2 or more measurement occasions. Unfortunately, application of these designs, when combined with the common practice of extreme score selection as well as the extant challenges in measuring headache frequency rates (eg, unreliability, regression to the mean), induces substantive threats to accurate interpretation of findings. Partitioning the amount of observed variance in rates of chronification and remission attributable to regression artifacts is a critical yet previously overlooked step to learning more about headache as a potentially progressive disease. In this series on rethinking headache chronification, we provide an overview of methodological issues in this area (this paper), highlight the influence of rounding error on estimates of headache frequency (second paper), examine the influence of random error and regression artifacts on estimates of chronification and remission (third paper), and consider future directions for this line of research (fourth paper). © 2013 American Headache Society.

  6. Rethinking Sexual Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Over the last two decades sexuality has emerged as a key theme in debates about citizenship, leading to the development of the concept of sexual citizenship. This article reviews this literature and identifies four main areas of critical framing: work that contests the significance of sexuality to citizenship; critiques that focus on the possibilities and limitations of mobilising the language of citizenship in sexual politics; analyses of sexual citizenship in relation to nationalisms and border making; and literature that critically examines western constructions of sexuality and sexual politics underpinning understandings of sexual citizenship. In order to progress the field theoretically, the article seeks to extend critiques of sexual citizenship focusing on two key aspects of its construction: the sexual citizen-subject and spaces of sexual citizenship. It argues for a critical rethink that encompasses a de-centring of a ‘western-centric’ focus in order to advance understandings of how sexual citizenship operates both in the Global North and South. PMID:28490816

  7. Rethinking Value in the Bio-economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Current debates in science and technology studies emphasize that the bio-economy—or, the articulation of capitalism and biotechnology—is built on notions of commodity production, commodification, and materiality, emphasizing that it is possible to derive value from body parts, molecular and cellular tissues, biological processes, and so on. What is missing from these perspectives, however, is consideration of the political-economic actors, knowledges, and practices involved in the creation and management of value. As part of a rethinking of value in the bio-economy, this article analyzes three key political-economic processes: financialization, capitalization, and assetization. In doing so, it argues that value is managed as part of a series of valuation practices, it is not inherent in biological materialities. PMID:28458406

  8. The Re-Think Tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gear, Jim

    1993-01-01

    The Re-Think Tree is a simple framework to help individuals assess and improve their behaviors related to environmental issues. The branches of the tree in order of priority are refuse, reduce, re-use, and recycle. Roots of the tree include such things as public opinion, education, and watchdog groups. (KS)

  9. Rethinking Popular Culture and Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Elizabeth, Ed.; Sensoy, Ozlem, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Rethinking Popular Culture and Media" is a provocative collection of articles that begins with the idea that the "popular" in classrooms and in the everyday lives of teachers and students is fundamentally political. This anthology includes outstanding articles by elementary and secondary public school teachers, scholars, and activists who…

  10. Rethinking Educational Evaluation for Quality Educational Outcomes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rethinking Educational Evaluation for Quality Educational Outcomes. ... Educational Evaluation (EE) provides information for action by offering invaluable knowledge in terms of theoretical and practical ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  11. Rethinking the Space for Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    What happens to people’s sense of belonging when globalization meets with proclaimed regional identities resting heavily on conceptions of religion and ethnicity? Who are the actors stressing cultural heritage and authenticity as tools for self-understanding? In Rethinking the Space for Religion...... as a political and cultural argument. The approach makes a nuanced and fresh survey for researchers and other initiated readers to engage in....

  12. Rethinking Lean Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, John; O'Donovan, Brendan; Zokaei, Keivan

    Ever since Levitt's influential Harvard Business Review article 'Production-Line Approach to Service' was published in 1972, it has been common for services to be treated like production lines in both the academic literature and more widely in management practice. The belief that achieving economies of scale will reduce unit costs is a common feature of management decision-making. As technological advancement has produced ever more sophisticated IT and telephony, it has become increasingly easier for firms to standardise and off-shore services. The development of the 'lean' literature has only helped to emphasise the same underlying management assumptions: by managing cost and workers' activity, organisational performance is expected to improve. This chapter argues that through misinterpretation of the core paradigm 'lean' has become subsumed into the 'business as usual' of conventional service management. As a result, 'lean' has become synonymous with 'process efficiency' and the opportunity for significant performance improvement - as exemplified by Toyota - has been missed.

  13. Rethinking the waste hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, C; Vigsoe, D [eds.

    2005-03-01

    There is an increasing need to couple environmental and economic considerations within waste management. Consumers and companies alike generate ever more waste. The waste-policy challenges of the future lie in decoupling growth in waste generation from growth in consumption, and in setting priorities for the waste management. This report discusses the criteria for deciding priorities for waste management methods, and questions the current principles of EU waste policies. The basis for the discussion is the so-called waste hierarchy which has dominated the waste policy in the EU since the mid-1970s. The waste hierarchy ranks possible methods of waste management. According to the waste hierarchy, the very best solution is to reduce the amount of waste. After that, reuse is preferred to recycling which, in turn, is preferred to incineration. Disposal at a landfill is the least favourable solution. (BA)

  14. Rethinking Interaction in Creative Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Peter

    The use of digital tools has become central in many creative practices. However, research into the design and use of such tools has thus far fallen in between the disciplinary cracks between HCI and Creativity Research. In this position paper, I offer a brief overview of our work on exploring...... and developing digital tools for collaborative creative work that integrates approaches and insights from these two disciplines. On this basis, I offer two theoretical perspectives for discussion at the the Rethinking Interactions workshop: shearing layers, building on studies of architecure in use [Brand 1994...

  15. Rethinking the MRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colglazier, E.W.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper various options for utilizing monitored retrievable storage of civilian spent fuel have been compared using the criteria of maximizing the likelihood of implementing successfully a comprehensive U.S. nuclear waste management system (taking into account scientific and institutional uncertainties) and minimizing the costs, risks, and other impacts. The option that appears to be most robust for dealing with the key uncertainties has two components: an integrated management system that maximizes dry-storage at reactors using dual purpose casks and shipment via dedicated trains and a more experimental approach to the development of the repository at Yucca Mountain and authorization of an unconstrained MRS facility on the Nevada Test Site

  16. Rethinking Destination Image

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josiassen, Alexander; Kock, Florian; Assaf, Albert G.

    A central research question in tourism management concerns tourist’s choice of specific destinations. The present article reviews the extant literature on destination image. From this review we suggest that individuals have a multitude of destination associations – the total imagery which relates....... The article further provides an extensive review of the literature with regard to the definitions, dimensionality, antecedents, and outcomes of the focal concepts as well as geographical scope of destination imagery and image studies and methodologies. This review has led to a novel understanding...

  17. Infantile wheeze: rethinking dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Benedictis, Fernando Maria; Bush, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Wheeze is a common symptom in young children and is usually associated with viral illnesses. It is a major source of morbidity and is responsible for a high consumption of healthcare and economic resources worldwide. A few children have a condition resembling classical asthma. Rarer specific conditions may have a wheezy component and should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Over the last half century, there have been many circular discussions about the best way of managing preschool wheeze. In general, intermittent wheezing should be treated with intermittent bronchodilator therapy, and a controller therapy should be prescribed for a young child with recurrent wheezing only if positively indicated, and only then if carefully monitored for efficacy. Good multidisciplinary support, attention to environmental exposition and education are essential in managing this common condition. This article analyses the pathophysiological basis of wheezing in infancy and critically discusses the evolution of the scientific progress over time in this unique field of respiratory medicine. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Rethinking the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornberger, Martin; Leixnering, Stephan; Meyer, Renate

    2017-01-01

    Our paper focuses on a non-standard sharing example that harbors the potential to disrupt received wisdom on the sharing economy. While originally entering the field to analyze, broadly from a governance perspective, how the 2015 refugee crisis was handled in Vienna, Austria, we found that the no...... of sharing: economic and moral. Our paper contributes to this Special Issue of the Academy of Management Discoveries by highlighting and explaining the two-fold economic and moral nature of sharing and the organization of sharing between movement and platform....... sharing of resources (i.e., the economic dimension): the sharing of a distinct concern (i.e., the moral dimension of sharing). Our discovery exemplifies such a moral dimension that is rather different from the status quo materialistic treatments focusing on economic transactions and property rights...

  19. Rethinking cancer nanotheranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongmin; Zhang, Weizhong; Zhu, Guizhi; Xie, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-07-01

    Advances in nanoparticle synthesis and engineering have produced nanoscale agents affording both therapeutic and diagnostic functions that are often referred to by the portmanteau 'nanotheranostics'. The field is associated with many applications in the clinic, especially in cancer management. These include patient stratification, drug-release monitoring, imaging-guided focal therapy and post-treatment response monitoring. Recent advances in nanotheranostics have expanded this notion and enabled the characterization of individual tumours, the prediction of nanoparticle-tumour interactions, and the creation of tailor-designed nanomedicines for individualized treatment. Some of these applications require breaking the dogma that a nanotheranostic must combine both therapeutic and diagnostic agents within a single, physical entity; instead, it can be a general approach in which diagnosis and therapy are interwoven to solve clinical issues and improve treatment outcomes. In this Review, we describe the evolution and state of the art of cancer nanotheranostics, with an emphasis on clinical impact and translation.

  20. Rethinking status dystonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Lopez, Marta; Fasano, Alfonso

    2017-12-01

    Status dystonicus is a movement disorder emergency that has been a source of controversy in terms of terminology, phenomenology, and management since it was first described in 1982. Here we argue that the current use of the term status dystonicus falls well short of the precision needed for either clinical or academic use. We performed a critical review on this topic, describing possible pathophysiological mechanisms and areas of uncertainties. This review also addresses the problems derived by the extreme clinical heterogeneity of this condition, as the lack of an objective criterion useful for the definition, or the fact that status dystonicus may present not only in the context of a known dystonic syndrome. We propose a new possible definition that includes not only dystonia but also other hyperkinetic movements in the wide range of movement disorders that can be seen during an episode. The new definition keeps the term status dystonicus and highlights the fact that this is a medical emergency based on the impairment of bulbar and/or respiratory function requiring hospital admission as the principal feature. Furthermore, the new definition should not consider as necessary unspecific features as patient's condition at baseline, the distribution of dystonia, occurrence of systemic symptoms such as fever or laboratory findings. We hope that this proposal will stimulate the debate on this subject among our peers, further developing a clinical and pathophysiological understanding of status dystonicus. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  1. Rethinking mobilities: is tourism dying?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Korstanje

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present essay-review explores the conceptual limitations of mobility as an all encompassing theory, which explains why thousand of citizens are unable to make tourism worldwide. Imagining tourism as a massindustry not only rests on a great fallacy but also ignores the effects of last financial crisis in global economies. Only less 1% of total population in the world has the necessary resources to vacation abroad. We need to rethink  mobilities in terms of the great asymmetries caused by capitalism, where behaviour of few  ones is ideologically presented as the guiding values to follow. Like chivalry in Middle Age, mobility and tourism are privileges for global mobile elite alone.

  2. Avenues of Rethinking CSR in development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Sameer Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    ’. The developmental implication is based on the governance structures triggering CSR in each context. We need to differentiate between strong and weak states and understand the ways that (lack of) states can influence CSR in developing countries. "Responsible business practices" are explored as useful among......The chapter addresses flaws of the CSR literature and seeks to rethink the concept in relation to developing countries. Two avenues for rethinking CSR in developing countries are outlined; a) a governance approach, and b) an application of the term ‘responsible business practices...

  3. Beyond the Spectrum: Rethinking Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The "spectrum" has become the dominant metaphor for conceptualizing autism, with fundamental consequences for notions of disability, diversity, and normality. In this article, we draw on ethnographic research with autistic communities to explore how the notion of the autism spectrum has become a focus of explicit identification, reflection, and contestation. To further this inquiry, we place these debates into conversation with earlier debates regarding another spectrum—the Kinsey Scale, a "spectrum" for conceptualizing sexual orientation that first appeared in 1948 but has been critiqued since the 1970s. How might responses to the Kinsey Scale (like the Klein Grid contribute to rethinking the autism spectrum? This is a question about the cultural and political implications of metaphors and conceptual models. It is of broad importance because the spectrum metaphor is being extended to a range of conditions beyond autism itself. Our goal is thus to build on insights from sexuality studies as well as the insights of autistic persons, advocates, and researchers who wish to forestall the naturalization of "the spectrum." In doing so, we seek to contribute to a discussion of what alternative frameworks might bring to questions of social justice, ability, and human flourishing.

  4. Rethinking reproductive "tourism" as reproductive "exile".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhorn, Marcia C; Patrizio, Pasquale

    2009-09-01

    Whereas reproductive "tourism" implies leisure travel, reproductive "exile" bespeaks the numerous difficulties and constraints faced by infertile patients who are "forced" to travel globally for assisted reproduction. Given this reality, it is time to rethink the language of "reproductive tourism," replacing it with more accurate and patient-centered terms.

  5. RETHINKING AN AFRICAN ETHICAL SYSTEM: BETWEEN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... paper, to rethink an aspect of African Philosophy Morality (ethics), ancient and modern, among the Tiv of the lower Benue valley in Nigeria. This shall be done in the light of what has changed and what has remained unchanged, and the effects of the change on Tiv social system. (Humanities Review: 2002 2(1): 134-147) ...

  6. Rethinking the Role of Grey Literature in the Fourth Industrial Revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Savić, Dobrica

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the potential impact of the emerging Fourth Industrial Revolution on grey literature and the challenges it will bring to the information management profession. Based on analysis of the most prevalent current trends and developments, it appears we will need to rethink the defi nition of grey literature, its creation and types, processing, storage, sustainability and usability. Information professionals, including the grey literature ones, will require training and new knowl...

  7. Rethinking conventional approaches to the detection, management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also known as the seedbox because of its distinctive dimorphic seeds, it has the potential of being an invasive pest and is classed a 'serious' or 'principal' weed in many countries. It is used locally for composting and in the concoction of traditional remedies in an unscientific and informal manner. In common with other plants ...

  8. Rethink! prototyping transdisciplinary concepts of prototyping

    CERN Document Server

    Nagy, Emilia; Stark, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    In this book, the authors describe the findings derived from interaction and cooperation between scientific actors employing diverse practices. They reflect on distinct prototyping concepts and examine the transformation of development culture in their fusion to hybrid approaches and solutions. The products of tomorrow are going to be multifunctional, interactive systems – and already are to some degree today. Collaboration across multiple disciplines is the only way to grasp their complexity in design concepts. This underscores the importance of reconsidering the prototyping process for the development of these systems, particularly in transdisciplinary research teams. “Rethinking Prototyping – new hybrid concepts for prototyping” was a transdisciplinary project that took up this challenge. The aim of this programmatic rethinking was to come up with a general concept of prototyping by combining innovative prototyping concepts, which had been researched and developed in three sub-projects: “Hybrid P...

  9. Rethinking Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Munive

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the special issue on DDR and ‘Armed Non-Statutory Actors’ (ANSAs which we prefer to the less precise label of Armed Non-State Actors. The understanding that disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR programs are essential in helping to prevent the recurrence of war in post-conflict situations is at the heart of current peacebuilding practice and the academic literature on peacekeeping and stabilization. But the changing strategic context of DDR programs and in particular the proliferation of ANSAs presents new challenges, the responses to which have been characterized as ‘second generation’ DDR. The changing context poses new questions and forces us to rethink assumptions and templates of DDR as the concept is blurred and expanded. The question is if it makes sense to hold on to the concept or whether the assumptions associated with it will get in the way of rethinking templates for violence reduction in the future.

  10. Rethinking Information Systems in the Public Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medaglia, Rony

    2014-01-01

    This section of Information Polity consists of papers presented during the workshop “Rethinking Information Systems in the Public Sector: Bridging Academia and Public Service”. The workshop was held on 8 June 2014 in Tel Aviv, Israel, in conjunction with the European Conference on Information...... Systems (ECIS 2014), and it is part of the activities of the Special Interest Group for eGovernment (SIGeGov) of the Association for Information Systems (AIS)....

  11. Gap analysis: rethinking the conceptual foundations

    OpenAIRE

    Langford, Gary O.; Franck, Raymond; Huynh, Tom; Lewis, Ira A.

    2007-01-01

    Acquisition research (Graduate School of Business & Public Policy) Gap Analysis is widely regarded as a useful tool to facilitate commercial and defense system acquisitions. This paper is a rethinking of the theoretical foundations and systematics of Gap Analysis with practical extensions to illustrate its utility and limitations. It also provides a new perspective on those theoretical foundations from the perspectives of systems and value engineering. The growing sophistication and comple...

  12. Public Value: rethinking value creation

    OpenAIRE

    Meynhardt, Timo; Gomez, Peter; Strathoff, Pepe; Hermann, Carolin

    2014-01-01

    Managers might refute public criticism of their business as an attitude of taking everything for granted in a saturated society, but ignoring Public Value aspects can threaten the success of new products and even the survival of entire firms.

  13. Rethinking Research for Genetically Modified (GM) Food

    OpenAIRE

    Yin-Ling; Lin

    2012-01-01

    This paper suggests a rethinking of the existing research about Genetically Modified (GM) food. Since the first batch of GM food was commercialised in the UK market, GM food rapidly received and lost media attention in the UK. Disagreement on GM food policy between the US and the EU has also drawn scholarly attention to this issue. Much research has been carried out intending to understand people-s views about GM food and the shaping of these views. This paper was based o...

  14. Rethinking the economics of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damian, Michel

    2012-05-01

    The paper makes a case for rethinking the economics of climate change. It questions the way the problem was conventionally framed and solved through top-down international cooperation and carbon emission permits, taxes and pricing. The paper argues that the on-going industrial and energy transition reflects a paradigmatic shift as compared to neoclassical environmental economics that has framed climate policy since the Rio conference in 1992. On a normative basis, the paper maintains that a carbon tax should not follow a Pigovian rationale. To be feasible such a tax should be of a Marshallian nature, i.e. earmarked, and rather modest at the beginning. (author)

  15. Knowledge Management in TENCompetence: concepts & tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmers, Ruud

    2009-01-01

    Lemmers, R. (2009). Knowledge Management in TENCompetence: concepts & tools. Presented at the 'Open workshop of TENCompetence - Rethinking Learning and Employment at a Time of Economic Uncertainty-event. November, 19, 2009, Manchester, United Kingdom: TENCompetence.

  16. Rethinking resistance : revolt and violence in African history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, G.J.; Bruijn, de M.E.; Walraven, van K.

    2003-01-01

    This collective volume reinterprets the genre of resistance studies, introduces recent conceptual perspectives and considers examples of African (civil) wars and insurgent movements. Contributions: Rethinking resistance in African history, an introduction, by Klaas van Walraven and Jon Abbink. Part

  17. Rethinking Game Based Learning: applying pedagogical standards to educational games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Birgit; Kelle, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Schmitz, B., & Kelle, S. (2010, 1-6 February). Rethinking Game Based Learning: applying pedagogical standards to educational games. Presentation at JTEL Winter School 2010 on Advanced Learning Technologies, Innsbruck, Austria.

  18. Re-thinking instructional strategies for enhancing gender equity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Re-thinking instructional strategies for enhancing gender equity in learning ... instructional mode on the cognitive achievement of boys and girls in primary science. ... Results revealed no statistically significant difference in the achievement of ...

  19. Book Review: J. Kelly. Rethinking Industrial Relations: Mobilization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review: J. Kelly. Rethinking Industrial Relations: Mobilization, Collectivism and Long Waves. K. Moody. Workers in a Lean World: Unions in the International Economy. B. Nissen. Which Direction for Organized Labour? Essays on Organizing, Outreach and Internal Transformation.

  20. Rethinking Volks V Robinson: The Implications of Applying a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rethinking Volks V Robinson: The Implications of Applying a "Contextaulised Choice Model" to Prospective South African Domestic Partnerships Legislation. ... is enacted. Keywords: Life partnership; domestic partnership; Domestic Partnerships Bill; choice argument; contextualised choice model; reciprocal duty of support.

  1. Ethnic diversity and knowledge synergies: Rethinking the interrelations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    desire to see ethnical diversity as productive. Theoretical reviews and empirical research have indicated that the link between diversity and knowledge synergy cannot be taken for granted. This article argues that some theoretical rethinking of managerial strategies toward cultural diversity...

  2. Rethinking I-94: Minnesota DOT: A TPCB Peer Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    This report highlights key recommendations and noteworthy practices identified at Rethinking I-94: MnDOT Peer Exchange held on August 15-16, 2017 in St. Paul, Minnesota. This event was sponsored by the Transportation Planning Capacity Building ...

  3. Rethinking Therapeutic Misconception in Biobanking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tupasela, Aaro; Snell, Karoliina; Cañada, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Some authors have noted that in biobank research participants may be guided by what is called therapeutic misconception, whereby participants attribute therapeutic intent to research procedures.This article argues that the notion of therapeutic misconception is increasingly less justified when...... underpinnings for the need to separate research and treatment, and thus the notion of therapeutic misconception in the fi rst place. We call this tension between research and treatment ambivalent research advancement to highlight the difficulties that various actors have in managing such shifts within...

  4. Rethinking Peran Perempuan Dalam Keluarga

    OpenAIRE

    Harun AR, Mariatul Qibtiyah

    2015-01-01

    It has been an urgent agenda to rediscuss the women role in regards to classic assumption proclaimed that women deserve to be in the house and manage domestic matters. Therefore, the questions would be: will it be a gender problem and a kind of descrimination if women stay at home at all times? What if the women prefer staying at home, as convinient and comfortable choice, to having career freely in public sphere? By keeping up the construction of role sharing with the absence of negotiation ...

  5. RETHINKING PERAN PEREMPUAN DALAM KELUARGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariatul Qibtiyah Harun AR

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been an urgent agenda to rediscuss the women role in regards to classic assumption proclaimed that women deserve to be in the house and manage domestic matters. Therefore, the questions would be: will it be a gender problem and a kind of descrimination if women stay at home at all times? What if the women prefer staying at home, as convinient and comfortable choice, to having career freely in public sphere? By keeping up the construction of role sharing with the absence of negotiation and reconsideration about role and position of men and women in a family, might facilitate the strength of gender imbalance that can inflict the both sides.Copyright (c 2015 by KARSA. All right reservedDOI: 10.19105/karsa.v23i1.607 

  6. Rethinking Participation and Re-enacting Its Dilemmas?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Birgit; Stephensen, Jan Løhmann

    2015-01-01

    In 2012 the Danish city of Aarhus was appointed European Capital of Culture for 2017. The appointment was based on an ambitious programme that – under the headline Rethink – tried to set an agenda of societal transformation, mainly by seeking to increase the impact of art and culture, and to enha......In 2012 the Danish city of Aarhus was appointed European Capital of Culture for 2017. The appointment was based on an ambitious programme that – under the headline Rethink – tried to set an agenda of societal transformation, mainly by seeking to increase the impact of art and culture...... Rethink project. Informed by theoretical distinctions between different forms of participation, and the diverse interests invested in participatory processes, we investigate how the young cultural entrepreneurs and the artistic administrators of Aarhus 2017 separately, in conjunction, and sometimes even...

  7. 5G: rethink mobile communications for 2020+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chih-Lin, I; Han, Shuangfeng; Xu, Zhikun; Sun, Qi; Pan, Zhengang

    2016-03-06

    The 5G network is anticipated to meet the challenging requirements of mobile traffic in the 2020s, which are characterized by super high data rate, low latency, high mobility, high energy efficiency and high traffic density. This paper provides an overview of China Mobile's 5G vision and potential solutions. Three key characteristics of 5G are analysed, i.e. super fast, soft and green. The main 5G R&D themes are further elaborated, which include five fundamental rethinkings of the traditional design methodologies. The 5G network design considerations are also discussed, with cloud radio access network, ultra-dense network, software defined network and network function virtualization examined as key potential solutions towards a green and soft 5G network. The paradigm shift to user-centric network operation from the traditional cell-centric operation is also investigated, where the decoupled downlink and uplink, control and data, and adaptive multiple connections provide sufficient means to achieve a user-centric 5G network with 'no more cells'. The software defined air interface is investigated under a uniform framework and can adaptively adapt the parameters to well satisfy various requirements in different 5G scenarios. © 2016 The Author(s).

  8. Basic Concepts for rethinking environmental issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Ladron de Guevara, Francisco Jose; Valencia Cuellar, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a review of the fundamental concepts from which environmental problems have been explained and solved during the last decades. Environment is understood as an encounter between nature and culture that is a social construct that reflects the interaction between human beings and the biophysical space in which they live. On the other hand, development is conceived as the ability that societies have to develop their potentialities, being a notion of a totalizing and ethical political nature, which incorporates the biophysical and social heritage of a certain society. Regarding the concept of culture, it must be said that it is built upon the basis that this is an adaptive strategy of the human species. Finally, the relationships between the concepts of culture, environment and development are studied in order to formulate a new perspective for rethinking the environmental issue, so that, in turn, it could be used to redirect survival strategies that human beings currently apply in their interaction with the environment.

  9. Rethinking tourism: Bali’s failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamdevi, M.; Bott, H.

    2018-03-01

    Bali is famous as the tourist destination in the world. Ironically, most of the people of Bali thought that tourism in Bali is a failure. The negative impact showed on modernization in South Bali, including Denpasar, Kuta, and Ubud. Cultural imperialism has shifted local culture in many aspects, especially the traditional houses and buildings. The climax of this problem is the development of Benoa Bay Reclamation, where the sacred location for the traditional ceremony will be built for new tourism development that offers pleasure and leisure. This raised hard protest from the people of Bali. They are also afraid that the Balinese cultural and natural environment will vanish. On the other hand, some movement of sustainable tourism in North Bali, that ran by the local community has also arisen. What is tourism? Is it only for pleasure and leisure only? This research will discuss the rethinking of tourism definition with Bali as a reflection case. The purpose of this paper is to find its right definition with qualitative methodology. A more sustainable tourism that more on local context would be a research result.

  10. Rethinking urban nature to promote human well-being and livelihoods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raymond, Christopher; Gulsrud, Natalie Marie; Rodela, Romina

    On the 25thJanuary, 25 researchers, social entrepreneurs and policy makers attended a MOVIUM and SLU Urban Futures funded workshop on “Rethinking urban nature to promote human well-being and livelihoods”. The objectives of the workshop wereto identify and discuss integrated digital, social...... of urbannature in Malmö. Each group was asked to present their presentation to the wider group, what inspired them the most from the workshop activity and how their understanding of integrated solutions in urban nature changed over the day.This report presents a summary of each group’screations and findings...... and nature solutions for the use, management and governance of urban nature in the City of Malmö;and to provide a platform for knowledge sharing and networking between researchers and practitioners.Multiple enlightening presentations on how to plan, design and manage urban nature were provided by the cities...

  11. Living on Borrowed Time: Rethinking Temporality, Self, Nihilism, and Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappleye, Jeremy; Komatsu, Hikaru

    2016-01-01

    Seeking to contribute to recent attempts to rethink the deepest foundations of the field, this paper offers news ways of contemplating time, specifically its relations to self, nihilism, and schooling. We briefly review how some leading Western thinkers have contemplated time before detailing Japanese scholars who have offered divergent, original,…

  12. Re-thinking clinical research training in residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer O'Brien

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: We conclude that medical educators should critically re-think our programs to develop resident researchers. If it is worthwhile to require original research projects during residency, then we must consider the priorities of local settings to best serve the public interest.

  13. The African Mind and Globalization: Rethinking the Causes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Mind and Globalization: Rethinking the Causes of Africa's ... which has become “the new bride” in building socio-economic, socio-cultural and ... Africa, the once touted “cradle of civilisation”, and indeed, the forerunner of science ...

  14. Academic and Career Development: Rethinking Advising for Asian American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Corinne M.; Huynh, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Academic and career development for Asian American students is complicated by cultural influences, interdependence with family, and racial stereotyping. This chapter highlights research, theory, and practice to help educators rethink traditional advising approaches to more appropriately work with Asian American students as they navigate their…

  15. Intimate Distance: Rethinking the Unthought God in Christianity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kate, L. ten

    2008-01-01

    The work of the French philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy shares with the thinkers of the ‘theological turn in phenomenology’ the programmatic desire to place the ‘theological’, in the broad sense of rethinking the religious traditions in our secular time, back on the agenda of critical thought. Like those

  16. Objectivity and Subjectivity: an Argument for Rethinking the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectivity and Subjectivity: an Argument for Rethinking the Philosophy Syllabus. ... South African Journal of Philosophy ... The aftermath of the rise of modern physics has been a picture of reality as alienated from our commonly experienced sense of purposes, aims, and intentions as defining our everyday lives, what we ...

  17. Managing oilfield data management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balough, Steve [Vastar Resources, Houston, TX (United States); Betts, Peter [Shell Internationale Petroleum Maatschappij BV, The Hague (Netherlands); Breig, Jack; Karcher, Bruno [Petrotechnical Open Software Corporation POSC, Houston, TX (United States); Erlich, Andre [GeoQuest, Corte Madera, CA (United States); Green, Jim [Unocal Energy Resources Division, Sugar Land, TX (United States); Haines, Paul; Landgren, Ken; Marsden, Rich; Smith, Dwight [GeoQuest, Houston, TX (United States); Pohlman, John [Pohlman and Associates, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Shields, R Wade [Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Winczewski, Laramie [Fourth Wave Group, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Low oil prices and a shrinking pool of internal talent are compelling oil companies to rethink how they manage exploration and production (E+P) data. The idea of a single data store is yielding to a three-level model of data storage: the master, project and application levels. In-house, proprietary software is giving way to third-party packages based on maturing industry standards. Limited access to data is shifting toward free access to any geoscientist. In this article a report and two case studies on how these trends affect geoscientists are given. 16 figs., 2 ills., 20 refs.

  18. Managing oilfield data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balough, Steve; Betts, Peter; Breig, Jack; Karcher, Bruno; Erlich, Andre; Green, Jim; Haines, Paul; Landgren, Ken; Marsden, Rich; Smith, Dwight; Pohlman, John; Shields, R. Wade; Winczewski, Laramie

    1994-01-01

    Low oil prices and a shrinking pool of internal talent are compelling oil companies to rethink how they manage exploration and production (E+P) data. The idea of a single data store is yielding to a three-level model of data storage: the master, project and application levels. In-house, proprietary software is giving way to third-party packages based on maturing industry standards. Limited access to data is shifting toward free access to any geoscientist. In this article a report and two case studies on how these trends affect geoscientists are given. 16 figs., 2 ills., 20 refs

  19. Health access and medical care as socio-political vindications. Rethinking global health from the margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Nuño Martínez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the exigencies of national and international institutions, non-governmental and grassroots organizations assisting waria —male-to-female transvestites— in the Indonesian city of Jogjakarta have focused all their programs in the prevention and treatment of HIV. As a result of a recent training program in social management, groups of waria have decided to establish themselves as independent institutions and initiate socio-political processes of revindication and negotiation aimed at obtaining free medical access and care. Throughout analysing the underlying causes that have motivated these practices and their consequences, this paper seeks to discuss and rethink the prevailing priorities constructed in global health —characterized by presenting the battle against HIV and Malaria as a the pressing health priorities in the Global South.

  20. Towards an intelligent learning management system under blended learning trends, profiles and modeling perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, Sofia B; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2013-01-01

    This book offers useful information that evokes initiatives towards rethinking of the value, efficiency, inclusiveness, effectiveness and personalization of the intelligent learning management systems-based blended-learning environment.

  1. Repensando e ressignificando a gestão democrática da educação na "cultura globalizada" Rethinking and resignifying the democratic management of education in the "globalized culture"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naura Syria Carapeto Ferreira

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Tanto em extensividade como em intensividade, as transformações científico-tecnológicas, econômico-sociais, ético-políticas e culturais na contemporaneidade, mais profundas do que a maior parte das mudanças características de todos os períodos históricos até então vividos, têm impactado mentes e corações de toda a humanidade, exigindo pensar e ressignificar a formação de profissionais da educação e a gestão da educação. Este texto aponta para a necessidade de humanizar a formação e as condições de existência dos profissionais da educação e da gestão da educação ressignificando-as com outra base ética, que permita fazer frente aos desafios violentos da "cultura globalizada" na "sociedade transbordante", "insatisfeita" e "excludente", constituída de "ressentimentos" e de exacerbação do individualismo rumo à formação da cidadania plena.Both in their extensiveness and intensiveness, the scientific-technological, economic-social, political-ethical and cultural changes in contemporary life have been much deeper than most changes that happened throughout history. They impacted on the minds and hearts of the whole humanity, requiring that we contemplate and resignify the education of education professionals and the management of education. This text points out a need for humanizing the education and living conditions of professionals in education and education management. They should be redefined based on a new ethics that allows to face the violent challenges of the "globalized culture" in the "overflowing society", that is "dissatisfied" and "exclusory", built on "resentments" and the exacerbation of individualism, and to move toward the formation of a whole citizenship.

  2. Feet to the Fire: New Orleans Kids Rethink Their Devastated School System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wholey, Jane; Burkes, Betty

    2015-01-01

    Kids Rethink New Orleans Schools is an organization of primarily middle school youth that formed after Hurricane Katrina destroyed most of the city's schools. This chapter describes Rethink's first six years of operation, which culminated in school system policy changes and an HBO documentary about the organization's groundbreaking work.

  3. An agent-based model on disease management in potato cultivation in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacilly, F.C.A.; Hofstede, G.J.; Groot, J.C.J.; Lammerts Van Bueren, E.

    2015-01-01

    In this project the host-pathogen system of potato (Solanum tuberosum) - late blight (Phytophthora infestans) was analysed as a model system to study management of crop-disease interactions. Resistant cultivars play an important role in sustainable management of the disease. We used an agent-based

  4. Towards Enhanced Affective Design: Rethinking the Notion of Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, SuKyoung; Cho, Youngil

    2017-09-01

    Design disciplines have been contributing to shaping the life of human beings, as well as fostering culture and heritage. Design disciplines and research have been rapidly transforming, and not only objects but also services are target of design. This paper reviews design disciplines towards enhanced affective design, which attributes to intuitive knowledge. It aims at rethinking the notion of design to propose a conceptual framework for integrating user experience into objects that strengthen the form and function based design with pleasing.

  5. Rethinking the Method of Principled Negotiation--1981-2011

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiaki Nomura

    2012-01-01

    Fisher, Ury & Patton's Getting to Yes has established the Seven Elements of Negotiation and shows what a "theory for practitioners" should be. However, the following three points, among others, should be given reconsideration. First, though various authors support the framework of the seven elements, their interrelationship has not been clarified by those authors. Second, the meaning of 5 core concerns and its relationship with the element of interests are not so clear. Rethinking of non-econ...

  6. Rethinking Socialization Research through the Lens of New Materialism

    OpenAIRE

    Höppner, Grit

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, socialization research appears to have suffered the loss of its former capacity to explain the processes of becoming a socialized subject in a social environment. In this article, I review socialization theories taking into account assumptions regarding human subjects and their social environments. I confront them with the idea of rethinking dualisms, ontologies, and agencies addressed by the field of new materialism. I propose a new materialist-inspired socialization theor...

  7. Rethinking managerial roles in change initiatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A.S. Koene (Bas)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractOrganisational change that is initiated by middle management rather than top management is more likely to gain employee support. This is the conclusion of a recent study co-authored by Bas Koene, assistant professor in RSM’s Department of Organisation and Personnel Management.

  8. Rethinking the Dutch Innovation Agenda: Management and Organization Matter Most

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.W. Volberda (Henk); F.A.J. van den Bosch (Frans)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn this essay, we challenge the present dominant emphasis in the Dutch Innovation Debate on the creation of technological innovations, the focus on a few core technologies, and the allocation of more financial resources. We argue that managerial capabilities and organizing principles for

  9. Digital asset ecosystems rethinking crowds and cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Blanke, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Digital asset management is undergoing a fundamental transformation. Near universal availability of high-quality web-based assets makes it important to pay attention to the new world of digital ecosystems and what it means for managing, using and publishing digital assets. The Ecosystem of Digital Assets reflects on these developments and what the emerging 'web of things' could mean for digital assets. The book is structured into three parts, each covering an important aspect of digital assets. Part one introduces the emerging ecosystems of digital assets. Part two examines digital asset manag

  10. Rethinking Hearing Aid Fitting by Learning From Behavioral Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Benjamin; Petersen, Michael Kai; Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik

    2017-01-01

    users to remotely enhance auditory focus and attenuate background noise to improve speech intelligibility. N=5, participants changed program settings and adjusted volume on their hearing instruments using their smartphones. We found that individual behavioral patterns affected the usage of the devices....... A significant difference between program usage, and weekdays versus weekends, were found. Users not only changed programs to modify aspects of directionality and noise reduction, but also continuously adjusted the volume. Rethinking hearing instruments as devices that adaptively learn behavioral patterns based...

  11. Rethinking Faraday's law for teaching motional electromotive force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuza, Kristina; Guisasola, Jenaro; Michelini, Marisa; Santi, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    This study shows physicists' discussions on the meaning of Faraday's law where situations involving extended conductors or moving contact points are particularly troublesome. We raise questions to test students' difficulties in applying Faraday's law in motional electromotive force phenomena. We suggest the benefit of analysing these phenomena when teaching Faraday's law in introductory physics courses at university. We are not implying that Faraday's law should be revised, but we do want to set the stage for careful rethinking regarding the meaning and application of each term of the law as it appears in traditional introductory courses. (paper)

  12. [Towards a theoretical framework for rethinking cultural accessibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landini, Fernando; Cowes, Valeria González; D'Amore, Eliana

    2014-02-01

    Health services accessibility is a key health policy issue. However, few in-depth studies have addressed it theoretically. Most distinguish between availability, accessibility, and acceptability, or between geographic, financial, administrative, and cultural accessibility. We discuss and analyze the concept of accessibility as conflictive articulation between supply and demand in health. The article addresses the importance of cultural accessibility, rethinking it as a social interface, i.e., a social arena with clashing worldviews (namely, those of physicians and patients). The approach sheds light on the complex processes of grasping, translating, and reshaping knowledge and recommendations within such interaction.

  13. Rethinking learning networks collaborative possibilities for a Deleuzian century

    CERN Document Server

    Kamp, Annelies

    2013-01-01

    In the face of today's complex policy challenges, various forms of 'joining-up' - networking, collaborating, partnering - have become key responses. However, institutions often fail to take advantage of the full benefits that joining-up offers. In this book, the author draws on ethnographic research into learning networks in post compulsory education and training in the state of Victoria, Australia, to explore why this might be the case and presents an argument for rethinking how joining-up works in practice. Throughout the book, Deleuzian concepts are engaged to forge a 'little complicating m

  14. RETHINKING THE GOVERNANCE OF SECURITY: THE PROBLEM OF UNCONSCIOUS CONSEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS SOLAR FORNAZZARI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Friesendorf and Daase, both researchers from the Peace Reasearch Institute Frankfurt (PRIF, establish in Rethinking Security Governance the problem of unforeseen consequences that are the result of the implementation of almost any security policy. The results of this book confirm that many, but not all, consequences are problematic, due in part to the fact that the effects of a security policy have become contingent on an infinity of factors that make it highly complex to attribute to what extent success was due or the failure of a particular policy.

  15. Rethinking dry eye disease: a perspective on clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bron, Anthony J; Tomlinson, Alan; Foulks, Gary N; Pepose, Jay S; Baudouin, Christophe; Geerling, Gerd; Nichols, Kelly K; Lemp, Michael A

    2014-04-01

    Publication of the DEWS report in 2007 established the state of the science of dry eye disease (DED). Since that time, new evidence suggests that a rethinking of traditional concepts of dry eye disease is in order. Specifically, new evidence on the epidemiology of the disease, as well as strategies for diagnosis, have changed the understanding of DED, which is a heterogeneous disease associated with considerable variability in presentation. These advances, along with implications for clinical care, are summarized herein. The most widely used signs of DED are poorly correlated with each other and with symptoms. While symptoms are thought to be characteristic of DED, recent studies have shown that less than 60% of subjects with other objective evidence of DED are symptomatic. Thus the use of symptoms alone in diagnosis will likely result in missing a significant percentage of DED patients, particularly with early/mild disease. This could have considerable impact in patients undergoing cataract or refractive surgery as patients with DED have less than optimal visual results. The most widely used objective signs for diagnosing DED all show greater variability between eyes and in the same eye over time compared with normal subjects. This variability is thought to be a manifestation of tear film instability which results in rapid breakup of the tearfilm between blinks and is an identifier of patients with DED. This feature emphasizes the bilateral nature of the disease in most subjects not suffering from unilateral lid or other unilateral destabilizing surface disorders. Instability of the composition of the tears also occurs in dry eye disease and shows the same variance between eyes. Finally, elevated tear osmolarity has been reported to be a global marker (present in both subtypes of the disease- aqueous-deficient dry eye and evaporative dry eye). Clinically, osmolarity has been shown to be the best single metric for diagnosis of DED and is directly related to

  16. Rethinking communication in innovation processes: creating space for change in complex systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwis, C.; Aarts, N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper systematically rethinks the role of communication in innovation processes, starting from largely separate theoretical developments in communication science and innovation studies. Literature review forms the basis of the arguments presented. The paper concludes that innovation is a

  17. Rethinking Communication in Innovation Processes: Creating Space for Change in Complex Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwis, C.; Aarts, N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper systematically rethinks the role of communication in innovation processes, starting from largely separate theoretical developments in communication science and innovation studies. Literature review forms the basis of the arguments presented. The paper concludes that innovation is a

  18. Introduction to "Rethinking Business History in Modern China"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-hsin Yeh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this special issue of Cross-Currents, the contributing authors look at how business linked China and the world from the mid-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century, and how Chinese and foreign companies interacted with one another, as well as with political power, long before today. Some authors concentrate on material connections, including shipping, banking, the building of railroads, the spread of the motion picture industry, international treaties, and the formation of knowledge, while others investigate the role of business culture and how entrepreneurship and networks of trust crossed borders. Both of these aspects are set against the backdrop of simultaneous Chinese state-building efforts that became evident in the state creation of a national market and the formation of political borders. All of the authors collected here draw on case studies of individual entrepreneurs or companies, just as they draw on the new historical and theoretical scholarship summarized above to fill out the picture of China’s economic development within global processes. As the contributions to this issue demonstrate, rethinking Chinese business history also forces us to rethink Chinese urban history more generally... The new pictures of business practice presented here entail a remapping of the spatial dynamics of such activities and thereby a new understanding of the making of urban China...

  19. Book Review: Jessica F Green, Rethinking Private Authority: Agents and Entrepreneurs in Global Environmental Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keremis, Anestis

    2017-01-01

    Book review of "Rethinking Private Authority: Agents and Entrepreneurs in Global Environmental Governance" by Jessica F Green. Princeton,NJ and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2014.215 pp., £16.95 (p/b), ISBN 9780691157597......Book review of "Rethinking Private Authority: Agents and Entrepreneurs in Global Environmental Governance" by Jessica F Green. Princeton,NJ and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2014.215 pp., £16.95 (p/b), ISBN 9780691157597...

  20. The Management of Luxury : A Practitioner's Handbook

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The meaning of luxury and the customers that buy luxury have continually been evolving and the luxury sector is today healthier than ever. However luxury companies have had to completely rethink their strategies and rely on state-of-the-art marketing and management tools to help them keep up with consumers' shifting expectations. The Management of Luxury presents the view of 51 international experts on what luxury management is, how to manage luxury organizations, and key strategies for ...

  1. Rethinking Trait Conceptions of Social Desirability Scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vries, Reinout E.; Zettler, Ingo; Hilbig, Benjamin E.

    2014-01-01

    of personality. Because of its focus on honesty and integrity, the Impression Management (IM) scale was hypothesized to be mainly related to HEXACO Honesty-Humility. In the main study among 1,106 students and well-acquainted others (friends, family, or partners), positive self-other agreement correlations were...... and Agreeableness, but Honesty-Humility was by far its most important predictor. In a subsample (n = 465), Honesty-Humility and IM were unrelated to GPA....

  2. Knowledge Management: A Skeptic's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation discussing knowledge management is shown. The topics include: 1) What is Knowledge Management? 2) Why Manage Knowledge? The Presenting Problems; 3) What Gets Called Knowledge Management? 4) Attempts to Rethink Assumptions about Knowledgs; 5) What is Knowledge? 6) Knowledge Management and INstitutional Memory; 7) Knowledge Management and Culture; 8) To solve a social problem, it's easier to call for cultural rather than organizational change; 9) Will the Knowledge Management Effort Succeed? and 10) Backup: Metrics for Valuing Intellectural Capital i.e. Knowledge.

  3. PROFILEing idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: rethinking biomarker discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby M. Maher

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite major advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, diagnosis and management of the condition continue to pose significant challenges. Clinical management of IPF remains unsatisfactory due to limited availability of effective drug therapies, a lack of accurate indicators of disease progression, and an absence of simple short-term measures of therapeutic response. The identification of more accurate predictors of prognosis and survival in IPF would facilitate counseling of patients and their families, aid communication among clinicians, and would guide optimal timing of referral for transplantation. Improvements in molecular techniques have led to the identification of new disease pathways and a more targeted approach to the development of novel anti-fibrotic agents. However, despite an increased interest in biomarkers of IPF disease progression there are a lack of measures that can be used in early phase clinical trials. Careful longitudinal phenotyping of individuals with IPF together with the application of novel omics-based technology should provide important insights into disease pathogenesis and should address some of the major issues holding back drug development in IPF. The PROFILE (Prospective Observation of Fibrosis in the Lung Clinical Endpoints study is a currently enrolling, prospective cohort study designed to tackle these issues.

  4. Rethinking gossip and scandal in healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, Kathryn

    2016-09-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to argue that gossip is a neglected aspect of organizational communication and knowledge, and an under-used management resource. Design/methodology/approach The paper challenges mainstream managerial assumptions that gossip is trivial or tainted talk which should be discouraged in the workplace. Instead, gossip is re-framed at an organizational level of analysis, which provides the opportunity for relational knowledge about systemic failure and poor practice in healthcare to surface. Findings Rather than simply viewing gossip as an individual behaviour and interpersonal process, it is claimed that organizational gossip is also a valuable early warning indicator of risk and failure in healthcare systems. There is potentially significant value in re-framing gossip as an aspect of organizational communication and knowledge. If attended to (rather than neglected or silenced) gossip can provide fresh insights into professional practice, decision making and relational leadership. Originality/value This paper offers a provocative challenge to mainstream health organization and management thinking about gossip in the workplace. It offers new ways of thinking to promote patient safety, and prevent the scandals that have plagued healthcare organizations in recent years.

  5. IMPROVING HOSPITAL LOGISTICS BY RETHINKING TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Peter; Jørgensen, Pelle Morten Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In order to cope with the future challenges of the health care sector, there is an urging need for improving efficiency at hospitals. The study presents a framework enabling health care managers of improving the in-house logistics. The distinctiveness of the framework is the way in which it relates...... technology, logistics, structure and procedures to efficiency. Changing one factor e.g. technology, initiates an iterative loop focusing on change in the related factors in order to obtain the optimal efficiency. The search for an optimal efficient solution is the driving force of the framework...... at a Danish hospital. The framework is tested on the blood sample logistics between the emergency department and laboratory with the goal of enhancing the efficiency of the emergency department....

  6. Rethinking the Measurement of Place Brands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zenker, Sebastian; Braun, Erik

    2015-01-01

    in the form of free brand associations of target customers with qualitative methods; in the form of attributes with quantitative methods like standardized questionnaires; and with mixed methods that combine qualitative research with quantitative methods. Two mixed methods, namely the network analysis......Place brand managers often disregard the complexity of place brands, as do their counterparts in the academic arena: they repeatedly use simple explorative descriptions of certain place brands, rather than a precise measurement. Thus, this chapter aims to identify and discuss measurement approaches...... that could prove useful in place branding. Therefore, we will define the brand and examine various options regarding what to measure in place branding. Finally, we will discuss the different approaches of brand measurement for their use in place branding, namely the approaches to measuring the brand...

  7. Using cereal rye (catch crop) and dehydrogenase activity as indicators of the residual fertility effects of anaerobic soil disinfestation and other biological soil management practices following field tomato production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) and other biological soil management practices employing carbon-rich and/or biologically-active ingredients help contribute to overall soil suppressiveness in crop disease management. However, their roles in soil fertility tended to be overshadowed by disease cont...

  8. Geographically isolated wetlands: Rethinking a misnomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushet, David M.; Calhoun, Aram J.K.; Alexander, Laurie C.; Cohen, Matthew J.; DeKeyser, Edward S.; Fowler, Laurie G.; Lane, Charles R.; Lang, Megan W.; Rains, Mark C.; Walls, Susan

    2015-01-01

    We explore the category “geographically isolated wetlands” (GIWs; i.e., wetlands completely surrounded by uplands at the local scale) as used in the wetland sciences. As currently used, the GIW category (1) hampers scientific efforts by obscuring important hydrological and ecological differences among multiple wetland functional types, (2) aggregates wetlands in a manner not reflective of regulatory and management information needs, (3) implies wetlands so described are in some way “isolated,” an often incorrect implication, (4) is inconsistent with more broadly used and accepted concepts of “geographic isolation,” and (5) has injected unnecessary confusion into scientific investigations and discussions. Instead, we suggest other wetland classification systems offer more informative alternatives. For example, hydrogeomorphic (HGM) classes based on well-established scientific definitions account for wetland functional diversity thereby facilitating explorations into questions of connectivity without an a priori designation of “isolation.” Additionally, an HGM-type approach could be used in combination with terms reflective of current regulatory or policymaking needs. For those rare cases in which the condition of being surrounded by uplands is the relevant distinguishing characteristic, use of terminology that does not unnecessarily imply isolation (e.g., “upland embedded wetlands”) would help alleviate much confusion caused by the “geographically isolated wetlands” misnomer.

  9. Rethinking Affordable Housing Delivery: An Analytical Insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olanrewaju Abdullateef

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia currently has a housing shortage of 12 million units. Towards the year 2020, this would require an annual supply of a minimum of 2 million homes. With the current production rate, the deficits will remain over the next 100 years. The crisis will lead to poor standards of living, un-affordable rental price, high mortgage payment, abandonment, and dilapidation of the existing housing stock. Lack of affordable housing is already a source of concern among many Malaysians. The middle and lower income earners spend more than 30% of their income on rent or for mortgage payment. Housing rent or mortgage is a basic need like foods, education, clothing and health. The government has introduced various measures to address the housing deficit. Despite these measures, the housing supply and distribution gaps continue to grow. To better understand the issues, there is a need to examine how the procurement planning in the affordable housing delivery supply chain and market is formulated, explore how cost of affordable housing would be reduced, identify the user value systems in affordable housing, and identify the criteria in the current regulatory framework? For these purposes, this paper reviews the relevant literature to reach preliminary findings on the stated issues. Among the factors found accounting for housing shortages, the overwhelming factors were that of poor policies, strategies, practice, management, and finance. The findings are meaningful in framing an affordable housing delivery model. It could also be useful to stakeholders involved in affordable housing delivery in Malaysia and elsewhere.

  10. Rethinking the Hanford Tank Waste Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, F. L.; Clark, D. E.; Morcos, N.

    2002-01-01

    The program to treat and dispose of the highly radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site has been studied. A strategy/management approach to achieve an acceptable (technically sound) end state for these wastes has been developed in this study. This approach is based on assessment of the actual risks and costs to the public, workers, and the environment associated with the wastes and storage tanks. Close attention should be given to the technical merits of available waste treatment and stabilization methodologies, and application of realistic risk reduction goals and methodologies to establish appropriate tank farm cleanup milestones. Increased research and development to reduce the mass of non-radioactive materials in the tanks requiring sophisticated treatment is highly desirable. The actual cleanup activities and milestones, while maintaining acceptable safety standards, could be more focused on a risk-to-benefit cost effectiveness, as agreed to by the involved stakeholders and in accordance with existing regulatory requirements. If existing safety standards can be maintained at significant cost savings under alternative plans but with a change in the Tri-Party Agreement (a regulatory requirement), those plans should be carried out. The proposed strategy would also take advantage of the lessons learned from the activities and efforts in the first phase of the two-phased cleanup of the Hanford waste tank farms

  11. New challenges to rethink the training of ecuadorian teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Sol Villagómez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Training ecuadorian teachers has traditionally been linked to public policy and national curricula that have defined the task of teaching, classroom work, and what basic teacher training institutions should prioritize on when it comes to training teachers. Recent years have seen major changes in the educational sector, as well as a revaluation of the teaching trade. New training challenges arise, not only from the teacher's perspective as executor of the curricula, but as a key player in the educational process. We need to rethink the training of teachers to and from a critical reflection and research point-of-view, in order to reflect on the curricula, their own experience, and their relevance in relation to the framework in wich they develop.

  12. Review Essay: Rethinking Gender Justice a Transnational Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Ambivalence” is one reason for feminists to be concerned about Fraser’s new theoretical and political approach. Here Fraser uses Karl Polanyi’s classical book: ’The Great Transformation’ (1944) as inspiration to rethink the character of the present political-economic crisis, social justice...... and the emancipatory potentials of feminism. The ambitious aim of the book is to contribute to feminism’s theoretical and political project in a globalized world. The title:’Fortunes of Feminism’, the prologue and the book’s structure as a drama in three acts all refer to Fraser’s interpretation of the evolution...... in in Justice Interruptus; two articles have only appeared in French It is therefore great to have a collection of some of her best articles, but the question is what gender researchers can learn from this book? To me, the final chapter: ”Between Marketization and Social Protection: Resolving the Feminist...

  13. Rethinking cities in the post-carbon society. Research notebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecutti-Etahiri, Nathalie; Brou, Evane; Riviere, Antoine; Emelianoff, C.; Mor, E.; Chevalier, J.; Boulianne, L.M.; Tabaka, K.; Pichavant, F.; Barbezet, S.; Pezet-Kuhn, M.; Aubree, L.; Bonduelle, A.; Metivier, S.; Dossier, J.; Hain, L.; Pares-Ramos, I.K.; Dupas, S.; Coutard, O.; Rutherford, J.; Gillet, C.; Lange, J.; Ranoux, M.; Noisette, P.; Deseez, G.; Allio, C.; Waisman, H.; Mousel, Michel; Girard, S.; Huber, A.; Thomas, Y.; Dobre, M.; Cordellier, M.; Barbier, C.; Blanc, N.; Sander, A.; Castelain Meunier, C.; Joliton, D.; Leroy, P.; Pour Rou Chottamin, N.; Radanne, P.; Chevrier, S.; Darris, G.; Gauthier, V.; Theile, D.; Souami, T.; Kasdi, I.; Meyer, P.; Artous, A.; Salini, P.; Vanel, S.

    2014-10-01

    This document compiles the different syntheses of the research projects which were used to prepare the synthesis report 'Rethinking cities in the post-carbon society', published in March 2014 by the French Agency of environment and energy mastery (Ademe). It allows to browse more precisely the experience of six French cities (Lille, Mulhouse, Tours, Fontainebleau, Plaine Commune et Grenoble) and to go deeper into the governance stakes. This publication also brings together some unpublished sectoral studies about life styles and consumption habits, energy inequalities and poverty, housing etc. Different levels of reading of the document are possible, in order to make it accessible to all readers and to involve all citizens in the post-carbon city culture

  14. Creative learning technologies as a catalyst for rethinking education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    is on exploring how learning with creative technologies can be a catalyst for rethinking education in primary and lower secondary school The mixed methods based research project has involved classes from all schools in one municipality in Denmark in digital creative lab activities The research points...... presents preliminary results from an R&D project on teacher led designs for creative and multimodal learning The focus is on developing designs for learning using creative learning technologies These include digital storytelling with mobile devices and digital animation in hybrid environments The focus......There is a movement towards a new paradigm in the mediatized Scandinavian societies that aims at developing the students' creativity, critical sense and ability to collaborate and communicate, thereby equipping them with necessary media skills and competencies for 21st Century learning This paper...

  15. Climate Change after the International : Rethinking Security, Territory and Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stripple, Johannes

    2005-01-01

    What does a politics after the international mean? Many strands of contemporary scholarship converge on the image of the international as obsolete, but strongly diverge on the contours of the kinds of politics that are superseding it. The modern state has been pivotal to the meaning of security, territory and authority - concepts central to the idea of the international - but they do not necessarily have to be tied to the state. This thesis offers a critique of International Relations theory combined with a study of climate change. A departure in 'process philosophy' facilitate a rethinking of security, territory and authority as activities rather than things, as verbs rather than nouns. The author shows that a multiplicity of practices of securitization, territorialization, and authorization are visible in the climate issue. The book goes beyond, and reflects upon, the traditional study of 'International Environmental Politics' as a particular subfield of International Relations

  16. Rethinking Socialization Research through the Lens of New Materialism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grit Höppner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, socialization research appears to have suffered the loss of its former capacity to explain the processes of becoming a socialized subject in a social environment. In this article, I review socialization theories taking into account assumptions regarding human subjects and their social environments. I confront them with the idea of rethinking dualisms, ontologies, and agencies addressed by the field of new materialism. I propose a new materialist-inspired socialization theory that assumes that humans, knowledge, and material environments become inseparable parts of (gendered socialization processes in a world of constant change. This approach contributes to socialization theory and methodology because it illustrates precisely how humans and non-humans coproduce socialization in situated material-discursive processes.

  17. On Rethinking Our Classrooms: A Critical Pedagogy View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Samacá Bohórquez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper, as its title suggests, introduces some reflections on the importance critical pedagogy as well as awareness-raising practices have in education today, especially in language teacher preparation programs, and how they provide a new opportunity for pre-service teachers to re-think their pedagogical experiences for social transformation. Critical pedagogy (CP as a philosophy of life helps teachers achieve a better understanding of what teaching really entails and raising awareness fosters reflection regarding our practices in educational settings, starting in the language classroom, exploring on the one hand, what pre-service teachers think and perceive about teaching and learning in the context they are involved in, and on the other hand, how those perceptions might influence their educational practices.

  18. Sustainable Refugee Migration: A Rethink towards a Positive Capability Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al-Husban

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge facing many countries around the world is how to sustainably address the issues of increased numbers of refugee migrants. The refugee migrant “issue” is often heavily political as a high density of migrants in local areas impacts communities (e.g., disrupting local employment, service and culture. Different migrants come with different “baggage” and needs which can be a significant draw on the hosting communities’ resources. This paper argues that sustainable long-term solutions to refugee migrants will require a rethink to the existing dominant models of containment and charity. The paper draws upon insights from a study of a large refugee camp in Jordan over a three-and-a-half-year period, and historical cases of refugee migration. The paper presents a sustainable model that develops long-term capability for the various stakeholder groups.

  19. Rethinking platelet function: thrombocytopenia induced immunodeficiency in critical illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Johansson, Per Ingemar

    2011-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia in critical illness predicts a poor clinical outcome. Apart from its role in microvascular thrombus formation, it is widely anticipated that this association is indirect rather than causal. Emerging evidence however indicates that platelets are also immune competent cells. Like...... per se results in immunodeficiency through loss of platelet-mediated immune functions, and propose that thrombocytopenia induced immunodeficiency in critical illness in part explain the negative predictive value of low or declining platelet count. We propose that rethinking the risks...... of thrombocytopenia to include not only bleeding but also immunodeficiency and immune dysregulation along with the conduct of studies investigating mechanisms contributing to thrombocytopenia induced poor non-hemorrhagic outcome in critical illness, may be means to improve outcome in these patients through...

  20. Rethinking School Finance. A Policy Issues Paper Prepared for the Chief State School Officers of the Northwest and Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Kenneth H.; And Others

    Ways of rethinking school financial policy issues are examined in this report. This rethinking has evolved from growing recognition of two related principles: school finance as part of public finance; and policy formation as a product of commitments and constraints. Principles of public finance, commitments and constraints are described. Five…

  1. Community mental health in India: A rethink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynkran Jothy R

    2008-07-01

    limited access and associated expenses entailed in seeking treatment, inadequate knowledge about the illness, lack of support from the family and community and continued dependence by the family on the service provider to provide solutions. Conclusion Community based initiatives in the management of mental disorders however well intentioned will not be sustainable unless the family and the community are involved in the intervention program with support being provided regularly by mental health professionals.

  2. Blockchains for business process management - Challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendling, Jan; Weber, Ingo; Van Der Aalst, Wil; Brocke, Jan Vom; Cabanillas, Cristina; Daniel, Florian; Debois, Søren; Di Ciccio, Claudio; Dumas, Marlon; Dustdar, Schahram; Gal, Avigdor; García-Bañuelos, Luciano; Governatori, Guido; Hull, Richard; La Rosa, Marcello; Leopold, Henrik; Leymann, Frank; Recker, Jan; Reichert, Manfred; Reijers, Hajo A.; Rinderlema, Stefanie; Solti, Andreas; Rosemann, Michael; Schulte, Stefan; Singh, Munindar P.; Slaats, Tijs; Staples, Mark; Weber, Barbara; Weidlich, Matthias; Weske, Mathias; Xu, Xiwei; Zhu, Liming

    Blockchain technology ofers a sizable promise to rethink the way interorganizational business processes are managed because of its potential to realize execution without a central party serving as a single point of trust (and failure). To stimulate research on this promise and the limits thereof, in

  3. Blockchains for business process management - Challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendling, J.; Weber, I.; van der Aalst, W.M.P.; vom Brocke, J.; Cabanillas, C.; Daniel, F.; Debois, S.; Di Ciccio, C.; Dumas, M.; Dustdar, S.; Gal, A.; García-Bañuelos, L.; Governatori, G.; Hull, R.; La Rosa, Marcello; Leopold, Henrik; Leymann, Frank; Recker, Jan; Reichert, Manfred; Reijers, H.A.; Rinderlema, Stefanie; Solti, Andreas; Rosemann, Michael; Schulte, Stefan; Singh, Munindar P.; Slaats, T.; Staples, Mark; Weber, Barbara; Weidlich, Matthias; Weske, Mathias; Xu, Xiwei; Zhu, Liming

    2018-01-01

    Blockchain technology ofers a sizable promise to rethink the way interorganizational business processes are managed because of its potential to realize execution without a central party serving as a single point of trust (and failure). To stimulate research on this promise and the limits thereof, in

  4. Analogy in causal inference: rethinking Austin Bradford Hill's neglected consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed, Douglas L

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this article was to rethink and resurrect Austin Bradford Hill's "criterion" of analogy as an important consideration in causal inference. In epidemiology today, analogy is either completely ignored (e.g., in many textbooks), or equated with biologic plausibility or coherence, or aligned with the scientist's imagination. None of these examples, however, captures Hill's description of analogy. His words suggest that there may be something gained by contrasting two bodies of evidence, one from an established causal relationship, the other not. Coupled with developments in the methods of systematic assessments of evidence-including but not limited to meta-analysis-analogy can be restructured as a key component in causal inference. This new approach will require that a collection-a library-of known cases of causal inference (i.e., bodies of evidence involving established causal relationships) be developed. This library would likely include causal assessments by organizations such as the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the National Toxicology Program, and the United States Environmental Protection Agency. In addition, a process for describing key features of a causal relationship would need to be developed along with what will be considered paradigm cases of causation. Finally, it will be important to develop ways to objectively compare a "new" body of evidence with the relevant paradigm case of causation. Analogy, along with all other existing methods and causal considerations, may improve our ability to identify causal relationships. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Rethink, Reform, Reenter: An Entrepreneurial Approach to Prison Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keena, Linda; Simmons, Chris

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this article was to present a description and first-stage evaluation of the impact of the Ice House Entrepreneurship Program on the learning experience of participating prerelease inmates at a Mississippi maximum-security prison and their perception of the transfer of skills learned in program into securing employment upon reentry. The Ice House Entrepreneurship Program is a 12-week program facilitated by volunteer university professors to inmates in a prerelease unit of a maximum-security prison in Mississippi. Participants' perspectives were examined through content analysis of inmates' answers to program Reflection and Response Assignments and interviews. The analyses were conducted according to the constant comparative method. Findings reveal the emergent of eight life-lessons and suggest that this is a promising approach to prison programming for prerelease inmates. This study discusses three approaches to better prepare inmates for a mindset change. The rethink, reform, and reenter approaches help break the traditional cycle of release, reoffend, and return. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Rethinking Global Water Governance for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, N. K.; Cooley, H.

    2012-12-01

    Growing pressure on the world's water resources is having major impacts on our social and economic well-being. According to the United Nations, today, at least 1.1 billion people do not have access to clean drinking water. Pressures on water resources are likely to continue to worsen in response to decaying and crumbling infrastructure, continued population growth, climate change, degradation of water quality, and other challenges. If these challenges are not addressed, they pose future risks for many countries around the world, making it urgent that efforts are made to understand both the nature of the problems and the possible solutions that can effectively reduce the associated risks. There is growing understanding of the need to rethink governance to meet the 21st century water challenges. More and more water problems extend over traditional national boundaries and to the global community and the types and numbers of organizations addressing water issues are large and growing. Economic globalization and transnational organizations and activities point to the need for improving coordination and integration on addressing water issues, which are increasingly tied to food and energy security, trade, global climate change, and other international policies. We will present some of the key limitations of global water governance institutions and provide recommendations for improving these institutions to address 21st century global water challenges more effectively.

  7. Rethinking Approaches to Strategic Stability in the 21st Century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) hosted a two-day conference on rethinking approaches to strategic stability in the 21st century on October 20-21, 2016 in Livermore, CA. The conference was jointly convened by Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, and Sandia National Laboratories, and was held in partnership with the United States Department of State’s Bureau of Arms Control, Verification and Compliance. The conference took place at LLNL’s Center for Global Security Research (CGSR) and included a range of representatives from U.S. government, academic, and private institutions, as well as representatives from U.S. allies in Europe and Asia.The following summary covers topics and discussions from each of the panels. It is not intended to capture every point in detail, but seeks to outline the range of views on these complex and inter-related issues while providing a general overview of the panel topics and discussions that took place. The conference was held under the Chatham House rule and does not attribute any remarks to any specific individual or institution. The views reflected in this report do not represent the United States Government, Department of State, or the national laboratories.

  8. Contested Development in Indonesia: Rethinking Ethnicity and Gender in Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Großmann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Page Header User Username Password Remember me Notifications View Subscribe Information For Readers Home About Login Register Search Current Archives Submit your Article Leave the Editoral Platform and Return to our Website Home > Vol 10, No 1 (2017 > Großmann Contested Development in Indonesia: Rethinking Ethnicity and Gender in Mining Kristina Großmann, Martina Padmanabhan, Katharina von Braun Abstract This article reviews the literature on the relationship between gender and ethnicity in Indonesia’s mining sector and outlines shortcomings and prospects for further research. Recent studies on mining and gender focus predominantly on women and how they are negatively affected by mining. Ethnicity, although a growing asset in struggles on environmental transformations, is hardly included in research on mining. The intertwinement of ethnicity and gender in elaborations on mining is often depicted in literature of development programs and environmental organizations in which indigenous women are homogenized as marginalized victims. We argue, however, for a multidimensional approach on mining that takes into account the institutionalization of gender and ethnicity in mining governance as well as the role of gender and ethnic identities. Feminist political ecology and institutional analysis are pointing the way for such an approach. Furthermore, other relevant categories such as class, age, or status should be considered in the analysis of the complex and multidimensional environmental transformations of the mining sector in Indonesia.

  9. The Pastoral Power of Technology. Rethinking Alienation in Digital Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Giritli Nygren

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to bring Foucault’s elaboration on ‘the pastoral modalities of power’ into play in order to rethink alienation in digital culture. Pastoral power is not displacing other conceptions of power, but provides another level of analysis involved in the forging of reasonable responsible subjects willing and able to sustain other conceptions of power. We will draw particularly on the early writings of Marx and the more recent poststructuralist developments concerning hegemony and superstructure in relation to technology. Technology as such is analysed in terms of repercussions of ‘design of the machine’ in industrial technological contexts and ‘design of digital culture’ in digital technological contexts. Pastoral power not only directs our focus to the making of technologies, but also to the making of individuals capable of taking on the responsibilities of technologies. This means that it is necessary to take on the notion of effective power of ideologies and their material reality.

  10. Rethinking Social Contracts: Building Resilience in a Changing Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen O'Brien

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Social contracts play an important role in defining the reciprocal rights, obligations, and responsibilities between states and citizens. Climate change is creating new challenges for both states and citizens, inevitably forcing a rethinking of existing and evolving social contracts. In particular, the social arrangements that enhance the well-being and security of both present and future generations are likely to undergo dramatic transformations in response to ecosystem changes, more extreme weather events, and the consequences of social-ecological changes in distant locations. The types of social contracts that evolve in the face of a changing climate will have considerable implications for adaptation policies and processes. We consider how a resilience approach can contribute to new social contracts in the face of uncertainty and change. Examples from Norway, New Zealand, and Canada show how resilience thinking provides a new way of looking at social contracts, emphasizing the dynamics, links, and complexity of coupled social-ecological systems. Resilience thinking provides valuable insights on the characteristics of a new social contract, and social contract theory provides some insights on creating resilience and human security in a warming world.

  11. Rethinking the Role of Grey Literature in the Fourth Industrial Revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savić, Dobrica

    2018-01-01

    The world is at the dawn of a new industrial revolution that will fundamentally change the way we live and work. Many consider this the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR). While the First Industrial Revolution (1IR) mechanized production using water and steam power, the second one brought mass production using electric power, and the third one was characterized by automation and digitization, mainly using electronics and information technology. The 4IR is building upon the third one, but the difference, and its main contribution, is the fusion of technologies that are blurring the lines between the physical, digital, and biological worlds. This is further enhanced by the emerging progress of technology in fields such as quantum computing, machine learning, artificial intelligence, robotics, virtual assistants, the Internet of Things, self-driving cars, drones, 3-D printing, nanotechnology, biotechnology, traffic and security monitoring systems, and renewable energy. This paper examines the potential impact of the emerging 4IR on grey literature (GL) and is based on analysis of the most prevalent current trends and developments in “cyber-physical systems” that connect machines, computers and people. It will examine the need to rethink the definition of GL, its creation and publication types, processing, sustainability and usability. Given the magnitude of the potential impact of the 4IR on GL, the question is what challenges the 4IR will pose to GL managers. One could assume that the acquisition of new knowledge and skills, and the revamping of existing processes and methods will be necessary. Becoming aware of this new phenomenon is only the beginning. It needs to be followed up by professional development and adequate training. Finally, the job of GL professionals will be to promote and publicize the usefulness and importance of GL, not only in their daily work, but also in research and science. (author)

  12. Rethinking the Modernist Curriculum with Habermas's Concept of Self-Critical Appropriation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarid, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to discuss the implications of applying Habermas's concept of self-critical appropriation for rethinking the structure of the modernist curriculum, specifically the organization of school subjects and instruction time devoted to each of them. To this end, the paper examines Habermas's differentiation between…

  13. Rethinking Ostia : a spatial enquiry into the urban society of Rome's imperial port-town

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stöger, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Rethinking Ostia presents an archaeological and spatial approach to Roman urbanism, focused on Rome’s port city. The study proceeds along the route of a ‘spatial investigation’, offering a fresh look and detailed insights into the past society and the built environment of this port town. Following a

  14. History versus Equilibrium Revisited: Rethinking Neoclassical Economics as the Foundation of Business Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charles Michael Andres

    2014-01-01

    The financial crisis was partially caused by neoclassical economic theory and theorists. This failure has prompted business educators to rethink the role of neoclassical economics as the foundation of business education. The author connects this question to the more general critique of the scientific model of business education and the old…

  15. The Second Educational Revolution: Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A.; Halverson, R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper drew upon a recent book ("Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology") to summarize a number of prospects and challenges arising from the appropriation of digital technology into learning and educational practice. Tensions between traditional models of schooling and the affordances of digital media were noted, while the promise of…

  16. Rethinking the making and breaking of traditional and statutory institutions in post-Nkrumah Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacey, Paul Austin

    2016-01-01

    This article examines a complex dispute over the jurisdictions of traditional and statutory institutions that traversed shifts in forms of government in Ghana for nearly a decade following the ousting of Kwame Nkrumah in February 1966. The analysis emphasizes underlying processes of continuity...... a rethinking of the notion that the post-Nkrumah era heralded a state-initiated revival of traditional institutions....

  17. Rethinking the Learning Society: Giorgio Agamben on Studying, Stupidity, and Impotence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tyson E.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author rethinks critiques of the learning society using Giorgio Agamben's theory of potentiality. Summarizing several major contributions to our understanding of the limitations of the discourse of learning, the author proposes that critics thus far have failed to fully pinpoint the exact danger of learning. Importantly,…

  18. Crisis, value, and hope: rethinking the economy. An introduction to supplement 9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narotzky, S.; Besnier, N.

    2014-01-01

    Crisis, value, and hope are three concepts whose intersection and mutual constitution open the door for a rethinking of the nature of economic life away from abstract models divorced from the everyday realities of ordinary people, the inadequacies of which the current world economic crisis has

  19. What's Love Got to Do with It? Rethinking Common Sense Assumptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachman, Matthew; Bluestone, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    One of the most basic tasks in introductory social science classes is to get students to reexamine their common sense assumptions concerning human behavior. This article introduces a shared assignment developed for a learning community that paired an introductory sociology and psychology class. The assignment challenges students to rethink the…

  20. re-thinking ethical leadership in kenya: adopting a new paradigm

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this article is to provoke students and scholars in the field of ethics to re-think and develop new approaches in the practice of ethical leadership. Many authors have written on the subject of leadership values and ethics, yet, the world continues to witness increasing cases of corruption and executive ...

  1. Rethinking Nutrition: Connecting Science and Practice in Early Childhood Settings, Revised Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzke, Susan; Riley, Dave; Ramminger, Ann; Jacobs, Georgine

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition has vital and long-lasting effects on children's development. Good nutrition helps children learn better and promotes lifelong healthy eating habits. Connecting current scientific research with best practices, "Rethinking Nutrition" provides information to help you meet and understand children's nutritional and developmental…

  2. Little Room for Capacitation: Rethinking Bourdieu on Pedagogy as Symbolic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Megan

    2018-01-01

    In Bourdieu's early work on education, he declares that "All pedagogic action (PA) is objectively symbolic violence insofar as it is the imposition of a cultural arbitrary by an arbitrary power". This article rethinks Bourdieu's proposition. It questions whether all PA is symbolic violence and the very notion of a cultural arbitrary upon…

  3. ‘One step beyond’ – Re-Think Athens, towards a new city centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemm, W.

    2013-01-01

    On the 27 February it is announced at the Onassis Cultural Centre in Athens (=opdrachtgever) that the OKRA team of OKRA in collaboration with Mixst urbanism and Wageningen University, has won the prestigious international architectural competition ReThink Athens, towards a new city centre. The team

  4. Climate change or variable weather: Rethinking Danish homeowners' perceptions of floods and climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Nina; Petersen, Lars Kjerulf

    2015-01-01

    Climate scenarios predict that an effect of climate change will be more areas at risk of extensive flooding. This article builds on a qualitative case study of homeowners in the flood-prone area of Lolland in Denmark and uses the theories of Tim Ingold and Bruno Latour to rethink the way we under...

  5. World Peace Through Law: Rethinking an Old Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Ranney

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The author sets about re-thinking the old concept of “World Peace Through Law” (WPTL, meaning replacing the use of international force with the global rule of law. He traces the history of the WPTL concept back to the British legal philosopher Jeremy Bentham, whose 1789 ‘Plan for an Universal and Perpetual Peace’ proposed “a plan of general and permanent pacification for all Europe,” with troop reductions(especially in naval forces and “a Common Court of Judicature” to resolve differences between nations. The author’s 21st century version of WPTL bears an uncanny resemblance to Bentham’s original proposal, calling for: 1 arms reductions (including abolition of nuclear weapons; 2 a four-stage comprehensive system of compulsory alternative dispute resolution(compulsory negotiation, mediation, arbitration, and adjudication; and 3 various enforcement mechanisms, including an international peace force.The author argues that now is the time for adoption of what is a mainstream middle-of-the-road proposition (previously adopted by four past American presidents, including Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, Dwight David Eisenhower, and John F. Kennedy that is neither “too little” (our current strategy of “collective insecurity” nor “too much” (world government or world federalism. Instead, WPTL calls for only 1 arms reductions, not general and complete disarmament; 2 compulsory international alternative dispute resolution systems, not a global legislature; and 3 means of effective enforcement (including an international police force, not pacifism.The whole concept of WPTL has been sadly neglected over the past half century. It is time to take a new look at the concept in this, the nuclear age.

  6. A Literary Perspective on the Environment: Rethinking Development through Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi Silva Gonçalves

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the environmental crisis that chokes contemporaneity, it is of paramount importance for society to rethink our physical and abstract behaviours towards nature. Ecocriticism, providing a bridge between literature and nature, allows us to reorganise proven problematic notions, such as progress and development, which tend to gradually separate human beings from the space they occupy. Such separation results in a detachment that hinders our ability to transcend metropolitan, narrow-minded, biased judgments regarding the future of developing countries like Brazil, and perhaps artistic tools like literature are the only ones capable of broadening our reflections for inviting us to go beyond preconditioned perspectives. This article aims at showing how Milton Hatoum’s novel The Brothers (2000 implies that we must look for distinct possibilities of developing our spaces, more specifically the Amazon, and, through the analysis of the book as well as the impact of development on the region, the dialogue between literature and nature is proposed. First the theoretical approach on both nature and literature is delineated, followed by a discussion on how important it is to (reconnect subjects and environment, and then by analysing the novel’s characters which evince the side effects of “progress” and “growth” in the Amazonian region. The result is a problematisation of normative dichotomies such as savage/civilised, past/future, subject/space, underdeveloped/developed, and the conclusion that, for development to stop being detrimental to nature, we shall avoid believing in a “faceless environment” (Campbell, 18, that is, one needs to start observing the impact of such development on the lives of those inevitably and automatically marginalised by it.

  7. Rethinking Prefigurative Politics: Introduction to the Special Thematic Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Cornish

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This special thematic section responds to the 21st century proliferation of social movements characterised by the slogans ‘another world is possible’ and ‘be the change you want to see’. It explores prefigurative politics as a means of instantiating radical social change in a context of widening global inequalities, climate change, and the crises and recoveries of neoliberal global capitalism. ‘Prefigurative politics’ refers to a range of social experiments that both critique the status quo and offer alternatives by implementing radically democratic practices in pursuit of social justice. This collection of articles makes the case for psychologists to engage with prefigurative politics as sites of psychological and social change, in the dual interests of understanding the world and changing it. The articles bridge psychology and politics in three different ways. One group of articles brings a psychological lens to political phenomena, arguing that attention to the emotional, relational and intergroup dynamics of prefigurative politics is required to understand their trajectories, challenges, and impacts. A second group focuses a political lens on social settings traditionally framed as psychological sites of well-being, enabling an understanding of their political nature. The third group addresses the ‘border tensions’ of the psychological and the political, contextualising and historicising the instantiation of prefigurative ideals and addressing tensions that arise between utopian ideals and various internal and external constraints. This introduction to the special section explores the concept and contemporary debates concerning prefigurative politics, outlines the rationale for a psychological engagement with this phenomenon, and presents the articles in the special thematic section. The general, prefigurative, aim is to advance psychology’s contribution to rethinking and remaking the world as it could be, not only

  8. Ensuring effective supply chain management under uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutsenko Iryna Sergiivna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Identified the main sources of uncertainty in supply chains and tools to mitigate them. The necessity of functional, spatial and temporal integration and linkage of decision-making at different management levels. Determined that the optimization of information flow can occur due to the “shrink” in time, volume and direction, this process should be preceded by a thorough analysis and rethinking of the business processes of a complex system of supply chains.

  9. Rethinking the city through memory and meaning of place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez-Gonzalez, Diego

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the city the understanding of each location involves an approach to the processes and strategies of power behind socio-spatial dynamics associated with urban segregation and social exclusion. However, the intellectual weakness of the interpretations of the urban phenomenon requires rethinking the concepts and methodological tools to face the challenges of urban development in a context of economic instability, population aging and climate change. In this regard, various experts invite us to unravel the complex reality behind urban social processes and give us grounds to encourage political commitment and avoid indifference. Precisely against apathy and widespread resignation on urban issues and growing inequality, there is a pressing need to experience different initiatives aimed at developing social commitment, from consensus-building anchored in dialogue and memory community. En la ciudad la comprensión de cada lugar implica un acercamiento a los procesos y estrategias de poder que hay detrás de las dinámicas socioespaciales asociadas a la segregación urbana y exclusión social. Sin embargo, la debilidad intelectual de las interpretaciones sobre el fenómeno urbano obliga a replantear los conceptos e instrumentos metodológicos para enfrentar los retos del desarrollo urbano en un contexto de inestabilidad económica, envejecimiento demográfico y de cambio climático. Al respecto, diferentes expertos nos invitan a desentrañar la compleja realidad que hay detrás de los procesos sociales urbanos y nos dan argumentos para propiciar el compromiso político y evitar la indiferencia. Precisamente, frente a la apatía y la resignación generalizadas sobre la cuestión urbana y la creciente desigualdad, existe una necesidad apremiante de experimentar distintas iniciativas encaminadas a desarrollar el compromiso social, a partir de la búsqueda de consensos anclados en el diálogo y la memoria de la comunidad.

  10. Recurrence: A Filmosophic Re-thinking of A Long Story/ Uzun Hikaye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basak Goksel Demiray

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study will re-think A Long Story under the guidance of Daniel Frampton’s perspective of “filmosophy” which theorises film as a ‘being’ independent from any external effect, and acknowledges that film  has a ‘mind’ and is ‘able to think’ in its own way. To be clear on re-thinking how A Long Story ‘thinks’ of the concept of ‘recurrence’ in its dramatic structure, this study first will give a detailed explanation of “filmosophy”. Then, it will elaborate the particular ‘intentions’ and ‘choices’ that the film is responsible of whilst constructing itself upon the idea of ‘recurrence’. Finally, this study will focus on a particular scene and explain its significance on locating ‘recurrence’ as the ‘whole knowledge’ the film keeps in mind.

  11. Theater of "bóias-frias": rethinking anthropology of performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Dawsey

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The anthropology of performance, as understood by Victor Turner, provides interesting perspectives for the analysis of what may be referred to as the "theater of bóias-frias". Conversely, this theater may be of special interest for purposes of rethinking some of the main propositions which have arisen on the borders between anthropology and performance. Considering the specificity of "the practice which calculates the place from which one views things" of this theater, several topics present themselves as guidelines for the text which follows: 1 social dramas, 2 relations between social and aesthetic dramas, 3 symbols and montage, and 4 theater paradigms in anthropology. In this exercise to rethink some of the "classic" contributions of Victor Turner, Erving Goffman, and Richard Schechner, "elective affinities" have been found between, on the one hand, the writings of Walter Benjamin and Brechtian theater, and, on the other, the dramaturgical principles of the bóias-frias.

  12. Realising the promise of Tanzania’s wildlife management areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Homewood, Katherine; Lund, Jens Friis; Keane, Aidan

    2017-01-01

    Tanzania’s Community Wildlife Management Areas (CWMAs) – originally called Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) – were intended to benefit both people and wildlife. However, for their first two decades, CWMAs have been characterised by land conflict, wildlife damage to people and crops, lack of tourism...... potential and high administration costs among other negative impacts. Can rethinking how CWMAs are run bring about the benefits once promised?...

  13. Blockchains for Business Process Management - Challenges and Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Mendling, Jan; Weber, Ingo; van der Aalst, Wil; Brocke, Jan vom; Cabanillas, Cristina; Daniel, Florian; Debois, Soren; Di Ciccio, Claudio; Dumas, Marlon; Dustdar, Schahram; Gal, Avigdor; Garcia-Banuelos, Luciano; Governatori, Guido; Hull, Richard; La Rosa, Marcello

    2017-01-01

    Blockchain technology offers a sizable promise to rethink the way inter-organizational business processes are managed because of its potential to realize execution without a central party serving as a single point of trust (and failure). To stimulate research on this promise and the limits thereof, in this paper we outline the challenges and opportunities of blockchain for Business Process Management (BPM). We first reflect how blockchains could be used in the context of the established BPM l...

  14. A tool for the auto-management of Units of Learning: the Link Tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pérez-Sanagustín, Mar; Cherian, Roy; Hernández-Leo, Davinia; Griffiths, Dai; Blat, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Pérez-Sanagustín, M., Cherian, R., Hernández-Leo, D., Griffiths, D., & Blat, J. (2010). A tool for the auto-management of Units of Learning: the Link Tool. In D. Griffiths, & R. Koper (Eds.), Rethinking Learning and Employment at a Time of Economic Uncertainty. Proceedings of the 6th TENCompetence

  15. Customized Content Delivery for Graduate Management Education: Application to Business Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Owen P., Jr.; Ko, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Globalization is bringing about a radical "rethink" regarding the delivery of graduate management education. Today, many students entering a residential MBA program do not possess an undergraduate degree in business. As a result, many business schools are increasingly turning to the Internet to provide "customized" instructional content to ensure…

  16. Facilitating Work Based Learning Projects: A Business Process Oriented Knowledge Management Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, Yongwu; Sloep, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Miao, Y., Sloep, P. B., & Koper, R. (2009). Facilitating Work Based Learning Projects: A Business Process Oriented Knowledge Management Approach. Presented at the 'Open workshop of TENCompetence - Rethinking Learning and Employment at a Time of Economic Uncertainty-event'. November, 19, 2009,

  17. Facilitating Work Based Learning Projects: A Business Process Oriented Knowledge Management Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, Yongwu; Sloep, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Miao, Y., Sloep, P. B., & Koper, R. (2010). Facilitating Work Based Learning Projects: A Business Process Oriented Knowledge Management Approach. In D. Griffiths & R. Koper (Eds.), Rethinking Learning and Employment at a Time of Economic Uncertainty. Proceedings of the 6th TENCompetence Open

  18. Management and Organization in the work of Michel Houellebecq : Unplugged - Voices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Cnossen (Boukje); E. Dekker (Erwin); L. Taskin (Laurent)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractResearch in management and organization may only gain by being inspired from arts, culture and humanities in order to rethink practices but also to nourish its own perspectives. Life in organizations is artificially separate from ordinary life: all of mundane objects are thus conducive

  19. Rethinking workforce boundaries: roles, responsibilities and skill mix and readiness for change in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Topping, Annie; Nkosana Nyawata, Idah; Stephenson, John; Featherstone, Valerie A.

    2012-01-01

    Title: Rethinking workforce boundaries: roles, responsibilities and skill mix and readiness for change in general practice \\ud The Problem \\ud The last 10 years has seen major changes in the way services are delivered in primary care. Skill mix, has offered many practices real opportunities for doing things differently. As the introduction of advanced nurse practitioners (ANPs) and health care assistants (HCAs) into the primary care workforce demonstrate. While workforce redesign has its crit...

  20. Review: Henry E. Brady & David Collier (Hrsg.) (2004). Rethinking Social Inquiry: Diverse Tools, Shared Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Catón, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Das Buch Rethinking Social Inquiry, herausgegeben von Henry E. BRADY und David COLLIER, ist eine Antwort auf den Band von KING, KEOHANE und VERBA (1994), in dem versucht wird, Standards der quantitativen Forschung in der qualitativen Forschung einzuführen. Die Autoren des hier rezensierten Buchs kritisieren viele der Vorschläge, da sie argumentieren, dass qualitative Forschung anderer Werkzeuge bedürfe. Trotzdem stimmen sie zu, dass die Grundlagen des Forschungsaufbaus ähnlich sind. Das Buch ...

  1. Review: Henry E. Brady & David Collier (Eds.) (2004). Rethinking Social Inquiry: Diverse Tools, Shared Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Matthias Catón

    2006-01-01

    Das Buch Rethinking Social Inquiry, herausgegeben von Henry E. BRADY und David COLLIER, ist eine Antwort auf den Band von KING, KEOHANE und VERBA (1994), in dem versucht wird, Standards der quantitativen Forschung in der qualitativen Forschung einzuführen. Die Autoren des hier rezensierten Buchs kritisieren viele der Vorschläge, da sie argumentieren, dass qualitative Forschung anderer Werkzeuge bedürfe. Trotzdem stimmen sie zu, dass die Grundlagen des Forschungsaufbaus ähnlich sind. Das Buch ...

  2. Humanistic, authoritative and ecopsychological perspective in education or rethinking philosophy for children under globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Lushyn, Pavel; Kirovograd State Pedagogical University

    2009-01-01

    Humanistic, authoritative and ecopsychological perspective in education or rethinking philosophy for children under globalization Abstract: The paper deals with the analysis of the buffer or transitional nature of humanistic-oriented school subjects like “Philosophy for children” first introduced in the USA by Dr. M. Lipman and Dr. Ann Sharp. A new ecopsychological and ecofacilitative vision is suggested. The ecofacilitative approach is assumed to be better fit a) into the framework of...

  3. Rethinking critical reflection on care: late modern uncertainty and the implications for care ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosman, Frans; Niemeijer, Alistair

    2017-12-01

    Care ethics as initiated by Gilligan, Held, Tronto and others (in the nineteen eighties and nineties) has from its onset been critical towards ethical concepts established in modernity, like 'autonomy', alternatively proposing to think from within relationships and to pay attention to power. In this article the question is raised whether renewal in this same critical vein is necessary and possible as late modern circumstances require rethinking the care ethical inquiry. Two late modern realities that invite to rethink care ethics are complexity and precariousness. Late modern organizations, like the general hospital, codetermined by various (control-, information-, safety-, accountability-) systems are characterized by complexity and the need for complexity reduction, both permeating care practices. By means of a heuristic use of the concept of precariousness, taken as the installment of uncertainty, it is shown that relations and power in late modern care organizations have changed, precluding the use of a straightforward domination idea of power. In the final section a proposition is made how to rethink the care ethical inquiry in order to take late modern circumstances into account: inquiry should always be related to the concerns of people and practitioners from within care practices.

  4. Public Sector Reforms In Africa: A Philosophical Re-Thinking

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    seriane.camara

    2009-05-14

    May 14, 2009 ... sector management in the name of PSR. ... the importance attached to this agenda, the World Bank created a fully fledged. Public Sector Group in 1997. ..... There is also a need to exploit indigenous knowledge in carrying out.

  5. (REThinking the Legal Education Through the Storytelling Practices: The Example of the Jury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Fakhoury Filho

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to (rethink legal education using new methodologies. This requires changing the dominant mindset in teaching and practice of law (still essentially based on conflict and judicial proceedings. A new model can be implemented with the strategic analysis of the law and the storytelling. The storytelling in the classroom and in professional practice, is one of the viable ways to implement these changes. As the storytelling is already used in the jury, it can also be used in other professional fields and enhanced as a tool teaching of law, regardless of discipline.

  6. RETHINKING VALUE: A VALUE-CENTRIC MODEL OF PRODUCT, SERVICE AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randmaa, Merili; Mougaard, Krestine; Howard, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Globalization and information technologies have made the economical landscape more transparent and customers smarter, more demanding and networked. Companies can see these changes as a threat to their business or as an opportunity to differentiate in the market and be a Prime Mover, by re......-thinking customer value within the value system. This article shows how the term “value” is understood in different contexts and fields of economy, to see if these definitions can be merged, in order to understand the concept of value in broader way. The authors argue through literature review and example cases...

  7. Rethinking the Poverty-disease Nexus: the Case of HIV/AIDS in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienaar, Kiran

    2017-09-01

    While it is well-established that poverty and disease are intimately connected, the nature of this connection and the role of poverty in disease causation remains contested in scientific and social studies of disease. Using the case of HIV/AIDS in South Africa and drawing on a theoretically grounded analysis, this paper reconceptualises disease and poverty as ontologically entangled. In the context of the South African HIV epidemic, this rethinking of the poverty-disease dynamic enables an account of how social forces such as poverty become embodied in the very substance of disease to produce ontologies of HIV/AIDS unique to South Africa.

  8. The Rethinking of “the Year of Women���s Domestic Products Movement”

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaohong Zhu

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we have a research of the rethinking of “the year of Women’s Domestic Products Movement”. The “Women’s Domestic Products Movement” which was launched in 1934 has been denied by people now and before because of failing to reach the country’s intended purpose. From the angle of economic history, “Women’s Domestic Products Movement” played a positive role in promoting the domestic sales growth, reducing the index of export and import value. After carefully referring to the related...

  9. Rethinking democracy and representation: a proposal to extend the democratic canon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Monsiváis Carrillo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rethinking political representation is necessary to understand many contemporary democratic challenges. However, a widely accepted view states that democracy and representation are two irreconcilable principles, thus hindering the theoretical assessment of political representation's democratic relevance. According to this view, what democracy needs is more popular participation; instead, representation involves elitism and political detachment. In this paper I will argue that such a view is inaccurate. Through the reconstruction of the democratic ideal, and the discussion of the concept of political representation, I intend to show that processes of political authorization, accountability and public justification are both elements of political representation and expression of democratic politics.

  10. Rethinking the Territorial Pact in the Context of European Territorial Cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina SAGHIN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors argue through this paper, the importance of rethinking the recently abandoned tools that can be reactivated in times of crisis. EU 2020 Strategy and other EU documents create a favorable frame in order to achieve the priorities set by reconsidering the territorial pact concept. Recent documents define the partnership agreement concept, which seems to be more rigid and less flexible than the territorial pact. Having as a starter point Romania’s specifics, there are individualized 10 thematic territorial pacts and 8 global pacts. They must generate territorial synergies capable of ensuring the coherence between regions, states and the European Union as a whole.

  11. Encounters between the "Oppressed" and the "Oppressor": Rethinking Paulo Freire in Anti-Racist Feminist Education in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of rethinking Paulo Freire's theory and its practices in race/ethnicity and education, this article uses intersectionality to deepen our understanding of differences among the oppressed and break the opposition between the oppressed and oppressor. Based on an ethnographic study carried out at a feminist adult educational institution…

  12. Important Issues, Some Rhetoric, and a Few Straw Men: A Response to Comments on "Rethinking Giftedness and Gifted Education"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrell, Frank C.; Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Subotnik, Rena F.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors respond to the eight commentaries on "Rethinking Giftedness and Gifted Education: A Proposed Direction Forward Based on Psychological Science" using several themes to organize their response. These themes include ability, developmental trajectories, effort and opportunity, psychosocial factors, eminence, and equity.…

  13. Breaking Out of the Circle: Rethinking Our Assumptions about Education and the Economy. Occasional Paper No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Sue E.

    The National Center on Education and Employment has taken on the task of challenging and rethinking the premises that underlie traditions of human capital development in this country. This task is summarized in the question, "Who should teach which work-related skills to whom, when, and how?" Its first priority is that the Center's primary…

  14. Rethinking Teaching and Learning Pedagogy for Education in the Twenty-First Century: Blended Learning in Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Renée

    2017-01-01

    In an increasingly technologically driven world, there is proliferate discussion among education and government authorities about the necessity to rethink education in the twenty-first century. The evolution of technology and its pervasive influence on the needs and requirements of society is central to this mindset. Innovations in online…

  15. Strategies for Leading Academics to Rethink Humanities and Social Sciences Curricula in the Context of Discipline Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Theda; Wallace, Joy; Allen, Pamela; Clark, Jennifer; Jones, Adrian; Lawrence, Jill; Cole, Bronwyn; Sheridan Burns, Lynette

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of discipline standards in Australia has required a comprehensive rethinking of humanities and social science curricula from first year through to graduation. This paper proposes a model to facilitate academics' engagement with discipline standards and their implication for first-year curricula. The model supports…

  16. Rethinking the Eurocentric Library Workplace: A Multi-faceted Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolivet, Linda C.; Knowles, Em Claire

    1996-01-01

    Defining and expanding diversity in the workplace may involve reassessment of the dominant workplace culture in libraries, in order to foster better understanding and more effective management, retention, and promotion of librarians of color. Highlights include a selected bibliography and a survey instrument that analyzes the dominant culture of a…

  17. Rethinking the delivery of public services to citizens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seidle, F. Leslie

    1995-01-01

    ... Sector Reform and Service Delivery in the Antipodes New Zealand: Transforming the State Australia: a Concerted Program of Management Reform Conclusion Notes 75 Chapter Four The Canadian Federal Government and Service Delivery Issues Perceptions of Service from the Federal Government The Mulroney Government and Public Service 2000 Special Operati...

  18. Re-thinking barriers to organizational change in public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nigel; Saltman, Richard B

    2017-01-01

    Public hospitals are well known to be difficult to reform. This paper provides a comprehensive six-part analytic framework that can help policymakers and managers better shape their organizational and institutional behavior. The paper first describes three separate structural characteristics which, together, inhibit effective problem description and policy design for public hospitals. These three structural constraints are i) the dysfunctional characteristics found in most organizations, ii) the particular dysfunctions of professional health sector organizations, and iii) the additional dysfunctional dimensions of politically managed organizations. While the problems in each of these three dimensions of public hospital organization are well-known, and the first two dimensions clearly affect private as well as publicly run hospitals, insufficient attention has been paid to the combined impact of all three factors in making public hospitals particularly difficult to manage and steer. Further, these three structural dimensions interact in an institutional environment defined by three restrictive context limitations, again two of which also affect private hospitals but all three of which compound the management dilemmas in public hospitals. The first contextual limitation is the inherent complexity of delivering high quality, safe, and affordable modern inpatient care in a hospital setting. The second contextual limitation is a set of specific market failures in public hospitals, which limit the scope of the standard financial incentives and reform measures. The third and last contextual limitation is the unique problem of generalized and localized anxiety , which accompanies the delivery of medical services, and which suffuses decision-making on the part of patients, medical staff, hospital management, and political actors alike. This combination of six institutional characteristics - three structural dimensions and three contextual dimensions - can help explain why

  19. Rethinking International Counterterrorism Assistance to the Greater Horn of Africa: Toward a Regional Risk Reduction Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Schwartz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Horn of Africa has long been a recipient of foreign security assistance, with significant funds increasingly devoted to supporting subregional civilian-oriented counterterrorism efforts over the past decade. Despite efforts to better coordinate delivery, counterterrorism programming in the subregion generally remains fragmented, short-term, and siloed in implementation. This article argues that it is time to rethink the international community’s approach to counterterrorism assistance to the Horn of Africa and calls for a cohesive regional approach that not only bridges the gap between security and development, but also the gap between counterterrorism and human security. It emphasizes that the international community must not only better coordinate existing streams of counterterrorism assistance to the region, but also rethink how this assistance is designed and the ways it can be delivered to complement broader subregional development and security agendas. After a brief introduction to international counterterrorism assistance to the Horn of Africa, the article examines linkages across three thematic streams of programming being delivered to the subregion: anti-money laundering and countering the financing of terrorism; criminal justice capacity building assistance to counter terrorism; and, countering violent extremism. This discussion will highlight the need for a regional risk reduction strategy for the Horn of Africa that not only builds on the interplay of different streams of counterterrorism assistance, but on synergies across broader subregional development and security agendas as well.

  20. The new organization: Rethinking work in the age of virtuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Duncan B., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Like two enormous steam engines, throttles wide-open, bells clanging and whistles screeching, careening toward each other down the same track, two powerful forces are about to collide and the point of collision will be smack in the middle of the white-collar workplace. Moreover, once the dust has settled, it is quite likely that we will never be able to think about the white-collar workplace in quite the same way again. The forces couldn't be more different. One force, the theory of complex adaptive systems, has its roots in the radical new sciences of chaos and complexity. The other force, the notion of organizations being learning systems, more like living organisms than 'information factories,' is an outgrowth of the new management thinking of leading organizational theorists like the Claremont Graduate School's Peter Drucker, MIT's Peter Senge, and Hitotsubashi University's Ikujiro Nonaka. Nevertheless, both the new science and the new management thinking seem to point to a similar and perhaps even startling conclusion: the business organization of the 21st century will look nothing like the bureaucratic organizational model that prevails in most companies today, a model that has remained largely unchanged since the manufacturing heydays of 1950s. While the details of the new organization remain sketchy, its rough outline is already beginning to take shape. Rather than simply being flatter through the elimination of layer upon layer of 'middle management,' the new organization is likely to be made up of networks of specialists who will be, for all practical purposes, self-managing. Rather than focusing on issues like re-engineering business processes, a holdover from Taylorism, the focus will be on supporting the continuous learning of an organization's specialists, the sharing of this learning with other specialists, and the embedding of this learning in the organization's physical structure. Finally, rather than viewing themselves as going through relatively

  1. Rethinking CCS. Moving forward in times of uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, Howard; Eide, Jan

    2013-01-01

    While in early 2009 strict climate policies were expected to be put in place, today the course of climate policy worldwide is certain. While there is no worldwide policy in place, the future of CCS should be considered. CCS is a technology that can help manage the concentration of CO 2 and thus have an impact on the climate change. This paper describes the status quo and provides an outlook on possible future developments.

  2. CHANGING BORDERS, RETHINKING SOVEREIGNTY: TOWARDS A RIGHT TO MIGRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maribel Casas-Cortes

    Full Text Available Abstract The intervention of European Union border authorities in countries of Africa, Asia and Eastern Europe has shown how the European state “border” has been displaced from its national moorings and externalized across the territories of neighboring states. Our research examines the outsourcing of the southern European Union border, focusing on the case of Spain and its relationship with Morocco and countries of Western Africa. In this paper we describe the development and implementation of this strategy of migration management, signaling implications of border externalization from the point of geopolitics and legality, including a suggestive call to reclaim the legal tradition of the Right to Migrate.

  3. Seeking surprise : rethinking monitoring for collective learning in rural resource management

    OpenAIRE

    Guijt, I.M.

    2008-01-01

    Commonsense says that monitoring systems should be able to provide feedback that can help correct ineffective actions. But practice shows that when dealing with complex rural development issues that involve collaborative action by a changing configuration of stakeholders, monitoring practice often falls short of its potential. In this thesis, I describe my search to understand why practice is so limited and what might be needed to design monitoring processes that foster learning in concerted ...

  4. Rethinking Trait Conceptions of Social Desirability Scales: Impression Management as an Expression of Honesty-Humility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, R.E.; Zettler, I.; Hilbig, B.E.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous researchers have noted that, instead of response sets or styles, most social desirability scales seem to measure personality traits instead. In two studies, we investigated the substantive interpretation of the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding in terms of the HEXACO model of

  5. Learning To Manage Anger: Discussion Leader's Manual for the RETHINK Workout for Teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute for Mental Health Initiatives, Washington, DC.

    Although anger is a universal emotion, many normal people have great difficulty expressing this feeling. It is associated with physical as well as emotional manifestations, and has serious, destructive social ramifications. Several cognitive skills have been identified in the constructive use of anger: focus strategies, cognitive restructuring,…

  6. Rethinking the Role of Humans in Water Management: Toward a New Model of Decision-Making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugnach, Marcela Fabiana; Ingram, Helen; Rose Johnston, B.

    2012-01-01

    During the first decade of the twenty-first century, water availability and distribution have become increasingly important for sustainable development and biodiversity conservation. Issues of water scarcity, quality, and accessibility affect the livelihood of many communities across the globe, as

  7. Seeking surprise : rethinking monitoring for collective learning in rural resource management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guijt, I.M.

    2008-01-01

    Commonsense says that monitoring systems should be able to provide feedback that can help correct ineffective actions. But practice shows that when dealing with complex rural development issues that involve collaborative action by a changing configuration of stakeholders, monitoring practice often

  8. Management

    OpenAIRE

    Daft, Richard L.; Kendrick, Martyn; Vershinina, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    The market-leading textbook for principles of management courses reaches a new level with Richard L. Daft being joined by Martyn Kendrick and Natalia Vershinina (both Leicester Business School) to provide an unparalleled resource for students in Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA). After listening to the requirements of lecturers, the authors have maintained the same comprehensive coverage and structure of the original work but carefully threaded in new EMEA and wider global examples an...

  9. Rethinking the economics of capital mobility and capital controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas I. Palley

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reexamines the issue of international financial capital mobility, which is today's economic orthodoxy. Discussion is often framed in terms of the impossible trinity. That framing distorts discussion by representing capital mobility as having equal significance with sovereign monetary policy and control over exchange rates. It also distorts discussion by ignoring possibilities for coordinated monetary policy and exchange rates, and for managed capital flows. The case for capital mobility rests on neo-classical economic efficiency arguments and neo-liberal political arguments. The case against capital mobility is based on Keynesian macroeconomic inefficiency arguments, neo-Walrasian market failure arguments, and neo-Marxian arguments regarding distortion of the social structure of accumulation. Close examination shows the case for capital mobility to be extremely flimsy, pointing to the ideological dimension behind today's policy orthodoxy.

  10. Nuclear re-think [The case for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, P.

    2006-01-01

    In the early 1970s, Patrick Moore, a co-founder of Greenpeace, believed that nuclear energy was synonymous with nuclear holocaust. Thirty years on, his views have changed because nuclear energy is the only non-greenhouse-gas-emitting power source that can effectively replace fossil fuels while satisfying the world's increasing demand for energy. Today, 441 nuclear plants operating globally avoid the release of nearly 3 billion tonnes of CO 2 emissions annually-the equivalent of the exhaust from more than 428 million cars. Concerns associated with nuclear energy are discussed including costs of nuclear energy, safety of nuclear plants, radioactive waste management, vulnerability of nuclear plants to terrorist attacks and diversion of nuclear fuel for weaponization. It is concluded that nuclear energy is the best way to produce safe, clean, reliable baseload electricity, and will play a key role in achieving global energy security. With climate change at the top of the international agenda, we must all do our part to encourage a nuclear energy renaissance

  11. Rethinking the intensive care environment: considering nature in nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Claire; Batten, Lesley

    2016-01-01

    With consideration of an environmental concept, this paper explores evidence related to the negative impacts of the intensive care unit environment on patient outcomes and explores the potential counteracting benefits of 'nature-based' nursing interventions as a way to improve care outcomes. The impact of the environment in which a patient is nursed has long been recognised as one determinant in patient outcomes. Whilst the contemporary intensive care unit environment contains many features that support the provision of the intensive therapies the patient requires, it can also be detrimental, especially for long-stay patients. This narrative review considers theoretical and evidence-based literature that supports the adoption of nature-based nursing interventions in intensive care units. Research and theoretical literature from a diverse range of disciplines including nursing, medicine, psychology, architecture and environmental science were considered in relation to patient outcomes and intensive care nursing practice. There are many nature-based interventions that intensive care unit nurses can implement into their nursing practice to counteract environmental stressors. These interventions can also improve the environment for patients' families and nurses. Intensive care unit nurses must actively consider and manage the environment in which nursing occurs to facilitate the best patient outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Trauma Tactics: Rethinking Trauma Education for Professional Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Paula; Liddil, Jessica; Eley, Scott; Winfield, Scott

    2016-01-01

    According to the National Trauma Institute (2015), trauma accounts for more than 180,000 deaths each year in the United States. Nurses play a significant role in the care of trauma patients and therefore need appropriate education and training (L. ). Although several courses exist for trauma education, many nurses have not received adequate education in trauma management (B. ; L. ). Trauma Tactics, a 2-day course that focuses on high-fidelity human patient simulation, was created to meet this educational need. This descriptive study was conducted retrospectively to assess the effectiveness of the Trauma Tactics course. Pre- and postsurveys, tests, and simulation performance were used to evaluate professional nurses who participated in Trauma Tactics over a 10-month period. Fifty-five nurses were included in the study. Pre- and postsurveys revealed an increase in overall confidence, test scores increased by an average of 2.5 points, and simulation performance scores increased by an average of 16 points. Trauma Tactics is a high-quality course that provides a valuable and impactful educational experience for nurses. Further research is needed to evaluate the long-term effects of Trauma Tactics and its impacts on quality of care and patient outcomes.

  13. Refusing to be Complicit in our Prison Nation: Teachers Rethinking Mandated Reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Meiners

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring that Black Lives Matter in schools requires seismic shifts including excavating the ongoing practices and policies that reproduce heterogendered white supremacy in schools. However, what is too often erased in these movements is the key way the profession of teaching facilitates racialized surveillance and criminalization. Teachers are mandated reporters who are required by law to report suspected negligence and abuse. While on paper this charge looks neutral, this essay illustrates why teachers should rethink their roles and organize against mandated reporting laws. To teach to ensure that all Black Lives Matter requires refusing to be complicit in the mechanisms that contribute to the destruction of too many families and communities.

  14. Rethinking central concepts of work and travel in the "age of aeromobility"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Claus

    2004-01-01

    between work and tourism is not distinct and there is a very complex connection between travel, work, tourism and play. It shows that actually, there is a strong ?material? impact from supposedly ?immaterial? organisations and this ?materiality? is particularly linked to the extension of forms of mobility......In this article, the hypothesis is that there is a connection between international aeromobility, knowledge organisations and environmental impacts. The object is therefore to examine the driving forces, mechanisms and patterns of meaning behind the increase in international long distance work......-mobility. The article will draw on a case study which involves two Danish examples of ?knowledge organisations?. It argues that it is necessary to rethink central concepts of travel, tourism and working life, in order to understand and describe this kind of international mobility in these organisations. The boundary...

  15. Rethinking Conventional Teaching In Language Learning And Proposing Edmodo As Intervention: A Qualitative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farha Alia Mokhtar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, educators are urged to transform the techniques in conducting language learning by incorporating technological tools because new technologies stimulate an explosion of new methods for teaching and learning. This article emphasizes the conventional teaching pedagogy and the urgency to rethink its practice in language learning while proposing a possible platform for learners’ and teachers’ needs. I outline the perceptions of future teachers on conventional teaching, shifting of teaching style from conventional to digital designs and the possibility of implementing Edmodo to curb the concerns arising. The argumentset forward isregarding conventional teaching that hinders potentials of students, followed by participants’ hopes for teaching approaches and the likelihood of implementing Edmodo to assist in the language learning classroom with grammar, vocabulary, self‐efficacy and target language and practice.  

  16. Review: Henry E. Brady & David Collier (Eds. (2004. Rethinking Social Inquiry: Diverse Tools, Shared Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Catón

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The book Rethinking Social Inquiry, edited by Henry E. BRADY and David COLLIER, is a response to a book by KING, KEOHANE and VERBA (1994 that aimed to introduce quantitative standards to qualitative research. The authors of the book reviewed here criticize many of the suggestions made there because they argue that qualitative research requires other tools. Nevertheless, they agree that the foundations of research design are similar. The book comprises a comprehensive critique of mainstream quantitative techniques, describes a set of qualitative tools for research, and addresses issues of how to combine qualitative and quantitative approaches to maximize analytical leverage. It is an excellent contribution to the methodological debate in the social sciences. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0602309

  17. Rethinking Social Work in times of economic and financial crisis in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Irene Carvalho

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to contextualize the social policy transformations in social services and health care system in the context of the economic and financial crisis and following intervention of the international monetary fund, the World Bank and the European Central Bank (Troika in Portugal, over the past four years. We analyze the social emergency program, which replaced the national plan for social inclusion, and the implementation of the national integrated network for long term care. Based on the evidence of the results we reflect on these transformations in Social Work, highlighting the negative aspects and the challenges for this profession. To achieve these aims we analyzed documents, statistical data and research on this subject. In this context of scarcity and emergency interventions, Social Work is challenged to rethink itself as a sociopolitical profession, taking into account the temporality of the intervention, the allocation of resources and the training of professionals.

  18. Rethinking of the criteria for natural analogue study. A case of Tono natural analogue study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hidekazu

    1996-01-01

    Natural analogue regarding long-term performance of the geological disposal system for radioactive waste isolation is essentially the study of geochemical process which has been evolved in geological environment. All geochemical studies, however, will not be nominated as natural analogue studies. It is, therefore, important to be clear the criteria for natural analogue study with the view of analogy by following three categories, (1) Conceptual model development, (2) Data provision and (3) Model testing, for the concept of geological disposal and safety assessment model. Rethinking of the criteria for natural analogue study through the case of Tono Natural Analogue Study, and the usefulness of natural analogue study for the safety assessment of geological disposal system in Japan have been presented in this paper. (author)

  19. Rethinking Suffering: Allowing for Suffering that is Intrinsic at End of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, Maxxine; Berzoff, Joan

    2016-01-01

    The dilemma so central to the work of providers of palliative and end-of-life care is the paradox of their professional and ethical duty to try to relieve suffering and the limitations of so doing. While the capacity to sit with suffering at the end of life is critical to clinical work, the idea that some intrinsic suffering cannot necessarily always be relieved may model for patients and families that suffering can be borne. Clinicians who encounter unrelievable suffering may feel a sense of failure, helplessness, moral distress, and compassion fatigue. While tolerating suffering runs counter to the aims of palliative care, acknowledging it, bearing it, and validating it may actually help patients and families to do the same. "Sitting with suffering" signals a paradigm shift within the discipline of palliative care, as it asks clinicians to rethink their role in being able to relieve some forms of psychosocial suffering intrinsic to dying.

  20. A quale ruolo “adulto” formerà la scuola? Riflessioni a par- tire dalla strategia europea Rethinking Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Marescotti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the European Commission Communication Rethinking Education: Investing in skills for better socio-economic outcomes (November 2012. The comments concern the school educational tasks and, in particular, the young-adult “identity” required to face multiple challenges of current global crisis. In an educational perspective, it require a "re-thinking" of education, maintaining a meaning horizon dedicated to the promotion of a "genuine" quality of life, and an anthropological project that cannot be sacrificed in the name of the contingent political and economic pressures. In a lifelong education view, this article considers the relationship between education/adult education and the meaning of adult identity, to improve the human "desirable" ideals vs than what is too often presented as “necessary evil”.

  1. Corporate Social Capital and Public Relations : Capital Accumulation by Social Relationship and Rethinking the Definition of Public Relations

    OpenAIRE

    北見, 幸一

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses Corporate Social Capital and Public Relations. This paper overviewed the Social Capital studies, especially early studies in sociology field, proposed the framework to evaluate Social Capital in a capital. Social Capital has the merit to reduce transaction costs, and should be clearly positioned as a component of capital of corporation. Using the concept of the Corporate Social Capital, to rethink the definition of Public Relations, this paper proposed the following defin...

  2. Hydrothermal Vents and Methane Seeps: Rethinking the Sphere of Influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Ann Levin

    2016-05-01

    well as regional oceanography and biodiversity. Many ecosystem services are associated with the interactions and transitions between chemosynthetic and background ecosystems, for example carbon cycling and sequestration, fisheries production, and a host of non-market and cultural services. The quantification of the sphere of influence of vents and seeps could be beneficial to better management of deep-sea environments in the face of growing industrialization.

  3. Hydrothermal vents and methane seeps: Rethinking the sphere of influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Baco, Amy; Bowden, David; Colaco, Ana; Cordes, Erik E.; Cunha, Marina; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Gobin, Judith; Grupe, Ben; Le, Jennifer; Metaxas, Anna; Netburn, Amanda; Rouse, Greg; Thurber, Andrew; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Van Dover, Cindy L.; Vanreusel, Ann; Watling, Les

    2016-01-01

    regional oceanography and biodiversity. Many ecosystem services are associated with the interactions and transitions between chemosynthetic and background ecosystems, for example carbon cycling and sequestration, fisheries production, and a host of non-market and cultural services. The quantification of the sphere of influence of vents and seeps could be beneficial to better management of deep-sea environments in the face of growing industrialization.

  4. DATA MINING AND ITS EFFICACY IN KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT WITH RESPECT TO HRIS APPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    Ms. Tripti Chopra; Dr. Shine David

    2016-01-01

    Industries are constantly trying to stay competitive by retaining its reputation in the market in which it is operating. Due to Globalization companies have to rethink their strategies and practices. A company’s strategy highly depends upon the use of application and the utilization of resources. Amidst all these HR factors tend to play a potential role in determining the effectiveness and competitiveness of an organization. HRIS is generally considered as managing people practices using IT e...

  5. Facilitating Work Based Learning Projects: A Business Process Oriented Knowledge Management Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Yongwu; Sloep, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Miao, Y., Sloep, P. B., & Koper, R. (2010). Facilitating Work Based Learning Projects: A Business Process Oriented Knowledge Management Approach. In D. Griffiths & R. Koper (Eds.), Rethinking Learning and Employment at a Time of Economic Uncertainty. Proceedings of the 6th TENCompetence Open workshop (pp. 22-33). November, 19-20, 2009, Manchester, UK. Bolton, UK: Institute for Educational Cybernetics, The University of Bolton. For the complete book please see http://hdl.handle.net/1820/3191

  6. Blockchains for Business Process Management - Challenges and Opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendling, Jan; Weber, Ingo; Van Der Aalst, Wil

    2018-01-01

    Blockchain technology offers a sizable promise to rethink the way inter-organizational business processes are managed because of its potential to realize execution without a central party serving as a single point of trust (and failure). To stimulate research on this promise and the limits thereof......, in this paper we outline the challenges and opportunities of blockchain for Business Process Management (BPM). We first reflect how blockchains could be used in the context of the established BPM lifecycle and second how they might become relevant beyond. We conclude our discourse with a summary of seven...... research directions for investigating the application of blockchain technology in the context of BPM...

  7. Rethinking Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , symbolic and social world of culture. It brings together eminent social and cultural psychologists who study dynamic, transformative and emergent phenomena, and invites them to conceptualise creativity in ways that depart from mainstream definitions and theoretical models existing in past and present...... and the lives of those around them. It will be of key interest to both social and cultural psychologists, as well as to creativity researchers and those who, as part of their personal or professional life, try to understand creativity and develop creative forms of expression....

  8. Rethinking Deindustrialization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernard, Andrew B.; Smeets, Valerie Anne Rolande; Warzynski, Frederic Michel Patrick

    This paper examines the decline in manufacturing in Denmark from 1994 to 2007. As in almost every other high-income country, manufacturing employment and the number of manufacturing firms in Denmark have been shrinking as a share of the total and in absolute levels. Most of the decline of manufac......This paper examines the decline in manufacturing in Denmark from 1994 to 2007. As in almost every other high-income country, manufacturing employment and the number of manufacturing firms in Denmark have been shrinking as a share of the total and in absolute levels. Most of the decline...... of manufacturing is due to firm exit and reduced employment at surviving manufacturers. However, a portion of the recorded decline is due to firms switching industries, from manufacturing to service sectors. We focus on this last group of firms, asking what they looked like before switched and how they fared after...... the switch. Overall this is a group of small high productivity firms that grow more rapidly after they switch. By 2007, employment at these former manufacturers equals 10 percent of manufacturing employment, reducing the apparent decline in manufacturing employment by about one half....

  9. Rethinking Extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E.; Niv, Yael; Daw, Nathaniel; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Extinction serves as the leading theoretical framework and experimental model to describe how learned behaviors diminish through absence of anticipated reinforcement. In the past decade, extinction has moved beyond the realm of associative learning theory and behavioral experimentation in animals and has become a topic of considerable interest in the neuroscience of learning, memory, and emotion. Here, we review research and theories of extinction, both as a learning process and as a behavior...

  10. Rethinking Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Paulauskas, Kęstutis

    2005-01-01

    The article argues that the period of “high” politics in the ever-problematic relations between Lithuania and Russia is over. At the same time, it is agued that tensions remain at the level of “low” politics, when the agenda of bilateral relations is dominated by the security interests related to Kaliningrad Oblast and Russia’s energy policy. The author claims that Lithuania should take a more pragmatic approach in her day-to-day relations with Russia and follow a more flexible policy towards...

  11. Rethinking Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Insel, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    How will we view schizophrenia in 2030? Schizophrenia today is a chronic, frequently disabling mental disorder that affects about one per cent of the world's population. After a century of studying schizophrenia, the cause of the disorder remains unknown. Treatments, especially pharmacological treatments, have been in wide use for nearly half a century, yet there is little evidence that these treatments have substantially improved outcomes for most people with schizophrenia. These current uns...

  12. Rethinking Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouché, Jaunine

    2013-01-01

    Which is better--telling high school students they are wrong, or letting them figure it out for themselves? Research supports the latter. In other words, do nit short-circuit students; struggles to achieve understanding as they grapple with their own beliefs. Removing that struggle may deny students the mechanism they need to replace their…

  13. Rethinking trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Roderick M

    2009-06-01

    Will we ever learn? We'd barely recovered from Enron and WorldCom before we faced the subprime mortgage meltdown and more scandals that shook our trust in businesspeople. Which raises the question: Do we trust too much? In this article, Stanford professor and social psychologist Kramer explores the reasons we trust so easily--and, often, so unwisely. He explains that genetics and childhood learning make us predisposed to trust and that it's been a good survival mechanism. That said, our willingness to trust makes us vulnerable. Our sense of trust kicks in on remarkably simple cues, such as when people look like us or are part of our social group. We also rely on third parties to verify the character of others, sometimes to our detriment (as the victims of Bernard Madoff learned). Add in our illusions of invulnerability and our tendencies to see what we want to see and to overestimate our own judgment, and the bottom line is that we're often easily fooled. We need to develop tempered trust. For those who trust too much, that means reading cues better; for the distrustful, it means developing more receptive behaviors. Everyone should start with small acts of trust that encourage reciprocity and build up. Having a hedge against potential abuses also helps. Hollywood scriptwriters, for instance, register their treatments with the Writers Guild of America to prevent their ideas from being stolen by the executives they pitch. To attract the right relationships, people must strongly signal their own honesty, proactively allay concerns, and, if their trust is abused, retaliate. Trusting individuals in certain roles, which essentially means trusting the system that selects and trains them, also works but isn't foolproof. And don't count on due diligence alone for protection; constant vigilance is needed to make sure the landscape hasn't changed.

  14. Rethinking Gamification

    OpenAIRE

    Ruffino, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Gamification marks a major change to everyday life. It describes the permeation of economic, political, and social contexts by game-elements such as awards, rule structures, and interfaces that are inspired by video games. Sometimes the term is reduced to the implementation of points, badges, and leaderboards as incentives and motivations to be productive. Sometimes it is envisioned as a universal remedy to deeply transform society toward more humane and playful ends. Despite its use by corpo...

  15. Rethinking Counterinsurgency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    in national and local governments, in the evolution of the English language, in the arts, in the media, and even in British cuisine . However...by Russian, U.S., British, French , Portuguese, Spanish, Indian, and Israeli soldiers. For several reasons, there is a stronger sense of continuity...insurgencies encountered by the British, French , Spanish, Portuguese, Americans, and Indians, each element represented in this equation was based in and

  16. Rethinking Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealy, Chynette

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism, presenting someone's words or other creative products as one's own, is a mandatory discussion and writing assignment in many undergraduate business communication courses. Class discussions about this topic tend to be lively, ranging from questions about simply omitting identified sources to different standards of ethical behaviors…

  17. Rethinking Relativism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, George J.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses Allan Bloom's "The Closing of the American Mind," examining his critique of relativism, particularly cultural relativism. The paper states that the existence of cultural relativism is a cause and sign of significant fragmentation and separateness in modern society and the university. (SM)

  18. Rethinking Antiquarianism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Murray

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the opportunity to discuss the rationale for a new collaborative research project directed at creating a global history of antiquarianism. Conventional histories of archaeology, particularly those by Daniel (e.g. 1976 and to a certain extent Trigger (1987, 2006, stress that antiquarians were in essence amateurs and dilettantes, perfect figures of their age, exemplified by the brilliantly scatty John Aubrey, or by Walter Scott’s grotesque pastiche Jonathan Oldbuck. However, following ground-breaking work by Arnoldo Momigliano (see e.g. 1966, 1990, and later by Alain Schnapp (e.g. 1996 for some time it had become clear that this was an inaccurate rendering – one designed to stress the scientific credentials of the disciplines that grew out and away from antiquarianism: the modern cultural sciences of history, sociology, anthropology, art history, archaeology, and history of religion. For Schnapp, especially in his Discovery of the Past, the division between amateur and professional (a distinction also explored with profit by Phillipa Levine (1986 was not the cause of the triumph of archaeology (or any one of the other disciplines over antiquarianism, and it is ill informed to interpret antiquarianism as a wrong-turning on the pathway to archaeological enlightenment. In this view antiquarianism was, and perhaps still is a full-fledged and (more important continuing body of thought and practice.

  19. Rethinking Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Cooperation Council (GCC), a regional economic and security alliance between Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Oman, Bahrain, Qatar , and the United Arab Emirates. (1...west bank of the Jordan River provides 25 percent of the water to the aquife ±r from which Israel draws its water. (1:-) 4. Authoritarian Nature of

  20. Rethinking Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E.; Niv, Yael; Daw, Nathaniel; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Extinction serves as the leading theoretical framework and experimental model to describe how learned behaviors diminish through absence of anticipated reinforcement. In the past decade, extinction has moved beyond the realm of associative learning theory and behavioral experimentation in animals and has become a topic of considerable interest in the neuroscience of learning, memory, and emotion. Here, we review research and theories of extinction, both as a learning process and as a behavioral technique, and consider whether traditional understandings warrant a re-examination. We discuss the neurobiology, cognitive factors, and major computational theories, and revisit the predominant view that extinction results in new learning that interferes with expression of the original memory. Additionally, we reconsider the limitations of extinction as a technique to prevent the relapse of maladaptive behavior, and discuss novel approaches, informed by contemporary theoretical advances, that augment traditional extinction methods to target and potentially alter maladaptive memories. PMID:26447572

  1. Rethinking technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Conley, Verena Andermatt

    1993-01-01

    .... Katherine Hayles 11. The Leap and the Lapse: Hacking a Private Site in Cyberspace Alberto Moreiras 12. Telefigures and Cyberspace Patrick Clancy 173 191 207 Works Cited 233 Contributors 241 Index 24...

  2. Rethinking Neoliberalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    There are many key questions concerning the current status of the notion of neoliberalism. What is it? Is it an appropriate concept to describe a political and intellectual movement or form of state? What are its prospects as a framework of public policy after the global financial crisis? The art......There are many key questions concerning the current status of the notion of neoliberalism. What is it? Is it an appropriate concept to describe a political and intellectual movement or form of state? What are its prospects as a framework of public policy after the global financial crisis......? The article proposes a way of answering these questions by regarding neoliberalism as a definite ‘thought collective’ and a regime of government of and by the state. It exemplifies these by shifts within neoliberalism regarding the question of monopoly, its relationship to classical liberalism and its...

  3. Rethinking Receivership

    OpenAIRE

    John Armour; Sandra Frisby

    2000-01-01

    A popular perception is that administrative receivers and their appointors hold 'too much' power in relation to troubled companies. Consideration of this issue is timely, because insolvency law is currently under review. We argue although the law's formal structure is imbalanced, this can nevertheless generate savings for parties by allowing a concentrated creditor who has invested in information-gathering about the debtor to conduct a private insolvency procedure. We suggest that this proced...

  4. By a communicative action/supervison: Haberma's strategy to rethink the educational practices in the Project of Professiobalization of Workers in the Field Nursing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elioenai Dornelles Alves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This philosophical reflection search to build some guide elements that can subsidize the discussions on the teaching methodologies in health and nursing, while philosophical referencial to rethink the pedagogic political projects used in the qualification of human resources in health and of the implications with the offers of courses, projects, researches and activities related to extension action the permanent education in health. This study search to rescue a critical and creative approach of the educators in health, contributing to a new look interdisciplinar focused philosophically of way multiprofissional, to rethink our praxis in the different acting forms.

  5. Re-thinking representations, re-writing nursing texts: possibilities through feminist and Foucauldian thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, A D; Gilmour, J A

    2001-09-01

    Critical approaches are increasingly being used to inform theory and research within the discipline of nursing. In this paper we discuss the work of feminist writers, particularly those located within the postmodern, and Michel Foucault. Their work, although having significant points of difference, can be viewed as complementary and our engagement with these ideas has led us to re-think nursing knowledge. Using ideas from Foucault and postmodern feminism foregrounds critical questions such as whose knowledge is visible in nursing literature, whose is suppressed, and the power relationships reflected in representations of knowledge. Our exploration of representations of knowledge has led us to review fundamental nursing texts that we consider to be important political and ideological artefacts in the enculturation of student nurses. The dominant position of medical knowledge in the texts reviewed continues to position this 'voice' as primary in nursing literature. Drawing on our current research on endometriosis to illustrate the potential inherent in rewriting such texts, we argue for a repositioning of knowledge related to the illness experience. Privileging the voices of people who are the focus of our clinical care reflects the reality of nurses' work; the embodied experience of the person is made visible rather than marginalized in the illness discourse.

  6. Rethinking clinical language mapping approaches: discordant receptive and expressive hemispheric language dominance in epilepsy surgery candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Nicole M; Eliashiv, Dawn S; Isenberg, Anna L; Fillmore, Paul T; Kurelowech, Lacey; Quint, Patti J; Chung, Jeffrey M; Otis, Shirley M

    2011-06-01

    Neuroimaging studies have shed light on cortical language organization, with findings implicating the left and right temporal lobes in speech processing converging to a left-dominant pattern. Findings highlight the fact that the state of theoretical language knowledge is ahead of current clinical language mapping methods, motivating a rethinking of these approaches. The authors used magnetoencephalography and multiple tasks in seven candidates for resective epilepsy surgery to investigate language organization. The authors scanned 12 control subjects to investigate the time course of bilateral receptive speech processes. Laterality indices were calculated for left and right hemisphere late fields ∼150 to 400 milliseconds. The authors report that (1) in healthy adults, speech processes activated superior temporal regions bilaterally converging to a left-dominant pattern, (2) in four of six patients, this was reversed, with bilateral processing converging to a right-dominant pattern, and (3) in three of four of these patients, receptive and expressive language processes were laterally discordant. Results provide evidence that receptive and expressive language may have divergent hemispheric dominance. Right-sided receptive language dominance in epilepsy patients emphasizes the need to assess both receptive and expressive language. Findings indicate that it is critical to use multiple tasks tapping separable aspects of language function to provide sensitive and specific estimates of language localization in surgical patients.

  7. Rethinking work and family policy: the making and taking of parental leave in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, M; Litwin, A S

    2005-10-01

    Despite the continued increase in female participation rates, Australia remains one of only two developed nations in the world without a paid maternity leave scheme. While research interest and public policy debate about paid maternity leave entitlements continues, little is known about the actual utilization of the 52 weeks unpaid parental leave that is currently available to all employees. Moreover, research and policy debate on the availability and provision of paid paternity leave has only just begun. This paper argues that, given the gendered nature of employee entitlements, it is time to re-evaluate all aspects of parental leave policy in Australia. Using unique data from a national survey of Australian employees, the paper provides a statistical analysis of the use of unpaid parental leave and the availability of paid maternity leave. The paper models the availability of paid maternity leave to Australian employees as a function of demographic and organizational characteristics, including annual income, union status, and establishment size. A parallel analysis of the likelihood that an individual has used the unpaid parental leave provision is also provided. The results show that the existing unpaid parental leave provision is rarely used and that the current availability of paid maternity leave is inequitable. The paper discusses the conceptual and policy implications of these results and concludes that a re-thinking of parental leave policy in Australia is essential if gender inequities at work and in society are to be addressed.

  8. Rethinking cities in a post-carbon society. Perspectives from a prospective programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidalenc, Eric; Riviere, Antoine; Delduc, Paul; Cecutti-Etahiri, Nathalie; Theys, Jacques

    2015-03-01

    This article is inspired by an interdisciplinary research programme (Rethinking towns in the post-carbon society) and addresses two critical issues, the role of cities in this energy transition, and how cities could lead to a post-carbon society. While discussing the first issue, the authors show that cities are both victims and executioners of climate changes, but also that they possess unique levers to drive a territory towards post-carbon transition. To study the second issue, the authors relied on a scenario-based approach. Six different and contrasted trajectories have been defined to express the complexity of the urban metabolism, but also to understand, through qualitative and quantitative analysis, the potential forces in action between now and 2050. Three main stakes are then identified: the sustainability of our societies will only be reached with a combination of technical and social innovations; the modification of behaviours and lifestyles is an important component to ensure the resilience of our societies on medium and long terms; and the global coherence of transition processes must be looked for, in terms of temporalities (short, medium and long terms) as well as space scales (from the individual to the global level)

  9. RETHINKING ‘RADICALISATION’: MICRORADICALISATIONS AND RECIPROCAL RADICALISATION AS AN INTERTWINED PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Bailey

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a rethinking of ‘radicalisation’ as a process with no definite beginning or inevitable end-point. Reflecting on empirical research which engaged with radical Islamist and far-right activists and supporters, it argues that we should not focus the concept of radicalisation on the moment in which an individual or group moves from legal to illegal activity, or from non-violent to violent, as this is only one part of a longer journey. Thus, the term radicalisation should encompass any movements towards greater conflict, both commonplace and rare, small and large, driven by a potentially infinite range of motives, encompassing all political outlooks, and made by individuals, groups, societies and states. Using this conceptualisation instead allows us to examine how small conflicts escalate through ‘reciprocal radicalisation’, and how big radicalisations arise from microradicalisations. This, we argue, provides a more equitable basis for policy and practice that aims to avoid, prevent or combat the most problematic radicalisations, or otherwise resolve political conflict. To achieve this, however, also means not hyping everyday radicalisations into a threat to the existence of the nation state.

  10. Reversing functional extinction of mammals prompts a rethink of paradigms about seed fate in arid Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Charlotte H; Letnic, Mike

    2018-01-01

    Functional extinction of once abundant species has frequently preceded understanding of their ecological roles. Consequently, our understanding of ecosystems is prone to shifting baselines because it often relies on observations made on depauperate species assemblages. In Australian deserts, current paradigms are that ants are the dominant granivores, mammals are unimportant seed predators and that myrmecochory in many Australian shrubs is an adaptation to increase dispersal distance and direct seeds to favourable germination sites. Here, we ask whether these paradigms could be artefacts of mammal extinction. We take advantage of a predator-proof reserve within which locally extinct native mammals have been reintroduced to compare seed removal by ants and mammals. Using foraging trays that selectively excluded mammals and ants we show that a reintroduced mammal, the woylie ( Bettongia penicillata ) was at least as important as ants in the removal of seeds of two shrub species ( Dodonaea viscosa and Acacia ligulata ). Our results provide evidence that the dominance of ants as granivores and current understanding of the adaptive benefit of myrmecochory in arid Australia may be artefacts of the functional extinction of mammals. Our study shows how reversing functional extinction can provide the opportunity to rethink contemporary understanding of ecological processes.

  11. Beyond the East-West Dilemma: Rethinking Greekness Through Diffracted Gazes in Contemporary Greek Travelogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peggy Karpouzou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Travel writing has been viewed as one of the main sources of national typologies and is often held responsible for the consolidation of stereotypes about otherness and for the promotion of an imperialist agenda. This paper aims to investigate conceptions of Greekness in contemporary Greek travelogues which involve a rethinking of stereotypical national representations. The analysis proceeds by proposing the method of “questioning home” in travelogues through diffracted gazes towards the traveller’s homeland as a result of his encounter with otherness. In the second part, Greekness is explored beyond the nation-state approach and the long-held national stereotype of the “Greek particularism”, Greece’s isolation because of the country’s unresolved tension between East and West. A. Vistonitis’ and M. Kassolas’s travelogues reporting their travels to the East (China and to the West (USA respectively at the end of the 20th century are examined as case-studies. Through narrators’ dialogues with their hosts and the raising of relevant political and geopolitical issues, “transnational” conceptions of Greek identity are explored: the notions of “diaspora”, “cosmopolitan citizenship”, “openness” and “connectivity” challenge the national narration based on “purity” and “exclusion”, and facilitate the investigation of potential roles for Greece in the globalized world of the early 21st century.

  12. Human rights for more than one voice: rethinking political space beyond the global/local divide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Adami

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers political agency and space as found in Cavarero's For More Than One Voice: Toward a Philosophy of Vocal Expression in order to take a critical philosophical approach to human rights education (HRE and the political implications of its increasingly legal discourse. Like Arendt, Cavarero is concerned with a radical rethinking of political space, as not limited to place or legal borders, but bound by our human condition of plurality and relationality. Both Arendt and Cavarero want politics to be coupled with justice, nevertheless, Cavarero provides a notion of politics that lets us think beyond territorial terms of a polis, which opens for exploring an expanded conceptualization of human rights politics, as not bound by national legislative measures, but as concerning political action in-between human beings. In contrast to the dominant discourse on ‘human rights experts’ who frame the content for HRE, the notion of ‘absolute local space’ questions the dichotomy of universal/particular in raising the importance of a plurality of unique voices who create a spectrum for the universality of rights.

  13. A Rethinking of the Production Approach in IPCC: Its Objectiveness in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongqiang Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The trade of harvested wood products (HWPs and their feedstock increasingly affects the dynamics of the complete national HWP carbon pool ignored by the Production Approach (PA, the current universal method, proposed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Existing research also overlooks the inherent factors that lead to the non-objectiveness of PA that affects the potential carbon trade and the sustainable use of forestry resources. This study aimed to investigate such inherent factors through a deductive derivation of PA and the Stock-Change Approach (SCA, based on which an empirical study on China was conducted to rethink the objectiveness of PA in the complete national HWP carbon pool. The deductive derivation indicated that the inherent factors rely on the balance between coefficients that describe the relationship between HWP trade and production and the relationship between the corresponding feedstock trade and production. The empirical study further illustrated that the dynamics of balance between coefficients negatively influence the objectiveness of PA. The absolute objectiveness of this approach was constantly weakened in the past 55 years and may potentially occur yet again in the future despite an improvement in its annual relative objectiveness.

  14. Rethinking vulnerability analysis and governance with emphasis on a participatory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol, Nicolas; Delvenne, Pierre; Turcanu, Catrinel

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on vulnerability analysis as it emerged as a complement to classical risk analysis, and it aims at exploring its ability for nurturing risk and vulnerability governance actions. An analysis of the literature on vulnerability analysis allows us to formulate a three-fold critique: first, vulnerability analysis has been treated separately in the natural and the technological hazards fields. This separation prevents vulnerability from unleashing the full range of its potential, as it constrains appraisals into artificial categories and thus already closes down the outcomes of the analysis. Second, vulnerability analysis focused on assessment tools that are mainly quantitative, whereas qualitative appraisal is a key to assessing vulnerability in a comprehensive way and to informing policy making. Third, a systematic literature review of case studies reporting on participatory approaches to vulnerability analysis allows us to argue that participation has been important to address the above, but it remains too closed down in its approach and would benefit from embracing a more open, encompassing perspective. Therefore, we suggest rethinking vulnerability analysis as one part of a dynamic process between opening-up and closing-down strategies, in order to support a vulnerability governance framework. © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis.

  15. Forms of presentism in the history of science. Rethinking the project of historical epistemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loison, Laurent

    2016-12-01

    Since the late 1980s, presentism has seen a resurgence among some historians of science. Most of them draw a line between a good form of presentism and typical anachronism, but where the line should be drawn remains an open question. The present article aims at resolving this problem. In the first part I define the four main distinct forms of presentism at work in the history of science and the different purposes they serve. Based on this typology, the second part reconsiders what counts as anachronism, Whiggism and positivist history. This clarification is used as a basis to rethink the research program of historical epistemology in the third section. Throughout this article, I examine the conceptual core of historical epistemology more than its actual history, from Bachelard to Foucault or others. Its project should be defined - as Canguilhem suggested - as an attempt to account for both the contingency and the rationality of science. As such, historical epistemology is based on a complex fifth form of presentism, which I call critical presentism. The critical relation at stake not only works from the present to the past, because of the acknowledged rationality of science, but also from the past to the present because of the contingency and historicity of scientific knowledge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rethinking poverty, power and privilege: A feminist post-structuralist research exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thérèse Hulme

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I described how the use of feminist methodology and post-structuralist analyses of the experiences of women in a poor ‘Coloured’ community in my research led to new understandings of the experiences of poverty and privilege. I discovered the relevance of Foucault’s historical analysis of the operation of ‘pastoral power’ through the narratives of women from the Scottsville community. Historical and current accounts of so-called ‘Coloured’ women’s subjugation and categorisation are reminders of how it came about that ‘being Coloured’ became associated in South Africa with shame and with ‘knowing one’s place’. Feminist post-structuralist analyses made visible the conditions that created practices of injustice in poor women’s lives whilst, at the same time, creating conditions of privilege for me. Justice-making in Scottsville therefore started with a radical rethinking of the terms by which people’s marginalisation took place and, consequently also of the terms of ‘just’ cross-cultural engagements.

  17. Individual differences in the effects of mobile phone exposure on human sleep: rethinking the problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughran, Sarah P; McKenzie, Raymond J; Jackson, Melinda L; Howard, Mark E; Croft, Rodney J

    2012-01-01

    Mobile phone exposure-related effects on the human electroencephalogram (EEG) have been shown during both waking and sleep states, albeit with slight differences in the frequency affected. This discrepancy, combined with studies that failed to find effects, has led many to conclude that no consistent effects exist. We hypothesised that these differences might partly be due to individual variability in response, and that mobile phone emissions may in fact have large but differential effects on human brain activity. Twenty volunteers from our previous study underwent an adaptation night followed by two experimental nights in which they were randomly exposed to two conditions (Active and Sham), followed by a full-night sleep episode. The EEG spectral power was increased in the sleep spindle frequency range in the first 30 min of non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep following Active exposure. This increase was more prominent in the participants that showed an increase in the original study. These results confirm previous findings of mobile phone-like emissions affecting the EEG during non-REM sleep. Importantly, this low-level effect was also shown to be sensitive to individual variability. Furthermore, this indicates that previous negative results are not strong evidence for a lack of an effect and, given the far-reaching implications of mobile phone research, we may need to rethink the interpretation of results and the manner in which research is conducted in this field. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Rethinking the concept of intercultural conflict: Italian returnees’ attitudes towards others during a cultural conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Baiutti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to rethink the concept of intercultural conflict. Specifically, I argue that the use of the adjective “intercultural” within ‘intercultural conflict’ is usually an expression of rhetorical discourse or is not appropriate. Following a semantic analysis I show that a cultural conflict, here conceptualized as incompatibility of cultural values between a minimum of two people belonging to different cultural backgrounds, might be described as an intercultural conflict. This is possible if the interactants, rather than focussing on solutions, adopt an ‘intercultural attitude’ (comity, ethical relativism, critical self-reflection, openness toward a potential change, suspending judgment, reframing meanings, curiosity, respect, and self-decentralization between them. Existing theoretical concepts are explored through qualitative research examining supposedly interculturally competent high school students’ (after one scholastic year abroad attitudes towards others during a cultural conflict. The study shows that curiosity and respect towards others might be considered as preconditions for a true dialogue. Two main attitudes emerge from the analysis: the multicultural one and the intercultural one. The former corresponds to respect for the different ideas of others. The second is exemplified by true interaction between interactants who seek a deep understanding of what is behind the point of view held by themselves and others. Adopting an intercultural attitude, they make all possible efforts to truly encounter each other’s otherness. 

  19. Weather Effects on Crop Diseases in Eastern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradt, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Since the 1970s there are several long-term monitoring programmes for plant diseases and pests in Germany. Within the framework of a national research project, some otherwise confidential databases comprising 77 111 samples from numerous sites accross Eastern Germany could be accessed and analysed. The pest data covered leaf rust (Puccinia triticina) and powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis) in winter wheat, aphids (Aphididae, four genera) on wheat and other cereal crops, late blight (Phytophthora infestans) in potatoes, and pollen beetles (Brassicogethes aeneus) on rape. These data were complemented by daily weather observations from the German Weather Service (DWD). In a first step, Pearson correlations between weather variables and pest frequencies were calculated for seasonal time periods of different start months and durations and ordered into so-called correlograms. This revealed principal weather effects on disease spread - e. g. that wind is favourable for mildew throughout the year or that rape pollen beetles like it warm, but not during wintertime. Secondly, the pest frequency samples were found to resemble gamma distributions, and a generalised linear model was fitted to describe their parameter shift depending on end-of-winter temperatures for aphids on cereals. The method clearly shows potential for systematic pest risk assessments regarding climate change.

  20. Investor Flows to Asset Managers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Susan E. K.; Musto, David K.; Wermers, Russ

    2014-01-01

    of the financial system and the real economy, and the retirement security and protection of the investors. There is an accordingly large and growing literature on flows that has concentrated on the main retail investment pool, the open-end mutual fund, and has used flows to explore many aspects of retail financial...... decision making. We survey this literature and, where relevant, describe how open-end flows compare to other investment vehicles. We also identify opportunities both for future research and for refinement of mutual fund design, in particular as suggested by the recent rethinking of retail investment pools......Cash flows between investors and funds are both cause and effect in a complex web of economic decisions. Among the issues at stake are the prospects and fees of the funds, the efforts and risk choices by the funds' managers, the pricing and comovement of the assets they trade, the stability...

  1. New Challenges for Asset Managers in the Danish Social Housing Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugbølle, Kim; Engberg, Lars A.

    2004-01-01

    During the 1990s, the social housing sector in Denmark has undergone a number of changes. New trends are forcing asset managers to rethink their roles and strategies. In this changing context, asset managers have been confronted with strategic challenges on three topics: 1. New modes of tenants......’ involvement. 2. New partnerships with the building industry. 3. Moving towards a European internal market of construction products. The paper explores and analyses these three challenges by drawing on a number of case studies as well as a re-analysis of current research on management of renewal and building...

  2. Rethinking of the heuristic-analytic dual process theory: a comment on Wada and Nittono (2004) and the reasoning process in the Wason selection task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaci, Maurizio; Misuraca, Raffaella

    2005-08-01

    This paper raises some methodological problems in the dual process explanation provided by Wada and Nittono for their 2004 results using the Wason selection task. We maintain that the Nittono rethinking approach is weak and that it should be refined to grasp better the evidence of analytic processes.

  3. How I Attend--Not How Well Do I Attend: Rethinking Developmental Frameworks of Attention and Cognition in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burack, Jacob A.; Russo, Natalie; Kovshoff, Hannah; Palma Fernandes, Tania; Ringo, Jason; Landry, Oriane; Iarocci, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from the study of attention among persons with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing (TD) children suggests a rethinking of the notion that performance inherently reflects disability, ability, or capacity in favor of a more nuanced story that involves an emphasis on styles and biases that reflect real-world attending. We…

  4. Comment on Brent Beal's and Heather Olson Beal's "Rethinking the Market Metaphor: School Choice, the Common Good, and the National Football League"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bast, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    In their article "Rethinking the Market Metaphor: School Choice, the Common Good, and the National Football League," Brent D. Beal and Heather K. Olson Beal (this issue) promise to update some of the arguments made by Jeffrey R. Henig (1994) and add an interesting twist by proposing the National Football League (NFL) as a possible…

  5. Demythologizing the Qur’an Rethinking Revelation Through Naskh al-Qur’an

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roslan Abdul-Rahim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article posits two important claims. One is that naskh al-Qur’an is a real and actual phenomenon. Early sources from the Muslim classical era have been cited to justify this claim. The other is that, the notion and theory of naskh al-Qur’an allow for our rethinking of revelation in Islam. The theoretical discourse of Naskh al-Qur’an hinges on the basic idea and principle of the legal annulment of the law contained in or implied by a particular Qur’anic verse that has since been declared as abrogated. While the Qur’anic theory of abrogation may be about the law, in essence, it is as much about the meanings and dynamics of revelation in Islam. Various processes may be identified with the theory of naskh. Most notably are the processes of “re-revelation” and “revelatory alignment”. Re-revelation, or revelatory revision or realignment is something to be appreciated. These terms imply adaptation. Through highlighting textual instances in the Qur’an, this paper intends to demonstrate that Qur’anic revelation apparently came down not in isolation but in tandem with the interests and altering dynamics of an emerging and developing community. This idea of revelatory adaptation has far reaching consequences. At the theological level, it impacts on the current established notion of the immutability of the Qur’an. It in turn signifies the significance of naskh in determining the direction of fiqh and tafsir, and in revealing to us the theological nature of wahy. At the interpretive and more practical level, it influences the way the law may be understood and applied in Islam. Most importantly, at the philosophical level, it demythologizes the Qur’an. This paper is a preliminary attempt at reassessing the notion of wahy in Islam. It proposes a paradigm shift in the way we look at the Qur’an and the way we understand revelation in Islam.

  6. Feeding people is easy: but we have to re-think the world from first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudge, Colin

    2005-09-01

    Agriculture designed to make best use of landscape and to be maximally sustainable would also provide food of the highest nutritional and gastronomic standards, and would inevitably employ a great many people. Thus it would solve the world's food problems, and its principal social problem, at a stroke. But agriculture in practice is designed for a quite different purpose--to generate wealth, in the cause of 'economic growth'. The pressing need is not for more science and technology, but to recognise the true cause of the problems and to re-think priorities. We could all be well fed. Indeed, everyone in the world who is ever likely to be born could be fed to the highest standards of gastronomy as well as of nutrition until humanity itself comes to an end. We already have most of the necessary technique--perhaps all that is needed. We could always do with more excellent science but we need not depend, as we are often told from on high, on the next technological fix. The methods that can provide excellent food would also create a beautiful environment, with plenty of scope for other creatures, and agreeable and stable agrarian economies with satisfying jobs for all. In reality, in absolute contrast, we have created a world in which almost a billion are chronically undernourished; another billion are horribly overnourished, so that obesity and diabetes are epidemic, and rising; a billion live on less than two dollars a day; and a billion live in urban slums--a figure set to increase and probably at least to double over the next half century; while other species are disappearing so fast that biologists speak of mass extinction.

  7. Blood, donors and dollars: Rethinking financial sustainability of safe blood services in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahabi Ganka Isangula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Collection, processing and distribution of safe blood in Tanzania occurs within a free-for-service context, that is, a collection from non-remunerated blood donors and distributing freely to the needy people through health facilities. The safe blood services in the country appear to be crippled with many challenges and cannot meet the demand for blood and its products. As such, a need for rethinking collection methods, financial models and possible mechanisms for donor remuneration is evident. Methods In this paper, we venture on multi-stakeholder meetings and ongoing discussions regarding the internal mechanisms of safe blood transfusion financing. The intent is to offer a perspective on the considerations for self- sustaining safe blood services in the country and the extent to which they may be implemented or not. Results We suggest that despite huge demand, the external donor dependent financing mechanisms for safe blood services in the country are ineffective. Therefore, we discuss two potential ‘internal’ financing mechanisms that have been identified in recent shareholders forums 1 introducing a blood processing fee accompanied by policy change to allow direct charging of either recipients or hospitals or 2 influencing the introduction of ‘blood services’ within the current insurance schemes. Conclusion We conclude that there is a need for constructing alternative financial mechanisms to sustain the demand of safe blood in the country. We discuss two cost recovery mechanisms, blood processing fee and insurance schemes; however, warning is noted that their implementation warrants structural adjustments, massive community sensitization and optimum stakeholder engagement to maximize acceptability within the country.

  8. Strategic Planning, Key Tool for Brand Management in the New Advertising Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Mayorga-Escalada

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available New market conditions combined with continuous technological development in Communication, push brands to take decisions in order to ensure viability. This adaptation process makes corporations to rethink new methods of Advertising Communication. Consumers have also changed, they are well informed and discerning buyers, a fact that forces brands to build relevant relationships with their audiences letting brands to develop powerful positioning connections and create added value. These new conditions lead brands to professionalize their management practices, developing comprehensive strategic planning process to manage their brand image building through the marketing mix also called branding.

  9. Cancel and rethink in the Wason selection task: further evidence for the heuristic-analytic dual process theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Kazushige; Nittono, Hiroshi

    2004-06-01

    The reasoning process in the Wason selection task was examined by measuring card inspection times in the letter-number and drinking-age problems. 24 students were asked to solve the problems presented on a computer screen. Only the card touched with a mouse pointer was visible, and the total exposure time of each card was measured. Participants were allowed to cancel their previous selections at any time. Although rethinking was encouraged, the cards once selected were rarely cancelled (10% of the total selections). Moreover, most of the cancelled cards were reselected (89% of the total cancellations). Consistent with previous findings, inspection times were longer for selected cards than for nonselected cards. These results suggest that card selections are determined largely by initial heuristic processes and rarely reversed by subsequent analytic processes. The present study gives further support for the heuristic-analytic dual process theory.

  10. Rethinking Assessments: Creating a New Tool Using the Zone Of Proximal Development within a Cultural-Historical Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minson V.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a picture of the current theoretical positions and methods used to assess children’s development. A maturational understanding of development is seen to be predominately used to inform the assessment tools which track how children develop across the 0—5 age group. This paper proposes that with the movement towards a cultural-historical understanding of development, a tool following from this standpoint should be developed. It is envisaged that a new assessment tool will be developed from this analysis. A theoretical rationale is given to support why the Zone of Proximal Development can be used to identify the indicators of children’s actual and potential levels of development, moving away from age/level based testing. Developing an assessment tool aligned to the principles of the ZPD can offer alternative method to assess children’s development in a theoretically robust way, providing empirical evidence to rethink the methodologies of child development assessments.

  11. Rethinking the Response to Emerging Microbes: Vaccines and Therapeutics in the Ebola Era--a Conference at Harvard Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipe, David M; Whelan, Sean P

    2015-08-01

    Harvard Medical School convened a meeting of biomedical and clinical experts on 5 March 2015 on the topic of "Rethinking the Response to Emerging Microbes: Vaccines and Therapeutics in the Ebola Era," with the goals of discussing the lessons from the recent Ebola outbreak and using those lessons as a case study to aid preparations for future emerging infections. The speakers and audience discussed the special challenges in combatting an infectious agent that causes sporadic outbreaks in resource-poor countries. The meeting led to a call for improved basic medical care for all and continued support of basic discovery research to provide the foundation for preparedness for future outbreaks in addition to the targeted emergency response to outbreaks and targeted research programs against Ebola virus and other specific emerging pathogens. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Obtaining weather data for input to crop disease-warning systems: leaf wetness duration as a case study Obtenção de dados meteorológicos para sistemas de alerta fitossanitário: o caso da duração do período de molhamento foliar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L. Gleason

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Disease-warning systems are decision support tools designed to help growers determine when to apply control measures to suppress crop diseases. Weather data are nearly ubiquitous inputs to warning systems. This contribution reviews ways in which weather data are gathered for use as inputs to disease-warning systems, and the associated logistical challenges. Grower-operated weather monitoring is contrasted with obtaining data from networks of weather stations, and the advantages and disadvantages of measuring vs. estimating weather data are discussed. Special emphasis is given to leaf wetness duration (LWD, not only because LWD data are inputs to many disease-warning systems but also because accurate data are uniquely challenging to obtain. It is concluded that there is no single " best" method to acquire weather data for use in disease-warning systems; instead, local, regional, and national circumstances are likely to influence which strategy is most successful.Os sistemas de alerta fitossanitário são ferramentas de suporte à decisão desenvolvidos para ajudar os agricultures a determinar o melhor momento da aplicação das medidas de controle para combater as doenças de plantas. As variáveis meteorológicas são dados de entrada quase que obrigatórios desses sistemas. Este trabalho apresenta uma revisão sobre os meios pelos quais as variáveis meteorológicas são coletadas para serem usadas como dados de entrada em sistemas de alerta fitossanitário e sobre os desafios associados à logística de obtenção desses dados. Essa revisão compara o monitoramento meteorológico ao nível do produtor, nas propriedades agrícolas, com aquele feito ao nível de redes de estações meteorológicas, assim como discute as vantagens e desvantagens entre medir e estimar tais variáveis meteorológicas. Especial ênfase é dada à duração do período de molhamento foliar (DPM, não somente pela sua importância como dado de entrada em diversos

  13. Paradigmatic Homeostasis in the Educational Management Praxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Emiro Arrieta Pérez

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This contribution aims to unveil considerations about the management of education in the third millennium, and the requirements of revision for the paradigmatic transformational impulse of performance in the educational context. The homeostatic processes and the mimicry guarantee of permanence of paradigms in the educational management praxis, represent disturbing elements of the desired management model, delineated in the varied management fundamentals, but not fully perceived in the various spaces of Venezuelan education. It is necessary to rethink transformational strategies of managerial performance that go beyond the fundamentals for holistically conceived educational management and organization, including the transformation of the educational manager's education, whose arguments for innovation are not supported by merely Rhetoric. The theme is related to the area of Management and Educational Leadership, particularly with the need to seek the transformation of educational quality, based on a hermeneutic methodology associated with the theoretical contributions of Malinowski (2016 and Cornejo (2014. As reflective considerations, it is argued that it is necessary to direct efforts to establish transformational processes of managerial praxis towards the construction of responses required by the educational dynamics, including ongoing formation, strategic and organizational updates.

  14. Biomedical waste management: Incineration vs. environmental safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Public concerns about incinerator emissions, as well as the creation of federal regulations for medical waste incinerators, are causing many health care facilities to rethink their choices in medical waste treatment. As stated by Health Care Without Harm, non-incineration treatment technologies are a growing and developing field. Most medical waste is incinerated, a practice that is short-lived because of environmental considerations. The burning of solid and regulated medical waste generated by health care creates many problems. Medical waste incinerators emit toxic air pollutants and toxic ash residues that are the major source of dioxins in the environment. International Agency for Research on Cancer, an arm of WHO, acknowledged dioxins cancer causing potential and classified it as human carcinogen. Development of waste management policies, careful waste segregation and training programs, as well as attention to materials purchased, are essential in minimizing the environmental and health impacts of any technology.

  15. The relationship between length of fallow and crop yields in shifting cultivation: A re-thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz, Ole

    2002-01-01

    farming systems modelling, government policies, land use intensification, local forest management, slash-and-burn, swidden productivity......farming systems modelling, government policies, land use intensification, local forest management, slash-and-burn, swidden productivity...

  16. Toward re-thinking science education in terms of affective practices: reflections from the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayumova, Shakhnoza; Tippins, Deborah

    2016-09-01

    Rational and operationalized views of science and what it means for teachers and students to know and enact legitimate science practices have dominated science education research for many decades (Fusco and Barton in J Res Sci Teach 38(3):337-354, 2001. doi: 10.1002/1098-2736(200103)38:33.0.CO;2-0). Michalinos Zembylas challenges historically prevalent dichotomies of mind/body, reason/emotion, and emotion/affect, calling researchers and educators to move beyond the Cartesian dualisms, which have perpetuated a myth of scientific objectivity devoid of bias, subjectivity and emotions. Zembylas (Crit Stud Teach Learn 1(1):1-21, 2013. doi: 10.14426/cristal.v1i1.2) contends that the role of emotions and affect are best understood as relational and entangled in epistemological, cultural, and historical contexts of education, which represent contested sites of control and resistance. We argue that Zembylas' work is pivotal since "theoretical frames of reference for doing research in science education…[and] what constitutes knowledge and being within a particular frame" carry material bearings over the enactments of science teaching and learning (Kyle in J Res Sci Teach 31:695-696, 1994, p. 321. doi: 10.1002/tea.3660310703). In this paper, we hold cogen dialogue about how re-thinking notions of emotion and affect affords us, both science educators and researchers, to re-envision science education beyond cognitive and social frames. The framing of our dialogue as cogen builds on Wolff-Michael Roth and Kenneth Tobin's (At the elbows of another: learning to teach through coteaching. Peter Lang Publishing, New York, 2002) notion of cogenerative dialogue. Holding cogen is an invitation to an openly dialogic and safe area, which serves as a space for a dialogic inquiry that includes radical listening of situated knowledges and learning from similarities as well as differences of experiences (Tobin in Cult Stud Sci Educ, in review, 2015). From our situated experiences reforms

  17. Gathering "wild" food in the city: rethinking the role of foraging in urban ecosystem planning and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca J. McLain; Patrick T. Hurley; Marla R. Emery; Melissa R. Poe

    2014-01-01

    Recent "green" planning initiatives envision food production, including urban agriculture and livestock production, as desirable elements of sustainable cities. We use an integrated urban political ecology and human-plant geographies framework to explore how foraging for "wild" foods in cities, a subversive practice that challenges prevailing views...

  18. On the Need for Rethinking Current Practice that Highlights Goal Achievement Risk in an Enterprise Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aven, Eyvind; Aven, Terje

    2015-09-01

    This article addresses the issue of how performance and risk management can complement each other in order to enhance the management of an enterprise. Often, we see that risk management focuses on goal achievements and not the enterprise risk related to its activities in the value chain. The statement "no goal, no risk" is a common misconception. The main aim of the article is to present a normative model for describing the links between performance and risk, and to use this model to give recommendations on how to best structure and plan the management of an enterprise in situations involving risk and uncertainties. The model, which has several novel features, is based on the interaction between different types of risk management (enterprise risk management, task risk management, and personal risk management) and a structure where the enterprise risk management overrules both the task and personal risk management. To illustrate the model we use the metaphor of a ship, where the ship is loaded with cash-generating activities and has a direction over time determined by the overall strategic objectives. Compared to the current enterprise risk management practice, the model and related analysis are founded on a new perspective on risk, highlighting knowledge and uncertainties beyond probabilities. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  19. GMDPtoolbox: A Matlab library for designing spatial management policies. Application to the long-term collective management of an airborne disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, Marie-Josée; Aubertot, Jean-Noël; Peyrard, Nathalie; Sabbadin, Régis

    2017-01-01

    Designing management policies in ecology and agroecology is complex. Several components must be managed together while they strongly interact spatially. Decision choices must be made under uncertainty on the results of the actions and on the system dynamics. Furthermore, the objectives pursued when managing ecological systems or agroecosystems are usually long term objectives, such as biodiversity conservation or sustainable crop production. The framework of Graph-Based Markov Decision Processes (GMDP) is well adapted to the qualitative modeling of such problems of sequential decision under uncertainty. Spatial interactions are easily modeled and integrated control policies (combining several action levers) can be designed through optimization. The provided policies are adaptive, meaning that management actions are decided at each time step (for instance yearly) and the chosen actions depend on the current system state. This framework has already been successfully applied to forest management and invasive species management. However, up to now, no "easy-to-use" implementation of this framework was available. We present GMDPtoolbox, a Matlab toolbox which can be used both for the design of new management policies and for comparing policies by simulation. We provide an illustration of the use of the toolbox on a realistic crop disease management problem: the design of long term management policy of blackleg of canola using an optimal combination of three possible cultural levers. This example shows how GMDPtoolbox can be used as a tool to support expert thinking.

  20. Models for joint ophthalmology-optometry patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, John J; Kim, Christine M

    2011-07-01

    American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) and American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) presented a joint position paper in February 2000 declaring that they do not support routine comanagement of patients with the optometrists. American Optometric Association and American Academy of Optometry quickly responded in support of AAO and ASCRS. All four entities did not preclude legitimate and proper comanagement arrangements. Since that time, the pattern of practice has changed, requiring us to rethink our positions. This paper is written to provide a possible model for the ophthalmology-optometry practice management in ophthalmic surgeries including refractive surgery. Since the publication of the Joint Position Paper, the concept of comanagement has faded and a new model of integrated management has evolved. This has occurred as the changes in the employment pattern of the ophthalmic practice have incorporated optometrists into its fold. This evolution allowed ophthalmic and optometric community to co-exist and thrive to provide better patient care.

  1. Improve global competitiveness with supply-chain management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krenek, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    Over the past 10 to 15 years, petrochemical companies have aggressively cut costs due to increased international competition. Unfortunately, these conditions will remain part of the future business environment. To remain international as players, leading chemical companies must develop new methods to keep a competitive edge. One option is to use global supply-chain management. With this strategy, organizations can optimize costs in an integrated fashion along the entire manufacturing and delivery system worldwide. This is a sharp contrast to previously used compartmentalized cost cutting by departments such as transportation, manufacturing, etc. Rethinking the supply-chain management requires devising a new order on how all manufacturing process costs contribute to the total product costs. Manufacturers can no longer look at operation segments as separate puzzle pieces. They must devise a framework that integrates all functions of production and distribution to be the lowest-cost manufacturer in that market

  2. The relation between project management education and newer streams in project management research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leimbach, Timo; Goodall, Julie Bladt

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades, research in project management (PM) has experienced significant new inputs from a range of new PM methodologies and critical research streams. As a consequence, members of the more critical streams have called for the education of project managers to advance from that of trai......In the last decades, research in project management (PM) has experienced significant new inputs from a range of new PM methodologies and critical research streams. As a consequence, members of the more critical streams have called for the education of project managers to advance from...... that of training technicians, to fostering reflective practitioners that are better equipped to handle the increasing complexity of the profession. This paper is based on a recently commenced re-search project titled "Rethinking Project Management Education – the Role of Universities" that is aimed at analysing...... how the development of PM research is reflected in the education of project managers. On the basis of a short overview of the state of the art of PM education research and practices, the possible challenges for the development of PM education are discussed, and, finding that there is a lack...

  3. Costs of disarmament - Rethinking the price tag: A methodological inquiry into the costs and benefits of arms control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willett, S.

    2002-06-01

    The growing number of arms control and disarmament treaties agreed on over the past decades as well as rising concerns about harmful environmental and public health effects of weapons disposal, have understandably led to an increase in the cost of implementing arms control agreements. As a result, the expenses associated with treaty compliance have emerged as a contentious issue within the realm of arms control and disarmament discussions. In particular, opponents of arms control and disarmament point to perceived rising costs of meeting current and proposed treaty obligations in an attempt to limit and undermine such activities. Yet determining just how much arms control and disarmament cost remains very much an ambiguous task. In Costs of Disarmament - Rethinking the Price Tag: A Methodological Inquiry into the Costs and Benefits of Arms Control, Susan Willett addresses the question of how the cost of arms control ought to be measured. Emphasizing the proper allocation of costs associated with arms control treaty implementation to the life cycle costs of weapon systems and their correct weighing against the benefits they procure in terms of averted arms races and increased international security, Willett argues for a revised methodology of costing arms control and disarmament that gives a more accurate - and significantly lower - estimate of the latter. Adopting such a revised methodology concludes the author, might dispel considerable misunderstanding and help point decisions over arms control and disarmament in the right direction

  4. Addressing weight stigma in physiotherapy: Development of a theory-driven approach to (re)thinking weight-related interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setchell, J; Gard, M; Jones, L; Watson, B M

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we propose a theory-driven approach to developing interventions for reducing weight stigma in physiotherapy and discuss the design and exploratory trial of such an intervention. Weight stigma has been identified in physiotherapists in empirical investigations. However, there has been little consideration of how this stigma might be addressed. We highlight Goffman's work on stigma that provides social and embodied understandings of stigma. Goffman's approach, however, is notably apolitical, ahistorical and lacks mechanisms for understanding power. We suggest that post-structuralist perspectives can provide insight into these areas. Drawing on these theories, we critically examine the literature on weight stigma reduction, finding that trials have largely been unsuccessful. We argue that this may be due to overly passive and simplistic intervention designs. As context-specific understandings are desirable, we examine the nature of physiotherapy to determine what might be relevant to (re)thinking weight in this profession. We then discuss the development of a multifactorial, active weight stigma intervention we trialed with eight physiotherapists. Supported by theory, the outcomes of the exploratory study suggest that physiotherapy-specific factors such as fostering professional reflexivity and improving understandings of stigma need to be incorporated into an active intervention that considers the complex determinants of weight stigma.

  5. 'Men who use the Internet to seek sex with men': Rethinking sexuality in the transnational context of HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souleymanov, R; Huang, Y-T

    2016-01-01

    MISM (i.e. men who use the Internet to seek sex with men) has emerged in public health literature as a population in need of HIV prevention. In this paper, we argue for the importance of rethinking the dominant notions of the MISM category to uncover its ethnocentric and heteronormative bias. To accomplish this, we conducted a historical, epistemological and transnational analysis of social sciences and health research literature (n = 146) published on MISM between 2000 and 2014. We critically unravel the normative underpinnings of 'westernised' knowledge upon which the MISM category is based. We argue that the essentialist approach of Western scholarship can homogenise MISM by narrowly referring to behavioural aspects of sexuality, thereby rendering multiple sexualities/desires invisible. Furthermore, we argue that a Eurocentric bias, which underlies the MISM category, may hinder our awareness of the transnational dynamics of sexual minority communities, identities, histories and cultures. We propose the conceptualisation of MISM as hybrid cultural subjects that go beyond transnational and social boundaries, and generate conclusions about the future of the MISM category for HIV prevention and health promotion.

  6. Rethinking Professional Study Programs and Continuing Education in the Euro-Mediterranean Region: Action Agenda and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Moustaghfir

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available the newcompetitive and changing dynamics made knowledge resources the most strategic assets to create and sustain competitive advantage in today’s business landscape. Businesses and public organizations alike need knowledge workers to streamline their processes, differentiate their product and service offerings, and generate value for their stakeholders. The discrepancy between the demand for such distinctive profiles and the current supply of human resources is causing higher education institutions to rethink their learning practices and the process whereby knowledge resources are developed, applied, and renewed. This article analyzes these dynamics and sheds more light on the changes that are affecting the learning processes with regards to professional study programs and continuing education, particularly in the Euro-Mediterranean region. The article draws up an action agenda to make such programs more valuable emphasizing the role of innovative pedagogical approaches, the importance of instructional design, the adding-value of information technologies, and the required structural and human resource changes at the level of universities’ organizational design. Building on the participants’ input gathered during the Emuni’s 2013 HR&R Conference, the article suggests specific recommendations on how the Euro-Mediterranean universities can play a catalyst role in reshaping, leading, and implementing competitive and targeted professional study programs based on network-based structures and on mapping and leveraging different partners’ distinctive capabilities and core competences.

  7. Urban green space qualities reframed toward a public value management paradigm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian; Konijnendijk van den Bosch, Cecil C.; Kjøller, Christian Philip

    2016-01-01

    The change toward a public value management (PVM) paradigm in the public sector has challenged urban green space managers to rethink how they define and assess their services. In the Nordic countries, the challenge has resulted in the development of the Nordic Green Space Award (NSGA), as a new...... shared standard. This article reviews the NGSA scheme and its development. The development of the scheme embodies a methodology for how the question of ‘what makes for a good urban green space' collectively can be addressed within a particular regional context. The resulting scheme relies on ‘structure...... and general aspects', 'functionality and experience', and ‘management and organisation', as three principal themes and provides an easily manageable, unified and affordable approach to assessment of a variety of urban green spaces. Conceptually, the scheme resembles other comparable assessment schemes...

  8. Knowledge contained and knowledge constrained in the communication across culture: a case on Scandinavian managers in an international setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob

    on assumptions. Further, recent research has indicated that the link between cross-cultural knowledge sharing and efficiency may be more complex and cannot through deductive reasoning be taken for granted. This article argues that some theoretical rethinking of the issues is necessary and it is suggested...... that the use of social constructivist theories with regard to interaction and knowledge sharing may be the way forward. Based on the authors own empirical research involving Scandinavian managers in engaging in cross cultural communication it is shown that barriers to a positive link between cross...

  9. Note Bibliografiche: Rochon L.-P. e Rossi S. (2017: A Modern Guide to Rethinking Economics; Jo T.-H., Chester L. e D’Ippoliti C. (2017: The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics. Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Corsi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of  ROCHON L.-P., ROSSI S. (2017: A Modern Guide to Rethinking Economics; and of Jo T.-H., Chester L., D’Ippoliti C. (2017: The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics. Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism.

  10. Application of multi-criteria decision-making on strategic municipal solid waste management in Dalmatia, Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vego, Goran; Kucar-Dragicevic, Savka; Koprivanac, Natalija

    2008-01-01

    The efficiency of providing a waste management system in the coastal part of Croatia consisting of four Dalmatian counties has been modelled. Two multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) methods, PROMETHEE and GAIA, were applied to assist with the systematic analysis and evaluation of the alternatives. The analysis covered two levels; first, the potential number of waste management centres resulting from possible inter-county cooperation; and second, the relative merits of siting of waste management centres in the coastal or hinterland zone was evaluated. The problem was analysed according to several criteria; and ecological, economic, social and functional criteria sets were identified as relevant to the decision-making process. The PROMETHEE and GAIA methods were shown to be efficient tools for analysing the problem considered. Such an approach provided new insights to waste management planning at the strategic level, and gave a reason for rethinking some of the existing strategic waste management documents in Croatia

  11. Application of multi-criteria decision-making on strategic municipal solid waste management in Dalmatia, Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vego, Goran; Kucar-Dragicević, Savka; Koprivanac, Natalija

    2008-11-01

    The efficiency of providing a waste management system in the coastal part of Croatia consisting of four Dalmatian counties has been modelled. Two multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) methods, PROMETHEE and GAIA, were applied to assist with the systematic analysis and evaluation of the alternatives. The analysis covered two levels; first, the potential number of waste management centres resulting from possible inter-county cooperation; and second, the relative merits of siting of waste management centres in the coastal or hinterland zone was evaluated. The problem was analysed according to several criteria; and ecological, economic, social and functional criteria sets were identified as relevant to the decision-making process. The PROMETHEE and GAIA methods were shown to be efficient tools for analysing the problem considered. Such an approach provided new insights to waste management planning at the strategic level, and gave a reason for rethinking some of the existing strategic waste management documents in Croatia.

  12. 1 Rethinking Transformation and Its Knowledge(s): The Case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lis Lange

    'transformation' as a concept has lost its intellectual, political and moral content through becoming .... strategies to the transformation of higher education, the schools system, the judiciary, the media, etc. .... staff, students, management and leadership at universities. Finally ..... Lack of hospitality and a sense of being Other is.

  13. Analyzing Gender in Public Places: Rethinking Goffman's Vision of Everyday Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Carol Brooks

    1989-01-01

    Discusses Erving Goffman's work on public places with regard to how that work represents women's experience in public places. Reviews strategies that women devise to manage appearances in public places in order to illustrate how gender-conscious appraisal is necessary to appreciate the character of public places. (Author/LS)

  14. Rethinking 3R strategies: Digging deeper into AnimalTestInfo promotes transparency in in vivo biomedical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörendahl, Antje; Leich, Nora; Vietze, Julia; Steinfath, Matthias; Chmielewska, Justyna; Hensel, Andreas; Grune, Barbara; Schönfelder, Gilbert

    2017-01-01

    In the European Union (EU), animal welfare is seen as a matter of great importance. However, with respect to animal experimentation, European citizens feel quite uninformed. The European Directive 2010/63/EU for the protection of laboratory animals aims for greater transparency and requires that a comprehensible, nontechnical summary (NTS) of each authorised research project involving animals is published by the respective Member State. However, the NTSs remain sleeping beauties if their contents are not easily and systematically accessible. The German web-based NTS database AnimalTestInfo is a unique channel for scientists to communicate their work, and provides the opportunity for large-scale analyses of planned animal studies to inform researchers and the public. For an in-depth meta-analysis, we classified the duly completed NTSs submitted to AnimalTestInfo in 2014 and 2015 according to the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) system. Indexing the NTSs with ICD codes provided a fine-grained overview of the prospective uses of experimental animals. Using this approach, transparency, especially for highly controversial animal research involving, for example, nonhuman primates, is fostered, as it enables pinpointing the envisaged beneficiary down to the level of the addressed disease. Moreover, research areas with many planned projects involving animals can be specified in detail. The development of 3R (replacement, reduction, and refinement) measures in these research areas may be most efficient, as a large number of experimental animals would benefit from it. Indexing NTSs with ICD codes can support governments and funding agencies in advancing target-oriented funding of 3R research. Data drawn from NTSs can provide a basis for the development, validation, and implementation of directed 3R strategies as well as guidance for rethinking the role of animal research models. PMID:29240762

  15. Rethinking 3R strategies: Digging deeper into AnimalTestInfo promotes transparency in in vivo biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Bettina; Dörendahl, Antje; Leich, Nora; Vietze, Julia; Steinfath, Matthias; Chmielewska, Justyna; Hensel, Andreas; Grune, Barbara; Schönfelder, Gilbert

    2017-12-01

    In the European Union (EU), animal welfare is seen as a matter of great importance. However, with respect to animal experimentation, European citizens feel quite uninformed. The European Directive 2010/63/EU for the protection of laboratory animals aims for greater transparency and requires that a comprehensible, nontechnical summary (NTS) of each authorised research project involving animals is published by the respective Member State. However, the NTSs remain sleeping beauties if their contents are not easily and systematically accessible. The German web-based NTS database AnimalTestInfo is a unique channel for scientists to communicate their work, and provides the opportunity for large-scale analyses of planned animal studies to inform researchers and the public. For an in-depth meta-analysis, we classified the duly completed NTSs submitted to AnimalTestInfo in 2014 and 2015 according to the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) system. Indexing the NTSs with ICD codes provided a fine-grained overview of the prospective uses of experimental animals. Using this approach, transparency, especially for highly controversial animal research involving, for example, nonhuman primates, is fostered, as it enables pinpointing the envisaged beneficiary down to the level of the addressed disease. Moreover, research areas with many planned projects involving animals can be specified in detail. The development of 3R (replacement, reduction, and refinement) measures in these research areas may be most efficient, as a large number of experimental animals would benefit from it. Indexing NTSs with ICD codes can support governments and funding agencies in advancing target-oriented funding of 3R research. Data drawn from NTSs can provide a basis for the development, validation, and implementation of directed 3R strategies as well as guidance for rethinking the role of animal research models.

  16. Rethinking 3R strategies: Digging deeper into AnimalTestInfo promotes transparency in in vivo biomedical research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Bert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the European Union (EU, animal welfare is seen as a matter of great importance. However, with respect to animal experimentation, European citizens feel quite uninformed. The European Directive 2010/63/EU for the protection of laboratory animals aims for greater transparency and requires that a comprehensible, nontechnical summary (NTS of each authorised research project involving animals is published by the respective Member State. However, the NTSs remain sleeping beauties if their contents are not easily and systematically accessible. The German web-based NTS database AnimalTestInfo is a unique channel for scientists to communicate their work, and provides the opportunity for large-scale analyses of planned animal studies to inform researchers and the public. For an in-depth meta-analysis, we classified the duly completed NTSs submitted to AnimalTestInfo in 2014 and 2015 according to the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD system. Indexing the NTSs with ICD codes provided a fine-grained overview of the prospective uses of experimental animals. Using this approach, transparency, especially for highly controversial animal research involving, for example, nonhuman primates, is fostered, as it enables pinpointing the envisaged beneficiary down to the level of the addressed disease. Moreover, research areas with many planned projects involving animals can be specified in detail. The development of 3R (replacement, reduction, and refinement measures in these research areas may be most efficient, as a large number of experimental animals would benefit from it. Indexing NTSs with ICD codes can support governments and funding agencies in advancing target-oriented funding of 3R research. Data drawn from NTSs can provide a basis for the development, validation, and implementation of directed 3R strategies as well as guidance for rethinking the role of animal research models.

  17. Rethinking international education through the concept of capabilities: a bridge to development in Asia's emergent knowledge societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lien Pham

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper calls for rethinking international education towards a transformative agenda to engender international students’ self-determination, self-reflection, agency and citizenship that would enable them to make valuable personal and social change for them and their communities when they return to their homeland. It argues for a reconceptualisation of the vision of international education to include both the instrumental objectives of skills development and jobs procurement, as well as the intrinsic value of creating substantive opportunities for people to live the lives they value. It further argues that there is a need to move research from institutional perspectives of international education providers to those of international students and graduates focussing on their personal and civic commitment within their home communities. In the context of this paper, the terms "West" and "Western" generally refer to countries in the geographical regions of Europe including the United Kingdom, North America, and Australia and New Zealand in the Pacific region. The terms "Anglo-West" and "Euro-America" are also used interchangeably with the same meaning. The terms "Asia" and "Asian" generally refer to countries in the geographical regions of East and South East Asia, and South Asia. This paper has four parts. The first part sketches the current discourses on international education in the emerging knowledge societies of Asia. It critiques the parochial Anglo-Western values in international education discourses and calls for contending viewpoints that consider diversity of students' cultural and social values. The second part presents Amartya Sen's Capability Approach (CA as an alternative framework for viewing and evaluating international education. The third part discusses the operationalising aspects of the CA in the practical contexts of its philosophical status and considers the potential of its epistemological benefits. The last part concludes

  18. Soft systems thinking and social learning for adaptive management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundill, G; Cumming, G S; Biggs, D; Fabricius, C

    2012-02-01

    The success of adaptive management in conservation has been questioned and the objective-based management paradigm on which it is based has been heavily criticized. Soft systems thinking and social-learning theory expose errors in the assumption that complex systems can be dispassionately managed by objective observers and highlight the fact that conservation is a social process in which objectives are contested and learning is context dependent. We used these insights to rethink adaptive management in a way that focuses on the social processes involved in management and decision making. Our approach to adaptive management is based on the following assumptions: action toward a common goal is an emergent property of complex social relationships; the introduction of new knowledge, alternative values, and new ways of understanding the world can become a stimulating force for learning, creativity, and change; learning is contextual and is fundamentally about practice; and defining the goal to be addressed is continuous and in principle never ends. We believe five key activities are crucial to defining the goal that is to be addressed in an adaptive-management context and to determining the objectives that are desirable and feasible to the participants: situate the problem in its social and ecological context; raise awareness about alternative views of a problem and encourage enquiry and deconstruction of frames of reference; undertake collaborative actions; and reflect on learning. ©2011 Society for Conservation Biology.

  19. Rethinking the contractual context for Building Information Modelling (BIM in the Australian built environment industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilsa Kuiper

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Building Information Modelling (BIM can be defined as a process of generating and managing information of a building or infrastructure during its life cycle. Whilst the 3D visualisation or dimensional functions of BIM are not necessarily new, it is the usage and integration of this information related to project delivery, management and performance analysis that are challenging current construction industry practices.  Industry has called for the development of more collaborative and integrated contractual arrangements to facilitate the use of BIM. Such recommendations appeal to the ideal use of BIM, but also provide a potential opportunity to seek improvement within the construction industry. This paper proposes a procurement approach to BIM to establish the applicable contractual context to address the potential legal risks and commercial considerations, relative to current practices in Australia. It als ooutlines why BIM, with other enabling technologies, will drive the evolution of contract delivery methodologies.

  20. Responsibility-centered management: a 10-year nursing assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, A B; Neiman, S; Johnson, J

    2000-01-01

    In 1988-89, Indiana University became the first public university to implement responsibility-centered management (RCM) comprehensively. This article describes and assesses the implementation of RCM on the core campus of Indiana University School of Nursing in Indianapolis. It describes how RCM encouraged an information-rich environment, particularly with the advent of economic modeling; decision making linked to strategic goals/objectives; and a performance-based reward structure (e.g., merit pay increases and incentive plans). It ends with a discussion about the worth of RCM and the changes that frame-work produced, particularly in reconceptualizing the roles of the business officer and dean. The most profound consequence of RCM may be the effect it has in encouraging rethinking of what it means to be a school of nursing at this point in time.

  1. Capability challenges of facility management (FM) personnel toward sustainability agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Ahmad Ilyas Ahmad; Sarpin, Norliana; Kasim, Narimah Binti; Zainal, Rozlin Binti

    2017-10-01

    The industries business play a significant role to contribute toward economic growth in develop and developing country. However, they always face serious problems such as time overrun, waste generation, and cost overrun during their operation and maintenance. Traditional practice is found unable to control that situation. These challenges accent the need for practitioners to rethink and improve their process management. This show that industries business has major potential when applying sustainable development by focusing on three pillars (economic, environment, and social). By adopting sustainability, it can reduce energy consumption and waste, while increasing productivity, financial return and corporate standing in community. FM personnel are most suitable position to lead organizations toward sustainability implementation. However, lack of skill and capability among FM personnel to achieve sustainable goal had become barrier that need to overcome. This paper focus to identify capability challenges of FM personnel toward sustainability. A multiple researches were conducted and data were gathered through literature review from previous studies.

  2. RE-THINKING ENTREPRENEURSHIP, INTRAPRENEURSHIP, AND INNOVATION: A MULTI-CONCEPT PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Cagrı Gundogdu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to show an understanding of the vague issues on the relations among the concepts of entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship and innovation. Some of the greatest intellectual challenges of our time are emerging from the huge study of business management and organization. Through these issues; creating and applying smart ideas that form the practice of business and management, namely entrepreneurial activities, have been noticeably stepping forward for more than three decades. An updated entrepreneurial view in business and management is crucial for reaching the aim of innovation; besides, as it’s mentioned above, this perspective deserves to be scrutinized deeply in order to obtain a full understanding of the key concepts of entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship, and innovation also to provide a lean conclusion, which is mainly based on the dual and multi-relations of the related terms. The approach taken in the literature, generally construes entrepreneurship as the main concept regarding entrepreneurial thought; intrapreneurship as its sub-concept; and considers innovation as redundant to include in some of the entrepreneurial definitions; though it’s not totally been ignored. However, the new economical framework has proven that a fresh insight is required from now on, in order to explain how to survive in this rapidly changing environment.  From this perspective, the main questions of this paper are: Can the concepts of entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship and innovation be appraised in an integrative approach, contemporarily? In other words, can these concepts be united under the umbrella of a valid single term different from these? If yes, how should the new concept be discussed and what are the attributes of the new character emerging from this concept?

  3. Rethinking the Psychogenic Model of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Somatoform Disorders and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Renee J.; Chopra, Pradeep; Richardi, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Explaining the etiology of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) from the psychogenic model is exceedingly unsophisticated, because neurocognitive deficits, neuroanatomical abnormalities, and distortions in cognitive mapping are features of CRPS pathology. More importantly, many people who have developed CRPS have no history of mental illness. The psychogenic model offers comfort to physicians and mental health practitioners (MHPs) who have difficulty understanding pain maintained by newly uncovered neuro inflammatory processes. With increased education about CRPS through a biopsychosocial perspective, both physicians and MHPs can better diagnose, treat, and manage CRPS symptomatology. PMID:24223338

  4. After Marikana: Rethinking Conflict Resolution in Africa: The South African Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin John Bradshaw

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper applies the Analytical Conflict Resolution School approach to achieve a deeper understanding of South Africa’s post-apartheid era. It argues that South Africa is an example of ‘protracted social conflict,’ because it displays a fundamental communal aspect, evinces a strong ‘human needs’ element, its pre-settlement condition had resulted in strongly authoritarian government, and it displayed a dependency in its foreign relations. While South Africa transcended traditional conflict resolution methodology with its National Peace Accord and Truth and Reconciliation Commission, neither of these processes was seen through to its end and, as a result, the South African conflict resolution process remains in limbo. This is coupled with a rising internal level of strain expressed in racial tension, violence, migration and economic frustration. A way out of this current malaise is the institutionalization of conflict management through its inclusion in the school curricula, the establishment of conflict management systems to deal with lower-level conflicts, and the building of needs-satisfying institutional arrangements throughout the society, enabling government to be more sensitive to the needs of the people.

  5. Electric landscapes and new economies: values, assets, social responsibility and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Coscia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the face of impressive industrial restructuring operations - in particular the rethinking of the full economic process of energy production - involving many areas of the West (and not only an emerging issue is that the disposal of the electrical assets and the requalification of the contexts. The process of the valorisation - disciplinedly consolidated - for this sector offers suggestions of research and debate with some elements of innovation: 1 a reinterpretation of the theory of value and its classical components; 2 the synergy between architectural interventions and structural economic interventions; 3 the urgency of census, knowledge building through databases and new information flows; 4 the control management process. The contribution aims to rethink the state of the art on the subject and to reinterpret in the light of the new approaches to valorisation combined with an environmental and circular economy. They support this critical analysis, the reading of Italian national cases (from Enel's operations and international ones, where they are already generating externalities, intangibles and expected benefits as well as economic surplus.

  6. Rethinking the Relationship Between Academia and Industry: Qualitative Case Studies of MIT and Stanford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fengliang; Hawk, Soaring

    2016-10-01

    As knowledge has become more closely tied to economic development, the interrelationship between academia and industry has become stronger. The result has been the emergence of what Slaughter and Leslie call academic capitalism. Inevitably, tensions between academia and industry arise; however, universities such as MIT and Stanford with long traditions of industry interaction have been able to achieve a balance between academic and market values. This paper describes the strategies adopted by MIT and Stanford to achieve this balance. The results indicate that implicit culture is a stronger determinant of balance than are explicit rules. Finally, the author proposes a concept of balance to reconsider the relationship between academia and industry: today's universities, particularly those with strengths in engineering and management, are both symbiotic and interdependent with industry. A reasonable attitude toward the university-industry relationship is that of balance rather than strict separation. Universities can thus establish effective mechanisms to reach a balance between conflicting values.

  7. Food hygiene training in the UK: time for a radical re-think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAuslan, E

    2001-12-01

    Training food handlers in the hospitality industry has been recommended by various organisations as a means of improving food handling practices and thus the safety of food for consumers. It is nearly 20 years since the first examinations for basic level food hygiene certificates were made available to food handlers in the UK. Since then little has changed in the syllabuses and in the way the questions are worded. However, the range of languages spoken by food handlers working in the UK has increased substantially since more employers are recruiting those who speak English as a second language. Training can be an unwelcome expense for managers where there is a high turnover of employees, especially amongst those for whom English is not a first language. To improve practical implementation of food hygiene theory it is time to develop a radical strategy concerning the way training is targeted and delivered in the UK, and perhaps Europe.

  8. Heart failure services in the United Kingdom: rethinking the machine bureaucracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Nathaniel M; Wright, David J; Capewell, Simon

    2013-01-20

    Poor outcomes and poor uptake of evidence based therapies persist for patients with heart failure in the United Kingdom. We offer a strategic analysis of services, defining the context, organization and objectives of the service, before focusing on implementation and performance. Critical flaws in past service development and performance are apparent, a consequence of failed performance management, policy and political initiative. The barriers to change and potential solutions are common to many health care systems. Integration, information, financing, incentives, innovation and values: all must be challenged and improved if heart failure services are to succeed. Modern healthcare requires open adaptive systems, continually learning and improving. The system also needs controls. Performance indicators should be simple, clinically relevant, and outcome focused. Heart failure presents one of the greatest opportunities to improve symptoms and survival with existing technology. To do so, heart failure services require radical reorganization. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Interning and Investing: Rethinking Unpaid Work, Social Capital, and the “Human Capital Regime”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Hope

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available For young workers, interning is a strategy for speculating on one’s asset portfolio. Students and graduates undertake internships as a way of maintaining their self-appreciation and avoiding depreciation in a “human capital regime.” In this article, we explore the specific example of interning in the creative industries as the self-management of human capital vis-à-vis the human capital theses. Taking three cultural objects and recent representations of the issue of unpaid internships—Intern magazine, an advert for a “volunteering opportunity” student placement, and testimonies from interns—we analyze how unpaid work in the creative industries and the neoliberal version of human capital entrepreneurship can be seen as embodied by interns.

  10. Health care delivery update: Part 1. Trends: less and more integration, bundled services, rethinking IPAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwood, P M

    1988-01-01

    Vertical integration of national medical firms that contract with physicians has slowed dramatically. At the same time, several top-level group practices, taking advantage of reputations for excellence, are integrating vertically on a national or regional scale. A shift from buying well to actually managing medical care will separate the "prospective supermeds" that learned to collaborate with physicians from those that are attempting to manipulate them. In view of the budget deficit and the needs for long-term care, Congress is likely to espouse more drastic Part B cost-cutting measures such as a physician PPO or an indexed relative-value scale. An emerging feature in health care is the growing variety of prospective payment arrangements in which the price for various combination services is set in advance. To be truly competitive, medical care organizations will have to be more selective, choosing physicians because they are cooperative and economical and because they are capable practitioners.

  11. In-room ultrasound fusion combined with fully compatible 3D-printed holding arm – rethinking interventional MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friebe M

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Michael Friebe,1 Juan Sanchez,1 Sathish Balakrishnan,1 Alfredo Illanes,1 Yeshaswini Nagaraj,2 Robert Odenbach,1 Marwah Matooq,1 Gabriele Krombach,3 Michael Vogele,4 Axel Boese1 1Chair of Intelligent Catheter, Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg, Germany; 2University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North East Netherlands, Groningen, the Netherlands; 3Universitätsklinikum Giessen, Radiologische Klinik, Giessen, Germany; 4Interventional Systems GmbH, Kitzbühel, Austria Abstract: There is no real need to discuss the potential advantages – mainly the excellent soft tissue contrast, nonionizing radiation, flow, and molecular information – of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as an intraoperative diagnosis and therapy system particularly for neurological applications and oncological therapies. Difficult patient access in conventional horizontal-field superconductive magnets, very high investment and operational expenses, and the need for special nonferromagnetic therapy tools have however prevented the widespread use of MRI as imaging and guidance tool for therapy purposes. The interventional use of MRI systems follows for the last 20+ years the strategy to use standard diagnostic systems and add more or less complicated and expensive components (eg, MRI-compatible robotic systems, specially shielded in-room monitors, dedicated tools and devices made from low-susceptibility materials, etc to overcome the difficulties in the therapy process. We are proposing to rethink that approach using an in-room portable ultrasound (US system that can be safely operated till 1 m away from the opening of a 3T imaging system. The live US images can be tracked using an optical inside–out approach adding a camera to the US probe in combination with optical reference markers to allow direct fusion with the MRI images inside the MRI suite. This leads to a comfortable US-guided intervention and excellent patient

  12. Rethinking biology instruction: The application of DNR-based instruction to the learning and teaching of biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskiewicz, April Lee

    Educational studies report that secondary and college level students have developed only limited understandings of the most basic biological processes and their interrelationships from typical classroom experiences. Furthermore, students have developed undesirable reasoning schemes and beliefs that directly affect how they make sense of and account for biological phenomena. For these reasons, there exists a need to rethink instructional practices in biology. This dissertation discusses how the principles of Harel's (1998, 2001) DNR-based instruction in mathematics could be applied to the teaching and learning of biology. DNR is an acronym for the three foundational principles of the system: Duality, Necessity, and Repeated-reasoning. This study examines the application of these three principles to ecology instruction. Through clinical and teaching interviews, I developed models of students' existing ways of understanding in ecology and inferred their ways of thinking. From these models a hypothetical learning trajectory was developed for 16 college level freshmen enrolled in a 10-week ecology teaching experiment. Through cyclical, interpretive analysis I documented and analyzed the evolution of the participants' progress. The results provide empirical evidence to support the claim that the DNR principles are applicable to ecology instruction. With respect to the Duality Principle, helping students develop specific ways of understanding led to the development of model-based reasoning---a way of thinking and the cognitive objective guiding instruction. Through carefully structured problem solving tasks, the students developed a biological understanding of the relationship between matter cycling, energy flow, and cellular processes such as photosynthesis and respiration, and used this understanding to account for observable phenomena in nature. In the case of intellectual necessity, the results illuminate how problem situations can be developed for biology learners

  13. Rethinking priorities: experience of an educational initiative to change attitudes, behaviours and clinical practice in end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Annette; Barros D'Sa, Viv; Hicks, Fiona

    2017-05-08

    To implement the National End of Life Care strategy and enable more people to express and achieve their preferences about care at the end of life, senior clinicians outside palliative medicine need to make it a routine part of their practice. However, it is acknowledged that recognising that people are entering the last phase of their illness is not always straightforward, and having conversations about aims of treatment and planning for future care may not be easy. In order to begin to address these challenges, funding was sought from the Yorkshire and the Humber Strategic Health Authority (SHA), and subsequently Health Education England, Yorkshire and the Humber (HEEYH), to pilot a development programme in 2 acute trusts. 2 palliative medicine consultants shared the trainer role at each site, supporting hospital consultants from a range of specialties, with a GP to give a community perspective. The programme involved individual clinicians identifying their own learning needs and specific issues for end-of-life care in their patients. The group met together monthly in action learning sets to discuss issues in a safe yet challenging environment. Following evaluation using a combination of training needs analyses, feedback questionnaires, audits and service evaluations, it was modified slightly and repiloted in 2 further trusts as 'Rethinking Priorities'. This paper describes the programme and its outcomes, especially in relation to participants' learning, service development and leadership. It also highlights the challenges, including different learning styles, the concept of action learning, obtaining funding and dedicated time, and how to evaluate the effectiveness of a programme. Overall, it suggests that an educational initiative based on clinicians identifying their own learning needs, and using an action learning approach to explore issues with other colleagues, with the addition of some targeted sessions, can result in positive change in knowledge, behaviour

  14. Information Communication Technologies in the Management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    computer-based tools used by organization personnel in the processing of ... hardware and software, the network and several other devices, e.g audio, video, photography ... how people learn, thereby bringing about rethinking the structure of.

  15. Rethinking Heat Injury in the SOF Multipurpose Canine: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Janice L; Hollier, Paul J; Miller, Laura; Lacy, Ward A

    2012-01-01

    Heat injury is a significant concern of the Special Operations Forces Multipurpose Canine (SOF MPC). The unique athletic abilities and working environment of the SOF MPC differ from that of companion dogs or even conventional military working dogs. This should be considered in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of heat injury of the SOF MPC. A critical review of the literature on canine heat injury as it pertains to working dogs demonstrates limited scientific evidence on best practices for immediate clinical management of heat injury in SOF MPCs. A majority of management guidelines for heat injury in veterinary reference books and journals are based on review articles or professional opinion of the author vs. evidence from original research. In addition, guidelines are written primarily for companion animal populations vs. SOF MPCs and focus on measures to be undertaken in a clinical setting vs. point of injury. The phenomenon of ?circular referencing? is also prevalent in the heat injury literature. Current guidelines supported by review articles and textbooks often provide no citation or cite other review articles for clinical standards such as normal temperature ranges, treatment methods, and recurrence of heat injury. This ?circular referencing? phenomenon misrepresents anecdotal evidence and professional opinion as scientifically validated, reinforcing concepts and recommendations that are not truly supported by the evidence. Further study is needed to fully understand heat injury in SOF MPCs and how this applies to prevention, diagnosis and treatment guidelines. In order to provide SOF canine programs with best clinical advice and care, SOF Veterinarians must make clinical judgments based on evaluation of the most accurate and valid information possible. Clinical guidelines are fluid and should be reviewed regularly for relevance to the defined population in question. Clinical Guidelines should also be utilized as guiding principles in conjunction with

  16. Soil Productive Lifespans: Rethinking Soil Sustainability for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    The ability for humans to sustainably manage the natural resources on which they depend has been one of the existential challenges facing mankind since the dawn of civilisation. Given the demands from this century's unprecedented global population and the unremitting course of climatic change, that challenge has soared in intensity. Sustainability, in this context, refers to agricultural practices which meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Ensuring sustainability is arguably of greatest importance when resources, such as soil, are non-renewable. However, there is as yet no tool to evaluate how sustainable conservation strategies are in the long-term. Up to now, many pedologists have assessed sustainability in binary terms, questioning whether management is sustainable or not. In truth, one can never determine whether a practice is ultimately sustainable because of the indefinite nature implied by "future generations". We suggest that a more useful assessment of sustainability for the 21st century should avoid binary questions and instead ask: how sustainable are soils? Indeed, how many future generations can soils provide for? Although the use of modelling is by no means a novelty for the discipline, there are very few holistic models that encompass the fluxes and dynamic relationships between both mass and quality concomitantly. We therefore propose a new conceptual framework - the Soil Productive Lifespan (SPL) - that employs empirically derived residence times of both soil mass and quality, together with pathways of environmental change, to forecast the length of time a soil profile can provide the critical functions. Although mass and quality are considered synergistically, the SPL model allows one to assess whether mass or quality alone presents the greatest limiting factor in the productive lifespans of soils. As a result, more targeted conservation strategies can be designed. Ultimately

  17. The Riches of the Ocean for Humankind: Rethinking Value in Economics and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orio Giarini

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We acknowledge the inadequacy of the ancient model to develop the wealth of nations and the recognition that both economics and ecology are the best possible ways to manage world and human resources to achieve a better wealth of nations. The rebuilding of economics and of a credible strategy for increasing the wealth and well-being of nations is today at the center of the problem of providing a sound basis for the legitimacy and credibility of public institutions and governments. If the dichotomy between traditional economic goals and new ecological and environmental requirements for sustainable development will not credibly combine, the political consensus and the legitimacy of governments at the local, national, and international levels will have a tendency to produce on the new liberalizing world disaggregation effects that could be as extensive as those witnessed in former Marxist countries. The oceans are a fundamental part of this patrimony and Elisabeth Mann* should be remembered for her very important dedication on this issue.

  18. Bad, mad and sad: rethinking the human condition in childhood with special relevance to moral development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Kenneth

    2011-09-01

    Identifying the territory, between what is subject to change and what is not in human functioning, is an extremely important strategy for limiting the range in which wisdom (discretion, judgment and the management of uncertainty) must be exercised. Over the last 30 years, child and adolescent psychiatry has seen an immense shift from the 'cannot change' category to the 'change category' and an even bigger shift to the territory between changeable and unchangeable. The question of the capacity for change in humans and the more traditional notion of 'the human condition' are in need of re-evaluation. The possibility that there might be elements of the human condition that are beyond good and evil is especially relevant to the psychiatric treatment of children and young people. The notion of the human condition in children and adolescents becomes problematic if an essential element of the human condition is the irreducibly unchangeable, as the essence of youth is change and the capacity to change. The notion of personality disorder, and the persistence of disturbed behaviour that the diagnosis implies, are completely out of place in childhood and adolescence. There is a telling discrepancy between the small number of mental health treatment facilities and the large number of juvenile detention facilities in Australia. The problem is that we can achieve change, and there is little political or community will to enable it to happen. © 2011 The Author. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  19. Rethinking water corporatisation: A 'negotiation space' for public and private interests, Colombia (1910-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Furlong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available As part of neoliberal reforms to public service delivery, the corporatisation of water supply has been of increasing concern since the late 1990s. Typically, both promoters and detractors frame it within neoliberal theory: it is the next best (or worst thing to privatisation, enabling the ostensibly independent, commercial and technical management of utilities. In Colombia, however, city-owned water supply corporations are far from new. They were adopted across the country’s main cities at the beginning of the 20th century. Colombia’s century-long experience with corporatised water supply is instructive. The case reveals a model that emerged in the context of challenges common to Southern cities, rather than as a 'solution' imposed from the North, the deep inter-linkages between public and private sectors in the evolution of publicly owned corporations and thus the limited nature of utility autonomy under corporatisation. In sum, corporatisation – imagined as a technology for the 'government of government' – cannot escape the shifting social realities in which it is immersed. It therefore emerges as a technology not for the excising of government authority but for the negotiation of public and private interests in (and influence over utility services in contexts of relatively limited government autonomy from the private sector.

  20. Video gaming and sexual violence: rethinking forensic nursing in a digital age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Dave; Parkinson, Denis

    2014-01-01

    This article reports findings from a qualitative study into how forensic nurses, and male personality disordered sexual offenders, talked about "pornography" in one U.K. high-security hospital. Research rationale was rooted in current professional and political debates, adopting a discourse analytic design to situate the project in a clinical context. Semistructured interviews, as co-constructed accounts, explored talk about sexual media, offending, treatment, and risk. Data were analyzed using a version of discourse analysis popular in healthcare research, identifying discursive repertoires, or collective language use, characteristic of the institutional culture. Findings revealed that masculine discourse marginalized female nurses and contradicted therapeutic goals, where men's talk about pornography, sex, and sexual crime represented discriminatory and gendered language. Nursing definitions of pornography were constructed in the context of the client group and an organizational need to manage risk. In a highly controlled environment, with a long-stay population, priority in respondent talk was given to mainstream commercial sexual media and everyday items/images perceived to have embedded sexual meaning. However, little mention was made of contemporary modes of producing/distributing pornography, where sex and sexual violence are enacted in virtual realities of cyberspace. Failure to engage with information technology, and globally mediated sex, is discussed as a growing concern for forensic health workers.

  1. Rethinking the data model: the drillbit proof-of-concept library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebke, Johannes; Waller, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The focus of many software architectures of the LHC experiments is to deliver a well-designed Event Data Model (EDM). Changes and additions to the stored data are often expensive, requiring large amounts of CPU time, disk storage and man-power. In addition, differing needs between groups of physicists lead to a tendency for common data formats to grow in terms of contained information whilst still not managing to service all needs. We introduce a new way of thinking about the data model based on the Dremel column store architecture published by Google. We present an EDM concept based on Dremel, which has the potential to significantly reduce the storage requirement for these common formats, decrease the time needed for independent physicists to compare their results and improve the speed at which data reprocessings can feasibly take place. The Dremel low-level encoding is implemented in a proof-of-concept C++ library called Drillbit, and it is shown that using a different encoding of the current data could save as much as 20% of disk space on average across a wide number of real-world derived data sets.

  2. Re-thinking the power transmission model for sub-Saharan Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebitosi, A.B.; Okou, R.

    2010-01-01

    A vision for a United States of Africa has been advocated since the dawn of independence by, among others, pioneers like Kwame Nkrumah, Gamal Abdel Nasser and Julius Nyerere. More recently the idea gained new momentum, through such initiatives as the New Partnership for African Development (NEPAD) and the African Union (AU) to create a single market of Africa's 750 million people that is competitive within itself and within the global economy. This would be achieved through a deliberate, systematic and concerted effort to integrate, upgrade and modernize infrastructure that would offer the required catalyst for economic growth. However, the prioritization by African policy makers of a grand plan to link up the entire African continent's electric power grid networks would appear to be incompatible with 21st century thinking. The specifications for a centrally managed power grid were made by Nicola Tesla in 1883 and have served the power industry for over 125 years but are now obsolete in the era of digital micro-electronics and smart grid concepts. This paper examines some issues that surround the evolution of sub-Sahara African regional power pools and highlights the anomalies and perhaps wrong timing around the conceptualization and prioritization of grand inter-state power grids. The authors then propose an alternative model that conforms to a new and more sustainable paradigm in electricity supply economics. The proposals are however not meant to provide a panacea but it is hoped that the article will ignite a debate that will lead to a lasting solution.

  3. Rethinking Data Sharing and Human Participant Protection in Social Science Research: Applications from the Qualitative Realm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dessi Kirilova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available While data sharing is becoming increasingly common in quantitative social inquiry, qualitative data are rarely shared. One factor inhibiting data sharing is a concern about human participant protections and privacy. Protecting the confidentiality and safety of research participants is a concern for both quantitative and qualitative researchers, but it raises specific concerns within the epistemic context of qualitative research. Thus, the applicability of emerging protection models from the quantitative realm must be carefully evaluated for application to the qualitative realm. At the same time, qualitative scholars already employ a variety of strategies for human-participant protection implicitly or informally during the research process. In this practice paper, we assess available strategies for protecting human participants and how they can be deployed. We describe a spectrum of possible data management options, such as de-identification and applying access controls, including some already employed by the Qualitative Data Repository (QDR in tandem with its pilot depositors. Throughout the discussion, we consider the tension between modifying data or restricting access to them, and retaining their analytic value. We argue that developing explicit guidelines for sharing qualitative data generated through interaction with humans will allow scholars to address privacy concerns and increase the secondary use of their data.

  4. Who Benefits from Chronic Opioid Therapy? Rethinking the Question of Opioid Misuse Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Huber

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Beginning in the late 1990s, a movement began within the pain management field focused upon the underutilization of opioids, thought to be a potentially safe and effective class of pain medication. Concern for addiction and misuse were present at the start of this shift within pain medicine, and an emphasis was placed on developing reliable and valid methods and measures of identifying those at risk for opioid misuse. Since that time, the evidence for the safety and effectiveness of chronic opioid therapy (COT has not been established. Rather, the harmful, dose-dependent deleterious effects have become clearer, including addiction, increased risk of injuries, respiratory depression, opioid induced hyperalgesia, and death. Still, many individuals on low doses of opioids for long periods of time appear to have good pain control and retain social and occupational functioning. Therefore, we propose that the question, “Who is at risk of opioid misuse?” should evolve to, “Who may benefit from COT?” in light of the current evidence.

  5. Rethinking Economics, the Role of Insurance: Adam Smith Upside Down—The Central Role of Insurance in the New Post-Industrial (Service Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orio Giarini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the first page of The Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith described an apparently trivial issue, the making of a pin. In his search for ways to effectively fight poverty, he formulated the basis for a new view of economy based on the Industrial Revolution. Two centuries later, the perspective he developed remains intact and is largely outdated. It does not reflect the radical shift from an industrial to a service economy, which occurred during the later half of the 20th century and prevails today. Insurance, a very important component of the modern service economy, was and has been ignored or dismissed by past and contemporary economists. Founded on the principle of uncertainty, insurance now provides the basis for valuable insights into the unique characteristics of the service economy. A rethinking of economics is needed from this perspective.

  6. Case Studies, Ethics, Philosophy and Liberal Learning for the Management Profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rendtorff, Jacob Dahl

    2015-01-01

    Case studies can be an important methodology for ethics and philosophy in humanistic management and liberal education as well as in the social sciences because they integrate a deeper, reflective, philosophical, and ethical understanding of the organization. A case study approach based...... on philosophy of management contributes to putting into practice the Carnegie Foundation report Rethinking Undergraduate Education: Liberal Learning for the Profession. This approach is both inductive and deductive and very different from a soft Socratic approach to case studies such as the one often used...... in business schools following the Harvard method, wherein students are supposed to get knowledge through the reading of a case prepared by the teacher or from a business textbook. The aim of the case study is to analyze a concrete case and get general knowledge through the integrated analysis of the different...

  7. On Health Policy and Management (HPAM: Mind the Theory-Policy-Practice Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Chinitz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We argue that the field of Health Policy and Management (HPAM ought to confront the gap between theory, policy, and practice. Although there are perennial efforts to reform healthcare systems, the conceptual barriers are considerable and reflect the theory-policy-practice gap. We highlight four dimensions of the gap: 1 the dominance of microeconomic thinking in health policy analysis and design; 2 the lack of learning from management theory and comparative case studies; 3 the separation of HPAM from the rank and file of healthcare; and 4 the failure to expose medical students to issues of HPAM. We conclude with suggestions for rethinking the field of HPAM by embracing broader perspectives, e.g. ethics, urban health, systems analysis and cross-national analyses of healthcare systems.

  8. Integrated and ecosystemic approaches for bridging the gap between environmental management and port management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Onetti, Javier; Scherer, Marinez E G; Barragán, Juan Manuel

    2018-01-15

    The rapid exploitation of coastal and marine ecosystemic capital is on course to reach a critical point. The difficulty of implementing Integrated and ecosystem based management models, taking into the account the great complexity of the marine socio-ecological systems, has resulted in a significant gap between theory and practice. The majority of authors emphasize difficulties in engaging and convincing private stakeholders and a number of economic sectors involved in these processes. This reticence is traditionally more pronounced in the port sector, despite their important role in the transformation of coastal and marine areas. This paper seeks to establish bridges between the Environmental Management systems and Tools (EMT) of economic sectors and the Integrated and Ecosystem Based Management models (IEBM). To achieve this goal, an effort has been made to rethink concepts and principles traditionally used in EMT to bring them into line with those of IEBM. A DPSIR adapted framework is proposed and applied in a conceptual model, where the necessary elements for environmental management tools and ecosystemic models coexist. The logic of ecosystem services has been included, with special attention to the variable of human behaviour. How the proposals fit into the reality of the maritime-port sector was analysed in a transversal way, seeking Socio-Ecological Port System (SEPS) perspectives. This made it possible to move from Environmental Management Systems to an Integrated and Ecosystem Based Port Environmental Management System (PEMS-IEB). From a managerial perspective, it was also suggested that an additional DPSIR framework should be applied to the "response" component, the management system itself, understood as a system with its own elements, processes and interrelations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Re-thinking the power transmission model for sub-Saharan Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebitosi, A.B. [Center for Renewable and Sustainable Energy Studies, University of Stellenbosch, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); Okou, R. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

    2010-03-15

    A vision for a United States of Africa has been advocated since the dawn of independence by, among others, pioneers like Kwame Nkrumah, Gamal Abdel Nasser and Julius Nyerere. More recently the idea gained new momentum, through such initiatives as the New Partnership for African Development (NEPAD) and the African Union (AU) to create a single market of Africa's 750 million people that is competitive within itself and within the global economy. This would be achieved through a deliberate, systematic and concerted effort to integrate, upgrade and modernize infrastructure that would offer the required catalyst for economic growth. However, the prioritization by African policy makers of a grand plan to link up the entire African continent's electric power grid networks would appear to be incompatible with 21st century thinking. The specifications for a centrally managed power grid were made by Nicola Tesla in 1883 and have served the power industry for over 125 years but are now obsolete in the era of digital micro-electronics and smart grid concepts. This paper examines some issues that surround the evolution of sub-Sahara African regional power pools and highlights the anomalies and perhaps wrong timing around the conceptualization and prioritization of grand inter-state power grids. The authors then propose an alternative model that conforms to a new and more sustainable paradigm in electricity supply economics. The proposals are however not meant to provide a panacea but it is hoped that the article will ignite a debate that will lead to a lasting solution. (author)

  10. Implications of movement for species distribution models - Rethinking environmental data tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneel, Stijn; Gobeyn, Sacha; Verhelst, Pieterjan; Reubens, Jan; Moens, Tom; Goethals, Peter

    2018-07-01

    Movement is considered an essential process in shaping the distributions of species. Nevertheless, most species distribution models (SDMs) still focus solely on environment-species relationships to predict the occurrence of species. Furthermore, the currently used indirect estimates of movement allow to assess habitat accessibility, but do not provide an accurate description of movement. Better proxies of movement are needed to assess the dispersal potential of individual species and to gain a more practical insight in the interconnectivity of communities. Telemetry techniques are rapidly evolving and highly capable to provide explicit descriptions of movement, but their usefulness for SDMs will mainly depend on the ability of these models to deal with hitherto unconsidered ecological processes. More specifically, the integration of movement is likely to affect the environmental data requirements as the connection between environmental and biological data is crucial to provide reliable results. Mobility implies the occupancy of a continuum of space, hence an adequate representation of both geographical and environmental space is paramount to study mobile species distributions. In this context, environmental models, remote sensing techniques and animal-borne environmental sensors are discussed as potential techniques to obtain suitable environmental data. In order to provide an in-depth review of the aforementioned methods, we have chosen to use the modelling of fish distributions as a case study. The high mobility of fish and the often highly variable nature of the aquatic environment generally complicate model development, making it an adequate subject for research. Furthermore, insight into the distribution of fish is of great interest for fish stock assessments and water management worldwide, underlining its practical relevance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Agile project portfolio management, new solutions and new challenges: preliminary findings from a case study of an agile organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kristian; Svejvig, Per

    project management framework including two complementary perspectives. One perspective, denoted as classical project management (CPM), highlights key characteristics of traditional PPM practices. A second perspective, denoted as rethinking project management (RPM), highlights characteristics...... of progressive PPM practices. We investigate a large Danish company by applying the research question: “How does agile PPM manifests itself in a real organization and what are the observed pros and cons?” Surprisingly, when summa-rizing our results, we find some traits of concepts from the CPM perspective...... that are manifested in strict control of projects and programs. Furthermore, we find the traits of the RPM perspective more dominating than the CPM perspective, and these traits are mostly found to have desirable effects. CPM traits seem to improve the organi-zation’s ability to cope with uncertainty, a so...

  12. Sustainability in the Food Sector: Rethinking the Relationship between the Agro‐Food System and the Natural, Social, Economic and Institutional Environments - Selected papers, 119th Seminar of the EAAE ‐

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Cicia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability in the Food Sector: Rethinking the Relationship between the Agro‐Food System and the Natural, Social, Economic and Institutional EnvironmentsSpecial issue with a selection of papers presented at the 119th Seminar of the European Association for Agricultural Economics (EAAE, Capri, Italy, June 30 - July 2, 2010Editors of the special issue:Gianni Cicia, University of Naples, ItalyMelanie Fritz, University of Bonn, Germany 

  13. RETHINKING DEMOCRACY (reflections on John Dunn’s “Breaking democracy’s spell”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Kanevskiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes a book “Breaking democracy’s spell”, the last work by John Dunn, world famous political scientist from Cambridge. Current discourse on democracy and tendencies of its development is seen through the lens of this book and John Dunn’s political thought. It is hard to question the fact that democracy is still one of the mightiest political symbols, although its core meaning still poses a lot of questions. Democracy is an unstable variable, which changes through time being influenced by multiple factors. This is why, before trying to understand where democracy’s mimicries are leading us, Dunn proposes to look closer at how it became a category which is so essential for legitimizing contemporary regimes. Is our understanding of democracy the same as it was 100, 50 or even 20 years ago? What determines the dynamics of democracy as a symbol of public power? Does democracy help nations in their quest for well being and effective government? Dunn’s work is not just an original analyses of democracy in political, sociological and historical perspectives, it is also a challenge to provoke a discussion on democracies failures both in developed and developing world. Dunn’s work divided scientific community on those who saw warning signs to democracy and those who considered author to be unjustified pessimist. In reality, Dunn’s work doesn’t give simple explanations because in relatively small text he managed to put complex set of questions, which can’t answered unequivocally. Author himself recognizes that he had to use absolutely new style to convey his thoughts. This article is an attempt to interpret Dunn’s ideas and react to his call to start a discussion on contents and perceptions of democracy which he sent to a political science community. This discourse is particularly important today for Russia where democracy not only encounters institutional difficulties and misunderstood by majority of the citizens

  14. Human Resource Management in Sports: A Critical Review of its Importance and Pertaining Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weerakoon Ranjan Kumara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper will illustrate the meaning and importance of human resource management (HRM, human resource planning, and strategic human resource management, which are critically important for an organization’s effectiveness and must be effectively managed (Doherty, 1998. This study used the literature review method to acquire its final results. The relevant HRM literature review was done according to the purpose of the study. It used the purposive random sample method for selecting relevant literature. This study shows the current economic environment in the sports industry; the second part of the study critically analyzes the value of the strategic management of employees for the effective and efficient operation of sports organizations. It also critically evaluates human resource planning and other pertinent issues in terms of legislation, recruitment, selection, training, induction, and reward management from different international examples in sports management. Over the past few decades, increasing competition, globalization, and continuous changes in the market and in technology have emphasized the need to rethink the management of the organization and of human resources for the sake of overcoming significant challenges (Taylor et al., 2006. Therefore, managers should use strategic human resource management to overcome significant issues and to form well-planned strategies so that the organization may succeed.

  15. Marketing and strategic management: integrating skills for a better hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, S S

    1987-05-01

    Participants in a 1985 one-day seminar sponsored by the American Hospital Association's Society for Hospital Planning and Marketing were asked two questions: How many of the hospitals represented here have conducted marketing surveys in the recent past? How many of you were satisfied with the results of the survey or could integrate it into the strategic management of your institution? While all but two of the 125 participants answered yes to the first question, only two responded affirmatively to the second. A gap between having a survey done and implementing the results had been identified. The administrators had probably rushed into "marketing" with little forethought and even less effort to comprehend how this management skill fits into existing institutional skills, capabilities, roles, and goals. To close the gap between marketing theory and practice an institution must adopt a more far-reaching, proactive stance toward integrating marketing into the management routine at an early stage. This article presents a case study that may help health care administrators rethink the role of marketing in management and its place in the sequence of strategic decision making for their institution.

  16. Evaluation of Enviromental Management Planing for a Biodiesel Production Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Mar Maldonado Romero

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Manuelita Oils SA is a company dedicated to the cultivation of palm, production and marketing of biodiesel, the company currently processes the fruit of their own crops. Currently Manuelita Oils SA is a growing company. Because the incursion of a new production line with a new product was necessary to does an environmental management design, in 2008, this was adapted to the needs of the company at the time and in the projections that were available, today, things have changed and what had been estimated at that time is no longer applicable to current realities, requiring an assessment of the current document and the rethinking of the same, with special emphasis in the management of waste generated and the impacts of the activity. As a field of action for the development of the project is intended to cover industrial waste type, which are generated in the normal course of business activities. Through a combination of methodologies that integrate the community with the use of better technologies achieved the management of waste and industrial byproducts that are generated by assessing and complementing the existing an environmental management design, raising new longterm options for handling waste and industrial products company and not only achieving adequate facilities for handling, temporary storage and processing data but also greater community awareness about environmental protection and the contribution that each makes daily from each of their activities.

  17. NEW PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POP Zenovia Cristiana

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available For developing economies the development of enterprises should be a strategic goal, this way of thinking may become viable only as a result of a combination of judicious analysis based on specific local economic aspects and a set of actions to correct any slippage or amplify existing development trends taken by the managers. A better leadership would unequivocally lead to a better strategy but sometimes the lack of information, first about the external environment, continuously undergoing quick and radical changes, the political problems and the complexity of the implementation of the strategy or the costs that it implies are not taken into consideration. Therefore managers have two options: to establish strategies, which would lead to the achievement of the objectives; evaluate them on the basis of economic efficiency or to identify an already existent strategy and to adapt it to the environment changes in which the enterprise carries on its activity. This paper aims at discussing and explaining from a theoretical perspective, the evolution and the advantages and disadvantages of the strategic management process, in order to convey the managers a modality to achieve competitiveness and evaluate the position of the firm. In the first section, we explain the the necessity of strategic management process. In the second section we present the different evolution stages. The third section presents our conclusions regarding the advantages and disadvantages of the strategic management process, fundamental for the strategy success. The financial crisis did affect the Romanian economy and Romanian enterprises early in 2009 registering an impact of the crisis identified in the need of the managers to rethink their strategies, to improve their management skills and perspectives on the role of the employees after the crisis. In this paper we try to underline the evolution stages of the strategic management process with its own characteristics by which both

  18. Anger Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... expect from anger management education or counseling. Anger management classes or counseling Anger management classes or counseling ... or last for weeks or months. Beginning anger management When you start working on anger management, identify ...

  19. Where the waters meet: sharing ideas and experiences between inland and marine realms to promote sustainable fisheries management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Steven J.; Arlinghaus, Robert; Bartley, Devin M.; Beard, T. Douglas; Cowx, Ian G.; Essington, Timothy E.; Jensen, Olaf P.; Lynch, Abigail J.; Taylor, William W.; Watson, Reg

    2014-01-01

    Although inland and marine environments, their fisheries, fishery managers, and the realm-specific management approaches are often different, there are a surprising number of similarities that frequently go unrecognized. We contend that there is much to be gained by greater cross-fertilization and exchange of ideas and strategies between realms and the people who manage them. The purpose of this paper is to provide examples of the potential or demonstrated benefits of working across aquatic boundaries for enhanced sustainable management of the world’s fisheries resources. Examples include the need to (1) engage in habitat management and protection as the foundation for fisheries, (2) rethink institutional arrangements and management for open-access fisheries systems, (3) establish “reference points” and harvest control rules, (4) engage in integrated management approaches, (5) reap conservation benefits from the link to fish as food, and (6) reframe conservation and management of fish to better engage the public and industry. Cross-fertilization and knowledge transfer between realms could be realized using environment-independent curricula and symposia, joint scientific advisory councils for management, integrated development projects, and cross-realm policy dialogue. Given the interdependence of marine and inland fisheries, promoting discussion between the realms has the potential to promote meaningful advances in managing global fisheries.

  20. Rethink, Rework, Recycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrhen, Linda; DiSpezio, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Information about the recycling and reuse of plastics, aluminum, steel, glass, and newspapers is presented. The phases of recycling are described. An activity that allows students to separate recyclable materials is included. The objectives, a list of needed materials, and procedure are provided. (KR)

  1. Rethinking Classroom Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Emily Dolci; Kaufman, Trent; Doty, Dave

    2014-01-01

    If your professional learning seems stalled, maybe you could put yourself and your colleagues in the driver's seat of professional development. The authors describe a professional learning approach that gives teachers both a say in what they focus their learning on and a chance to practice and refine teaching strategies that they hope to…

  2. Rethinking humanitarian space

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Sana

    2016-01-01

    This study looks at the humanitarian space in Myanmar which includes not just the humanitarian operations in the country, the access to volatile zones by the humanitarian organisations, the humanitarian principles, but also a space which permits a complementary arrangement of diverse actors holding different positions and skill sets and deliver to those in need. The study is based on the practical experiences and reflections of these different actors on field and their operations in different...

  3. Rethinking National Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    III. ’Proliferation in the 1990m.’ tratomic Rhvii . 17 (Summer 1969): 9-20. 30 McGowan. Pat, and Charles W. Ke.le.. ZuLfMl. weaLpon. mi Foreig L Y...Vayrynen. ads. Militarization #1nd Production . New York: St. Martin’s, 1983. (HC 79 .D4 M54 1983) Twight, Charlotte. *Political Economy of the National

  4. Rethinking Defensive Information Warfare

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    French, Geoffrey S

    2004-01-01

    .... This paper examines defensive tactics and strategies from the German defense in depth that emerged from World War I to the American Active Defense that developed in the Cold War and proposes a new mindset for DIW that draws on these operational concepts from military history.

  5. Room for a rethink?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, S. [Independent Editorial and Technical Services, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2000-05-01

    Room-and-pillar has traditionally satisfied the need for a low-cost, flexible coal mining system. Its downside can be low resource recovery. With accessible reserves falling steadily, can mining companies afford to accept this? Simon Walker looks into this problem using evidence presented recently on the US experience by Richard Bonskorski of the US Energy Information Administration, Dr Michael Karmis of Virgina Tech, Roger O'Quinn from Eimco, an equipment manufacturer, and Larry Howe from J H Fletcher. An urgent need is identified to develop new systems to allow significant gains in extraction, using novel concepts such as remote mining. 2 refs., 1 fig., 4 photos.

  6. RETHINKING THE EMOTIONAL BRAIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeDoux, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    I propose a re-conceptualization of key phenomena important in the study of emotion — those phenomena that reflect functions and circuits related to survival, and that are shared by humans and other animals. The approach shifts the focus from questions about whether emotions that humans consciously feel are also present in other animals, and towards questions about the extent to which circuits and corresponding functions that are present in other animals (survival circuits and functions) are also present in humans. Survival circuit functions are not causally related to emotional feelings, but obviously contribute to these, at least indirectly. The survival circuit concept integrates ideas about emotion, motivation, reinforcement, and arousal in the effort to understand how organisms survive and thrive by detecting and responding to challenges and opportunities in daily life. PMID:22365542

  7. Rethinking covert stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Christopher Dominick; Manning, Walter H; Nordstrom, Susan Naomi

    2017-09-01

    The experience of passing as fluent, also called covert stuttering, has been uncritically framed as an inherently negative pursuit. Historically passing has been understood as a repression of one's true, authentic self in response to either psychological distress or social discrimination. The authors of this paper seek a more nuanced understanding of passing. We ask, how must a person relate to herself in order to pass as fluent? This is a qualitative research study in which the authors utilized the ethical theories of philosopher Michel Foucault to contextualize data obtained from semi-structured interviews with nine participants who pass as fluent. Rather than a repression of an authentic self our data suggests passing is more usefully understood as a form of resistance by people who stutter to a hostile society. Participants learned from experiences of delegitimization that their stuttering had ethical ramifications. Consequently, they used a variety of self-forming practices to pass and thereby achieve the privileges that come with perceived able-bodiedness. Passing as fluent is not an inauthentic form of stuttering but a form of stuttering that is produced through the use of specific technologies of communication. These technologies of communication are constituted by the unique ethical relationship of the person who stutters with herself. Passing can be understood as an active form of resistance rather than a passive form of repression. By theorizing passing as fluent as an ethical relationship, we open up the possibility of changing the relationship and performing it differently. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rethinking the NPT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilat, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    The Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), with over 160 parties, is the most widely adhered to arms control treaty in history, but it has been criticized throughout its existence. In 1995, it is confronting a fateful decision on its extension and its application to today's world. In many ways it it unfortunate that fundamental questions about the treaty and its role in the post-Cold War world are not being addressed. The environment in which the NPT emerged and flourished has changed fundamentally, including the collapse of one of the founding members, the USSR. Iraq, Iran, and North Korea weapon development programs have raised important questions about its effectiveness. Also, the NPT, with its discrimination between nuclear weapon states (NWSs) and nonnuclear weapon states (NNWSs), is now being questioned and alternatives such as a revival of the Baruch Plan are being put forward, moreover, the NPT has not been the chosen international policy path for dealing with chemical and biological weapons. The paper outlines the history of international policy on nuclear weapons and their proliferation from the 1940's to today. If the NPT does survive in 1995, can it be strengthened? The full range of issues on NPTs extension will be debated endlessly, but vigilance is necessary, the treaty will have to be tended over time or it will wither and die

  9. Rethinking enhancement in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Andy

    2006-12-01

    This article explores the arguments surrounding the use of human enhancement technologies in sport, arguing for a reconceptualization of the doping debate. First, it develops an overview and critique of the legislative structures on enhancement. Subsequently, a conceptual framework for understanding the role of technological effects in sport is advanced. Finally, two case studies (hypoxic chambers and gene transfer) receive specific attention, through which it is argued that human enhancement technologies can enrich the practice of elite sports rather than diminish them. In conclusion, it is argued that elite sports are at a pivotal moment in their history as an increasing range of enhancements makes less relevant the protection of the natural human through anti-doping.

  10. Rethinking Humane Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsthemke, Kai

    2009-01-01

    The increase in violence in South African schools, as elsewhere, has been associated with a general "decline in moral values". There have been three different responses that emphasise the decline in religious teaching at schools, the loss of traditional values like "ubuntu," communalism and the like; and humankind's increasing…

  11. Rethinking expansive learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte; Lundh Snis, Ulrika

    Abstract: This paper analyses an online community of master’s students taking a course in ICT and organisational learning. The students initiated and facilitated an educational design for organisational learning called Proactive Review in the organisation where they are employed. By using an online...... discussion forum on Google groups, they created new ways of reflecting and learning. We used netnography to select qualitative postings from the online community and expansive learning concepts for data analysis. The findings show how students changed practices of organisational learning...

  12. Rethinking medical humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapperino, Luca; Boniolo, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    This paper questions different conceptions of Medical Humanities in order to provide a clearer understanding of what they are and why they matter. Building upon former attempts, we defend a conception of Medical Humanities as a humanistic problem-based approach to medicine aiming at influencing its nature and practice. In particular, we discuss three main conceptual issues regarding the overall nature of this discipline: (i) a problem-driven approach to Medical Humanities; (ii) the need for an integration of Medical Humanities into medicine; (iii) the methodological requirements that could render Medical Humanities an effective framework for medical decision-making.

  13. Rethink Your Drink!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-08-11

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about the importance of drinking a lot of water.  Created: 8/11/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/11/2016.

  14. Rethinking Development Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph E. Stiglitz

    2011-01-01

    "Twelve years ago, when I was chief economist of the World Bank, I suggested that the major challenge to development economics was learning the lessons of the previous several decades: a small group of countries, mostly in Asia, but a few in other regions, had had phenomenal success, beyond anything that had been anticipated by economists; while many other countries had experienced slow growth, or even worse, stagnation and decline—inconsistent with the standard models in economics which pred...

  15. Rethinking Adoptee Justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anders Riel

    2012-01-01

    Hvilken økonomisk rolle spillede international adoption i den koreanske udviklingspolitik? Denne artikel kæder international adoption sammen med koreansk økonomisk udviklingspolitik i 70'erne og 80'erne....

  16. Radically Rethinking Marriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J. Barker

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of the Onati Socio-Legal Series offers inter-disciplinary, feminist perspectives that collectively ‘re-think’ the institution of marriage, not only in the field of legal discourse and institutions but also in the humanities and social sciences as well as through activisms. With a focus on jurisdictions in Europe, North America and Africa, the articles included in this issue challenge normative assumptions about marriage, reconsider forms of conjugality, re-write judicial interpretations and problematize legal and activist interventions and reasonings.Este número especial de la Oñati Socio-legal Series ofrece perspectivas interdisciplinarias y feministas que "re-piensan" colectivamente la institución del matrimonio, no sólo en el campo del discurso jurídico y las instituciones, sino también en las humanidades y ciencias sociales, así como en los activismos. Enfocándose en las jurisdicciones de Europa, América del Norte y África, los artículos incluidos en este número cuestionan las asunciones normativas sobre el matrimonio, reconsideran las formas de la conyugalidad, reescriben las interpretaciones judiciales y problematizan las intervenciones y razonamientos legales y activistas.DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2890956

  17. Rethinking the Beijing Consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    for a long time overshadowed the increasing dependence on the US market, putting China in a dilemma now in both development and diplomatic strategies. Third, centralised decision-making may be faster than democratic processes, but it may also go against the principle of ‘scientific decision’ as proposed...... by the Chinese leadership. A prominent feature of China's responses to the crisis is a bias towards state-owned enterprises and the public sector, which exacerbates the existing problems of monopoly, over-capacity, inequality, the regulators being ‘captured’ by industrial interests and protectionism. Given...... limited economic resources, domestic political contentions and the questionable credibility of the China Model, it would be difficult for China to practice ‘responsible great power’ diplomacy or assume leadership in the region or globally....

  18. Rethinking Journalism Again

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . But does rehashing such familiar rationales bring journalism studies forward? Does it contribute to ongoing discussions surrounding journalism’s viability going forth? For all their seeming self-evidence, this book considers what bearing these old platitudes have in the new digital era. It asks whether......It’s easy to make a rhetorical case for the value of journalism. Because, it is a necessary precondition for democracy; it speaks to the people and for the people; it informs citizens and enables them to make rational decisions; it functions as their watchdog on government and other powers that be...... such hopeful talk really reflects the concrete roles journalism now performs for people in their everyday lives. In essence, it poses questions that strike at the core of the idea of journalism itself. Is there a singular journalism that has one well-defined role in society? Is its public mandate as strong...

  19. Rethinking voluntary euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyles, Byron J; Costreie, Sorin

    2013-12-01

    Our goal in this article is to explicate the way, and the extent to which, euthanasia can be voluntary from both the perspective of the patient and the perspective of the health care providers involved in the patient's care. More significantly, we aim to challenge the way in which those engaged in ongoing philosophical debates regarding the morality of euthanasia draw distinctions between voluntary, involuntary, and nonvoluntary euthanasia on the grounds that drawing the distinctions in the traditional manner (1) fails to reflect what is important from the patient's perspective and (2) fails to reflect the significance of health care providers' interests, including their autonomy and integrity.

  20. Rethinking historical trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmayer, Laurence J; Gone, Joseph P; Moses, Joshua

    2014-06-01

    Recent years have seen the rise of historical trauma as a construct to describe the impact of colonization, cultural suppression, and historical oppression of Indigenous peoples in North America (e.g., Native Americans in the United States, Aboriginal peoples in Canada). The discourses of psychiatry and psychology contribute to the conflation of disparate forms of violence by emphasizing presumptively universal aspects of trauma response. Many proponents of this construct have made explicit analogies to the Holocaust as a way to understand the transgenerational effects of genocide. However, the social, cultural, and psychological contexts of the Holocaust and of post-colonial Indigenous "survivance" differ in many striking ways. Indeed, the comparison suggests that the persistent suffering of Indigenous peoples in the Americas reflects not so much past trauma as ongoing structural violence. The comparative study of genocide and other forms of massive, organized violence can do much to illuminate both common mechanisms and distinctive features, and trace the looping effects from political processes to individual experience and back again. The ethics and pragmatics of individual and collective healing, restitution, resilience, and recovery can be understood in terms of the self-vindicating loops between politics, structural violence, public discourse, and embodied experience. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. Rethinking daylighting and compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Mardaljevic

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Daylight in buildings is the natural illumination experienced by the occupants of any man-made construction with openings to the outside. Our attempts to formulate some measure of daylight provision in buildings can be traced back over a century, and the daylight factor as we know it today is over 50 years old. Still the most common measure found in guidelines and recommendations worldwide, the daylight factor is used routinely and, it is fair to say, often rather uncritically. The consideration of daylight in buildings has received a new impetus from the accumulation of evidence on the wider benefits of daylight exposure. But it is continuing to prove difficult to advance beyond daylight factors towards a more realistic quantification of daylighting performance that would allow us to accommodate these new considerations in an evaluative schema. This paper examines the basis of current practice with respect to daylight evaluation, and suggests a few ways in which it can be improved with relatively modest additional effort. The paper also critiques some of the recent attempts to advance daylight evaluation by incremental means using so-called “clear sky options”.

  2. Rethinking Impulsivity in Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonsky, E. David; May, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Elevated impulsivity is thought to facilitate the transition from suicidal thoughts to suicidal behavior. Therefore, impulsivity should distinguish those who have attempted suicide (attempters) from those who have only considered suicide (ideators-only). This hypothesis was examined in three large nonclinical samples: (1) 2,011 military recruits,…

  3. Rethinking School Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, Donald, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    School health and nutrition programs can contribute to achieving the goals of the Education for All initiative (EFA) by helping children enroll on time, complete their education, and realize their cognitive potential. Achieving these goals depends on reaching the children most in need. One strong feature of school health and nutrition programs is…

  4. Rethinking Laboratory Notebooks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted; Zander, Pär-Ola

    2010-01-01

    We take digitalization of laboratory work practice as a challenging design domain to explore. There are obvious drawbacks with the use of paper instead of ICT in the collaborative writing that takes place in laboratory notebooks; yet paper persist in being the most common solution. The ultimate aim...... with our study is to produce design relevant knowledge that can envisage an ICT solution that keeps as many advantages of paper as possible, but with the strength of electronic laboratory notebooks as well. Rather than assuming that users are technophobic and unable to appropriate state of the art software...

  5. Rethinking Colour Constancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logvinenko, Alexander D; Funt, Brian; Mirzaei, Hamidreza; Tokunaga, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    Colour constancy needs to be reconsidered in light of the limits imposed by metamer mismatching. Metamer mismatching refers to the fact that two objects reflecting metameric light under one illumination may reflect non-metameric light under a second; so two objects appearing as having the same colour under one illuminant can appear as having different colours under a second. Yet since Helmholtz, object colour has generally been believed to remain relatively constant. The deviations from colour constancy registered in experiments are usually thought to be small enough that they do not contradict the notion of colour constancy. However, it is important to determine how the deviations from colour constancy relate to the limits metamer mismatching imposes on constancy. Hence, we calculated metamer mismatching's effect for the 20 Munsell papers and 8 pairs of illuminants employed in the colour constancy study by Logvinenko and Tokunaga and found it to be so extensive that the two notions-metamer mismatching and colour constancy-must be mutually exclusive. In particular, the notion of colour constancy leads to some paradoxical phenomena such as the possibility of 20 objects having the same colour under chromatic light dispersing into a hue circle of colours under neutral light. Thus, colour constancy refers to a phenomenon, which because of metamer mismatching, simply cannot exist. Moreover, it obscures the really important visual phenomenon; namely, the alteration of object colours induced by illumination change. We show that colour is not an independent, intrinsic attribute of an object, but rather an attribute of an object/light pair, and then define a concept of material colour in terms of equivalence classes of such object/light pairs. We suggest that studying the shift in material colour under a change in illuminant will be more fruitful than pursuing colour constancy's false premise that colour is an intrinsic attribute of an object.

  6. Rethinking retailer buying behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars

    2001-01-01

    Research of retailer buying behaviour has previously focused on the buying decision. In this paper a new approach to studying retailer buying behaviour is suggested, one which focuses on the sensemaking processes leading up to a decision being made. A research project taking a sensemaking...... perspective is outlined and the implications and expected contribution of studying retailer buying behaviour from a sensemaking perspective are discussed....

  7. Rethinking Permissioned Blockchains

    OpenAIRE

    Vukolic, Marko

    2017-01-01

    Current blockchain platforms, especially the recent permissioned systems, have architectural limitations: smart contracts run sequentially, all node executes all smart contracts, consensus protocols are hard-coded, the trust model is static and not exible, and non-determinism in smart-contract execution poses serious problems. Overcoming these limitations is critical for improving both functional properties of blockchains, such as con dentiality and consistency, as well as their non-functiona...

  8. Reflexive Dressing: Rethinking Retro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella North

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article undertakes a philosophical exploration of the act we know, or think we know, as ‘dressing’. Inhabiting, in thought, the moment in which we dress, I examine some of its constituent mechanisms, attending to the impulses by which dressing is generated out of subjective experience.  When those impulses are temporally marked, as they are in the case of retro dress, this generation is a two-pronged process, in which the holding of the body in time, and the holding of time in the body, recalibrate one another. The process of ‘dressing,’ in this understanding, has a reflexivity which is double; it entails the turning of the body, with dress as medium, towards itself, and the turning of present experience towards some felt notion of the past. Reflexively dressing, we are always becoming ourselves, and becoming other than ourselves, at once; a movement of circuitous internalisation and externalisation by which the ambiguation inherent in material experience is realised.

  9. Rethinking Culture and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambach, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The author reviews three books that provide complementary and thought-provoking insights. The three books under review are: (1) "Reproducing class: education, neoliberalism, and the rise of the new middle class in Istanbul," by Henry J. Rutz and Erol M. Balkan; (2) "Technology, culture, family: influences on home life," by…

  10. [Rethink the panic disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amami, O; Aloulou, J; Siala, M; Aribi, L

    2010-04-01

    We propose some reflexions on the validity of the conceptualization of panic disorder, its nosographical place, and its clinical homogeneity, through the study of the frequency of some of its psychiatric comorbidities. To define a panic attack, DSM IV requires a number of symptoms which vary from four to 13. However, some patients suffer from panic attacks with less than four symptoms (paucisymptomatic attacks) and which fill the other criteria of panic disorder. These patients would have a biological vulnerability, familial antecedents, and a treatment response which are similar to those that fill the criteria of the panic attack according to the DSM. Some authors differentiate the panic disorder in several sub-groups, such as the panic disorder with cardiorespiratory symptoms, or vestibular symptoms, or cognitive symptoms. This division of the panic disorder in several sub-groups would have an interest in the knowledge of the etiopathogeny, the attacks' frequency, the disorder severity and the treatment response. Panic disorder with prevalent somatic expression includes crises without cognitive symptoms. This sub-type can be common in the medical context, especially in cardiology, but it is often ignored, at the price of loss of socio-professional adaptability, and a medical overconsumption. The relationship between panic disorder and agoraphobia appears to be the subject of controversies. According to the behavioral theory, phobic disorder is the primum movens of the sequence of appearance of the disorders. American psychiatry considers agoraphobia as a secondary response to the panic disorder, and pleads for a central role of panic attacks as an etiopathogenic factor in the development of agoraphobia. The distinction between panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder can be difficult. This is due to the existence of paucisymptomatic panic attacks. Their paroxystic nature is difficult to distinguish from the fluctuations of the generalized anxiety disorder. This frequent comorbidity could be also due to the community of certain symptoms of each disorder. These observations increase the validity of the anxiety generalized disorder as an autonomous morbid entity, rather than corresponding to a residual syndrome of the panic disorder, and could be an argument of an implicit return to the Freudian concept of the anxiety neurosis. The frequent comorbidity of panic disorder and personality disorders suggests the existence of a link. The pathological personality can be a factor of vulnerability in the panic disorder, as it can be a consequence of the panic disorder through the personality changing related on the evolution of the disorder and its complications. The relationship between panic disorder and depression has been interpreted in various ways, with mainly three assumptions: the unit position, which considers anxiety and depression as concerning a common diathesis; the dualistic position, which suggests that anxiety and depression are heterogeneous diagnostic categories and the anxio-depressive position that considers anxiety and depression combined as a syndrome differing from the pure anxiety and pure depression. The genetic studies, as well as the family studies, clearly show that the two entities are undissociated. Likewise, the therapeutic action of serotoninergic antidepressants in the two types of disorders reinforces the idea of a common biological vulnerability between anxiety and depression. Several studies have shown a significant association between panic disorder and suicide. However, the suicidal conducts are multiple and proceed by complex interactions between factors of features and states. Accordingly, panic disorder can be considered as a factor of state associated with the suicidal risk. 2009 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Rethinking exercise identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Andersen, Christina; Lillelund, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To explore physically inactive breast and colon cancer patients’ prediagnosis exercise history and attitudes to physical activity (PA) and experiences in initiating PA while undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy. Design: An explorative qualitative study guided the interpretive analysis...... age 49 years: 25 patients with breast cancer and 8 with colon cancer, 72% with a low cardiac respiratory fitness level and the majority with a high level of education. Patients received adjuvant chemotherapy, oncologist’s PA recommendation and exercise, cancer nurse specialist’s counselling prior...... to allocation to PA interventions or waitlist control group. Results: Prediagnosis exercise had been excluded from patients’ daily lives due to perceptions of exercise as boring, lack of discipline and stressful work conditions for both genders. Recommendations from oncologists and nurses inspired the patients...

  12. Rethinking the "Restricted" Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Miranda

    2015-01-01

    It's the whispering and giggling that tips off the school librarian, and the growing circle of students gathering around a book or computer screen. The students have discovered something, and it's probably not just a funny cat video or a particularly fascinating diagram of a medieval castle. Maybe it's a book about: puberty, an art book with a few…

  13. Rethinking Colour Constancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander D Logvinenko

    Full Text Available Colour constancy needs to be reconsidered in light of the limits imposed by metamer mismatching. Metamer mismatching refers to the fact that two objects reflecting metameric light under one illumination may reflect non-metameric light under a second; so two objects appearing as having the same colour under one illuminant can appear as having different colours under a second. Yet since Helmholtz, object colour has generally been believed to remain relatively constant. The deviations from colour constancy registered in experiments are usually thought to be small enough that they do not contradict the notion of colour constancy. However, it is important to determine how the deviations from colour constancy relate to the limits metamer mismatching imposes on constancy. Hence, we calculated metamer mismatching's effect for the 20 Munsell papers and 8 pairs of illuminants employed in the colour constancy study by Logvinenko and Tokunaga and found it to be so extensive that the two notions-metamer mismatching and colour constancy-must be mutually exclusive. In particular, the notion of colour constancy leads to some paradoxical phenomena such as the possibility of 20 objects having the same colour under chromatic light dispersing into a hue circle of colours under neutral light. Thus, colour constancy refers to a phenomenon, which because of metamer mismatching, simply cannot exist. Moreover, it obscures the really important visual phenomenon; namely, the alteration of object colours induced by illumination change. We show that colour is not an independent, intrinsic attribute of an object, but rather an attribute of an object/light pair, and then define a concept of material colour in terms of equivalence classes of such object/light pairs. We suggest that studying the shift in material colour under a change in illuminant will be more fruitful than pursuing colour constancy's false premise that colour is an intrinsic attribute of an object.

  14. Rethinking political correctness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Robin J; Meyerson, Debra E; Davidson, Martin N

    2006-09-01

    Legal and cultural changes over the past 40 years ushered unprecedented numbers of women and people of color into companies' professional ranks. Laws now protect these traditionally underrepresented groups from blatant forms of discrimination in hiring and promotion. Meanwhile, political correctness has reset the standards for civility and respect in people's day-to-day interactions. Despite this obvious progress, the authors' research has shown that political correctness is a double-edged sword. While it has helped many employees feel unlimited by their race, gender, or religion,the PC rule book can hinder people's ability to develop effective relationships across race, gender, and religious lines. Companies need to equip workers with skills--not rules--for building these relationships. The authors offer the following five principles for healthy resolution of the tensions that commonly arise over difference: Pause to short-circuit the emotion and reflect; connect with others, affirming the importance of relationships; question yourself to identify blind spots and discover what makes you defensive; get genuine support that helps you gain a broader perspective; and shift your mind-set from one that says, "You need to change," to one that asks, "What can I change?" When people treat their cultural differences--and related conflicts and tensions--as opportunities to gain a more accurate view of themselves, one another, and the situation, trust builds and relationships become stronger. Leaders should put aside the PC rule book and instead model and encourage risk taking in the service of building the organization's relational capacity. The benefits will reverberate through every dimension of the company's work.

  15. Rethinking sunk costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capen, E.C.

    1991-01-01

    As typically practiced in the petroleum/ natural gas industry, most economic calculations leave out sunk costs. Integrated businesses can be hurt by the omission of sunk costs because profits and costs are not allocated properly among the various business segments. Not only can the traditional sunk-cost practice lead to predictably bad decisions, but a company that operates under such a policy will have no idea how to allocate resources among its operating components; almost none of its calculated returns will be correct. This paper reports that the solution is to include asset value as part of the investment in the calculation

  16. Shrink rethink: rebranding psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabb, Jim; Barber, Lee; Masson, Neil

    2017-11-01

    Negative public attitudes towards psychiatry hinder individuals coming for treatment and prevent us from attracting and retaining the very brightest and best doctors. As psychiatrists we are skilled in using science to change the thoughts and behaviours of individuals, however, we lack the skills to engage entire populations. Expertise in this field is the preserve of branding, advertising and marketing professionals. Techniques from these fields can be used to rebrand psychiatry at a variety of levels from national recruitment drives to individual clinical interactions between psychiatrists and their patients. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  17. Rethinking Atlantic History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Walvin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Shaping the Stuart World 1603-1714: The Atlantic Connection. Allan I. Macinnes & Arthur H. Williamson (eds.. Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2006. xiv + 389 pp. (Cloth US$ 135.00 Slavery and the British Empire: From Africa to America. Kenneth Morgan. New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. x + 221 pp. (Paper US$ 32.00 Although an important debate continues about the concept itself, the use of “the Atlantic” has embedded itself in scholarly vernacular. The scholarly output directly spawned by an engagement with the concept continues apace. That ocean, and the peoples who lived and traded along its edges, and who finally moved across it, have provided an important geographical focus for some major reconsiderations of modern history. Prompted by the Macinnes/Williamson volume, I returned to my own undergraduate and graduate notes and essays from courses on Stuart Britain: the Atlantic was totally absent – not even present as a distant speck on our intellectual map. We studied, and debated, the formal histories of migrations to the Americas (i.e. European migrations but there was no mention of Africa or Africans. And no sense was conveyed that the European engagement with the Americas (in their totality – as opposed to North America was a two-way, mutual force: that the European world was influenced, indeed shaped in many critical regards, by the Americas: by the land, the products, the peoples, and by the markets of that hemisphere. At its most obvious in the ebb and flow of peoples, even that eluded the historians I encountered as a student. It was as if we were talking about a different cosmos; few moved beyond the conventions of European migrations westwards and little attention was paid to that most dominant of migrations – the enforced African migrations to the Americas.

  18. Rethinking spoken fluency

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article re-examines the notion of spoken fluency. Fluent and fluency are terms commonly used in everyday, lay language, and fluency, or lack of it, has social consequences. The article reviews the main approaches to understanding and measuring spoken fluency and suggest that spoken fluency is best understood as an interactive achievement, and offers the metaphor of ‘confluence’ to replace the term fluency. Many measures of spoken fluency are internal and monologue-based, whereas evidence...

  19. Rethinking generic skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Canning

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides a critical analysis of the notion of generic or transversal skillscontained with European Union policy discourses. The author presents a conceptualframework that challenges the idea that generic skills are universal, transferable andautonomous. An alternative analysis is put forward that argues the case forcontextualising skills and knowledge within particular understandings and cultures thatare more collective than individualistic in nature. The arguments are framed withinwider cross-disciplinary debates in linguistics, geosemiotics and social-cultural theoryand build upon an earlier paper exploring core skills in the UK (Canning, 2007.

  20. Rethinking Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    F?rstenwerth, Hauke

    2012-01-01

    An increasing body of clinical observations and experimental evidence suggests that cardiac dysfunction results from autonomic dysregulation of the contractile output of the heart. Excessive activation of the sympathetic nervous system and a decrease in parasympathetic tone are associated with increased mortality. Elevated levels of circulating catecholamines closely correlate with the severity and poor prognosis in heart failure. Sympathetic over-stimulation causes increased levels of catech...

  1. Rethinking Family Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranichfeld, Marion L.

    1987-01-01

    Men's power is emphasized in the family power literature on marital decision making. Little attention has been paid to women's power, accrued through their deeper embeddedness in intrafamilial roles. Micro-level analysis of family power demonstrates that women's positions in the family power structure rest not on the horizontal marital tie but…

  2. Rethinking the Argumentative Essay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneer, David

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the construction of the argumentative essay as it is commonly presented in academic writing textbooks and classrooms for English language learners. The author first examines the traditional three-stage structure (thesis-argument-conclusion) and then problematizes it within a genre-based approach to academic writing. He…

  3. Rethinking Educational Supervision

    OpenAIRE

    Burhanettin DÖNMEZ; Kadir BEYCİOĞLU

    2009-01-01

    The history of educational (school) supervision has been influenced by the history of the interaction of intellectual movements in politics, society, philosophy and industrial movements. The purpose of this conceptual and theoretical study is to have a brief look at the concept of educational supervision with related historical developments in the field. The paper also intends to see the terms and issues critically, and to conceptualize some issues associated with educational supervision in...

  4. Rethinking Educational Supervision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burhanettin DÖNMEZ

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The history of educational (school supervision has been influenced by the history of the interaction of intellectual movements in politics, society, philosophy and industrial movements. The purpose of this conceptual and theoretical study is to have a brief look at the concept of educational supervision with related historical developments in the field. The paper also intends to see the terms and issues critically, and to conceptualize some issues associated with educational supervision in practice. In the paper, the issues are discussed and a number of suggestions are addressed for debate.

  5. Rethinking Defensive Information Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Countless studies, however, have demonstrated the weakness in this system.15 The tension between easily remembered passwords and suffi...vulnerabilities Undiscovered flaws The patch model for Internet security has failed spectacularly. Caida , 2004 Signature-Based Defense Anti virus, intrusion

  6. Rethinking Moral Responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vedder, A.H.; Johnson, D.; Moor, J.; Tavani, H.

    2000-01-01

    Questions regarding the moral responsibility of Internet access and service providers relating to possible negative aspects of information on the Internet call for a reassessment of the ways in which we think about attributing blame, guilt, and duties of reparation and compensation. They invite us

  7. Rethinking the MSW Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Ira C.

    2013-01-01

    The foundation year and specialization year of study are the accepted framework for graduate social work education. A common belief among educators is that accreditation standards are prescriptive by design, resulting in a rigidity that neither encourages nor supports curricular innovation. This article outlines a newly developed curriculum model…

  8. Rethinking the World's energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Wilson da

    2012-01-01

    Can we really shift the world completely away from fossil fuels in the next 20 years? In June 2011 at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Canada, forty physicists from around the world came together for the Equinox Summit: 2030. They discussed how to power modern civilisation this century without warming the planet to catastrophic levels, by using science. Five key solutions, dubbed 'exemplar pathways' emerged; large-scale storage, enhanced geothermal, advanced nuclear, off-grid electricity and smart urbanization.

  9. Personal Knowledge Management in the Training of Non-Literary Translators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastberg, Peter

    2009-01-01

    of problems. As Karl Popper states we may even say that a profession is a conglomerate of acknowledged problems and the disciplinary-internal resources with which to solve these problems (Popper 1979[1962]:108). The particular translation problem, which I will be discussing in this paper, was reintroduced...... to us by the German translation scholar Reiss back in the 1980s when she laconically stated that "you cannot translate what you do not understand". In this article I will discuss one particular aspect of this problem, namely how students of non-literary translation are currently taught to reach...... the ground for rethinking how we deal with subject matter in the training of non-literary translators   KEYWORDS   Translator training, translation curricula, subject matter competence, Personal Knowledge Management...

  10. Managing knowledge management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    2016-01-01

    today is that knowledge about health and health care is generated from a multitude of sources and circulated rapidly across professional and Karin Knorr Cetina (2006, 2007) stresses that to understand knowledge management practices we need to magnify the space of knowledge in action and consider......This work-in-progress focuses on the management of knowledge management and its socio-material implications. More specifically, it focuses on the management of epistemic objects and objectives in professional health care organisations. One of the main characteristics of professional health care...... the presentation and circulation of epistemic objects in extended contexts. In other words, we need to consider that the routes from research to practice – and the relation between knowledge and management – is not straightforward. First epistemic objects and objectives may lead to contrasting results...

  11. Economically optimal timing for crop disease control under uncertainty: an options approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ndeffo Mbah, M.L.; Forster, G.; Wesseler, J.H.H.; Gilligan, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    Severe large-scale disease and pest infestations in agricultural regions can cause significant economic damage. Understanding if and when disease control measures should be taken in the presence of risk and uncertainty is a key issue. We develop a framework to examine the economically optimal timing

  12. Iowa Commercial Pesticide Applicator Manual, Category 1C: Agricultural Crop Disease Control. CS-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyvall, Robert F.; Ryan, Stephen O.

    This manual provides information needed to meet specific standards for certification as a pesticide applicator. It summarizes the economically important diseases of field and forage crops such as corn, soybeans and alfalfa. Special attention is given to pesticide application methods and safety. (CS)

  13. Laboratorio di Comunicazione Militante, Isola Art Centre, and MACAO: enhancing autonomous social organisation through artistic means and rethinking the radical imaginary and the radical imagination in curatorial practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aria Spinelli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the relation between curatorial practice and political theory, through a recuperation and proposal of the philosophical work of Greek-French philosopher Cornelius Castoriadis. In it, I will isolated the terms the radical imaginary and the radical imagination, and argue that their relation to curatorial practice is exemplified in the politics of cultural spaces that use autonomous social organisation as their means for artistic production. In his writings, specifically in his manuscript The Imaginary Institution of Society (1998, Castoriadis uses the terms to describe the capacity of socialized human beings to rethink and criticize social structures, and sees the radical imaginary and the radical imagination as means of a radical social transformation towards autonomy, or rather towards autonomous social organisation. Within this framework, this article proposes a historical parallelism between three self-organised platforms for art and activism from Milan, such as Laboratorio di Comunicazione Militante, Isola Art Centre, and MACAO, arguing that they are three cases in which autonomous social organisation is a means for artistic and curatorial production. This historical parallelism, constructed around the concepts of the radical imaginary and the radical imagination, demonstrates how the work of Castoriadis is a valuable resource for contextualising and analysing processes politicization of artistic, curatorial and cultural practices. Based on his writings, this article wants to also highlight the importance of autonomous social organisation as a functional framework capable unpacking the complexity of the relation between artistic, curatorial and cultural practices and political and social activism.

  14. The trouble with 'Categories': Rethinking men who have sex with men, transgender and their equivalents in HIV prevention and health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Richard; Aggleton, Peter; Perez-Brumer, Amaya G

    2016-01-01

    This double Special Issue of Global Public Health presents a collection of articles that seek more adequately to represent sexual and gender diversities and to begin to rethink the relationship to HIV prevention and health promotion - in both the resource rich nations of the global North, as well as in the more resource constrained nations of the global South. Reckoning with the reality that today the global response to HIV has failed to respond to the needs of gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men, and transgender persons, we turn our attention to processes and practices of categorisation and classification, and the entanglement of the multiple social worlds that constitute our understanding of each of these categories and people within the categories. Jointly, these articles provide critical perspectives on how defining and redefining categories may impact the conceptual frameworks and empirical evidence that inform global understandings of HIV infection, those communities most vulnerable, and our collective response to the evolving HIV epidemic.

  15. Rethink space: (Re)designing a workspace using human-centered design to support flexibility, collaboration, and engagement among clinical and translational research support services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Aalap; Clay, Christina

    2017-06-01

    Space matters. We read space like we read people's faces. Space is an instrument of collaboration and innovation. At the University of Michigan's Institute for Clinical and Health Research (MICHR), a team was created to creatively and economically enhance our operating space into a flexible workspace that supports privacy, innovation, creativity, and most important, a culture of collaboration. The team used a human-centered design process to creatively engage the staff at large into analyzing our existing space, identifying latent needs, proposing solutions, generating feedback, and economically building the rethought process. The redesigned workspace embraces the differences among MICHR's teams while encouraging collaboration and teamwork and keeping costs at a minimum. It has resulted in a flexible space that includes co-located teams, spaces dedicated to different work goals, an open area for collaboration, quiet zones for focused work, and better wayfinding. Through our Rethink Space project, we hope to have demonstrated that, by initiating the project internally and by engaging the users of the space themselves in an empathetic, visual, and human-centered way, a space redesign can be undertaken economically while also leading to improved levels of employee and team satisfaction.

  16. Managers’ Support – A Key Driver behind Enterprise Risk Management Maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sprčić Danijela Miloš

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Severe consequences of the global fi nancial crisis resulted in re-thinking the risk management processes and approaches, highlighting the need for a comprehensive risk management framework. Consequently, more and more companies are moving away from the Traditional “silo-based” Risk Management (TRM to a more holistic approach known as Enterprise Risk Management (ERM. This paper presents results of both exploratory and empirical research. First, we develop ERM Index that measures maturity of ERM process within the company. Then, we present empirical results on the level of maturity and determinants of risk management system development in listed Croatian companies. Research indicates low levels of ERM development: even 38 per cent of analysed companies have no elements of ERM system, from which 22 per cent do not manage corporate risks at all. Except the company’s size supported by the economies of scale argument, managers’ support is the most important determinant of ERM system maturity in Croatian companies.

  17. Integrating emerging earth science technologies into disaster risk management: an enterprise architecture approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. D.; Hao, W.; Chettri, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Disaster risk management has grown to rely on earth observations, multi-source data analysis, numerical modeling, and interagency information sharing. The practice and outcomes of disaster risk management will likely undergo further change as several emerging earth science technologies come of age: mobile devices; location-based services; ubiquitous sensors; drones; small satellites; satellite direct readout; Big Data analytics; cloud computing; Web services for predictive modeling, semantic reconciliation, and collaboration; and many others. Integrating these new technologies well requires developing and adapting them to meet current needs; but also rethinking current practice to draw on new capabilities to reach additional objectives. This requires a holistic view of the disaster risk management enterprise and of the analytical or operational capabilities afforded by these technologies. One helpful tool for this assessment, the GEOSS Architecture for the Use of Remote Sensing Products in Disaster Management and Risk Assessment (Evans & Moe, 2013), considers all phases of the disaster risk management lifecycle for a comprehensive set of natural hazard types, and outlines common clusters of activities and their use of information and computation resources. We are using these architectural views, together with insights from current practice, to highlight effective, interrelated roles for emerging earth science technologies in disaster risk management. These roles may be helpful in creating roadmaps for research and development investment at national and international levels.

  18. Managing knowledge management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    ) and colleagues, who stresses that to understand knowledge management practices we need to magnify the space of knowledge in action and consider the presentation and circulation of epistemic objects in extended contexts. In other words, we need to consider that the routes from research to practice......The work-in-progress that I would like to present and discuss in the workshop focuses on the management of knowledge management and its socio-material implications. More specifically, my work focuses on how epistemic objects and objectives are managed in professional health care organisations. One...... of the characteristics of professional health care today is that knowledge is generated from a multitude of sources and circulated rapidly across organizational boundaries. This derives not only from a growth in knowledge production within many organizations, but also from the emergence of agencies that specialize...

  19. Information management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricks, Wendell; Corker, Kevin

    1990-01-01

    Primary Flight Display (PFD) information management and cockpit display of information management research is presented in viewgraph form. The information management problem in the cockpit, information management burdens, the key characteristics of an information manager, the interface management system handling the flow of information and the dialogs between the system and the pilot, and overall system architecture are covered.

  20. Climate risk management information, sources and responses in a pastoral region in East Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Egeru

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pastoralists in East Africa face a range of stressors, climate variability and change being one of them. Effective climate risk management involves managing the full range of variability and balancing hazard management with efforts to capitalise on opportunity; climate risk management information is central in this process. In this study, pastoralists’ perceptions of climate change, climate risk management information types, sources and attendant responses in a pastoral region in East Africa are examined. Through a multi-stage sampling process, a total of 198 heads of households in three districts were selected and interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. In addition, 29 focus group discussions and 10 key informant interviews were conducted to generate qualitative information to supplement survey data. Descriptive and thematic analysis were utilised in summarizing the data. Ninety-nine percent of the pastoralists noted that the climate had changed evidenced by high but erratic rainfall, occurrence of floods and variation in rainfall onset and cessation among other indicators. This change in climate had led to emergence of ‘new’ livestock and crop diseases, crop failure and low yields leading to frequent food shortages, water shortages, poor market access, and variation in pasture availability among other effects. Climate risk management information was received from multiple sources including; radio, diviners, community meetings, shrine elders, humanitarian agencies, and Uganda People’s defence forces (UPDF. Community meetings were however perceived as most accessible, reliable and dependable sources of information. Shifting livestock to dry season grazing and watering areas, selling firewood and charcoal, seeking for military escorts to grazing areas, purchasing veterinary drugs, shifting livestock to disease ‘free’ areas, and performing rituals (depending on the perceived risk constituted a set of responses undertaken in

  1. Performance management vital in implementing new strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruzner, D.; Trollinger, R.

    1996-01-01

    Wedged between the growing cost of environmental compliance and consumer protests over prices, the downstream oil and gas and petrochemical business segments are having to accelerate the changes that have engulfed their industry. Despite recent price increases, thinning margins have driven energy companies to rethink their role in life and to revaluate and reshape operations and assets in pursuit of new strategies. As companies concentrate on core competencies, shift to demand-pull production, and try to leverage their clout in selected regions for market dominance, performance of key operations has become paramount. In theory, performance management is a simple, straightforward proposition. It means deploying a comprehensive, strategy-linked framework for measuring performance across the entire enterprise and then using the results of these measurements to serve two critical managerial functions. First, performance measurement is the means for making informed, knowledge-based decisions about important business issues such as minimizing operational costs, manufacturing the right mix of products, identifying the most profitable distribution channels, and optimizing the utilization of assets. Second -- and in the long run more importantly -- measuring performance is a means for identifying and addressing areas where a company needs to make the kinds of organizational and process improvements that can develop, sustain, and amplify competitive advantage over the long haul. Experiences at a variety of companies, both within and outside the oil and gas and chemical business segments, demonstrate that progress towards comprehensive performance management is possible, with quantifiable benefits and results. Competitive advantage will be enjoyed by those companies that advance further and faster down this path

  2. Strategic knowledge management in brazilian organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivadávia Correa Drummond de Alvarenga

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Investigates the theme known as “Knowledge Management” (KM in three large Brazilian organizations trying to discuss its concepts, constituent elements, managerial approaches and tools, while aiming at leaving behind the purely terminological discussion, which is innocuous and naive. The basic presuppositions were two: (i most of what it´s referred to or named KM is actually “Information Management” (IM and IM is just one of the components of KM. KM is more than simply IM due to the fact that it includes and incorporates other concerns, such as the creation, use and sharing of information and knowledge in the organizational context; (ii a conceptual model or map can be formulated based on three basic conceptions: (a a strategic conception of information and knowledge, (b the introduction of such strategy in the tactical and operational levels through the several managerial approaches and informaion technology tools and (c the creation of an organizational space for knowledge. The main objective is to investigate and analyze the conceptions, motivations, practices and results of KM effectively implemented in three large Brazilian organizations. The qualitative research strategy used was the study of multiple cases with incorporated units of analysis and three criteria ere observed for the judgment of the quality of the research project: validity of the construct, external validity and reliability. Multiple sources of evidence were used and data analysis consisted of three flows of activities: data reduction, data displays and conclusion drawing/verification. The results confirmed the presuppositions and the fact that KM means a rethinking of management practices in the information ea. It was also identified that the main challenges facing organizations committed to KM have its focus on change management, cultural and behavioral issues and the creation of an enabling context that favors the creation, use and sharing of information and

  3. Demand chain management – The implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Ericsson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Most current supply chain models were developed during a period of relative stability. Today, the environment is discontinuous, volatile and unpredictable. This requires a major rethinking and revitalisation of existing supply chain models. Supply chains are much more than warehouses, transportation and technology, they are people powered and have to be treated as social and political as well as economic and technical systems.The most difficult yet challenging and rewarding factor is the change of mindset from approaches based on the old industrial paradigm to the new knowledge oriented paradigm. From "one size fits all" to customisation and buyer behaviour oriented segmentation based on structural flexibility. The new approach requires a change of processes and management systems, but most of all, a change of mindset, organisation structure and behaviour.This may create internal resistance that has to be overcome to reach the desired future state. This future state is highly dependent on cooperation and consensus with external companies, and the next step is therefore to extend the alignment approach to the chosen partners in the demand chain. The development towards channel rather than company competition requires an interorganisational approach to channel design. Internal alignment and cooperation is necessary but not sufficient, which means that an agile and dynamically aligned demand chain has to be created.All this is well known and documented in both research and theory. However, the challenge is to implement these theories, models and behaviour in practice. This paper presents one practical approach to implementation of the theories put forth by Ericsson [Ericsson D, 2011, Demand chain management - The evolution, ORiON, 27(1, pp. 45-81.].

  4. Managing Quality

    CERN Document Server

    Kelemen, Mihaela L

    2002-01-01

    Managing Quality provides a comprehensive review and critical analysis of quality management discourses and techniques by drawing on a number of management disciplines such as operations management, HRM, organizational behaviour, strategy, marketing and organization theory. The book: - introduces readers to key concepts and issues in quality management - provides an overview of both managerial and critical perspectives on quality management - presents the 'wisdom' of quality management gurus - documents the way quality is pursued in manufacturing, service and public sector organizations - comp

  5. Campinas metropolitan region: solid waste management for regional sustainable development; Regiao metropolitana de Campinas: gestao de residuo solido para o desenvolvimento regional sustentavel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, Elizabeth Camargo; Teixeira, Egle Novaes; Craveiros, Stephanie Grant; London, Pedro; Ferreira, Ronan Goncalves [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo; Streb, Cleci Schalemberger [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2004-07-01

    Each person generates a lot of residues in their daily activities. The life cycle of residues, production, collection, transportation, treatment and/or end use have negatively impacted the environment. The society has unobserved the limits for the environment and is living with an undesirable pollution level, regarding the capacity of absorbing and recycling residues and materials. Due to these, there is a necessity of rethink the actual model of development adopted by the society. Regarding the global sustainability, the residue management needs to be planned in order to assure the surviving of future generation with life quality. By a theoretic analysis, this article objective is to evaluate the residue management of Campinas Metropolitan Region interference at the regional sustainable development. (author)

  6. The Bsc and the Health Management Consortia: A Case Study of its Applicability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Caroline Coutinho Coelho Guimarães

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The professional management development consistent with the demands of society is an undeniable reality in Public Health. The enactment of 11.107/2005 Law inserts an agenda for change in the reality of Health Consortia. Against this backdrop of change, uncertainty and social costs, we need to rethink management practices. The management supporting tools have been evolving rapidly since 1980, highlighting the Balanced Scorecard (BSC. The adoption of the BSC as a management supporting tool to consortia comes to meet the existing demand to improve professionalization in public administration. This article aims to analyze the applicability of a support management tool to a Health Consortia, based on BSC through a proposed pilot project in a consortium selected to do so. Thus, for the realization of this work, designed a Case Study in CISMEV - Consortium Health of Middle Velhas River, and developed a proposal for the construction of the BSC with nine distinct steps. Thus, it was possible to identify the key steps to be met for the adoption of new procedures and routines, as well as the challenges encountered in the development process of the BSC by public institutions. We also identified the possible gains from deploying this tool culminating in fulfilling the mission and building the organizational vision. It was felt that identifying motivators for choosing this tool, as well as their strengths and limitations are essential to the construction of this process with greater criticality.

  7. Diagnostics of the ability of the management-leader to interact efficiently

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lugova Victoria M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the issue of diagnostics of ability of a manager-leader to interact efficiently. It conducts a theoretical analysis of a list of qualities of an efficient manager and leader. It specifies the qualities that provide the manager’s ability to conduct efficient social interaction. They include organisational qualities and social perception. The article offers methods of their diagnostics, namely: “Psychological assessment of organisational abilities of a person in a group” and “Diagnostics of perceptive and interactive competence”. Approbation of these methods at five enterprises of the Kharkiv region showed that the level of development of organisational qualities and perceptive and interactive competence of managers is average. The article proves that managers of Ukrainian enterprises not yet ready to be also leaders to their personnel. The article offers to develop ability of a manager-leader to interact efficiently through obtaining new information about specific features of manager’s interaction with other people, re-thinking of own self and own behaviour, structuring new forms of behaviour and regulation of inter-personal interaction and securing positive experience under conventional situations of managerial interaction with the help of trainings.

  8. "Your Professor Will Know You as a Person": Evaluating and Rethinking the Relational Boundaries between Faculty and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chory, Rebecca M.; Offstein, Evan H.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, several management educators have urged faculty to reexamine their relationships with students. To do this, many have proposed novel metaphors to reconceptualize the faculty-to-student relationship. These include embracing students not as pupils to be taught but rather as clients, consumers, and even employees. At the heart…

  9. RE-THINKING THE MODERN LEADERSHIP IN THE ROMANIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH IN THE CONTEXT OF ROMANIA’S EUROPEAN MEMBERSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihail TEACĂ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the issue of leadership within the Romanian Orthodox Church, as it is going through a period of redefinition of its values. Connections between organizational culture, management culture and leadership in modern organizations highlight the manner in which leadership is exercised in the context of knowledge of the organization's foundation.

  10. Reforming Management of Behavior Symptoms and Psychiatric Conditions in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Different Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Steven A; Desai, Abhilash K

    2017-04-01

    Despite much attention including national initiatives, concerns remain about the approaches to managing behavior symptoms and psychiatric conditions across all settings, including in long-term care settings such as nursing homes and assisted living facilities. One key reason why problems persist is because most efforts to "reform" and "correct" the situation have failed to explore or address root causes and instead have promoted inadequate piecemeal "solutions." Further improvement requires jumping off the bandwagon and rethinking the entire issue, including recognizing and applying key concepts of clinical reasoning and the care delivery process to every situation. The huge negative impact of cognitive biases and rote approaches on related clinical problem solving and decision making and patient outcomes also must be addressed. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. From empowerment to response-ability: rethinking socio-spatial, environmental justice, and nature-culture binaries in the context of STEM education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayumova, Shakhnoza; McGuire, Chad J.; Cardello, Suzanne

    2018-04-01

    In this conceptual paper, we draw upon the insights of Feminist Science Studies, in particular Karen Barad's concept of agential realism, as a critical analytical tool to re-think nature and culture binaries in dominant science knowledge-making practices and explanatory accounts, and their possible implications for science education in the context of socio-spatial and environmental injustices. Barad's framework proposes a relational and more expansive approach to justice, which takes into account consequential effects of nature-culture practices on humans, non-humans, and more than human vitalities. In efforts to understand potentialities of Barad's theory of agential realism, we situate our argument in the "story" of local children who encounter a bottle of cyanide in a former manufacturing building. The story takes place in a post-industrial urban city located in the U.S., caught up in an inverse relationship between the technological and scientific advances observed "globally" and the deteriorating environmental and living conditions experienced "locally" as the result of erstwhile industrial activity. Based on agential realist readings of the story and taking into consideration children's developing subjectivities, we argue that equity-oriented scholarship in science education might not be able to achieve justice devoid of understanding of the relatedness to plurality of life forms. We invite our readers to consider (re)configuring socio-spatial and environmental issues as an ethical response-ability that is constituted through relationships of care, recognition, openness, and responsiveness to vitalities of humans and nonhumans equally, one which cannot be conceptualized from a priori and distant calculations, but rather continuous entangled relations.

  12. 數位學習之學習成果的再思考 Rethinking the Learning Outcome of E-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jing Chiou

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available 本文分析國內外近年來在數位學習(E-Learning)的評量學習成果的方式,並進一步比較國內外研究在理論及實證上差異處,希望透過相關的文獻分析重新思考數位學習的學習成果及其評量方式,以瞭解數位學習對學習者的助益。本研究的分結果發現,在國內針對數位學習的學習成果多以成就測驗的成績及課程滿意度做為評量依據,但國外近來相關研究則認為學習成為應從多元壆度來評量,且師生應用數位學習的方式直接影響到學習成果的高低。This paper analysises the recently approach of assessment E-learning outcome in internal and abroad, and further compare the difference of practical and theory between internal and abroad. The destination of this paper is through rethinking related study about assessment approach of E-learning outcome to realize the advantages to learners. This study discovery in internal, the learning outcome of E-learning almost use the grade of achievement test and satisfaction as indicators, but abroad indicators are use multidimensional indicators, and the approach which instructor and learners implement E-learning direct affect learning outcome.

  13. Weight Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Weight Management English English Español Weight Management Obesity is a chronic condition that affects more ... Liver (NASH) Heart Disease & Stroke Sleep Apnea Weight Management Topics About Food Portions Bariatric Surgery for Severe ...

  14. Bladder Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Catheterization • Urinary Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter Bladder Management [ Download this pamphlet: "Bladder Management" - (PDF, 499KB) ] The ... and medication or surgery may be helpful. Bladder Management Foley or Suprapubic Catheter A tube is inserted ...

  15. POMICS: A Simulation Disease Model for Timing Fungicide Applications in Management of Powdery Mildew of Cucurbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapak, Z; Salam, M U; Minchinton, E J; MacManus, G P V; Joyce, D C; Galea, V J

    2017-09-01

    A weather-based simulation model, called Powdery Mildew of Cucurbits Simulation (POMICS), was constructed to predict fungicide application scheduling to manage powdery mildew of cucurbits. The model was developed on the principle that conditions favorable for Podosphaera xanthii, a causal pathogen of this crop disease, generate a number of infection cycles in a single growing season. The model consists of two components that (i) simulate the disease progression of P. xanthii in secondary infection cycles under natural conditions and (ii) predict the disease severity with application of fungicides at any recurrent disease cycles. The underlying environmental factors associated with P. xanthii infection were quantified from laboratory and field studies, and also gathered from literature. The performance of the POMICS model when validated with two datasets of uncontrolled natural infection was good (the mean difference between simulated and observed disease severity on a scale of 0 to 5 was 0.02 and 0.05). In simulations, POMICS was able to predict high- and low-risk disease alerts. Furthermore, the predicted disease severity was responsive to the number of fungicide applications. Such responsiveness indicates that the model has the potential to be used as a tool to guide the scheduling of judicious fungicide applications.

  16. OPINIONS ON INTERNATIONAL RESERVES MANAGEMENT - POST CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MERCEA (HANDRO PATRICIA AMALIA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent crisis demonstrated once again the importance of maintaining an adequate level of the international reserves as part of the defense of a country against the shocks internationally transmitted. Liquidity buffers aided the good functioning of financial systems, and allowed countries to cope with sudden foreign capital stops or to manage massive outflows without facing a costly crisis. This logic has been strengthened in the context of the crisis from 2008, when countries with lots of reserves, such as China or Brazil, came through better than those with lower liquid assets. Economists have argued that developing countries need reserves mainly to cover urgent imports and short-term debts. The current level of global reserves far exceeds this traditional postulate. In this context, it is necessary to rethink the adequacy of the level of constituting the reserves portfolio. The dominance of the dollar as a reserve currency, another important feature of the current reserves portfolio, makes the holders become vulnerable to the monetary policy of FED. A greater flexibility of the currency will also be needed. The often called the “trilemma” of international economics dictates: when capital is mobile, countries must choose between fixing their currencies and controlling their domestic monetary conditions. They cannot do both. The domestic currency inflexibility will ultimately lead to asset bubbles and inflation. The pressure of capital flows will depend on the prospects of rich economies, especially America’s. The increment of emerging economies availability to allow the exchange rate to move will depend on what China does - and China may remain forever linked to the dollar. The emergence of a global currency that constitute a genuine means of exchange or the use of cross-border multifaceted cash pools common to IMF members would reduce systemic risks. International regulations for countries with persistent trade surpluses could be a

  17. Social capital and fisheries management: the case of Chilika Lake in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Nagothu Udaya

    2007-04-01

    This article shows how social capital impacts fisheries management at the local level in Chilika Lake, located in the state of Orissa in India. In Chilika, the different fishing groups established norms and "rules of the game" including, but not limited to, spatial limits that determine who can fish and in what areas, temporal restrictions about when and for how long people may fish, gear constraints about what harvesting gear may be used by each group, and physical controls on size and other characteristics of fish that may be harvested. A survey of the members of fishing groups has shown that the bonding social capital is strong within the Chilika fishing groups. Bonding and bridging social capital keeps the fishers together in times of resource scarcity, checks violations of community rules and sanctions, and strengthens the community fisheries management. In contrast, linking social capital in Chilika appears to be weak, as is evident from the lack of trust in external agencies, seeking the help of formal institutions for legal support, and increasing conflicts. Trust and cooperation among fishers is crucial in helping to build the social capital. A social capital perspective on fisheries governance suggests that there should be a rethinking of priorities and funding mechanisms, from "top-down" fisheries management towards "co-management" with a focus on engendering rights and responsibilities for fishers and their communities.

  18. Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Project Management Theory Meets Practice contains the proceedings from the 1st Danish Project Management Research Conference (DAPMARC 2015), held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on May 21st, 2015.......Project Management Theory Meets Practice contains the proceedings from the 1st Danish Project Management Research Conference (DAPMARC 2015), held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on May 21st, 2015....

  19. Management concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Rhonda

    2006-01-01

    Management concepts evolve through time. Health care managers can learn new concepts by evaluating classical management strategies, as well as modern-day strategies. Focusing on quality improvement and team building can help managers align the goals of their departments with the goals of the organization, consequently improving patient care.

  20. Improving the phenotypic expression of rice genotypes: Rethinking “intensification” for production systems and selection practices for rice breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Uphoff

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Intensification in rice crop production is generally understood as requiring increased use of material inputs: water, inorganic fertilizers, and agrochemicals. However, this is not the only kind of intensification available. More productive crop phenotypes, with traits such as more resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses and shorter crop cycles, are possible through modifications in the management of rice plants, soil, water, and nutrients, reducing rather than increasing material inputs. Greater factor productivity can be achieved through the application of new knowledge and more skill, and (initially more labor, as seen from the System of Rice Intensification (SRI, whose practices are used in various combinations by as many as 10 million farmers on about 4 million hectares in over 50 countries. The highest yields achieved with these management methods have come from hybrids and improved rice varieties, confirming the importance of making genetic improvements. However, unimproved varieties are also responsive to these changes, which induce better growth and functioning of rice root systems and more abundance, diversity, and activity of beneficial soil organisms. Some of these organisms as symbiotic endophytes can affect and enhance the expression of rice plants' genetic potential as well as their phenotypic resilience to multiple stresses, including those of climate change. SRI experience and data suggest that decades of plant breeding have been selecting for the best crop genetic endowments under suboptimal growing conditions, with crowding of plants that impedes their photosynthesis and growth, flooding of rice paddies that causes roots to degenerate and forgoes benefits derived from aerobic soil organisms, and overuse of agrochemicals that adversely affect these organisms as well as soil and human health. This review paper reports evidence from research in India and Indonesia that changes in crop and water management can improve the

  1. Case management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Judy; Rice, Eve

    2015-03-01

    Health care in the United States is changing rapidly under pressure from both political and professional stakeholders, and one area on the front line of required change is the discipline of case management. Historically, case management has worked to defragment the health care delivery system for clients and increase access to health care. Case management will have an expanded role resulting from Affordable Care Act initiatives to improve health care. This article includes definitions of case management, current issues related to case management, case management standards of practice, and a case study of the management of pediatric chronic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilkington, Alan; Chai, Kah-Hin; Le, Yang

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies the true coverage of PM theory through a bibliometric analysis of the International Journal of Project Management from 1996-2012. We identify six persistent research themes: project time management, project risk management, programme management, large-scale project management......, project success/failure and practitioner development. These differ from those presented in review and editorial articles in the literature. In addition, topics missing from the PM BOK: knowledge management project-based organization and project portfolio management have become more popular topics...

  3. Hidden Alliances: Rethinking Environmentality and the Politics of Knowledge in Thailand′s Campaign for Community Forestry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Forsyth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a counterpoint to recent discussions of ′eco-governmentality′ or ′environmentality,′ which analyse how states use knowledge to regulate citizens and make problems governable. Adopting the concept of co-production from Science and Technology Studies (STS, this paper argues that well-known approaches to environmentality fail to acknowledge how both state and citizens can both actively participate in reifying authoritative expertise about environmental problems; and that this expertise can be based on shared visions of social order, which also exclude alternative perspectives about environmental management. The paper illustrates this debate with the history of legislation and social movements about community forestry in Thailand, where different state agencies and non-governmental organisations have disagreed about policies, but also demonstrated hidden alliances that reify and legitimise statements about the hydraulic functions of forests that exclude long-standing scientific research or alternative options for watershed management. The paper argues that political debates about community forestry should therefore pay more attention to how political opponents agree-and the social groups and policy options that are excluded from these agreements-rather than only analyse how one party might have power over another.

  4. Demand chain management — The implementation | Ericsson ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most current supply chain models were developed during a period of relative stability. Today, the environment is discontinuous, volatile and unpredictable. This requires a major rethinking and revitalisation of existing supply chain models. Supply chains are much more than warehouses, transportation and technology, they ...

  5. More than Target 6.3: A Systems Approach to Rethinking Sustainable Development Goals in a Resource-Scarce World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development outlines 17 individual Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs that guide the needs of practice for many professional disciplines around the world, including engineering, research, policy, and development. The SDGs represent commitments to reduce poverty, hunger, ill health, gender inequality, environmental degradation, and lack of access to clean water and sanitation. If a typical reductionist approach is employed to address and optimize individual goals, it may lead to a failure in technological, policy, or managerial development interventions through unintended consequences in other goals. This study uses a systems approach to understand the fundamental dynamics between the SDGs in order to identify potential synergies and antagonisms. A conceptual system model was constructed to illustrate the causal relationships between SDGs, examine system structures using generic system archetypes, and identify leverage points to effectively influence intentional and minimize unintentional changes in the system. The structure of interactions among the SDGs reflects three archetypes of system behavior: Reinforcing Growth, Limits to Growth, and Growth and Underinvestment. The leverage points identified from the conceptual model are gender equality, sustainable management of water and sanitation, alternative resources, sustainable livelihood standards, and global partnerships. Such a conceptual system analysis of SDGs can enhance the likelihood that the development community will broaden its understanding of the potential synergistic benefits of their projects on resource management, environmental sustainability, and climate change. By linking the interactions and feedbacks of those projects with economic gains, women’s empowerment, and educational equality, stakeholders can recognize holistic improvements that can be made to the quality of life of many of the world’s poor.

  6. Re-thinking global health sector efforts for HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control: promoting integration of programme activities within a strengthened health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Dermot

    2010-07-05

    The global financial crisis threatens global health, particularly exacerbating diseases of inequality, e.g. HIV/AIDS, and diseases of poverty, e.g. tuberculosis. The aim of this paper is to reconsider established practices and policies for HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control, aiming at delivering better results and value for money. This may be achieved by promoting greater integration of HIV and tuberculosis control programme activities within a strengthened health system. HIV and tuberculosis share many similarities in terms of their disease burden and the recommended stratagems for their control. HIV and tuberculosis programmes implement similar sorts of control activities, e.g. case finding and treatment, which depend for success on generic health system issues, including vital registration, drug procurement and supply, laboratory network, human resources, and financing. However, the current health system approach to HIV and tuberculosis control often involves separate specialised services. Despite some recent progress, collaboration between the programmes remains inadequate, progress in obtaining synergies has been slow, and results remain far below those needed to achieve universal access to key interventions. A fundamental re-think of the current strategic approach involves promoting integrated delivery of HIV and tuberculosis programme activities as part of strengthened general health services: epidemiological surveillance, programme monitoring and evaluation, community awareness of health-seeking behavior, risk behaviour modification, infection control, treatment scale-up (first-line treatment regimens), drug-resistance surveillance, containing and countering drug-resistance (second-line treatment regimens), research and development, global advocacy and global partnership. Health agencies should review policies and progress in HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control, learn mutual lessons for policy development and scaling up interventions, and identify ways

  7. Re-thinking global health sector efforts for HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control: promoting integration of programme activities within a strengthened health system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Dermot

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The global financial crisis threatens global health, particularly exacerbating diseases of inequality, e.g. HIV/AIDS, and diseases of poverty, e.g. tuberculosis. The aim of this paper is to reconsider established practices and policies for HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control, aiming at delivering better results and value for money. This may be achieved by promoting greater integration of HIV and tuberculosis control programme activities within a strengthened health system. Discussion HIV and tuberculosis share many similarities in terms of their disease burden and the recommended stratagems for their control. HIV and tuberculosis programmes implement similar sorts of control activities, e.g. case finding and treatment, which depend for success on generic health system issues, including vital registration, drug procurement and supply, laboratory network, human resources, and financing. However, the current health system approach to HIV and tuberculosis control often involves separate specialised services. Despite some recent progress, collaboration between the programmes remains inadequate, progress in obtaining synergies has been slow, and results remain far below those needed to achieve universal access to key interventions. A fundamental re-think of the current strategic approach involves promoting integrated delivery of HIV and tuberculosis programme activities as part of strengthened general health services: epidemiological surveillance, programme monitoring and evaluation, community awareness of health-seeking behavior, risk behaviour modification, infection control, treatment scale-up (first-line treatment regimens, drug-resistance surveillance, containing and countering drug-resistance (second-line treatment regimens, research and development, global advocacy and global partnership. Health agencies should review policies and progress in HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control, learn mutual lessons for policy

  8. Heritage planning and rethinking the meaning and values of designating heritage sites in a post-disaster context: The case of Aceh, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meutia, Z. D.; Akbar, R.; Zulkaidi, D.

    2018-05-01

    importance of understanding how local values create heritage, that heritage is not only about material and physical aspects but it is also a cultural process. The methodology used is ethnography with in-depth interviews to uncover meaning and values in this context. This paper uses the examples of how the sites in Aceh that were affected by the tsunami disaster in 2004 such as the PLTD Apung ship and the Mosque of Ulee Lheue are sites that a mutual and role of historical city relating to the potential as signs of civilization, historical values, commemorative values, religious values, and values of consensus within the community as outstanding local values, as a basis of consideration in rethinking the designations of heritage sites of less than 50 years old.

  9. Rethinking capital markets reform: a reassessment of Olson problem and regulatory dualism in the German capital markets from a varieties of capitalism perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Ziccardi de Carvalho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Since its proposition by Peter A. Hall and David Soskice the Varieties of Capitalism (VoC approach has been particularly important to explain the relationship between economic agents and sets of institutional arrangements that, even in regulatory scenarios that Law and Finance’s school would consider “less than optimal”, are able to generate sustainable economic growth. In this context the VoC approach has been consistently challenging the traditional “one fits all” approach towards capital markets reform usually endorsed by institutions such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, as well as by many scholars and capital markets regulators associated with La Porta’s Law and Finance School. As any theoretical framework, however, the VoC approach also faces its own challenges and still lacks the scientific maturity achieved by the Law and Finance School. Consequently a conciliation between the relational view of the firm proposed by the VoC approach and the overview of corporate governance practices throughout the world presented by the Law and Finance School would be instrumental to construe a more clear understanding of the competitive advantages generated by certain sets of institutions and, at the same time, more accurately assess impacts of reforms that, even if implemented with the legitimate goal of promoting firms’ transparency and higher corporate governance standards, may counter-intuitively generate unprecedented corporate and capital markets crisis. By analyzing two concepts proposed by Ronald J. Gilson, Henry Hansmann and Mariana Pargendler that have an apparent fundamental link to La Porta’s school of Law and Finance (i.e. Olson Problem and Regulatory Dualism through a varieties of capitalism approach, this study aims at rethinking the traditional “one fits all” approach towards capital markets reform and taking a further step in the direction of conciliating the VoC approach with La Porta’s Law

  10. Promise-based management: the essence of execution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sull, Donald N; Spinosa, Charles

    2007-04-01

    Critical initiatives stall for a variety of reasons--employee disengagement, a lack of coordination between functions, complex organizational structures that obscure accountability, and so on. To overcome such obstacles, managers must fundamentally rethink how work gets done. Most of the challenges stem from broken or poorly crafted commitments. That's because every company is, at its heart, a dynamic network of promises made between employees and colleagues, customers, outsourcing partners, or other stakeholders. Executives can overcome many problems in the short-term and foster productive, reliable workforces for the long-term by practicing what the authors call "promise-based management," which involves cultivating and coordinating commitments in a systematic way. Good promises share five qualities: They are public, active, voluntary, explicit, and mission based. To develop and execute an effective promise, the "provider" and the "customer" in the deal should go through three phases of conversation. The first, achieving a meeting of minds, entails exploring the fundamental questions of coordinated effort: What do you mean? Do you understand what I mean? What should I do? What will you do? Who else should we talk to? In the next phase, making it happen, the provider executes on the promise. In the final phase, closing the loop, the customer publicly declares that the provider has either delivered the goods or failed to do so. Leaders must weave and manage their webs of promises with great care-encouraging iterative conversation and making sure commitments are fulfilled reliably. If they do, they can enhance coordination and cooperation among colleagues, build the organizational agility required to seize new business opportunities, and tap employees' entrepreneurial energies.

  11. Curriculation and Competence Based Education Training (CBET in Tanzania: A Critical Assessment of Public Administration and Management (PAM Curricula at Tanzania Public Service College (TPSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadhani Marijani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article directs the discourse in Public Administration and Management (PAM curricula at Tanzania Public Service College. The motive for this attempt is based on the fact that Public Administration (PA is itself recognized as a profession whose teaching aims at producing competent professionals and therefore needs constant review to conform to the current work complexities. Five big questions and content analysis are used as the basis for directing the discourse. The findings indicate that curriculation for PAM is complex and dynamic. Moreover, the findings indicate that the two curricula are more vocational than educational as there is little weight allocated for occupational course modules (36 out of 360 in PA and (126 out of 360 in HRM. This may pose the danger of “pourtpouri” problem in curriculum design. The article proposes rethinking interventions on curriculation for PAM at TPSC to benefit from Public Administration discipline.

  12. La asesoría del psicopedagogo y la dirección del círculo infantil Psychological counseling and nursery school management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laritza Raquel del Risco López

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper refers the impact of psychological counseling on improving nursery school management. By studying the actual practices of these professionals and institutions, constructing a theoretical framework, and exchanging with specialists, the authors attain to rethink, improve and update educational practice. The researchers make extensive use of theoretical methods for constructing a framework, observe psychologist performance at nursery schools, and conduct interviews and survey on related issues. The effectiveness of the proposal was assessed on the basis of experts’ criteria (nursery school professionals and psychologists. The findings include a description of psychological counseling in nursery schools viewing the process as a dynamic interchange of ideas and mutual professional support. Likewise, the highlights of the process of articulating psychologists and principal performances are given. ,

  13. Stress Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management By Mayo Clinic Staff Stress basics Stress is a normal psychological and physical reaction to the demands of life. ... some people's alarm systems rarely shut off. Stress management gives you a range of tools to reset ...

  14. Medical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... org Close Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Medical Management Although there’s no cure for CMT, there are ... individualized physical therapy program. For more on medical management of CMT, see Surgery Sometimes, Bracing Often, Caution ...

  15. Manage Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Manage Stress Print This Topic En español Manage Stress Browse Sections The Basics Overview Signs and Health ... and Health Effects What are the signs of stress? When people are under stress, they may feel: ...

  16. Construction management

    CERN Document Server

    Pellicer, Eugenio; Teixeira, José C; Moura, Helder P; Catalá, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    The management of construction projects is a wide ranging and challenging discipline in an increasingly international industry, facing continual challenges and demands for improvements in safety, in quality and cost control, and in the avoidance of contractual disputes. Construction Management grew out of a Leonardo da Vinci project to develop a series of Common Learning Outcomes for European Managers in Construction. Financed by the European Union, the project aimed to develop a library of basic materials for developing construction management skills for use in a pan-European context. Focused exclusively on the management of the construction phase of a building project from the contractor's point of view, Construction Management covers the complete range of topics of which mastery is required by the construction management professional for the effective delivery of new construction projects. With the continued internationalisation of the construction industry, Construction Management will be required rea...

  17. Accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, R.J.; Monty, B.S.; Liparulo, N.J.; Desaedeleer, G.

    1989-01-01

    The foundation of the framework for a Severe Accident Management Program is the contained in the Probabilistic Safety Study (PSS) or the Individual Plant Evaluations (IPE) for a specific plant. The development of a Severe Accident Management Program at a plant is based on the use of the information, in conjunction with other applicable information. A Severe Accident Management Program must address both accident prevention and accident mitigation. The overall Severe Accident Management framework must address these two facets, as a living program in terms of gathering the evaluating information, the readiness to respond to an event. Significant international experience in the development of severe accident management programs exist which should provide some direction for the development of Severe Accident Management in the U.S. This paper reports that the two most important elements of a Severe Accident Management Program are the Emergency Consultation process and the standards for measuring the effectiveness of individual Severe Accident Management Programs at utilities

  18. Waste management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun Hansen, Karsten; Jamison, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark.......The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark....

  19. Diversity management

    OpenAIRE

    Knákalová, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    The key topic of the work is diversity management, i.e. management of em-ployees" diversity within organization. Opening part of the work identifies the position of diversity within society and related phenomena such as stereotypes, biases and various forms of discrimination. Then the work discusses the role of diversity management in organizations, its principles and basic areas of focus. Attention is paid to certain social groups that the diversity management concept should especially deal ...

  20. Brand Management

    OpenAIRE

    Polách, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical part of thesis on the topic "Brand management" will deal with tools for strategic brand management ifself, specifically managements instruments. Next part will be devoted to brand, its identity, image, elements, value, legal protection and eventually to methods of valuation. In practical part will be applied knowledge of strategic brand management to the selected company Vivantis a.s. Part of practical part will be surfy about public awareness of the brand Vivantis a.s. On the bas...

  1. Change Management

    OpenAIRE

    Motab Raja Aljohani

    2015-01-01

    Managing change within organizations is a core challenge for the HR professionals as any change concerns people working within the organization. The study of Human Resource Management is based on achievement of goals through corporate strategy and effective management of change within the organization. Change can be successful when it links people job satisfaction and productivity within an organization. Effective change management can result in greater productivity higher work life quality a...

  2. Hypocrites of old or water carriers of new era and their invisible victims: Rethinking corporate social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurić-Kuzmanović Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern business results indicate more clearly the increasing negative effects which corporation business strategies, exclusively oriented to making profit, have on population and the planet. Corporative social responsibility (CSR as a complex system of business and management that balances among the economic, social and ecological objectives of stakeholders is increasingly recommended as an alternative or integral part of modern business and development strategies. The role and effectiveness of CSR is becoming the subject of intense debate between all those who interpret it as hypocritical mercy of employers and those who see it as a possible paradigm shift in thinking about more effective social and business development strategies. In this paper the role of CSR is discussed from the perspectives of Feminist development economics and Another development strategies, primarily in relation to the safety of employees and the population. The aim of this paper is to recognise the role of CSR in reproducing the increasing number of, from the neo-liberal discourse, still insufficiently visible victims of neoliberal capitalism using comparative theoretical analysis. The paper further aims to emphasise the need to redefine the action, evaluation and measurement of CSR in terms of New economy 2 and Another development.

  3. Re-thinking the unimpeded tube-well growth under the depleting groundwater resources in the Punjab, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watto, Muhammad Arif; Mugera, Amin W.; Kingwell, Ross; Saqab, Muhammad Mudasar

    2018-04-01

    Groundwater resources are crucial in sustaining agro-ecosystems and ensuring food security in many parts of the world, including Pakistan. However, the sustainability of groundwater resources is subject to a number of challenges, including over-extraction, deterioration in quality, and vulnerability to the impacts of climate change and population growth. Given the current state of groundwater resources in Pakistan, policymakers seek to manage groundwater resources by limiting groundwater extraction. To achieve this goal on a national scale, it is important to understand the determinants of the decisions made by local farmers in respect of tube-well adoption. This study investigates smallholder farmers' decisions to adopt tube-well technology in the face of dwindling groundwater resources and falling water tables. Analysis is based on a cross-sectional survey of 200 rural households from the arid to semi-arid predominantly groundwater-irrigated plains of the Punjab province, Pakistan. It is found that farmers will adopt tube-well technology in pursuit of reliable irrigation water supplies to hedge against production risks but not against the risk associated with unfavourable extreme events (downside risk) such as total crop failure. This suggests that the adoption decision is influenced by the expected long-term rather than the short-term benefits. This paper draws attention to the need to regulate groundwater resource exploitation by requiring the use of tube-well technology to be accompanied by irrigation water-efficient techniques and technologies.

  4. The BdV screen of memory and Ciutat d'Asunción boulevard at the Baró de Viver neighborhood (Barcelona: (rethinking citizens' participation in urban design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomeu Vidal

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of citizen participation to design some public spaces in Baró de Viver, a neighbourhood of the city of Barcelona. Our aim is to reflect on the ways to understand citizen participation in political and academic agenda, the role of different actors (citizens, professionals, politicians... and strategies and methods used in participatory urban planning. The experience showed in this paper is located in a scale of urban design very close and well known to the people. We begin with a brief historical overview of the neighborhood where the project arose. Then we give an account of the stages of the participatory process, showing the main milestones, features and methods. Finally we propose some ideas to rethink the conceptual and methodological aspects of the intervention and urban research in environmental psychology and people-environment studies.

  5. Time Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilov, Todor, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The time management is worthy goal of many human activities. It concerns variety problems related to goals definition, assessment of available resources, control of management policies, scheduling of decisions. This book is an attempt to illustrate the decision making process in time management for different success stories, which can be used as…

  6. Managing Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ronald V.

    The management of innovation in instruction in English as a second language can benefit from the experience and techniques of management in the world of commerce as well as from theories and procedures in education. A systematic approach to the management of innovation emphasizes the importance of clearly defined objectives, evaluation that…

  7. Cash Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Mary L.; Ostrom, John S.

    1982-01-01

    Elements of an effective management program for colleges and universities are examined. Five basic purposes of an effective program of cash management are identified: developing accurate cash projections, managing cash receipts, controlling cash disbursements, establishing sound banking relationships, and investing funds. It is suggested that all…

  8. Forest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Hummel; K. L. O' Hara

    2008-01-01

    Global variation in forests and in human cultures means that a single method for managing forests is not possible. However, forest management everywhere shares some common principles because it is rooted in physical and biological sciences like chemistry and genetics. Ecological forest management is an approach that combines an understanding of universal processes with...

  9. Does the accreditation of private dental practices work? Time to rethink how accreditation can improve patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Gillian

    2017-10-09

    Accreditation to demonstrate engagement with the National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards (Standards) is compulsory for most hospital and healthcare settings, but to date remains voluntary for private dental practices (PDPs). The regulatory framework governing the dental profession lacks a proactive element to drive improvements in quality and safety of care, and an accreditation scheme can strengthen existing regulation. The current model of accreditation operating in accordance with the Australian Health Service Safety and Quality Accreditation Scheme (Scheme) is based on the Standards, which were written for a hospital model of healthcare service. The majority of PDPs are small office-based businesses with clear leadership structure and employing six staff or fewer. The Scheme is overly bureaucratic given the simplicity of the PDP business model. This article considers whether accreditation has a proven track record of improving quality of service and offers opinions about how a more appropriate safety management program for PDPs may look. What is known about the topic? There has been minimal research about the impact of accreditation schemes in improving patient safety in PDP. What does this paper add? This paper proposes a redesign of the Scheme to make it more relevant to PDPs. The paper offers strategies to minimise duplication of purpose between accreditation and existing legislation; and to strengthen critical elements of accreditation to improve effects on patient safety. What are the implications for practitioners? A redesigned accreditation scheme will support dental practitioners to implement a quality assurance system with improved efficiency, reduced administrative burden, and optimised patient safety.

  10. Public sector energy management: A strategy for catalyzing energy efficiency in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anish Kumar

    To date the public sector role in facilitating the transition to a sustainable energy future has been envisaged mainly from a regulatory perspective. In such a role, the public sector provides the push factors---enforcing regulations and providing incentives---to correct market imperfections that impede energy transitions. An alternative and complementary role of the public sector that is now gaining increasing attention is that of catalyzing energy transitions through public sector energy management initiatives. This dissertation offers a conceptual framework to rationalize such a role for the public sector by combining recent theories of sustainable energy transition and public management. In particular, the framework identifies innovative public management strategies (such as performance contracting and procurement) for effectively implementing sustainable energy projects in government facilities. The dissertation evaluates a model of sustainable public sector energy management for promoting energy efficiency in Malaysia. The public sector in Malaysia can be a major player in leading and catalyzing energy efficiency efforts as it is not only the largest and one of the most influential energy consumers, but it also plays a central role in setting national development strategy. The dissertation makes several recommendations on how a public sector energy management strategy can be implemented in Malaysia. The US Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is used as a practical model. The analysis, however, shows that in applying the FEMP model to the Malaysian context, there are a number of limitations that will have to be taken into consideration to enable a public sector energy management strategy to be effectively implemented. Overall the analysis of this dissertation contributes to a rethinking of the public sector role in sustainable energy development that can strengthen the sector's credibility both in terms of governance and institutional performance. In

  11. Knowledge management: another management fad?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard J. Ponzi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge management is a subject of a growth body of literature. While capturing the interest of practitioners and scholars in the mid-1990s, knowledge management remains a broadly defined concept with faddish characteristics. Based on annual counts of article retrieved from Science Citation Index, Social Science Citation Index, and ABI Inform referring to three previous recognized management fad, this paper introduces empirical evidence that proposes that a typical management movement generally reveals itself as a fad in approximately five years. In applying this approach and assumption to the case of knowledge management, the findings suggest that knowledge management is at least living longer than typical fads and perhaps is in the process of establishing itself as a new aspect of management. To further the understanding of knowledge management's development, its interdisciplinary activity and breadth are reported and briefly discussed.

  12. The Manager Coaching in Management

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz Cardozo, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    The paper aims to make contributions to the Manager Coaching, optimization of management in all areas in which it develops and operates the human being, in that sense, devotes part of its content to the figure of the manager, and Coaching as a leader, manager, director and conductor of processes, identified as largely responsible, you must have knowledge and experience in such functions, in addition to meeting a set of skills that will allow you to efficiently fulfill their activities. It rel...

  13. Adaptive management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rist, Lucy; Campbell, Bruce Morgan; Frost, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive management (AM) emerged in the literature in the mid-1970s in response both to a realization of the extent of uncertainty involved in management, and a frustration with attempts to use modelling to integrate knowledge and make predictions. The term has since become increasingly widely used...... in scientific articles, policy documents and management plans, but both understanding and application of the concept is mixed. This paper reviews recent literature from conservation and natural resource management journals to assess diversity in how the term is used, highlight ambiguities and consider how...... the concept might be further assessed. AM is currently being used to describe many different management contexts, scales and locations. Few authors define the term explicitly or describe how it offers a means to improve management outcomes in their specific management context. Many do not adhere to the idea...

  14. Teaching Managers How to Manage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hylko, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Following graduation from a college or university with a technical degree, or through years of experience, an individual's training and career development activities typically focus on enhancing technical problem-solving skills. However, as these technical professionals, herein referred to as 'Techies', advance throughout their careers, they may be required to accept and adapt to the role of being a manager, and must undergo a transition to learn and rely on new problem-solving skills. However, unless a company has a specific manager-trainee class to address this subject and develop talent from within, an employee's management style is learned and developed 'on the job'. Both positive and negative styles are nurtured by those managers having similar qualities. Unfortunately, a negative style often contributes to the deterioration of employee morale and ultimate closing of a department or company. This paper provides the core elements of an effective management training program for 'Teaching Managers How to Manage' derived from the Department of Energy's Integrated Safety Management System and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration 's Voluntary Protection Program. Discussion topics and real-life examples concentrate on transitioning an employee from a 'Techie' to a manager; common characteristics of being a manager; the history and academic study of management; competition, change and the business of waste management; what to do after taking over a department by applying Hylko's Star of Success; command media; the formal and informal organizational charts; chain of command; hiring and developing high-degree, autonomous employees through effective communication and delegation; periodic status checks; and determining if the program is working successfully. These common characteristics of a strong management/leadership culture and practical career tips discussed herein provide a solid foundation for any company or department that is serious about developing

  15. How do Category Managers Manage?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Kim Sundtoft; Sigurbjornsson, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to explore the managerial role of category managers in purchasing. A network management perspective is adopted. A case based research methodology is applied, and three category managers managing a diverse set of component and service categories in a global production...... firm is observed while providing accounts of their progress and results in meetings. We conclude that the network management classification scheme originally deve loped by Harland and Knight (2001) and Knight and Harland (2005) is a valuable and fertile theoretical framework for the analysis...

  16. Change Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motab Raja Aljohani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Managing change within organizations is a core challenge for the HR professionals as any change concerns people working within the organization. The study of Human Resource Management is based on achievement of goals through corporate strategy and effective management of change within the organization. Change can be successful when it links people job satisfaction and productivity within an organization. Effective change management can result in greater productivity higher work life quality and improved readiness for future changes. Most HR professionals are regularly being asked for developing attitudes and personal skills for change implementation as technical understanding of applying the tools for managing change. This article will outline the challenges faced by Human Resource managers in change implementation. The well-known theories and literature will also be discussed to share light on the importance and change management for HR. Also recommendations and suggestion will be provided for improving change management process within an organizational context. Keywords Change Management Human Resource Management

  17. Managing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandifer, Q D

    1997-09-01

    The terms 'managed care' and 'disease management' are gaining common usage in the health service but their meaning is not widely understood. Managed care is a generic term describing any health care system that integrates the financing and delivery of medical care. Its growth in the United States has been driven by pressure to control costs, and there is circumstantial evidence that costs are slowing as a result of better management of resources. However, it is not clear how much of this is due to managed care, the selection of more favourable enrollees to health plans or other factors. Research evidence is limited, and that available is constrained by the rapidly changing nature of managed care. In the United States a bewildering variety of managed care arrangements have emerged, although several common characteristics can be identified: limited choice of physician providers; controlled access to secondary care; selective contracting; financial incentives; quality management; and utilization management. All are present in the National Health Service (NHS), which exemplifies a nationalized managed care system. Disease management is an extension of managed care that takes a global approach to patient care by attempting to co-ordinate resources across the entire health care delivery system throughout the life cycle of the disease. This is poorly developed in the NHS, so that the attention of commercial organizations has been attracted. However, concern has been expressed about the implications of commercial involvement: the fragmentation of general medical services; effect of for-profit status; and use of patient-based data. Recent policy developments could allow disease management to develop within the NHS.

  18. Managing Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slavich, Barbara; Velikova, Silviya Svejenova

    2016-01-01

    This article aims at providing definitional clarity on creativity and a systematic understanding of its management in organizations. By drawing on the results of a content analysis of creativity definitions in 440 scholarly publications in the field of management between 1990 and 2014, this study...... clarifies how scholars in the management domain have defined the concept and identifies core categories shared by these definitions. It also brings together these conceptual categories into an integrative multilevel framework of relevance for managing creativity in organizations. The framework outlines...... a view of managing creativity, which involves managing interconnected processes as well as dualities, such as processes-outcomes, individuals-collectives, and permanent-temporary creativity units. Finally, it paves the way to new research frontiers for the domain....

  19. Managing mayhem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, K.S.

    2012-01-01

    Research institutes, typically full of excellent scientists and engineers, tend to be very focused on the technical aspects of their work, but reluctant to put much energy into the management functions that enable a healthy, productive organization. This is not really surprising when one considers that scientists and engineers are well trained to measure and evaluate quantitative entities while the management arena is dominated by qualitative concepts. Management is generally considered to include planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Not confusing talking with communication and the ability to boost motivation and creativity without generating conflicts are necessary qualities for a good manager. The good manager in research and development organization must be willing to relinquish some control and focus more effort on leading and coordinating the abilities of highly intelligent, educated and autonomous individuals. This paper discusses the essential management functions and techniques that can be employed to maximize success in a research and development organization

  20. Records Management Directive

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Records Management Directive provides guidelines for the management of OPM records, and identifies the records management...

  1. Risk management

    OpenAIRE

    Mcmanus, John

    2009-01-01

    Few projects are completed on time, on budget, and to their original requirement or specifications. Focusing on what project managers need to know about risk in the pursuit of delivering projects, Risk Management covers key components of the risk management process and the software development process, as well as best practices for risk identification, risk planning, and risk analysis. The book examines risk planning, risk analysis responses to risk, the tracking and modelling of risks, intel...

  2. Managing crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Bakacsi, Gyula

    2010-01-01

    The traditional approach to crisis management suggest autocratic leadership, that has risks anyway (leader is the bottle-neck of problem solving, single-loop learning, crisis management is a matter of efficiency). However, managing nowadays crisis is rather effectiveness issue, and requires double-loop learning (second-order change) and leadership role in the sense of Kotter’s theory. Paper discusses the top-management’s leadership responsibilities, and their special tasks in the problem solv...

  3. Management Accounting

    OpenAIRE

    John Burns; Martin Quinn; Liz Warren; João Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Overview of the BookThe textbook comprises six sections which together represent a comprehensive insight into management accounting - its technical attributes, changeable wider context, and the multiple roles of management accountants. The sections cover: (1) an introduction to management accounting, (2) how organizations account for their costs, (3) the importance of tools and techniques which assist organizational planning and control, (4) the various dimensions of making business decisions...

  4. Change management

    OpenAIRE

    Kebrlová, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This diploma thesis is focused on Change Management, for which I used translation "správa změn" in my thesis. The diploma thesis includes a proposal for solution of Change Management, which is based from elements of RUP (Rational Unified Process), and methodology and CMMI (Capability Maturity Model Integration). In the first chapter, entitled Software requirements, there are at first defined basic concepts related to Change Management. The chapter includes the definition of software requireme...

  5. Practice management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althausen, Peter L; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    The practicing orthopaedic traumatologist must have a sound knowledge of business fundamentals to be successful in the changing healthcare environment. Practice management encompasses multiple topics including governance, the financial aspects of billing and coding, physician extender management, ancillary service development, information technology, transcription utilization, and marketing. Some of these are universal, but several of these areas may be most applicable to the private practice of medicine. Attention to each component is vital to develop an understanding of the intricacies of practice management.

  6. Blast management

    OpenAIRE

    Shouraki, Mohammad Kargar; Naserkheil, Ali Asghar

    2011-01-01

    Blast Management (BM) is composed of the combination of human resources management (HRM) principles and concepts and various methods of quality management (QM) with a financial approach. BM is made up of three aspects: hard, soft and concept and BLAST means an explosive shift in organization's mindset and thought and rapid action against it. The first aspect, hard, includes a set of managerial toots and philosophies to improve the quality and productivity with a financial approach.

  7. Waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewska, E.

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter formation of wastes and basic concepts of non-radioactive waste management are explained. This chapter consists of the following parts: People in Peril; Self-regulation of nature as a guide for minimizing and recycling waste; The current waste management situation in the Slovak Republic; Categorization and determination of the type of waste in legislative of Slovakia; Strategic directions waste management in the Slovak Republic.

  8. Portfolio Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Enterprise Business Information Services Division (EBIS) supports the Laboratory and its functions through the implementation and support of business information systems on behalf of its business community. EBIS Five Strategic Focus Areas: (1) Improve project estimating, planning and delivery capability (2) Improve maintainability and sustainability of EBIS Application Portfolio (3) Leap forward in IT Leadership (4) Comprehensive Talent Management (5) Continuous IT Security Program. Portfolio Management is a strategy in which software applications are managed as assets

  9. Talent management

    OpenAIRE

    Lappyová, Nella

    2011-01-01

    This thesis deals with talent management. It is divided into two parts, a theoretical one and a practical one. The aim is to provide a comprehensive overview of talent management from a theoretical and practical point of view. The aim of the practical part is also to assess talent management at Alliance Healthcare Ltd. giving my own recommendations on the basis of theoretical knowledge. The theoretical part is based on theoretical knowledge and professional literature. It aims to explain basi...

  10. Reservoir management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satter, A.; Varnon, J.E.; Hoang, M.T.

    1992-01-01

    A reservoir's life begins with exploration leading to discovery followed by delineation of the reservoir, development of the field, production by primary, secondary and tertiary means, and finally to abandonment. Sound reservoir management is the key to maximizing economic operation of the reservoir throughout its entire life. Technological advances and rapidly increasing computer power are providing tools to better manage reservoirs and are increasing the gap between good and neural reservoir management. The modern reservoir management process involves goal setting, planning, implementing, monitoring, evaluating, and revising plans. Setting a reservoir management strategy requires knowledge of the reservoir, availability of technology, and knowledge of the business, political, and environmental climate. Formulating a comprehensive management plan involves depletion and development strategies, data acquisition and analyses, geological and numerical model studies, production and reserves forecasts, facilities requirements, economic optimization, and management approval. This paper provides management, engineers, geologists, geophysicists, and field operations staff with a better understanding of the practical approach to reservoir management using a multidisciplinary, integrated team approach

  11. Management services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adkins, S.K.; Alford, D.R.; Barnette, A.B.

    1979-01-01

    The Management Services Section provides coordinated professional administrative services to the Fusion Energy Division (FED), allowing the work of technical professionals to be more fully concentrated in their areas of specialty. Services are provided in general administration, personnel, financial management, communications (including text and graphics generation), management information, library, safety, quality assurance, and nonprogrammatic engineering services. Highlights of the past year included adoption of the Procurement Module in the FED Management Information System (MIS) for use by the entire Laboratory, completion of the Personnel Module of the MIS, greatly increased personnel recruiting activity, and increased industrial subcontracting activity

  12. Management research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, M.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Management Research center (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The Center research programs include the management of different organizations, such as industry, administrative systems, hospitals and cultural systems. The investigations performed concern the improvement and better knowledge of the new methods of analysis: the role of the speech, the logic conflicts; the crisis development, symptoms and effects; the relationship between the management practices and the prevailing ideas or theories. The approach adopted by the scientists involves the accurate analysis of the essential management activities. The investigations carried out in 1988 are summarized. The published papers, the congress communications and the thesis are listed [fr

  13. Knowledge management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Mahnke, Volker

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge management has emerged as a very successful organization practice and has beenextensively treated in a large body of academic work. Surprisingly, however, organizationaleconomics (i.e., transaction cost economics, agency theory, team theory and property rightstheory) has played no role...... in the development of knowledge management. We argue thatorganizational economics insights can further the theory and practice of knowledge managementin several ways. Specifically, we apply notions of contracting, team production,complementaries, hold-up, etc. to knowledge management issues (i.e., creating...... and integrationknowledge, rewarding knowledge workers, etc.) , and derive refutable implications that are novelto the knowledge management field from our discussion....

  14. Identity Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Provides information for identity management services on the creation, modification and eventual deletion of accounts and entitlements based on user relationships on...

  15. Reservoir management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satter, A.; Varnon, J.E.; Hoang, M.T.

    1992-01-01

    A reservoir's life begins with exploration leading to discovery followed by delineation of the reservoir, development of the field, production by primary, secondary and tertiary means, and finally to abandonment. Sound reservoir management is the key to maximizing economic operation of the reservoir throughout its entire life. Technological advances and rapidly increasing computer power are providing tools to better manage reservoirs and are increasing the gap between good and neutral reservoir management. The modern reservoir management process involves goal setting, planning, implementing, monitoring, evaluating, and revising plans. Setting a reservoir management strategy requires knowledge of the reservoir, availability of technology, and knowledge of the business, political, and environmental climate. Formulating a comprehensive management plan involves depletion and development strategies, data acquisition and analyses, geological and numerical model studies, production and reserves forecasts, facilities requirements, economic optimization, and management approval. This paper provides management, engineers geologists, geophysicists, and field operations staff with a better understanding of the practical approach to reservoir management using a multidisciplinary, integrated team approach

  16. Cluster management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, R

    1992-11-01

    Cluster management is a management model that fosters decentralization of management, develops leadership potential of staff, and creates ownership of unit-based goals. Unlike shared governance models, there is no formal structure created by committees and it is less threatening for managers. There are two parts to the cluster management model. One is the formation of cluster groups, consisting of all staff and facilitated by a cluster leader. The cluster groups function for communication and problem-solving. The second part of the cluster management model is the creation of task forces. These task forces are designed to work on short-term goals, usually in response to solving one of the unit's goals. Sometimes the task forces are used for quality improvement or system problems. Clusters are groups of not more than five or six staff members, facilitated by a cluster leader. A cluster is made up of individuals who work the same shift. For example, people with job titles who work days would be in a cluster. There would be registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, nursing assistants, and unit clerks in the cluster. The cluster leader is chosen by the manager based on certain criteria and is trained for this specialized role. The concept of cluster management, criteria for choosing leaders, training for leaders, using cluster groups to solve quality improvement issues, and the learning process necessary for manager support are described.

  17. Blue Water Footprint Management in a UK Poultry Supply Chain under Environmental Regulatory Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoum Tsolakis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Chicken is the most consumed meat in the UK, accounting for 40% of meat consumption, while national production sufficiency reaches about 80%. As a farmed animal product, chicken meat is responsible for significant freshwater appropriation volumes during its production cycle. In this context, this research aims at exploring freshwater dynamics in the UK processed poultry industry. Specifically, we develop a System Dynamics model to capture the blue water footprint, as a key sustainability performance indicator of a poultry supply chain, in the case that relevant environmental and regulatory constraints are applied. The model contributes towards investigating the impact of two potential policy-making scenarios, namely, the “water penalty” and the “water tax”, on the nexus between profitability and water usage across the poultry supply chain. Responding to the regulatory constraints, the food processor either reconfigures the supply chain through rethinking desired inventory levels or implements a water management intervention. The results indicate that investing in water-friendly production technologies could offer a greater advantage to sustainable supply chains in terms of blue water efficiency and profitability, compared to employing inventory management strategies. Overall, our analysis highlights that effective policy-making and technology-driven interventions could provide potential towards ensuring economic growth and environmental sustainability of the UK poultry sector.

  18. Fostering food security in areas of extreme poverty through Integrated Farm Management: the case of Burundi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Aad; van Duivenbooden, Niek; van Beek, Christy

    2014-05-01

    Extreme poverty in Burundi's rural area and tensions between families with limited access to arable land hinder development towards a more stable and peaceful society. Due to these tensions and a rapid population growth, agricultural land is currently subject to increased degradation and low agricultural productivity. A whole range of other limiting factors contributes to this, such as: poor seed quality, poor nutrient management combined with low soil fertility, inadequate agronomic practices, pests and crop diseases, poorly developed supply chains, health problems, difficult access to credit, and insecurity. Solving one of these problems will not solve the chain that eventually leads to low food production; it will simply move the emphasis to the next constraining factor. An integrated rural development approach is therefore required to break this vicious circle. The project Fanning the Spark, a Public-Private-Partnership between Achmea Foundation, Alterra of Wageningen University and Research Centre, and HealthNet-TPO in Burundi started in September 2013 with an intervention in several rural villages in Gitega. The project's objective is to increase food production at village level, by means of investments in crop production, a family (income) insurance package that protects rural families against the financial consequences of catastrophic events (natural and health) and making micro-credits available. This will enhance farmers' workability and generate income from agricultural activities in order to break the poverty cycle and enhance food security. The insurance package comprises agricultural and health insurances, and will be jointly implemented with the sustainable agriculture component. The latter component focuses on Integrated Farm Management and the use of innovative soil management practices. Farmer-to-farmer training and scaling-up are crucial components, and in the first phase of the project "innovative farmer groups" have a central role in the

  19. Marketing Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilke, Ricky

    2012-01-01

    Book review of: Christian Homburg, Sabine Kuester, Harley Krohmer, Marketing Management – A Contemporary Perspective, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2009......Book review of: Christian Homburg, Sabine Kuester, Harley Krohmer, Marketing Management – A Contemporary Perspective, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2009...

  20. Construction Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, James F.

    This article provides a detailed discussion of a team approach to building that involves a construction manager, an architect, and a contractor. Bidding methods are outlined; the major components in construction management -- value engineering and fast track scheduling -- and the use of performance specifications are discussed. The construction…