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Sample records for resuscitation outcomes consortium

  1. Advanced vs. Basic Life Support in the Treatment of Out-of-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest in the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Michael Christopher; Schmicker, Robert H; Leroux, Brian; Nichol, Graham; Aufderheide, Tom P; Cheskes, Sheldon; Grunau, Brian; Jasti, Jamie; Kudenchuk, Peter; Vilke, Gary M; Buick, Jason; Wittwer, Lynn; Sahni, Ritu; Straight, Ronald; Wang, Henry E

    2018-04-30

    Prior observational studies suggest no additional benefit from advanced life support (ALS) when compared with providing basic life support (BLS) for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We compared the association of ALS care with OHCA outcomes using prospective clinical data from the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC). Included were consecutive adults OHCA treated by participating emergency medical services (EMS) agencies between June 1, 2011, and June 30, 2015. We defined BLS as receipt of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and/or automated defibrillation and ALS as receipt of an advanced airway, manual defibrillation, or intravenous drug therapy. We compared outcomes among patients receiving: 1) BLS-only; 2) BLS + late ALS; 3) BLS + early ALS; and 4) ALS-first care. Using multivariable logistic regression, we evaluated the associations between level of care and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), survival to hospital discharge, and survival with good functional status, adjusting for age, sex, witnessed arrest, bystander CPR, shockable initial rhythm, public location, EMS response time, CPR quality, and ROC site. Among 35,065 patients with OHCA, characteristics were median age 68 years (IQR 56-80), male 63.9%, witnessed arrest 43.8%, bystander CPR 50.6%, and shockable initial rhythm 24.2%. Care delivered was: 4.0% BLS-only, 31.5% BLS + late ALS, 17.2% BLS + early ALS, and 47.3% ALS-first. ALS care with or without initial BLS care was independently associated with increased adjusted ROSC and survival to hospital discharge unless delivered greater than 6 min after BLS arrival (BLS + late ALS). Regardless of when it was delivered, ALS care was not associated with significantly greater functional outcome. ALS care was associated with survival to hospital discharge when provided initially or within six minutes of BLS arrival. ALS care, with or without initial BLS care, was associated with increased ROSC, however it was

  2. Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) PRIMED cardiac arrest trial methods part 1: rationale and methodology for the impedance threshold device (ITD) protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufderheide, Tom P; Kudenchuk, Peter J; Hedges, Jerris R; Nichol, Graham; Kerber, Richard E; Dorian, Paul; Davis, Daniel P; Idris, Ahamed H; Callaway, Clifton W; Emerson, Scott; Stiell, Ian G; Terndrup, Thomas E

    2008-08-01

    The primary aim of this study is to compare survival to hospital discharge with a modified Rankin score (MRS)CPR) plus an active impedance threshold device (ITD) versus standard CPR plus a sham ITD in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Secondary aims are to compare functional status and depression at discharge and at 3 and 6 months post-discharge in survivors. Prospective, double-blind, randomized, controlled, clinical trial. Patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated by emergency medical services (EMS) providers. EMS systems participating in the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium. Based on a one-sided significance level of 0.025, power=0.90, a survival with MRSCPR and sham ITD, and two interim analyses, a maximum of 14,742 evaluable patients are needed to detect a 6.69% survival with MRSCPR and active ITD (1.36% absolute survival difference). If the ITD demonstrates the hypothesized improvement in survival, it is estimated that 2700 deaths from cardiac arrest per year would be averted in North America alone.

  3. Outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation - predictors of survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishtiaq, O.; Iqbal, M.; Zubair, M.; Qayyum, R.; Adil, M.

    2008-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of patients undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Data were collected retrospectively of all adult patients who underwent CPR. Clinical outcomes of interest were survival at the end of CPR and survival at discharge from hospital. Factors associated with survival were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Of the 159 patients included, 55 (35%) were alive at the end of CPR and 17 (11%) were discharged alive from the hospital. At the end of CPR, univariate logistic regression analysis found the following factors associated with survival: cardiac arrest within hospital as compared to outside the hospital (odds ratio = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.27-6.20, p-value = 0.01), both cardiac and pulmonary arrest as compared to either cardiac or pulmonary arrest (odds ratio = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.19- 0.73, p-value = 0.004), asystole as cardiac rhythm at presentation (odds ratio = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.24-0.93, p-value = 0.03), and total atropine dose given during CPR (odds ratio = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.62-0.97, p-value = 0.02). In multivariate logistic regression, cardiac arrest within hospital (odds ratio = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.06-5.99, p-value = 0.04) and both cardiac and pulmonary arrest as compared to cardiac or pulmonary arrest (odds ratio = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.21-0.91, p-value = 0.03) were associated with survival at the end of CPR. At the time of discharge from hospital, univariate logistic regression analysis found following factors that were associated with survival: cardiac arrest within hospital (odds ratio = 8.4, 95% CI = 1.09-65.64, p-value = 0.04), duration of CPR (odds ratio = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.85-0.96, p-value = 0.001), and total atropine dose given during CPR (odds ratio = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.47-0.99, p-value = 0.05). In multivariate logistic regression analysis cardiac arrest within hospital (odds ratio 8.69, 95% CI = 1.01-74.6, p-value = 0.05) and duration of CPR (odds ratio 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87-0.98, p-value = 0.01) were associated with survival at

  4. Outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest--why do physicians withhold resuscitation attempts?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsted, Tina I; Rasmussen, Lars S; Lippert, Freddy K

    2004-01-01

    To describe the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with a focus on why physicians withhold resuscitation attempts.......To describe the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with a focus on why physicians withhold resuscitation attempts....

  5. Prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Folke, Fredrik; Kragholm, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    AIM: It is unclear whether prolonged resuscitation can result in successful outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA). We assessed associations between duration of pre-hospital resuscitation on survival and functional outcome following OHCA in patients achieving pre-hospital return...

  6. Outcome after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Puyvelde, Tim; Ameloot, Koen; Roggen, Mieke; Troost, Els; Gewillig, Marc; Budts, Werner; Van De Bruaene, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Outcome after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in patients with underlying congenital heart disease is uncertain. This study aimed at evaluating outcome after CPR in patients with underlying congenital heart disease, factors related to worse outcome after CPR and whether survivors of sudden cardiac death (SCD) have a worse outcome when compared to an age, gender and disease-matched control population. Between 1984 and 2015, all patients with congenital heart disease who received in or out-of-hospital CPR were identified from the database of congenital heart disease from the University Hospitals Leuven. Postoperative and neonatal (CPR was excluded. For each survivor of SCD, two control patients matched for gender, age and underlying heart defect were included in the study. Thirty-eight patients (66% men; median age 25 years (interquartile range 9-40); 68% out-of-hospital) were identified, of which 27 (66%) survived the event. The main cause of SCD was ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation ( n=21). Heart defect complexity (odds ratio (OR) 5.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-21.9; P=0.027), pulmonary hypertension (OR 13.8; 95% CI 2.1-89.5; P=0.006) and time to return of spontaneous circulation (OR 1.1; 95% CI 1.0-1.1; P=0.046) were related to worse outcome. Survivors of SCD had a worse prognosis when compared to an age, gender and disease-matched control group (5-year survival 76% vs. 98%; P=0.002). The complexity of underlying heart defect, pulmonary hypertension and time to return of spontaneous circulation are related to worse outcome in the case of CPR. Survivors of SCD have a worse outcome when compared to matched controls, indicating the need for adequate implantable cardioverter defibrillator indication assessment and for stringent follow-up of patients with worsening haemodynamics.

  7. Dynamic prediction of patient outcomes during ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonghee; Kim, Kyuseok; Callaway, Clifton W; Doh, Kibbeum; Choi, Jungho; Park, Jongdae; Jo, You Hwan; Lee, Jae Hyuk

    2017-02-01

    The probability of the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and subsequent favourable outcomes changes dynamically during advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). We sought to model these changes using time-to-event analysis in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Adult (≥18 years old), non-traumatic OHCA patients without prehospital ROSC were included. Utstein variables and initial arterial blood gas measurements were used as predictors. The incidence rate of ROSC during the first 30min of ACLS in the emergency department (ED) was modelled using spline-based parametric survival analysis. Conditional probabilities of subsequent outcomes after ROSC (1-week and 1-month survival and 6-month neurologic recovery) were modelled using multivariable logistic regression. The ROSC and conditional probability models were then combined to estimate the likelihood of achieving ROSC and subsequent outcomes by providing k additional minutes of effort. A total of 727 patients were analyzed. The incidence rate of ROSC increased rapidly until the 10th minute of ED ACLS, and it subsequently decreased. The conditional probabilities of subsequent outcomes after ROSC were also dependent on the duration of resuscitation with odds ratios for 1-week and 1-month survival and neurologic recovery of 0.93 (95% CI: 0.90-0.96, p<0.001), 0.93 (0.88-0.97, p=0.001) and 0.93 (0.87-0.99, p=0.031) per 1-min increase, respectively. Calibration testing of the combined models showed good correlation between mean predicted probability and actual prevalence. The probability of ROSC and favourable subsequent outcomes changed according to a multiphasic pattern over the first 30min of ACLS, and modelling of the dynamic changes was feasible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Better outcome after pediatric resuscitation is still a dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahu Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cardiac arrest is not a single problem. Although most episodes of pediatric cardiac arrest occur as complications and progression of respiratory failure and shock. Sudden cardiac arrest may result from abrupt and unexpected arrhythmias. With a better-tailored therapy, we can optimize the outcome. In the hospital, cardiac arrest often develops as a progression of respiratory failure and shock. Typically half or more of pediatric victims of in-hospital arrest have pre-existing respiratory failure and one-third or more have shock, although these figures vary somewhat among reporting hospitals. When in-hospital respiratory arrest or failure is treated before the development of cardiac arrest, survival ranges from 60% to 97%. Bradyarrthmia, asystole or pulseless electric activity (PEA were recorded as an initial rhythm in half or more of the recent reports of in-hospital cardiac arrest, with survival to hospital discharge ranging from 22% to 40%. Data allowing characterization of out of hospital pediatric arrest are limited, although existing data support the long-held belief that as with hospitalized children, cardiac arrest most often occurs as a progression of respiratory failure or shock to cardiac arrest with bradyasystole rhythm. Although VF (Ventricular fibrillation, is a very rapid, uncoordinated, ineffective series of contractions throughout the lower chambers of the heart. Unless stopped, these chaotic impulses are fatal and VT (Ventricular tachycardia is a rapid heartbeat that originates in one of the ventricles of the heart. To be classified as tachycardia, the heart rate is usually at least 100 beats per minute are not common out-of-cardiac arrest in children, they are more likely to be present with sudden, witnessed collapse, particularly among adolescents. Pre-hospital care till the late 1980s was mainly concerned with adult care, and the initial focus for pediatric resuscitation was provision of oxygen and ventilation, with

  9. Prehospital plasma resuscitation associated with improved neurologic outcomes after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Matthew C; Thiels, Cornelius A; Aho, Johnathon M; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Zielinski, Martin D; Stubbs, James A; Jenkins, Donald H; Zietlow, Scott P

    2017-09-01

    Trauma-related hypotension and coagulopathy worsen secondary brain injury in patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Early damage control resuscitation with blood products may mitigate hypotension and coagulopathy. Preliminary data suggest resuscitation with plasma in large animals improves neurologic function after TBI; however, data in humans are lacking. We retrospectively identified all patients with multiple injuries age >15 years with head injuries undergoing prehospital resuscitation with blood products at a single Level I trauma center from January 2002 to December 2013. Inclusion criteria were prehospital resuscitation with either packed red blood cells (pRBCs) or thawed plasma as sole colloid resuscitation. Patients who died in hospital and those using anticoagulants were excluded. Primary outcomes were Glasgow Outcomes Score Extended (GOSE) and Disability Rating Score (DRS) at dismissal and during follow-up. Of 76 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 53% (n = 40) received prehospital pRBCs and 47% (n = 36) received thawed plasma. Age, gender, injury severity or TBI severity, arrival laboratory values, and number of prehospital units were similar (all p > 0.05). Patients who received thawed plasma had an improved neurologic outcome compared to those receiving pRBCs (median GOSE 7 [7-8] vs. 5.5 [3-7], p plasma had improved functionality compared to pRBCs (median DRS 2 [1-3.5] vs. 9 [3-13], p plasma compared to pRBCs by both median GOSE (8 [7-8] vs. 6 [6-7], p plasma is associated with improved neurologic and functional outcomes at discharge and during follow-up compared to pRBCs alone. These preliminary data support the further investigation and use of plasma in the resuscitation of critically injured TBI patients. Therapeutic, level V.

  10. Outcome after resuscitation beyond 30 minutes in drowned children with cardiac arrest and hypothermia : Dutch nationwide retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J. K.; Verkade, H. J.; Burgerhof, J. G.; Bierens, J. J.; van Rheenen, P. F.; Kneyber, M. C.; Albers, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the outcome of drowned children with cardiac arrest and hypothermia, and to determine distinct criteria for termination of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in drowned children with hypothermia and absence of spontaneous circulation. DESIGN Nationwide retrospective cohort study.

  11. Pravastatin But Not Simvastatin Improves Survival and Neurofunctional Outcome After Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Bergt, MD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Cardiac arrest (CA followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is associated with high mortality and poor neurological outcome. We compared the effects of pravastatin and simvastatin on survival and neurofunction in a murine model of CA/CPR. Pravastatin, a hydrophilic statin, increased survival and neurofunction during a 28-day follow-up period. This therapy was associated with improved pulmonary function, reduced pulmonary edema, and increased endothelial cell function in vitro. In contrast, lipophilic simvastatin did not modulate survival but increased pulmonary edema and impaired endothelial cell function. Although pravastatin may display a therapeutic option for post-CA syndrome, the application of simvastatin may require re-evaluation. Key Words: cardiac arrest, endothelial cell function, ischemia and reperfusion injury, pravastatin, resuscitation, simvastatin

  12. The significance of clinical experience on learning outcome from resuscitation training-a randomised controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Lind; Lippert, Freddy; Hesselfeldt, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: The impact of clinical experience on learning outcome from a resuscitation course has not been systematically investigated. AIM: To determine whether half a year of clinical experience before participation in an Advanced Life Support (ALS) course increases the immediate learning outcome...... and retention of learning. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective single blinded randomised controlled study of the learning outcome from a standard ALS course on a volunteer sample of the entire cohort of newly graduated doctors from Copenhagen University. The outcome measurement was ALS...... immediately following graduation. RESULTS: Invitation to participate was accepted by 154/240 (64%) graduates and 117/154 (76%) completed the study. There was no difference between the intervention and control groups with regard to the immediate learning outcome. The intervention group had significantly higher...

  13. Resuscitation outcomes of reproductive-age females who experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Manabu; Nagata, Takashi; Abe, Takeru; Nabeshima, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-01

    Although some studies have shown that women in their reproductive years have better resuscitation outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), conflicting results and methodological problems have also been noted. Thus, we evaluated the resuscitation outcomes of OHCA of females by age. This was a prospective observational study using registry data from all OHCA cases between 2005 and 2012 in Japan. The subjects were females aged 18-110 years who suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Logistic regression analyses were performed using total and propensity-matched patients. There were 381,123 OHCA cases that met the inclusion criteria. Among propensity-matched patients, females aged 18-49 and 50-60 years of age had similar rates of return of spontaneous circulation before hospital arrival and 1-month survival (all p>0.60). In contrast, females aged 18-49 years of age had significantly lower rates of 1-month survival with minimal neurological impairment than did females aged 50-60 years of age (after adjusting for selected variables: Cerebral Performance Category scale 1 or 2 (CPC (1, 2)), OR=0.45, p=0.020; Overall Performance Category scale 1 or 2 (OPC (1, 2)): OR=0.42, p= 0.014; after adjustment for all variables: CPC (1, 2), OR=0.27, p= 0.008; OPC (1, 2), OR=0.29, p=0.009). Women of reproductive age did not show improved resuscitation outcomes in OHCA. Additionally, women in their reproductive years showed worse neurological outcomes one month after the event, which may be explained by the negative effects of estrogen. These findings need to be verified in further studies.

  14. Patient-Reported Outcome (PRO) Consortium translation process: consensus development of updated best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremenco, Sonya; Pease, Sheryl; Mann, Sarah; Berry, Pamela

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the rationale and goals of the Patient-Reported Outcome (PRO) Consortium's instrument translation process. The PRO Consortium has developed a number of novel PRO measures which are in the process of qualification by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in clinical trials where endpoints based on these measures would support product labeling claims. Given the importance of FDA qualification of these measures, the PRO Consortium's Process Subcommittee determined that a detailed linguistic validation (LV) process was necessary to ensure that all translations of Consortium-developed PRO measures are performed using a standardized approach with the rigor required to meet regulatory and pharmaceutical industry expectations, as well as having a clearly defined instrument translation process that the translation industry can support. The consensus process involved gathering information about current best practices from 13 translation companies with expertise in LV, consolidating the findings to generate a proposed process, and obtaining iterative feedback from the translation companies and PRO Consortium member firms on the proposed process in two rounds of review in order to update existing principles of good practice in LV and to provide sufficient detail for the translation process to ensure consistency across PRO Consortium measures, sponsors, and translation companies. The consensus development resulted in a 12-step process that outlines universal and country-specific new translation approaches, as well as country-specific adaptations of existing translations. The PRO Consortium translation process will play an important role in maintaining the validity of the data generated through these measures by ensuring that they are translated by qualified linguists following a standardized and rigorous process that reflects best practice.

  15. Evaluation of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) for Patient Outcomes and their Predictors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Swati; Grewal, Anju; Gautam, Parshotam L; Luthra, Neeru; Tanwar, Gayatri; Kaur, Amarpreet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac arrest continues to be a common cause of in-hospital deaths. Even small improvements in survival can translate into thousands of lives saved every year. Aim The aim of our prospective observational study was to elicit the outcomes and predictors of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation among adult patients. Settings and Design All in-hospital adult patients (age >14) who suffered cardiac arrest & were attended by a Code Blue Team between 1st January 2012 & 30th April 2013 were part of the study. Materials and Methods The cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was assessed in terms of: Response time, Presenting initial rhythm, Time to first defibrillation, Duration of CPR and Outcome (Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) at discharge). Statistical Analysis Age, GOS and mean response time were analysed using t-test and ANOVA. Logistic regression was applied to determine the significance of the various factors in determining mortality. Results ROSC was achieved in 44% of a total of 127 patients included in our study. Asystole/Pulseless electrical activity (PEA) was the most common presenting rhythm (87.5%). The survival to discharge was seen in 7.1% patients of whom only 3.9% patients had good neurological outcome. Regression and survival analysis depicted achievement of ROSC during CPR, absence of co-morbidities and shorter response time of code blue team as predictors of good outcome. Conclusion We found poor outcome of CPR after in-hospital cardiac arrest. This was mainly attributed to an initial presenting rhythm of Asystole/PEA in most cases and delayed response times. PMID:26894150

  16. Outcomes of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Among Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Waleed; Ghafoor, Irum; Jamshed, Arif; Gul, Sabika; Hafeez, Haroon

    2017-04-01

    To review all episodes where an emergency code was called in a cancer-specialized hospital in Pakistan and to assess survival to discharge among patients who received a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We reviewed demographic and clinical data related to all "code blue" calls over 3 years. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test the association of clinical characteristics with the primary outcome of survival to discharge. A total of 646 code blue calls were included in the analysis. The CPR was performed in 388 (60%) of these calls. For every 20 episodes of CPR among patients with cancer of all ages, only 1 resulted in a patient's survival to discharge, even though in 52.2% episodes there was a return of spontaneous circulation. No association was found between the type of rhythm at initiation of CPR and likelihood of survival to discharge. The proportion of patients with advanced cancer surviving to discharge after in-hospital CPR in a low-income country was in line with the reported international experience. Most patients with cancer who received in-hospital CPR did not survive to discharge and did not appear to benefit from resuscitation. Advance directives by patients with cancer limiting aggressive interventions at end of life and proper documentation of these directives will help in provision of care that is humane and consonant with patients' wishes for a dignified death. Patients' early appreciation of the limited benefits of CPR in advanced cancer is likely to help them formulate such advance directives.

  17. Initial Resuscitation at Delivery and Short Term Neonatal Outcomes in Very-Low-Birth-Weight Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Su Jin; Shin, Jeonghee; Namgung, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Survival of very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWI) depends on professional perinatal management that begins at delivery. Korean Neonatal Network data on neonatal resuscitation management and initial care of VLBWI of less than 33 weeks gestation born from January 2013 to June 2014 were reviewed to investigate the current practice of neonatal resuscitation in Korea. Antenatal data, perinatal data, and short-term morbidities were analyzed. Out of 2,132 neonates, 91.7% needed resuscitation at birt...

  18. Post-cardiotomy extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in neonates with complex single ventricle: analysis of outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimenakos, Anastasios C; Wojtyla, Patrice; Smith, Pamela J; Rizzo, Vincent; Nater, Melissa; El Zein, Chawki F; Ilbawi, Michel N

    2011-12-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) in children with cardiac arrest refractory to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been reported with encouraging results. We sought to review outcomes of neonates with functional single ventricle (FSV) receiving post-cardiotomy ECPR. Forty-eight patients who required post-cardiotomy extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) since the introduction of our ECPR protocol (January 2007-December 2009) were identified. Twenty-seven were neonates. Review of records and survival analysis were conducted. Of 27 neonates receiving post-cardiotomy ECMO 20 had FSV. Fourteen had ECPR. Ten underwent Norwood operation (NO) for hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Four had FSV other than HLHS. Three underwent Damus-Kay-Stansel or modified NO with systemic-to-pulmonary shunt (SPS) and one SPS with anomalous pulmonary venous connection repair. Mean age and weight were 7.8 ± 2.9 days and 3.44 ± 1.78 kg, respectively. ECMO median duration was 6 days (interquartile range (IQR) 3-14). Survival to ECMO discontinuation was 79% (11 of 14 patients) and at hospital discharge was 57% (8 of 14 patients). The most common cause of death was multi-organ failure (four of six deaths). At last follow-up (median: 11 months (1-34)) 43% of patients were alive. CPR mean duration for patients with favorable versus unfavorable outcome was 38.6 ± 6.3 versus 42.1 ± 7.7 min (p = 0.12). Previously reported determinants for poorer prognosis in conventional non-rescue ECMO (such as pre-ECMO pH0.05). ECMO support in neonates with FSV requiring ECPR can result in favorable outcome in more than half of patients at hospital discharge. Aggressive strategy toward timely application of ECPR is justified. Expeditious ECPR deployment after proper patients' selection, refinement of CPR quality and use of adjunctive neuroprotective interventions, such as induced hypothermia, might further improve outcomes. Copyright © 2011 European Association for

  19. Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcome Reports: Update of the Utstein Resuscitation Registry Templates for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From a Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian and New Zealand Council on Resuscitation, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council of Southern Africa, Resuscitation Council of Asia); and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perkins, Gavin D.; Jacobs, Ian G.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Berg, Robert A.; Bhanji, Farhan; Biarent, Dominique; Bossaert, Leo L.; Brett, Stephen J.; Chamberlain, Douglas; de Caen, Allan R.; Deakin, Charles D.; Finn, Judith C.; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Iwami, Taku; Koster, Rudolph W.; Lim, Swee Han; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; McNally, Bryan F.; Morley, Peter T.; Morrison, Laurie J.; Monsieurs, Koenraad G.; Montgomery, William; Nichol, Graham; Okada, Kazuo; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Travers, Andrew H.; Nolan, Jerry P.; Aikin, Richard P.; Böttiger, Bernd W.; Callaway, Clifton W.; Castren, Maaret K.; Eisenberg, Mickey S.; Kleinman, Monica E.; Kloeck, David A.; Kloeck, Walter G.; Mancini, Mary E.; Neumar, Robert W.; Ornato, Joseph P.; Paiva, Edison F.; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Soar, Jasmeet; Sierra, Alfredo F.; Stanton, David; Zideman, David A.; Rea, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Utstein-style guidelines contribute to improved public health internationally by providing a structured framework with which to compare emergency medical services systems. Advances in resuscitation science, new insights into important predictors of outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and

  20. Survival and neurological outcome following in-hospital paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Vinay; Bansal, Arun; Singhi, Sunit C; Singhi, Pratibha; Muralidharan, Jayashree

    2016-05-01

    Data on outcome of children undergoing in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in low- and middle-income countries are scarce. To describe the clinical profile and outcome of children undergoing in-hospital CPR. This prospective observational study was undertaken in the Advanced Pediatric Center, PGIMER, Chandigarh. All patients aged 1 month to 12 years who underwent in-hospital CPR between July 2010 and March 2011 were included. Data were recorded using the 'Utstein style'. Outcome variables included 'sustained return of spontaneous circulation' (ROSC), survival at discharge and neurological outcome at 1 year. The incidence of in-hospital CPR in all hospital admissions (n = 4654) was 6.7% (n = 314). 64.6% (n = 203) achieved ROSC, 14% (n = 44) survived to hospital discharge and 11.1% (n = 35) survived at 1 year. Three-quarters of survivors had a good neurological outcome at 1-year follow-up. Sixty per cent of patients were malnourished. The Median Pediatric Risk of Mortality-III (PRISM-III) score was 16 (IQR 9-25). Sepsis (71%), respiratory (39.5%) and neurological (31.5%) illness were the most common diagnoses. The most common initial arrhythmia was bradycardia (52.2%). On multivariate logistic regression, duration of CPR, diagnosis of sepsis and requirement for vasoactive support prior to arrest were independent predictors of decreased hospital survival. The requirement for in-hospital CPR is common in PGIMER. ROSC was achieved in two-thirds of children, but mortality was higher than in high-income countries because of delayed presentation, malnutrition and severity of illness. CPR >15 min was associated with death. Survivors had good long-term neurological outcome, demonstrating the value of timely CPR.

  1. The outcome of trauma patients with do-not-resuscitate orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Kazuhide; Schaefer, Eric W; Won, Eugene J; Armen, Scott B

    2016-02-01

    Institutional variation in outcome of patients with do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders has not been well described in the setting of trauma. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of trauma center designation on outcome of patients with DNR orders. A statewide trauma database (Pennsylvania Trauma Outcome Study) was used for the analysis. Characteristics of patients with DNR orders were compared between state-designated level 1 and 2 trauma centers. Inhospital mortality and major complication rates were compared using hierarchical logistic regression models that included a random effect for trauma centers. We adjusted for a number of potential confounders and allowed for nonlinearity in injury severity score and age in these models. A total of 106,291 patients (14 level 1 and 11 level 2 trauma centers) were identified in the Pennsylvania Trauma Outcome Study database between 2007 and 2011. We included 5953 patients with DNR orders (5.6%). Although more severely injured patients with comorbid disease were made DNR in level 1 trauma centers, trauma center designation level was not a significant factor for inhospital mortality of patients with DNR orders (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.81-2.18; P = 0.26). Level 1 trauma centers were significantly associated with a higher rate of major complications (odds ratio, 1.75; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-2.75; P = 0.016). Inhospital mortality of patients with DNR orders was not significantly associated with trauma designation level after adjusting for case mix. More aggressive treatment or other unknown factors may have resulted in a significantly higher complication rate at level 1 trauma centers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcome Reports: Update of the Utstein Resuscitation Registry Templates for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From a Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian and New Zealand Council on Resuscitation, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council of Southern Africa, Resuscitation Council of Asia); and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Gavin D; Jacobs, Ian G; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Berg, Robert A; Bhanji, Farhan; Biarent, Dominique; Bossaert, Leo L; Brett, Stephen J; Chamberlain, Douglas; de Caen, Allan R; Deakin, Charles D; Finn, Judith C; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Iwami, Taku; Koster, Rudolph W; Lim, Swee Han; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; McNally, Bryan F; Morley, Peter T; Morrison, Laurie J; Monsieurs, Koenraad G; Montgomery, William; Nichol, Graham; Okada, Kazuo; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Travers, Andrew H; Nolan, Jerry P

    2015-11-01

    Utstein-style guidelines contribute to improved public health internationally by providing a structured framework with which to compare emergency medical services systems. Advances in resuscitation science, new insights into important predictors of outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and lessons learned from methodological research prompted this review and update of the 2004 Utstein guidelines. Representatives of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation developed an updated Utstein reporting framework iteratively by meeting face to face, by teleconference, and by Web survey during 2012 through 2014. Herein are recommendations for reporting out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Data elements were grouped by system factors, dispatch/recognition, patient variables, resuscitation/postresuscitation processes, and outcomes. Elements were classified as core or supplemental using a modified Delphi process primarily based on respondents' assessment of the evidence-based importance of capturing those elements, tempered by the challenges to collect them. New or modified elements reflected consensus on the need to account for emergency medical services system factors, increasing availability of automated external defibrillators, data collection processes, epidemiology trends, increasing use of dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, emerging field treatments, postresuscitation care, prognostication tools, and trends in organ recovery. A standard reporting template is recommended to promote standardized reporting. This template facilitates reporting of the bystander-witnessed, shockable rhythm as a measure of emergency medical services system efficacy and all emergency medical services system-treated arrests as a measure of system effectiveness. Several additional important subgroups are identified that enable an estimate of the specific contribution of rhythm and bystander actions that are key determinants of outcome. Copyright © 2014 European

  3. Neonatal Resuscitation in the Delivery Room from a Tertiary Level Hospital: Risk Factors and Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Afjeh, Seyyed-Abolfazl; Sabzehei, Mohammad-Kazem; Esmaili, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Objective Timely identification and prompt resuscitation of newborns in the delivery room may cause a decline in neonatal morbidity and mortality. We try to identify risk factors in mother and fetus that result in birth of newborns needing resuscitation at birth. Methods Case notes of all deliveries and neonates born from April 2010 to March 2011 in Mahdieh Medical Center (Tehran, Iran), a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, were reviewed; relevant maternal, fetal and perinatal data was e...

  4. Ambulance cardiopulmonary resuscitation: outcomes and associated factors in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell Ortiz, Fernando; García Del Águila, Javier; Fernández Del Valle, Patricia; J Mellado-Vergel, Francisco; Vergara-Pérez, Santiago; R Ruiz-Montero, María; Martínez-Lara, Manuela; J Gómez-Jiménez, Francisco; Gonzáez-Lobato, Ismael; García-Escudero, Guillermo; Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; Caballero-García, Auxiliadora; Vivar-Díaz, Itziar; Olavarría-Govantes, Luis

    2018-06-01

    To assess factors associated with survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during ambulance transport. Retrospective analysis of a registry of OHCA cases treated between 2008 and 2014. We included patients who had not recovered circulation at the time it was decided to transport to a hospital and who were rejected as non-heart-beating donors. Multivariate analysis was used to explore factors associated with the use of ambulance CPR, survival, and neurologic outcome. Out of a total of 7241 cases, 259 (3.6%) were given CPR during emergency transport. The mean (SD) age was 51.6 (23.6) years; 27 (10.1%) were aged 16 years or younger. The following variables were associated with the use of CPR during transport: age 16 years or under (odds ratio [OR], 6.48; 95% CI, 3.91-10.76); P<.001)], witnessed OHCA (OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.16-2.26; P=.004), cardiac arrest outside the home (OR, 3.17; 95% CI, 2.38-4.21; P<.001), noncardiac cause (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.07-2.02; P=.019], initially shockable rhythm (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.17-2.37; P=.004), no prior basic life support (OR, 3.48; 95% CI, 2.58-4.70; P<.001), and orotracheal intubation (OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.24-2.99; P=.003). One patient (0.38%) survived to discharge with good neurologic outcome. Ambulance CPR by a physician on board is applied in few OHCA cases. Young patient age, cardiac arrest outside the home, the presence of a witness, lack of a shockable rhythm on responder arrival, lack of basic life support prior to responder arrival, noncardiac cause, and orotracheal intubation are associated with the use of ambulance CPR, a strategy that can be considered futile.

  5. Neonatal Resuscitation in the Delivery Room from a Tertiary Level Hospital: Risk Factors and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afjeh, Seyyed-Abolfazl; Sabzehei, Mohammad-Kazem; Esmaili, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Objective Timely identification and prompt resuscitation of newborns in the delivery room may cause a decline in neonatal morbidity and mortality. We try to identify risk factors in mother and fetus that result in birth of newborns needing resuscitation at birth. Methods Case notes of all deliveries and neonates born from April 2010 to March 2011 in Mahdieh Medical Center (Tehran, Iran), a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, were reviewed; relevant maternal, fetal and perinatal data was extracted and analyzed. Findings During the study period, 4692 neonates were delivered; 4522 (97.7%) did not require respiratory assistance. One-hundred seven (2.3%) newborns needed resuscitation with bag and mask ventilation in the delivery unit, of whom 77 (1.6%) babies responded to bag and mask ventilation while 30 (0.65%) neonates needed endotracheal intubation and 15 (0.3%) were given chest compressions. Epinephrine/volume expander was administered to 10 (0.2%) newborns. In 17 patients resuscitation was continued for >10 mins. There was a positive correlation between the need for resuscitation and following risk factors: low birth weight, preterm labor, chorioamnionitis, pre-eclampsia, prolonged rupture of membranes, abruptio placentae, prolonged labor, meconium staining of amniotic fluid, multiple pregnancy and fetal distress. On multiple regression; low birth weight, meconium stained liquor and chorioamnionitis revealed as independent risk factors that made endotracheal intubation necessary. Conclusion Accurate identification of risk factors and anticipation at the birth of a high-risk neonate would result in adequate preparation and prompt resuscitation of neonates who need some level of intervention and thus, reducing neonatal morbidity and mortality. PMID:24910747

  6. Predictors of outcome in children with status epilepticus during resuscitation in pediatric emergency department: A retrospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indumathy Santhanam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study the clinical profile and predictors of outcome in children with status epilepticus (SE during resuscitation in pediatric emergency department. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was carried out in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Admission and resuscitation data of children, aged between 1 month and 12 years, treated for SE, between September 2013 and August 2014, were extracted using a standard data collection form. Our SE management protocol had employed a modified pediatric assessment triangle to recognize and treat acute respiratory failure, cardiovascular dysfunction (CD, and subtle SE until all parameters resolved. Continuous positive airway pressure, fluid boluses based on shock etiology, inotropes, and cardiac safe anticonvulsants were the other modifications. Risk factors predicting mortality during resuscitation were analyzed using univariate and penalized logistic regression. Results: Among 610 who were enrolled, 582 (95.4% survived and 28 (4.6% succumbed. Grunt odds ratio (OR: 3.747 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.035−13.560, retractions OR: 2.429 (95% CI: 1.036−5.698, rales OR: 10.145 (95% CI: 4.027−25.560, prolonged capillary refill time OR: 3.352 (95% CI: 1.339−8.388, and shock requiring >60 mL/kg fluids OR: 2.439 (95% CI 1.040−5.721 were associated with 2−3 times rise in mortality. Inappropriate prehospital treatment and CD were the significant predictors of mortality OR: 7.82 (95% CI 2.10−29.06 and 738.71 (95% CI: 97.11−999, respectively. Resolution of CD was associated with improved survival OR: 0.02 (95% CI: 0.003−0.17. Conclusion: Appropriate prehospital management and treatment protocol targeting resolution of CD during resuscitation could reduce mortality in children with SE.

  7. The establishment of the GENEQOL consortium to investigate the genetic disposition of patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, M.A.G.; Sloan, J.A.; Veenhoven, R.; Cleeland, C.S.; Halyard, M.Y.; Abertnethy, A.P.; Baas, F.; Barsevick, A.M.; Bartels, M.; Boomsma, D.I.; Chauhan, C.; Dueck, A.C.; Frost, M.H.; Hall, P.; Klepstad, P.; Martin, N.G.; Miaskowski, C.; Mosing, M.; Movsas, B.; van Noorden, C.J.F.; Patrick, D.L.; Pedersen, N.L.; Ropka, M.E.; Shi, Q.; Shinozaki, G.; Singh, J.A.; Yang, P.; Zwinderman, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    To our knowledge, no comprehensive, interdisciplinary initiatives have been taken to examine the role of genetic variants on patient-reported qualityof-life outcomes. The overall objective of this paper is to describe the establishment of an international and interdisciplinary consortium, the

  8. The establishment of the GENEQOL consortium to investigate the genetic disposition of patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Veenhoven, Ruut; Cleeland, Charles S.; Halyard, Michele Y.; Abertnethy, Amy P.; Baas, Frank; Barsevick, Andrea M.; Bartels, Meike; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Chauhan, Cynthia; Dueck, Amylou C.; Frost, Marlene H.; Hall, Per; Klepstad, Pål; Martin, Nicholas G.; Miaskowski, Christine; Mosing, Miriam; Movsas, Benjamin; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; Patrick, Donald L.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Ropka, Mary E.; Shi, Quiling; Shinozaki, Gen; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Yang, Ping; Zwinderman, Ailko H.

    2009-01-01

    To our knowledge, no comprehensive, interdisciplinary initiatives have been taken to examine the role of genetic variants on patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes. The overall objective of this paper is to describe the establishment of an international and interdisciplinary consortium, the

  9. Early neonatal mortality and neurological outcomes of neonatal resuscitation in a resource-limited setting on the Thailand-Myanmar border: A descriptive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Janet

    Full Text Available Of the 4 million neonatal deaths worldwide yearly, 98% occur in low and middle-income countries. Effective resuscitation reduces mortality and morbidity but long-term outcomes in resource-limited settings are poorly described. This study reports on newborn neurological outcomes following resuscitation at birth in a resource-limited setting where intensive newborn care including intubation is unavailable.Retrospective analysis of births records from 2008 to 2015 at Shoklo Malaria Research Unit (SMRU on the Thailand-Myanmar border.From 21,225 newbonrs delivered, 15,073 (71% met the inclusion criteria (liveborn, singleton, ≥28 weeks' gestation, delivered in SMRU. Neonatal resuscitation was performed in 460 (3%; 422 basic, 38 advanced cases. Overall early neonatal mortality was 6.6 deaths per 1000 live births (95% CI 5.40-8.06. Newborns receiving basic and advanced resuscitation presented an adjusted rate for death of 1.30 (95%CI 0.66-2.55; p = 0.442, and 6.32 (95%CI 3.01-13.26; p<0.001 respectively, compared to newborns given routine care. Main factors related to increased need for resuscitation were breech delivery, meconium, and fetal distress (p<0.001. Neurodevelopmental follow-up to one year was performed in 1,608 (10.5% of the 15,073 newborns; median neurodevelopmental scores of non-resuscitated newborns and those receiving basic resuscitation were similar (64 (n = 1565 versus 63 (n = 41; p = 0.732, while advanced resuscitation scores were significantly lower (56 (n = 5; p = 0.017.Newborns requiring basic resuscitation at birth have normal neuro-developmental outcomes at one year of age compared to low-risk newborns. Identification of risk factors (e.g., breech delivery associated with increased need for neonatal resuscitation may facilitate allocation of staff to high-risk deliveries. This work endorses the use of basic resuscitation in low-resource settings, and supports on-going staff training to maintain bag-and-mask ventilation skills.

  10. Initial Resuscitation at Delivery and Short Term Neonatal Outcomes in Very-Low-Birth-Weight Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Su Jin; Shin, Jeonghee; Namgung, Ran

    2015-10-01

    Survival of very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWI) depends on professional perinatal management that begins at delivery. Korean Neonatal Network data on neonatal resuscitation management and initial care of VLBWI of less than 33 weeks gestation born from January 2013 to June 2014 were reviewed to investigate the current practice of neonatal resuscitation in Korea. Antenatal data, perinatal data, and short-term morbidities were analyzed. Out of 2,132 neonates, 91.7% needed resuscitation at birth, chest compression was performed on only 104 infants (5.4%) and epinephrine was administered to 80 infants (4.1%). Infants who received cardiac compression and/or epinephrine administration at birth (DR-CPR) were significantly more acidotic (P CPR resulted in greater early mortality of less than 7 days (OR, 5.64; 95% CI 3.25-9.77) increased intraventricular hemorrhage ≥ grade 3 (OR, 2.71; 95% CI 1.57-4.68), periventricular leukomalacia (OR, 2.94; 95% CI 1.72-5.01), and necrotizing enterocolitis (OR, 2.12; 95% CI 1.15-3.91) compared with those infants who needed only PPV. Meticulous and aggressive management of infants who needed DR-CPR at birth and quality improvement of the delivery room management will result in reduced morbidities and early death for the vulnerable VLBWI.

  11. Resuscitation of preterm infants: delivery room interventions and their effect on outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Colm P F

    2012-12-01

    Despite advances in neonatal care, the rate of oxygen dependence at 36 weeks\\' postmenstrual age or bronchopulmonary dysplasia has not fallen. Neonatologists are increasingly careful to apply ventilation strategies that are gentle to the lung in the neonatal intensive care unit. However, there has not been the same emphasis applying gentle ventilation strategies immediately after birth. A lung-protective strategy should start immediately after birth to establish a functional residual capacity, reduce volutrauma and atelectotrauma, facilitate gas exchange, and improve oxygenation during neonatal transition. This article discusses techniques and equipment recommended by international resuscitation guidelines during breathing assistance in the delivery room.

  12. Variable effects of high-dose adrenaline relative to standard-dose adrenaline on resuscitation outcomes according to cardiac arrest duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeung, Kyung Woon; Ryu, Hyun Ho; Song, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Byung Kook; Lee, Hyoung Youn; Heo, Tag; Min, Yong Il

    2011-07-01

    Adjustment of adrenaline (epinephrine) dosage according to cardiac arrest (CA) duration, rather than administering the same dose, may theoretically improve resuscitation outcomes. We evaluated variable effects of high-dose adrenaline (HDA) relative to standard-dose adrenaline (SDA) on resuscitation outcomes according to CA duration. Twenty-eight male domestic pigs were randomised to the following 4 groups according to the dosage of adrenaline (SDA 0.02 mg/kg vs. HDA 0.2mg/kg) and duration of CA before beginning cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR): 6 min SDA, 6 min HDA, 13 min SDA, or 13 min HDA. After the predetermined duration of untreated ventricular fibrillation, CPR was provided. All animals in the 6 min SDA, 6 min HDA, and 13 min HDA groups were successfully resuscitated, while only 4 of 7 pigs in the 13 min SDA group were successfully resuscitated (p=0.043). HDA groups showed higher right atrial pressure, more frequent ventricular ectopic beats, higher blood glucose, higher troponin-I, and more severe metabolic acidosis than SDA groups. Animals of 13 min groups showed more severe metabolic acidosis and higher troponin-I than animals of 6 min groups. All successfully resuscitated animals, except two animals in the 13 min HDA group, survived for 7 days (p=0.121). Neurologic deficit score was not affected by the dose of adrenaline. HDA showed benefit in achieving restoration of spontaneous circulation in 13 min CA, when compared with 6 min CA. However, this benefit did not translate into improved long-term survival or neurologic outcome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Anticipated educational outcomes: a case study of the outdoor recreation consortium experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasong Wang; Alan Graefe

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on a case study of an outdoor experiential learning program and examines its meaning for program participants. The research was conducted with 56 university students who participated in the Outdoor Recreation Consortium held at the Great Smoky Mountain Institute in Tremont, TN. A mixed-method comparative research approach, using both quantitative and...

  14. Resuscitation outcomes comparing year 2000 with year 2005 ALS guidelines in a pig model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthos, Theodoros; Tsirikos-Karapanos, Nikolas; Papadimitriou, Dimitrios; Vlachos, Ioannis S; Tsiftsi, Katerina; Ekmektzoglou, Konstantinos A; Papadimitriou, Lila

    2007-06-01

    Ventricular fibrillation remains the leading cause of death in western societies. International organizations publish guidelines to follow in case of cardiac arrest. The aim of the present study is to assess whether the newly published guidelines record similar resuscitation success with the 2000 Advanced Life Support Guidelines on Resuscitation in a swine model of cardiac arrest. Nineteen landrace/large white pigs were used. Ventricular fibrillation was induced with the use of a transvenous pacing wire inserted into the right ventricle. The animals were randomized into two groups. In Group A, 10 animals were resuscitated using the 2000 guidelines, whereas in Group B, 9 animals were resuscitated using the 2005 guidelines. Both algorithms recorded similar successful resuscitation rates, as 60% of the animals in Group A and 44.5% in Group B were successfully resuscitated. However, animals in Group A restored a rhythm, compatible with a pulse, quicker than those in Group B (p=0.002). Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) was not adversely affected by three defibrillation attempts in Group A. Both algorithms' resulted in comparable resuscitation success, however, guidelines 2000 resulted in faster resuscitation times. These preliminary results merit further investigation.

  15. Outcome of extremely low birth weight infants who received delivery room cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Myra H; Salhab, Walid A; Heyne, Roy J; Kendrick, Douglas E; Stoll, Barbara J; Laptook, Abbot R

    2012-02-01

    To determine whether delivery room cardiopulmonary resuscitation (DR-CPR) independently predicts morbidities and neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) in extremely low birth weight infants. We conducted a cohort study of infants born with birth weight of 401 to 1000 g and gestational age of 23 to 30 weeks. DR-CPR was defined as chest compressions, medications, or both. Logistic regression was used to determine associations among DR-CPR and morbidities, mortality, and NDI at 18 to 24 months of age (Bayley II mental or psychomotor index blindness, or deafness). Data are adjusted ORs with 95% CIs. Of 8685 infants, 1333 (15%) received DR-CPR. Infants who received DR-CPR had lower birth weight (708±141 g versus 764±146g, PCPR had more pneumothoraces (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.48-2.99), grade 3 to 4 intraventricular hemorrhage (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.23-1.74), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.13-1.59), death by 12 hours (OR, 3.69; 95% CI, 2.98-4.57), and death by 120 days after birth (OR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.93-2.57). Rates of NDI in survivors (OR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02-1.49) and death or NDI (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.46-1.99) were higher for DR-CPR infants. Only 14% of DR-CPR recipients with 5-minute Apgar score CPR is a prognostic marker for higher rates of mortality and NDI for extremely low birth weight infants. New DR-CPR strategies are needed for this population. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Intensity of delivery room resuscitation and neonatal outcomes in infants born at 33 to 36 weeks' gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S; Lyu, Y; Ye, X Y; Monterrosa, L; Shah, P S; Lee, S K

    2016-02-01

    Examine the relationship between delivery room resuscitation intensity and mortality, morbidities and resource use in late preterm infants. Retrospective cohort study of inborn infants born at 33 to 36 weeks' gestation and admitted to Canadian neonatal intensive care units during 2010 to 2013. The 13 619 infants were grouped according to delivery room resuscitation intensity: no or minimal resuscitation (64.5%); continuous positive airway pressure (10.2%); bag-mask ventilation (21.7%); endotracheal intubation (3.1%); and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (0.6%). Overall mortality, early mortality, respiratory distress, pneumothorax, late-onset sepsis and resource use increased with higher intensity resuscitation. Compared with no or minimal resuscitation, intubation and CPR were associated with increased odds of mortality (adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 50 (20 to 125) and 180 (63 to 518), respectively). Intubation or higher intensity delivery room resuscitation is associated with increased mortality, morbidities and resource use in late preterm infants. Extra intensive care is required for such infants, especially during the first week of life.

  17. The Effects of Travel Burden on Outcomes After Resection of Extrahepatic Biliary Malignancies: Results from the US Extrahepatic Biliary Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Sean C; Mogal, Harveshp; Russell, Gregory; Ethun, Cecilia; Fields, Ryan C; Jin, Linda; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Vitiello, Gerardo; Idrees, Kamran; Isom, Chelsea A; Martin, Robert; Scoggins, Charles; Pawlik, Timothy M; Schmidt, Carl; Poultsides, George; Tran, Thuy B; Weber, Sharon; Salem, Ahmed; Maithel, Shishir; Shen, Perry

    2017-12-01

    Surgical resection of extrahepatic biliary malignancies has been increasingly centralized at high-volume tertiary care centers. While this has improved outcomes overall, increased travel burden has been associated with worse survival for many other malignancies. We hypothesized that longer travel distances are associated with worse outcomes for these patients as well. Data was analyzed from the US Extrahepatic Biliary Consortium database, which retrospectively reviewed patients who received resection of extrahepatic biliary malignancies at 10 high-volume centers. Driving distance to the patient's treatment center was measured for 1025 patients. These were divided into four quartiles for analysis: travel distances were associated with decreased overall survival, especially in the 3rd quartile of our study. Patients traveling longer distances also had a lower household income, suggesting that these patients have significant barriers to care.

  18. Two-year survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in neonatal patients after complex cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Gregory; Joffe, Ari R; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Robertson, Charlene M T; Biggs, Wayne S G; Ross, David B; Rebeyka, Ivan M

    2011-03-01

    To examine survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes in neonates having post-operative cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This inception cohort study included all neonates (6 weeks old or less) who received postoperative CPR (Group 1) after cardiac surgery from 1996 to 2005, matched for heart defect, year of surgery, chromosomal abnormality, and socioeconomic status to two neonates who did not receive postoperative CPR (Group 2). Two-year neurodevelopment was prospectively assessed with Bayley Scales of Infant Development II and Adaptive Behavior Assessment System II. Pre-, intra-, and post-operative variables were collected prospectively. Cardiac arrest variables were collected retrospectively. Predictors of mortality were analyzed by univariate analysis and conditional multiple logistic regression. There were 29 patients in Group 1, and 58 patients in Group 2. In survivors, there were no significant differences between Groups 1 and 2 in outcomes [mean (SD)] of mental developmental index [84.5 (12.2) vs. 81.0 (18.9)], psychomotor developmental index [82.8 (13.8) vs. 80.1 (21.9)], General Adaptive Composite [84.6 (15.3) vs. 84.3 (19.2)], Motor scale [8.4 (3.2) vs. 8.0 (3.8)], or delay on any of these scales. Two-year mortality [58.6% Group 1; 8.6% Group 2], was associated on conditional multiple logistic regression with CPR (OR 26.6; 95% CI, 5.4, 129.5). In Group 1, on multiple logistic regression, 2-year mortality was associated with minutes of chest compressions (OR 1.04, 95% CI, 1.01, 1.08). Among neonates having cardiac surgery, CPR is associated with greater mortality. There is no evidence that CPR survivors have different 2-year neurodevelopmental outcomes than those neonates not having CPR. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Resuscitation training.

    OpenAIRE

    Shepherd, A.

    1995-01-01

    All physicians, dentists, nurses and health care personnel should be adequately and regularly trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Guidelines for acquiring the necessary skills in basic and advanced life support are now available.

  20. Neurologic outcome in comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with prolonged downtime and treated with therapeutic hypothermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won Young; Giberson, Tyler A.; Uber, Amy; Berg, Katherine; Cocchi, Michael N.; Donnino, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous reports have shown that prolonged duration of resuscitation efforts in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with poor neurologic outcome. This concept has recently been questioned with advancements in post-cardiac arrest care including the use of therapeutic hypothermia (TH). The aim of this study was to determine the rate of good neurologic outcome based on the duration of resuscitation efforts in OHCA patients treated with TH. Methods This prospective, observational, study was conducted between January 2008 and September 2012. Inclusion criteria consisted of adult non-traumatic OHCA patients who were comatose after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and received TH. The primary endpoint was good neurologic outcome defined as a cerebral performance category score of 1 or 2. Downtime was calculated as the length of time between the patient being recognized as pulseless and ROSC. Results 105 patients were treated with TH and 19 were excluded due to unknown downtime, leaving 86 patients for analysis. The median downtime was 18.5 (10.0–32.3) minutes and 33 patients (38.0%) had a good neurologic outcome. When downtime was divided into four groups (≤10 min, 11-20 min, 21-30 min, > 30 min), good neurologic outcomes were 62.5%, 37%, 25%, and 21.7%, respectively (p=0.02). However, even with downtime >20 minutes, 22.9% had a good neurologic outcome, and this percentage increased to 37.5% in patients with an initial shockable rhythm. Conclusions Although longer downtime is associated with worse outcome in OHCA patients, we found that comatose patients who have been successfully resuscitated and treated with TH have neurologically intact survival rates of 23% even with downtime > 20 minutes. PMID:24746783

  1. Neurologic outcome in comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with prolonged downtime and treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won Young; Giberson, Tyler A; Uber, Amy; Berg, Katherine; Cocchi, Michael N; Donnino, Michael W

    2014-08-01

    Previous reports have shown that prolonged duration of resuscitation efforts in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with poor neurologic outcome. This concept has recently been questioned with advancements in post-cardiac arrest care including the use of therapeutic hypothermia (TH). The aim of this study was to determine the rate of good neurologic outcome based on the duration of resuscitation efforts in OHCA patients treated with TH. This prospective, observational, study was conducted between January 2008 and September 2012. Inclusion criteria consisted of adult non-traumatic OHCA patients who were comatose after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and received TH. The primary endpoint was good neurologic outcome defined as a cerebral performance category score of 1 or 2. Downtime was calculated as the length of time between the patient being recognized as pulseless and ROSC. 105 patients were treated with TH and 19 were excluded due to unknown downtime, leaving 86 patients for analysis. The median downtime was 18.5 (10.0-32.3)min and 33 patients (38.0%) had a good neurologic outcome. When downtime was divided into four groups (≤10min, 11-20min, 21-30min, >30min), good neurologic outcomes were 62.5%, 37%, 25%, and 21.7%, respectively (p=0.02). However, even with downtime >20min, 22.9% had a good neurologic outcome, and this percentage increased to 37.5% in patients with an initial shockable rhythm. Although longer downtime is associated with worse outcome in OHCA patients, we found that comatose patients who have been successfully resuscitated and treated with TH have neurologically intact survival rates of 23% even with downtime >20min. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Advanced resuscitation of adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, F.K.; Lauritsen, T.L.; Torp-Pedersen, C.

    2008-01-01

    International and European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines for Resuscitation 2005 implicate major changes in resuscitation, including new universal treatment algorithms. This brief summary of Guidelines 2005 for advanced resuscitation of adult cardiac arrest victims is based upon the ERC...

  3. Survival and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes of Preterms Resuscitated With Different Oxygen Fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boronat, Nuria; Aguar, Marta; Rook, Denise; Iriondo, Martin; Brugada, María; Cernada, María; Nuñez, Antonio; Izquierdo, Montserrat; Cubells, Elena; Martinez, María; Parra, Anna; van Goudoever, Hans; Vento, Máximo

    2016-01-01

    Stabilization of preterm infants after birth frequently requires oxygen supplementation. At present the optimal initial oxygen inspiratory fraction (Fio2) for preterm stabilization after birth is still under debate. We aimed to compare neurodevelopmental outcomes of extremely preterm infants at 24

  4. Termination of Resuscitation Rules to Predict Neurological Outcomes in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest for an Intermediate Life Support Prehospital System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Randy Wang Long; Li, Huihua; Doctor, Nausheen Edwin; Ng, Yih Yng; Goh, E Shaun; Leong, Benjamin Sieu-Hon; Gan, Han Nee; Foo, David; Tham, Lai Peng; Charles, Rabind; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Futile resuscitation can lead to unnecessary transports for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The Basic Life Support (BLS) and Advanced Life Support (ALS) termination of resuscitation (TOR) guidelines have been validated with good results in North America. This study aims to evaluate the performance of these two rules in predicting neurological outcomes of OHCA patients in Singapore, which has an intermediate life support Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system. A retrospective cohort study was carried out on Singapore OHCA data collected from April 2010 to May 2012 for the Pan-Asian Resuscitation Outcomes Study (PAROS). The outcomes of each rule were compared to the actual neurological outcomes of the patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and predicted transport rates of each test were evaluated. A total of 2,193 patients had cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac etiology. TOR was recommended for 1,411 patients with the BLS-TOR rule, with a specificity of 100% (91.9, 100.0) for predicting poor neurological outcomes, PPV 100% (99.7, 100.0), sensitivity 65.7% (63.6, 67.7), NPV 5.6% (4.1, 7.5), and transportation rate 35.6%. Using the ALS-TOR rule, TOR was recommended for 587 patients, specificity 100% (91.9, 100.0) for predicting poor neurological outcomes, PPV 100% (99.4, 100.0), sensitivity 27.3% (25.4, 29.3), NPV 2.7% (2.0, 3.7), and transportation rate 73.2%. BLS-TOR predicted survival (any neurological outcome) with specificity 93.4% (95% CI 85.3, 97.8) versus ALS-TOR 98.7% (95% CI 92.9, 99.8). Both the BLS and ALS-TOR rules had high specificities and PPV values in predicting neurological outcomes, the BLS-TOR rule had a lower predicted transport rate while the ALS-TOR rule was more accurate in predicting futility of resuscitation. Further research into unique local cultural issues would be useful to evaluate the feasibility of any system-wide implementation of TOR.

  5. Age × Gender Interaction Effect on Resuscitation Outcomes in Patients With Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Ono, Junko; Nagata, Takashi; Hasegawa, Manabu

    2017-08-01

    Although an interaction between gender and age has been shown to influence resuscitation outcomes in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), this interaction has not been investigated in Asian populations. In this prospective, observational study, data from all cases of OHCA in Japan between 2005 and 2012 were obtained from the Japanese National Registry. We determined the relative excess risk due to interaction and the ratio of odds ratios (ORs) to assess the interaction effect of gender and age on the incidence of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) before hospital arrival, 1-month survival, and neurologically intact survival 1 month after OHCA. Male gender was associated with decreased ROSC and lower 1-month survival rates in patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac origin. Older age was associated with lower 1-month and neurologically intact survival rates in male patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac and noncardiac origin and with increased ROSC in male patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac origin. The relative excess risk due to interaction for ROSC in patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac origin was statistically significant (OR 0.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.06 to 0.32). The ratio of ORs for ROSC was statistically significant in patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac origin (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.47) and of noncardiac origin (OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.92). In conclusion, the interaction effect between age and gender on ROSC was positive in OHCA cases of presumed cardiac origin and negative in those of noncardiac origin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Accelerating the Development of 21st-Century Toxicology: Outcome of a Human Toxicology Project Consortium Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Martin L.; Barrow, Craig; Andersen, Melvin E.; Boekelheide, Kim; Carmichael, Paul L.; Holsapple, Michael P.; Lafranconi, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. National Research Council (NRC) report on “Toxicity Testing in the 21st century” calls for a fundamental shift in the way that chemicals are tested for human health effects and evaluated in risk assessments. The new approach would move toward in vitro methods, typically using human cells in a high-throughput context. The in vitro methods would be designed to detect significant perturbations to “toxicity pathways,” i.e., key biological pathways that, when sufficiently perturbed, lead to adverse health outcomes. To explore progress on the report’s implementation, the Human Toxicology Project Consortium hosted a workshop on 9–10 November 2010 in Washington, DC. The Consortium is a coalition of several corporations, a research institute, and a non-governmental organization dedicated to accelerating the implementation of 21st-century Toxicology as aligned with the NRC vision. The goal of the workshop was to identify practical and scientific ways to accelerate implementation of the NRC vision. The workshop format consisted of plenary presentations, breakout group discussions, and concluding commentaries. The program faculty was drawn from industry, academia, government, and public interest organizations. Most presentations summarized ongoing efforts to modernize toxicology testing and approaches, each with some overlap with the NRC vision. In light of these efforts, the workshop identified recommendations for accelerating implementation of the NRC vision, including greater strategic coordination and planning across projects (facilitated by a steering group), the development of projects that test the proof of concept for implementation of the NRC vision, and greater outreach and communication across stakeholder communities. PMID:21948868

  7. Conflicting perspectives compromising discussions on cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Groarke, J

    2010-09-01

    Healthcare professionals, patients and their relatives are expected to discuss resuscitation together. This study aims to identify the differences in the knowledge base and understanding of these parties. Questionnaires examining knowledge and opinion on resuscitation matters were completed during interviews of randomly selected doctors, nurses and the general public. 70% doctors, 24% nurses and 0% of a public group correctly estimated survival to discharge following in-hospital resuscitation attempts. Deficiencies were identified in doctor and nurse knowledge of ethics governing resuscitation decisions. Public opinion often conflicts with ethical guidelines. Public understanding of the nature of cardiopulmonary arrests and resuscitation attempts; and of the implications of a \\'Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR)\\' order is poor. Television medical dramas are the primary source of resuscitation knowledge. Deficiencies in healthcare professionals\\' knowledge of resuscitation ethics and outcomes may compromise resuscitation decisions. Educational initiatives to address deficiencies are necessary. Parties involved in discussion on resuscitation do not share the same knowledge base reducing the likelihood of meaningful discussion. Public misapprehensions surrounding resuscitation must be identified and corrected during discussion.

  8. Neurology of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, M; Geocadin, R G

    2017-01-01

    This chapter aims to provide an up-to-date review of the science and clinical practice pertaining to neurologic injury after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The past two decades have seen a major shift in the science and practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, with a major emphasis on postresuscitation neurologic care. This chapter provides a nuanced and thoughtful historic and bench-to-bedside overview of the neurologic aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A particular emphasis is made on the anatomy and pathophysiology of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, up-to-date management of survivors of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and a careful discussion on neurologic outcome prediction. Guidance to practice evidence-based clinical care when able and thoughtful, pragmatic suggestions for care where evidence is lacking are also provided. This chapter serves as both a useful clinical guide and an updated, thorough, and state-of-the-art reference on the topic for advanced students and experienced practitioners in the field. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation by trained responders versus lay persons and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A community observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoo Mi; Shin, Sang Do; Lee, Yu Jin; Song, Kyoung Jun; Ro, Young Sun; Ahn, Ki Ok

    2017-09-01

    The study aims to compare bystander processes of care (cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation) and outcomes for witnessed presumed cardiac etiology in OHCA patients in whom initial resuscitation was provided by dedicated trained responder (TR) versus lay person (LP) bystanders. Data on witnessed and presumed cardiac OHCA in adults (15 years or older) from 2011 to 2015 in a metropolitan city with 10 million persons were collected, excluding cases in which the information on TRs, bystander CPR, defibrillation, and clinical outcomes was unknown. Exposure variables were TRs who were legally designated with CPR education and response and LPs who were bystanders who witnessed the OHCA by chance. The primary/secondary/tertiary outcomes were a good cerebral performance category (CPC) of 1 or 2, survival to discharge, and bystander defibrillation. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for potential confounders. Of 20,984 OHCA events, 6475 cases were ultimately analyzed. The TR group constituted 6.4% of the cases, and the patients showed significantly better survival and a good CPC. From the multivariable logistic regression analysis of the outcomes, by comparing the TR group with the LP group, the AOR (95% CIs) was 1.49 (1.04-2.15) for a good CPC, 1.59 (1.20-2.11) for survival to discharge, and 10.02 (7.04-14.26) for bystander defibrillation. The TR group witnessed a relatively low proportion of OHCA but was associated with better survival outcomes and good neurological recovery through higher CPR rates and defibrillation of adults older than 15 years with witnessed OHCA in a metropolitan city. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. PROSPECT Eligibility and Clinical Outcomes: Results From the Pan-Canadian Rectal Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, Dominick; Mercer, Jamison; Raissouni, Soundouss; Dennis, Kristopher; Goodwin, Rachel; Jiang, Di; Powell, Erin; Kumar, Aalok; Lee-Ying, Richard; Price-Hiller, Julie; Heng, Daniel Y C; Tang, Patricia A; MacLean, Anthony; Cheung, Winson Y; Vickers, Michael M

    2016-09-01

    The PROSPECT trial (N1048) is evaluating the selective use of chemoradiation in patients with cT2N1 and cT3N0-1 rectal cancer undergoing sphincter-sparing low anterior resection. We evaluated outcomes of PROSPECT-eligible and -ineligible patients from a multi-institutional database. Data from patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received chemoradiation and low anterior resection from 2005 to 2014 were retrospectively collected from 5 Canadian centers. Overall survival, disease-free survival (DFS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and time to local recurrence (LR) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and a multivariate analysis was performed adjusting for prognostic factors. A total of 566 (37%) of 1531 patients met the PROSPECT eligibility criteria. Eligible patients were more likely to have better PS (P = .0003) and negative circumferential resection margin (P PROSPECT eligibility was associated with improved DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.61-0.91), overall survival (HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.57-0.95), and RFS (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.54-0.86) in univariate analyses. In multivariate analysis, only RFS remained significantly improved for PROSPECT-eligible patients (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.57-1.00, P = .0499). The 3-year DFS and freedom from LR for PROSPECT-eligible patients were 79.1% and 97.4%, respectively, compared to 71.1% and 96.8% for PROSPECT-ineligible patients. Real-world data corroborate the eligibility criteria used in the PROSPECT study; the criteria identify a subgroup of patients in whom risk of recurrence is lower and in whom selective use of chemoradiation should be actively examined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Resuscitation of newborn in high risk deliveries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousaf, U.F.; Hayat, S.

    2015-01-01

    High risk deliveries are usually associated with increased neonatal mortality and morbidity. Neonatal resuscitation can appreciably affect the outcome in these types of deliveries. Presence of personnel trained in basic neonatal resuscitation at the time of delivery can play an important role in reducing perinatal complications in neonates at risk. The study was carried out to evaluate the effects of newborn resuscitation on neonatal outcome in high risk deliveries. Methods: This descriptive case series was carried out at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Jinnah Hospital, Lahore. Ninety consecutive high risk deliveries were included and attended by paediatricians trained in newborn resuscitation. Babies delivered by elective Caesarean section, normal spontaneous vaginal deliveries and still births were excluded. Neonatal resuscitation was performed in babies who failed to initiate breathing in the first minute after birth. Data was analyzed using SPSS-16.0. Results: A total of 90 high risk deliveries were included in the study. Emergency caesarean section was the mode of delivery in 94.4% (n=85) cases and spontaneous vaginal delivery in 5.6% (n=5). Preterm pregnancy was the major high risk factor. Newborn resuscitation was required in 37.8% (n=34) of all high risk deliveries (p=0.013). All the new-borns who required resuscitation survived. Conclusion: New-born resuscitation is required in high risk pregnancies and personnel trained in newborn resuscitation should be available at the time of delivery. (author)

  12. A prospective study to determine the circumstances, incidence and outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a referral hospital in India, in relation to various factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhar Joshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Cardiac arrest has multifactorial aetiology and the outcome depends on timely and correct interventions. We decided to investigate the circumstances, incidence and outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR at a tertiary hospital in India, in relation to various factors, including extensive basic life support and advanced cardiac life support training programme for all nurses and doctors. Methods: It has been over a decade and a half with periodical updates and implementation of newer guidelines prepared by various societies across the world about CPR for both in-hospital and out-of hospital cardiac arrests (IHCA and OHCA. We conducted a prospective study wherein all cardiac arrests reported in the hospital consecutively for 12 months were registered for the study and followed their survival up to 1-year. Statistical analysis was performed by using Chi-square test for significant differences in proportions applied to various parameters of the study. Results: The main outcome measures were; (following CPR return of spontaneous circulation, survival for 24 h, survival from 24 h to 6 weeks or discharge, alive at 1-year. For survivors, an assessment was made about their cerebral performance and overall performance and accordingly graded. All these data were tabulated. Totally 419 arrests were reported in the hospital, out of which 413 were in-hospital arrests. Out of this 260 patients were considered for resuscitation, we had about 27 survivors at the end of 1-year follow-up (10.38%. Conclusion: We conclude by saying there are many factors involved in good clinical outcomes following IHCAs and these variable factors need to be researched further.

  13. The impact of obesity on pediatric procedural sedation-related outcomes: results from the Pediatric Sedation Research Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Patricia D; Mallory, Michael D; Cravero, Joseph P; Lowrie, Lia; Hertzog, James H; Berkenbosch, John W

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the impact of obesity on adverse events and required interventions during pediatric procedural sedation. The Pediatric Sedation Research Consortium database of prospectively collected procedural sedation encounters was queried to identify patients for whom body mass index (BMI) could be calculated. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥95th percentile for age and gender. Sedation-related outcomes, adverse events, and therapeutic interventions were compared between obese and nonobese patients. For analysis, 28,792 records were eligible. A total of 5,153 patients (17.9%) were obese; they were predominantly male and older and had a higher median American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status classification (P obese patients (odds ratio [OR] 1.49, 95% confidence interval [1.31, 1.70]). Respiratory events (airway obstruction OR 1.94 [1.54, 2.44], oxygen desaturation OR 1.99 [1.50, 2.63], secretions OR 1.48 [1.01, 2.15], laryngospasm OR 2.30 [1.30, 4.05]), inability to complete the associated procedure (OR 1.96 [1.16, 3.30]), and prolonged recovery (OR 2.66 [1.26, 5.59]) were increased in obese patients. Obese patients more frequently required airway intervention including repositioning, suctioning, jaw thrust, airway adjuncts, and bag-valve-mask ventilation. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated obesity to be independently associated with minor and moderate but not major adverse events. Obesity is an independent risk factor for adverse respiratory events during procedural sedation and is associated with an increased frequency of airway interventions, suggesting that additional vigilance and expertise are required when sedating these patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. [European Resuscitation Council guidelines for resuscitation 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunyadi-Anticević, Silvija; Colak, Zeljko; Funtak, Ines Lojna; Lukić, Anita; Filipović-Grcić, Boris; Tomljanović, Branka; Kniewald, Hrvoje; Protić, Alen; Pandak, Tatjana; Poljaković, Zdravka; Canadija, Marino

    2011-01-01

    of 10-30 microg/kg. Newly born infants born at term or near-term with moderate to severe hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be treated with therapeutic hypothermia. PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATION IN RESUSCITATION: The aim is to ensure that learners acquire and retain skill and knowledge that will enable them to act correctly in actual cardiac arrest and improve patient outcome. Short video/computer self-instruction courses, with minimal or no instructor coaching, combined with hands-on practice can be considered as an effective alternative to instructor-led basic life support (BLS and AED) courses. Ideally all citizens should be trained in standard CPR that includes compressions and ventilations. Basic and advanced life support knowledge and skills deteriorate in as little as three to six months. CPR prompt or feedback devices improve CPR skill acquisition and retention.

  15. Default options and neonatal resuscitation decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haward, Marlyse Frieda; Murphy, Ryan O; Lorenz, John M

    2012-12-01

    To determine whether presenting delivery room management options as defaults influences decisions to resuscitate extremely premature infants. Adult volunteers recruited from the world wide web were randomised to receive either resuscitation or comfort care as the delivery room management default option for a hypothetical delivery of a 23-week gestation infant. Participants were required to check a box to opt out of the default. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of respondents electing resuscitation. Data were analysed using χ(2) tests and multivariate logistic regression. Participants who were told the delivery room management default option was resuscitation were more likely to opt for resuscitation (OR 6.54 95% CI 3.85 to 11.11, pmanipulation. Further, this effect may operate in ways that a decision maker is not aware of and this raises questions of patient autonomy. Presenting delivery room options for extremely premature infants as defaults may compromise autonomous decision-making.

  16. Usefulness of Serum B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Comatose Patients Resuscitated from Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest to Predict Outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydland, Martin; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Erlinge, David

    2016-01-01

    N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic (NT-proBNP) is expressed in the heart and brain, and serum levels are elevated in acute heart and brain diseases. We aimed to assess the possible association between serum levels and neurological outcome and death in comatose patients resuscitated from out......-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Of the 939 comatose OHCA patients enrolled and randomized in the Targeted Temperature Management (TTM) trial to TTM at 33°C or 36°C for 24 hours, 700 were included in the biomarker substudy. Of these, 647 (92%) had serum levels of NT-proBNP measured 24, 48, and 72 hours after return...... of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Neurological outcome was evaluated by the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 6 months. Six hundred thirty-eight patients (99%) had serum NT-proBNP levels ≥125 pg/ml. Patients with TTM at 33°C had significantly lower NT-proBNP serum...

  17. Improving healthcare and outcomes for high-risk children and teens: formation of the National Consortium for Pediatric and Adolescent Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Fineout-Overholt, Ellen; Hockenberrry, Marilyn; Huth, Myra; Jamerson, Patricia; Latta, Linda; Lewandowski, Linda; Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie

    2007-01-01

    Although major healthcare and professional organizations as well as key leaders have long emphasized the importance of evidence-based practice (EBP) in improving patient care and outcomes, the majority of healthcare professionals do not implement EBP. There is a huge gap in time that exists between the generation of research findings and the translation of those findings into clinical practice. Many efficacious interventions are not being used in clinical practice even though research findings suggest that they improve child and adolescent health and development. Conversely, many clinical practices are being implemented without sufficient evidence to support their use. Because of the need to accelerate EBP and to generate evidence to support best practices, the first EBP Leadership Summit focused on children and adolescents was conducted in February 2007. Several nationally recognized EBP experts and healthcare leaders from a number of children's hospitals and colleges of nursing across the U.S. participated in the Summit. This article describes the process used and outcomes generated from this landmark event in child and adolescent healthcare, including the launching of the new National Consortium for Pediatric and Adolescent EBP (NCPAEP). Future directions of the consortium also are highlighted.

  18. BACTERIAL CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons like benzen e, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene, together known as BTEX, has almost the same chemical structure. These aromatic hydrocarbons are released as pollutants in th e environment. This work was taken up to develop a solvent tolerant bacterial cons ortium that could degrade BTEX compounds as they all share a common chemical structure. We have isolated almost 60 different types of bacterial strains from different petroleum contaminated sites. Of these 60 bacterial strains almost 20 microorganisms were screene d on the basis of capability to tolerate high concentration of BTEX. Ten differe nt consortia were prepared and the compatibility of the bacterial strains within the consortia was checked by gram staining and BTEX tolerance level. Four successful mi crobial consortia were selected in which all the bacterial strains concomitantly grew in presence of high concentration of BTEX (10% of toluene, 10% of benzene 5% ethyl benzene and 1% xylene. Consortium #2 showed the highest growth rate in pr esence of BTEX. Degradation of BTEX by consortium #2 was monitored for 5 days by gradual decrease in the volume of the solvents. The maximum reduction observed wa s 85% in 5 days. Gas chromatography results also reveal that could completely degrade benzene and ethyl benzene within 48 hours. Almost 90% degradation of toluene and xylene in 48 hours was exhibited by consortium #2. It could also tolerate and degrade many industrial solvents such as chloroform, DMSO, acetonitrile having a wide range of log P values (0.03–3.1. Degradation of aromatic hydrocarbon like BTEX by a solvent tolerant bacterial consortium is greatly significant as it could degrade high concentration of pollutants compared to a bacterium and also reduces the time span of degradation.

  19. Updates in small animal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Daniel J; Boller, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    For dogs and cats that experience cardiopulmonary arrest, rates of survival to discharge are 6% to 7%, as compared with survival rates of 20% for people. The introduction of standardized cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines and training in human medicine has led to substantial improvements in outcome. The Reassessment Campaign on Veterinary Resuscitation initiative recently completed an exhaustive literature review and generated a set of evidence-based, consensus cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines in 5 domains: preparedness and prevention, basic life support, advanced life support, monitoring, and postcardiac arrest care. This article reviews some of the most important of these new guidelines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Damage control resuscitation for abdominal war injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-wei DING

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the concept of comprehensive treatment for military trauma has been comprehensively updated. The application of damage control surgery has significantly improved the clinical outcome of severe abdominal injury. With appropriate surgical intervention, post-trauma fluid resuscitation plays an increasingly important role in the treatment of abdominal injury. The damage control resuscitation strategy addresses the importance of permissive hypotension and haemostatic resuscitation for patients with severe trauma, under the guidance of damage control surgical principle. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.03.02

  1. Novel Resuscitation from Lethal Hemorrhage-Suspended Animation for Delayed Resuscitation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Safar, Peter

    2003-01-01

    ...). We have conceived and documented the concept of "suspended animation (SA) for delayed resuscitation" using a hypothermic saline flush into the aorta within the first 5 min of CA, using novel clinically relevant outcome models in dogs...

  2. Development and validation of risk models to predict outcomes following in-hospital cardiac arrest attended by a hospital-based resuscitation team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David A; Patel, Krishna; Nixon, Edel; Soar, Jasmeet; Smith, Gary B; Gwinnutt, Carl; Nolan, Jerry P; Rowan, Kathryn M

    2014-08-01

    The National Cardiac Arrest Audit (NCAA) is the UK national clinical audit for in-hospital cardiac arrest. To make fair comparisons among health care providers, clinical indicators require case mix adjustment using a validated risk model. The aim of this study was to develop and validate risk models to predict outcomes following in-hospital cardiac arrest attended by a hospital-based resuscitation team in UK hospitals. Risk models for two outcomes-return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) for greater than 20min and survival to hospital discharge-were developed and validated using data for in-hospital cardiac arrests between April 2011 and March 2013. For each outcome, a full model was fitted and then simplified by testing for non-linearity, combining categories and stepwise reduction. Finally, interactions between predictors were considered. Models were assessed for discrimination, calibration and accuracy. 22,479 in-hospital cardiac arrests in 143 hospitals were included (14,688 development, 7791 validation). The final risk model for ROSC>20min included: age (non-linear), sex, prior length of stay in hospital, reason for attendance, location of arrest, presenting rhythm, and interactions between presenting rhythm and location of arrest. The model for hospital survival included the same predictors, excluding sex. Both models had acceptable performance across the range of measures, although discrimination for hospital mortality exceeded that for ROSC>20min (c index 0.81 versus 0.72). Validated risk models for ROSC>20min and hospital survival following in-hospital cardiac arrest have been developed. These models will strengthen comparative reporting in NCAA and support local quality improvement. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Time matters--realism in resuscitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Kristian B; Høyer, Christian B; Ostergaard, Doris; Eika, Berit

    2014-08-01

    The advanced life support guidelines recommend 2min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and minimal hands-off time to ensure sufficient cardiac and cerebral perfusion. We have observed doctors who shorten the CPR intervals during resuscitation attempts. During simulation-based resuscitation training, the recommended 2-min CPR cycles are often deliberately decreased in order to increase the number of scenarios. The aim of this study was to test if keeping 2-min CPR cycles during resuscitation training ensures better adherence to time during resuscitation in a simulated setting. This study was designed as a randomised control trial. Fifty-four 4th-year medical students with no prior advanced resuscitation training participated in an extra-curricular one-day advanced life support course. Participants were either randomised to simulation-based training using real-time (120s) or shortened CPR cycles (30-45s instead of 120s) in the scenarios. Adherence to time was measured using the European Resuscitation Council's Cardiac Arrest Simulation Test (CASTest) in retention tests conducted one and 12 weeks after the course. The real-time group adhered significantly better to the recommended 2-min CPR cycles (time-120s) (mean 13; standard derivation (SD) 8) than the shortened CPR cycle group (mean 45; SD 19) when tested (ptraining to optimise outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Development and validation of risk models to predict outcomes following in-hospital cardiac arrest attended by a hospital-based resuscitation team☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David A.; Patel, Krishna; Nixon, Edel; Soar, Jasmeet; Smith, Gary B.; Gwinnutt, Carl; Nolan, Jerry P.; Rowan, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim The National Cardiac Arrest Audit (NCAA) is the UK national clinical audit for in-hospital cardiac arrest. To make fair comparisons among health care providers, clinical indicators require case mix adjustment using a validated risk model. The aim of this study was to develop and validate risk models to predict outcomes following in-hospital cardiac arrest attended by a hospital-based resuscitation team in UK hospitals. Methods Risk models for two outcomes—return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) for greater than 20 min and survival to hospital discharge—were developed and validated using data for in-hospital cardiac arrests between April 2011 and March 2013. For each outcome, a full model was fitted and then simplified by testing for non-linearity, combining categories and stepwise reduction. Finally, interactions between predictors were considered. Models were assessed for discrimination, calibration and accuracy. Results 22,479 in-hospital cardiac arrests in 143 hospitals were included (14,688 development, 7791 validation). The final risk model for ROSC > 20 min included: age (non-linear), sex, prior length of stay in hospital, reason for attendance, location of arrest, presenting rhythm, and interactions between presenting rhythm and location of arrest. The model for hospital survival included the same predictors, excluding sex. Both models had acceptable performance across the range of measures, although discrimination for hospital mortality exceeded that for ROSC > 20 min (c index 0.81 versus 0.72). Conclusions Validated risk models for ROSC > 20 min and hospital survival following in-hospital cardiac arrest have been developed. These models will strengthen comparative reporting in NCAA and support local quality improvement. PMID:24830872

  5. Early do-not-resuscitate orders in intracerebral haemorrhage; frequency and predictive value for death and functional outcome. A retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brizzi Marco

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In former studies from North America early Do-Not–Resuscitate orders (DNR orders in patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH had negative prognostic impact on mortality. The influence of DNR orders on functional outcome and whether DNR orders are grounded on relevant patient characteristics is unknown. We aimed to determine the frequency and predictive factors of DNR-orders and its association to prognosis, in ICH patients, in Scandinavia. Methods In 197 consecutive ICH patients admitted to Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden, between January 2007 and June 2009, information of the presence of DNR orders within 48 hours, clinical and radiological characteristics was retrieved by review of patient medical journal and computed tomography scans. Determinants of DNR-orders, one-month case fatality and bad functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale, grade 4–6 were assessed by logistic regression analysis. Results DNR orders were made in 41% of the cases. After adjustment for confounding factors, age ≥ 75 years (Odds Ratio (95% confidence interval 4.2(1.8-9.6, former stroke (5.1(1.9-3.1, Reaction Level Scale grade 2–3 and 4 (7.0(2.8-17.5 and (4.1(1.2-13.5, respectively and intraventricular haemorrhage (3.8(1.6-9.4 were independent determinants of early DNR orders. Independent predictors of one-month case fatality was age ≥ 75 years (3.7(1.4-9.6 volume ≥ 30 ml (3.5(1.3-9.6 and DNR orders (3.5(1.5-8.6. Seizure (6.0(1.04-34.2 and brain stem hemorrhage (8.0(1.1-58.4 were related to bad functional outcome, whereas early DNR order was not (3.5(0.99-12.7. Conclusions Well known prognostic factors are determinants for DNR orders, however DNR orders are independently related to one-month case fatality. In addition to improvements of the local routines, we welcome a change of attitude with an enhanced awareness of the definition of, and a more careful approach with respect to DNR orders.

  6. Resuscitation and post resuscitation care of the very old after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is worthwhile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Nielsen, Niklas; Lippert, Freddy K; Køber, Lars; Wanscher, Michael; Søholm, Helle

    2015-12-15

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with a poor prognosis. As comorbidity and frailty increase with age; ethical dilemmas may arise when OHCA occur in the very old. We aimed to investigate mortality, neurological outcome and post resuscitation care in octogenarians (≥80) to assess whether resuscitation and post resuscitation care should be avoided. During 2007-2011 consecutive OHCA-patients were attended by the physician-based Emergency Medical Services-system in Copenhagen. Pre-hospital data based on Utstein-criteria, and data on post resuscitation care were collected. Primary outcome was successful resuscitation; secondary endpoints were 30-day mortality and neurological outcome (Cerebral Performance Category (CPC)). 2509 OHCA-patients with attempted resuscitation were recorded, 22% (n=558) were octogenarians/nonagenarians. 166 (30% of all octogenarians with resuscitation attempted) octogenarians were successfully resuscitated compared to 830 (43% with resuscitation attempted) patients <80 years. 30-day mortality in octogenarians was significantly higher after adjustment for prognostic factors (HR=1.61 CI: 1.22-2.13, p<0.001). Octogenarians received fewer coronary angiographies (CAG) (14 vs. 37%, p<0.001), and had lower odds of receiving CAG by multivariate logistic regression (OR: 0.19, CI: 0.08-0.44, p<0.001). A favorable neurological outcome (CPC 1/2) in survivors to discharge was found in 70% (n=26) of octogenarians compared to 86% (n=317, p=0.03) in the younger patients. OHCA in octogenarians was associated with a significantly higher mortality rate after adjustment for prognostic factors. However, the majority of octogenarian survivors were discharged with a favorable neurological outcome. Withholding resuscitation and post resuscitation care in octogenarians does not seem justified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Haemostatic resuscitation in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Jakob; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Johansson, Par I.

    2016-01-01

    of a ratio driven strategy aiming at 1 : 1 : 1, using tranexamic acid according to CRASH-2, and applying haemostatic monitoring enabling a switch to a goal-directed approach when bleeding slows. Haemostatic resuscitation is the mainstay of trauma resuscitation and is associated with improved survival...

  8. An unsuccessful resuscitation:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Breaking bad news, resuscitation, communication, emergency ... Twelve family members whose loved ones had died in the emergency room and ... There was no effective follow-up of the families and the doctors also ... be available for staff involved in unsuccessful resuscitations. .... ed with the healing process.

  9. The impact of caudate lobe resection on margin status and outcomes in patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma: a multi-institutional analysis from the US Extrahepatic Biliary Malignancy Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutiani, Neal; Scoggins, Charles R; McMasters, Kelly M; Ethun, Cecilia G; Poultsides, George A; Pawlik, Timothy M; Weber, Sharon M; Schmidt, Carl R; Fields, Ryan C; Idrees, Kamran; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Shen, Perry; Maithel, Shishir K; Martin, Robert C G

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of caudate resection on margin status and outcomes during resection of extrahepatic hilar cholangiocarcinoma. A database of 1,092 patients treated for biliary malignancies at institutions of the Extrahepatic Biliary Malignancy Consortium was queried for individuals undergoing curative-intent resection for extrahepatic hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Patients who did versus did not undergo concomitant caudate resection were compared with regard to demographic, baseline, and tumor characteristics as well as perioperative outcomes. A total of 241 patients underwent resection for a hilar cholangiocarcinoma, of whom 85 underwent caudate resection. Patients undergoing caudate resection were less likely to have a final positive margin (P = .01). Kaplan-Meier curve of overall survival for patients undergoing caudate resection indicated no improvement over patients not undergoing caudate resection (P = .16). On multivariable analysis, caudate resection was not associated with improved overall survival or recurrence-free survival, although lymph node positivity was associated with worse overall survival and recurrence-free survival, and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy was associated with improved overall survival and recurrence-free survival. Caudate resection is associated with a greater likelihood of margin-negative resection in patients with extrahepatic hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Precise preoperative imaging is critical to assess the extent of biliary involvement, so that all degrees of hepatic resections are possible at the time of the initial operation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The International Childhood Cardiovascular Cohort (i3C) consortium outcomes study of childhood cardiovascular risk factors and adult cardiovascular morbidity and mortality: Design and recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinaiko, Alan R; Jacobs, David R; Woo, Jessica G; Bazzano, Lydia; Burns, Trudy; Hu, Tian; Juonala, Markus; Prineas, Ronald; Raitakari, Olli; Steinberger, Julia; Urbina, Elaine; Venn, Alison; Jaquish, Cashell; Dwyer, Terry

    2018-04-22

    Although it is widely thought that childhood levels of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors are related to adult CV disease, longitudinal data directly linking the two are lacking. This paper describes the design and organization of the International Childhood Cardiovascular Cohort Consortium Outcomes Study (i3C Outcomes), the first longitudinal cohort study designed to locate adults with detailed, repeated, childhood biological, physical, and socioeconomic measurements and a harmonized database. I3C Outcomes uses a Heart Health Survey (HHS) to obtain information on adult CV endpoints, using mail, email, telephone, and clinic visits in the United States (U.S.) and Australia and a national health database in Finland. Microsoft Access, REsearch Data Capture (REDCap) (U.S.), LimeSurvey (Australia), and Medidata™ Rave data systems are used to collect, transfer and organize data. Self-reported CV events are adjudicated via hospital and doctor-released medical records. After the first two study years, participants (N = 10,968) were more likely to be female (56% vs. 48%), non-Hispanic white (90% vs. 80%), and older (10.4 ± 3.8 years vs. 9.4 ± 3.3 years) at their initial childhood study visit than the currently non-recruited cohort members. Over 48% of cohort members seen during both adulthood and childhood have been found and recruited, to date, vs. 5% of those not seen since childhood. Self-reported prevalences were 0.7% Type 1 Diabetes, 7.5% Type 2 Diabetes, 33% hypertension, and 12.8% CV event. 32% of CV events were judged to be true. I3C Outcomes is uniquely able to establish evidence-based guidelines for child health care and to clarify relations to adult CV disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The establishment of the GENEQOL consortium to investigate the genetic disposition of patient reported quality-of-life outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.G. Sprangers (Mirjam); J.A. Sloan (Jeff); R. Veenhoven (Ruut); C.S. Cleeland (Charles); M.Y. Halyard (Michele); A.P. Abertnethy (Amy); F. Baas (Frank); A.M. Barsevick (Andrea); M. Bartels (Meike); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); C. Chauhan (Cynthia); A.C. Dueck (Amylou); M.H. Frost (Marlene); P. Hall (Per); P. Klepstad (Pal); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); C. Miaskowski (Christine); M. Mosing (Miriam); B. Movsas (Benjamin); C.J.F. van Noorden (Cornelis); D.L. Patrick (Donald); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); M.E. Ropka (Mary); Q. Shi (Quiling); G. Shinozaki (Gen); J.A. Singh (Jasvinder); P. Yang (Ping); A.H. Zwinderman (Ailko)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTo our knowledge, no comprehensive, interdisciplinary initiatives have been taken to examine the role of genetic variants on patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes. The overall objective of this paper is to describe the establishment of an international and interdisciplinary

  12. Protocol compliance and time management in blunt trauma resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanjersberg, W R; Bergs, E A; Mushkudiani, N; Klimek, M; Schipper, I B

    2009-01-01

    To study advanced trauma life support (ATLS) protocol adherence prospectively in trauma resuscitation and to analyse time management of daily multidisciplinary trauma resuscitation at a level 1 trauma centre, for both moderately and severely injured patients. All victims of severe blunt trauma were consecutively included. Patients with a revised trauma score (RTS) of 12 were resuscitated by a "minor trauma" team and patients with an RTS of less than 12 were resuscitated by a "severe trauma" team. Digital video recordings were used to analyse protocol compliance and time management during initial assessment. From 1 May to 1 September 2003, 193 resuscitations were included. The "minor trauma" team assessed 119 patients, with a mean injury severity score (ISS) of 7 (range 1-45). Overall protocol compliance was 42%, ranging from 0% for thoracic percussion to 93% for thoracic auscultation. The median resuscitation time was 45.9 minutes (range 39.7-55.9). The "severe team" assessed 74 patients, with a mean ISS of 22 (range 1-59). Overall protocol compliance was 53%, ranging from 4% for thoracic percussion to 95% for thoracic auscultation. Resuscitation took 34.8 minutes median (range 21.6-44.1). Results showed the current trauma resuscitation to be ATLS-like, with sometimes very low protocol compliance rates. Timing of secondary survey and radiology and thus time efficiency remains a challenge in all trauma patients. To assess the effect of trauma resuscitation protocols on outcome, protocol adherence needs to be improved.

  13. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  14. Outcome of Patients With Metastatic Sarcomatoid Renal Cell Carcinoma: Results From the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyriakopoulos, Christos E; Chittoria, Namita; Choueiri, Toni K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma is associated with poor prognosis. Data regarding outcome in the targeted therapy era are lacking. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Clinical, prognostic, and treatment parameters in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients with and without sarcomatoid histology......% intermediate risk, and 40% vs. 24% poor risk; P system metastases (6...... of second- (P = .018) and third-line (P systemic therapy. The median progression-free survival (PFS)/overall survival (OS) was 4.5/10.4 months in sRCC patients and 7.8/22.5 months in non-sRCC patients (P

  15. Teamwork during resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Peter; Halamek, Louis P

    2008-08-01

    Effective resuscitation requires the integration of several cognitive, technical, and behavioral skills. Because resuscitation is performed by teams of health care professionals, these individuals must be able to work together in a coordinated and efficient manner, making teamwork a critical skill for care of patients in distress. Despite the importance of teamwork in health care, little consensus exists as to what it is, how it can most effectively be learned, and how it should be assessed. This article reviews current knowledge on the measurement, training, and importance of teamwork in pediatric resuscitation.

  16. Outcome of secondary high-grade glioma in children previously treated for a malignant condition: A study of the Canadian Pediatric Brain Tumour Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carret, Anne-Sophie; Tabori, Uri; Crooks, Bruce; Hukin, Juliette; Odame, Isaac; Johnston, Donna L.; Keene, Daniel L.; Freeman, Carolyn; Bouffet, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Reports of secondary high-grade glioma (HGG) in survivors of childhood cancer are scarce. The aim of this study was to review the pattern of diagnosis, the treatment, and outcome of secondary pediatric HGG. Patients and methods: We performed a multi-center retrospective study among the 17 paediatric institutions participating in the Canadian Pediatric Brain Tumour Consortium (CPBTC). Results: We report on 18 patients (14 males, 4 females) treated in childhood for a primary cancer, who subsequently developed a HGG as a second malignancy. All patients had previously received radiation therapy +/- chemotherapy for either acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (n = 9) or solid tumour (n = 9). All HGG occurred within the previous radiation fields. At the last follow-up, 17 patients have died and the median survival time is 9.75 months. Conclusion: Although aggressive treatment seems to provide sustained remissions in some patients, the optimal management is still to be defined. Further documentation of such cases is necessary in order to better understand the pathogenesis, the natural history and the prevention of these tumours

  17. Cutaneous Lymphoma International Consortium Study of Outcome in Advanced Stages of Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarisbrick, Julia J; Prince, H Miles; Vermeer, Maarten H

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Advanced-stage mycosis fungoides (MF; stage IIB to IV) and Sézary syndrome (SS) are aggressive lymphomas with a median survival of 1 to 5 years. Clinical management is stage based; however, there is wide range of outcome within stages. Published prognostic studies in MF/SS have been single......, proliferation index, large-cell transformation, WBC/lymphocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase, and identical T-cell clone in blood and skin. Data were collected at specialist centers on patients diagnosed with advanced-stage MF/SS from 2007. Each parameter recorded at diagnosis was tested against overall...... survival (OS). RESULTS: Staging data on 1,275 patients with advanced MF/SS from 29 international sites were included for survival analysis. The median OS was 63 months, with 2- and 5-year survival rates of 77% and 52%, respectively. The median OS for patients with stage IIB disease was 68 months...

  18. Mid-term study of transcatheter aortic valve implantation in an Asian population with severe aortic stenosis: two-year Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Nicholas; Hon, Jimmy Kim Fatt; Yip, Wei Luen James; Chan, Siew Pang; Poh, Kian-Keong; Kong, William Kok-Fai; Teoh, Kristine Leok Kheng; Yeo, Tiong Cheng; Tan, Huay Cheem; Tay, Edgar Lik Wui

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an effective treatment for high-risk or inoperative patients with severe aortic stenosis. Given the unique characteristics of Asian populations, questions regarding mid-term outcomes in Asians undergoing TAVI have yet to be addressed. We evaluated the two-year clinical outcomes of TAVI in an Asian population using Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 definitions. This prospective study recruited 59 patients from a major academic medical centre in Singapore. The main outcomes were two-year survival rates, peri-procedural complications, symptom improvement, valvular function and assessment of learning curve. Mean age was 76.8 years (61.0% male), mean body surface area 1.6 m 2 and mean logistic EuroSCORE 18.7%. Survival was 93.2%, 86.0% and 79.1% at 30 days, one year and two years, respectively. At 30 days post TAVI, the rate of stroke was 1.7%, life-threatening bleeding 5.1%, acute kidney injury 25.0%, major vascular complication 5.1%, and new permanent pacemaker implantation 6.8%. 29.3% of TAVI patients were rehospitalised (47.1% cardiovascular-related) within one year. These composite outcomes were measured: device success (93.2%); early safety (79.7%); clinical efficacy (66.1%); and time-related valve safety (84.7%). Univariate analysis found these predictors of two-year all-cause mortality: logistic EuroSCORE (hazard ratio [HR] 1.07; p < 0.001); baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (HR 0.97; p = 0.048); and acute kidney injury (HR 5.33; p = 0.022). Multivariate analysis identified non-transfemoral TAVI as a predictor of cardiovascular-related two-year mortality (HR 14.64; p = 0.008). Despite the unique clinical differences in Asian populations, this registry demonstrated favourable mid-term clinical and safety outcomes in Asians undergoing TAVI. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association

  19. Resuscitation at the limits of viability--an Irish perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, R A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Advances in neonatal care continue to lower the limit of viability. Decision making in this grey zone remains a challenging process. OBJECTIVE: To explore the opinions of healthcare providers on resuscitation and outcome in the less than 28-week preterm newborn. DESIGN\\/METHODS: An anonymous postal questionnaire was sent to health care providers working in maternity units in the Republic of Ireland. Questions related to neonatal management of the extreme preterm infant, and estimated survival and long-term outcome. RESULTS: The response rate was 55% (74% obstetricians and 70% neonatologists). Less than 1% would advocate resuscitation at 22 weeks, 10% of health care providers advocate resuscitation at 23 weeks gestation, 80% of all health care providers would resuscitate at 24 weeks gestation. 20% of all health care providers would advocate cessation of resuscitation efforts on 22-25 weeks gestation at 5 min of age. 65% of Neonatologists and 54% trainees in Paediatrics would cease resuscitation at 10 min of age. Obstetricians were more pessimistic about survival and long term outcome in newborns delivered between 23 and 27 weeks when compared with neonatologists. This difference was also observed in trainees in paediatrics and obstetrics. CONCLUSION: Neonatologists, trainees in paediatrics and neonatal nurses are generally more optimistic about outcome than their counterparts in obstetrical care and this is reflected in a greater willingness to provide resuscitation efforts at the limits of viability.

  20. Resuscitation of Newborn Babies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ann Burgess

    in which neonatal resuscitation was a central component1. ... together with an umbilical catheter through which they are given, but if ... drugs: Insert an umbilical venous cannula, and ... Case history from Berega Hospital, Tanzania. Following a ...

  1. Novel Resuscitation from Lethal Hemorrhage. Increasing Survival of Combat Casualties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Safar, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Using our novel animal models of severe hemorrhage, focusing on evaluation of outcome to 3-10 days, the following strategies were found superior in terms of intact survival compared to standard resuscitation...

  2. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  3. “Putting It All Together” to Improve Resuscitation Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Robert M.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Abella, Benjamin S.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is a major public health problem affecting thousands of individuals each year in both the before hospital and in-hospital settings. However, although the scope of the problem is large, the quality of care provided during resuscitation attempts frequently does not meet quality of care standards, despite evidence-based cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines, extensive provider training, and provider credentialing in resuscitation medicine. Although this fact may be disappointing, it should not be surprising. Resuscitation of the cardiac arrest victim is a highly complex task requiring coordination between various levels and disciplines of care providers during a stressful and relatively infrequent clinical situation. Moreover, it requires a targeted, high-quality response to improve clinical outcomes of patients. Therefore, solutions to improve care provided during resuscitation attempts must be multifaceted and targeted to the diverse number of care providers to be successful. PMID:22107978

  4. The clinical nurse specialist as resuscitation process manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderhahn, Mary Elizabeth; Fish, Anne Folta

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the history and leadership dimensions of the role of resuscitation process manager and provide specific examples of how this role is implemented at a Midwest medical center. In 1992, a medical center in the Midwest needed a nurse to manage resuscitation care. This role designation meant that this nurse became central to all quality improvement efforts in resuscitation care. The role expanded as clinical resuscitation guidelines were updated and as the medical center grew. The role became known as the critical care clinical nurse specialist as resuscitation process manager. This clinical care nurse specialist was called a manager, but she had no direct line authority, so she accomplished her objectives by forming a multitude of collaborative networks. Based on a framework by Finkelman, the manager role incorporated specific leadership abilities in quality improvement: (1) coordination of medical center-wide resuscitation, (2) use of interprofessional teams, (3) integration of evidence into practice, and (4) staff coaching to develop leadership. The manager coordinates resuscitation care with the goals of prevention of arrests if possible, efficient and effective implementation of resuscitation protocols, high quality of patient and family support during and after the resuscitation event, and creation or revision of resuscitation policies for in-hospital and for ambulatory care areas. The manager designs a comprehensive set of meaningful and measurable process and outcome indicators with input from interprofessional teams. The manager engages staff in learning, reflecting on care given, and using the evidence base for resuscitation care. Finally, the manager role is a balance between leading quality improvement efforts and coaching staff to implement and sustain these quality improvement initiatives. Revisions to clinical guidelines for resuscitation care since the 1990s have resulted in medical centers developing improved

  5. Are We Successful in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalan Kozaci

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this study, we aimed to determine the success rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation performed in the patients with diagnosis of cardiac arrest, and demographic characteristics of these patients. Material and Methods: The patients admitted to Adana Numune Education and Research Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine between 01.01.2011 and 31.12.2012, and who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation were included to this study planned as retrospectively. The age, gender, status of judicial cases, causes and time of cardiac arrest, first observed arrest rhythm, the diseases prior to the arrest, means of arrival to emergency department, duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the name of the hospitalised clinic, the existence of the operation, and outcome of the patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation in accordance with current advanced life support protocols were recorded in standard data entry form. Results: A total of 290 patients with completely accessible data were included to the study. Most of these patients were men (65.2%. The mean ages were 61 ± 19 years for men, 67 ± 14 years for women (p = 0.018. The most common diagnosis were ischemic heart disease and heart failure according to the analysis of the patient's medical history. 92 patients (31.7% were brought to the emergency department after death, and all of these patients were unsuccessful following to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 198 patients (68.3% had cardiac arrest in the emergency department, and we determined that cardiopulmonary resuscitation application of 102 patients were successful. The most common causes of cardiac arrest were myocardial infarction and heart failure. Mostly first observed rhythm in the monitor was asystole. The response rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia was higher. Most patients were hospitalised to the

  6. [Prehospital thrombolysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spöhr, F; Böttiger, B W

    2005-02-01

    Although prehospital cardiac arrest has an incidence of 40-90/100,000 inhabitants per year, there has been a lack of therapeutic options to improve the outcome of these patients. Of all cardiac arrests, 50-70% are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or massive pulmonary embolism (PE). Thrombolysis has been shown to be a causal and effective therapy in patients with AMI or PE who do not suffer cardiac arrest. In contrast, experience with the use of thrombolysis during cardiac arrest has been limited. Thrombolysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) acts directly on thrombi or emboli causing AMI or PE. In addition, experimental studies suggest that thrombolysis causes an improvement in microcirculatory reperfusion after cardiac arrest. In-hospital and prehospital case series and clinical studies suggest that thrombolysis during CPR may cause a restoration of spontaneous circulation and survival even in patients that have been resuscitated conventionally without success. In addition, there is evidence for an improved neurological outcome in patients receiving a thrombolytic therapy during during CPR. A large randomized, double-blind multicenter trial that has started recently is expected to show if this new therapeutic option can generally improve the prognosis of patients with cardiac arrest.

  7. Out-of-Hospital Hypertonic Resuscitation Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulger, Eileen M.; May, Susanne; Brasel, Karen J.; Schreiber, Martin; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Newgard, Craig; Slutsky, Arthur; Coimbra, Raul; Emerson, Scott; Minei, Joseph P.; Bardarson, Berit; Kudenchuk, Peter; Baker, Andrew; Christenson, Jim; Idris, Ahamed; Davis, Daniel; Fabian, Timothy C.; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Callaway, Clifton; Williams, Carolyn; Banek, Jane; Vaillancourt, Christian; van Heest, Rardi; Sopko, George; Hata, J. Steven; Hoyt, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Context Hypertonic fluids restore cerebral perfusion with reduced cerebral edema and modulate inflammatory response to reduce subsequent neuronal injury and thus have potential benefit in resuscitation of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Objective To determine whether out-of-hospital administration of hypertonic fluids improves neurologic outcome following severe TBI. Design, Setting, and Participants Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial involving 114 North American emergency medical services agencies within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, conducted between May 2006 and May 2009 among patients 15 years or older with blunt trauma and a prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or less who did not meet criteria for hypovolemic shock. Planned enrollment was 2122 patients. Intervention A single 250-mL bolus of 7.5% saline/6% dextran 70 (hypertonic saline/dextran), 7.5% saline (hypertonic saline), or 0.9% saline (normal saline) initiated in the out-of-hospital setting. Main Outcome Measure Six-month neurologic outcome based on the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) (dichotomized as >4 or ≤4). Results The study was terminated by the data and safety monitoring board after randomization of 1331 patients, having met prespecified futility criteria. Among the 1282 patients enrolled, 6-month outcomes data were available for 1087 (85%). Baseline characteristics of the groups were equivalent. There was no difference in 6-month neurologic outcome among groups with regard to proportions of patients with severe TBI (GOSE ≤4) (hypertonic saline/dextran vs normal saline: 53.7% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.2% [95% CI, −4.5% to 9.0%]; hypertonic saline vs normal saline: 54.3% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.9% [95% CI, −4.0% to 9.7%]; P=.67). There were no statistically significant differences in distribution of GOSE category or Disability Rating Score by treatment group. Survival at 28 days was 74.3% with hypertonic saline

  8. T-piece resuscitator versus self-inflating bag for preterm resuscitation: an institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Archana; Sima, Adam; Barker, Gail; Thacker, Leroy R

    2013-07-01

    Manual ventilation in the delivery room is provided with devices such as self-inflating bags (SIBs), flow-inflating bags, and T-piece resuscitators. To compare the effect of type of manual ventilation device on overall response to resuscitation among preterm neonates born at Apgar score. Secondary outcomes were incidence of air leaks, need for chest compressions/epinephrine, need for intubation, and surfactant use. We identified 294 resuscitations requiring ventilation. SIB was used for 135 neonates, and T-piece was used for 159 neonates. There was no significant difference between the 1-min and 5-min Apgar scores between SIB and T-piece (P = .77 and P = .11, respectively), nor were there significant differences in secondary outcomes. The rate of rise of Apgar score was higher, by 0.47, with T-piece, compared to SIB (95% CI 0.08-0.87, P = .02). Although some manikin studies favor T-piece for providing reliable and consistent pressures, our experience did not indicate significant differences in effectiveness of resuscitation between the T-piece and SIB in preterm resuscitations.

  9. Challenging surgical dogma in the management of proximal esophageal atresia with distal tracheoesophageal fistula: Outcomes from the Midwest Pediatric Surgery Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Dave R; Gadepalli, Samir K; Downard, Cynthia D; Ostlie, Daniel J; Minneci, Peter C; Swedler, Ruth M; Chelius, Thomas H; Cassidy, Laura; Rapp, Cooper T; Billmire, Deborah; Bruch, Steven; Burns, R Carland; Deans, Katherine J; Fallat, Mary E; Fraser, Jason D; Grabowski, Julia; Hebel, Ferdynand; Helmrath, Michael A; Hirschl, Ronald B; Kabre, Rashmi; Kohler, Jonathan; Landman, Matthew P; Leys, Charles M; Mak, Grace Z; Raque, Jessica; Rymeski, Beth; Saito, Jacqueline M; St Peter, Shawn D; von Allmen, Daniel; Warner, Brad W; Sato, Thomas T

    2017-06-01

    Perioperative management of infants with esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) is frequently based on surgeon experience and dogma rather than evidence-based guidelines. This study examines whether commonly perceived important aspects of practice affect outcome in a contemporary multi-institutional cohort of patients undergoing primary repair for the most common type of esophageal atresia anomaly, proximal EA with distal TEF. The Midwest Pediatric Surgery Consortium conducted a multicenter, retrospective study examining selected outcomes on infants diagnosed with proximal EA with distal TEF who underwent primary repair over a 5-year period (2009-2014), with a minimum 1-year follow up, across 11 centers. 292 patients with proximal EA and distal TEF who underwent primary repair were reviewed. The overall mortality was 6% and was significantly associated with the presence of congenital heart disease (OR 4.82, p=0.005). Postoperative complications occurred in 181 (62%) infants, including: anastomotic stricture requiring intervention (n=127; 43%); anastomotic leak (n=54; 18%); recurrent fistula (n=15; 5%); vocal cord paralysis/paresis (n=14; 5%); and esophageal dehiscence (n=5; 2%). Placement of a transanastomotic tube was associated with an increase in esophageal stricture formation (OR 2.2, p=0.01). Acid suppression was not associated with altered rates of stricture, leak or pneumonia (all p>0.1). Placement of interposing prosthetic material between the esophageal and tracheal suture lines was associated with an increased leak rate (OR 4.7, p24h were used in 193 patients (66%) with no difference in rates of infection, shock or death when compared to antibiotic use ≤24h (all p>0.3). Hospital volume was not associated with postoperative complication rates (p>0.08). Routine postoperative esophagram obtained on day 5 resulted in no delayed/missed anastomotic leaks or a difference in anastomotic leak rate as compared to esophagrams obtained on day 7

  10. Cardiocerebral resuscitation: facts and prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Dejan Kupnik; Miljenko Križmarić

    2009-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the prehospital setting still has to cope with poor lay-rescuer knowledge of resuscitation techniques, low public availability of automated external defi brillators, many detrimental interruptions of chest compressions during lay and professional resuscitation eff orts and suboptimal postresuscitation care. Th erefore the survival of patients aft er cardiac arrest remains poor. To address those fl aws, cardiopulmonary resuscitatio...

  11. Applying lessons from commercial aviation safety and operations to resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornato, Joseph P; Peberdy, Mary Ann

    2014-02-01

    Both commercial aviation and resuscitation are complex activities in which team members must respond to unexpected emergencies in a consistent, high quality manner. Lives are at stake in both activities and the two disciplines have similar leadership structures, standard setting processes, training methods, and operational tools. Commercial aviation crews operate with remarkable consistency and safety, while resuscitation team performance and outcomes are highly variable. This commentary provides the perspective of two physician-pilots showing how commercial aviation training, operations, and safety principles can be adapted to resuscitation team training and performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. To resuscitate or not to resuscitate: a logistic regression analysis of physician-related variables influencing the decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einav, Sharon; Alon, Gady; Kaufman, Nechama; Braunstein, Rony; Carmel, Sara; Varon, Joseph; Hersch, Moshe

    2012-09-01

    To determine whether variables in physicians' backgrounds influenced their decision to forego resuscitating a patient they did not previously know. Questionnaire survey of a convenience sample of 204 physicians working in the departments of internal medicine, anaesthesiology and cardiology in 11 hospitals in Israel. Twenty per cent of the participants had elected to forego resuscitating a patient they did not previously know without additional consultation. Physicians who had more frequently elected to forego resuscitation had practised medicine for more than 5 years (p=0.013), estimated the number of resuscitations they had performed as being higher (p=0.009), and perceived their experience in resuscitation as sufficient (p=0.001). The variable that predicted the outcome of always performing resuscitation in the logistic regression model was less than 5 years of experience in medicine (OR 0.227, 95% CI 0.065 to 0.793; p=0.02). Physicians' level of experience may affect the probability of a patient's receiving resuscitation, whereas the physicians' personal beliefs and values did not seem to affect this outcome.

  13. Human factors in resuscitation teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Elizabeth M; Lockey, Andrew S

    2012-04-01

    There is an increasing interest in human factors within the healthcare environment reflecting the understanding of their impact on safety. The aim of this paper is to explore how human factors might be taught on resuscitation courses, and improve course outcomes in terms of improved mortality and morbidity for patients. The delivery of human factors training is important and this review explores the work that has been delivered already and areas for future research and teaching. Medline was searched using MESH terms Resuscitation as a Major concept and Patient or Leadership as core terms. The abstracts were read and 25 full length articles reviewed. Critical incident reporting has shown four recurring problems: lack of organisation at an arrest, lack of equipment, non functioning equipment, and obstructions preventing good care. Of these, the first relates directly to the concept of human factors. Team dynamics for both team membership and leadership, management of stress, conflict and the role of debriefing are highlighted. Possible strategies for teaching them are discussed. Four strategies for improving human factors training are discussed: team dynamics (including team membership and leadership behaviour), the influence of stress, debriefing, and conflict within teams. This review illustrates how human factor training might be integrated further into life support training without jeopardising the core content and lengthening the courses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Singapore Paediatric Resuscitation Guidelines 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Gene Yong Kwang; Chan, Irene Lai Yeen; Ng, Agnes Suah Bwee; Chew, Su Yah; Mok, Yee Hui; Chan, Yoke Hwee; Ong, Jacqueline Soo May; Ganapathy, Sashikumar; Ng, Kee Chong

    2017-07-01

    We present the revised 2016 Singapore paediatric resuscitation guidelines. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation's Pediatric Taskforce Consensus Statements on Science and Treatment Recommendations, as well as the updated resuscitation guidelines from the American Heart Association and European Resuscitation Council released in October 2015, were debated and discussed by the workgroup. The final recommendations for the Singapore Paediatric Resuscitation Guidelines 2016 were derived after carefully reviewing the current available evidence in the literature and balancing it with local clinical practice. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  15. Are regional variations in activity of dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests outcomes? A nation-wide population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Taiki; Kamikura, Takahisa; Funada, Akira; Myojo, Yasuhiro; Ishida, Tetsuya; Inaba, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (DA-CPR) impacts the rates of bystander CPR (BCPR) and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs). This study aimed to elucidate whether regional variations in indexes for BCPR and emergency medical service (EMS) may be associated with OHCA outcomes. We conducted a population-based observational study involving 157,093 bystander-witnessed, resuscitation-attempted OHCAs without physician involvement between 2007 and 2011. For each index of BCPR and EMS, we classified the 47 prefectures into the following three groups: advanced, intermediate, and developing regions. Nominal logit analysis followed by multivariable logistic regression including OHCA backgrounds was employed to examine the association between neurologically favourable 1-month survival, and regional classifications based on BCPR- and EMS-related indexes. Logit analysis including all regional classifications revealed that the number of BLS training course participants per population or bystander's own performance of BCPR without DA-CPR was not associated with the survival. Multivariable logistic regression including the OHCA backgrounds known to be associated with survival (BCPR provision, arrest aetiology, initial rhythm, patient age, time intervals of witness-to-call and call-to-arrival at patient), the following regional classifications based on DA-CPR but not on EMS were associated with survival: sensitivity of DA-CPR [adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) for advanced region; those for intermediate region, with developing region as reference, 1.277 (1.131-1.441); 1.162 (1.058-1.277)]; the proportion of bystanders to follow DA-CPR [1.749 (1.554-1.967); 1.280 (1.188-1.380)]. Good outcomes of bystander-witnessed OHCAs correlate with regions having higher sensitivity of DA-CPR and larger proportion of bystanders to follow DA-CPR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hydroxyethyl starch for resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Nicolai; Perner, Anders

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Resuscitation with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) is controversial. In this review, we will present the current evidence for the use of HES solutions including data from recent high-quality randomized clinical trials. RECENT FINDINGS: Meta-analyses of HES vs. control fluids show clear...

  17. Hemostatic resuscitation is neither hemostatic nor resuscitative in trauma hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sirat; Brohi, Karim; Chana, Manik; Raza, Imran; Stanworth, Simon; Gaarder, Christine; Davenport, Ross

    2014-03-01

    Trauma hemorrhage continues to carry a high mortality rate despite changes in modern practice. Traditional approaches to the massively bleeding patient have been shown to result in persistent coagulopathy, bleeding, and poor outcomes. Hemostatic (or damage control) resuscitation developed from the discovery of acute traumatic coagulopathy and increased recognition of the negative consequences of dilutional coagulopathy. These strategies concentrate on early delivery of coagulation therapy combined with permissive hypotension. The efficacy of hemostatic resuscitation in correcting coagulopathy and restoring tissue perfusion during acute hemorrhage has not been studied. This is a prospective cohort study of ROTEM and lactate measurements taken from trauma patients recruited to the multicenter Activation of Coagulation and Inflammation in Trauma (ACIT) study. A blood sample is taken on arrival and during the acute bleeding phase after administration of every 4 U of packed red blood cells (PRBCs), up to 12 U. The quantity of blood products administered within each interval is recorded. Of the 106 study patients receiving at least 4 U of PRBC, 27 received 8 U to 11 U of PRBC and 31 received more than 12 U of PRBC. Average admission lactate was 6.2 mEq/L. Patients with high lactate (≥5 mEq/L) on admission did not clear lactate until hemorrhage control was achieved, and no further PRBC units were required. On admission, 43% of the patients were coagulopathic (clot amplitude at 5 minutes ≤ 35 mm). This increased to 49% by PRBC 4; 62% by PRBC 8 and 68% at PRBC 12. The average fresh frozen plasma/PRBC ratio between intervals was 0.5 for 0 U to 4 U of PRBC, 0.9 for 5 U to 8 U of PRBC, 0.7 for 9 U to 12 U of PRBC. There was no improvement in any ROTEM parameter during ongoing bleeding. While hemostatic resuscitation offers several advantages over historical strategies, it still does not achieve correction of hypoperfusion or coagulopathy during the acute phase of trauma

  18. Relationship between chest compression rates and outcomes from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Ahamed H; Guffey, Danielle; Aufderheide, Tom P; Brown, Siobhan; Morrison, Laurie J; Nichols, Patrick; Powell, Judy; Daya, Mohamud; Bigham, Blair L; Atkins, Dianne L; Berg, Robert; Davis, Dan; Stiell, Ian; Sopko, George; Nichol, Graham

    2012-06-19

    Guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend a chest compression rate of at least 100 compressions per minute. Animal and human studies have reported that blood flow is greatest with chest compression rates near 120/min, but few have reported rates used during out-of-hospital (OOH) cardiopulmonary resuscitation or the relationship between rate and outcome. The purpose of this study was to describe chest compression rates used by emergency medical services providers to resuscitate patients with OOH cardiac arrest and to determine the relationship between chest compression rate and outcome. Included were patients aged ≥ 20 years with OOH cardiac arrest treated by emergency medical services providers participating in the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium. Data were abstracted from monitor-defibrillator recordings during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Multiple logistic regression analysis assessed the association between chest compression rate and outcome. From December 2005 to May 2007, 3098 patients with OOH cardiac arrest were included in this study. Mean age was 67 ± 16 years, and 8.6% survived to hospital discharge. Mean compression rate was 112 ± 19/min. A curvilinear association between chest compression rate and return of spontaneous circulation was found in cubic spline models after multivariable adjustment (P=0.012). Return of spontaneous circulation rates peaked at a compression rate of ≈ 125/min and then declined. Chest compression rate was not significantly associated with survival to hospital discharge in multivariable categorical or cubic spline models. Chest compression rate was associated with return of spontaneous circulation but not with survival to hospital discharge in OOH cardiac arrest.

  19. Interhospital Transport of Children Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Practical and Ethical Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noje, Corina; Fishe, Jennifer N; Costabile, Philomena M; Klein, Bruce L; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Pronovost, Peter J

    2017-10-01

    To discuss risks and benefits of interhospital transport of children in cardiac arrest undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Narrative review. Not applicable. Transporting children in cardiac arrest with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation between hospitals is potentially lifesaving if it enables access to resources such as extracorporeal support, but may risk transport personnel safety. Research is needed to optimize outcomes of patients transported with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and reduce risks to the staff caring for them.

  20. International Radical Cystectomy Consortium: A way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Johar Raza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC is an emerging operative alternative to open surgery for the management of invasive bladder cancer. Studies from single institutions provide limited data due to the small number of patients. In order to better understand the related outcomes, a world-wide consortium was established in 2006 of patients undergoing RARC, called the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium (IRCC. Thus far, the IRCC has reported its findings on various areas of operative interest and continues to expand its capacity to include other operative modalities and transform it into the International Radical Cystectomy Consortium. This article summarizes the findings of the IRCC and highlights the future direction of the consortium.

  1. Resuscitation of the Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilduff, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    All infants have some degree of hypoxia and respiratory acidosis at birth, but these conditions are more profound in the asphyxiated newborn. The newborn infant is very susceptible to cooling and may require warming. Skin temperature should be maintained between 36-36.5°.2 Resuscitation of the asphyxiated newborn must include both ventilatory and metabolic correction. Newborn infants may have cardiorespiratory problems due to asphyxia, drugs given to the mother, intrathoracic disease, anemia, hypovolemia (due to antepartum hemorrhage), hypotension, etc. There is no substitute for oxygen which is the drug of choice in respiratory depression of the newborn. The use of stimulating drugs like Coramine, picrotoxin, alphalobectine, and Megamide has no place in the resuscitation of the asphyxiated newborn. Imagesp74-ap74-bp74-cp74-d PMID:20469196

  2. Potential of photoplethysmography to guide pulse checks during cardiopulmonary resuscitation : observations in an animal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijshoff, R.W.C.G.R.; Sar, van der T.; Aarts, R.M.; Woerlee, P.H.; Noordergraaf, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Detecting return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) via palpation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is challenging and often time-consuming, which can negatively impact outcome. Non-invasive ROSC detection could reduce compression pauses and thereby improve outcome. We

  3. Clinical practice: neonatal resuscitation. A Dutch consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Dungen, F.A.M.; van Veenendaal, M.B.; Mulder, A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    The updated Dutch guidelines on Neonatal Resuscitation assimilate the latest evidence in neonatal resuscitation. Important changes with regard to the 2004 guidelines and controversial issues concerning neonatal resuscitation are reviewed, and recommendations for daily practice are provided and

  4. Family presence at resuscitation attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaques, Helen

    UK resuscitation guidelines suggest that parents and carers should be allowed to be present during a resuscitation attempt in hospital but no guidance is available regarding family presence when resuscitation takes place out of hospital. A new research study has suggested that relatives who were offered the opportunity to witness resuscitation were less likely to develop symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder than those who were not given the chance. This article summarises the results of this study and provides an expert commentary on its conclusions.

  5. Midwives' Experiences, Education, and Support Needs Regarding Basic Newborn Resuscitation in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassab, Manal; Alnuaimi, Karimeh; Mohammad, Khitam; Creedy, Debra; Hamadneh, Shereen

    2016-06-01

    Newborns who are compromised at birth require rapid attention to stabilize their respiration attempts. Lack of knowledge regarding basic newborn resuscitation is a contributing factor to poor newborn health outcomes and increased mortality. The purpose of this study was to explore Jordanian midwives' experiences, education, and support needs to competently perform basic newborn resuscitation. Qualitative descriptive methodology was used to analyze a convenience sample of 20 midwives. A thematic approach was used to analyze the data. Participants discussed their experiences of basic newborn resuscitation including knowledge, skills, and barriers and suggested solutions to improve practice. Four themes were revealed: lack of knowledge and skills in newborn resuscitation, organizational constraints, inadequate teamwork, and educational needs. The midwives perceived that their ability to perform newborn resuscitation was hindered by lack of knowledge and skills in newborn resuscitation, organizational constraints (such as lack of equipment), and poor co-ordination and communication among team members. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Associations of Hospital and Patient Characteristics with Fluid Resuscitation Volumes in Patients with Severe Sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortrup, Peter Buhl; Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Fluid resuscitation is a key intervention in patients with sepsis and circulatory impairment. The recommendations for continued fluid therapy in sepsis are vague, which may result in differences in clinical practice. We aimed to evaluate associations between hospital and patient characte....... The data indicate variations in clinical practice not explained by patient characteristics emphasizing the need for RCTs assessing fluid resuscitation volumes fluid in patients with sepsis.......PURPOSE: Fluid resuscitation is a key intervention in patients with sepsis and circulatory impairment. The recommendations for continued fluid therapy in sepsis are vague, which may result in differences in clinical practice. We aimed to evaluate associations between hospital and patient...... characteristics and fluid resuscitation volumes in ICU patients with severe sepsis. METHODS: We explored the 6S trial database of ICU patients with severe sepsis needing fluid resuscitation randomised to hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.42 vs. Ringer's acetate. Our primary outcome measure was fluid resuscitation volume...

  7. Team-focused Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Prehospital Principles Adapted for Emergency Department Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Blake; Runyon, Michael; Weekes, Anthony; Pearson, David

    2018-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has high rates of morbidity and mortality, and a growing body of evidence is redefining our approach to the resuscitation of these high-risk patients. Team-focused cardiopulmonary resuscitation (TFCPR), most commonly deployed and described by prehospital care providers, is a focused approach to cardiac arrest care that emphasizes early defibrillation and high-quality, minimally interrupted chest compressions while de-emphasizing endotracheal intubation and intravenous drug administration. TFCPR is associated with statistically significant increases in survival to hospital admission, survival to hospital discharge, and survival with good neurologic outcome; however, the adoption of similar streamlined resuscitation approaches by emergency physicians has not been widely reported. In the absence of a deliberately streamlined approach, such as TFCPR, other advanced therapies and procedures that have not shown similar survival benefit may be prioritized at the expense of simpler evidence-based interventions. This review examines the current literature on cardiac arrest resuscitation. The recent prehospital success of TFCPR is highlighted, including the associated improvements in multiple patient-centered outcomes. The adaptability of TFCPR to the emergency department (ED) setting is also discussed in detail. Finally, we discuss advanced interventions frequently performed during ED cardiac arrest resuscitation that may interfere with early defibrillation and effective high-quality chest compressions. TFCPR has been associated with improved patient outcomes in the prehospital setting. The data are less compelling for other commonly used advanced resuscitation tools and procedures. Emergency physicians should consider incorporating the TFCPR approach into ED cardiac arrest resuscitation to optimize delivery of those interventions most associated with improved outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Public awareness and self-efficacy of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in communities and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A multi-level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Young Sun; Shin, Sang Do; Song, Kyoung Jun; Hong, Sung Ok; Kim, Young Taek; Lee, Dong-Woo; Cho, Sung-Il

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to test the association between capacity of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) at community level and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Emergency medical service (EMS)-treated OHCAs with cardiac etiology in Korea between 2012 and 2013 were analyzed, excluding cases witnessed by EMS providers. Exposure variables were five indexes of community CPR capacity: awareness of CPR (CPR-Awareness), any training experience of CPR (CPR-Any-Training), recent CPR training within the last 2 years (CPR-Recent-Training), CPR training with a manikin (CPR-Manikin-Training), and CPR self-efficacy (CPR-Self-Efficacy). All measures of capacity were calculated as aggregated values for each county level using the national Korean Community Health Survey database of 228,921 responders sampled representatively from 253 counties in 2012. Endpoints were bystander CPR (BCPR) and survival to discharge. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (AORs) per 10% increment in community CPR capacity using multi-level logistic regression models, adjusting for potential confounders at individual levels. Of 29,052 eligible OHCAs, 11,079 (38.1%) received BCPR. Patients were more likely to receive BCPR in communities with higher proportions of residents with CPR-Awareness, CPR-Any-Training, CPR-Recent-Training, CPR-Manikin-Training, and CPR-Self-Efficacy (all pCPR-Awareness, 1.10 (1.04-1.15) for CPR-Any-Training, and 1.08 (1.03-1.13) for CPR-Self-Efficacy. For survival to discharge, AORs (95% CIs) were 1.34 (1.23-1.47) per 10% increment in CPR-Awareness, 1.36 (1.20-1.54) for CPR-Any-Training, and 1.29 (1.15-1.45) for CPR-Self-Efficacy. Higher CPR capacity at community level was associated with higher bystander CPR and survival to discharge rates after OHCA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Resuscitation and emergency management for neonatal foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, Kevin T T; Axon, Jane E

    2005-08-01

    Early intervention can dramatically alter outcome in foals. Cardio-pulmonary cerebral resuscitation can be successful and clinically worthwhile when applied to foals that arrest as part of the birthing process. Readily available equipment and an ordered plan starting with addressing the respiratory system (airway and breathing) followed by the circulatory system (circulation and drugs) are the keys to success. Hypoglycemia is common in foals that are not nursing and in septic foals. Support of serum glucose can be an important emergency treatment. Respiratory support with oxygen therapy should be considered in all foals following resuscitation and dystocia. Other foals that are likely to benefit from oxygen are those that are dyspneic, cyanotic, meconium-stained after birth,or recumbent. Emergency therapies, applied correctly, are expected to result in decreased mortality and morbidity.

  10. Initial fluid resuscitation of patients with septic shock in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Sarah; Perner, A

    2011-01-01

    Fluid is the mainstay of resuscitation of patients with septic shock, but the optimal composition and volume are unknown. Our aim was to evaluate the current initial fluid resuscitation practice in patients with septic shock in the intensive care unit (ICU) and patient characteristics and outcome...

  11. Global health and emergency care: a resuscitation research agenda--part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aufderheide, Tom P.; Nolan, Jerry P.; Jacobs, Ian G.; van Belle, Gerald; Bobrow, Bentley J.; Marshall, John; Finn, Judith; Becker, Lance B.; Bottiger, Bernd; Cameron, Peter; Drajer, Saul; Jung, Julianna J.; Kloeck, Walter; Koster, Rudolph W.; Huei-Ming Ma, Matthew; Shin, Sang Do; Sopko, George; Taira, Breena R.; Timerman, Sergio; Eng Hock Ong, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    At the 2013 Academic Emergency Medicine global health consensus conference, a breakout session on a resuscitation research agenda was held. Two articles focusing on cardiac arrest and trauma resuscitation are the result of that discussion. This article describes the burden of disease and outcomes,

  12. Resuscitation of neonates at 23 weeks' gestational age: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, J Colin; Robertson, Kathryn R; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Landman, Geri Ottaviano; Allen, Allison J; Caughey, Aaron B

    2015-01-01

    Resuscitation of infants at 23 weeks' gestation remains controversial; clinical practices vary. We sought to investigate the cost effectiveness of resuscitation of infants born 23 0/7-23 6/7 weeks' gestation. Decision-analytic modeling comparing universal and selective resuscitation to non-resuscitation for 5176 live births at 23 weeks in a theoretic U.S. cohort. Estimates of death (77%) and disability (64-86%) were taken from the literature. Maternal and combined maternal-neonatal utilities were applied to discounted life expectancy to generate QALYs. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated, discounting costs and QALYs. Main outcomes included number of survivors, their outcome status and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for the three strategies. A cost-effectiveness threshold of $100 000/QALY was utilized. Universal resuscitation would save 1059 infants: 138 severely disabled, 413 moderately impaired and 508 without significant sequelae. Selective resuscitation would save 717 infants: 93 severely disabled, 279 moderately impaired and 343 without significant sequelae. For mothers, non-resuscitation is less expensive ($19.9 million) and more effective (127 844 mQALYs) than universal resuscitation ($1.2 billion; 126 574 mQALYs) or selective resuscitation ($845 million; 125 966 mQALYs). For neonates, both universal and selective resuscitation were cost-effective, resulting in 22 256 and 15 134 nQALYS, respectively, versus 247 nQALYs for non-resuscitation. In sensitivity analyses, universal resuscitation was cost-effective from a maternal perspective only at utilities for neonatal death permissive response to parental requests for aggressive intervention at 23 weeks' gestation.

  13. Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Elton

    2004-01-01

    The Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium is a unique, forward-thinking, community-based healthcare service project organized around 5 not-for-profit community hospitals located throughout Louisiana and Mississippi...

  14. Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Elton

    2003-01-01

    The Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium is a unique, forward-thinking, community-based healthcare service project organized around 5 not-for-profit community hospitals located throughout Louisiana and Mississippi...

  15. Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Jr, Elton L

    2007-01-01

    The Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium is a unique, forward-thinking, community-based healthcare service project organized around 5 not-for-profit community hospitals located throughout Louisiana and Mississippi...

  16. Medical students’ experiences of resuscitation and discussions surrounding resuscitation status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal AR

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Asha R Aggarwal, Iqbal Khan Department of Medical Education, Northampton General Hospital, Northampton, UK Objectives: In the UK, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR should be undertaken in the event of cardiac arrest unless a patient has a “Do Not Attempt CPR” document. Doctors have a legal duty to discuss CPR with patients or inform them that CPR would be futile. In this study, final-year medical students were interviewed about their experiences of resuscitation on the wards and of observing conversations about resuscitation status to explore whether they would be equipped to have an informed discussion about resuscitation in the future. Methods: Twenty final-year medical students from two medical schools were interviewed about their experiences on the wards. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and thematic analysis was undertaken.Results: Students who had witnessed CPR on the wards found that aspects of it were distressing. A significant minority had never seen resuscitation status being discussed with a patient. No students reported seeing a difficult conversation. Half of the students interviewed reported being turned away from difficult conversations by clinicians. Only two of the twenty students would feel comfortable raising the issue of resuscitation with a patient. Conclusion: It is vital that doctors are comfortable talking to patients about resuscitation. Given the increasing importance of this aspect of communication, it should be considered for inclusion in the formal communication skills teaching during medical school. Keywords: undergraduate, communication, DNACPR, palliative care, end of life care

  17. Pharmacology of pediatric resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushay, H M; Notterman, D A

    1997-02-01

    The resuscitation of children from cardiac arrest and shock remains a challenging goal. The pharmacologic principles underlying current recommendations for intervention in pediatric cardiac arrest have been reviewed. Current research efforts, points of controversy, and accepted practices that may not be most efficacious have been described. Epinephrine remains the most effective resuscitation adjunct. High-dose epinephrine is tolerated better in children than in adults, but its efficacy has not received full analysis. The preponderance of data continues to point toward the ineffectiveness and possible deleterious effects of overzealous sodium bicarbonate use. Calcium chloride is useful in the treatment of ionized hypocalcemia but may harm cells that have experienced asphyxial damage. Atropine is an effective agent for alleviating bradycardia induced by increased vagal tone, but because most bradycardia in children is caused by hypoxia, improved oxygenation is the intervention of choice. Adenosine is an effective and generally well-tolerated agent for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia. Lidocaine is the drug of choice for ventricular dysrhythmias, and bretylium, still relatively unexplored, is in reserve. Many pediatricians use dopamine for shock in the postresuscitative period, but epinephrine is superior. Most animal research on cardiac arrest is based on models with ventricular fibrillation that probably are not reflective of cardiac arrest situations most often seen in pediatrics.

  18. Factors Promoting Survival After Prolonged Resuscitation Attempts: A Case of Survival With Good Neurological Outcome Following 60 Minutes of Downtime After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Douglas; Gluer, Robert; Murdoch, Dale

    2018-03-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest is a significant cause of death affecting approximately 25,000 people in Australia annually. We present an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with prolonged down time and recurrent ventricular arrhythmias treated with extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation. The patient survived to hospital discharge with good neurological outcome. The patient's excellent outcome was a result of immediate good quality CPR, high level premorbid function, reversible cause of arrest and rapid access to an ECMO centre. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel Resuscitation from Lethal Hemorrhage - Suspended Animation for Delayed Resuscitation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Safar, Peter

    2002-01-01

    .... We have conceived and documented "suspended animation for delayed resuscitation" with the use of hypothermic saline flush into the aorta within the first 5 minute of no blood flow, using novel...

  20. 2017 American Heart Association Focused Update on Adult Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality: An Update to the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Monica E; Goldberger, Zachary D; Rea, Thomas; Swor, Robert A; Bobrow, Bentley J; Brennan, Erin E; Terry, Mark; Hemphill, Robin; Gazmuri, Raúl J; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Travers, Andrew H

    2018-01-02

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a lifesaving technique for victims of sudden cardiac arrest. Despite advances in resuscitation science, basic life support remains a critical factor in determining outcomes. The American Heart Association recommendations for adult basic life support incorporate the most recently published evidence and serve as the basis for education and training for laypeople and healthcare providers who perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in hospitalized infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornik, Christoph P; Graham, Eric M; Hill, Kevin; Li, Jennifer S; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Clark, Reese H; Smith, P Brian

    2016-10-01

    Hospitalized infants requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) represent a high-risk group. Recent data on risk factors for mortality following CPR in this population are lacking. We hypothesized that infant demographic characteristics, diagnoses, and levels of cardiopulmonary support at the time of CPR requirement would be associated with survival to hospital discharge following CPR. Retrospective cohort study. All infants receiving CPR on day of life 2 to 120 admitted to 348 Pediatrix Medical Group neonatal intensive care units from 1997 to 2012. We collected data on demographics, interventions, center volume, and death prior to NICU discharge. We evaluated predictors of death after CPR using multivariable logistic regression with generalized estimating equations to account for clustering of the data by center. Our cohort consisted of 2231 infants receiving CPR. Of these, 1127 (51%) survived to hospital discharge. Lower gestational age, postnatal age, 5-min APGAR, congenital anomaly, and markers of severity of illness were associated with higher mortality. Mortality after CPR did not change significantly over time (Cochran-Armitage test for trend p=0.35). Mortality following CPR in infants is high, particularly for less mature, younger infants with congenital anomalies and those requiring cardiopulmonary support prior to CPR. Continued focus on at risk infants may identify targets for CPR prevention and improve outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Tactical Damage Control Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Andrew D; Miles, Ethan A; Cap, Andrew P; Strandenes, Geir; Kane, Shawn F

    2015-08-01

    Recently the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care changed the guidelines on fluid use in hemorrhagic shock. The current strategy for treating hemorrhagic shock is based on early use of components: Packed Red Blood Cells (PRBCs), Fresh Frozen Plasma (FFP) and platelets in a 1:1:1 ratio. We suggest that lack of components to mimic whole blood functionality favors the use of Fresh Whole Blood in managing hemorrhagic shock on the battlefield. We present a safe and practical approach for its use at the point of injury in the combat environment called Tactical Damage Control Resuscitation. We describe pre-deployment preparation, assessment of hemorrhagic shock, and collection and transfusion of fresh whole blood at the point of injury. By approaching shock with goal-directed therapy, it is possible to extend the period of survivability in combat casualties. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  3. Evaluating Neonatal Resuscitation Skills of Nursing and Midwifery Students Using Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Malekzadeh

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: The students’ skills in neonatal resuscitation were lower than expected. As competence in this area is of high significance for the improvement of neonatal outcomes, holding training workshops through applying novel training methods is recommended.

  4. The Genomic Standards Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Field, Dawn; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cochrane, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Standards Consortium (GSC), an open-membership organization that drives community-based standardization activities, Here we provide a short history of the GSC, provide an overview of its range of current activities, and make a call for the scientific community to join forces to improve the quality...

  5. delta-Opioid-induced pharmacologic myocardial hibernation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiangshao; Tang, Wanchun; Sun, Shijie; Weil, Max Harry

    2006-12-01

    Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation is an event of global myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, which is associated with severe postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction and fatal outcome. Evidence has demonstrated that mammalian hibernation is triggered by cyclic variation of a delta-opiate-like compound in endogenous serum, during which the myocardial metabolism is dramatically reduced and the myocardium tolerates the stress of ischemia and reperfusion without overt ischemic and reperfusion injury. Previous investigations also proved that the delta-opioid agonist elicited the cardioprotection in a model of regional ischemic intact heart or myocyte. Accordingly, we were prompted to search for an alternative intervention of pharmacologically induced myocardial hibernation that would result in rapid reductions of myocardial metabolism and therefore minimize the myocardial ischemic and reperfusion injury during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Prospective, controlled laboratory study. University-affiliated research laboratory. In the series of studies performed in the established rat and pig model of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the delta-opioid receptor agonist, pentazocine, was administered during ventricular fibrillation. : The myocardial metabolism reflected by the concentration of lactate, or myocardial tissue PCO2 and PO2, is dramatically reduced during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. These are associated with less severe postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction and longer duration of postresuscitation survival. delta-Opioid-induced pharmacologic myocardial hibernation is an option to minimize the myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  6. Update on pediatric resuscitation drugs: high dose, low dose, or no dose at all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Annalise

    2005-04-01

    Pediatric resuscitation has been a topic of discussion for years. It is difficult to keep abreast of changing recommendations, especially for busy pediatricians who do not regularly use these skills. This review will focus on the most recent guidelines for resuscitation drugs. Three specific questions will be discussed: standard dose versus high-dose epinephrine, amiodarone use, and the future of vasopressin in pediatric resuscitation. The issue of using high-dose epinephrine for cardiopulmonary resuscitation refractory to standard dose epinephrine has been a topic of debate for many years. Recently, a prospective, double-blinded study was performed to help settle the debate. These results will be reviewed and compared with previous studies. Amiodarone is a medication that was added to the pediatric resuscitation algorithms with the most recent recommendations from the American Heart Association in 2000. Its use and safety will also be discussed. Another topic that is resurfacing in resuscitation is the use of vasopressin. Its mechanism and comparisons to other agents will be highlighted, although its use in the pediatric patient has not been thoroughly studied. Pediatric resuscitation is a constantly evolving subject that is on the mind of anyone taking care of sick children. Clinicians are continually searching for the most effective methods to resuscitate children in terms of short- and long-term outcomes. It is important to be familiar with not only the agents being used but also the optimal way to use them.

  7. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Andrés Vargas-Garzón

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reanimation’s guidelines dictated by the AHA (American Heart Association are the strategies to follow in the envi­ronment of any situation related to cardiac arrest. They are acquired after the analysis of the evidence available in reani­mation from higher to less quality, with the best neurological results. After years of observation, was achieved to establish that survival behind cardiac arrest is, in general, low (6%, except that any witness starts immediately cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR maneuvers; therefore, medical personal must know and practice these maneuvers. With these con­siderations, it’s necessary to emphasize in the theoretical training of CPR of all health professional and laity, which guarantee everybody be prepared to emergency system ac­tivation, brain’s preservation and defibrillate to recuperate heart and life. The actual approach that combines compres­sions and defibrillation to closed chest, rescue ventilation and cardio tonic drugs. The guidelines AHA 2010, focus on increase frequency and quality of CPR. The objective of this article is to recognize various changes in these guidelines in cardiopulmonary reanimation and promote the continued education’s importance in reanimation.

  8. IPD-Work consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Virtanen, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    of countries. The aim of the consortium is to estimate reliably the associations of work-related psychosocial factors with chronic diseases, disability, and mortality. Our findings are highly cited by the occupational health, epidemiology, and clinical medicine research community. However, some of the IPD-Work......'s findings have also generated disagreement as they challenge the importance of job strain as a major target for coronary heart disease (CHD) prevention, this is reflected in the critical discussion paper by Choi et al (1). In this invited reply to Choi et al, we aim to (i) describe how IPD-Work seeks......Established in 2008 and comprising over 60 researchers, the IPD-Work (individual-participant data meta-analysis in working populations) consortium is a collaborative research project that uses pre-defined meta-analyses of individual-participant data from multiple cohort studies representing a range...

  9. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenbacher, Don [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  10. Basic and advanced paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation - guidelines of the Australian and New Zealand Resuscitation Councils 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibballs, James; Aickin, Richard; Nuthall, Gabrielle

    2012-07-01

    Guidelines for basic and advanced paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have been revised by Australian and New Zealand Resuscitation Councils. Changes encourage CPR out-of-hospital and aim to improve the quality of CPR in-hospital. Features of basic CPR include: omission of abdominal thrusts for foreign body airway obstruction; commencement with chest compression followed by ventilation in a ratio of 30:2 or compression-only CPR if the rescuer is unwilling/unable to give expired-air breathing when the victim is 'unresponsive and not breathing normally'. Use of automated external defibrillators is encouraged. Features of advanced CPR include: prevention of cardiac arrest by rapid response systems; restriction of pulse palpation to 10 s to diagnosis cardiac arrest; affirmation of 15:2 compression-ventilation ratio for children and for infants other than newly born; initial bag-mask ventilation before tracheal intubation; a single direct current shock of 4 J/kg for ventricular fibrillation (VF) and pulseless ventricular tachycardia followed by immediate resumption of CPR for 2 min without analysis of cardiac rhythm and avoidance of unnecessary interruption of continuous external cardiac compressions. Monitoring of exhaled carbon dioxide is recommended to detect non-tracheal intubation, assess quality of CPR, and to help match ventilation to reduced cardiac output. The intraosseous route is recommended if immediate intravenous access is impossible. Amiodarone is strongly favoured over lignocaine for refractory VF and adrenaline over atropine for severe bradycardia, asystole and pulseless electrical activity. Family presence at resuscitation is encouraged. Therapeutic hypothermia is acceptable after resuscitation to improve neurological outcome. Extracorporeal circulatory support for in-hospital cardiac arrest may be used in equipped centres. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal

  11. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Unusual Techniques for Unusual Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhu Bhatnagar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in prone position has been dealt with in 2010 American Heart Association (AHA guidelines but have not been reviewed in 2015 guidelines. The guidelines for patients presenting with cardiac arrest under general anesthesia in lateral decubitus position and regarding resuscitation in confined spaces like airplanes are also not available in AHA guidelines. This article is an attempt to highlight the techniques adopted for resuscitation in these unusual situations. Aims: This study aims to find out the methodology and efficacy in nonconventional CPR approaches such as CPR in prone, CPR in lateral position, and CPR in confined spaces. Methods: We conducted a literature search using MeSH search strings such as CPR + Prone position, CPR + lateral Position, and CPR + confined spaces. Results: No randomized controlled trials are available. The literature search gives a handful of case reports, some simulation- and manikin-based studies but none can qualify for class I evidence. The successful outcome of CPR performed in prone position has shown compressions delivered on the thoracic spine with the same rate and force as they were delivered during supine position. A hard surface is required under the patient to provide uniform force and sternal counter pressure. Two rescuer technique for providing successful chest compression in lateral position has been documented in the few case reports published. Over the head CPR and straddle (STR, CPR has been utilized for CPR in confined spaces. Ventilation in operating rooms was taken care by an advanced airway in situ. Conclusion: A large number of studies of high quality are required to be conducted to determine the efficacy of CPR in such positions.

  12. Withholding or termination of resuscitation in pediatric out-of-hospital traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallat, Mary E

    2014-04-01

    This multiorganizational literature review was undertaken to provide an evidence base for determining whether or not recommendations for out-of-hospital termination of resuscitation could be made for children who are victims of traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest. Although there is increasing acceptance of out-of-hospital termination of resuscitation for adult traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest when there is no expectation of a good outcome, children are routinely excluded from state termination-of-resuscitation protocols. The decision to withhold resuscitative efforts in a child under specific circumstances (decapitation or dependent lividity, rigor mortis, etc) is reasonable. If there is any doubt as to the circumstances or timing of the traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest, under the current status of limiting termination of resuscitation in the field to persons older than 18 years in most states, resuscitation should be initiated and continued until arrival to the appropriate facility. If the patient has arrested, resuscitation has already exceeded 30 minutes, and the nearest facility is more than 30 minutes away, involvement of parents and family of these children in the decision-making process with assistance and guidance from medical professionals should be considered as part of an emphasis on family-centered care, because the evidence suggests that either death or a poor outcome is inevitable.

  13. Non-ASD outcomes at 36 months in siblings at familial risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD): A baby siblings research consortium (BSRC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charman, Tony; Young, Gregory S; Brian, Jessica; Carter, Alice; Carver, Leslie J; Chawarska, Katarzyna; Curtin, Suzanne; Dobkins, Karen; Elsabbagh, Mayada; Georgiades, Stelios; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hutman, Ted; Iverson, Jana M; Jones, Emily J; Landa, Rebecca; Macari, Suzanne; Messinger, Daniel S; Nelson, Charles A; Ozonoff, Sally; Saulnier, Celine; Stone, Wendy L; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Webb, Sara Jane; Yirmiya, Nurit; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie

    2017-01-01

    We characterized developmental outcomes of a large sample of siblings at familial high-risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who themselves did not have ASD (n = 859), and low-risk controls with no family history of ASD (n = 473). We report outcomes at age 3 years using the Mullen Scales of Early Learning, the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) and adaptive functioning on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales. Around 11% of high-risk siblings had mild-to-moderate levels of developmental delay, a rate higher than the low-risk controls. The groups did not differ in the proportion of toddlers with mild-to-moderate language delay. Thirty percent of high-risk siblings had elevated scores on the ADOS, double the rate seen in the low-risk controls. High-risk siblings also had higher parent reported levels of ASD symptoms on the ADI-R and lower adaptive functioning on the Vineland. Males were more likely to show higher levels of ASD symptoms and lower levels of developmental ability and adaptive behavior than females across most measures but not mild-to-moderate language delay. Lower maternal education was associated with lower developmental and adaptive behavior outcomes. These findings are evidence for early emerging characteristics related to the "broader autism phenotype" (BAP) previously described in older family members of individuals with ASD. There is a need for ongoing clinical monitoring of high-risk siblings who do not have an ASD by age 3 years, as well as continued follow-up into school age to determine their developmental and behavioral outcomes. Autism Res 2017, 10: 169-178. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-09-01

    differed in length, intensity, and training level of participants, all programs demonstrated improved team performance. Despite the relative paucity of literature on leadership in resuscitations, this review found leadership improves processes of care in trauma and can be enhanced through dedicated training. Future research is needed to validate leadership assessment scales, develop optimal training mechanisms, and demonstrate leadership's effect on patient-level outcome.

  15. "In the beginning...": tools for talking about resuscitation and goals of care early in the admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jocelyn; Fromme, Erik K

    2013-11-01

    Quality standards no longer allow physicians to delay discussing goals of care and resuscitation. We propose 2 novel strategies for discussing goals and resuscitation on admission. The first, SPAM (determine Surrogate decision maker, determine resuscitation Preferences, Assume full care, and advise them to expect More discussion especially with clinical changes), helps clinicians discover patient preferences and decision maker during routine admissions. The second, UFO-UFO (Understand what they know, Fill in knowledge gaps, ask about desired Outcomes, Understand their reasoning, discuss the spectrum Feasible Outcomes), helps patients with poor or uncertain prognosis or family-team conflict. Using a challenging case example, this article illustrates how SPAM and UFO-UFO can help clinicians have patient-centered resuscitation and goals of care discussions at the beginning of care.

  16. Investigating the Causal Relationship of C-Reactive Protein with 32 Complex Somatic and Psychiatric Outcomes: A Large-Scale Cross-Consortium Mendelian Randomization Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram P Prins

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is associated with immune, cardiometabolic, and psychiatric traits and diseases. Yet it is inconclusive whether these associations are causal.We performed Mendelian randomization (MR analyses using two genetic risk scores (GRSs as instrumental variables (IVs. The first GRS consisted of four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CRP gene (GRSCRP, and the second consisted of 18 SNPs that were significantly associated with CRP levels in the largest genome-wide association study (GWAS to date (GRSGWAS. To optimize power, we used summary statistics from GWAS consortia and tested the association of these two GRSs with 32 complex somatic and psychiatric outcomes, with up to 123,865 participants per outcome from populations of European ancestry. We performed heterogeneity tests to disentangle the pleiotropic effect of IVs. A Bonferroni-corrected significance level of less than 0.0016 was considered statistically significant. An observed p-value equal to or less than 0.05 was considered nominally significant evidence for a potential causal association, yet to be confirmed. The strengths (F-statistics of the IVs were 31.92-3,761.29 and 82.32-9,403.21 for GRSCRP and GRSGWAS, respectively. CRP GRSGWAS showed a statistically significant protective relationship of a 10% genetically elevated CRP level with the risk of schizophrenia (odds ratio [OR] 0.86 [95% CI 0.79-0.94]; p < 0.001. We validated this finding with individual-level genotype data from the schizophrenia GWAS (OR 0.96 [95% CI 0.94-0.98]; p < 1.72 × 10-6. Further, we found that a standardized CRP polygenic risk score (CRPPRS at p-value thresholds of 1 × 10-4, 0.001, 0.01, 0.05, and 0.1 using individual-level data also showed a protective effect (OR < 1.00 against schizophrenia; the first CRPPRS (built of SNPs with p < 1 × 10-4 showed a statistically significant (p < 2.45 × 10-4 protective effect with an OR of 0.97 (95% CI 0.95-0.99. The CRP GRSGWAS showed that a

  17. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: knowledge and opinions among the U.S. general public. State of the science-fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Catherine A; Larkin, Gregory L

    2008-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is undertaken more than 250,000 times annually in the United States. This study was undertaken to determine knowledge and opinions of the general public regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Validated multisite community-based cross-sectional survey. Knowledge and opinions about resuscitative practices and outcomes, using hypothetical clinical scenarios and other social, spiritual, and environmental considerations. Among 1831 participants representing 38 states, markedly inaccurate perceptions of cardiac arrest were reported. Participants' mean estimate of predicted survival rate after cardiac arrest was 54% (median 50%, IQR 35-75%), and mean estimated duration of resuscitative efforts in the ED was 28min (median 15min; IQR 10-30). Projected age and health status were independent predictors of resuscitation preferences in a series of 4 hypothetical scenarios. Participants indicated that physicians should consider patient and family wishes as the most important factors when making resuscitation decisions. Participants considered advanced technology and physician communication to be the most important actions during attempted resuscitation. Inaccurate perceptions regarding resuscitation and survival rates exist among the lay public. Participants indicated strong preferences regarding resuscitation and advance directives.

  18. Trauma patients' rights during resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Bruce

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Doctors and nurses working in hospital emergency departments face ethical and moral conflicts more so than in other health care units. Traditional curricular approaches to health professional education have been embedded in a discriminatory societal context and as such have not prepared health professionals adequately for the ethical realities of their practice. Furthermore, the discourse on ethical theories and ethical principles do not provide clear-cut solutions to ethical dilemmas but rather serve as a guide to ethical decision- making. Within the arena of trauma and resuscitation, fundamental ethical principles such as respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice cannot be taken as absolutes as these may in themselves create moral conflict. Resuscitation room activities require a balance between what is “ ethically" correct and what is “pragmatically required” . Because of the urgent nature of a resuscitation event, this balance is often under threat, with resultant transgression of patients’ rights. This article explores the sources of ethical and moral issues in trauma care and proposes a culture of human rights to provide a context for preserving and protecting trauma patients’ rights during resuscitation. Recommendations for education and research are alluded to in concluding the article.

  19. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: what cost to cheat death?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K H; Angus, D C; Abramson, N S

    1996-12-01

    To review the various outcomes from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), the factors that influence these outcomes, the costs associated with CPR, and the application of cost-analyses to CPR. Data used to prepare this article were drawn from published articles and work in progress. Articles were selected for their relevance to the subjects of CPR and cost-analysis by MEDLINE keyword search. The authors extracted all applicable data from the English literature. Cost-analysis studies of CPR programs are limited by the high variation in resources consumed and attribution of cost to these resources. Furthermore, cost projections have not been adjusted to reflect patient-dependent variation in outcome. Variation in the patient's underlying condition, presenting cardiac rhythm, time to provision of definitive CPR, and effective perfusion all influence final outcome and, consequently, influence the cost-effectiveness of CPR programs. Based on cost data from previous studies, preliminary estimates of the cost-effectiveness of CPR programs for all 6-month survivors of a large international multicenter collaborative trial are $406,605.00 per life saved (range $344,314.00 to $966,759.00), and $225,892.00 per quality-adjusted-life-year (range $191,286.00 to $537,088.00). Reported outcome from CPR has varied from reasonable rates of good recovery, including return to full employment to 100% mortality. Appropriate CPR is encouraged, but continued widespread application appears extremely expensive.

  20. The International Human Epigenome Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Hirst, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC) coordinates the generation of a catalog of high-resolution reference epigenomes of major primary human cell types. The studies now presented (see the Cell Press IHEC web portal at http://www.cell.com/consortium/IHEC) highlight the coordinated ac...

  1. Hawaii Space Grant Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Luke P.

    2005-01-01

    The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium is composed of ten institutions of higher learning including the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, the University of Hawai'i at Hilo, the University of Guam, and seven Community Colleges spread over the 4 main Hawaiian islands. Geographic separation is not the only obstacle that we face as a Consortium. Hawai'i has been mired in an economic downturn due to a lack of tourism for almost all of the period (2001 - 2004) covered by this report, although hotel occupancy rates and real estate sales have sky-rocketed in the last year. Our challenges have been many including providing quality educational opportunities in the face of shrinking State and Federal budgets, encouraging science and technology course instruction at the K-12 level in a public school system that is becoming less focused on high technology and more focused on developing basic reading and math skills, and assembling community college programs with instructors who are expected to teach more classes for the same salary. Motivated people can overcome these problems. Fortunately, the Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium (HSGC) consists of a group of highly motivated and talented individuals who have not only overcome these obstacles, but have excelled with the Program. We fill a critical need within the State of Hawai'i to provide our children with opportunities to pursue their dreams of becoming the next generation of NASA astronauts, engineers, and explorers. Our strength lies not only in our diligent and creative HSGC advisory board, but also with Hawai'i's teachers, students, parents, and industry executives who are willing to invest their time, effort, and resources into Hawai'i's future. Our operational philosophy is to FACE the Future, meaning that we will facilitate, administer, catalyze, and educate in order to achieve our objective of creating a highly technically capable workforce both here in Hawai'i and for NASA. In addition to administering to programs and

  2. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the

  3. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, Stephen [EWI, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  4. Time matters – Realism in resuscitation training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Kristian; Høyer, Christian Bjerre; Østergaard, Doris

    2014-01-01

    -based resuscitation training, the recommended 2-min CPR cycles are often deliberately decreased in order to increase the number of scenarios. The aim of this study was to test if keeping 2-min CPR cycles during resuscitation training ensures better adherence to time during resuscitation in a simulated setting......Background: The advanced life support guidelines recommend 2 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and minimal hands-off time to ensure sufficient cardiac and cerebral perfusion. We have observed doctors who shorten the CPR intervals during resuscitation attempts. During simulation....... Methods: This study was designed as a randomised control trial. Fifty-four 4th-year medical students with no prior advanced resuscitation training participated in an extra-curricular one-day advanced life support course. Participants were either randomised to simulation-based training using real-time (120...

  5. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savas Menticoglou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 minutes in the second. After volume resuscitation circulation was restored, there was profound brain damage and the babies died. Conclusion. Unsuspected hypovolemic shock may explain some cases of failed resuscitation after shoulder dystocia. This may require a change in clinical practice. Rather than immediately clamping the cord after the baby is delivered, it is proposed that (1 the obstetrician delay cord clamping to allow autotransfusion of the baby from the placenta and (2 the neonatal resuscitators give volume much sooner.

  6. Resuscitation on television: realistic or ridiculous? A quantitative observational analysis of the portrayal of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in television medical drama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Dylan; Willoughby, Hannah

    2009-11-01

    Patients' preferences for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) relate to their perception about the likelihood of success of the procedure. There is evidence that the lay public largely base their perceptions about CPR on their experience of the portrayal of CPR in the media. The medical profession has generally been critical of the portrayal of CPR on medical drama programmes although there is no recent evidence to support such views. To compare the patient characteristics, cause and success rates of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on medical television drama with published resuscitation statistics. Observational study. 88 episodes of television medical drama were reviewed (26 episodes of Casualty, Casualty, 25 episodes of Holby City, 23 episodes of Grey's Anatomy and 14 episodes of ER) screened between July 2008 and April 2009. The patient's age and sex, medical history, presumed cause of arrest, use of CPR and immediate and long term survival rate were recorded. Immediate survival and survival to discharge following CPR. There were a total of 76 cardio-respiratory arrests and 70 resuscitation attempts in the episodes reviewed. The immediate success rate (46%) did not differ significantly from published real life figures (p=0.48). The resuscitation process appeared to follow current guidelines. Survival (or not) to discharge was rarely shown. The average age of patients was 36 years and contrary to reality there was not an age related difference in likely success of CPR in patients less than 65 compared with those 65 and over (p=0.72). The most common cause of cardiac arrest was trauma with only a minor proportion of arrests due to cardio-respiratory causes such as myocardial infarction. Whilst the immediate success rate of CPR in medical television drama does not significantly differ from reality the lack of depiction of poorer medium to long term outcomes may give a falsely high expectation to the lay public. Equally the lay public may perceive that the

  7. Educational Purpose Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DRAGHICIU Nicolae

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Along with the development of computers and other sciences we can use in our personal projects complex structures built with microcontrollers. They miniaturise and simplify the final project, instead they depend/rely on the computer, through the programming of the microcontroller/s/them. This project presents the application of electronics in order to achieve a resuscitation mannequin for didactic purpose, using Arduino Prototyping Platform.

  8. Pharmacotherapy In Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNAYDIN, Berrin

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is defined as cessation of cardiac mechanical activity. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an attempt to restore spontaneous circulation through several maneuvers and techniques. Although the two interventions, which are competent basic life support and prompt defibrillation, improve the survival rate, several adjuvant cardiac medication drugs are advocated to treat cardiac arrest during advanced cardiac life support. Since the introduction of modern CPR there have been man...

  9. Low Volume Resuscitation with Cell Impermeants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    of 10% Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA), a prototypical oncotic agent (n = 6). The outcomevariables for the study includedLVR time, plasma lactate, mean...re- quirement of bicarbonate administration to correct acidosis during resuscitation. The impermeant effect in LVR solutions is greatly aug- mented...resuscitation exacerbates TICS, acidosis , hypothermia, and coagulopathy (3, 4). Other resuscitation solutions such as hypertonic saline or starch have had

  10. Neonatal resuscitation: advances in training and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawyer T

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Taylor Sawyer, Rachel A Umoren, Megan M Gray Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Neonatal Education and Simulation-based Training (NEST Program, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Each year in the US, some four hundred thousand newborns need help breathing when they are born. Due to the frequent need for resuscitation at birth, it is vital to have evidence-based care guidelines and to provide effective neonatal resuscitation training. Every five years, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR reviews the science of neonatal resuscitation. In the US, the American Heart Association (AHA develops treatment guidelines based on the ILCOR science review, and the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP translates the AHA guidelines into an educational curriculum. In this report, we review recent advances in neonatal resuscitation training and practice. We begin with a review of the new 7th edition NRP training curriculum. Then, we examine key changes to the 2015 AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines. The four components of the NRP curriculum reviewed here include eSim®, Performance Skills Stations, Integrated Skills Station, and Simulation and Debriefing. The key changes to the AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines reviewed include initial steps of newborn care, positive-pressure ventilation, endotracheal intubation and use of laryngeal mask, chest compressions, medications, resuscitation of preterm newborns, and ethics and end-of-life care. We hope this report provides a succinct review of recent advances in neonatal resuscitation. Keywords: neonatal resuscitation, Neonatal Resuscitation Program, NRP, simulation, deliberate practice, debriefing, eSIM

  11. How much do cancer-related symptoms contribute to health-related quality of life in lung and colorectal cancer patients? A report from the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance (CanCORS) Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzik, Kelly M; Ganz, Patricia A; Martin, Michelle Y; Petersen, Laura; Hays, Ron D; Arora, Neeraj; Pisu, Maria

    2015-08-15

    The objective of this study was to examine associations of symptoms with physical and mental health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and in patients with lung cancer. Patients with newly diagnosed CRC (n = 3040) or lung cancer (n = 2297) who were participating in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium study completed surveys on general HRQOL and symptoms. HRQOL was measured by using physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores on the Medical Outcomes Study 12-item short-form heath survey. Nonspecific cancer symptoms were measured using items from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core quality-of-life questionnaire. Cancer type-specific modules developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer were used to assess CRC-specific and lung cancer-specific symptoms. For both cancer types, linear regression models that were controlled for demographic and clinical information were used to examine correlations of nonspecific and cancer-specific symptoms with PCS and MCS scores. PCS scores for patients with CRC and lung cancer were below the general population norm of 50 (43 and 37, respectively), and MCS scores were at the population norm. For the CRC sample, in the model that included both symptom indices, an increase in nonspecific symptoms was more strongly associated with lower PCS and MCS scores than an increase in CRC-specific symptoms (PCS, standardized coefficient [β] = -0.41 vs -0.09; MCS, β = -0.38 vs -0.08). In a similar model for lung cancer, increases in lung cancer-specific symptoms were more strongly associated with lower PCS scores (β = -0.34 vs -0.20), whereas nonspecific symptoms were more strongly associated with lower MCS scores (β = -0.34 vs -0.14). Symptoms were associated with HRQOL impairments in recently diagnosed patients. Additional supportive care implemented early in cancer care

  12. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Menchine

    2016-09-01

    included didactic teaching followed by simulations. Although programs differed in length, intensity, and training level of participants, all programs demonstrated improved team performance. Conclusion: Despite the relative paucity of literature on leadership in resuscitations, this review found leadership improves processes of care in trauma and can be enhanced through dedicated training. Future research is needed to validate leadership assessment scales, develop optimal training mechanisms, and demonstrate leadership’s effect on patient-level outcome.

  13. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    followed by simulations. Although programs differed in length, intensity, and training level of participants, all programs demonstrated improved team performance. Conclusion Despite the relative paucity of literature on leadership in resuscitations, this review found leadership improves processes of care in trauma and can be enhanced through dedicated training. Future research is needed to validate leadership assessment scales, develop optimal training mechanisms, and demonstrate leadership’s effect on patient-level outcome. PMID:27625718

  14. [The latest in paediatric resuscitation recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce, Jesús; Rodríguez, Antonio; Carrillo, Angel; de Lucas, Nieves; Calvo, Custodio; Civantos, Eva; Suárez, Eva; Pons, Sara; Manrique, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    Cardiac arrest has a high mortality in children. To improve the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, it is essential to disseminate the international recommendations and the training of health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article summarises the 2015 European Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, which are based on a review of the advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and consensus in the science and treatment by the International Council on Resuscitation. The Spanish Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, developed by the Spanish Group of Paediatric and Neonatal Resuscitation, are an adaptation of the European recommendations, and will be used for training health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article highlights the main changes from the previous 2010 recommendations on prevention of cardiac arrest, the diagnosis of cardiac arrest, basic life support, advanced life support and post-resuscitation care, as well as reviewing the algorithms of treatment of basic life support, obstruction of the airway and advanced life support. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  15. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to

  16. Case of a cardiac arrest patient who survived after extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation and 1.5 hours of resuscitation: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seong Ho; Kim, Jong Woo; Byun, Joung Hun; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ki Nyun; Choi, Jun Young; Jang, In Seok; Lee, Chung Eun; Yang, Jun Ho; Kang, Dong Hun; Park, Hyun Oh

    2017-11-01

    Per the American Heart Association guidelines, extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation should be considered for in-hospital patients with easily reversible cardiac arrest. However, there are currently no consensus recommendations regarding resuscitation for prolonged cardiac arrest cases. We encountered a 48-year-old man who survived a cardiac arrest that lasted approximately 1.5 hours. He visited a local hospital's emergency department complaining of chest pain and dyspnea that had started 3 days earlier. Immediately after arriving in the emergency department, a cardiac arrest occurred; he was transferred to our hospital for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Resuscitation was performed with strict adherence to the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology advanced cardiac life support guidelines until ECMO could be placed. On hospital day 7, he had a full neurologic recovery. On hospital day 58, additional treatments, including orthotopic heart transplantation, were considered necessary; he was transferred to another hospital. To our knowledge, this is the first case in South Korea of patient survival with good neurologic outcomes after resuscitation that lasted as long as 1.5 hours. Documenting cases of prolonged resuscitation may lead to updated guidelines and improvement of outcomes of similar cases in future. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation: current and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Benjamin S

    2016-06-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) represents the cornerstone of cardiac arrest resuscitation care. Prompt delivery of high-quality CPR can dramatically improve survival outcomes; however, the definitions of optimal CPR have evolved over several decades. The present review will discuss the metrics of CPR delivery, and the evidence supporting the importance of CPR quality to improve clinical outcomes. The introduction of new technologies to quantify metrics of CPR delivery has yielded important insights into CPR quality. Investigations using CPR recording devices have allowed the assessment of specific CPR performance parameters and their relative importance regarding return of spontaneous circulation and survival to hospital discharge. Additional work has suggested new opportunities to measure physiologic markers during CPR and potentially tailor CPR delivery to patient requirements. Through recent laboratory and clinical investigations, a more evidence-based definition of high-quality CPR continues to emerge. Exciting opportunities now exist to study quantitative metrics of CPR and potentially guide resuscitation care in a goal-directed fashion. Concepts of high-quality CPR have also informed new approaches to training and quality improvement efforts for cardiac arrest care.

  18. Atlantic Coast Environmental Indicators Consortium

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — n 2000, the US EPA granted authority to establish up to five Estuarine Indicator Research Programs. These Programs were designed to identify, evaluate, recommend and...

  19. NCI Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI has awarded grants to five research teams to participate in its Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium, which is intended to help to prioritize which agents to pursue in pediatric clinical trials.

  20. Hickory Consortium 2001 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2003-02-01

    As with all Building America Program consortia, systems thinking is the key to understanding the processes that Hickory Consortium hopes to improve. The Hickory Consortium applies this thinking to more than the whole-building concept. Their systems thinking embraces the meta process of how housing construction takes place in America. By understanding the larger picture, they are able to identify areas where improvements can be made and how to implement them.

  1. Comparison of the T-piece resuscitator with other neonatal manual ventilation devices: A qualitative review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-31

    AIM: To review the literature surrounding various aspects of T-piece resuscitator use, with particular emphasis on the evidence comparing the device to other manual ventilation devices in neonatal resuscitation. DATA SOURCES: The Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane databases were searched in April 2011. Ongoing trials were identified using www.clinicaltrials.gov and www.controlled-trials.com. Additional studies from reference lists of eligible articles were considered. All studies including T-piece resuscitator use were eligible for inclusion. RESULTS: Thirty studies were included. There were two randomised controlled trials in newborn infants comparing the devices, one of which addressed short and intermediate term morbidity and mortality outcomes and found no difference between the T-piece resuscitator and self inflating bag. From manikin studies, advantages to the T-piece resuscitator include the delivery of inflating pressures closer to predetermined target pressures with least variation, the ability to provide prolonged inflation breaths and more consistent tidal volumes. Disadvantages include a technically more difficult setup, more time required to adjust pressures during resuscitation, a larger mask leak and less ability to detect changes in compliance. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need for appropriately designed randomised controlled trials in neonates to highlight the efficacy of one device over another. Until these are performed, healthcare providers should be appropriately trained in the use of the device available in their departments, and be aware of its own limitations.

  2. A survey of nurses' perceived competence and educational needs in performing resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Sook; Issenberg, S Barry; Chung, Hyun Soo; Kim, So Sun; Lim, Tae Ho

    2013-05-01

    Effective training is needed for high-quality performance of staff nurses, who are often the first responders in initiating resuscitation. There is insufficient evidence to identify specific educational strategies that improve outcomes, including early recognition and rescue of the critical patient. This study was conducted to identify perceived competence and educational needs as well as to examine factors influencing perceived competence in resuscitation among staff nurses to build a resuscitation training curriculum. A convenience sample of 502 staff nurses was recruited from 11 hospitals in a single city. Staff nurses were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire. On a five-point scale, chest compression was the lowest-rated technical skill (M = 3.33, SD = 0.80), whereas staying calm and focusing on required tasks was the lowest-rated non-technical skill (M = 3.30, SD = 0.80). Work duration, the usefulness of simulation, recent code experience, and recent simulation-based training were significant factors in perceived competence, F(4, 496) = 45.94, p < .001. Simulation-based resuscitation training was the most preferred training modality, and cardiac arrest was the most preferred training topic. Based on this needs assessment, a simulation-based resuscitation training curriculum with cardiac arrest scenarios is suggested to improve the resuscitation skills of staff nurses. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Teamwork among midwives during neonatal resuscitation at a maternity hospital in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrammert, Johan; Sapkota, Sabitri; Baral, Kedar; Kc, Ashish; Målqvist, Mats; Larsson, Margareta

    2017-06-01

    The ability of health care providers to work together is essential for favourable outcomes in neonatal resuscitation, but perceptions of such teamwork have rarely been studied in low-income settings. Neonatal resuscitation is a proven intervention for reducing neonatal mortality globally, but the long-term effects of clinical training for this skill need further attention. Having an understanding of barriers to teamwork among nurse midwives can contribute to the sustainability of improved clinical practice. To explore nurse midwives' perceptions of teamwork when caring for newborns in need of resuscitation. Nurse midwives from a tertiary-level government hospital in Nepal participated in five focus groups of between 4 and 11 participants each. Qualitative Content Analysis was used for analysis. One overarching theme emerged: looking for comprehensive guidelines and shared responsibilities in neonatal resuscitation to avoid personal blame and learn from mistakes. Participants discussed the need for protocols relating to neonatal resuscitation and the importance of shared medical responsibility, and the importance of the presence of a strong and transparent leadership. The call for clear and comprehensive protocols relating to neonatal resuscitation corresponded with previous research from different contexts. Nurse midwives working at a maternity health care facility in Nepal discussed the benefits and challenges of teamwork in neonatal resuscitation. The findings suggest potential benefits can be made from clarifying guidelines and responsibilities in neonatal resuscitation. Furthermore, a structured process to deal with clinical incidents must be considered. Management must be involved in all processes. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  5. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: the essential of 2015 guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maudet, Ludovic; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Trueb, Lionel

    2016-02-10

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines have been updated in October 2015. The 2010 guidelines are reaffirmed: immediate call for help via the local dispatch center, high quality CPR (frequency between 100 and 120/min, compression depth between 5 and 6 cm) and early defibrillation improve patient's survival chances. This article reviews the essential elements of resuscitation and recommended advanced measures.

  6. Iatrogenic burns injury complicating neonatal resuscitation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of iatrogenic thermal injury in a newborn infant during resuscitation for perinatal asphyxia at a secondary health facility is described. The injury, with surface area coverage of about 4%, involved the lower limbs. This report highlights the poor newborn resuscitation skills of traditional medical practice. Un cas d'une ...

  7. Radiation Therapy Versus No Radiation Therapy to the Neo-breast Following Skin-Sparing Mastectomy and Immediate Autologous Free Flap Reconstruction for Breast Cancer: Patient-Reported and Surgical Outcomes at 1 Year-A Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium (MROC) Substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Andrew L; Diaz-Abele, Julian; Hayakawa, Tom; Buchel, Ed; Dalke, Kimberly; Lambert, Pascal

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) is associated with adverse patient-reported outcomes and surgical complications 1 year after skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate autologous free flap reconstruction for breast cancer. We compared 24 domains of patient-reported outcome measures 1 year after autologous reconstruction between patients who received adjuvant RT and those who did not. A total of 125 patients who underwent surgery between 2012 and 2015 at our institution were included from the Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium study database. Adjusted multivariate models were created incorporating RT technical data, age, cancer stage, estrogen receptor, chemotherapy, breast size, body mass index, and income to determine whether RT was associated with outcomes. At 1 year after surgery, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Breast Cancer-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire breast symptoms were significantly greater in 64 patients who received RT (8-point difference on 100-point ordinal scale, PBREAST-Q (Post-operative Reconstruction Module), Patient-Report Outcomes Measurement Information System Profile 29, McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (MPQ-SF) score, Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, and Patient Health Questionnaire-were not statistically different between groups. Surgical complications were uncommon and did not differ by treatment. RT to the neo-breast compared with no RT following immediate autologous free flap reconstruction for breast cancer is well tolerated at 1 year following surgery despite patients undergoing RT also having a higher cancer stage and more intensive surgical and systemic treatment. Neo-breast symptoms are more common in patients receiving RT by the EORTC Breast Cancer-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire but not by the BREAST-Q. Patient-reported results at 1 year after surgery suggest RT following immediate autologous free flap breast reconstruction is well tolerated

  8. Survival without sequelae after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation after electric shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motawea, Mohamad; Al-Kenany, Al-Sayed; Hosny, Mostafa; Aglan, Omar; Samy, Mohamad; Al-Abd, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    "Electrical shock is the physiological reaction or injury caused by electric current passing through the human body. It occurs upon contact of a human body part with any source of electricity that causes a sufficient current through the skin, muscles, or hair causing undesirable effects ranging from simple burns to death." Ventricular fibrillation is believed to be the most common cause of death after electrical shock. "The ideal duration of cardiac resuscitation is unknown. Typically prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation is associated with poor neurologic outcomes and reduced long term survival. No consensus statement has been made and traditionally efforts are usually terminated after 15-30 minutes." The case under discussion seems worthy of the somewhat detailed description given. It is for a young man who survived after 65 minutes after electrical shock (ES) after prolonged high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), multiple defibrillations, and artificial ventilation without any sequelae. Early start of adequate chest compressions and close adherence to advanced cardiac life support protocols played a vital role in successful CPR.

  9. Factors affecting team leadership skills and their relationship with quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Joyce H Y; Ong, G J; Davies, Robin P; Gao, Fang; Perkins, Gavin D

    2012-09-01

    This study aims to explore the relationship between team-leadership skills and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in an adult cardiac-arrest simulation. Factors affecting team-leadership skills were also assessed. Forty advanced life-support providers leading a cardiac arrest team in a standardized cardiac-arrest simulation were videotaped. Background data were collected, including age (in yrs), sex, whether they had received any leadership training in the past, whether they were part of a professional group, the most recent advanced life-support course (in months) they had undergone, advanced life-support instructor/provider status, and whether they had led in any cardiac arrest situation in the preceding 6 months. Participants were scored using the Cardiac Arrest Simulation test score and Leadership Behavior Description Questionnaire for leadership skills. Process-focused quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation data were collected directly from manikin and video recordings. Primary outcomes were complex technical skills (measured as Cardiac Arrest Simulation test score, preshock pause, and hands-off ratio). Secondary outcomes were simple technical skills (chest-compression rate, depth, and ventilation rate). Univariate linear regressions were performed to examine how leadership skills affect quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and bivariate correlations elicited factors affecting team-leadership skills.Teams led by leaders with the best leadership skills performed higher quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation with better technical performance (R = 0.75, p resuscitation training.

  10. The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Schill, Lyndele; Ivory, Joyce

    2017-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) program is designed to increase the number of underrepresented minority students into STEM and STEM careers by providing unique summer research experiences followed by long-term mentoring and cohort support. Hallmarks of the NAC program include: research or internship opportunities at one of the NAC partner sites, a framework to continue research over the academic year, peer and faculty mentoring, monthly virtual hangouts, and much more. NAC students also participate in two professional travel opportunities each year: the annual NAC conference at Howard University and poster presentation at the annual AAS winter meeting following their summer internship.The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) is a program led by the National Radio Astronomy Consortium (NRAO) and Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), in partnership with the National Society of Black Physicist (NSBP), along with a number of minority and majority universities.

  11. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  12. The OncoArray Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amos, Christopher I; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Zhaoming

    2017-01-01

    by Illumina to facilitate efficient genotyping. The consortium developed standard approaches for selecting SNPs for study, for quality control of markers, and for ancestry analysis. The array was genotyped at selected sites and with prespecified replicate samples to permit evaluation of genotyping accuracy...... among centers and by ethnic background. RESULTS: The OncoArray consortium genotyped 447,705 samples. A total of 494,763 SNPs passed quality control steps with a sample success rate of 97% of the samples. Participating sites performed ancestry analysis using a common set of markers and a scoring...

  13. The ocean sampling day consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate...... the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our...

  14. The BADER Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    target of $4.5M. The remaining $87k will be transferred to the next Call for Proposal budget. • Procurement of furniture was provided for the UD...capable of collecting high quality biomechanics data. 1c. Evaluation of the MTF CAREN Virtual Reality systems for Visual3D integration and data...who are developing patient reported outcomes measures for individuals with lower extremity amputation, to investigate possible ways to augment and

  15. Acute posthypoxic myoclonus after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouwes Aline

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute posthypoxic myoclonus (PHM can occur in patients admitted after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and is considered to have a poor prognosis. The origin can be cortical and/or subcortical and this might be an important determinant for treatment options and prognosis. The aim of the study was to investigate whether acute PHM originates from cortical or subcortical structures, using somatosensory evoked potential (SEP and electroencephalogram (EEG. Methods Patients with acute PHM (focal myoclonus or status myoclonus within 72 hours after CPR were retrospectively selected from a multicenter cohort study. All patients were treated with hypothermia. Criteria for cortical origin of the myoclonus were: giant SEP potentials; or epileptic activity, status epilepticus, or generalized periodic discharges on the EEG (no back-averaging was used. Good outcome was defined as good recovery or moderate disability after 6 months. Results Acute PHM was reported in 79/391 patients (20%. SEPs were available in 51/79 patients and in 27 of them (53% N20 potentials were present. Giant potentials were seen in 3 patients. EEGs were available in 36/79 patients with 23/36 (64% patients fulfilling criteria for a cortical origin. Nine patients (12% had a good outcome. A broad variety of drugs was used for treatment. Conclusions The results of this study show that acute PHM originates from subcortical, as well as cortical structures. Outcome of patients admitted after CPR who develop acute PHM in this cohort was better than previously reported in literature. The broad variety of drugs used for treatment shows the existing uncertainty about optimal treatment.

  16. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Consortium Agreement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Asada, Haruhiko

    1999-01-01

    ... of Phase 2 of the Home Automation and Healthcare Consortium. This report describes all major research accomplishments within the last six months since we launched the second phase of the consortium...

  17. Termination of prehospital resuscitative efforts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Caroline; Binderup, Lars Grassmé

    2017-01-01

    -and-death decision-making in the patient's medical records is required. We suggest that a template be implemented in the prehospital medical records describing the basis for any ethical decisions. This template should contain information regarding the persons involved in the deliberations and notes on ethical......BACKGROUND: Discussions on ethical aspects of life-and-death decisions within the hospital are often made in plenary. The prehospital physician, however, may be faced with ethical dilemmas in life-and-death decisions when time-critical decisions to initiate or refrain from resuscitative efforts...... need to be taken without the possibility to discuss matters with colleagues. Little is known whether these considerations regarding ethical issues in crucial life-and-death decisions are documented prehospitally. This is a review of the ethical considerations documented in the prehospital medical...

  18. Acceptability of Bedside Resuscitation With Intact Umbilical Cord to Clinicians and Patients’ Families in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup C. Katheria

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWhile delayed umbilical cord clamping in preterm infants has shown to improve long-term neurological outcomes, infants who are thought to need resuscitation do not receive delayed cord clamping even though they may benefit the most. A mobile resuscitation platform allows infants to be resuscitated at the mother’s bedside with the cord intact. The newborn is supplied with placental blood during the resuscitation in view of the mother. The objective of the study is to assess the usability and acceptability of mobile resuscitation platform, LifeStart trolley, among the infants’ parents and perinatal providers.MethodsA resuscitation platform was present during every delivery that required advanced neonatal providers for high-risk deliveries. Perinatal providers and parents of the infants were given a questionnaire shortly after the delivery.Results60 neonatal subjects were placed on the trolley. The majority of deliveries were high risk for meconium-stained amniotic fluid (43%, and non-reassuring fetal heart rate (45%. About 50% of neonatal providers felt that there were some concerns regarding access to the baby. No parents were uncomfortable with the bedside neonatal interventions, and most parents perceived that communication was improved because of the proximity to the care team.ConclusionBedside resuscitation with umbilical cord intact through the use of a mobile resuscitation trolley is feasible, safe, and effective, but about half of the perinatal providers expressed concerns. Logistical issues such as improved space management and/or delivery setup should be considered in centers planning to perform neonatal resuscitation with an intact cord.

  19. Teaching Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carveth, Stephen W.

    1979-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a key part of emergency cardiac care. It is a basic life support procedure that can be taught in the schools with the assistance of the American Heart Association. (JMF)

  20. The Evolving Science of Trauma Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Tim; Davenport, Ross; Mak, Matthew; Brohi, Karim

    2018-02-01

    This review summarizes the evolution of trauma resuscitation from a one-size-fits-all approach to one tailored to patient physiology. The most dramatic change is in the management of actively bleeding patients, with a balanced blood product-based resuscitation approach (avoiding crystalloids) and surgery focused on hemorrhage control, not definitive care. When hemostasis has been achieved, definitive resuscitation to restore organ perfusion is initiated. This approach is associated with decreased mortality, reduced duration of stay, improved coagulation profile, and reduced crystalloid/vasopressor use. This article focuses on the tools and methods used for trauma resuscitation in the acute phase of trauma care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A SOF Damage Control Resuscitation Cocktail

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    resuscitation (DCR) cocktail for use by SOF’s that is capable of improving survival from polytrauma in austere settings. The cocktail components...components are tested in a combat-relevant swine polytrauma model of hemorrhagic shock with traumatic brain injury, free internal bleeding from an aortic...from polytrauma in austere settings. The cocktail components include Hextend for volume resuscitation and tissue perfusion, fibrinogen concentrate

  2. Amitriptyline Intoxication Responded to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güldem Turan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The most severe effects in amitriptiline intoxications are related with central nervous system and cardiovascular system. Amitriptiline intoxication especially with high doses has severe cardiac effects and can result in cardiac arrest. Most favorable responses can be achieved with efficient and prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We wanted to present a case ingested high dose of amitriptiline for attempt to suicide and responded to prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  3. Fluid Creep and Over-resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffle, Jeffrey R

    2016-10-01

    Fluid creep is the term applied to a burn resuscitation, which requires more fluid than predicted by standard formulas. Fluid creep is common today and is linked to several serious edema-related complications. Increased fluid requirements may accompany the appropriate resuscitation of massive injuries but dangerous fluid creep is also caused by overly permissive fluid infusion and the lack of colloid supplementation. Several strategies for recognizing and treating fluid creep are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Wide variation in cardiopulmonary resuscitation interruption intervals among commercially available automated external defibrillators may affect survival despite high defibrillation efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, David; Morgan, Carl

    2004-09-01

    Recent studies have associated interruptions of cardiopulmonary resuscitation imposed by automated external defibrillators (AEDs) with poor resuscitation outcome. In particular, the "hands-off" interval between precordial compressions and subsequent defibrillation shock has been implicated. We sought to determine the range of variation among current-generation AEDs with respect to this characteristic. Seven AEDs from six manufacturers were characterized via stopwatch and arrhythmia simulator with respect to the imposed hands-off interval. All AEDs were equipped with new batteries, and measurements were repeated five times for each AED. A wide variation in the hands-off interval between precordial compressions and shock delivery was observed, ranging from 5.2 to 28.4 secs, with only one AED achieving an interruption of <10 secs. Laboratory and clinical data suggest that this range of variation could be responsible for a more than two-fold variation in patient resuscitation success, an effect that far exceeds any defibrillation efficacy differences that may hypothetically exist. In addition to defibrillation waveform and dose, researchers should consider the hands-off cardiopulmonary resuscitation interruption interval between cardiopulmonary resuscitation and subsequent defibrillation shock to be an important covariate of outcome in resuscitation studies. Defibrillator design should minimize this interval to avoid potential adverse consequences on patient survival.

  5. Prediction of survival to discharge following cardiopulmonary resuscitation using classification and regression trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebell, Mark H; Afonso, Anna M; Geocadin, Romergryko G

    2013-12-01

    To predict the likelihood that an inpatient who experiences cardiopulmonary arrest and undergoes cardiopulmonary resuscitation survives to discharge with good neurologic function or with mild deficits (Cerebral Performance Category score = 1). Classification and Regression Trees were used to develop branching algorithms that optimize the ability of a series of tests to correctly classify patients into two or more groups. Data from 2007 to 2008 (n = 38,092) were used to develop candidate Classification and Regression Trees models to predict the outcome of inpatient cardiopulmonary resuscitation episodes and data from 2009 (n = 14,435) to evaluate the accuracy of the models and judge the degree of over fitting. Both supervised and unsupervised approaches to model development were used. 366 hospitals participating in the Get With the Guidelines-Resuscitation registry. Adult inpatients experiencing an index episode of cardiopulmonary arrest and undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the hospital. The five candidate models had between 8 and 21 nodes and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve from 0.718 to 0.766 in the derivation group and from 0.683 to 0.746 in the validation group. One of the supervised models had 14 nodes and classified 27.9% of patients as very unlikely to survive neurologically intact or with mild deficits (Tree models that predict survival to discharge with good neurologic function or with mild deficits following in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. Models like this can assist physicians and patients who are considering do-not-resuscitate orders.

  6. Corn in consortium with forages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Maria de Paula Garcia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic premises for sustainable agricultural development with focus on rural producers are reducing the costs of production and aggregation of values through the use crop-livestock system (CLS throughout the year. The CLS is based on the consortium of grain crops, especially corn with tropical forages, mainly of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The study aimed to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn crop intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The experiment was conducted at the Fazenda de Ensino, Pesquisa e Extensão – FEPE  of the Faculdade de Engenharia - UNESP, Ilha Solteira in an Oxisol in savannah conditions and in the autumn winter of 2009. The experimental area was irrigated by a center pivot and had a history of no-tillage system for 8 years. The corn hybrid used was simple DKB 390 YG at distances of 0.90 m. The seeds of grasses were sown in 0.34 m spacing in the amount of 5 kg ha-1, they were mixed with fertilizer minutes before sowing  and placed in a compartment fertilizer seeder and fertilizers were mechanically deposited in the soil at a depth of 0.03 m. The experimental design used was a randomized block with four replications and five treatments: Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CTD of the corn; Panicum maximum cv. Mombaça sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CMD of the corn; Urochloa brizantha cv. Xaraés sown during the occasion of nitrogen fertilization (CBD of the corn; Urochloa ruziziensis cv. Comumsown during the nitrogen fertilization (CRD of the corn and single corn (control. The production components of corn: plant population per hectare (PlPo, number of ears per hectare (NE ha-1, number of rows per ear (NRE, number of kernels per row on the cob (NKR, number of grain in the ear (NGE and mass of 100 grains (M100G were not influenced by consortium with forage. Comparing grain yield (GY single corn and maize intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum

  7. Opinions of Brazilian resuscitation instructors regarding resuscitation in the delivery room of extremely preterm newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Ribeiro Ambrósio

    2016-11-01

    Conclusion: Difficulty can be observed regarding the decision to not resuscitate a preterm infant with 23 weeks of gestational age. At the same time, a small percentage of pediatricians would not resuscitate neonates of unquestionable viability at 26 weeks of gestational age in the delivery room.

  8. Resuscitative therapy with erythropoietin reduces oxidative stress and inflammatory responses of vital organs in a rat severe fixed-volume hemorrhagic shock model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Kadkhodaee, Mehri; Seifi, Behjat; Mirzaei, Reza; Ahghari, Parisa

    2018-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) still has a high mortality rate and none of the known resuscitative regimens completely reverse its adverse outcomes. This study investigated the effects of different models of resuscitative therapy on the healing of organ damage in a HS model. Male Wistar rats were randomized into six groups: Sham, without HS induction; HS, without resuscitation; HS+Blood, resuscitation with the shed blood; HS+Blood+NS, resuscitation with blood and normal saline; HS+Blood+RL, resuscitation with blood and Ringer's lactate; EPO, erythropoietin was added to the blood and RL. Blood and urine samples were obtained 3 h after resuscitation. Kidney, liver and brain tissue samples were harvested for multiple organ failure evaluation. Survival rate was the highest in the Sham, EPO and HS+Blood+RL groups compared to others. Plasma creatinine concentration, ALT, AST, urinary NAG activity and renal NGAL mRNA expression significantly increased in the HS+Blood+RL group compared to the Sham group. There was a significant increase in tissue oxidative stress markers and pro-inflammatory cytokines in HS+Blood+RL group compared to the Sham rats. EPO had more protective effects on multiple organ failure compared to the HS+Blood+RL group. EPO, as a resuscitative treatment, attenuated HS-induced organ damage. It seems that it has a potential to be attractive for clinical trials.

  9. Virginia ADS consortium - thorium utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myneni, Ganapati

    2015-01-01

    A Virginia ADS consortium, consisting of Virginia Universities (UVa, VCU, VT), Industry (Casting Analysis Corporation, GEM*STAR, MuPlus Inc.), Jefferson Lab and not-for-profit ISOHIM, has been organizing International Accelerator-Driven Sub-Critical Systems (ADS) and Thorium Utilization (ThU) workshops. The third workshop of this series was hosted by VCU in Richmond, Virginia, USA Oct 2014 with CBMM and IAEA sponsorship and was endorsed by International Thorium Energy Committee (IThEC), Geneva and Virginia Nuclear Energy Consortium Authority. In this presentation a brief summary of the successful 3 rd International ADS and ThU workshop proceedings and review the worldwide ADS plans and/or programs is given. Additionally, a report on new start-ups on Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) systems is presented. Further, a discussion on potential simplistic fertile 232 Th to fissile 233 U conversion is made

  10. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  11. Colloid normalizes resuscitation ratio in pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraklas, Iris; Lam, Uyen; Cochran, Amalia; Stoddard, Gregory; Saffle, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation of burned children is challenging because of their small size and intolerance to over- or underresuscitation. Our American Burn Association-verified regional burn center has used colloid "rescue" as part of our pediatric resuscitation protocol. With Institutional Review Board approval, the authors reviewed children with ≥15% TBSA burns admitted from January 1, 2004, to May 1, 2009. Resuscitation was based on the Parkland formula, which was adjusted to maintain urine output. Patients requiring progressive increases in crystalloid were placed on a colloid protocol. Results were expressed as an hourly resuscitation ratio (I/O ratio) of fluid infusion (ml/kg/%TBSA/hr) to urine output (ml/kg/hr). We reviewed 53 patients; 29 completed resuscitation using crystalloid alone (lactated Ringer's solution [LR]), and 24 received colloid supplementation albumin (ALB). Groups were comparable in age, gender, weight, and time from injury to admission. ALB patients had more inhalation injuries and larger total and full-thickness burns. LR patients maintained a median I/O of 0.17 (range, 0.08-0.31), whereas ALB patients demonstrated escalating ratios until the institution of albumin produced a precipitous return of I/O comparable with that of the LR group. Hospital stay was lower for LR patients than ALB patients (0.59 vs 1.06 days/%TBSA, P = .033). Twelve patients required extremity or torso escharotomy, but this did not differ between groups. There were no decompressive laparotomies. The median resuscitation volume for ALB group was greater than LR group (9.7 vs 6.2 ml/kg/%TBSA, P = .004). Measuring hourly I/O is a helpful means of evaluating fluid demands during burn shock resuscitation. The addition of colloid restores normal I/O in pediatric patients.

  12. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutz, K.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    1995-01-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The research activities will be conducted in cooperation with coal companies, equipment manufacturers, and A ampersand E firms working in the Appalachian coal fields. This approach is consistent with President Clinton's initiative in establishing Regional Technology Alliances to meet regional needs through technology development in cooperation with industry. The consortium activities are complementary to the High-Efficiency Preparation program of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, but are broader in scope as they are inclusive of technology developments for both near-term and long-term applications, technology transfer, and training a highly-skilled work force

  13. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutz, K.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The research activities will be conducted in cooperation with coal companies, equipment manufacturers, and A&E firms working in the Appalachian coal fields. This approach is consistent with President Clinton`s initiative in establishing Regional Technology Alliances to meet regional needs through technology development in cooperation with industry. The consortium activities are complementary to the High-Efficiency Preparation program of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, but are broader in scope as they are inclusive of technology developments for both near-term and long-term applications, technology transfer, and training a highly-skilled work force.

  14. Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta and Resuscitative Thoracotomy in Select Patients with Hemorrhagic Shock: Early Results from the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma's Aortic Occlusion in Resuscitation for Trauma and Acute Care Surgery Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Megan; Inaba, Kenji; Aiolfi, Alberto; DuBose, Joseph; Fabian, Timothy; Bee, Tiffany; Holcomb, John B; Moore, Laura; Skarupa, David; Scalea, Thomas M

    2018-05-01

    Aortic occlusion is a potentially valuable tool for early resuscitation in patients nearing extremis or in arrest from severe hemorrhage. The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma's Aortic Occlusion in Resuscitation for Trauma and Acute Care Surgery registry identified trauma patients without penetrating thoracic injury undergoing aortic occlusion at the level of the descending thoracic aorta (resuscitative thoracotomy [RT] or zone 1 resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta [REBOA]) in the emergency department (ED). Survival outcomes relative to the timing of CPR need and admission hemodynamic status were examined. Two hundred and eighty-five patients were included: 81.8% were males, with injury due to penetrating mechanisms in 41.4%; median age was 35.0 years (interquartile range 29 years) and median Injury Severity Score was 34.0 (interquartile range 18). Resuscitative thoracotomy was used in 71%, and zone 1 REBOA in 29%. Overall survival beyond the ED was 50% (RT 44%, REBOA 63%; p = 0.004) and survival to discharge was 5% (RT 2.5%, REBOA 9.6%; p = 0.023). Discharge Glasgow Coma Scale score was 15 in 85% of survivors. Prehospital CPR was required in 60% of patients with a survival beyond the ED of 37% and survival to discharge of 3% (all p > 0.05). Patients who did not require any CPR before had a survival beyond the ED of 70% (RT 48%, REBOA 93%; p American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in palliative care cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjørstad, Odd Jarle; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg

    2013-02-19

    The criteria for refraining from cardiopulmonary resuscitation in palliative care cancer patients are based on patients' right to refuse treatment and the duty of the treating personnel not to exacerbate their suffering and not to administer futile treatment. When is cardiopulmonary resuscitation futile in these patients? Systematic literature searches were conducted in PubMed for the period 1989-2010 on the results of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation in advanced cancer patients and on factors that affected the results of CPR when special mention was made of cancer. The searches yielded 333 hits and 18 included articles: four meta-analyses, eight retrospective clinical studies, and six review articles. Cancer patients had a poorer post-CPR survival than non-cancer patients. Survival declined with increasing extent of the cancer disease. Widespread and therapy-resistant cancer disease coupled with a performance status lower than WHO 2 or a PAM score (Pre-Arrest Morbidity Index) of above 8 was regarded as inconsistent with survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is futile for in-hospital cancer patients with widespread incurable disease and poor performance status.

  16. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Infants and Children With Cardiac Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Bradley S; Tabbutt, Sarah; MacLaren, Graeme; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Adatia, Ian; Atkins, Dianne L; Checchia, Paul A; DeCaen, Allan; Fink, Ericka L; Hoffman, George M; Jefferies, John L; Kleinman, Monica; Krawczeski, Catherine D; Licht, Daniel J; Macrae, Duncan; Ravishankar, Chitra; Samson, Ricardo A; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Toms, Rune; Tweddell, James; Laussen, Peter C

    2018-04-23

    Cardiac arrest occurs at a higher rate in children with heart disease than in healthy children. Pediatric basic life support and advanced life support guidelines focus on delivering high-quality resuscitation in children with normal hearts. The complexity and variability in pediatric heart disease pose unique challenges during resuscitation. A writing group appointed by the American Heart Association reviewed the literature addressing resuscitation in children with heart disease. MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases were searched from 1966 to 2015, cross-referencing pediatric heart disease with pertinent resuscitation search terms. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association classification of recommendations and levels of evidence for practice guidelines were used. The recommendations in this statement concur with the critical components of the 2015 American Heart Association pediatric basic life support and pediatric advanced life support guidelines and are meant to serve as a resuscitation supplement. This statement is meant for caregivers of children with heart disease in the prehospital and in-hospital settings. Understanding the anatomy and physiology of the high-risk pediatric cardiac population will promote early recognition and treatment of decompensation to prevent cardiac arrest, increase survival from cardiac arrest by providing high-quality resuscitations, and improve outcomes with postresuscitation care. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy Technology (CARET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, E. M.; Henderson, D. O.; Buffinger, D. R.; Fuller, C. W.; Uribe, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy (CARET) is a research and education program which uses the theme of renewable energy to build a minority scientist pipeline. CARET is also a consortium of four universities and NASA Lewis Research Center working together to promote science education and research to minority students using the theme of renewable energy. The consortium membership includes the HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities), Fisk, Wilberforce and Central State Universities as well as Kent State University and NASA Lewis Research Center. The various stages of this pipeline provide participating students experiences with a different emphasis. Some emphasize building enthusiasm for the classroom study of science and technology while others emphasize the nature of research in these disciplines. Still others focus on relating a practical application to science and technology. And, of great importance to the success of the program are the interfaces between the various stages. Successfully managing these transitions is a requirement for producing trained scientists, engineers and technologists. Presentations describing the CARET program have been given at this year's HBCU Research Conference at the Ohio Aerospace Institute and as a seminar in the Solar Circle Seminar series of the Photovoltaic and Space Environments Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center. In this report, we will describe the many positive achievements toward the fulfillment of the goals and outcomes of our program. We will begin with a description of the interactions among the consortium members and end with a description of the activities of each of the member institutions .

  18. CT findings of the brain post cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, Masami; Miyamoto, Seiji; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Fukuzumi, Akio; Iwasaki, Satoru; Tabuse, Hisayuki

    1999-01-01

    The subjects were 88 cases of non-traumatic CPA excluding those with primary brain disease. The subjects were divided into 4 groups according to the duration of cardiac arrest: Group A (less than 15 minutes, 2 cases), Group B (15-30 minutes, 11 cases), Group C (more than 30 minutes, 40 cases), Group D (no resuscitation after cardiac arrest, 35 cases). All cases in Group A were observed to be clear consciousness after resuscitation. Not only the functional outcome but also the survivals rates were poorer as the duration of cardiac arrest increased in Groups B and C compared to Group A. The mortality rate was 85% or higher for cardiac arrest of 15 minutes or longer. Brain edema after resuscitation was examined by head CT in the basal-ganglia and thalamus regions, and in the corticomedullary junction of the cerebrum. In the cases of short duration of cardiac arrest, the basal-ganglia and thalamus regions, and the corticomedullary junction were clearly visible on CT. On the other hand, these areas were poorly or not visible (marked brain edema) in the cases of longer duration of cardiac arrest. The borders of the basal-ganglia and thalamus regions, and the corticomedullary junction were not obscured in any of the cases in Group A. However, the borders of these regions were poorly visible or not visible more frequently as the duration of cardiac arrest increased. In particular, the corticomedullary junction was not visible more frequently after cardiac arrest of long duration. Brain edema is caused and intensified by prolongation of hypoxia, but it is also reported to be caused by external cardiac massage, which increases the intracranial pressure. This was also suggested by the more notable brain edema in the corticomedullary junction than in the basal-ganglia and thalamus regions. These findings of brain edema appeared on head CT within 4 hours after CPR. Findings suggestive of vascular occlusion were also obtained. (K.H.)

  19. Comparison of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques using video camera recordings.

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, C J; Heyworth, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To use video recordings to compare the performance of resuscitation teams in relation to their previous training in cardiac resuscitation. METHODS--Over a 10 month period all cardiopulmonary resuscitations carried out in an accident and emergency (A&E) resuscitation room were videotaped. The following variables were monitored: (1) time to perform three defibrillatory shocks; (2) time to give intravenous adrenaline (centrally or peripherally); (3) the numbers and grade of medical an...

  20. Comparative Effectiveness of Emergency Resuscitative Thoracotomy versus Closed Chest Compressions among Patients with Critical Blunt Trauma: A Nationwide Cohort Study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kodai; Inoue, Shigeaki; Morita, Seiji; Watanabe, Nobuo; Shintani, Ayumi; Inokuchi, Sadaki; Ogura, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Although emergency resuscitative thoracotomy is performed as a salvage maneuver for critical blunt trauma patients, evidence supporting superior effectiveness of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy compared to conventional closed-chest compressions remains insufficient. The objective of this study was to investigate whether emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at the emergency department or in the operating room was associated with favourable outcomes after blunt trauma and to compare its effectiveness with that of closed-chest compressions. This was a retrospective nationwide cohort study. Data were obtained from the Japan Trauma Data Bank for the period between 2004 and 2012. The primary and secondary outcomes were patient survival rates 24 h and 28 d after emergency department arrival. Statistical analyses were performed using multivariable generalized mixed-effects regression analysis. We adjusted for the effects of different hospitals by introducing random intercepts in regression analysis to account for the differential quality of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at hospitals where patients in cardiac arrest were treated. Sensitivity analyses were performed using propensity score matching. In total, 1,377 consecutive, critical blunt trauma patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency department or operating room were included in the study. Of these patients, 484 (35.1%) underwent emergency resuscitative thoracotomy and 893 (64.9%) received closed-chest compressions. Compared to closed-chest compressions, emergency resuscitative thoracotomy was associated with lower survival rate 24 h after emergency department arrival (4.5% vs. 17.5%, respectively, P chest compressions (P chest compressions.

  1. Family presence during resuscitation: A Canadian Critical Care Society position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oczkowski, Simon John Walsh; Mazzetti, Ian; Cupido, Cynthia; Fox-Robichaud, Alison E

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that patient outcomes are not affected by the offering of family presence during resuscitation (FPDR), and that psychological outcomes are neutral or improved in family members of adult patients. The exclusion of family members from the resuscitation area should, therefore, be reassessed. The present Canadian Critical Care Society position paper is designed to help clinicians and institutions decide whether to incorporate FPDR as part of their routine clinical practice, and to offer strategies to implement FPDR successfully. The authors conducted a literature search of the perspectives of health care providers, patients and families on the topic of FPDR, and considered the relevant ethical values of beneficence, nonmaleficence, autonomy and justice in light of the clinical evidence for FPDR. They reviewed randomized controlled trials and observational studies of FPDR to determine strategies that have been used to screen family members, select appropriate chaperones and educate staff. FPDR is an ethically sound practice in Canada, and may be considered for the families of adult and pediatric patients in the hospital setting. Hospitals that choose to implement FPDR should develop transparent policies regarding which family members are to be offered the opportunity to be present during the resuscitation. Experienced chaperones should accompany and support family members in the resuscitation area. Intensive educational interventions and increasing experience with FPDR are associated with increased support for the practice from health care providers. FPDR should be considered to be an important component of patient and family-centred care.

  2. Basic life support knowledge of secondary school students in cardiopulmonary resuscitation training using a song.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca Del Pozo, Francisco Javier; Valle Alonso, Joaquin; Canales Velis, Nancy Beatriz; Andrade Barahona, Mario Miguel; Siggers, Aidan; Lopera, Elisa

    2016-07-20

    To examine the effectiveness of a "cardiopulmonary resuscitation song" in improving the basic life support skills of secondary school students. This pre-test/post-test control design study enrolled secondary school students from two middle schools randomly chosen in Córdoba, Andalucia, Spain. The study included 608 teenagers. A random sample of 87 students in the intervention group and 35 in the control group, aged 12-14 years were selected. The intervention included a cardiopulmonary resuscitation song and video. A questionnaire was conducted at three-time points: pre-intervention, one month and eight months post-intervention. On global knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there were no significant differences between the intervention group and the control group in the trial pre-intervention and at the month post-intervention. However, at 8 months there were significant differences with a p-value = 0.000 (intervention group, 95% CI: 6.39 to 7.13 vs. control group, 95% CI: 4.75 to 5.92), F(1,120)=16.644, p=0.000). In addition, significant differences about students' basic life support knowledge about chest compressions at eight months post-intervention (F(1,120)=15.561, p=0.000) were found. Our study showed that incorporating the song component in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation teaching increased its effectiveness and the ability to remember the cardiopulmonary resuscitation algorithm. Our study highlights the need for different methods in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation teaching to facilitate knowledge retention and increase the number of positive outcomes after sudden cardiac arrest.

  3. The Black Rock Forest Consortium: A narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzetto-More, Nicole Antoinette

    The Black Rock Forest is a 3,785-acre wilderness area whose richly forested landscape represents the splendor of the Hudson Valley Region of New York State. Although originally intended to become the home of wealthy banker James Stillman, it was his son Ernest whose love of conservation caused him to embrace the then new and revolutionary practice of sustainable forestry and establish Black Rock in 1928. Due to Ernest Stillman's foresight, the property was protected from development and bequeathed to Harvard University following his death for the establishment of an experimental forest. The modern environmental movement in America began when the Black Rock Forest was threatened with development by Consolidated Edison, and the people of the surrounding community banded together, battling tirelessly for over 17 years to stop the degradation of this historic forest. The outcome of this crusade marked a hallmark win for the environment leaving an illustrious and inveterate legacy. The campaign resulted in the watershed legislation the National Environmental Policy Act, the formation of several environmental advocacy groups, the creation of the Council on Environmental Quality of the Executive Office of the President, as well as set a precedent for communities to initiate and win cases against major corporations in order to safeguard natural resources. In the midst of the controversy it became apparent that alternative futures for the Forest needed to be explored. As a result of a committee report and one man's vision, the idea emerged to create a consortium that would purchase and steward the Forest. With a formation that took nearly fifteen years, the Black Rock Forest Consortium was formed, a unique amalgamation of K--12 public and private schools, colleges and universities, and science and cultural centers that successfully collaborate to enhance scientific research, environmental conservation, and education. The Consortium works to bridge the gaps between learners

  4. Certified Basic Life Support Instructors Assess Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills Poorly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla; Rasmussen, Stinne E; Kristensen, Mette Amalie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves survival from cardiac arrest. During basic life support (BLS) training, instructors assess CPR skills to enhance learning outcome. Emergency department staff and senior residents have been shown to assess chest compression...... quality poorly. Currently no studies have evaluated CPR assessment among certified BLS instructors. The aim of this study was to investigate certified BLS instructors’ assessment of chest compressions and rescue breathing.Methods: Data were collected at BLS courses for medical students at Aarhus...... of CPR skills may be beneficial to ensure high-quality learning outcome.Author Disclosures: C. Hansen: None. S.E. Rasmussen: None. M.A. Nebsbjerg: None. M. Stærk: None. B. Løfgren: None....

  5. Liver laceration related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Beydilli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is recognized as a medical procedure performed to maintain vital functions of a person whose cardiac and respiratory functions have stopped. Chest compression is the most essential component of CPR and it is performed on the lower half of the sternum. During CPR, many complications may occur because of chest compressions, especially chest injuries including sternum and rib fractures. Rarely tracheal injury, rupture of the stomach, or liver or spleen injury may also occur as complications.In this study, we present two cases of liver injury caused by resuscitation. With this article, we want to emphasize the importance of making correct chest compressions. Keywords: Resuscitation complications, Emergency service, Liver laceration, Autopsy

  6. Persisting effect of community approaches to resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Møller; Isbye, Dan Lou; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: On the Danish island of Bornholm an intervention was carried out during 2008-2010 aiming at increasing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival. The intervention included mass media focus on resuscitation and widespread educational activities. The aim of this study was to compare....... There was no significant change in all-rhythm 30-day survival for non-EMS witnessed OHCAs with presumed cardiac aetiology (6.7% [95% CI 3-13] in the follow-up period; vs. 4.6% [95% CI 1-12], p=0.76). CONCLUSION: In a 3-year follow-up period after an intervention engaging laypersons in resuscitation through mass education...... in BLS combined with a media focus on resuscitation, we observed a persistent significant increase in the bystander BLS rate for all OHCAs with presumed cardiac aetiology. There was no significant difference in 30-day survival....

  7. Consortium for Health and Military Performance (CHAMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center's work addresses a wide scope of trauma exposure from the consequences of combat, operations other than war, terrorism, natural and humanmade disasters,...

  8. Cancer patients' perceptions of do not resuscitate orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olver, Ian N; Eliott, Jaklin A; Blake-Mortimer, Jane

    2002-01-01

    Patients' perceptions of do not resuscitate (DNR) orders and how and when to present the information were sought to aid in framing DNR policy. Semi-structured interviews of 23 patients being treated for cancer, were conducted by a clinical psychologist. The interviews were transcribed and analysed with the aid of a qualitative software package. Discourse analysis enabled hypotheses to be formed based on consistencies and variations of the language used. Most patients understood what DNR meant and preferred DNR orders to 'good palliative care' orders. They saw it as their autonomous right and responsibility to make such decisions. They would seek information on the likely medical outcomes of resuscitation but also would use non-rational criteria based on emotional and social factors to make their decisions. Family considerations suggest that personal autonomy is not the overriding basis of the decision. Patients were unsure of the best timing of a DNR discussion and were prepared to defer to doctors' intuition. Most advocated written DNR orders but few had them. Families were construed as advocates but also seen as constraining individual autonomy. When considering DNR orders, patients recognise the diversity of preferences likely to exist that belie a one policy fits all approach. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Oxidative stress in resuscitation and in ventilation of newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitto, E; Pellegrino, S; D'Arrigo, S; Barberi, I; Reiter, R J

    2009-12-01

    The lungs of newborns are especially prone to oxidative damage induced by both reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species. Yet, these infants are often 1) exposed to high oxygen concentrations, 2) have infections or inflammation, 3) have reduced antioxidant defense, and 4) have high free iron levels which enhance toxic radical generation. Oxidative stress has been postulated to be implicated in several newborn conditions with the phrase "oxygen radical diseases of neonatology" having been coined. There is, however, reason to believe that oxidative stress is increased more when resuscitation is performed with pure oxygen compared with ambient air and that the most effective ventilatory strategy is the avoidance of mechanical ventilation with the use of nasopharyngeal continuous positive airway pressure whenever possible. Multiple ventilation strategies have been attempted to reduce injury and improve outcomes in newborn infants. In this review, the authors summarise the scientific evidence concerning oxidative stress as it relates to resuscitation in the delivery room and to the various modalities of ventilation.

  10. 2015 revised Utstein-style recommended guidelines for uniform reporting of data from drowning-related resuscitation: An ILCOR advisory statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Ahamed H; Bierens, Joost J L M; Perkins, Gavin D; Wenzel, Volker; Nadkarni, Vinay; Morley, Peter; Warner, David S; Topjian, Alexis; Venema, Allart M; Branche, Christine M; Szpilman, David; Morizot-Leite, Luiz; Nitta, Masahiko; Løfgren, Bo; Webber, Jonathon; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Beerman, Stephen B; Youn, Chun Song; Jost, Ulrich; Quan, Linda; Dezfulian, Cameron; Handley, Anthony J; Hazinski, Mary Fran

    2017-09-01

    Utstein-style guidelines use an established consensus process, endorsed by the international resuscitation community, to facilitate and structure resuscitation research and publication. The first "Guidelines for Uniform Reporting of Data From Drowning" were published over a decade ago. During the intervening years, resuscitation science has advanced considerably, thus making revision of the guidelines timely. In particular, measurement of cardiopulmonary resuscitation elements and neurological outcomes reporting have advanced substantially. The purpose of this report is to provide updated guidelines for reporting data from studies of resuscitation from drowning. An international group with scientific expertise in the fields of drowning research, resuscitation research, emergency medical services, public health, and development of guidelines met in Potsdam, Germany, to determine the data that should be reported in scientific articles on the subject of resuscitation from drowning. At the Utstein-style meeting, participants discussed data elements in detail, defined the data, determined data priority, and decided how data should be reported, including scoring methods and category details. The template for reporting data from drowning research was revised extensively, with new emphasis on measurement of quality of resuscitation, neurological outcomes, and deletion of data that have proved to be less relevant or difficult to capture. The report describes the consensus process, rationale for selecting data elements to be reported, definitions and priority of data, and scoring methods. These guidelines are intended to improve the clarity of scientific communication and the comparability of scientific investigations. Copyright © 2017 European Resuscitation Council, American Heart Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Novel Resuscitation From Lethal Hemorrhage Suspended Animation for Delayed Resuscitation, Year 7

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kochanek, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    ...). We have conceived and documented the concept of "suspended animation (SA) for delayed resuscitation" using a hypothermic saline flush into the aorta after rapid (over 5 min) exsanguination (Ex...

  12. New insights for adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Up-coming resuscitation guidelines 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Pranskūnas, Andrius; Dobožinskas, Paulius; Pilvinis, Vidas; Pranskūnienė, Živilė; Jasinskas, Nedas; Stašaitis, Kęstutis; Vaitkaitienė, Eglė; Vaitkaitis, Dinas

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in cardiac arrest care, the overall survival to hospital discharge remains poor. The objective of this paper was to review the innovations in cardiopulmonary resuscitation that could influence survival or change our understanding about cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We have performed a search in the MEDLINE and the Cochrane databases for randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, expert reviews from December 2005 to March 2010 using the terms cardiac arrest, basic life supp...

  13. Acute posthypoxic myoclonus after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwes, Aline; van Poppelen, Daniel; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Kuiper, Michael A.; Zandstra, Durk F.; Weinstein, Henry C.; Tromp, Selma C.; Zandbergen, Eveline G. J.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Horn, Janneke

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acute posthypoxic myoclonus (PHM) can occur in patients admitted after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and is considered to have a poor prognosis. The origin can be cortical and/or subcortical and this might be an important determinant for treatment options and prognosis. The aim of

  14. [Basic and advanced resuscitation of children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, T.L.; Jensen, Tim; Greisen, G.

    2008-01-01

    The ERC Guidelines 2005 regarding the resuscitation of children and neonates recommend changes in treatment algorithms. Cardiac arrest in children is most often caused or worsened by hypoxic conditions. On confirmation of cardiac arrest in a child, treatment is initiated with 5 ventilations and c...

  15. Resuscitation of the Newborn: AN IMPROVED NEONATAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This places a unique demand on a resuscitator which can be used safely at birth. It must be able to achieve such pressures without injuring the lungs; yet once the FRC has been established, it must be able to adapt itself to the differing ventilatory requirements, without altering the blood chemistry of the neonate. S. Afr. Med.

  16. Anaesthetists' knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation | Ogboli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) is an integral part of an anaesthetist's knowledge and practice. In Nigeria, these skills are taught mainly during medical school and postgraduate training. Objectives: The study sought to assess the knowledge of anaesthetists about CPR. Methodology: A structured ...

  17. [Basic and advanced resuscitation of children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, T.L.; Jensen, Tim; Greisen, G.

    2008-01-01

    The ERC Guidelines 2005 regarding the resuscitation of children and neonates recommend changes in treatment algorithms. Cardiac arrest in children is most often caused or worsened by hypoxic conditions. On confirmation of cardiac arrest in a child, treatment is initiated with 5 ventilations and c...... of basic life support, i.e. before a new attempt of defibrillation Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11/17...

  18. Simulation technology for resuscitation training: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, William C; Kennedy, Cassie C; Szostek, Jason H; Cook, David A

    2013-09-01

    To summarize current available data on simulation-based training in resuscitation for health care professionals. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ERIC, Web of Science, Scopus and reference lists of published reviews. Published studies of any language or date that enrolled health professions' learners to investigate the use of technology-enhanced simulation to teach resuscitation in comparison with no intervention or alternative training. Data were abstracted in duplicate. We identified themes examining different approaches to curriculum design. We pooled results using random effects meta-analysis. 182 studies were identified involving 16,636 participants. Overall, simulation-based training of resuscitation skills, in comparison to no intervention, appears effective regardless of assessed outcome, level of learner, study design, or specific task trained. In comparison to no intervention, simulation training improved outcomes of knowledge (Hedges' g) 1.05 (95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.29), process skill 1.13 (0.99-1.27), product skill 1.92 (1.26-2.60), time skill 1.77 (1.13-2.42) and patient outcomes 0.26 (0.047-0.48). In comparison with non-simulation intervention, learner satisfaction 0.79 (0.27-1.31) and process skill 0.35 (0.12-0.59) outcomes favored simulation. Studies investigating how to optimize simulation training found higher process skill outcomes in courses employing "booster" practice 0.13 (0.03-0.22), team/group dynamics 0.51 (0.06-0.97), distraction 1.76 (1.02-2.50) and integrated feedback 0.49 (0.17-0.80) compared to courses without these features. Most analyses reflected high between-study inconsistency (I(2) values >50%). Simulation-based training for resuscitation is highly effective. Design features of "booster" practice, team/group dynamics, distraction and integrated feedback improve effectiveness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Phase II trial of isotonic fluid resuscitation in Kenyan children with severe malnutrition and hypovolaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boga Mwanamvua

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with severe malnutrition who develop shock have a high mortality. Contrary to contemporaneous paediatric practice, current guidelines recommend use of low dose hypotonic fluid resuscitation (half-strength Darrows/5% dextrose (HSD/5D. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of this guideline compared to resuscitation with a standard isotonic solution. Methods A Phase II randomised controlled, safety and efficacy trial in Kenyan children aged over 6 months with severe malnutrition and shock including children with severe dehydration/shock and presumptive septic shock (non-diarrhoeal shock. Eligible children were randomised to HSD/5D or Ringer's Lactate (RL. A maximum of two boluses of 15 ml/kg of HSD/5D were given over two hours (as recommended by guidelines while those randomised to RL received 10 ml/kg aliquots half hourly (maximum 40 ml/kg. Primary endpoint was resolution of shock at 8 and 24 hours. Secondary outcomes included resolution of acidosis, adverse events and mortality. Results 61 children were enrolled: 41 had shock and severe dehydrating diarrhoea, 20 had presumptive septic shock; 69% had decompensated shock. By 8 hours response to volume resuscitation was poor with shock persisting in most children:-HSD/5D 15/22 (68% and RL14/25 (52%, p = 0.39. Oliguria was more prevalent at 8 hours in the HSD/5D group, 9/22 (41%, compared to RL-3/25 (12%, p = 0.02. Mortality was high, HSD/5D-15/26(58% and RL 13/29(45%; p = 0.42. Most deaths occurred within 48 hours of admission. Neither pulmonary oedema nor cardiogenic failure was detected. Conclusions Outcome was universally poor characterised by persistence of shock, oliguria and high case fatality. Isotonic fluid was associated with modest improvement in shock and survival when compared to HSD/5D but inconclusive due to the limitations of design and effectiveness of either resuscitation strategy. Although isotonic fluid resuscitation did not result in cardiogenic heart

  20. Impact of a novel, resource appropriate resuscitation curriculum on Nicaraguan resident physician's management of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Breena R; Orue, Aristides; Stapleton, Edward; Lovato, Luis; Vangala, Sitaram; Tinoco, Lucia Solorzano; Morales, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Project Strengthening Emergency Medicine, Investing in Learners in Latin America (SEMILLA) created a novel, language and resource appropriate course for the resuscitation of cardiac arrest for Nicaraguan resident physicians. We hypothesized that participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program would significantly improve the physician's management of simulated code scenarios. Thirteen Nicaraguan resident physicians were evaluated while managing simulated cardiac arrest scenarios before, immediately, and at 6 months after participating in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program. This project was completed in 2014 in Leon, Nicaragua. The Cardiac Arrest Simulation Test (CASTest), a validated scoring system, was used to evaluate performance on a standardized simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Mixed effect logistic regression models were constructed to assess outcomes. On the pre-course simulation exam, only 7.7% of subjects passed the test. Immediately post-course, the subjects achieved a 30.8% pass rate and at 6 months after the course, the pass rate was 46.2%. Compared with pre-test scores, the odds of passing the CASTest at 6 months after the course were 21.7 times higher (95% CI 4.2 to 112.8, PSEMILLA resuscitation course and retain these skills.

  1. Resuscitation speed affects brain injury in a large animal model of traumatic brain injury and shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Jin, Guang; Johansson, Pär I

    2014-01-01

    as lesion size (3285.44¿±¿130.81 mm3 vs. 2509.41¿±¿297.44 mm3, p¿=¿0.04). This was also associated with decreased cardiac output (NS: 4.37¿±¿0.12 l/min vs. 6.35¿±¿0.10 l/min, p¿brain compared......BackgroundOptimal fluid resuscitation strategy following combined traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) remain controversial and the effect of resuscitation infusion speed on outcome is not well known. We have previously reported that bolus infusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP......) protects the brain compared with bolus infusion of 0.9% normal saline (NS). We now hypothesize reducing resuscitation infusion speed through a stepwise infusion speed increment protocol using either FFP or NS would provide neuroprotection compared with a high speed resuscitation protocol.Methods23...

  2. Effects of Psychosocial Stress on Subsequent Hemorrhagic Shock and Resuscitation in Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langgartner, Dominik; Wachter, Ulrich; Hartmann, Clair; Gröger, Michael; Vogt, Josef; Merz, Tamara; McCook, Oscar; Fink, Marina; Kress, Sandra; Georgieff, Michael; Kunze, Julia F; Radermacher, Peter L; Reber, Stefan O; Wepler, Martin

    2018-06-08

    Hypoxemia and tissue ischemia during hemorrhage as well as formation of oxygen and nitrogen radicals during resuscitation promote hyperinflammation and, consequently, trigger severe multiple-organ-failure (MOF). Individuals diagnosed with stress-related disorders or reporting a life history of psychosocial stress are characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation and a reduced glucocorticoid (GC) signaling. We hypothesized that exposure to chronic psychosocial stress during adulthood prior to hemorrhagic shock increases oxidative/nitrosative stress and therefore the risk of developing MOF in mice. To induce chronic psychosocial stress linked to mild immune activation and reduced GC signaling in male mice, the chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC) paradigm was employed. Single-housed (SHC) mice were used as controls. Subsequently, CSC and SHC mice were exposed to hemorrhagic shock following resuscitation to investigate the effects of prior psychosocial stress load on survival, organ function, metabolism, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and inflammatory readouts. An increased adrenal weight in CSC mice indicates that the stress paradigm reliably worked. However, no effect of prior psychosocial stress on outcome after subsequent hemorrhage and resuscitation could be detected. Chronic psychosocial stress during adulthood is not sufficient to promote hemodynamic complications, organ dysfunction, metabolic disturbances and did not increase the risk of MOF after subsequent hemorrhage and resuscitation. Intravenous norepinephrine to keep target hemodynamics might have led to a certain level of oxidative stress in both groups and, therefore, disguised potential effects of chronic psychosocial stress on organ function after hemorrhagic shock in the present murine trauma model.

  3. Tri-District Arts Consortium Summer Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Charlotte O.

    1990-01-01

    The Tri-District Arts Consortium in South Carolina was formed to serve artistically gifted students in grades six-nine. The consortium developed a summer program offering music, dance, theatre, and visual arts instruction through a curriculum of intense training, performing, and hands-on experiences with faculty members and guest artists. (JDD)

  4. Increasing Sales by Developing Production Consortiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher A.; Russo, Robert

    Intended to help rehabilitation facility administrators increase organizational income from manufacturing and/or contracted service sources, this document provides a decision-making model for the development of a production consortium. The document consists of five chapters and two appendices. Chapter 1 defines the consortium concept, explains…

  5. Consortium for military LCD display procurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echols, Gregg

    2002-08-01

    International Display Consortium (IDC) is the joining together of display companies to combined their buying power and obtained favorable terms with a major LCD manufacturer. Consolidating the buying power and grouping the demand enables the rugged display industry of avionics, ground vehicles, and ship based display manufacturers to have unencumbered access to high performance AMLCDs while greatly reducing risk and lowering cost. With an unrestricted supply of AMLCD displays, the consortium members have total control of their risk, cost, deliveries and added value partners. Every display manufacturer desires a very close relationship with a display vender. With IDC each consortium member achieves a close relationship. Consortium members enjoy cost effective access to high performance, industry standard sized LCD panels, and modified commercial displays with 100 degree C clearing points and portrait configurations. Consortium members also enjoy proposal support, technical support and long-term support.

  6. Multicenter observational prehospital resuscitation on helicopter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, John B; Swartz, Michael D; DeSantis, Stacia M; Greene, Thomas J; Fox, Erin E; Stein, Deborah M; Bulger, Eileen M; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Goodman, Michael; Schreiber, Martin A; Zielinski, Martin D; O'Keeffe, Terence; Inaba, Kenji; Tomasek, Jeffrey S; Podbielski, Jeanette M; Appana, Savitri N; Yi, Misung; Wade, Charles E

    2017-07-01

    Earlier use of in-hospital plasma, platelets, and red blood cells (RBCs) has improved survival in trauma patients with severe hemorrhage. Retrospective studies have associated improved early survival with prehospital blood product transfusion (PHT). We hypothesized that PHT of plasma and/or RBCs would result in improved survival after injury in patients transported by helicopter. Adult trauma patients transported by helicopter from the scene to nine Level 1 trauma centers were prospectively observed from January to November 2015. Five helicopter systems had plasma and/or RBCs, whereas the other four helicopter systems used only crystalloid resuscitation. All patients meeting predetermined high-risk criteria were analyzed. Patients receiving PHT were compared with patients not receiving PHT. Our primary analysis compared mortality at 3 hours, 24 hours, and 30 days, using logistic regression to adjust for confounders and site heterogeneity to model patients who were matched on propensity scores. Twenty-five thousand one hundred eighteen trauma patients were admitted, 2,341 (9%) were transported by helicopter, of which 1,058 (45%) met the highest-risk criteria. Five hundred eighty-five of 1,058 patients were flown on helicopters carrying blood products. In the systems with blood available, prehospital median systolic blood pressure (125 vs 128) and Glasgow Coma Scale (7 vs 14) was significantly lower, whereas median Injury Severity Score was significantly higher (21 vs 14). Unadjusted mortality was significantly higher in the systems with blood products available, at 3 hours (8.4% vs 3.6%), 24 hours (12.6% vs 8.9%), and 30 days (19.3% vs 13.3%). Twenty-four percent of eligible patients received a PHT. A median of 1 unit of RBCs and plasma were transfused prehospital. Of patients receiving PHT, 24% received only plasma, 7% received only RBCs, and 69% received both. In the propensity score matching analysis (n = 109), PHT was not significantly associated with mortality

  7. Attitude of elderly patients towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chliara, Daphne; Chalkias, Athanasios; Horopanitis, Evaggelos E; Papadimitriou, Lila; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-10-01

    Although researchers in several countries have investigated patients' points of view regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there has been no research investigating this issue in Greece. The present study aimed at identifying the attitude of older Greek patients regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation. One basic questionnaire consisting of 34 questions was used in order to identify patients' opinions regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation in five different hospitals from June to November 2011. In total, 300 questionnaires were collected. Although patients' knowledge regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation was poor, most of them would like to be resuscitated in case they suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest. Also, they believe that they should have the right to accept or refuse treatment. However, the legal and sociocultural norms in Greece do not support patients' choice for the decision to refuse resuscitation. The influence of several factors, such as their general health status or the underlying pathology, could lead patients to give a "do not attempt resuscitation" order. The attitudes of older Greek patients regarding resuscitation are not different from others', whereas the legal and sociocultural norms in Greece do not support patient choice in end-of-life decisions, namely the decision to refuse resuscitation. We advocate the introduction of advanced directives, as well as the establishment and implementation of specific legislation regarding the ethics of resuscitation in Greece. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  8. Positive end-expiratory pressure improves survival in a rodent model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation using high-dose epinephrine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCaul, Conán

    2009-10-01

    Multiple interventions have been tested in models of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to optimize drug use, chest compressions, and ventilation. None has studied the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on outcome. We hypothesized that because PEEP can reverse pulmonary atelectasis, lower pulmonary vascular resistance, and potentially improve cardiac output, its use during CPR would increase survival.

  9. Successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation following cardiopulmonary arrest in a geriatric chinchilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Christina M; Peyton, Jamie L; Miller, Mona; Johnson, Eric G; Kovacic, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    To describe the successful application of CPR in a geriatric chinchilla employing basic and advanced life support measures during cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA). A 13-year-old female intact chinchilla presented to a general and multispecialty referral hospital for a dental procedure. During recovery from anesthesia the patient suffered CPA and CPR was initiated. Noninvasive positive pressure mask ventilation was initiated and external chest compressions were performed. An 18-Ga needle was introduced into the medullary cavity of the right humerus as an intraosseous catheter and provided access for administration of drugs and fluids. After return of spontaneous circulation was noted mannitol was administered via the intraosseous catheter to alleviate suspected increased intracranial pressure. Clinical improvement was noted shortly after administration. Monitoring during the recovery period showed a normal sinus cardiac rhythm and a SpO₂ of 100% while on supplemental oxygen. Neurologic function continued to improve over the following hours. Oxygen therapy was provided via an oxygen cage, and administration of antimicirobials, gastrointestinal protectants, and nutritional supplementation were part of the post resuscitation care. Oxygen therapy was discontinued after 24 hours, during which time normal behaviors were observed and neurologic status was considered appropriate. The patient was discharged 48 hours after CPA. Published reports from clinical practice on the outcomes of CPR for exotic small mammals are limited. This report details the successful outcome of the use of combined basic and advanced life support measures for the provision of CPR in a chinchilla. This report also highlights the utility of an intraosseous catheter for administration of drugs and fluids novel to this species during resuscitation and recovery. To the authors' knowledge this is the first published report of successful CPR following CPA in a geriatric chinchilla. © Veterinary Emergency

  10. Australasian Resuscitation In Sepsis Evaluation trial statistical analysis plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Anthony; Peake, Sandra L; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Cameron, Peter; Holdgate, Anna; Howe, Belinda; Higgins, Alisa; Presneill, Jeffrey; Webb, Steve

    2013-10-01

    The Australasian Resuscitation In Sepsis Evaluation (ARISE) study is an international, multicentre, randomised, controlled trial designed to evaluate the effectiveness of early goal-directed therapy compared with standard care for patients presenting to the ED with severe sepsis. In keeping with current practice, and taking into considerations aspects of trial design and reporting specific to non-pharmacologic interventions, this document outlines the principles and methods for analysing and reporting the trial results. The document is prepared prior to completion of recruitment into the ARISE study, without knowledge of the results of the interim analysis conducted by the data safety and monitoring committee and prior to completion of the two related international studies. The statistical analysis plan was designed by the ARISE chief investigators, and reviewed and approved by the ARISE steering committee. The data collected by the research team as specified in the study protocol, and detailed in the study case report form were reviewed. Information related to baseline characteristics, characteristics of delivery of the trial interventions, details of resuscitation and other related therapies, and other relevant data are described with appropriate comparisons between groups. The primary, secondary and tertiary outcomes for the study are defined, with description of the planned statistical analyses. A statistical analysis plan was developed, along with a trial profile, mock-up tables and figures. A plan for presenting baseline characteristics, microbiological and antibiotic therapy, details of the interventions, processes of care and concomitant therapies, along with adverse events are described. The primary, secondary and tertiary outcomes are described along with identification of subgroups to be analysed. A statistical analysis plan for the ARISE study has been developed, and is available in the public domain, prior to the completion of recruitment into the

  11. Real-Time Mobile Device-Assisted Chest Compression During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Satyam; Bucuti, Hakiza; Chitnis, Anurag; Klacman, Alex; Dantu, Ram

    2017-07-15

    Prompt administration of high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a key determinant of survival from cardiac arrest. Strategies to improve CPR quality at point of care could improve resuscitation outcomes. We tested whether a low cost and scalable mobile phone- or smart watch-based solution could provide accurate measures of compression depth and rate during simulated CPR. Fifty health care providers (58% intensive care unit nurses) performed simulated CPR on a calibrated training manikin (Resusci Anne, Laerdal) while wearing both devices. Subjects received real-time audiovisual feedback from each device sequentially. Primary outcome was accuracy of compression depth and rate compared with the calibrated training manikin. Secondary outcome was improvement in CPR quality as defined by meeting both guideline-recommend compression depth (5 to 6 cm) and rate (100 to 120/minute). Compared with the training manikin, typical error for compression depth was mobile device feedback (60% vs 50%; p = 0.3). Sessions that did not meet guideline recommendations failed primarily because of inadequate compression depth (46 ± 2 mm). In conclusion, a mobile device application-guided CPR can accurately track compression depth and rate during simulation in a practice environment in accordance with resuscitation guidelines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct peritoneal resuscitation improves obesity-induced hepatic dysfunction after trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Paul J; Franklin, Glen A; Hurt, Ryan T; Downard, Cynthia D; Smith, Jason W; Garrison, Richard N

    2012-04-01

    The metabolic syndrome and associated fatty liver disease are thought to contribute to poor outcomes in trauma patients. Experimentally, obesity compromises liver blood flow. We sought to correlate the effect of obesity, injury severity, and liver dysfunction with trauma outcomes. We hypothesized that obesity-related liver dysfunction could be mitigated with the novel technique of adjunctive direct peritoneal resuscitation (DPR). This study has clinical and experimental arms. The clinical study was a case-controlled retrospective analysis of ICU trauma patients (n = 72 obese, n = 187 nonobese). The experimental study was a hemorrhagic shock model in obese rats to assess the effect of DPR on liver blood flow, liver function, and inflammatory mediators. In trauma patients, univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated increasing mortality (p trauma outcomes regardless of injury severity. Obesity-related liver and renal dysfunction is aggravated by injury severity. In an obese rat model of resuscitated hemorrhagic shock, the addition of DPR abrogates trauma-induced liver, renal, and inflammatory responses. We conclude that the addition of DPR to the clinical resuscitation regimen will benefit the obese trauma patient. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Neonatal resuscitation: a knowledge gap amongst obstetrical trainees. A cross-sectional survey amongst medical graduates of Civil Hospital Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Tooba; Raza, Natasha; Haq, Gulfishan

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the neonatal resuscitation competence of obstetrical trainees to assess the gap in knowledge and to determine training needs. The cross-sectional study was conducted at the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Civil Hospital, Karachi, from January to March 2013 and comprised House Officers and Postgraduate trainees. A questionnaire was used to test the evaluation skills of different conditions and choice of appropriate action required during neonatal resuscitation. Data was collected and analysed through SPSS 17.0. Of the 102 obstetrical trainees, 44 (43.1%) were House Officers and 58 (56.9%) were Postgraduate trainees with an overall mean age 25.69 +/- 2.3 years. Only 19 (18.6%) subjects cleared the test; 8 (42.1%) of them were House Officers and 11 (57.9%) were Postgraduate trainees. The result did not show any significant difference between those who had previous training or those who had performed neonatal resuscitation and those who had no such exposure. Majority, 92 (90.2%) considered their knowledge inadequate and 99 (97%) favoured that updated neonatal resuscitation programmes should be periodically arranged. The study showed inadequate level of knowledge on neonatal resuscitation amongst obstetrical trainees. There is urgent need of formal training programmes which can make doctors skilful enough to face any adverse neonatal outcome professionally.

  14. The impact of post-resuscitation feedback for paramedics on the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleijenberg, Eduard; Koster, Rudolph W; de Vries, Hendrik; Beesems, Stefanie G

    2017-01-01

    The Guidelines place emphasis on high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This study aims to measure the impact of post-resuscitation feedback on the quality of CPR as performed by ambulance personnel. Two ambulances are dispatched for suspected cardiac arrest. The crew (driver and paramedic) of the first arriving ambulance is responsible for the quality of CPR. The crew of the second ambulance establishes an intravenous access and supports the first crew. All resuscitation attempts led by the ambulance crew of the study region were reviewed by two research paramedics and structured feedback was given based on defibrillator recording with impedance signal. A 12-months period before introduction of post-resuscitation feedback was compared with a 19-months period after introduction of feedback, excluding a six months run-in interval. Quality parameters were chest compression fraction (CCF), chest compression rate, longest peri-shock pause and longest non-shock pause. In the pre-feedback period 55 cases were analyzed and 69 cases in the feedback period. Median CCF improved significantly in the feedback period (79% vs 86%, presuscitation feedback improves the quality of resuscitation, significantly increasing CCF and decreasing the duration of longest non-shock pauses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation standards for clinical practice and training in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbott, David; Smith, Gary; Mitchell, Sarah; Colquhoun, Michael; Nolan, Jerry; Soar, Jasmeet; Pitcher, David; Perkins, Gavin; Phillips, Barbara; King, Ben; Spearpoint, Ken

    2005-07-01

    The Royal College of Anaesthetists, the Royal College of Physicians, the Intensive Care Society and the Resuscitation Council (UK) have published new resuscitation standards. The document provides advice to UK healthcare organisations, resuscitation committees and resuscitation officers on all aspects of the resuscitation service. It includes sections on resuscitation training, resuscitation equipment, the cardiac arrest team, cardiac arrest prevention, patient transfer, post-resuscitation care, audit and research. The document makes several recommendations. Healthcare institutions should have, or be represented on, a resuscitation committee that is responsible for all resuscitation issues. Every institution should have at least one resuscitation officer responsible for teaching and conducting training in resuscitation techniques. Staff with patient contact should be given regular resuscitation training appropriate to their expected abilities and roles. Clinical staff should receive regular training in the recognition of patients at risk of cardiopulmonary arrest and the measures required for the prevention of cardiopulmonary arrest. Healthcare institutions admitting acutely ill patients should have a resuscitation team, or its equivalent, available at all times. Clear guidelines should be available indicating how and when to call for the resuscitation team. Cardiopulmonary arrest should be managed according to current national guidelines. Resuscitation equipment should be available throughout the institution for clinical use and for training. The practice of resuscitation should be audited to maintain and improve standards of care. A do not attempt resuscitation (DNAR) policy should be compiled, communicated to relevant members of staff, used and audited regularly. Funding must be provided to support an effective resuscitation service.

  16. SEEA SOUTHEAST CONSORTIUM FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, Timothy [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Ball, Kia [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Fournier, Ashley [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance

    2014-01-21

    In 2010 the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) received a $20 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Building Neighborhood Program (BBNP). This grant, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also included sub-grantees in 13 communities across the Southeast, known as the Southeast Consortium. The objective of this project was to establish a framework for energy efficiency retrofit programs to create models for replication across the Southeast and beyond. To achieve this goal, SEEA and its project partners focused on establishing infrastructure to develop and sustain the energy efficiency market in specific localities across the southeast. Activities included implementing minimum training standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency through strategic marketing and outreach and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency through a variety of financing mechanisms. The anticipated outcome of these activities would be best practice models for program design, marketing, financing, data collection and evaluation as well as increased market demand for energy efficiency retrofits and products. The Southeast Consortium’s programmatic impacts along with the impacts of the other BBNP grantees would further the progress towards the overall goal of energy efficiency market transformation. As the primary grantee SEEA served as the overall program administrator and provided common resources to the 13 Southeast Consortium sub-grantees including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection, reporting and compliance. Sub-grantee programs were located in cities across eight states including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each sub

  17. Mitigating hyperventilation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolla, Dhimitri; Lewandowski, Tyler; Carlson, Jestin

    2016-03-01

    Although multiple airway management and ventilation strategies have been proposed during cardiac arrest, the ideal strategy is unknown. Current strategies call for advanced airways, such as endotracheal intubation and supraglottic airways. These may facilitate hyperventilation which is known to adversely affect cardiopulmonary physiology. We provide a summary of conceptual models linking hyperventilation to patient outcomes and identify methods for mitigating hyperventilation during cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    I ntroduction: Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons’ ATLS course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. D...

  19. Resuscitating the tracheostomy patient in the ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex

    2016-06-01

    Emergency physicians must be masters of the airway. The patient with tracheostomy can present with complications, and because of anatomy, airway and resuscitation measures can present several unique challenges. Understanding tracheostomy basics, features, and complications will assist in the emergency medicine management of these patients. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the basics and features of the tracheostomy, along with an approach to managing tracheostomy complications. This review provides background on the reasons for tracheostomy placement, basics of tracheostomy, and tracheostomy tube features. Emergency physicians will be faced with complications from these airway devices, including tracheostomy obstruction, decannulation or tube dislodgement, stenosis, tracheoinnominate fistula, and tracheoesophageal fistula. Critical patients should be evaluated in the resuscitation bay, and consultation with ENT should be completed while the patient is in the department. This review provides several algorithms for management of complications. Understanding these complications and an approach to airway management during cardiac arrest resuscitation is essential to optimizing patient care. Tracheostomy patients can present unique challenges for emergency physicians. Knowledge of the basics and features of tracheostomy tubes can assist physicians in managing life-threatening complications including tube obstruction, decannulation, bleeding, stenosis, and fistula. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: update, controversies and new advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre C. Zago

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary arrest is a medical emergency in which the lapse of time between event onset and the initiation of measures of basic and advanced support, as well as the correct care based on specific protocols for each clinical situation, constitute decisive factors for a successful therapy. Cardiopulmonary arrest care cannot be restricted to the hospital setting because of its fulminant nature. This necessitates the creation of new concepts, strategies and structures, such as the concept of life chain, cardio-pulmonary resuscitation courses for professionals who work in emergency medical services, the automated external defibrillator, the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, and mobile intensive care units, among others. New concepts, strategies and structures motivated by new advances have also modified the treatment and improved the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the hospital setting. Among them, we can cite the concept of cerebral resuscitation, the application of the life chain, the creation of the universal life support algorithm, the adjustment of drug doses, new techniques - measure of the end-tidal carbon dioxide levels and of the coronary perfusion pressure - and new drugs under research.

  1. Comparison of Quantitative Characteristics of Early Post-resuscitation EEG Between Asphyxial and Ventricular Fibrillation Cardiac Arrest in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bihua; Chen, Gang; Dai, Chenxi; Wang, Pei; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Yuanyuan; Li, Yongqin

    2018-04-01

    Quantitative electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis has shown promising results in studying brain injury and functional recovery after cardiac arrest (CA). However, whether the quantitative characteristics of EEG, as potential indicators of neurological prognosis, are influenced by CA causes is unknown. The purpose of this study was designed to compare the quantitative characteristics of early post-resuscitation EEG between asphyxial CA (ACA) and ventricular fibrillation CA (VFCA) in rats. Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rats of both sexes were randomized into either ACA or VFCA group. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated after 5-min untreated CA. Characteristics of early post-resuscitation EEG were compared, and the relationships between quantitative EEG features and neurological outcomes were investigated. Compared with VFCA, serum level of S100B, neurological deficit score and brain histopathologic damage score were dramatically higher in the ACA group. Quantitative measures of EEG, including onset time of EEG burst, time to normal trace, burst suppression ratio, and information quantity, were significantly lower for CA caused by asphyxia and correlated with the 96-h neurological outcome and survival. Characteristics of earlier post-resuscitation EEG differed between cardiac and respiratory causes. Quantitative measures of EEG not only predicted neurological outcome and survival, but also have the potential to stratify CA with different causes.

  2. Some Medicolegal Aspects of the Russian Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Kuksinsky

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to analyze the Russian legislation to identify the medicolegal aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which are most significant for an intensive care anesthesiologist. Statutory acts concerning human health care, including those pertinent to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and those providing for the responsibility of medical workers in some cases were analyzed. A number of discrepancies in various legal acts concerning human death verification and resuscitative measures were identified. The analysis has revealed the aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which are, from the point of view of legislation, most important for the physician.

  3. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. The bioleaching potential of a bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Mauricio; Cortés, María Paz; Travisany, Dante; Di Genova, Alex; Budinich, Marko; Reyes-Jara, Angélica; Hödar, Christian; González, Mauricio; Parada, Pilar; Bobadilla-Fazzini, Roberto A; Cambiazo, Verónica; Maass, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    This work presents the molecular foundation of a consortium of five efficient bacteria strains isolated from copper mines currently used in state of the art industrial-scale biotechnology. The strains Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans Licanantay, Acidiphilium multivorum Yenapatur, Leptospirillum ferriphilum Pañiwe, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Wenelen and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans Cutipay were selected for genome sequencing based on metal tolerance, oxidation activity and bioleaching of copper efficiency. An integrated model of metabolic pathways representing the bioleaching capability of this consortium was generated. Results revealed that greater efficiency in copper recovery may be explained by the higher functional potential of L. ferriphilum Pañiwe and At. thiooxidans Licanantay to oxidize iron and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds. The consortium had a greater capacity to resist copper, arsenic and chloride ion compared to previously described biomining strains. Specialization and particular components in these bacteria provided the consortium a greater ability to bioleach copper sulfide ores. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Update on the US Government's Biometric Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campbell, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    .... The goals of the consortium remain largely the same under this new leadership. The current emphasis is on the formal approval of our charter and on the establishment of a national biometric test and evaluation laboratory.

  6. NASA space radiation transport code development consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, L. W.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, NASA established a consortium involving the Univ. of Tennessee (lead institution), the Univ. of Houston, Roanoke College and various government and national laboratories, to accelerate the development of a standard set of radiation transport computer codes for NASA human exploration applications. This effort involves further improvements of the Monte Carlo codes HETC and FLUKA and the deterministic code HZETRN, including developing nuclear reaction databases necessary to extend the Monte Carlo codes to carry out heavy ion transport, and extending HZETRN to three dimensions. The improved codes will be validated by comparing predictions with measured laboratory transport data, provided by an experimental measurements consortium, and measurements in the upper atmosphere on the balloon-borne Deep Space Test Bed (DSTB). In this paper, we present an overview of the consortium members and the current status and future plans of consortium efforts to meet the research goals and objectives of this extensive undertaking. (authors)

  7. The LBNL/JSU/AGMUS Science Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses the 11 year of accomplishments of the science consortium of minority graduates from Jackson State University and Ana G. Mendez University at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  8. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A consortium designed to enhance collaboration among epidemiologists studying lymphoma, to provide a forum for the exchange of research ideas, and to create a framework for collaborating on analyses that pool data from multiple studies

  9. Neonatal resuscitation and immediate newborn assessment and stimulation for the prevention of neonatal deaths: a systematic review, meta-analysis and Delphi estimation of mortality effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Of 136 million babies born annually, around 10 million require assistance to breathe. Each year 814,000 neonatal deaths result from intrapartum-related events in term babies (previously “birth asphyxia”) and 1.03 million from complications of prematurity. No systematic assessment of mortality reduction from tactile stimulation or resuscitation has been published. Objective To estimate the mortality effect of immediate newborn assessment and stimulation, and basic resuscitation on neonatal deaths due to term intrapartum-related events or preterm birth, for facility and home births. Methods We conducted systematic reviews for studies reporting relevant mortality or morbidity outcomes. Evidence was assessed using GRADE criteria adapted to provide a systematic approach to mortality effect estimates for the Lives Saved Tool (LiST). Meta-analysis was performed if appropriate. For interventions with low quality evidence but strong recommendation for implementation, a Delphi panel was convened to estimate effect size. Results We identified 24 studies of neonatal resuscitation reporting mortality outcomes (20 observational, 2 quasi-experimental, 2 cluster randomized controlled trials), but none of immediate newborn assessment and stimulation alone. A meta-analysis of three facility-based studies examined the effect of resuscitation training on intrapartum-related neonatal deaths (RR= 0.70, 95%CI 0.59-0.84); this estimate was used for the effect of facility-based basic neonatal resuscitation (additional to stimulation). The evidence for preterm mortality effect was low quality and thus expert opinion was sought. In community-based studies, resuscitation training was part of packages with multiple concurrent interventions, and/or studies did not distinguish term intrapartum-related from preterm deaths, hence no meta-analysis was conducted. Our Delphi panel of 18 experts estimated that immediate newborn assessment and stimulation would reduce both intrapartum

  10. Structured Communication: Teaching Delivery of Difficult News with Simulated Resuscitations in an Emergency Medicine Clerkship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamba, Sangeeta; Nagurka, Roxanne; Offin, Michael; Scott, Sandra R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The objective is to describe the implementation and outcomes of a structured communication module used to supplement case-based simulated resuscitation training in an emergency medicine (EM) clerkship. Methods We supplemented two case-based simulated resuscitation scenarios (cardiac arrest and blunt trauma) with role-play in order to teach medical students how to deliver news of death and poor prognosis to family of the critically ill or injured simulated patient. Quantitative outcomes were assessed with pre and post-clerkship surveys. Secondarily, students completed a written self-reflection (things that went well and why; things that did not go well and why) to further explore learner experiences with communication around resuscitation. Qualitative analysis identified themes from written self-reflections. Results A total of 120 medical students completed the pre and post-clerkship surveys. Majority of respondents reported that they had witnessed or role-played the delivery of difficult news, but only few had real-life experience of delivering news of death (20/120, 17%) and poor prognosis (34/120, 29%). This communication module led to statistically significant increased scores for comfort, confidence, and knowledge with communicating difficult news of death and poor prognosis. Pre-post scores increased for those agreeing with statements (somewhat/very much) for delivery of news of poor prognosis: comfort 69% to 81%, confidence 66% to 81% and knowledge 76% to 90% as well as for statements regarding delivery of news of death: comfort 52% to 68%, confidence 57% to 76% and knowledge 76% to 90%. Respondents report that patient resuscitations (simulated and/or real) generated a variety of strong emotional responses such as anxiety, stress, grief and feelings of loss and failure. Conclusion A structured communication module supplements simulated resuscitation training in an EM clerkship and leads to a self-reported increase in knowledge, comfort, and

  11. Personalised fluid resuscitation in the ICU: still a fluid concept?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haren, Frank

    2017-12-28

    The administration of intravenous fluid to critically ill patients is one of the most common, but also one of the most fiercely debated, interventions in intensive care medicine. Even though many thousands of patients have been enrolled in large trials of alternative fluid strategies, consensus remains elusive and practice is widely variable. Critically ill patients are significantly heterogeneous, making a one size fits all approach unlikely to be successful.New data from basic, animal, and clinical research suggest that fluid resuscitation could be associated with significant harm. There are several important limitations and concerns regarding fluid bolus therapy as it is currently being used in clinical practice. These include, but are not limited to: the lack of an agreed definition; limited and short-lived physiological effects; no evidence of an effect on relevant patient outcomes; and the potential to contribute to fluid overload, specifically when fluid responsiveness is not assessed and when targets and safety limits are not used.Fluid administration in critically ill patients requires clinicians to integrate abnormal physiological parameters into a clinical decision-making model that also incorporates the likely diagnosis and the likely risk or benefit in the specific patient's context. Personalised fluid resuscitation requires careful attention to the mnemonic CIT TAIT: context, indication, targets, timing, amount of fluid, infusion strategy, and type of fluid.The research agenda should focus on experimental and clinical studies to: improve our understanding of the physiological effects of fluid infusion, e.g. on the glycocalyx; evaluate new types of fluids; evaluate novel fluid minimisation protocols; study the effects of a no-fluid strategy for selected patients and scenarios; and compare fluid therapy with other interventions. The adaptive platform trial design may provide us with the tools to evaluate these types of interventions in the intrinsically

  12. Basic cardiopulmonary life support (BCLS for cardiopulmonary resuscitation by trained paramedics and medics outside the hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiopulmonary resuscitation guideline of Basic Cardiopulmonary Life Support (BCLS for management of adult victims with cardiopulmonary arrest outside the hospital provides an algorithmic stepwise approach for optimal outcome of the victims by trained medics and paramedics. This guideline has been developed considering the need to have a universally acceptable practice guideline for India and keeping in mind the infrastructural limitations of some areas of the country. This guideline is based on evidence elicited in the international and national literature. In the absence of data from Indian population, the excerpts have been taken from international data, discussed with Indian experts and thereafter modified to make them practically applicable across India. The optimal outcome for a victim with cardiopulmonary arrest would depend on core links of early recognition and activation; early high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, early defibrillation and early transfer to medical facility. These links are elaborated in a stepwise manner in the BCLS algorithm. The BCLS also emphasise on quality check for various steps of resuscitation.

  13. Implementation of near-infrared spectroscopy in a rat model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Juan G.; Xiao, Feng; Ferrara, Davon; Ewing, Jennifer; Zhang, Shu; Alexander, Steven; Battarbee, Harold

    2002-07-01

    Transient global cerebral ischemia accompanying cardiac arrest (CA) often leads to permanent brain damage with poor neurological outcome. The precise chain of events underlying the cerebral damage after CA is still not fully understood. Progress in this area may profit from the development of new non-invasive tools that provide real-time information on the vascular and cellular processes preceding the damage. One way to assess these processes is through near-IR spectroscopy, which has demonstrated the ability to quantify changes in blood volume, hemoglobin oxygenation, cytochrome oxidase redox state, and tissue water content. Here we report on the successful implementation of this form of spectroscopy in a rat model of asphyxial CA and resuscitation, under hypothermic and normothermic conditions. Preliminary results are shown that provide a new temporal insight into the cerebral circulation during CA and post-resuscitation.

  14. Clinical audit on documentation of anticipatory "Not for Resuscitation" orders in a tertiary australian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Sulakshan Salins

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this clinical audit was to determine how accurately documentation of anticipatory Not for Resuscitation (NFR orders takes place in a major metropolitan teaching hospital of Australia. Materials and Methods: Retrospective hospital-based study. Independent case reviewers using a questionnaire designed to study NFR documentation reviewed documentation of NFR in 88 case records. Results: Prognosis was documented in only 40% of cases and palliative care was offered to two-third of patients with documented NFR. There was no documentation of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR process or outcomes of CPR in most of the cases. Only in less than 50% of cases studied there was documented evidence to suggest that the reason for NFR documentation was consistent with patient′s choices. Conclusion: Good discussion, unambiguous documentation and clinical supervision of NFR order ensure dignified and quality care to the dying.

  15. Resuscitation by hyperbaric exposure from a venous gas emboli following laparoscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Hansen, Egon G; Holler, Nana G

    2012-01-01

    Venous gas embolism is common after laparoscopic surgery but is only rarely of clinical relevance. We present a 52 year old woman undergoing laparoscopic treatment for liver cysts, who also underwent cholecystectomy. She was successfully extubated. However, after a few minutes she developed cardiac......, could have contributed to the formation of the intravascular gas emboli. We conclude that persistent resuscitation followed by hyperbaric oxygen treatment after venous gas emboli contributed to the elimination of intravascular bubbles and the favourable outcome for the patient....... arrest due to a venous carbon dioxide (CO2) embolism as identified by transthoracic echocardiography and aspiration of approximately 7 ml of gas from a central venous catheter. She was resuscitated and subsequently treated with hyperbaric oxygen to reduce the size of remaining gas bubbles. Subsequently...

  16. Optimal Chest Compression Rate and Compression to Ventilation Ratio in Delivery Room Resuscitation: Evidence from Newborn Piglets and Neonatal Manikins

    OpenAIRE

    Solev?g, Anne Lee; Schm?lzer, Georg M.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) duration until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) influences survival and neurologic outcomes after delivery room (DR) CPR. High quality chest compressions (CC) improve cerebral and myocardial perfusion. Improved myocardial perfusion increases the likelihood of a faster ROSC. Thus, optimizing CC quality may improve outcomes both by preserving cerebral blood flow during CPR and by reducing the recovery time. CC quality is determined by rate, CC to vent...

  17. Comparison of clinical outcomes and prognostic utility of risk stratification tools in patients with therapy-related vs de novo myelodysplastic syndromes: a report on behalf of the MDS Clinical Research Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, A M; Al Ali, N; Barnard, J; Padron, E; Lancet, J E; Sekeres, M A; Steensma, D P; DeZern, A; Roboz, G; Jabbour, E; Garcia-Manero, G; List, A; Komrokji, R

    2017-06-01

    While therapy-related (t)-myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have worse outcomes than de novo MDS (d-MDS), some t-MDS patients have an indolent course. Most MDS prognostic models excluded t-MDS patients during development. The performances of the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), revised IPSS (IPSS-R), MD Anderson Global Prognostic System (MPSS), WHO Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) and t-MDS Prognostic System (TPSS) were compared among patients with t-MDS. Akaike information criteria (AIC) assessed the relative goodness of fit of the models. We identified 370 t-MDS patients (19%) among 1950 MDS patients. Prior therapy included chemotherapy alone (48%), chemoradiation (31%), and radiation alone in 21%. Median survival for t-MDS patients was significantly shorter than for d-MDS (19 vs 46 months, PMDS (PMDS had a significantly higher hazard of death relative to d-MDS in every risk model, and had inferior survival compared to patients with d-MDS within all risk group categories. AIC Scores (lower is better) were 2316 (MPSS), 2343 (TPSS), 2343 (IPSS-R), 2361 (WPSS) and 2364 (IPSS). In conclusion, subsets of t-MDS patients with varying clinical outcomes can be identified using conventional risk stratification models. The MPSS, TPSS and IPSS-R provide the best predictive power.

  18. Albumin in Burn Shock Resuscitation: A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navickis, Roberta J; Greenhalgh, David G; Wilkes, Mahlon M

    2016-01-01

    Critical appraisal of outcomes after burn shock resuscitation with albumin has previously been restricted to small relatively old randomized trials, some with high risk of bias. Extensive recent data from nonrandomized studies assessing the use of albumin can potentially reduce bias and add precision. The objective of this meta-analysis was to determine the effect of burn shock resuscitation with albumin on mortality and morbidity in adult patients. Randomized and nonrandomized controlled clinical studies evaluating mortality and morbidity in adult patients receiving albumin for burn shock resuscitation were identified by multiple methods, including computer database searches and examination of journal contents and reference lists. Extracted data were quantitatively combined by random-effects meta-analysis. Four randomized and four nonrandomized studies with 688 total adult patients were included. Treatment effects did not differ significantly between the included randomized and nonrandomized studies. Albumin infusion during the first 24 hours showed no significant overall effect on mortality. However, significant statistical heterogeneity was present, which could be abolished by excluding two studies at high risk of bias. After those exclusions, albumin infusion was associated with reduced mortality. The pooled odds ratio was 0.34 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.19 to 0.58 (P Albumin administration was also accompanied by decreased occurrence of compartment syndrome (pooled odds ratio, 0.19; 95% confidence interval, 0.07-0.50; P albumin can improve outcomes of burn shock resuscitation. However, the scope and quality of current evidence are limited, and additional trials are needed.

  19. Exhaled CO2 Parameters as a Tool to Assess Ventilation-Perfusion Mismatching during Neonatal Resuscitation in a Swine Model of Neonatal Asphyxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Elliott Shang-shun; Cheung, Po-Yin; O'Reilly, Megan; LaBossiere, Joseph; Lee, Tze-Fun; Cowan, Shaun; Bigam, David L.; Schmölzer, Georg Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Background End-tidal CO2 (ETCO2), partial pressure of exhaled CO2 (PECO2), and volume of expired CO2 (VCO2) can be continuously monitored non-invasively to reflect pulmonary ventilation and perfusion status. Although ETCO2 ≥14mmHg has been shown to be associated with return of an adequate heart rate in neonatal resuscitation and quantifying the PECO2 has the potential to serve as an indicator of resuscitation quality, there is little information regarding capnometric measurement of PECO2 and ETCO2 in detecting return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survivability in asphyxiated neonates receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Methods Seventeen newborn piglets were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented, and exposed to 45-minute normocapnic hypoxia followed by apnea to induce asphyxia. Protocolized resuscitation was initiated when heart rate decreased to 25% of baseline. Respiratory and hemodynamic parameters including ETCO2, PECO2, VCO2, heart rate, cardiac output, and carotid artery flow were continuously measured and analyzed. Results There were no differences in respiratory and hemodynamic parameters between surviving and non-surviving piglets prior to CPR. Surviving piglets had significantly higher ETCO2, PECO2, VCO2, cardiac index, and carotid artery flow values during CPR compared to non-surviving piglets. Conclusion Surviving piglets had significantly better respiratory and hemodynamic parameters during resuscitation compared to non-surviving piglets. In addition to optimizing resuscitation efforts, capnometry can assist by predicting outcomes of newborns requiring chest compressions. PMID:26766424

  20. Exhaled CO2 Parameters as a Tool to Assess Ventilation-Perfusion Mismatching during Neonatal Resuscitation in a Swine Model of Neonatal Asphyxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Shang-shun Li

    Full Text Available End-tidal CO2 (ETCO2, partial pressure of exhaled CO2 (PECO2, and volume of expired CO2 (VCO2 can be continuously monitored non-invasively to reflect pulmonary ventilation and perfusion status. Although ETCO2 ≥14 mmHg has been shown to be associated with return of an adequate heart rate in neonatal resuscitation and quantifying the PECO2 has the potential to serve as an indicator of resuscitation quality, there is little information regarding capnometric measurement of PECO2 and ETCO2 in detecting return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC and survivability in asphyxiated neonates receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR.Seventeen newborn piglets were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented, and exposed to 45-minute normocapnic hypoxia followed by apnea to induce asphyxia. Protocolized resuscitation was initiated when heart rate decreased to 25% of baseline. Respiratory and hemodynamic parameters including ETCO2, PECO2, VCO2, heart rate, cardiac output, and carotid artery flow were continuously measured and analyzed.There were no differences in respiratory and hemodynamic parameters between surviving and non-surviving piglets prior to CPR. Surviving piglets had significantly higher ETCO2, PECO2, VCO2, cardiac index, and carotid artery flow values during CPR compared to non-surviving piglets.Surviving piglets had significantly better respiratory and hemodynamic parameters during resuscitation compared to non-surviving piglets. In addition to optimizing resuscitation efforts, capnometry can assist by predicting outcomes of newborns requiring chest compressions.

  1. The Success Rate of Pediatric In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Ahvaz Training Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shideh Assar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Objective. This study determined the outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR after in-hospital cardiac arrest and factors influencing it in two training hospitals in Ahvaz. Method. Patients hospitalized in the pediatric wards and exposed to CPR during hospital stay were included in the study (September 2013 to May 2014. The primary outcome of CPR was assumed to be the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC and the secondary outcome was assumed to be survival to discharge. The neurological outcome of survivors was assessed using the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category (PCPC method. Results. Of the 279 study participants, 138 patients (49.4% showed ROSC, 81 patients (29% survived for 24 hours after the CPR, and 33 patients (11.8% survived to discharge. Of the surviving patients, 16 (48.5% had favorable neurological outcome. The resuscitation during holidays resulted in fewer ROSC. Multivariate analysis showed that longer CPR duration, CPR by junior residents, growth deficiency, and prearrest vasoactive drug infusion were associated with decreased survival to discharge (p<0.05. Infants and patients with respiratory disease had higher survival rates. Conclusion. The rate of successful CPR in our study was lower than rates reported by developed countries. However, factors influencing the outcome of CPR were similar. These results reflect the necessity of paying more attention to pediatric CPR training, postresuscitation conditions, and expansion of intensive care facilities.

  2. Post resuscitation management of cardiac arrest patients in the critical care environment: A retrospective audit of compliance with evidence based guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milonas, Annabel; Hutchinson, Ana; Charlesworth, David; Doric, Andrea; Green, John; Considine, Julie

    2017-11-01

    There is a clear relationship between evidence-based post resuscitation care and survival and functional status at hospital discharge. The Australian Resuscitation Council (ARC) recommends protocol driven care to enhance chance of survival following cardiac arrest. Healthcare providers have an obligation to ensure protocol driven post resuscitation care is timely and evidence based. The aim of this study was to examine adherence to best practice guidelines for post resuscitation care in the first 24h from Return of Spontaneous Circulation for patients admitted to the intensive care unit from the emergency department having suffered out of hospital or emergency department cardiac arrest and survived initial resuscitation. A retrospective audit of medical records of patients who met the criteria for survivors of cardiac arrest was conducted at two health services in Melbourne, Australia. Criteria audited were: primary cardiac arrest characteristics, oxygenation and ventilation management, cardiovascular care, neurological care and patient outcomes. The four major findings were: (i) use of fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO 2 ) of 1.0 and hyperoxia was common during the first 24h of post resuscitation management, (ii) there was variability in cardiac care, with timely 12 lead Electrocardiograph and majority of patients achieving systolic blood pressure (SBP) greater than 100mmHg, but delays in transfer to cardiac catheterisation laboratory, (iii) neurological care was suboptimal with a high incidence of hyperglycaemia and failure to provide therapeutic hypothermia in almost 50% of patients and (iv) there was an association between in-hospital mortality and specific elements of post resuscitation care during the first 24h of hospital admission. Evidence-based context-specific guidelines for post resuscitation care that span the whole patient journey are needed. Reliance on national guidelines does not necessarily translate to evidence based care at a local level, so

  3. The National Resuscitation Council, Singapore, and 34 years of resuscitation training: 1983 to 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, Venkataraman

    2017-07-01

    Training in the modern form of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) started in Singapore in 1983. For the first 15 years, the expansion of training programmes was mainly owing to the interest of a few individuals. Public training in the skill was minimal. In an area of medical care where the greatest opportunity for benefit lies in employing core resuscitation skills in the prehospital environment, very little was being done to address such a need. In 1998, a group of physicians, working together with the Ministry of Health, set up the National Resuscitation Council (NRC). Over the years, the NRC has created national guidelines on resuscitation and reviewed them at five-yearly intervals. Provider training manuals are now available for most programmes. The NRC has set up an active accreditation system for monitoring and maintaining standards of life support training. This has led to a large increase in the number of training centres, as well as recognition and adoption of the council's guidelines in the country. The NRC has also actively promoted the use of bystander CPR through community-based programmes, resulting in a rise in the number of certified providers. Improving the chain of survival, through active community-based training programmes, will likely lead to more lives being saved from sudden cardiac arrest. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  4. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation versus conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Morimura, Naoto; Nagao, Ken; Asai, Yasufumi; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Nara, Satoshi; Hase, Mamoru; Tahara, Yoshio; Atsumi, Takahiro

    2014-06-01

    A favorable neurological outcome is likely to be achieved in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients with ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT) on the initial electrocardiogram (ECG). However, in patients without pre-hospital restoration of spontaneous circulation despite the initial VF/VT, the outcome is extremely low by conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Extracorporeal CPR (ECPR) may enhance cerebral blood flow and recovery of neurological function. We prospectively examined how ECPR for OHCA with VF/VT would affect neurological outcomes. The design of this trial was a prospective, observational study. We compared differences of outcome at 1 and 6 months after OHCA between ECPR group (26 hospitals) and non-ECPR group (20 hospitals). Primary endpoints were the rate of favorable outcomes defined by the Glasgow-Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance and Overall Performance Categories (CPC) 1 or 2 at 1 and 6 months after OHCA. Based on intention-to-treat analysis, CPC 1 or 2 were 12.3% (32/260) in the ECPR group and 1.5% (3/194) in the non-ECPR group at 1 month (P<0.0001), and 11.2% (29/260) and 2.6% (5/194) at 6 months (P=0.001), respectively. By per protocol analysis, CPC 1 or 2 were 13.7% (32/234) in the ECPR group and 1.9% (3/159) in the non-ECPR group at 1 month (P<0.0001), and 12.4% (29/234) and 3.1% (5/159) at 6 months (P=0.002), respectively. In OHCA patients with VF/VT on the initial ECG, a treatment bundle including ECPR, therapeutic hypothermia and IABP was associated with improved neurological outcome at 1 and 6 months after OHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Trauma hemostasis and oxygenation research position paper on remote damage control resuscitation: definitions, current practice, and knowledge gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Donald H; Rappold, Joseph F; Badloe, John F; Berséus, Olle; Blackbourne, Lorne; Brohi, Karim H; Butler, Frank K; Cap, Andrew P; Cohen, Mitchell Jay; Davenport, Ross; DePasquale, Marc; Doughty, Heidi; Glassberg, Elon; Hervig, Tor; Hooper, Timothy J; Kozar, Rosemary; Maegele, Marc; Moore, Ernest E; Murdock, Alan; Ness, Paul M; Pati, Shibani; Rasmussen, Todd; Sailliol, Anne; Schreiber, Martin A; Sunde, Geir Arne; van de Watering, Leo M G; Ward, Kevin R; Weiskopf, Richard B; White, Nathan J; Strandenes, Geir; Spinella, Philip C

    2014-05-01

    The Trauma Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research Network held its third annual Remote Damage Control Resuscitation Symposium in June 2013 in Bergen, Norway. The Trauma Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research Network is a multidisciplinary group of investigators with a common interest in improving outcomes and safety in patients with severe traumatic injury. The network's mission is to reduce the risk of morbidity and mortality from traumatic hemorrhagic shock, in the prehospital phase of resuscitation through research, education, and training. The concept of remote damage control resuscitation is in its infancy, and there is a significant amount of work that needs to be done to improve outcomes for patients with life-threatening bleeding secondary to injury. The prehospital phase of resuscitation is critical in these patients. If shock and coagulopathy can be rapidly identified and minimized before hospital admission, this will very likely reduce morbidity and mortality. This position statement begins to standardize the terms used, provides an acceptable range of therapeutic options, and identifies the major knowledge gaps in the field.

  6. Resuscitation of newborn piglets. short-term influence of FiO2 on matrix metalloproteinases, caspase-3 and BDNF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rønnaug Solberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia is a major cause of mortality and cerebral morbidity, and using oxygen during newborn resuscitation may further harm the brain. The aim was to examine how supplementary oxygen used for newborn resuscitation would influence early brain tissue injury, cell death and repair processes and the regulation of genes related to apoptosis, neurodegeneration and neuroprotection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Anesthetized newborn piglets were subjected to global hypoxia and then randomly assigned to resuscitation with 21%, 40% or 100% O(2 for 30 min and followed for 9 h. An additional group received 100% O(2 for 30 min without preceding hypoxia. The left hemisphere was used for histopathology and immunohistochemistry and the right hemisphere was used for in situ zymography in the corpus striatum; gene expression and the activity of various relevant biofactors were measured in the frontal cortex. There was an increase in the net matrix metalloproteinase gelatinolytic activity in the corpus striatum from piglets resuscitated with 100% oxygen vs. 21%. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE staining revealed no significant changes. Nine hours after oxygen-assisted resuscitation, caspase-3 expression and activity was increased by 30-40% in the 100% O(2 group (n = 9/10 vs. the 21% O(2 group (n = 10; p<0.04, whereas brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF activity was decreased by 65% p<0.03. CONCLUSIONS: The use of 100% oxygen for resuscitation resulted in increased potentially harmful proteolytic activities and attenuated BDNF activity when compared with 21%. Although there were no significant changes in short term cell loss, hyperoxia seems to cause an early imbalance between neuroprotective and neurotoxic mechanisms that might compromise the final pathological outcome.

  7. Knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of clinicians at a South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... patients and recognising cardiac arrest, to assess clinicians' ... programmes that are accessible, innovative and inexpensive. .... well as, and sometimes better than, traditional CPR.16 In ... resuscitation training programme resulted in a noticeable ... 31 physicians in Canada whose resuscitation skills were.

  8. Rapid Resuscitation with Small Volume Hypertonic Saline Solution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rapid Resuscitation with Small Volume Hypertonic Saline Solution for Patients in Traumatic Haemorrhagic Shock. ... The data were entered into a computer data base and analysed. Results: Forty five patients were enrolled and resuscitated with 250 mls 7.5% HSS. Among the studied patients, 88.9% recovered from shock ...

  9. Endothelial Dysfunction in Resuscitated Cardiac Arrest (ENDO-RCA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anna Sina P; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Kjærgaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Morbidity and mortality following initial survival of cardiac arrest remain high despite great efforts to improve resuscitation techniques and post-resuscitation care, in part due to the ischemia-reperfusion injury secondary to the restoration of the blood circulation. Patients resusc...

  10. Successful Resuscitation of a three month old Child with Intralipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthetic agents used locally can be toxic especially if given as an inappropriate dose or route. Lipid infusion has been demonstrated in several animal models to successfully resuscitate bupivacaine induced toxicity. We present a case of successful use of 26% lipid infusion to resuscitate a paediatric patient with a ...

  11. Protocol compliance and time management in blunt trauma resuscitation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjersberg, W.R.; Bergs, E.A.; Mushkudiani, N.; Klimek, M.; Schipper, I.B.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study advanced trauma life support (ATLS) protocol adherence prospectively in trauma resuscitation and to analyse time management of daily multidisciplinary trauma resuscitation at a level 1 trauma centre, for both moderately and severely injured patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All

  12. The art of providing resuscitation in Greek mythology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siempos, Ilias I; Ntaidou, Theodora K; Samonis, George

    2014-12-01

    We reviewed Greek mythology to accumulate tales of resuscitation and we explored whether these tales could be viewed as indirect evidence that ancient Greeks considered resuscitation strategies similar to those currently used. Three compendia of Greek mythology: The Routledge Handbook of Greek Mythology, The Greek Myths by Robert Graves, and Greek Mythology by Ioannis Kakridis were used to find potentially relevant narratives. Thirteen myths that may suggest resuscitation (including 1 case of autoresuscitation) were identified. Methods to attempt mythological resuscitation included use of hands (which may correlate with basic life support procedures), a kiss on the mouth (similar to mouth-to-mouth resuscitation), application of burning torches (which might recall contemporary use of external defibrillators), and administration of drugs (a possible analogy to advanced life support procedures). A careful assessment of relevant myths demonstrated that interpretations other than medical might be more credible. Although several narratives of Greek mythology might suggest modern resuscitation techniques, they do not clearly indicate that ancient Greeks presaged scientific methods of resuscitation. Nevertheless, these elegant tales reflect humankind's optimism that a dying human might be restored to life if the appropriate procedures were implemented. Without this optimism, scientific improvement in the field of resuscitation might not have been achieved.

  13. [Real-time feedback systems for improvement of resuscitation quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, R P; Van Aken, H; Engel, P; Bohn, A

    2011-07-01

    The quality of chest compression is a determinant of survival after cardiac arrest. Therefore, the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) 2010 guidelines on resuscitation strongly focus on compression quality. Despite its impact on survival, observational studies have shown that chest compression quality is not reached by professional rescue teams. Real-time feedback devices for resuscitation are able to measure chest compression during an ongoing resuscitation attempt through a sternal sensor equipped with a motion and pressure detection system. In addition to the electrocardiograph (ECG) ventilation can be detected by transthoracic impedance monitoring. In cases of quality deviation, such as shallow chest compression depth or hyperventilation, feedback systems produce visual or acoustic alarms. Rescuers can thereby be supported and guided to the requested quality in chest compression and ventilation. Feedback technology is currently available both as a so-called stand-alone device and as an integrated feature in a monitor/defibrillator unit. Multiple studies have demonstrated sustainable enhancement in the education of resuscitation due to the use of real-time feedback technology. There is evidence that real-time feedback for resuscitation combined with training and debriefing strategies can improve both resuscitation quality and patient survival. Chest compression quality is an independent predictor for survival in resuscitation and should therefore be measured and documented in further clinical multicenter trials.

  14. Decision to resuscitate or not in patients with chronic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saltbæk, Lena; Tvedegaard, Erling

    2012-01-01

    Do-not-resuscitate (DNR) decisions are frequently made without informing the patients. We attempt to determine whether patients and physicians wish to discuss the DNR decision, who they think, should be the final decision maker and whether they agree on the indication for cardiopulmonary...... resuscitation (CPR) in case of cardiac arrest....

  15. Neonatal Resuscitation: Knowledge And Practice Of Nurses In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Appropriate resuscitation techniques are crucial to the survival of newborn infants. Objective. To assess knowledge of nurses in western Nigeria about neonatal resuscitation. Method. A cross-sectional survey of the nurses attached to secondary health facilities in western Nigeria was done using a ...

  16. Persisting effect of community approaches to resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Anne Møller; Isbye, Dan Lou; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2014-11-01

    On the Danish island of Bornholm an intervention was carried out during 2008-2010 aiming at increasing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival. The intervention included mass media focus on resuscitation and widespread educational activities. The aim of this study was to compare the bystander BLS rate and survival after OHCA on Bornholm in a 3-year follow-up period after the intervention took place. Data on OHCA on Bornholm were collected from September 28th, 2010 to September 27th, 2013 and compared to data from the intervention period, September 28th, 2008 to September 27th, 2010. The bystander BLS rate for non-EMS witnessed OHCAs with presumed cardiac aetiology was significantly higher in the follow-up period (70% [95% CI 61-77] vs. 47% [95% CI 37-57], p=0.001). AEDs were deployed in 22 (18%) cases in the follow-up period and a shock was provided in 13 cases. There was no significant change in all-rhythm 30-day survival for non-EMS witnessed OHCAs with presumed cardiac aetiology (6.7% [95% CI 3-13] in the follow-up period; vs. 4.6% [95% CI 1-12], p=0.76). In a 3-year follow-up period after an intervention engaging laypersons in resuscitation through mass education in BLS combined with a media focus on resuscitation, we observed a persistent significant increase in the bystander BLS rate for all OHCAs with presumed cardiac aetiology. There was no significant difference in 30-day survival. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Bystander initiated actions in out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: results from the Amsterdam Resuscitation Study (ARRESUST)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalewijn, R. A.; Tijssen, J. G.; Koster, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the functioning of the first two links of the chain of survival: 'access' and 'basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)'. In a prospective study, all bystander witnessed circulatory arrests resuscitated by emergency medical service (EMS) personnel, were

  18. Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Among Patients with Structurally Normal Hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Stephanie J; Bridges, Brian C; Kalra, Yuvraj; Pietsch, John B; Smith, Andrew H

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) has been well described as a rescue therapy in refractory cardiac arrest among patients with congenital heart disease. The purpose of this retrospective analysis of data from the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization was to evaluate outcomes of eCPR in patients with structurally normal hearts and to identify risk factors that may contribute to mortality. During the study period, 1,431 patients met inclusion criteria. Median age was 16 years. Overall survival to hospital discharge was 32%. Conditional logistic regression demonstrated an independent survival benefit among smaller patients, patients with a lower partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) on cannulation, and those with a shorter duration from intubation to eCPR cannulation. A diagnosis of sepsis was independently associated with a nearly threefold increase in odds of mortality, whereas the diagnosis of myocarditis portended a more favorable outcome. Neurologic complications, pulmonary hemorrhage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, CPR, pH less than 7.20, and hyperbilirubinemia after eCPR cannulation were independently associated with an increase in odds of mortality. When utilizing eCPR in patients with structurally normal hearts, a diagnosis of sepsis is independently associated with mortality, whereas a diagnosis of myocarditis is protective. Neurologic complications and pulmonary hemorrhage while on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) are independently associated with mortality.

  19. Regional Cerebral Oximetry During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Useful or Useless?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genbrugge, Cornelia; Dens, Jo; Meex, Ingrid; Boer, Willem; Eertmans, Ward; Sabbe, Marc; Jans, Frank; De Deyne, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 375,000 people annually experience sudden cardiac arrest (CA) in Europe. Most patients who survive the initial hours and days after CA die of postanoxic brain damage. Current monitors, such as electrocardiography and end-tidal capnography, provide only indirect information about the condition of the brain during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In contrast, cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy provides continuous, noninvasive, real-time information about brain oxygenation without the need for a pulsatile blood flow. It measures transcutaneous cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (rSO2). This information could supplement currently used monitors. Moreover, an evolution in rSO2 monitoring technology has made it easier to assess rSO2 in CA conditions. We give an overview of the literature regarding rSO2 measurements during CPR and the current commercially available devices. We highlight the feasibility of cerebral saturation measurement during CPR, its role as a quality parameter of CPR, predictor of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and neurologic outcome, and its monitoring function during transport. rSO2 is feasible in the setting of CA and has the potential to measure the quality of CPR, predict ROSC and neurologic outcome, and monitor post-CA patients during transport. The literature shows that rSO2 has the potential to serve multiple roles as a neuromonitoring tool during CPR and also to guide neuroprotective therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Brain computed tomographic findings in post-cardiopulmonary resuscitation patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Tsuguharu; Yoshinaga, Kazumasa; Horibe, Takashi; Kokubu, Kiyokazu; Kokura, Yoshihiro; Matsui, Konosuke; Inamoto, Kazuo.

    1986-01-01

    We retrospectively assessed the brain computed tomographic (CT) findings in 22 post-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) patients excluding neonatal cases. On the basis of the CT findings, the patients were divided into two groups. Eight patients (36.4 %) had bilateral abnormal lowdensity areas in the basal ganglia (Group I). The remaining 14 patients (63.6 %) had no abnormalities in that area (Group II). In Group I, the incidence of primary cardiac arrest and duration of advanced life support (ALS) was significantly different (p < 0.05) from Group II. Sex, age, duration of basic life support (BLS), time elapsed from initiation of BLS to initial CT and from initiation of ALS to initial CT was not significantly different between the two groups. Outcome was very poor in both groups and no significant difference was noted between them. We conclude that primary cardiac arrest and long duration of ALS were predictors of abnormal bilateral low-density areas in the basal ganglia in post-CPR patients. However, their appearance was not related to outcome. (author)

  1. Capnography during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Current evidence and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavani Shankar Kodali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Capnography continues to be an important tool in measuring expired carbon dioxide (CO 2 . Most recent Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS guidelines now recommend using capnography to ascertain the effectiveness of chest compressions and duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Based on an extensive review of available published literature, we selected all available peer-reviewed research investigations and case reports. Available evidence suggests that there is significant correlation between partial pressure of end-tidal CO 2 (PETCO 2 and cardiac output that can indicate the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Additional evidence favoring the use of capnography during CPR includes definitive proof of correct placement of the endotracheal tube and possible prediction of patient survival following cardiac arrest, although the latter will require further investigations. There is emerging evidence that PETCO 2 values can guide the initiation of extracorporeal life support (ECLS in refractory cardiac arrest (RCA. There is also increasing recognition of the value of capnography in intensive care settings in intubated patients. Future directions include determining the outcomes based on capnography waveforms PETCO 2 values and determining a reasonable duration of CPR. In the future, given increasing use of capnography during CPR large databases can be analyzed to predict outcomes.

  2. Emergency Medical Technicians Are Often Consulted on Termination of Resuscitation, and Will Terminate Resuscitation Based on Controversial Single Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind-Klausen, Troels; Glerup Lauridsen, Kasper; Bødtker, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Many out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attempts have to be terminated. Previous studies have investigated knowledge on abandoning resuscitation among physicians. In the prehospital setting emergency medical technicians (EMTs) may be involved in the decision......: 100%) participated. Median clinical experience was 12 (IQR: 6-22) years. All EMTs had performed resuscitation (median time since last resuscitation attempt: 1 (IQR: 0.5-2.8) month). Overall, 68% of EMTs had been consulted on termination of CPR, 74% felt it was important to be consulted, and 74% felt...... arrest (12%), witnessed cardiac arrest without bystander CPR within 10 minutes (30%), age above 80 years (20%), age above 90 years (62%), living at a nursing home (62%), known cancer (24%) and absence of pupillary light reflex (54%) during resuscitation. Conclusion: The majority of EMTs have been...

  3. Naloxone and epinephrine are equally effective for cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a rat asphyxia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M-H; Xie, L; Liu, T-W; Song, F-Q; He, T

    2006-10-01

    It is not known whether naloxone is as efficacious as epinephrine during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The aim of the study was to compare the effects of naloxone and epinephrine on the outcomes of CPR following asphyxial cardiac arrest in rats. Cardiac arrest was induced with asphyxia by clamping the tracheal tubes. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized prospectively into a saline group (treated with normal saline, 1 ml intravenously, n = 8), an epinephrine group (treated with epinephrine, 0.04 mg/kg intravenously, n = 8) or a naloxone group (treated with naloxone, 1 mg/kg intravenously, n = 8) in a blind fashion during resuscitation after asphyxial cardiac arrest. After 5 min of untreated cardiac arrest, conventional manual CPR was started and each drug was administered at the same time. The rates of restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) were one of eight (12.5%), seven of eight (87.5%) and seven of eight (87.5%) in the saline, epinephrine and naloxone groups, respectively. The rates of ROSC in the epinephrine and naloxone groups were equal and significantly greater than that in the saline group (P = 0.01 and P = 0.01, respectively). The administration of naloxone or epinephrine alone may increase the resuscitation rate, and both drugs are equally effective for CPR in a rat asphyxia model. However, the mechanism by which naloxone produces its efficacy during CPR remains unclear and further experimentation will be necessary.

  4. Bridging the knowledge-resuscitation gap for children: Still a long way to go

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Ran D; Ho, Kendall; Peterson, Robert; Kissoon, Niranjan

    2007-01-01

    The American Heart Association, along with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, recently made changes to the paediatric resuscitation guidelines. Knowledge translation (KT) is imperative, but there is a lack of sufficient evidence for appropriate methodologies for implementation of these guidelines. Paediatric resuscitation presents many challenges; cases happen infrequently, affording few opportunities for implementation of the new guidelines, and are highly stressful and filled with uncertainty. Some KT strategies have shown some success in causing a notable degree of change in behaviour, but none have shown a striking difference when used alone. Previous efforts to disseminate current guidelines centred on development of courses for health care providers and preparing paediatric residents and paediatricians for circumstances they could encounter with paediatric acute illness. None of the studies assessing these techniques measured direct patient outcomes, and only a few demonstrated some long-term knowledge acquisition among trainees. The purpose of the present review was to illuminate the challenges, offer future directions for KT and outline potentially more effective methodologies and strategies to overcome current barriers. PMID:19030414

  5. Supreme Laryngeal Mask Airway versus Face Mask during Neonatal Resuscitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisanuto, Daniele; Cavallin, Francesco; Nguyen, Loi Ngoc; Nguyen, Tien Viet; Tran, Linh Dieu; Tran, Chien Dinh; Doglioni, Nicoletta; Micaglio, Massimo; Moccia, Luciano

    2015-08-01

    To assess the effectiveness of supreme laryngeal mask airway (SLMA) over face mask ventilation for preventing need for endotracheal intubation at birth. We report a prospective, randomized, parallel 1:1, unblinded, controlled trial. After a short-term educational intervention on SLMA use, infants ≥34-week gestation and/or expected birth weight ≥1500 g requiring positive pressure ventilation (PPV) at birth were randomized to resuscitation by SLMA or face mask. The primary outcome was the success rate of the resuscitation devices (SLMA or face mask) defined as the achievement of an effective PPV preventing the need for endotracheal intubation. We enrolled 142 patients (71 in SLMA and 71 in face mask group, respectively). Successful resuscitation rate was significantly higher with the SLMA compared with face mask ventilation (91.5% vs 78.9%; P = .03). Apgar score at 5 minutes was significantly higher in SLMA than in face mask group (P = .02). Neonatal intensive care unit admission rate was significantly lower in SLMA than in face mask group (P = .02). No complications related to the procedure occurred. In newborns with gestational age ≥34 weeks and/or expected birth weight ≥1500 g needing PPV at birth, the SLMA is more effective than face mask to prevent endotracheal intubation. The SLMA is effective in clinical practice after a short-term educational intervention. Registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01963936. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Predicting Outcomes of Hormone and Chemotherapy in the Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC Study by Biochemically-inspired Machine Learning [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseos J. Mucaki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Genomic aberrations and gene expression-defined subtypes in the large METABRIC patient cohort have been used to stratify and predict survival. The present study used normalized gene expression signatures of paclitaxel drug response to predict outcome for different survival times in METABRIC patients receiving hormone (HT and, in some cases, chemotherapy (CT agents. This machine learning method, which distinguishes sensitivity vs. resistance in breast cancer cell lines and validates predictions in patients; was also used to derive gene signatures of other HT  (tamoxifen and CT agents (methotrexate, epirubicin, doxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil used in METABRIC. Paclitaxel gene signatures exhibited the best performance, however the other agents also predicted survival with acceptable accuracies. A support vector machine (SVM model of paclitaxel response containing genes ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC1, ABCC10, BAD, BBC3, BCL2, BCL2L1, BMF, CYP2C8, CYP3A4, MAP2, MAP4, MAPT, NR1I2, SLCO1B3, TUBB1, TUBB4A, and TUBB4B was 78.6% accurate in predicting survival of 84 patients treated with both HT and CT (median survival ≥ 4.4 yr. Accuracy was lower (73.4% in 304 untreated patients. The performance of other machine learning approaches was also evaluated at different survival thresholds. Minimum redundancy maximum relevance feature selection of a paclitaxel-based SVM classifier based on expression of genes BCL2L1, BBC3, FGF2, FN1, and TWIST1 was 81.1% accurate in 53 CT patients. In addition, a random forest (RF classifier using a gene signature (ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC1, ABCC10, BAD, BBC3, BCL2, BCL2L1, BMF, CYP2C8, CYP3A4, MAP2, MAP4, MAPT, NR1I2,SLCO1B3, TUBB1, TUBB4A, and TUBB4B predicted >3-year survival with 85.5% accuracy in 420 HT patients. A similar RF gene signature showed 82.7% accuracy in 504 patients treated with CT and/or HT. These results suggest that tumor gene expression signatures refined by machine learning techniques can be useful for

  7. Predicting Outcomes of Hormone and Chemotherapy in the Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC) Study by Biochemically-inspired Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucaki, Eliseos J; Baranova, Katherina; Pham, Huy Q; Rezaeian, Iman; Angelov, Dimo; Ngom, Alioune; Rueda, Luis; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    Genomic aberrations and gene expression-defined subtypes in the large METABRIC patient cohort have been used to stratify and predict survival. The present study used normalized gene expression signatures of paclitaxel drug response to predict outcome for different survival times in METABRIC patients receiving hormone (HT) and, in some cases, chemotherapy (CT) agents. This machine learning method, which distinguishes sensitivity vs. resistance in breast cancer cell lines and validates predictions in patients; was also used to derive gene signatures of other HT  (tamoxifen) and CT agents (methotrexate, epirubicin, doxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil) used in METABRIC. Paclitaxel gene signatures exhibited the best performance, however the other agents also predicted survival with acceptable accuracies. A support vector machine (SVM) model of paclitaxel response containing genes  ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC1, ABCC10, BAD, BBC3, BCL2, BCL2L1, BMF, CYP2C8, CYP3A4, MAP2, MAP4, MAPT, NR1I2, SLCO1B3, TUBB1, TUBB4A, and TUBB4B  was 78.6% accurate in predicting survival of 84 patients treated with both HT and CT (median survival ≥ 4.4 yr). Accuracy was lower (73.4%) in 304 untreated patients. The performance of other machine learning approaches was also evaluated at different survival thresholds. Minimum redundancy maximum relevance feature selection of a paclitaxel-based SVM classifier based on expression of genes  BCL2L1, BBC3, FGF2, FN1,  and  TWIST1   was 81.1% accurate in 53 CT patients. In addition, a random forest (RF) classifier using a gene signature ( ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC1, ABCC10, BAD, BBC3, BCL2, BCL2L1, BMF, CYP2C8, CYP3A4, MAP2, MAP4, MAPT, NR1I2,SLCO1B3, TUBB1, TUBB4A,  and TUBB4B ) predicted >3-year survival with 85.5% accuracy in 420 HT patients. A similar RF gene signature showed 82.7% accuracy in 504 patients treated with CT and/or HT. These results suggest that tumor gene expression signatures refined by machine learning techniques can be useful for

  8. Cutaneous Lymphoma International Consortium Study of Outcome in Advanced Stages of Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome: Effect of Specific Prognostic Markers on Survival and Development of a Prognostic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarisbrick, Julia J.; Prince, H. Miles; Vermeer, Maarten H.; Quaglino, Pietro; Horwitz, Steven; Porcu, Pierluigi; Stadler, Rudolf; Wood, Gary S.; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Pham-Ledard, Anne; Foss, Francine; Girardi, Michael; Bagot, Martine; Michel, Laurence; Battistella, Maxime; Guitart, Joan; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Martinez-Escala, Maria Estela; Estrach, Teresa; Papadavid, Evangelia; Antoniou, Christina; Rigopoulos, Dimitis; Nikolaou, Vassilki; Sugaya, Makoto; Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Gniadecki, Robert; Sanches, José Antonio; Cury-Martins, Jade; Miyashiro, Denis; Servitje, Octavio; Muniesa, Cristina; Berti, Emilio; Onida, Francesco; Corti, Laura; Hodak, Emilia; Amitay-Laish, Iris; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L.; Rodríguez-Peralto, Jose L.; Knobler, Robert; Porkert, Stefanie; Bauer, Wolfgang; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Grandi, Vieri; Cowan, Richard; Rook, Alain; Kim, Ellen; Pileri, Alessandro; Patrizi, Annalisa; Pujol, Ramon M.; Wong, Henry; Tyler, Kelly; Stranzenbach, Rene; Querfeld, Christiane; Fava, Paolo; Maule, Milena; Willemze, Rein; Evison, Felicity; Morris, Stephen; Twigger, Robert; Talpur, Rakhshandra; Kim, Jinah; Ognibene, Grant; Li, Shufeng; Tavallaee, Mahkam; Hoppe, Richard T.; Duvic, Madeleine; Whittaker, Sean J.; Kim, Youn H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Advanced-stage mycosis fungoides (MF; stage IIB to IV) and Sézary syndrome (SS) are aggressive lymphomas with a median survival of 1 to 5 years. Clinical management is stage based; however, there is wide range of outcome within stages. Published prognostic studies in MF/SS have been single-center trials. Because of the rarity of MF/SS, only a large collaboration would power a study to identify independent prognostic markers. Patients and Methods Literature review identified the following 10 candidate markers: stage, age, sex, cutaneous histologic features of folliculotropism, CD30 positivity, proliferation index, large-cell transformation, WBC/lymphocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase, and identical T-cell clone in blood and skin. Data were collected at specialist centers on patients diagnosed with advanced-stage MF/SS from 2007. Each parameter recorded at diagnosis was tested against overall survival (OS). Results Staging data on 1,275 patients with advanced MF/SS from 29 international sites were included for survival analysis. The median OS was 63 months, with 2- and 5-year survival rates of 77% and 52%, respectively. The median OS for patients with stage IIB disease was 68 months, but patients diagnosed with stage III disease had slightly improved survival compared with patients with stage IIB, although patients diagnosed with stage IV disease had significantly worse survival (48 months for stage IVA and 33 months for stage IVB). Of the 10 variables tested, four (stage IV, age > 60 years, large-cell transformation, and increased lactate dehydrogenase) were independent prognostic markers for a worse survival. Combining these four factors in a prognostic index model identified the following three risk groups across stages with significantly different 5-year survival rates: low risk (68%), intermediate risk (44%), and high risk (28%). Conclusion To our knowledge, this study includes the largest cohort of patients with advanced-stage MF/SS and

  9. Rescuer fatigue during simulated neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, E S; Cheung, P-Y; O'Reilly, M; Aziz, K; Schmölzer, G M

    2015-02-01

    To assess development of fatigue during chest compressions (CCs) in simulated neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Prospective randomized manikin crossover study. Thirty neonatal healthcare professionals who successfully completed the Neonatal Resuscitation Program performed CPR using (i) 3:1 compression:ventilation (C:V) ratio, (ii) continuous CC with asynchronous ventilation (CCaV) at a rate of 90 CC per min and (iii) CCaV at 120 CC per min for a duration of 10 min on a neonatal manikin. Changes in peak pressure (a surrogate of fatigue) and CC rate were continuously recorded and fatigue among groups was compared. Participants were blinded to pressure tracings and asked to rate their level of comfort and fatigue for each CPR trial. Compared with baseline, a significant decrease in peak pressure was observed after 72, 96 and 156 s in group CCaV-120, CCaV-90 and 3:1 C:V, respectively. CC depth decreased by 50% within the first 3 min during CCaV-120, 30% during CCaV-90 and 20% during 3:1 C:V. Moreover, 3:1 C:V and CCaV were similarly preferred by healthcare professionals. Similarly, 3:1 C:V and CCaV CPR were also fatiguing. We recommend that rescuers should switch after every second cycle of heart rate assessment during neonatal CPR.

  10. Temporal variations in dispatcher-assisted and bystander-initiated resuscitation efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Akira; Maeda, Tetsuo; Myojo, Yasuhiro; Wato, Yukihiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Inaba, Hideo

    2018-04-03

    To investigate temporal variations in dispatcher-assisted and bystander-initiated resuscitation efforts and their association with survival after bystander-witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs). We retrospectively analyzed the neurologically favorable 1-month survival and the parameters related to dispatcher assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (DA-CPR) and bystander CPR (BCPR) for 227,524 OHCA patients between 2007 and 2013 in Japan. DA-CPR sensitivity for OHCAs, bystander's compliance to DA-CPR assessed by the proportion of bystanders who follow DA-CPR, and performance of BCPR measured by the rate of bystander-initiated CPR in patients without DA-CPR were calculated as indices of resuscitation efforts. Performance of BCPR was only similar to temporal variations in the survival (correlation between hourly paired values, R 2 =0.263, P=0.01): a lower survival rate (3.4% vs 4.2%) and performance of BCPR (23.1% vs 30.8%) during night-time (22:00-5:59) than during non-night-time. In subgroup analyses based on interaction tests, all three indices deteriorated during night-time when OHCAs were witnessed by non-family (adjusted odds ratio, 0.73-0.82), particularly in non-elderly patients. The rate of public access defibrillation for these OHCAs markedly decreased during night-time (adjusted odds ratio, 0.49) with delayed emergency calls and BCPR initiation. Multivariable logistic regression analyses revealed that the survival rate of non-family-witnessed OHCAs was 1.83-fold lower during night-time than during non-night-time. Dispatcher-assisted and bystander-initiated resuscitation efforts are low during night-time in OHCAs witnessed by non-family. A divisional alert system to recruit well-trained individuals is needed in order to improve the outcomes of night-time OHCAs witnessed by non-family bystanders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Review of educational interventions to increase traditional birth attendants' neonatal resuscitation self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendhi, Marvesh M; Cartmell, Kathleen B; Newman, Susan D; Premji, Shahirose; Pope, Charlene

    2018-05-21

    Annually, up to 2.7 million neonatal deaths occur worldwide, and 25% of these deaths are caused by birth asphyxia. Infants born in rural areas of low-and-middle-income countries are often delivered by traditional birth attendants and have a greater risk of birth asphyxia-related mortality. This review will evaluate the effectiveness of neonatal resuscitation educational interventions in improving traditional birth attendants' knowledge, perceived self-efficacy, and infant mortality outcomes in low-and-middle-income countries. An integrative review was conducted to identify studies pertaining to neonatal resuscitation training of traditional birth attendants and midwives for home-based births in low-and-middle-income countries. Ten studies met inclusion criteria. Most interventions were based on the American Association of Pediatrics Neonatal Resuscitation Program, World Health Organization Safe Motherhood Guidelines and American College of Nurse-Midwives Life Saving Skills protocols. Three studies exclusively for traditional birth attendants reported decreases in neonatal mortality rates ranging from 22% to 65%. These studies utilized pictorial and oral forms of teaching, consistent in addressing the social cognitive theory. Studies employing skill demonstration, role-play, and pictorial charts showed increased pre- to post-knowledge scores and high self-efficacy scores. In two studies, a team approach, where traditional birth attendants were assisted, was reported to decrease neonatal mortality rate from 49-43/1000 births to 10.5-3.7/1000 births. Culturally appropriate methods, such as role-play, demonstration, and pictorial charts, can contribute to increased knowledge and self-efficacy related to neonatal resuscitation. A team approach to training traditional birth attendants, assisted by village health workers during home-based childbirths may reduce neonatal mortality rates. Copyright © 2018 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  12. Sustained versus intermittent lung inflation for resuscitation of preterm infants: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Chimi, Mohamed S; Awad, Hisham A; El-Gammasy, Tarek M; El-Farghali, Ola G; Sallam, Mohamed T; Shinkar, Dina M

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate efficacy and safety of delivery room (DR) sustained lung inflation (SLI) in resuscitation of preterm neonates. Randomized Controlled Trial including 112 preterm infants randomized to either SLI (n = 57) using T-piece resuscitator [maximum three inflations with maximum pressure of 30 cmH 2 O for 15 s followed by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) of 5-7 cmH 2 O] or conventional bag/mask inflation (CBMI) (n = 55) using traditional self-inflating bag (maximum pressure of 40 cmH 2 O at a rate of 40-60 per min). Failure was defined as the need for DR or first 72 h intubation. Cord and 2-h post-resuscitation blood samples were collected to measure interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α levels before and after intervention. SLI was associated with significantly higher success rate compared to CBMI [75.4 versus 54.5%; p = 0.017], lower need for DR intubation [5.3% versus 23.6%; (X 2  =   7.7; p = 0.005)], higher 5-min-Apgar score (median 8 versus 7; p = 0.018), shorter duration on nasal-CPAP (p = 0.017), and non-significantly different air leak (7% versus 11%; p = 0.3) and bronchopulmonary dysplasia rates among survivors (2% versus 11%; p = 0.09). Post-resuscitation IL-1β plasma levels increased significantly in CBMI (p = 0.009) and not in SLI group. Delivery room SLI is more effective than intermittent bag and mask inflation for improving short-term respiratory outcome in preterm infants, without significant adverse effects.

  13. Maternal BMI at the start of pregnancy and offspring epigenome-wide DNA methylation: Findings from the pregnancy and childhood epigenetics (PACE) consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.C. Sharp (Gemma C.); L.A. Salas (Lucas A.); C. Monnereau; C. Allard (Catherine); P. Yousefi (Paul); Everson, T.M. (Todd M.); J. Bohlin (Jon); Z. Xu (Zongli); Huang, R.-C. (Rae-Chi); S.E. Reese (Sarah E.); C.-J. Xu (Cheng-Jian); N. Baïz (Nour); Hoyo, C. (Cathrine); Agha, G. (Golareh); Roy, R. (Ritu); J. Holloway (John); Ghantous, A. (Akram); S.K. Merid (Simon Kebede); K.M. Bakulski (Kelly M.); A.M. Küpers (Marlijn); Zhang, H. (Hongmei); R.C. Richmond (Rebecca C.); Page, C.M. (Christian M.); Duijts, L. (Liesbeth); Lie, R.T. (Rolv T.); Melton, P.E. (Phillip E.); J.M. Vonk (Judith); C. Nohr (Christian); Williams-DeVane, C. (ClarLynda); K. Huen (Karen); S.L. Rifas-Shiman (Sheryl); Ruiz-Arenas, C. (Carlos); Gonseth, S. (Semira); Rezwan, F.I. (Faisal I.); Z. Herceg (Zdenko); Ekström, S. (Sandra); Croen, L. (Lisa); F. Falahi (Fahimeh); Perron, P. (Patrice); M.R. Karagas (Margaret); B.M. Quraishi (Bilal M.); M.J. Suderman (Matthew J.); Magnus, M.C. (Maria C.); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); Taylor, J.A. (Jack A.); D. Anderson (Denise); Zhao, S. (Shanshan); H.A. Smit (Henriëtte); Josey, M.J. (Michele J.); Bradman, A. (Asa); A.A. Baccarelli (Andrea A.); M. Bustamante (Mariona); S.E. Håberg (Siri E); G. Pershagen (Göran); I. Hertz-Picciotto (Irva); Newschaffer, C. (Craig); W.E. Corpeleijn (Willemijn); L. Bouchard (Luigi); Lawlor, D.A. (Debbie A.); Maguire, R.L. (Rachel L.); L.F. Barcellos (Lisa); Smith, G.D. (George Davey); B. Eskenazi (B.); Karmaus, W. (Wilfried); Marsit, C.J. (Carmen J.); M.-F. Hivert (Marie-France); H. Snieder (Harold); Fallin, M.D. (M. Daniele); Melén, E. (Erik); M.C. Munthe-Kaas (Monica Cheng); H. Arshad (Hasan); J. Wiemels (Joseph); I. Annesi-Maesano; M. Vrijheid (Martine); E. Oken (Emily); Holland, N. (Nina); Murphy, S.K. (Susan K.); T.I.A. Sørensen (Thorkild); G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); J.P. Newnham (John); A.J. Wilcox (Allen); W. Nystad (Wenche); S.J. London (Stephanie J.); J.F. Felix (Janine); C.L. Relton (Caroline)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractPre-pregnancy maternal obesity is associated with adverse offspring outcomes at birth and later in life. Individual studies have shown that epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation could contribute. Within the Pregnancy and Childhood Epigenetics (PACE) Consortium, we

  14. Improved Clinical Performance and Teamwork of Pediatric Interprofessional Resuscitation Teams With a Simulation-Based Educational Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilfoyle, Elaine; Koot, Deanna A; Annear, John C; Bhanji, Farhan; Cheng, Adam; Duff, Jonathan P; Grant, Vincent J; St George-Hyslop, Cecilia E; Delaloye, Nicole J; Kotsakis, Afrothite; McCoy, Carolyn D; Ramsay, Christa E; Weiss, Matthew J; Gottesman, Ronald D

    2017-02-01

    To measure the effect of a 1-day team training course for pediatric interprofessional resuscitation team members on adherence to Pediatric Advanced Life Support guidelines, team efficiency, and teamwork in a simulated clinical environment. Multicenter prospective interventional study. Four tertiary-care children's hospitals in Canada from June 2011 to January 2015. Interprofessional pediatric resuscitation teams including resident physicians, ICU nurse practitioners, registered nurses, and registered respiratory therapists (n = 300; 51 teams). A 1-day simulation-based team training course was delivered, involving an interactive lecture, group discussions, and four simulated resuscitation scenarios, each followed by a debriefing. The first scenario of the day (PRE) was conducted prior to any team training. The final scenario of the day (POST) was the same scenario, with a slightly modified patient history. All scenarios included standardized distractors designed to elicit and challenge specific teamwork behaviors. Primary outcome measure was change (before and after training) in adherence to Pediatric Advanced Life Support guidelines, as measured by the Clinical Performance Tool. Secondary outcome measures were as follows: 1) change in times to initiation of chest compressions and defibrillation and 2) teamwork performance, as measured by the Clinical Teamwork Scale. Correlation between Clinical Performance Tool and Clinical Teamwork Scale scores was also analyzed. Teams significantly improved Clinical Performance Tool scores (67.3-79.6%; p Teamwork Scale scores (56.0-71.8%; p Teamwork Scale (R = 0.281; p teamwork during simulated pediatric resuscitation. A positive correlation between clinical and teamwork performance suggests that effective teamwork improves clinical performance of resuscitation teams.

  15. Effect of socioemotional stress on the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation during advanced life support in a randomized manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørshol, Conrad Arnfinn; Myklebust, Helge; Nilsen, Kjetil Lønne; Hoff, Thomas; Bjørkli, Cato; Illguth, Eirik; Søreide, Eldar; Sunde, Kjetil

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether socioemotional stress affects the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation during advanced life support in a simulated manikin model. A randomized crossover trial with advanced life support performed in two different conditions, with and without exposure to socioemotional stress. The study was conducted at the Stavanger Acute Medicine Foundation for Education and Research simulation center, Stavanger, Norway. Paramedic teams, each consisting of two paramedics and one assistant, employed at Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. A total of 19 paramedic teams performed advanced life support twice in a randomized fashion, one control condition without socioemotional stress and one experimental condition with exposure to socioemotional stress. The socioemotional stress consisted of an upset friend of the simulated patient who was a physician, spoke a foreign language, was unfamiliar with current Norwegian resuscitation guidelines, supplied irrelevant clinical information, and repeatedly made doubts about the paramedics' resuscitation efforts. Aural distractions were supplied by television and cell telephone. The primary outcome was the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation: chest compression depth, chest compression rate, time without chest compressions (no-flow ratio), and ventilation rate after endotracheal intubation. As a secondary outcome, the socioemotional stress impact was evaluated through the paramedics' subjective workload, frustration, and feeling of realism. There were no significant differences in chest compression depth (39 vs. 38 mm, p = .214), compression rate (113 vs. 116 min⁻¹, p = .065), no-flow ratio (0.15 vs. 0.15, p = .618), or ventilation rate (8.2 vs. 7.7 min⁻¹, p = .120) between the two conditions. There was a significant increase in the subjective workload, frustration, and feeling of realism when the paramedics were exposed to socioemotional stress. In this advanced life

  16. Role of transfused red blood cells for shock and coagulopathy within remote damage control resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinella, Philip C; Doctor, Allan

    2014-05-01

    The philosophy of damage control resuscitation (DCR) and remote damage control resuscitation (RDCR) can be summarized by stating that the goal is to prevent death from hemorrhagic shock by "staying out of trouble instead of getting out of trouble." In other words, it is preferred to arrest the progression of shock, rather than also having to reverse this condition after significant tissue damage and organ injury cascades are established. Moreover, to prevent death from exsanguination, a balanced approach to the treatment of both shock and coagulopathy is required. This was military doctrine during World War II, but seemed to be forgotten during the last half of the 20th century. Damage control resuscitation and RDCR have revitalized the approach, but there is still more to learn about the most effective and safe resuscitative strategies to simultaneously treat shock and hemorrhage. Current data suggest that our preconceived notions regarding the efficacy of standard issue red blood cells (RBCs) during the hours after transfusion may be false. Standard issue RBCs may not increase oxygen delivery and may in fact decrease it by disturbing control of regional blood flow distribution (impaired nitric oxide processing) and failing to release oxygen, even when perfusing hypoxic tissue (abnormal oxygen affinity). Standard issue RBCs may assist with hemostasis but appear to have competing effects on thrombin generation and platelet function. If standard issue or RBCs of increased storage age are not optimal, then are there alternatives that will allow for an efficacious and safe treatment of shock while also supporting hemostasis? Studies are required to determine if fresh RBCs less than 7 to 10 days provide an outcome advantage. A resurgence in the study of whole blood stored at 4°C for up to 10 days also holds promise. Two randomized controlled trials in humans have indicated that following transfusion with either whole blood stored at 4°C or platelets stored at 4

  17. Extensive cardiopulmonary resuscitation for VLBW and ELBW infants: a systematic review and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, P S

    2009-10-01

    Studies of the outcomes of preterm infants after the receipt of extensive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) at birth or in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have yielded varied results. A systematic review of the outcomes of very low birth weight (VLBW) and extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants who received extensive resuscitation at birth or in the NICU was carried out. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL databases were searched for studies of extensive CPR in the delivery room (DR-CPR) and in NICU (NICU-CPR) that have reported neonatal or long-term outcomes. A total of 20 eligible studies were identified (11 of DR-CPR, 7 of NICU-CPR and 2 had combined data). DR-CPR was associated with an increased risk of mortality (odds ratio (OR) 2.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.92, 4.16) and severe neurological injury (OR 2.27, 95% CI 1.40, 3.67) compared with infants who did not receive extensive CPR. NICU-CPR was associated with an increased risk of mortality (OR 55, 95% CI 15, 195) compared with infants who did not receive CPR; however, confidence limits were wide. The long-term outcome of survivors was reported in a limited number of studies. Extensive CPR at birth or in the NICU for VLBW or ELBW infants was associated with higher risk of mortality.

  18. STROKOG (stroke and cognition consortium): An international consortium to examine the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of neurocognitive disorders in relation to cerebrovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdev, Perminder S; Lo, Jessica W; Crawford, John D; Mellon, Lisa; Hickey, Anne; Williams, David; Bordet, Régis; Mendyk, Anne-Marie; Gelé, Patrick; Deplanque, Dominique; Bae, Hee-Joon; Lim, Jae-Sung; Brodtmann, Amy; Werden, Emilio; Cumming, Toby; Köhler, Sebastian; Verhey, Frans R J; Dong, Yan-Hong; Tan, Hui Hui; Chen, Christopher; Xin, Xu; Kalaria, Raj N; Allan, Louise M; Akinyemi, Rufus O; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Klimkowicz-Mrowiec, Aleksandra; Dichgans, Martin; Wollenweber, Frank A; Zietemann, Vera; Hoffmann, Michael; Desmond, David W; Linden, Thomas; Blomstrand, Christian; Fagerberg, Björn; Skoog, Ingmar; Godefroy, Olivier; Barbay, Mélanie; Roussel, Martine; Lee, Byung-Chul; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Wardlaw, Joanna; Makin, Stephen J; Doubal, Fergus N; Chappell, Francesca M; Srikanth, Velandai K; Thrift, Amanda G; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Kandiah, Nagaendran; Chander, Russell J; Lin, Xuling; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Moulin, Solene; Rossi, Costanza; Sabayan, Behnam; Stott, David J; Jukema, J Wouter; Melkas, Susanna; Jokinen, Hanna; Erkinjuntti, Timo; Mok, Vincent C T; Wong, Adrian; Lam, Bonnie Y K; Leys, Didier; Hénon, Hilde; Bombois, Stéphanie; Lipnicki, Darren M; Kochan, Nicole A

    2017-01-01

    The Stroke and Cognition consortium (STROKOG) aims to facilitate a better understanding of the determinants of vascular contributions to cognitive disorders and help improve the diagnosis and treatment of vascular cognitive disorders (VCD). Longitudinal studies with ≥75 participants who had suffered or were at risk of stroke or TIA and which evaluated cognitive function were invited to join STROKOG. The consortium will facilitate projects investigating rates and patterns of cognitive decline, risk factors for VCD, and biomarkers of vascular dementia. Currently, STROKOG includes 25 (21 published) studies, with 12,092 participants from five continents. The duration of follow-up ranges from 3 months to 21 years. Although data harmonization will be a key challenge, STROKOG is in a unique position to reuse and combine international cohort data and fully explore patient level characteristics and outcomes. STROKOG could potentially transform our understanding of VCD and have a worldwide impact on promoting better vascular cognitive outcomes.

  19. Impact of a novel, resource appropriate resuscitation curriculum on Nicaraguan resident physician’s management of cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Project Strengthening Emergency Medicine, Investing in Learners in Latin America (SEMILLA) created a novel, language and resource appropriate course for the resuscitation of cardiac arrest for Nicaraguan resident physicians. We hypothesized that participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program would significantly improve the physician’s management of simulated code scenarios. Methods: Thirteen Nicaraguan resident physicians were evaluated while managing simulated cardiac arrest scenarios before, immediately, and at 6 months after participating in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program. This project was completed in 2014 in Leon, Nicaragua. The Cardiac Arrest Simulation Test (CASTest), a validated scoring system, was used to evaluate performance on a standardized simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Mixed effect logistic regression models were constructed to assess outcomes. Results: On the pre-course simulation exam, only 7.7% of subjects passed the test. Immediately post-course, the subjects achieved a 30.8% pass rate and at 6 months after the course, the pass rate was 46.2%. Compared with pre-test scores, the odds of passing the CASTest at 6 months after the course were 21.7 times higher (95% CI 4.2 to 112.8, PSEMILLA resuscitation course and retain these skills. PMID:27378010

  20. Failure mode effects and criticality analysis: innovative risk assessment to identify critical areas for improvement in emergency department sepsis resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Emilie S; O'Connor, Lanty M; Nannicelli, Anna P; Barker, Lisa T; Khare, Rahul K; Seivert, Nicholas P; Holl, Jane L; Vozenilek, John A

    2014-06-01

    Sepsis is an increasing problem in the practice of emergency medicine as the prevalence is increasing and optimal care to reduce mortality requires significant resources and time. Evidence-based septic shock resuscitation strategies exist, and rely on appropriate recognition and diagnosis, but variation in adherence to the recommendations and therefore outcomes remains. Our objective was to perform a multi-institutional prospective risk-assessment, using failure mode effects and criticality analysis (FMECA), to identify high-risk failures in ED sepsis resuscitation. We conducted a FMECA, which prospectively identifies critical areas for improvement in systems and processes of care, across three diverse hospitals. A multidisciplinary group of participants described the process of emergency department (ED) sepsis resuscitation to then create a comprehensive map and table listing all process steps and identified process failures. High-risk failures in sepsis resuscitation from each of the institutions were compiled to identify common high-risk failures. Common high-risk failures included limited availability of equipment to place the central venous catheter and conduct invasive monitoring, and cognitive overload leading to errors in decision-making. Additionally, we identified great variability in care processes across institutions. Several common high-risk failures in sepsis care exist: a disparity in resources available across hospitals, a lack of adherence to the invasive components of care, and cognitive barriers that affect expert clinicians' decision-making capabilities. Future work may concentrate on dissemination of non-invasive alternatives and overcoming cognitive barriers in diagnosis and knowledge translation.

  1. 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) of pediatric and neonatal patients: pediatric basic life support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    recommended that supplementary oxygen be available to use if there is no appreciable improvement within 90 seconds after birth. In situations where supplementary oxygen is not readily available, positive-pressure ventilation should be administered with room air. Current recommendations no longer advise routine intrapartum oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal suctioning for infants born to mothers with meconium staining of amniotic fluid. Endotracheal suctioning for infants who are not vigorous should be performed immediately after birth. A self-inflating bag, a flow-inflating bag, or a T-piece (a valved mechanical device designed to regulate pressure and limit flow) can be used to ventilate a newborn. An increase in heart rate is the primary sign of improved ventilation during resuscitation. Exhaled CO2 detection is the recommended primary technique to confirm correct endotracheal tube placement when a prompt increase in heart rate does not occur after intubation. The recommended intravenous (IV) epinephrine dose is 0.01 to 0.03 mg/kg per dose. Higher IV doses are not recommended, and IV administration is the preferred route. Although access is being obtained, administration of a higher dose (up to 0.1 mg/kg) through the endotracheal tube may be considered. It is possible to identify conditions associated with high mortality and poor outcome in which withholding resuscitative efforts may be considered reasonable, particularly when there has been the opportunity for parental agreement. The following guidelines must be interpreted according to current regional outcomes: When gestation, birth weight, or congenital anomalies are associated with almost certain early death and when unacceptably high morbidity is likely among the rare survivors, resuscitation is not indicated. Examples are provided in the guidelines. In conditions associated with a high rate of survival and acceptable morbidity, resuscitation is nearly always indicated. In conditions associated with uncertain prognosis

  2. Ethics and medico legal aspects of "Not for Resuscitation"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Sulakshan Salins

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Not for resuscitation in India still remains an abstract concept with no clear guidelines or legal frame work. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a complex medical intervention which is often used inappropriately in hospitalized patients and usually guided by medical decision making rather than patient-directed choices. Patient autonomy still remains a weak concept and relatives are expected to make this big decision in a short time and at a time of great emotional distress. This article outlines concepts around ethics and medico legal aspects of not for resuscitation, especially in Indian setting.

  3. A Staff Education Consortium: One Model for Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetler, Cheryl Beth; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the development, organization, activities, problems, and future of a staff education consortium of five medical center hospitals in Boston. The purposes of the consortium are mutual sharing, reduction in duplication, and cost containment of educational programing. (JOW)

  4. Comparison of training in neonatal resuscitation using self inflating bag and T-piece resuscitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, S.S.; Adhikari, K.M.; Rajeev, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Both the self inflating bag and the T-piece resuscitator are recommended for neonatal resuscitation, but many health care workers are unfamiliar with using the latter. A prospective, comparative, observational study was done to determine the ease and effectiveness of training of health care personnel in the two devices using infant training manikins. Methods 100 health care workers, who had no prior formal training in neonatal resuscitation, were divided into small groups and trained in the use of the two devices by qualified trainers. Assessment of cognitive skills was done by pre and post MCQs. Psychomotor skill was assessed post training on manikins using a 10-point objective score. Acceptance by users was ascertained by questionnaire. Assessments were also done after 24 h and 3 months. Comparison was done by Chi square and paired t-tests. Results Pre-training cognitive tests increased from 3.77 (+1.58) to 6.99 (+1.28) on day of training which was significant. Post training assessment of psychomotor skills showed significantly higher initial scores for the T-piece group (7.07 + 2.57) on day of training. Reassessment after 24 h showed significant improvement in cognitive scores (9.89 + 1.24) and psychomotor scores in both groups (8.86 + 1.42 for self inflating bag and 9.70 + 0.57 for T-piece resuscitator). After 3–6 months the scores in both domains showed some decline which was not statistically significant. User acceptability was the same for both devices. Conclusion It is equally easy to train health care workers in both devices. Both groups showed good short term recall and both devices were equally acceptable to the users. PMID:25609858

  5. Laryngeal mask airway versus bag-mask ventilation or endotracheal intubation for neonatal resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Mosarrat J; Kumar, Manoj

    2018-03-15

    Providing effective positive pressure ventilation is considered to be the single most important component of successful neonatal resuscitation. Ventilation is frequently initiated manually with bag and face mask (BMV) followed by endotracheal intubation if respiratory depression continues. These techniques may be difficult to perform successfully resulting in prolonged resuscitation or neonatal asphyxia. The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) may achieve initial ventilation and successful resuscitation faster than a bag-mask device or endotracheal intubation. Among newborns requiring positive pressure ventilation for cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, is LMA more effective than BMV or endotracheal intubation for successful resuscitation? When BMV is either insufficient or ineffective, is effective positive pressure ventilation and successful resuscitation achieved faster with the LMA compared to endotracheal intubation? We used the standard search strategy of Cochrane Neonatal to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2017, Issue 1), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 15 February 2017), Embase (1980 to 15 February 2017), and CINAHL (1982 to 15 February 2017). We also searched clinical trials registers, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared LMA for neonatal resuscitation with either BMV or endotracheal intubation and reported on any outcomes related to neonatal resuscitation specified in this review. Two review authors independently evaluated studies for risk of bias assessments, and extracted data using Cochrane Neonatal criteria. Categorical treatment effects were described as relative risks and continuous treatment effects were described as the mean difference, with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of estimates. We included seven trials that involved a total of 794 infants. Five

  6. A description of the "event manager" role in resuscitations: A qualitative study of interviews and focus groups of resuscitation participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Katherine L; Parshuram, Christopher S; Ferri, Susan; Mema, Briseida

    2017-06-01

    Communication during resuscitation is essential for the provision of coordinated, effective care. Previously, we observed 44% of resuscitation communication originated from participants other than the physician team leader; 65% of which was directed to the team, exclusive of the team leader. We called this outer-loop communication. This institutional review board-approved qualitative study used grounded theory analysis of focus groups and interviews to describe and define outer-loop communication and the role of "event manager" as an additional "leader." Participants were health care staff involved in the medical management of resuscitations in a quaternary pediatric academic hospital. The following 3 domains were identified: the existence and rationale of outer-loop communication; the functions fulfilled by outer-loop communication; and the leadership and learning of event manager skills. The role was recognized by all team members and evolved organically as resuscitation complexity increased. A "good" manager has similar qualities to a "good team leader" with strong nontechnical skills. Event managers were not formally identified and no specific training had occurred. "Outer-loop" communication supports resuscitation activities. An event manager gives direction to the team, coordinates activities, and supports the team leader. We describe a new role in resuscitation in light of structural organizational theory and cognitive load with a view to incorporating this structure into resuscitation training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Griffith (Linda); M. Cowan (Morton); L.D. Notarangelo (Luigi Daniele); R. Kohn (Robert); J. Puck (Jennifer); S.-Y. Pai (Sung-Yun); B. Ballard (Barbara); S.C. Bauer (Sarah); J. Bleesing (Jack); M. Boyle (Marcia); R.W. Brower (Ronald); R.H. Buckley (Rebecca); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); L.M. Burroughs (Lauri); F. Candotti (Fabio); A. Cant (Andrew); T. Chatila (Talal); C. Cunningham-Rundles (Charlotte); M.C. Dinauer (Mary); J. Dvorak (Jennie); A. Filipovich (Alexandra); L.A. Fleisher (Lee); H.B. Gaspar (Bobby); T. Gungor (Tayfun); E. Haddad (Elie); E. Hovermale (Emily); F. Huang (Faith); A. Hurley (Alan); M. Hurley (Mary); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); E.M. Kang (Elizabeth); B.R. Logan (Brent); J.R. Long-Boyle (Janel); H. Malech (Harry); S.A. McGhee (Sean); S. Modell (Sieglinde); S. Modell (Sieglinde); H.D. Ochs (Hans); R.J. O'Reilly (Richard); R. Parkman (Robertson); D. Rawlings (D.); J.M. Routes (John); P. Shearer (P.); T.N. Small (Trudy); H. Smith (H.); K.E. Sullivan (Kathleen); P. Szabolcs (Paul); A.J. Thrasher (Adrian); D. Torgerson; P. Veys (Paul); K. Weinberg (Kenneth); J.C. Zuniga-Pflucker (Juan Carlos)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency

  8. Maryland Family Support Services Consortium. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, James F.; Markowitz, Ricka Keeney

    The Maryland Family Support Services Consortium is a 3-year demonstration project which developed unique family support models at five sites serving the needs of families with a developmentally disabled child (ages birth to 21). Caseworkers provided direct intensive services to 224 families over the 3-year period, including counseling, liaison and…

  9. Incidence, characteristics, and survival following cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the quaternary neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, Elizabeth E; Langeveld, Robert; Heimall, Lauren; Deveney, Alyson; Ades, Anne; Jensen, Erik A; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2017-01-01

    The contemporary characteristics and outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are poorly described. The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence, interventions, and outcomes of CPR in a quaternary referral NICU. Retrospective observational study of infants who received chest compressions for resuscitation in the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia NICU between April 1, 2011 and June 30, 2015. Patient, event, and survival characteristics were abstracted from the medical record and the hospital-wide resuscitation database. The primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to identify patient and event factors associated with survival to discharge. There were 1.2 CPR events per 1000 patient days. CPR was performed in 113 of 5046 (2.2%) infants admitted to the NICU during the study period. The median duration of chest compressions was 2min (interquartile range 1, 6min). Adrenaline was administered in 34 (30%) CPR events. Of 113 infants with at least one CPR event, 69 (61%) survived to hospital discharge. Factors independently associated with decreased survival to hospital discharge were inotrope treatment prior to CPR (adjusted Odds Ratio [aOR] 0.14, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.04, 0.54), and adrenaline administration during CPR (aOR 0.14, 95% CI 0.04, 0.50). Although it was not uncommon, the incidence of CPR was low (CPR and adrenaline administration during CPR were less likely to survive to hospital discharge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Establishing a Consortium for the Study of Rare Diseases: The Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminara, Jennifer; Tuchman, Mendel; Krivitzky, Lauren; Krischer, Jeffrey; Lee, Hye-Seung; LeMons, Cynthia; Baumgartner, Matthias; Cederbaum, Stephen; Diaz, George A.; Feigenbaum, Annette; Gallagher, Renata C.; Harding, Cary O.; Kerr, Douglas S.; Lanpher, Brendan; Lee, Brendan; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; McCandless, Shawn E.; Merritt, J. Lawrence; Oster-Granite, Mary Lou; Seashore, Margretta R.; Stricker, Tamar; Summar, Marshall; Waisbren, Susan; Yudkoff, Marc; Batshaw, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium (UCDC) was created as part of a larger network established by the National Institutes of Health to study rare diseases. This paper reviews the UCDC’s accomplishments over the first six years, including how the Consortium was developed and organized, clinical research studies initiated, and the importance of creating partnerships with patient advocacy groups, philanthropic foundations and biotech and pharmaceutical companies. PMID:20188616

  11. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation during spaceflight: examining the role of timing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Victor W; Whittam, Sarah W; Austin, Paul N; Branson, Richard D; Beck, George

    2011-08-01

    The majority of International Space Station (ISS) astronauts represent nonmedical professions. In order to serve as Crew Medical Officers (CMO), future crewmembers receive 40-70 h of medical training within 18 mo before missions, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) per the Guidelines of the American Heart Association. CPR compliance with the Guidelines is known to vary even among trained clinicians, let alone minimally trained caregivers (e.g., bystanders, nonphysician astronauts). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of timing devices, including audible metronomic tones, on CPR performed by nonmedical personnel, specifically 40 astronaut analogues trained in a fashion and within a timeframe similar to an ISS astronaut. Twenty bystander pairs performed two-person CPR for 4 min on a simulated cardiac arrest patient using three interventions: 1) CPR with no timing devices; 2) CPR with metronomic tones for chest compressions; and 3) CPR with a timing device and metronome for coordinating ventilation and compression rates, respectively. Each CPR performance was evaluated for compliance with the (then current) 2000 AHA Guidelines. Numbers of breaths and compressions significantly deviated from target values in the first two interventions (38 and 42 breaths vs. target of 32 breaths; 282 and 318 compressions vs. target of 240 compressions); the use of timing devices for both components of CPR resulted in significant improvement (32 breaths and 231 compressions). CPR timing devices that coordinate both breaths and compressions improve compliance of astronaut analogue rescuers with CPR guidelines, and may improve overall CPR performance and outcome.

  12. [Assessment of the prognosis in patients who remain comatose after resuscitation from cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramberg, Emilie; Fedder, Anette Marianne; Dyrskog, Stig Eric; Degn, Niels Sanderhoff; Hassager, Christian; Jensen, Reinhold; Kirkegaard, Hans; Weber, Sven; Hoffmann-Petersen, Joachim Torp; Larsen, Niels Heden; Strange, Ditte Gry; Sonne, Morten; Lippert, Freddy K

    2014-06-30

    In Denmark there are around 3,500 unexpected cardiac arrests (CA) out of hospital each year. There is an unknown number of CA in hospitals. The survival rate after CA outside a hospital in Denmark is 10% after 30 days. There are varying data for the neurological outcome in this group of patients. The purpose of this work is to disseminate new knowledge and to help standardizing the treatment in the group of patients who remain comatose after being resuscitated from CA. Assessment of the prognosis for a patient in this group can be made after 72 hours and a multi-modal approach to the patient is required.

  13. Aggressive Fluid Resuscitation in Severe Pediatric Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharara-Chami Rana

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This report describes a severe case of hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome complicated by rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, hyperthermia, and hypovolemic shock, with management centred upon fluid administration. Design. Case report. Setting. Pediatric intensive care unit in university teaching hospital. Patients. 12 years old adolescent female presenting with hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome with a new diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Intervention. Aggressive fluid resuscitation and insulin. Main results. The patient had a good outcome, discharged home on hospital day 6. Conclusions. Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome is associated with a number of complications. Management strategies are undefined, given the rarity of its presentation, and further studies are warranted.

  14. Nationwide survey of resuscitation education in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäntti, H; Silfvast, T; Turpeinen, A; Paakkonen, H; Uusaro, A

    2009-09-01

    Good-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is highlighted in the International Resuscitation Guidelines, but clinically the quality of CPR is often poor. Education of CPR has a major role in the primary skills imparted to students. Different methods can be used to teach CPR quality. We evaluated the current status of their usage in Finland institutes teaching students of emergency medicine at different levels. The following institutes were included in an anonymous survey: medical schools (teaching future physicians), universities of applied sciences (paramedics), colleges (emergency medical technicians) and emergency services college (fire-fighters). Hours of teaching theory lessons of CPR and hours of small group training were evaluated. In particular, we focussed on the teaching methods for adequate chest compression rate and depth. Twenty-one of 30 institutes responded to the questionnaire. The median for hours of theory lessons of CPR was 8h (range: 2-28 h). The median for hours of small group training was 10 (range: 3-40 h). The methods of teaching adequate chest compression rate were instructors' visual estimation in 28.5% of the institutions, watch in 33.3%, metronome in 9.5% and manikins' graphic in 28.5% of institutions. The methods of teaching adequate chest compression depth were instructors' visual estimation in 33.3%, in manikins light indicators in 23.8% and manikins' graphics in 52.3% of institutions. The hours of theoretic lessons and small group training vary widely among different institutes. In one-third of institutions, the instructor's visual estimation was a sole method used to teach adequate chest compression rate and depth. Different technical methods were surprisingly seldom used.

  15. Brain Resuscitation in the Drowning Victim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topjian, Alexis A.; Berg, Robert A.; Bierens, Joost J. L. M.; Branche, Christine M.; Clark, Robert S.; Friberg, Hans; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W. E.; Holzer, Michael; Katz, Laurence M.; Knape, Johannes T. A.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Nadkarni, Vinay; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.

    2013-01-01

    Drowning is a leading cause of accidental death. Survivors may sustain severe neurologic morbidity. There is negligible research specific to brain injury in drowning making current clinical management non-specific to this disorder. This review represents an evidence-based consensus effort to provide recommendations for management and investigation of the drowning victim. Epidemiology, brain-oriented prehospital and intensive care, therapeutic hypothermia, neuroimaging/monitoring, biomarkers, and neuroresuscitative pharmacology are addressed. When cardiac arrest is present, chest compressions with rescue breathing are recommended due to the asphyxial insult. In the comatose patient with restoration of spontaneous circulation, hypoxemia and hyperoxemia should be avoided, hyperthermia treated, and induced hypothermia (32–34 °C) considered. Arterial hypotension/hypertension should be recognized and treated. Prevent hypoglycemia and treat hyperglycemia. Treat clinical seizures and consider treating non-convulsive status epilepticus. Serial neurologic examinations should be provided. Brain imaging and serial biomarker measurement may aid prognostication. Continuous electroencephalography and N20 somatosensory evoked potential monitoring may be considered. Serial biomarker measurement (e.g., neuron specific enolase) may aid prognostication. There is insufficient evidence to recommend use of any specific brain-oriented neuroresuscitative pharmacologic therapy other than that required to restore and maintain normal physiology. Following initial stabilization, victims should be transferred to centers with expertise in age-specific post-resuscitation neurocritical care. Care should be documented, reviewed, and quality improvement assessment performed. Preclinical research should focus on models of asphyxial cardiac arrest. Clinical research should focus on improved cardiopulmonary resuscitation, re-oxygenation/reperfusion strategies, therapeutic hypothermia

  16. Fluid Resuscitation for Hemorrhagic Shock in Tactical Combat Casualty Care: TCCC Guidelines Change 14-01 - 2 June 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-02

    associated coagulopathy.32 The presence of a coagulopathy was found to nearly double the mortality in patients with traumatic subdural hematoma .125 The...375. 125. Lemcke J, Al-Zain F, Brelie CvD, Meier U. The influence of coagulopathy on outcome after traumatic subdural hematoma : a retrospective...of a subdural mass. Anesthesiology. 1991;75:319–327. 165. Stanford G, Patterson C, Payne L, Fabian T. Hypertonic saline resuscitation in a porcine

  17. Acute kidney injury in critically burned patients resuscitated with a protocol that includes low doses of Hydroxyethyl Starch

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Sánchez, M.; Garcia-de-Lorenzo, A.; Cachafeiro, L.; Herrero, E.; Asensio, MJ.; Agrifoglio, A.; Flores, E.; Estebanez, B.; Extremera, P.; Iglesias, C.; Martinez, J.R..

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important complication in burn patients. Recently, it has been recommended that hydroxyethyl starch (HES) be avoided in burn patients because it increases the incidence of AKI. Our purpose was to study incidence of AKI in critically ill burn patients resuscitated with Ringer’s solution and supplements of HES. We conducted an observational study of 165 patients admitted to the critical care burn unit (with 30 ± 15% TBSA burned). The main outcome measures were in...

  18. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation til behandling af hjertestop på hospital udløst af multifaktoriel hypoksi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akkawi, Ali; Petersen, Joachim Hoffmann; Riber, Lars

    2018-01-01

    A 69-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency unit due to respiratory distress. Initially the blood pressure was normal. However, it decreased concomitant with low saturation (70%), and it was decided to intubate her due to hypoxia. During intubation, she developed in-hospital cardiac arrest ...... with pulseless electric activity as initial rhythm. Cardio pulmonary resuscitation was initiated, but sufficient spontaneous circulation was not obtained. We successfully initiated extracorporeal life support, and the patient survived with a good outcome....

  19. "Utstein style" spreadsheet and database programs based on Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access software for CPR data management of in-hospital resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bruce D; Whitlock, Warren L

    2004-04-01

    In 1997, The American Heart Association in association with representatives of the International Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) published recommended guidelines for reviewing, reporting and conducting in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) outcomes using the "Utstein style". Using these guidelines, we developed two Microsoft Office based database management programs that may be useful to the resuscitation community. We developed a user-friendly spreadsheet based on MS Office Excel. The user enters patient variables such as name, age, and diagnosis. Then, event resuscitation variables such as time of collapse and CPR team arrival are entered from a "code flow sheet". Finally, outcome variables such as patient condition at different time points are recorded. The program then makes automatic calculations of average response times, survival rates and other important outcome measurements. Also using the Utstein style, we developed a database program based on MS Office Access. To promote free public access to these programs, we established at a website. These programs will help hospitals track, analyze, and present their CPR outcomes data. Clinical CPR researchers might also find the programs useful because they are easily modified and have statistical functions.

  20. Effects of the administration of 2,3-butanedione monoxime during conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation on ischaemic contracture and resuscitability in a pig model of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Kook; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Choi, Sung Soo; Park, Sang Wook; Yun, Seong Woo; Lee, Sung Min; Kim, Nan Yeol; Heo, Tag; Min, Yong Il

    2015-02-01

    Ischaemic contracture compromises the haemodynamic effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and resuscitability. 2,3-Butanedione monoxime (BDM) reduced ischaemic contracture by inhibiting actin-myosin crossbridge formation in an isolated heart model. We investigated the effects of BDM on ischaemic contracture and resuscitation outcomes in a pig model of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). After 15min of untreated ventricular fibrillation, followed by 8min of basic life support, 16 pigs were randomised to receive either 2mlkg(-1) of BDM solution (25gl(-1)) or 2mlkg(-1) of saline during advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). During the ACLS, the control group showed an increase in left ventricular (LV) wall thickness from 10.0mm (10.0-10.8) to 13.0mm (13.0-13.0) and a decrease in LV chamber area from 8.13cm(2) (7.59-9.29) to 7.47cm(2) (5.84-8.43). In contrast, the BDM group showed a decrease in the LV wall thickness from 10mm (9.0-10.8) to 8.5mm (7.0-9.8) and an increase in the LV chamber area from 9.86cm(2) (7.22-12.39) to 12.15 cm(2) (8.02-14.40). Mixed model analyses of the LV wall thickness and LV chamber area revealed significant group effects and group-time interactions. Spontaneous circulation was restored in four (50%) animals in the control group and in eight (100%) animals in the BDM group (p=0.077). All the resuscitated animals survived during an intensive care period of 4h. BDM administered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation reversed ischaemic contracture in a pig model of OHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative Effectiveness of Emergency Resuscitative Thoracotomy versus Closed Chest Compressions among Patients with Critical Blunt Trauma: A Nationwide Cohort Study in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodai Suzuki

    Full Text Available Although emergency resuscitative thoracotomy is performed as a salvage maneuver for critical blunt trauma patients, evidence supporting superior effectiveness of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy compared to conventional closed-chest compressions remains insufficient. The objective of this study was to investigate whether emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at the emergency department or in the operating room was associated with favourable outcomes after blunt trauma and to compare its effectiveness with that of closed-chest compressions.This was a retrospective nationwide cohort study. Data were obtained from the Japan Trauma Data Bank for the period between 2004 and 2012. The primary and secondary outcomes were patient survival rates 24 h and 28 d after emergency department arrival. Statistical analyses were performed using multivariable generalized mixed-effects regression analysis. We adjusted for the effects of different hospitals by introducing random intercepts in regression analysis to account for the differential quality of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at hospitals where patients in cardiac arrest were treated. Sensitivity analyses were performed using propensity score matching.In total, 1,377 consecutive, critical blunt trauma patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency department or operating room were included in the study. Of these patients, 484 (35.1% underwent emergency resuscitative thoracotomy and 893 (64.9% received closed-chest compressions. Compared to closed-chest compressions, emergency resuscitative thoracotomy was associated with lower survival rate 24 h after emergency department arrival (4.5% vs. 17.5%, respectively, P < 0.001 and 28 d after arrival (1.2% vs. 6.0%, respectively, P < 0.001. Multivariable generalized mixed-effects regression analysis with and without a propensity score-matched dataset revealed that the odds ratio for an unfavorable survival rate after 24 h was lower for

  2. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: state of the art in 2011

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... knowledge and science of resuscitation and offer treatment recommendations. .... anaesthesia falls into one of two categories: medication related and ..... manual pads, or by pressing the button on the defibrillator. Check the ...

  3. Evolution of Burn Resuscitation in Operation Iraqi Freedom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Kevin K; Blackbourne, Lorne H; Wolf, Steven E; White, Chrsitopher E; Renz, Evan M; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Holcomb, John B; Barillo, David J

    2006-01-01

    ... of the burn resuscitation. Critical advances in air evacuation of the war wounded, thorough prewar planning, and sustained burn care education of deployed personnel have proven vital in the optimal care of our injured soldiers...

  4. Prolonged Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Process and Lower Frequency of Medical Staff Visit Predicts Independently In-hospital Resuscitation Success in the Elderly Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Chen Tsai

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: Although the initial resuscitation success rate was not affected by age, a longer time interval between the last medical staffs’ visit and the onset of resuscitation did result in a worse success rate in elderly patients. Our data suggest that more frequent staff visits to the elderly population during hospitalization could alter initial resuscitation results.

  5. Novel electronic refreshers for cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magura Stephen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently the American Red Cross requires that individuals renew their cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR certification annually; this often requires a 4- to 8-hour refresher course. Those trained in CPR often show a decrease in essential knowledge and skills within just a few months after training. New electronic means of communication have expanded the possibilities for delivering CPR refreshers to members of the general public who receive CPR training. The study’s purpose was to determine the efficacy of three novel CPR refreshers - online website, e-mail and text messaging – for improving three outcomes of CPR training - skill retention, confidence for using CPR and intention to use CPR. These three refreshers may be considered “novel” in that they are not typically used to refresh CPR knowledge and skills. Methods The study conducted two randomized clinical trials of the novel CPR refreshers. A mailed brochure was a traditional, passive refresher format and served as the control condition. In Trial 1, the refreshers were delivered in a single episode at 6 months after initial CPR training. In Trial 2, the refreshers were delivered twice, at 6 and 9 months after initial CPR training, to test the effect of a repeated delivery. Outcomes for the three novel refreshers vs. the mailed brochure were determined at 12 months after initial CPR training. Results Assignment to any of three novel refreshers did not improve outcomes of CPR training one year later in comparison with receiving a mailed brochure. Comparing outcomes for subjects who actually reviewed some of the novel refreshers vs. those who did not indicated a significant positive effect for one outcome, confidence for performing CPR. The website refresher was associated with increased behavioral intent to perform CPR. Stated satisfaction with the refreshers was relatively high. The number of episodes of refreshers (one vs. two did not have a significant effect

  6. Novel electronic refreshers for cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently the American Red Cross requires that individuals renew their cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification annually; this often requires a 4- to 8-hour refresher course. Those trained in CPR often show a decrease in essential knowledge and skills within just a few months after training. New electronic means of communication have expanded the possibilities for delivering CPR refreshers to members of the general public who receive CPR training. The study’s purpose was to determine the efficacy of three novel CPR refreshers - online website, e-mail and text messaging – for improving three outcomes of CPR training - skill retention, confidence for using CPR and intention to use CPR. These three refreshers may be considered “novel” in that they are not typically used to refresh CPR knowledge and skills. Methods The study conducted two randomized clinical trials of the novel CPR refreshers. A mailed brochure was a traditional, passive refresher format and served as the control condition. In Trial 1, the refreshers were delivered in a single episode at 6 months after initial CPR training. In Trial 2, the refreshers were delivered twice, at 6 and 9 months after initial CPR training, to test the effect of a repeated delivery. Outcomes for the three novel refreshers vs. the mailed brochure were determined at 12 months after initial CPR training. Results Assignment to any of three novel refreshers did not improve outcomes of CPR training one year later in comparison with receiving a mailed brochure. Comparing outcomes for subjects who actually reviewed some of the novel refreshers vs. those who did not indicated a significant positive effect for one outcome, confidence for performing CPR. The website refresher was associated with increased behavioral intent to perform CPR. Stated satisfaction with the refreshers was relatively high. The number of episodes of refreshers (one vs. two) did not have a significant effect on any outcomes

  7. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: determinant factors for immediate survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Aparecida Morais

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze determinant factors for the immediate survival of persons who receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation from the advanced support units of the Mobile Emergency Medical Services (SAMU of Belo Horizonte.METHOD: this is a retrospective, epidemiological study which analyzed 1,165 assistance forms, from the period 2008 - 2010. The collected data followed the Utstein style, being submitted to descriptive and analytical statistics with tests with levels of significance of 5%.RESULTS: the majority were male, the median age was 64 years, and the ambulance response time, nine minutes. Immediate survival was observed in 239 persons. An association was ascertained of this outcome with "cardiac arrest witnessed by persons trained in basic life support" (OR=3.49; p<0.05; CI 95%, "cardiac arrest witnessed by Mobile Emergency Medical Services teams" (OR=2.99; p<0.05; CI95%, "only the carry out of basic life support" (OR=0.142; p<0.05; CI95%, and "initial cardiac rhythm of asystole" (OR=0.33; p<0.05; CI 95%.CONCLUSION: early access to cardiopulmonary resuscitation was related to a favorable outcome, and the non-undertaking of advanced support, and asystole, were associated with worse outcomes. Basic and advanced life support techniques can alter survival in the event of cardiac arrest.

  8. The Level Of Knowlege Guidelines Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation For Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Lukešová, Ludmila

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to determine the level of theoretical knowledge of the procedures of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of selected non-medical staff members in VFN in Prague. The work is subdivided into a theoretical and a practical part. In the first part I comment on the history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the basic and widespread vital support to adults and children and the didactics of CPR. In the second- practical part I compare the theoretical knowledge of CPR of selected n...

  9. Compliance with barrier precautions during paediatric trauma resuscitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Deirdre C; Carter, Elizabeth A; Waterhouse, Lauren J; Burd, Randall S

    2013-03-01

    Barrier precautions protect patients and providers from blood-borne pathogens. Although barrier precaution compliance has been shown to be low among adult trauma teams, it has not been evaluated during paediatric resuscitations in which perceived risk of disease transmission may be low. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with compliance with barrier precautions during paediatric trauma resuscitations. Video recordings of resuscitations performed on injured children (compliance with an established policy requiring gowns and gloves. Depending on activation level, trauma team members included up to six physicians, four nurses, and a respiratory therapist. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the effect of team role, resuscitation factors, and injury mechanism on barrier precaution compliance. Over twelve weeks, 1138 trauma team members participated in 128 resuscitations (4.7% penetrating injuries, 9.4% highest level activations). Compliance with barrier precautions was 81.3%, with higher compliance seen among roles primarily at the bedside compared to positions not primarily at the bedside (90.7% vs. 65.1%, pcompliance, while surgical attendings (20.8%) had the lowest (prole, increased compliance was observed during resuscitations of patients with penetrating injuries (OR=3.97 [95% CI: 1.35-11.70], p=0.01), during resuscitations triaged to the highest activation level (OR=2.61 [95% CI: 1.34-5.10], p=0.005), and among team members present before patient arrival (OR=4.14 [95% CI: 2.29-7.39], pCompliance with barrier precautions varies by trauma team role. Team members have higher compliance when treating children with penetrating and high acuity injuries and when arriving before the patient. Interventions integrating barrier precautions into the workflow of team members are needed to reduce this variability and improve compliance with universal precautions during paediatric trauma resuscitations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  10. Fluid resuscitation for major burn patients with the TMMU protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gaoxing; Peng, Yizhi; Yuan, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Wenguang; Wu, Jun; Tang, Jin; Huang, Yuesheng; Fitzgerald, Mark

    2009-12-01

    Fluid resuscitation is one of the critical treatments for the major burn patient in the early phases after injury. We evaluated the practice of fluid resuscitation for severely burned patients with the Third Military Medical University (TMMU) protocol, which is most widely used in many regions of China. Patients with major burns (>30% total body surface area (TBSA)) presenting to Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, between January 2005 and October 2007, were included in this study. Fluid resuscitation was initiated by the TMMU protocol. A total of 71 patients were (46 adults and 25 children) included in this study. All patients survived the first 48 h after injury smoothly and none developed abdominal compartment syndrome or other recognised complications associated with fluid resuscitation. The average quantity of fluid infused was 3.3-61.33% more than that calculated based on the TMMU protocol in both adult and paediatric groups. The average urine output during the first 24h after injury was about 1.2 ml per kg body weight per hour in the two groups, but reached 1.2 ml and 1.7 ml during the second 24h in adult and pediatric groups, respectively. This study indicates that the TMMU protocol for fluid resuscitation is a feasible option for burn patients. Individualised resuscitation - guided by the physiological response to fluid administration - is still important as in other protocols.

  11. The role of simulation in teaching pediatric resuscitation: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Y

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Yiqun Lin,1 Adam Cheng2 1KidSIM-ASPIRE Simulation Research Program, Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2KidSIM-ASPIRE Research Program, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada Abstract: The use of simulation for teaching the knowledge, skills, and behaviors necessary for effective pediatric resuscitation has seen widespread growth and adoption across pediatric institutions. In this paper, we describe the application of simulation in pediatric resuscitation training and review the evidence for the use of simulation in neonatal resuscitation, pediatric advanced life support, procedural skills training, and crisis resource management training. We also highlight studies supporting several key instructional design elements that enhance learning, including the use of high-fidelity simulation, distributed practice, deliberate practice, feedback, and debriefing. Simulation-based training is an effective modality for teaching pediatric resuscitation concepts. Current literature has revealed some research gaps in simulation-based education, which could indicate the direction for the future of pediatric resuscitation research. Keywords: simulation, pediatric resuscitation, medical education, instructional design, crisis resource management, health care

  12. Recommendations From the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long-Term Care Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilton, Katherine S; Bowers, Barbara J; Heath, Hazel; Shannon, Kay; Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Prentice, Dawn; Siegel, Elena O; Meyer, Julienne; Chu, Charlene H; Ploeg, Jenny; Boscart, Veronique M; Corazzini, Kirsten N; Anderson, Ruth A; Mueller, Christine A

    2016-02-01

    In response to the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics' global agenda for clinical research and quality of care in long-term care homes (LTCHs), the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long Term Care Homes (the Consortium) was formed to develop nursing leadership capacity and address the concerns regarding the current state of professional nursing practice in LTCHs. At its invitational, 2-day inaugural meeting, the Consortium brought together international nurse experts to explore the potential of registered nurses (RNs) who work as supervisors or charge nurses within the LTCHs and the value of their contribution in nursing homes, consider what RN competencies might be needed, discuss effective educational (curriculum and practice) experiences, health care policy, and human resources planning requirements, and to identify what sustainable nurse leadership strategies and models might enhance the effectiveness of RNs in improving resident, family, and staff outcomes. The Consortium made recommendations about the following priority issues for action: (1) define the competencies of RNs required to care for older adults in LTCHs; (2) create an LTCH environment in which the RN role is differentiated from other team members and RNs can practice to their full scope; and (3) prepare RN leaders to operate effectively in person-centered care LTCH environments. In addition to clear recommendations for practice, the Consortium identified several areas in which further research is needed. The Consortium advocated for a research agenda that emphasizes an international coordination of research efforts to explore similar issues, the pursuit of examining the impact of nursing and organizational models, and the showcasing of excellence in nursing practice in care homes, so that others might learn from what works. Several studies already under way are also described. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care

  13. Advanced Cardiac Resuscitation Evaluation (ACRE: A randomised single-blind controlled trial of peer-led vs. expert-led advanced resuscitation training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advanced resuscitation skills training is an important and enjoyable part of medical training, but requires small group instruction to ensure active participation of all students. Increases in student numbers have made this increasingly difficult to achieve. Methods A single-blind randomised controlled trial of peer-led vs. expert-led resuscitation training was performed using a group of sixth-year medical students as peer instructors. The expert instructors were a senior and a middle grade doctor, and a nurse who is an Advanced Life Support (ALS Instructor. A power calculation showed that the trial would have a greater than 90% chance of rejecting the null hypothesis (that expert-led groups performed 20% better than peer-led groups if that were the true situation. Secondary outcome measures were the proportion of High Pass grades in each groups and safety incidents. The peer instructors designed and delivered their own course material. To ensure safety, the peer-led groups used modified defibrillators that could deliver only low-energy shocks. Blinded assessment was conducted using an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE. The checklist items were based on International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR guidelines using Ebel standard-setting methods that emphasised patient and staff safety and clinical effectiveness. The results were analysed using Exact methods, chi-squared and t-test. Results A total of 132 students were randomised: 58 into the expert-led group, 74 into the peer-led group. 57/58 (98% of students from the expert-led group achieved a Pass compared to 72/74 (97% from the peer-led group: Exact statistics confirmed that it was very unlikely (p = 0.0001 that the expert-led group was 20% better than the peer-led group. There were no safety incidents, and High Pass grades were achieved by 64 (49% of students: 33/58 (57% from the expert-led group, 31/74 (42% from the peer-led group. Exact

  14. Prehospital management and fluid resuscitation in hypotensive trauma patients admitted to Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talving, Peep; Pålstedt, Joakim; Riddez, Louis

    2005-01-01

    Few previous studies have been conducted on the prehospital management of hypotensive trauma patients in Stockholm County. The aim of this study was to describe the prehospital management of hypotensive trauma patients admitted to the largest trauma center in Sweden, and to assess whether prehospital trauma life support (PHTLS) guidelines have been implemented regarding prehospital time intervals and fluid therapy. In addition, the effects of the age, type of injury, injury severity, prehospital time interval, blood pressure, and fluid therapy on outcome were investigated. This is a retrospective, descriptive study on consecutive, hypotensive trauma patients (systolic blood pressure Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, during 2001-2003. The reported values are medians with interquartile ranges. Basic demographics, prehospital time intervals and interventions, injury severity scores (ISS), type and volumes of prehospital fluid resuscitation, and 30-day mortality were abstracted. The effects of the patient's age, gender, prehospital time interval, type of injury, injury severity, on-scene and emergency department blood pressure, and resuscitation fluid volumes on mortality were analyzed using the exact logistic regression model. In 102 (71 male) adult patients (age > or = 15 years) recruited, the median age was 35.5 years (range: 27-55 years) and 77 patients (75%) had suffered blunt injury. The predominant trauma mechanisms were falls between levels (24%) and motor vehicle crashes (22%) with an ISS of 28.5 (range: 16-50). The on-scene time interval was 19 minutes (range: 12-24 minutes). Fluid therapy was initiated at the scene of injury in the majority of patients (73%) regardless of the type of injury (77 blunt [75%] / 25 penetrating [25%]) or injury severity (ISS: 0-20; 21-40; 41-75). Age (odds ratio (OR) = 1.04), male gender (OR = 3.2), ISS 21-40 (OR = 13.6), and ISS >40 (OR = 43.6) were the significant factors affecting outcome in the exact

  15. Prevalence of systemic air-embolism after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation in newborns: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbertsma, Feico J J; Mohns, Thilo; Bok, Levinus A; Niemarkt, Hendrik J; Kramer, Boris W

    2015-08-01

    Chest compressions (CC) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are the cornerstone of adult CPR protocols and are meant to restore circulation and improve outcome. Although adverse effects such as air-embolisms have been reported, these are rare and considered to be outweighed by beneficial effect. In newborns, however, the lung tissue is more fragile. Thus, the high intra-thoracic pressures resulting from CC may make the newborns more vulnerable for air-embolisms. We studied the postmortem prevalence of air-embolism in neonates that have received CPR. Prospective cohort analysis of newborns receiving CC during CPR. CPR was performed by trained staff according to ILCOR guidelines, in a tertiary hospital. Air-embolisms were sought after using CT/MRI and autopsy. During a 61/2 year period (2007-2014), n = 56 newborns received CC. Newborns were resuscitated following severe perinatal hypoxia, or due to complications during NICU treatment. In n = 14 (25.0%) circulation could not be restored (mean CPR duration: 32.7 ± 15.2 min). Post-mortem CT/MRI was performed in n = 9, of whom n = 8 (88.9%) had air-embolisms. Autopsy was performed in n = 9. The air-embolisms could not be retraced on autopsy except for n = 1 patient. In patients with CPR resulting in restored circulation (n = 42), no CT or MRI was performed for comparison due to radiation and/or hemodynamic instability. Cerebral ultrasound could not identify or exclude air-embolisms in this subgroup. Post-mortem CT after prolonged resuscitation showed a high prevalence of intravascular air-embolism. Autopsy was not suited to detect air-embolism. The clinical importance of air-embolisms on the lethal outcome needs further research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of Bystander Automated External Defibrillator Use on Survival and Functional Outcomes in Shockable Observed Public Cardiac Arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Ross A; Brown, Siobhan P; Rea, Thomas; Aufderheide, Tom; Barbic, David; Buick, Jason E; Christenson, James; Idris, Ahamed H; Jasti, Jamie; Kampp, Michael; Kudenchuk, Peter; May, Susanne; Muhr, Marc; Nichol, Graham; Ornato, Joseph P; Sopko, George; Vaillancourt, Christian; Morrison, Laurie; Weisfeldt, Myron

    2018-02-26

    Background - Survival following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with shockable rhythms can be improved with early defibrillation. Although shockable OHCA accounts for only ≈25% of overall arrests, ≈60% of public OHCAs are shockable, offering the possibility of restoring thousands of individuals to full recovery with early defibrillation by bystanders. We sought to determine the association of bystander automated external defibrillator use with survival and functional outcomes in shockable observed public OHCA. Methods - From 2011 to 2015, the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium prospectively collected detailed information on all cardiac arrests at 9 regional centers. The exposures were shock administration by a bystander-applied automated external defibrillator in comparison with initial defibrillation by emergency medical services. The primary outcome measure was discharge with normal or near-normal (favorable) functional status defined as a modified Rankin Score ≤2. Survival to hospital discharge was the secondary outcome measure. Results -Among 49 555 OHCAs, 4115 (8.3%) observed public OHCAs were analyzed, of which 2500 (60.8%) were shockable. A bystander shock was applied in 18.8% of the shockable arrests. Patients shocked by a bystander were significantly more likely to survive to discharge (66.5% versus 43.0%) and be discharged with favorable functional outcome (57.1% versus 32.7%) than patients initially shocked by emergency medical services. After adjusting for known predictors of outcome, the odds ratio associated with a bystander shock was 2.62 (95% confidence interval, 2.07-3.31) for survival to hospital discharge and 2.73 (95% confidence interval, 2.17-3.44) for discharge with favorable functional outcome. The benefit of bystander shock increased progressively as emergency medical services response time became longer. Conclusions - Bystander automated external defibrillator use before emergency medical services arrival in shockable observed

  17. Born not breathing: A randomised trial comparing two self-inflating bag-masks during newborn resuscitation in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallinger, Monica; Ersdal, Hege Langli; Francis, Fortunata; Yeconia, Anita; Mduma, Estomih; Kidanto, Hussein; Linde, Jørgen Erland; Eilevstjønn, Joar; Gunnes, Nina; Størdal, Ketil

    2017-07-01

    Effective ventilation is crucial to save non-breathing newborns. We compared standard equipment for newborn resuscitation to a new Upright bag, in an area with high neonatal mortality. Newborns requiring resuscitation at Haydom Lutheran Hospital, Tanzania, were ventilated with 230ml standard or 320ml Upright bag-mask by weekly non-blinded block randomisation. A Laerdal Newborn Resuscitation Monitor collected ventilation data through a flow sensor between mask and bag and heart rate with electrocardiography electrodes. Primary outcome was expiratory tidal volume per birth weight. Of 6110 babies born, 136 randomised to standard bag-mask and 192 to Upright, both groups had similar birth weight, gestational age, Apgar scores, gender, and mode of delivery. Compared to standard bag-mask, Upright gave higher median expiratory tidal volume (8.6ml/kg (IQR: 3.5-13.8) vs. 10.0ml/kg (IQR: 4.3-16.8) difference ratio 1.29, 95%CI 1.05, 1.58, p=0.014)), increased mean airway and peak inspiratory pressures, and higher early expired CO 2 (median at 20s 4.2% vs. 3.2%, p=0.0099). Clinical outcome 30min post-delivery was normal in 44% with standard versus 57% with Upright (p=0.016), but similar at 24h. Upright provided higher expired tidal volume, MAP, PIP and early ECO 2 than the standard bag. Clinical outcome differed at 30min, but not at 24h. Larger volume of Upright than standard bag can be an important factor. The results are relevant for low- and high-income settings as ventilatory and heart rate parameters during resuscitation of newborns are rarely reported. Trial registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01869582. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Overview of the Inland California Translational Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkas, Linda H.

    2017-05-01

    The mission of the Inland California Translational Consortium (ICTC), an independent research consortium comprising a unique hub of regional institutions (City of Hope [COH], California Institute of Technology [Caltech], Jet Propulsion Laboratory [JPL], University of California Riverside [UCR], and Claremont Colleges Keck Graduate Institute [KGI], is to institute a new paradigm within the academic culture to accelerate translation of innovative biomedical discoveries into clinical applications that positively affect human health and life. The ICTC actively supports clinical translational research as well as the implementation and advancement of novel education and training models for the translation of basic discoveries into workable products and practices that preserve and improve human health while training and educating at all levels of the workforce using innovative forward-thinking approaches.

  19. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkert, Wynn; Kumar, Arvind; Becker, Bryan; Schwinke, Victor; Gonzalez, Angel; McGregor, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  20. Consortium for Verification Technology Fellowship Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, Lorraine E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-06-01

    As one recipient of the Consortium for Verification Technology (CVT) Fellowship, I spent eight days as a visiting scientist at the University of Michigan, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences (NERS). During this time, I participated in multiple department and research group meetings and presentations, met with individual faculty and students, toured multiple laboratories, and taught one-half of a one-unit class on Risk Analysis in Nuclear Arms control (six 1.5 hour lectures). The following report describes some of the interactions that I had during my time as well as a brief discussion of the impact of this fellowship on members of the consortium and on me/my laboratory’s technical knowledge and network.

  1. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

    2010-12-08

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  2. The COPD Biomarker Qualification Consortium (CBQC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casaburi, Richard; Celli, Bartolome; Crapo, James

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Knowledge about the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has advanced dramatically over the last 30 years. Unfortunately, this has had little impact in terms of new treatments. Over the same time frame, only one new class of medication for COPD......, and no interested party has been in a position to undertake such a process. In order to facilitate the development of novel tools to assess new treatments, the Food and Drug Administration, in collaboration with the COPD Foundation, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute and scientists from the pharmaceutical...... industry and academia conducted a workshop to survey the available information that could contribute to new tools. Based on this, a collaborative project, the COPD Biomarkers Qualification Consortium, was initiated. The Consortium in now actively preparing integrated data sets from existing resources...

  3. Quality of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during paediatric resuscitation training: time to stop the blind leading the blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshid, Muhammad; Lo, Tsz-Yan Milly; Reynolds, Fiona

    2009-05-01

    Recent evidence suggested that the quality of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during adult advanced life support training was suboptimal. This study aimed to assess the CPR quality of a paediatric resuscitation training programme, and to determine whether it was sufficiently addressed by the trainee team leaders during training. CPR quality of 20 consecutive resuscitation scenario training sessions was audited prospectively using a pre-designed proforma. A consultant intensivist and a senior nurse who were also Advanced Paediatric Life Support (APLS) instructors assessed the CPR quality which included ventilation frequency, chest compression rate and depth, and any unnecessary interruption in chest compressions. Team leaders' response to CPR quality and elective change of compression rescuer during training were also recorded. Airway patency was not assessed in 13 sessions while ventilation rate was too fast in 18 sessions. Target compression rate was not achieved in only 1 session. The median chest compression rate was 115 beats/min. Chest compressions were too shallow in 10 sessions and were interrupted unnecessarily in 13 sessions. More than 50% of training sessions did not have elective change of the compression rescuer. 19 team leaders failed to address CPR quality during training despite all team leaders being certified APLS providers. The quality of CPR performance was suboptimal during paediatric resuscitation training and team leaders-in-training had little awareness of this inadequacy. Detailed CPR quality assessment and feedback should be integrated into paediatric resuscitation training to ensure optimal performance in real life resuscitations.

  4. The pediatric diabetes consortium: improving care of children with type 1 diabetes through collaborative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Although there are some interactions between the major pediatric diabetes programs in the United States, there has been no formal, independent structure for collaboration, the sharing of information, and the development of joint research projects that utilize common outcome measures. To fill this unmet clinical and research need, a consortium of seven pediatric diabetes centers in the United States has formed the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium (PDC) through an unrestricted grant from Novo Nordisk, Inc. (Princeton, NJ). This article describes the organizational structure of the PDC and the design of a study of important clinical outcomes in children and adolescents with new-onset, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The outcomes study will describe the changes in A1c levels, the frequency of adverse events (diabetic ketoacidosis/severe hypoglycemia), and the frequency and timing of the "honeymoon" phase in newly diagnosed patients with T1DM over the first 12-24 months of the disease and examine the relationship between these clinical outcomes and demographic, socioeconomic, and treatment factors. This project will also allow the Consortium to develop a cohort of youth with T1DM whose clinical course has been well characterized and who wish to participate in future clinical trials and/or contribute to a repository of biological samples.

  5. The ARC (Astrophysical Research Consortium) telescope project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K. S.

    A consortium of universities intends to construct a 3.5 meter optical-infrared telescope at a site in south-central New Mexico. The use of innovative mirror technology, a fast primary, and an alt-azimuth mounting results in a compact and lightweight instrument. This telescope will be uniquely well-suited for addressing certain observational programs by virtue of its capability for fully remote operation and rapid instrument changes.

  6. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Consortium Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-03-01

    This is the third progress report of the M.I.T. Home Automation and Healthcare Consortium-Phase Two. It covers majority of the new findings, concepts...research projects of home automation and healthcare, ranging from human modeling, patient monitoring, and diagnosis to new sensors and actuators, physical...aids, human-machine interface and home automation infrastructure. This report contains several patentable concepts, algorithms, and designs.

  7. Removal of Triphenylmethane Dyes by Bacterial Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihane Cheriaa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila-(CM-4 was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L and malachite green (50 mg/L dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes.

  8. Is hospital care of major importance for outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest? Experience acquired from patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitated by the same Emergency Medical Service and admitted to one of two hospitals over a 16-year period in the municipality of Göteborg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engdahl, J; Abrahamsson, P; Bång, A; Lindqvist, J; Karlsson, T; Herlitz, J

    2000-02-01

    To describe patient characteristics, hospital investigations and interventions and early mortality among patients being hospitalized after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in two hospitals. Municipality of Göteborg, Sweden. All patients suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who were successfully resuscitated and admitted to hospital between 1 October 1980 and 31 December 1996. All patients were resuscitated by the same Emergency Medical Service and admitted alive to one of the two city hospitals in Göteborg. Of 579 patients admitted to Sahlgrenska Hospital, 253 (44%) were discharged alive and of 459 patients admitted to Ostra Hospital, 152 (33%) were discharged alive (P percentage of patients admitted to Sahlgrenska Hospital underwent coronary angiography (P < 0.001), electrophysiological testing (P < 0.001), Holter recording (P < 0.001), echocardiography (P = 0.004), percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA, P = 0.009), implantation of automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD, P = 0.03) and exercise stress tests (P = 0.003). Inhabitants in the catchment area of Ostra Hospital had a less favourable socio-economic profile. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest may be affected by the course of hospital management. Other variables that might influence survival are socio-economic factors and cardiorespiratory status on admission to hospital. Further investigation is called for as more patients are being hospitalised alive after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

  9. Addressing the challenges of obtaining functional outcomes in traumatic brain injury research: missing data patterns, timing of follow-up, and three prognostic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelnick, Leila R; Morrison, Laurie J; Devlin, Sean M; Bulger, Eileen M; Brasel, Karen J; Sheehan, Kellie; Minei, Joseph P; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Tisherman, Samuel A; Rizoli, Sandro; Karmy-Jones, Riyad; van Heest, Rardi; Newgard, Craig D

    2014-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common and debilitating. Randomized trials of interventions for TBI ideally assess effectiveness by using long-term functional neurological outcomes, but such outcomes are difficult to obtain and costly. If there is little change between functional status at hospital discharge versus 6 months, then shorter-term outcomes may be adequate for use in future clinical trials. Using data from a previously published multi-center, randomized, placebo-controlled TBI clinical trial, we evaluated patterns of missing outcome data, changes in functional status between hospital discharge and 6 months, and three prognostic models to predict long-term functional outcome from covariates available at hospital discharge (functional measures, demographics, and injury characteristics). The Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Hypertonic Saline trial enrolled 1282 TBI patients, obtaining the primary outcome of 6-month Glasgow Outcome Score Extended (GOSE) for 85% of patients, but missing the primary outcome for the remaining 15%. Patients with missing outcomes had less-severe injuries, higher neurological function at discharge (GOSE), and shorter hospital stays than patients whose GOSE was obtained. Of 1066 (83%) patients whose GOSE was obtained both at hospital discharge and at 6-months, 71% of patients had the same dichotomized functional status (severe disability/death vs. moderate/no disability) after 6 months as at discharge, 28% had an improved functional status, and 1% had worsened. Performance was excellent (C-statistic between 0.88 and 0.91) for all three prognostic models and calibration adequate for two models (p values, 0.22 and 0.85). Our results suggest that multiple imputation of the standard 6-month GOSE may be reasonable in TBI research when the primary outcome cannot be obtained through other means.

  10. Pulse oximeter sensor application during neonatal resuscitation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Deepak; Sundaram, Venkataseshan; Kumar, Praveen

    2014-03-01

    This study was done to compare 2 techniques of pulse oximeter sensor application during neonatal resuscitation for faster signal detection. Sensor to infant first (STIF) and then to oximeter was compared with sensor to oximeter first (STOF) and then to infant in ≥28 weeks gestations. The primary outcome was time from completion of sensor application to reliable signal, defined as stable display of heart rate and saturation. Time from birth to sensor application, time taken for sensor application, time from birth to reliable signal, and need to reapply sensor were secondary outcomes. An intention-to-treat analysis was done, and subgroup analysis was done for gestation and need for resuscitation. One hundred fifty neonates were randomized with 75 to each technique. The median (IQR) time from sensor application to detection of reliable signal was longer in STIF group compared with STOF group (16 [15-17] vs. 10 [6-18] seconds; P signal did not differ between the 2 methods (STIF: 61 [52-76] seconds; STOF: 58 [47-73] seconds [P = .09]). Time taken for signal acquisition was longer with STIF than with STOF in both subgroups. In the delivery room setting, the STOF method recognized saturation and heart rate faster than the STIF method. The time from birth to reliable signal was similar with the 2 methods.

  11. Obstacles to bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, K; Taniguchi, T; Yoshida, M; Yamamoto, K

    2000-05-01

    bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is performed infrequently in Japan. We conducted this study to identify Japanese attitudes toward the performance of bystander CPR. participants were asked about their willingness to perform CPR with varying scenarios and CPR techniques (mouth-to-mouth ventilation plus chest compression (MMV plus CC) versus chest compression alone (CC)). a total of 1302/1355 individuals completed the questionnaire, including high school students, teachers, emergency medical technicians, medical nurses, and medical students. About 2% of high school students, 3% of teachers, 26% of emergency medical technicians, 3% of medical nurses and 16% of medical students claimed they would 'definitely' perform MMV plus CC on a stranger. However, 21-72% claimed they would prefer the alternative of performing CC alone. Respondents claimed their unwillingness to perform MMV is not due to the fear of contracting a communicable disease, but the lack of confidence in their ability to perform CPR properly. in all categories of respondents, willingness to perform MMV plus CC for a stranger was disappointingly low. Better training in MMV together with teaching awareness that CC alone can be given should be instituted to maximize the number of potential providers of CPR in the community, even in communities where the incidence of HIV is very low.

  12. The importance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Benjamin S

    2013-06-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a fundamental component of initial care for the victim of cardiac arrest. In the past few years, increasing quantitative evidence has demonstrated that survival from cardiac arrest is dependent on the quality of delivered CPR. This review will focus on this body of evidence and on a range of practical approaches to improving CPR performance. A number of strategies to improve CPR quality have been evaluated recently, during both prehospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest care. These strategies have included the use of real-time CPR sensing and feedback, the employment of physiologic monitoring such as end-tidal CO(2) measurement and the use of metronome prompting. The use of mechanical CPR devices to avoid the challenges of manual CPR performance has also represented a topic of great current interest. Additional approaches have focused on both prearrest training (e.g. high-fidelity simulation education and CPR refreshers) and postarrest training (e.g. debriefing). A number of strategies have been evaluated to improve CPR performance. While many questions remain surrounding the relative value of each approach, it is likely that combinations of these methods may be useful in a variety of care settings to improve care for cardiac arrest victims.

  13. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation using the cardio vent device in a resuscitation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suner, Selim; Jay, Gregory D; Kleinman, Gary J; Woolard, Robert H; Jagminas, Liudvikas; Becker, Bruce M

    2002-05-01

    To compare the "Bellows on Sternum Resuscitation" (BSR) device that permits simultaneous compression and ventilation by one rescuer with two person cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with bag-valve-mask (BVM) ventilation in a single blind crossover study performed in the laboratory setting. Tidal volume and compression depth were recorded continuously during 12-min CPR sessions with the BSR device and two person CPR. Six CPR instructors performed a total of 1,894 ventilations and 10,532 compressions in 3 separate 12-min sessions. Mean tidal volume (MTV) and compression rate (CR) with the BSR device differed significantly from CPR with the BVM group (1242 mL vs. 1065 mL, respectively, p = 0.0018 and 63.2 compressions per minute (cpm) vs. 81.3 cpm, respectively, p = 0.0076). Error in compression depth (ECD) rate of 9.78% was observed with the BSR device compared to 8.49% with BMV CPR (p = 0.1815). Error rate was significantly greater during the second half of CPR sessions for both BSR and BVM groups. It is concluded that one-person CPR with the BSR device is equivalent to two-person CPR with BVM in all measured parameters except for CR. Both groups exhibited greater error rate in CPR performance in the latter half of 12-min CPR sessions.

  14. Do-not-resuscitate order: The experiences of iranian cardiopulmonary resuscitation team members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolghader Assarroudi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One dilemma in the end-of-life care is making decisions for conducting cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. This dilemma is perceived in different ways due to the influence of culture and religion. This study aimed to understand the experiences of CPR team members about the do-not-resuscitate order. Methods: CPR team members were interviewed, and data were analyzed using a conventional content analysis method. Results: Three categories and six subcategories emerged: “The dilemma between revival and suffering” with the subcategories of “revival likelihood” and “death as a cause for comfort;” “conflicting situation” with the subcategories of “latent decision” and “ambivalent order;” and “low-quality CPR” with the subcategories of “team member demotivation” and “disrupting CPR performance.” Conclusion: There is a need for the development of a contextual guideline, which is required for respecting the rights of patients and their families and providing legal support to health-care professionals during CPR.

  15. EMuRgency - New approaches for resuscitation support and training in the Euregio Meuse-Rhine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Skorning, Max; Haberstroh, Max; Gorgels, Ton; Klerkx, Joris; Vergnion, Michel; Van Poucke, Sven; Lenssen, Niklas; Biermann, Henning; Schuffelen, Petra; Pijls, Ruud; Ternier, Stefaan; De Vries, Fred; Van der Baaren, John; Parra, Gonzalo; Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Kalz, M., Skorning, M., Haberstroh, M., Gorgels, T., Klerkx, J., Vergnion, M., ...Specht, M. (2012). EMuRgency – New approaches for resuscitation support and training in the Euregio Meuse-Rhine. Resuscitation, 83 (S1). e37.

  16. Interventions for intrauterine resuscitation in suspected fetal distress during term labor : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bullens, L.; van Runnard Heimel, P.J.; van der Hout-van der Jagt, M.B.; Oei, G.

    IMPORTANCE: Intrauterine resuscitation techniques during term labor are commonly used in daily clinical practice. Evidence, however, to support the beneficial effect of intrauterine resuscitation techniques on fetal distress during labor is limited and sometimes contradictory. In contrast, some of

  17. The effect of resuscitation strategy on the longitudinal immuno-inflammatory response to blunt trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Alexander; Nordestgaard, Ask Tybjærg; Kirial, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Resuscitation strategies following blunt trauma have been linked to immuno-inflammatory complications leading to systemic inflammatory syndrome (SIRS), sepsis and multiple organ failure (MOF). The effect of resuscitation strategy on longitudinal inflammation marker trajectories is...

  18. Closed-Loop Resuscitation of Hemorrhagic Shock: Novel Solutions Infused to Hypotensive and Normotensive Endpoints

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kramer, George C

    2007-01-01

    .... Our long-term goal is to develop efficient and efficacious resuscitation regimens for combat casualty care and to develop a microprocessor controlled closed-loop resuscitation system that will...

  19. Damage Control Resuscitation Supplemented with Vasopressin in a Severe Polytrauma Model with Traumatic Brain Injury and Uncontrolled Internal Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, J Michael; Wang, Xu; St John, Alexander E; Lim, Esther B; Stern, Susan A; White, Nathan J

    2018-03-14

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) are the leading causes of traumatic death worldwide and particularly on the battlefield. They are especially challenging when present simultaneously (polytrauma), and clear blood pressure end points during fluid resuscitation are not well described for this situation. The goal of this study is to evaluate for any benefit of increasing blood pressure using a vasopressor on brain blood flow during initial fluid resuscitation in a swine polytrauma model. We used a swine polytrauma model with simultaneous TBI, femur fracture, and HS with uncontrolled noncompressible internal bleeding from an aortic tear injury. Five animals were assigned to each of three experimental groups (hydroxyethyl starch only [HES], HES + 0.4 U/kg vasopressin, and no fluid resuscitation [No Fluids]). Fluids were given as two 10 mL/kg boluses according to tactical field care guidelines. Primary outcomes were mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and brain blood flow at 60 min. Secondary outcomes were blood flows in the heart, intestine, and kidney; arterial blood lactate level; and survival at 6 hr. Organ blood flow was measured using injection of colored microspheres. Five animals were tested in each of the three groups. There was a statistically significant increase in MAP with vasopressin compared with other experimental groups, but no significant increase in brain blood flow during the first 60 min of resuscitation. The vasopressin group also exhibited greater total internal hemorrhage volume and rate. There was no difference in survival at 6 hours. In this experimental swine polytrauma model, increasing blood pressure with vasopressin did not improve brain perfusion, likely due to increased internal hemorrhage. Effective hemostasis should remain the top priority for field treatment of the polytrauma casualty with TBI.

  20. Evidence on Adrenaline Use in Resuscitation and Its Relevance to Newborn Infants: A Non-Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Merlin; Solevåg, Anne Lee; OʼReilly, Megan; Aziz, Khalid; Cheung, Po-Yin; Schmölzer, Georg M

    2017-01-01

    Guidelines for newborn resuscitation state that if the heart rate does not increase despite adequate ventilation and chest compressions, adrenaline administration should be considered. However, controversy exists around the safety and effectiveness of adrenaline in newborn resuscitation. The aim of this review was to summarise a selection of the current knowledge about adrenaline during resuscitation and evaluate its relevance to newborn infants. A search in PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar until September 1, 2015, using search terms including adrenaline/epinephrine, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, death, severe brain injury, necrotizing enterocolitis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and adrenaline versus vasopressin/placebo. Adult data indicate that adrenaline improves the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) but not survival to hospital discharge. Newborn animal studies reported that adrenaline might be needed to achieve ROSC. Intravenous administration (10-30 μg/kg) is recommended; however, if there is no intravenous access, a higher endotracheal dose (50-100 μg/kg) is needed. The safety and effectiveness of intraosseous adrenaline remain undetermined. Early and frequent dosing does not seem to be beneficial. In fact, negative hemodynamic effects have been observed, especially with doses ≥30 μg/kg intravenously. Little is known about adrenaline in birth asphyxia and in preterm infants, but observations indicate that hemodynamics and neurological outcomes may be impaired by adrenaline administration in these conditions. However, a causal relationship between adrenaline administration and outcomes cannot be established from the few available retrospective studies. Alternative vasoconstrictors have been investigated, but the evidence is scarce. More research is needed on the benefits and risks of adrenaline in asphyxia-induced bradycardia or cardiac arrest during perinatal transition. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and contrast media reactions in a radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, John M.; McBride, Kieran D.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To assess current knowledge and training in the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation within a radiology department. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The standard of knowledge about the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation among radiologists, radiographers and nurses were audited using a two-section questionnaire. Our results were compared against nationally accepted standards. Repeat audits were undertaken over a 28-month period. Three full audit cycles were completed. RESULTS: The initial audit confirmed that although a voluntary training programme was in place, knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques were below acceptable levels (set at 70%) for all staff members. The mean score for radiologists was 50%. Immediate changes instituted included retraining courses, the distribution of standard guidelines and the composition and distribution of two separate information handouts. Initial improvements were complemented by new wallcharts, which were distributed throughout the department, a series of lectures on management of contrast reactions and regular reviews with feedback to staff. In the third and final audit all staff groups had surpassed the required standard. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of contrast media reactions and resuscitation needs constant updating. Revision of skills requires a prescriptive programme; visual display of advice is a constant reminder. It is our contention all radiology departmental staff should consider it a personal duty to maintain their resuscitation skills at appropriate standards. O'Neill, J.M., McBride, K.D.(2001). Clinical Radiology 00, 000-000

  2. Human factors in resuscitation: Lessons learned from simulator studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunziker S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical algorithms, technical skills, and repeated training are the classical cornerstones for successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Increasing evidence suggests that human factors, including team interaction, communication, and leadership, also influence the performance of CPR. Guidelines, however, do not yet include these human factors, partly because of the difficulties of their measurement in real-life cardiac arrest. Recently, clinical studies of cardiac arrest scenarios with high-fidelity video-assisted simulations have provided opportunities to better delineate the influence of human factors on resuscitation team performance. This review focuses on evidence from simulator studies that focus on human factors and their influence on the performance of resuscitation teams. Similar to studies in real patients, simulated cardiac arrest scenarios revealed many unnecessary interruptions of CPR as well as significant delays in defibrillation. These studies also showed that human factors play a major role in these shortcomings and that the medical performance depends on the quality of leadership and team-structuring. Moreover, simulated video-taped medical emergencies revealed that a substantial part of information transfer during communication is erroneous. Understanding the impact of human factors on the performance of a complex medical intervention like resuscitation requires detailed, second-by-second, analysis of factors involving the patient, resuscitative equipment such as the defibrillator, and all team members. Thus, high-fidelity simulator studies provide an important research method in this challenging field.

  3. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and contrast media reactions in a radiology department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, John M.; McBride, Kieran D

    2001-04-01

    AIM: To assess current knowledge and training in the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation within a radiology department. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The standard of knowledge about the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation among radiologists, radiographers and nurses were audited using a two-section questionnaire. Our results were compared against nationally accepted standards. Repeat audits were undertaken over a 28-month period. Three full audit cycles were completed. RESULTS: The initial audit confirmed that although a voluntary training programme was in place, knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques were below acceptable levels (set at 70%) for all staff members. The mean score for radiologists was 50%. Immediate changes instituted included retraining courses, the distribution of standard guidelines and the composition and distribution of two separate information handouts. Initial improvements were complemented by new wallcharts, which were distributed throughout the department, a series of lectures on management of contrast reactions and regular reviews with feedback to staff. In the third and final audit all staff groups had surpassed the required standard. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of contrast media reactions and resuscitation needs constant updating. Revision of skills requires a prescriptive programme; visual display of advice is a constant reminder. It is our contention all radiology departmental staff should consider it a personal duty to maintain their resuscitation skills at appropriate standards. O'Neill, J.M., McBride, K.D.(2001). Clinical Radiology 00, 000-000.

  4. Analysis of Medication Errors in Simulated Pediatric Resuscitation by Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Porter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of our study was to estimate the incidence of prescribing medication errors specifically made by a trainee and identify factors associated with these errors during the simulated resuscitation of a critically ill child. Methods: The results of the simulated resuscitation are described. We analyzed data from the simulated resuscitation for the occurrence of a prescribing medication error. We compared univariate analysis of each variable to medication error rate and performed a separate multiple logistic regression analysis on the significant univariate variables to assess the association between the selected variables. Results: We reviewed 49 simulated resuscitations . The final medication error rate for the simulation was 26.5% (95% CI 13.7% - 39.3%. On univariate analysis, statistically significant findings for decreased prescribing medication error rates included senior residents in charge, presence of a pharmacist, sleeping greater than 8 hours prior to the simulation, and a visual analog scale score showing more confidence in caring for critically ill children. Multiple logistic regression analysis using the above significant variables showed only the presence of a pharmacist to remain significantly associated with decreased medication error, odds ratio of 0.09 (95% CI 0.01 - 0.64. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the presence of a clinical pharmacist during the resuscitation of a critically ill child reduces the medication errors made by resident physician trainees.

  5. Design of a Functional Training Prototype for Neonatal Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaramakrishnan Rajaraman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Birth Asphyxia is considered to be one of the leading causes of neonatal mortality around the world. Asphyxiated neonates require skilled resuscitation to survive the neonatal period. The project aims to train health professionals in a basic newborn care using a prototype with an ultimate objective to have one person at every delivery trained in neonatal resuscitation. This prototype will be a user-friendly device with which one can get trained in performing neonatal resuscitation in resource-limited settings. The prototype consists of a Force Sensing Resistor (FSR that measures the pressure applied and is interfaced with Arduino® which controls the Liquid Crystal Display (LCD and Light Emitting Diode (LED indication for pressure and compression counts. With the increase in population and absence of proper medical care, the need for neonatal resuscitation program is not well addressed. The proposed work aims at offering a promising solution for training health care individuals on resuscitating newborn babies under low resource settings.

  6. A multimedia intervention on cardiopulmonary resuscitation and advance directives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, R; Galecki, A T; Goold, S D; Hogikyan, R V

    1999-09-01

    To assess the effects of a multimedia educational intervention about advance directives (ADs) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on the knowledge, attitude and activity toward ADs and life-sustaining treatments of elderly veterans. Prospective randomized controlled, single blind study of educational interventions. General medicine clinic of a university-affiliated Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC). One hundred seventeen Veterans, 70 years of age or older, deemed able to make medical care decisions. The control group (n = 55) received a handout about ADs in use at the VAMC. The experimental group (n = 62) received the same handout, with an additional handout describing procedural aspects and outcomes of CPR, and they watched a videotape about ADs. Patients' attitudes and actions toward ADs, CPR and life-sustaining treatments were recorded before the intervention, after it, and 2 to 4 weeks after the intervention through self-administered questionnaires. Only 27.8% of subjects stated that they knew what an AD is in the preintervention questionnaire. This proportion improved in both the experimental and control (87.2% experimental, 52.5% control) subject groups, but stated knowledge of what an AD is was higher in the experimental group (odds ratio = 6.18, p CPR. This improved after the intervention in the experimental group (OR = 4.27, p =.004), but did not persist at follow-up. In the postintervention questionnaire, few subjects in either group stated that they discussed CPR or ADs with their physician on that day (OR = 0.97, p = NS). We developed a convenient means of educating elderly male patients regarding CPR and advance directives that improved short-term knowledge but did not stimulate advance care planning.

  7. Predictive performance of universal termination of resuscitation rules in an Asian community: are they accurate enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wen-Chu; Ko, Patrick Chow-In; Chang, Anna Marie; Liu, Sot Shih-Hung; Wang, Hui-Chih; Yang, Chih-Wei; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Chen, Shey-Ying; Lai, Mei-Shu; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming

    2015-04-01

    Prehospital termination of resuscitation (TOR) rules have not been widely validated outside of Western countries. This study evaluated the performance of TOR rules in an Asian metropolitan with a mixed-tier emergency medical service (EMS). We analysed the Utstein registry of adult, non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) in Taipei to test the performance of TOR rules for advanced life support (ALS) or basic life support (BLS) providers. ALS and BLS-TOR rules were tested in OHCAs among three subgroups: (1) resuscitated by ALS, (2) by BLS and (3) by mixed ALS and BLS. Outcome definition was in-hospital death. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value and decreased transport rate (DTR) among various provider combinations were calculated. Of the 3489 OHCAs included, 240 were resuscitated by ALS, 1727 by BLS and 1522 by ALS and BLS. Overall survival to hospital discharge was 197 patients (5.6%). Specificity and PPV of ALS-TOR and BLS-TOR for identifying death ranged from 70.7% to 81.8% and 95.1% to 98.1%, respectively. Applying the TOR rules would have a DTR of 34.2-63.9%. BLS rules had better predictive accuracy and DTR than ALS rules among all subgroups. Application of the ALS and BLS TOR rules would have decreased OHCA transported to the hospital, and BLS rules are reasonable as the universal criteria in a mixed-tier EMS. However, 1.9-4.9% of those who survived would be misclassified as non-survivors, raising concern of compromising patient safety for the implementation of the rules. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Obesity-induced hepatic hypoperfusion primes for hepatic dysfunction after resuscitated hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Paul J; Hurt, Ryan T; Franklin, Glen A; McClain, Craig J; Garrison, R Neal

    2009-10-01

    Obese patients (BMI>35) after blunt trauma are at increased risk compared to non-obese for organ dysfunction, prolonged hospital stay, infection, prolonged mechanical ventilation, and mortality. Obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) produce a low grade systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) with compromised hepatic blood flow, which increases with body mass index. We hypothesized that obesity further aggravates liver dysfunction by reduced hepatic perfusion following resuscitated hemorrhagic shock (HEM). Age-matched Zucker rats (Obese, 314-519 g & Lean, 211-280 g) were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 10-12/group): (1) Lean-Sham; (2) Lean, HEM, and resuscitation (HEM/RES); (3) Obese-Sham; and (4) Obese-HEM/RES. HEM was 40% of mean arterial pressure (MAP) for 60 min; RES was return of shed blood/5 min and 2 volumes of saline/25 min. Hepatic blood flow (HBF) using galactose clearance, liver enzymes and complete metabolic panel were measured over 4 h after completion of RES. Obese rats had increased MAP, heart rate, and fasting blood glucose and BUN concentrations compared to lean controls, required less blood withdrawal (mL/g) to maintain 40% MAP, and RES did not restore BL MAP. Obese rats had decreased HBF at BL and during HEM/RES, which persisted 4 h post RES. ALT and BUN were increased compared to Lean-HEM/RES at 4 h post-RES. These data suggest that obesity significantly contributes to trauma outcomes through compromised vascular control or through fat-induced sinusoidal compression to impair hepatic blood flow after HEM/RES resulting in a greater hepatic injury. The pro-inflammatory state of NAFLD seen in obesity appears to prime the liver for hepatic ischemia after resuscitated hemorrhagic shock, perhaps intensified by insidious and ongoing hepatic hypoperfusion established prior to the traumatic injury or shock.

  9. A mixed-methods study of interprofessional learning of resuscitation skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul; Cooper, Simon; Duncan, Fiona

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed to identify the effects of interprofessional resuscitation skills teaching on medical and nursing students' attitudes, leadership, team-working and performance skills. Year 2 medical and nursing students learned resuscitation skills in uniprofessional or interprofessional settings, prior to undergoing observational ratings of video-recorded leadership, teamwork and skills performance and subsequent focus group interviews. The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) was administered pre- and post-intervention and again 3-4 months later. There was no significant difference between interprofessional and uniprofessional teams for leadership, team dynamics or resuscitation tasks performance. Gender, previous interprofessional learning experience, professional background and previous leadership experience had no significant effect. Interview analysis showed broad support for interprofessional education (IPE) matched to clinical reality with perceived benefits for teamwork, communication and improved understanding of roles and perspectives. Concerns included inappropriate role adoption, hierarchy issues, professional identity and the timing of IPE episodes. The RIPLS subscales for professional identity and team-working increased significantly post-intervention for interprofessional groups but returned to pre-test levels by 3-4 months. However, interviews showed interprofessional groups retained a 'residual positivity' towards IPE, more so than uniprofessional groups. An intervention based on common, relevant, shared learning outcomes set in a realistic educational context can work with students who have differing levels of previous IPE and skills training experience. Qualitatively, positive attitudes outlast quantitative changes measured using the RIPLS. Further quantitative and qualitative work is required to examine other domains of learning, the timing of interventions and impact on attitudes towards IPE.

  10. Patient-centric Blood Pressure–targeted Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Improves Survival from Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, Stuart H.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Lampe, Joshua W.; Bratinov, George; Weiland, Theodore R.; Garuccio, Mia; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Becker, Lance B.; Berg, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Although current resuscitation guidelines are rescuer focused, the opportunity exists to develop patient-centered resuscitation strategies that optimize the hemodynamic response of the individual in the hopes to improve survival. Objectives: To determine if titrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to blood pressure would improve 24-hour survival compared with traditional CPR in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods: After 7 minutes of asphyxia, followed by VF, 20 female 3-month-old swine randomly received either blood pressure–targeted care consisting of titration of compression depth to a systolic blood pressure of 100 mm Hg and vasopressors to a coronary perfusion pressure greater than 20 mm Hg (BP care); or optimal American Heart Association Guideline care consisting of depth of 51 mm with standard advanced cardiac life support epinephrine dosing (Guideline care). All animals received manual CPR for 10 minutes before first shock. Primary outcome was 24-hour survival. Measurements and Main Results: The 24-hour survival was higher in the BP care group (8 of 10) compared with Guideline care (0 of 10); P = 0.001. Coronary perfusion pressure was higher in the BP care group (point estimate +8.5 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 3.9–13.0 mm Hg; P < 0.01); however, depth was higher in Guideline care (point estimate +9.3 mm; 95% confidence interval, 6.0–12.5 mm; P < 0.01). Number of vasopressor doses before first shock was higher in the BP care group versus Guideline care (median, 3 [range, 0–3] vs. 2 [range, 2–2]; P = 0.003). Conclusions: Blood pressure–targeted CPR improves 24-hour survival compared with optimal American Heart Association care in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated VF cardiac arrest. PMID:25321490

  11. Patient-centric blood pressure-targeted cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves survival from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Robert M; Friess, Stuart H; Naim, Maryam Y; Lampe, Joshua W; Bratinov, George; Weiland, Theodore R; Garuccio, Mia; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Becker, Lance B; Berg, Robert A

    2014-12-01

    Although current resuscitation guidelines are rescuer focused, the opportunity exists to develop patient-centered resuscitation strategies that optimize the hemodynamic response of the individual in the hopes to improve survival. To determine if titrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to blood pressure would improve 24-hour survival compared with traditional CPR in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated ventricular fibrillation (VF). After 7 minutes of asphyxia, followed by VF, 20 female 3-month-old swine randomly received either blood pressure-targeted care consisting of titration of compression depth to a systolic blood pressure of 100 mm Hg and vasopressors to a coronary perfusion pressure greater than 20 mm Hg (BP care); or optimal American Heart Association Guideline care consisting of depth of 51 mm with standard advanced cardiac life support epinephrine dosing (Guideline care). All animals received manual CPR for 10 minutes before first shock. Primary outcome was 24-hour survival. The 24-hour survival was higher in the BP care group (8 of 10) compared with Guideline care (0 of 10); P = 0.001. Coronary perfusion pressure was higher in the BP care group (point estimate +8.5 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 3.9-13.0 mm Hg; P < 0.01); however, depth was higher in Guideline care (point estimate +9.3 mm; 95% confidence interval, 6.0-12.5 mm; P < 0.01). Number of vasopressor doses before first shock was higher in the BP care group versus Guideline care (median, 3 [range, 0-3] vs. 2 [range, 2-2]; P = 0.003). Blood pressure-targeted CPR improves 24-hour survival compared with optimal American Heart Association care in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated VF cardiac arrest.

  12. Direct to Operating Room Trauma Resuscitation Decreases Mortality Among Severely Injured Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieck, Minna M; Cunningham, Aaron J; Behrens, Brandon; Ohm, Erika T; Maxwell, Bryan G; Hamilton, Nicholas A; Adams, M Christopher; Cole, Frederick J; Jafri, Mubeen A

    2018-03-16

    Expediting evaluation and intervention for severely injured patients has remained a mainstay of advanced trauma care. One technique, direct to operating room (DOR) resuscitation, for selective adult patients has demonstrated decreased mortality. We sought to investigate the application of this protocol in children. All DOR pediatric patients from 2009-2016 at a pediatric Level I Trauma Center were identified. DOR criteria included penetrating injury, chest injuries, amputations, significant blood loss, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and surgeon discretion. Demographics, injury patterns, interventions, and outcomes were analyzed. Observed mortality was compared to expected mortality, calculated using Trauma Injury Severity Score (TRISS) methodology, with two-tailed t-tests and a p-value 15, 33% had GCS≤8, and 9% were hypotensive. The most commonly injured body regions were external (66%), head (34%), chest (30%), and abdomen (27%). Sixty-seven patients (82%) required emergent procedural intervention, most commonly wound exploration/repair (35%), central venous access (22%), tube thoracostomy (19%) and laparotomy (18%). Predictors of intervention were ISS>15 (odds ratio=14, p=0.013) and GCS<9 (odds ratio=8.5, p=0.044). The survival rate to discharge for DOR patients was 84% compared with an expected survival of 79% (TRISS) (p=0.4). The greatest improvement relative to expected mortality was seen in the subgroup with penetrating trauma (84.5% vs. 74.4%, p=0.002). A selective policy of resuscitating the most severely injured children in the operating room can decrease mortality. Patients suffering penetrating trauma with the highest ISS and diminished GCS have the greatest benefit. Trauma centers with appropriate resources should evaluate implementing similar policies. Level II. Diagnostic tests or criteria.

  13. The definition of massive transfusion in trauma: a critical variable in examining evidence for resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Biswadev; Cameron, Peter A; Gruen, Russell L; Mori, Alfredo; Fitzgerald, Mark; Street, Alison

    2011-06-01

    'Massive' transfusion is a poorly defined inclusion criteria for studies examining the blood and blood product that are used during trauma resuscitation. We aimed to compare the traditional definition of massive transfusion (≥10 units in 24 h) to a more acute definition of at least 5 units in 4 h. Multitrauma patients were subgrouped according to the traditional definition and compared with the acute definition. Demographics, presenting vital signs and blood results, management including transfusion practice and outcomes were retrospectively studied. Associations of transfused fresh frozen plasma:packed red blood cells (PRBC) ratios with mortality were studied. There were 927 patients who received PRBCs in the first 24 h, with 314 patients identified using the traditional definition and 303 patients using the acute definition. The patients identified using the traditional definition received 18 (12-29) units of PRBC in 24 h, significantly higher than those identified using the acute definition [15 (9-29) units, Pdefinition excluded a significant proportion of patients who died in the emergency department. By using the acute definition to select a study sample, there seems to be an increase in mortality with fresh frozen plasma:PRBC ratio of 1 : 1 ratio compared with a 1 : 2 ratio. The traditional 'massive' transfusion definition not only 'dilutes' the potential study samples with a less acute group of patients, but also further excludes patients who die early. This latter group is most likely to be benefitted from any change to resuscitation practice. An acute definition of massive transfusion should be adopted when examining clinical practice during initial trauma resuscitation.

  14. So you want to conduct a randomised trial? Learnings from a 'failed' feasibility study of a Crisis Resource Management prompt during simulated paediatric resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teis, Rachel; Allen, Jyai; Lee, Nigel; Kildea, Sue

    2017-02-01

    No study has tested a Crisis Resource Management prompt on resuscitation performance. We conducted a feasibility, unblinded, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial at one Australian paediatric hospital (June-September 2014). Eligible participants were any doctor, nurse, or nurse manager who would normally be involved in a Medical Emergency Team simulation. The unit of block randomisation was one of six scenarios (3 control:3 intervention) with or without a verbal prompt. The primary outcomes tested the feasibility and utility of the intervention and data collection tools. The secondary outcomes measured resuscitation quality and team performance. Data were analysed from six resuscitation scenarios (n=49 participants); three control groups (n=25) and three intervention groups (n=24). The ability to measure all data items on the data collection tools was hindered by problems with the recording devices both in the mannequins and the video camera. For a pilot study, greater training for the prompt role and pre-briefing participants about assessment of their cardio-pulmonary resuscitation quality should be undertaken. Data could be analysed in real time with independent video analysis to validate findings. Two cameras would strengthen reliability of the methods. Copyright © 2016 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Migrating from Informal to Formal Consortium — COSTLI Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdie, C.; Patil, Y. M.

    2010-10-01

    There are many models of library consortia which have come into existence due to various reasons and compulsions. FORSA (Forum for Resource Sharing in Astronomy) is an informal consortium born from the links between academic institutions specializing in astronomy in India. FORSA is a cooperative venture initiated by library professionals. Though this consortium was formed mainly for inter-lending activities and bibliographic access, it has matured over the years to adopt the consortium approach on cooperative acquisitions, due to increased requirements.

  16. Latest Developments of the Isprs Student Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detchev, I.; Kanjir, U.; Reyes, S. R.; Miyazaki, H.; Aktas, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    The International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) Student Consortium (SC) is a network for young professionals studying or working within the fields of photogrammetry, remote sensing, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and other related geo-spatial sciences. The main goal of the network is to provide means for information exchange for its young members and thus help promote and integrate youth into the ISPRS. Over the past four years the Student Consortium has successfully continued to fulfil its mission in both formal and informal ways. The formal means of communication of the SC are its website, newsletter, e-mail announcements and summer schools, while its informal ones are multiple social media outlets and various social activities during student related events. The newsletter is published every three to four months and provides both technical and experiential content relevant for the young people in the ISPRS. The SC has been in charge or at least has helped with organizing one or more summer schools every year. The organization's e-mail list has over 1,100 subscribers, its website hosts over 1,300 members from 100 countries across the entire globe, and its public Facebook group currently has over 4,500 joined visitors, who connect among one another and share information relevant for their professional careers. These numbers show that the Student Consortium has grown into a significant online-united community. The paper will present the organization's on-going and past activities for the last four years, its current priorities and a strategic plan and aspirations for the future four-year period.

  17. External RNA Controls Consortium Beta Version Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hangnoh; Pine, P Scott; McDaniel, Jennifer; Salit, Marc; Oliver, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Spike-in RNAs are valuable controls for a variety of gene expression measurements. The External RNA Controls Consortium developed test sets that were used in a number of published reports. Here we provide an authoritative table that summarizes, updates, and corrects errors in the test version that ultimately resulted in the certified Standard Reference Material 2374. We have noted existence of anti-sense RNA controls in the material, corrected sub-pool memberships, and commented on control RNAs that displayed inconsistent behavior.

  18. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators

  19. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  20. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1994 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high {Tc} superconductivity. During the past year, 27 projects produced over 123 talks and 139 publications. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in August and January); with the second MISCON Workshop held in August; 13 external speakers; 79 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 48 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  1. History of the Tinnitus Research Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, James B

    2016-04-01

    This article describes the creation and accomplishments of the Tinnitus Research Consortium (TRC), founded and supported through philanthropy and intended to enrich the field of tinnitus research. Bringing together a group of distinguished auditory researchers, most of whom were not involved in tinnitus research, over the fifteen years of its life it developed novel research approaches and recruited a number of new investigators into the field. The purpose of this special issue is to highlight some of the significant accomplishments of the investigators supported by the TRC. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Tinnitus". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1994 Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high T c superconductivity. During the past year, 27 projects produced over 123 talks and 139 publications. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in August and January); with the second MISCON Workshop held in August; 13 external speakers; 79 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 48 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors

  3. The cognitive basis of effective team performance: features of failure and success in simulated cardiac resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Pallavi; Cohen, Trevor; Patel, Bhavesh; Patel, Vimla L

    2009-11-14

    Despite a body of research on teams in other fields relatively little is known about measuring teamwork in healthcare. The aim of this study is to characterize the qualitative dimensions of team performance during cardiac resuscitation that results in good and bad outcomes. We studied each team's adherence to Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) protocol for ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia and identified team behaviors during simulated critical events that affected their performance. The process was captured by a developed task checklist and a validated team work coding system. Results suggest that deviation from the sequence suggested by the ACLS protocol had no impact on the outcome as the successful team deviated more from this sequence than the unsuccessful team. It isn't the deviation from the protocol per se that appears to be important, but how the leadership flexibly adapts to the situational changes with deviations is the crucial factor in team competency.

  4. The key changes in pediatric and neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Dyi-Shiang; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) were changed in 2005. There were some key changes in the recommendations for pediatric basic and advanced life support, and neonatal resuscitation. The key changes included: emphasis on effective compressions (push hard, push fast, allow full chest recoil and minimize interruptions in compressions), a single compression-ventilation ratio (30:2) CPR for all groups of ages (except neonate), confirmation of effective ventilations, medication given and defibrillator charged without interruption of CPR, not recommended to routine tracheal suction the vigorous meconium-stained baby in newborn resuscitation, etc. We illustrate the major key changes and hope everyone is well trained to perform high quality CPR.

  5. Resuscitation of asphyxiated newborn infants with room air or oxygen: an international controlled trial: the Resair 2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugstad, O D; Rootwelt, T; Aalen, O

    1998-07-01

    abnormal neurologic examination at 4 weeks. The existing routines for resuscitation in each participating unit were followed, and the ventilation techniques described by the American Heart Association were used as guidelines aiming at a frequency of manual ventilation of 40 to 60 breaths per minute. Forms for 703 enrolled infants from 11 centers were received by the steering committee. All 94 patients from one of the centers were excluded because of violation of the inclusion criteria in 86 of these. Therefore, the final number of infants enrolled in the study was 609 (from 10 centers), with 288 in the room air group and 321 in the oxygen group. Median (5 to 95 percentile) gestational ages were 38 (32.0 to 42.0) and 38 (31.1 to 41.5) weeks (NS), and birth weights were 2600 (1320 to 4078) g and 2560 (1303 to 3900) g (NS) in the room air and oxygen groups, respectively. There were 46% girls in the room air and 41% in the oxygen group (NS). Mortality in the first 7 days of life was 12.2% and 15.0% in the room air and oxygen groups, respectively; adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.82 with 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 0.50-1.35. Neonatal mortality was 13.9% and 19.0%; adjusted OR = 0. 72 with 95% CI = 0.45-1.15. Death within 7 days of life and/or moderate or severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (primary outcome measure) was seen in 21.2% in the room air group and in 23.7% in the oxygen group; OR = 0.94 with 95% CI = 0.63-1.40. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

  6. Public cardiopulmonary resuscitation training rates and awareness of hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a cross-sectional survey of Victorians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Janet E; Smith, Karen; Case, Rosalind; Cartledge, Susie; Straney, Lahn; Finn, Judith

    2017-04-01

    To provide contemporary Australian data on the public's training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and awareness of hands-only CPR. A cross-sectional telephone survey in April 2016 of adult residents of the Australian state of Victoria was conducted. Primary outcomes were rates of CPR training and awareness of hands-only CPR. Of the 404 adults surveyed (mean age 55 ± 17 years, 59% female, 73% metropolitan residents), 274 (68%) had undergone CPR training. Only 50% (n = 201) had heard of hands-only CPR, with most citing first-aid courses (41%) and media (36%) as sources of information. Of those who had undergone training, the majority had received training more than 5 years previously (52%) and only 28% had received training or refreshed training in the past 12 months. Most received training in a formal first-aid class (43%), and received training as a requirement for work (67%). The most common reasons for not having training were: they had never thought about it (59%), did not have time (25%) and did not know where to learn (15%). Compared to standard CPR, a greater proportion of respondents were willing to provide hands-only CPR for strangers (67% vs 86%, P CPR training rates and awareness of hands-only CPR. Further promotion of hands-only CPR and self-instruction (e.g. DVD kits or online) may see further improvements in CPR training and bystander CPR rates. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  7. Is pulseless electrical activity a reason to refuse cardiopulmonary resuscitation with ECMO support?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, Dirk; Brehm, Christoph E

    2018-04-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation with ECMO support (ECPR) has shown to improve outcome in patients after cardiac arrest under resuscitation. Most current recommendations for ECPR do not include patients with a non-shockable rhythm such as PEA and asystole. The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of 3 patient groups separated by initial rhythm at time of ECMO placement during CPR: asystole, PEA and shockable rhythm. We made a retrospective single-center study of adults who underwent ECPR for in-hospital cardiac arrest between June 2008 and January 2017. Outcome and survival were identified in 3 groups of patients regarding to the heart rhythm at the time decision for ECMO support was made: 1. patients with asystole, 2. patients with pulseless electrical activity, 3. patients with a shockable rhythm. 63 patients underwent ECPR in the mentioned time frame. Five patients were excluded due to incomplete data. Under the 58 included patients the number of cases for asystole, PEA, shockable rhythm was 7, 21 and 30 respectively. The means of CPR-time in these groups were 37, 41 and 37min. Survival to discharge was 0.0%, 23.8% and 40.0% respectively (p=0.09). All survivors to discharge had a good neurological outcome, defined as cerebral performance category 1or 2. Survival to discharge in patients with PEA as initial rhythm at the time of decision for ECPR is 23.8% while no patients with asystole as initial rhythm survived discharge. Patients with PEA should be carefully considered for ECPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tension pneumoperitoneum after bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry Johnson

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The Veress needle, usually used for insufflating the abdomen during laparoscopy, can also be an effective tool to decompress the abdomen when presented with tension pneumoperitoneum. Abdominal visceral injuries are rare following CPR but do occur and will likely require an invasive intervention. Surviving cardiac arrest as a young person and living without deficits outweighs the risk of a surgical correction for a visceral injury. While resuscitation measures are critical for survival, medical personnel need to be aware of potential complications from resuscitative efforts and potential management strategies.

  9. Prolonged successful cerebro cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Libardo A; Sanchez, Robinson; Gomez, Maria T; Cabrales, Jaime R; Echeverri, Dario

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of a 57 year old patient patient who underwent a diagnostic coronariography that showed three-vessel coronary disease. He presented cardiorespiratory arrest immediately at the end of the procedure; basic and advanced resuscitation maneuvers were started during a two hours period. During the resuscitation, primary angioplasty and stent implantation in the circumflex artery was performed. The patient recovered spontaneous circulation and was transferred to the coronary care unit. On the second day, a successful myocardial revascularization was performed and was discharged 16 days after the event without evident neurological deficit.

  10. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the elderly: analysis of the events in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Tricerri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing number of old people in all western countries and increasing life expectancy at birth, many seniors spend the last period of their life with various afflictions that may lead to cardiac arrest. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR increases survival rates. Octogenarians are the fastest growing segment of the population and despite empirical evidence that CPR is of questionable effectiveness in seniors with comorbidities, it is still the only treatment among life-sustaining ones. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is frequently unsuccessful, but if survival is achieved, a fairly good quality of life can be expected. Various papers analyzed the effect of CPR in hospitalized patients or in cardiac arrest occurring at home or in public places, while less is known about events occurring in the emergency room (ER. We performed a retrospective analysis of cardiac arrest events occurred in ER within 54 months: we analyzed 415,001 records of ER visits (from 01/01/1999 to 30/06/2003 in San Giovanni Addolorata Hospital. Data were analyzed in terms of age and outcome. We identified 475 records with the outcome of death in ER or death on arrival. Out of them, we selected 290 medical records which had sufficient data to be analyzed. Of the 290 patients evaluated, 225 died in ER, 18 were deemed to die on arrival, and 47 survived the cardiac arrest and were admitted to intensive care unit (ICU. The overall mortality was 0.11%, while the incidence of the selected events was 0.072%. The mean age of the analyzed population was 71.3 years. The only possible diagnosis was often cardiac arrest, though most of the times we could specify and group the diagnosis even better. The analysis of the procedures showed that cardiac arrest treated by direct current (DC shock was similarly distributed in different age groups, and no difference was detectable between the two groups. The mean age of the patients who underwent tracheal intubation (TI was

  11. BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE BY A MICROORGANISM CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alimohammadi, A. R. Mesdaghinia, M. Mahmoodi, S. Nasseri, A. H. Mahvi and J. Nouri

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE is one of the ether oxygenates which its use has been increased within the last twenty years. This compound is produced from isobutylene and methanol reaction that is used as octane index enhancer and also increases dissolved oxygen in gasoline and decreases carbon monoxide emission in four phased motors because of better combustion of gasoline. High solubility in water (52 g/L, high vapor pressure (0.54 kg/cm3, low absorption to organic carbon of soil and presence of MTBE in the list of potentially-carcinogens of U.S EPA has made its use of great concern. The culture media used in this study was Mineral Salt Medium (MSM. The study lasted for 236 days and in three different concentrations of MTBE of 200, 5 and 0.8 mg/L. A control sample was also used to compare the results. This research studied the isolation methods of microbial consortium in the MTBE polluted soils in Tehran and Abadan petroleum refinery besides MTBE degradation. The results showed the capability of bacteria in consuming MTBE as carbon source. Final microbial isolation was performed with several microbial passages as well as keeping consortium in a certain amount of MTBE as the carbon source.

  12. Fermentative hydrogen production by microbial consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maintinguer, Sandra I.; Fernandes, Bruna S.; Duarte, Iolanda C.S.; Saavedra, Nora Katia; Adorno, M. Angela T.; Varesche, M. Bernadete [Department of Hydraulics and Sanitation, School of Engineering of Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense, 400, 13566-590 Sao Carlos-SP (Brazil)

    2008-08-15

    Heat pre-treatment of the inoculum associated to the pH control was applied to select hydrogen-producing bacteria and endospores-forming bacteria. The source of inoculum to the heat pre-treatment was from a UASB reactor used in the slaughterhouse waste treatment. The molecular biology analyses indicated that the microbial consortium presented microorganisms affiliated with Enterobacter cloacae (97% and 98%), Clostridium sp. (98%) and Clostridium acetobutyricum (96%), recognized as H{sub 2} and volatile acids' producers. The following assays were carried out in batch reactors in order to verify the efficiencies of sucrose conversion to H{sub 2} by the microbial consortium: (1) 630.0 mg sucrose/L, (2) 1184.0 mg sucrose/L, (3) 1816.0 mg sucrose/L and (4) 4128.0 mg sucrose/L. The subsequent yields were obtained as follows: 15% (1.2 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), 20% (1.6 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), 15% (1.2 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose) and 4% (0.3 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), respectively. The intermediary products were acetic acid, butyric acid, methanol and ethanol in all of the anaerobic reactors. (author)

  13. Overview of the carbon products consortium (CPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, C.L. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) is an industry, university, government cooperative research team which has evolved over the past seven years to produce and evaluate coal-derived feedstocks for carbon products. The members of the Carbon Products Consortium are UCAR Carbon Company, Koppers Industries, CONOCO, Aluminum Company of America, AMOCO Polymers, and West Virginia University. The Carbon and Insulation Materials Technology Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Fiber Materials Inc., and BASF Corporation are affiliates of the CPC. The initial work on coal-derived nuclear graphites was supported by a grant to WVU, UCAR Carbon, and ORNL from the U.S. DOE New Production Reactor program. More recently, the CPC program has been supported through the Fossil Energy Materials program and through PETC`s Liquefaction program. The coal processing technologies involve hydrogenation, extraction by solvents such as N-methyl pyrolidone and toluene, material blending, and calcination. The breadth of carbon science expertise and manufacturing capability available in the CPC enables it to address virtually all research and development issues of importance to the carbon products industry.

  14. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Resource-limited Health Systems-Considerations for Training and Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Jason; Patterson, Dean; Munjal, Kevin

    2015-02-01

    In the past 50 years, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has gained widespread recognition as a life-saving skill that can be taught successfully to the general public. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation can be considered a cost-effective intervention that requires minimal classroom training and low-cost equipment and supplies; it is commonly taught throughout much of the developed world. But, the simplicity of CPR training and its access for the general public may be misleading, as outcomes for patients in cardiopulmonary arrest are poor and survival is dependent upon a comprehensive "chain-of-survival," which is something not achieved easily in resource-limited health care settings. In addition to the significant financial and physical resources needed to both train and develop basic CPR capabilities within a community, there is a range of ethical questions that should also be considered. This report describes some of the financial and ethical challenges that might result from CPR training in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). It is determined that for many health care systems, CPR training may have financial and ethically-deleterious, unintended consequences. Evidence shows Basic Life Support (BLS) skills training in a community is an effective intervention to improve public health. But, health care systems with limited resources should include CPR training only after considering the full implications of that intervention.

  15. Comprehensive cardiopulmonary life support (CCLS for cardiopulmonary resuscitation by trained paramedics and medics inside the hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR guideline of comprehensive cardiopulmonary life support (CCLS for management of the patient with cardiopulmonary arrest in adults provides an algorithmic step-wise approach for optimal outcome of the patient inside the hospital by trained medics and paramedics. This guideline has been developed considering the infrastructure of healthcare delivery system in India. This is based on evidence in the international and national literature. In the absence of data from the Indian population, the extrapolation has been made from international data, discussed with Indian experts and modified accordingly to ensure their applicability in India. The CCLS guideline emphasise the need to recognise patients at risk for cardiac arrest and their timely management before a cardiac arrest occurs. The basic components of CPR include chest compressions for blood circulation; airway maintenance to ensure airway patency; lung ventilation to enable oxygenation and defibrillation to convert a pathologic 'shockable' cardiac rhythm to one capable to maintaining effective blood circulation. CCLS emphasises incorporation of airway management, drugs, and identification of the cause of arrest and its correction, while chest compression and ventilation are ongoing. It also emphasises the value of organised team approach and optimal post-resuscitation care.

  16. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration and survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnet, Frederic; Triba, Mohamed N; Borron, Stephen W; Lapostolle, Frederic; Hubert, Hervé; Gueugniaud, Pierre-Yves; Escutnaire, Josephine; Guenin, Aurelien; Hoogvorst, Astrid; Marbeuf-Gueye, Carol; Reuter, Paul-Georges; Javaud, Nicolas; Vicaut, Eric; Chevret, Sylvie

    2017-02-01

    Relationship between cardiopulmonary arrest and resuscitation (CPR) durations and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remain unclear. Our primary aim was to determine the association between survival without neurologic sequelae and cardiac arrest intervals in the setting of witnessed OHCA. We analyzed 27,301 non-traumatic, witnessed OHCA patients in France included in the national registry from June 1, 2011 through December 1, 2015. We analyzed cardiac arrest intervals, designated as no-flow (NF; from collapse to start of CPR) and low-flow (LF; from start of CPR to cessation of resuscitation) in relation to 30-day survival without sequelae. We determined the influence of recognized prognostic factors (age, gender, initial rhythm, location of cardiac arrest) on this relation. For the entire cohort, the area delimited by a value of NF greater than 12min (95% confidence interval: 11-13min) and LF greater than 33min (95% confidence interval: 29-45min), yielded a probability of 30-day survival of less than 1%. These sets of values were greatly influenced by initial cardiac arrest rhythm, age, sex and location of cardiac arrest. Extended CPR duration (greater than 40min) in the setting of initial shockable cardiac rhythm is associated with greater than 1% survival with NF less than 18min. The NF interval was highly influential on the LF interval regardless of outcome, whether return of spontaneous circulation (padvanced techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of a structured neonatal resuscitation program on delivery room practices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, C A

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: This study evaluated the introduction of the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association into the delivery room of an Irish maternity hospital. DESIGN: Prospective, controlled observational study of 51 deliveries before and 51 deliveries following the training of delivery room personnel in the NRP. SAMPLE: Participants were 33 nurse-midwives and 11 pediatric resident physicians. MAIN OUTCOME VARIABLE: Evaluation of postdelivery, newborn resuscitation practices. RESULTS: The introduction of the NRP was associated with significant improvements in delivery room preparation, in the evaluation and management of the newborn infant, and in thermal protection at birth. Although there was a trend to use more free-flow oxygen following the introduction of the NRP, this was not statistically significant. Bag and mask ventilation was also used more frequently following NRP training. However, there were no significant differences in the use of endotracheal intubation, chest compressions, and medications. Fifteen of the 51 infants became hypothermic prior to the introduction of the NRP; none of the infants developed hypothermia in the post-NRP part of the study.

  18. Smaller self-inflating bags produce greater guideline consistent ventilation in simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehme, Ziad; Boyle, Malcolm J

    2009-02-20

    Suboptimal bag ventilation in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has demonstrated detrimental physiological outcomes for cardiac arrest patients. In light of recent guideline changes for resuscitation, there is a need to identify the efficacy of bag ventilation by prehospital care providers. The objective of this study was to evaluate bag ventilation in relation to operator ability to achieve guideline consistent ventilation rate, tidal volume and minute volume when using two different capacity self-inflating bags in an undergraduate paramedic cohort. An experimental study using a mechanical lung model and a simulated adult cardiac arrest to assess the ventilation ability of third year Monash University undergraduate paramedic students. Participants were instructed to ventilate using 1600 ml and 1000 ml bags for a length of two minutes at the correct rate and tidal volume for a patient undergoing CPR with an advanced airway. Ventilation rate and tidal volume were recorded using an analogue scale with mean values calculated. Ethics approval was granted. Suboptimal ventilation with the use of conventional 1600 ml bag was common, with 77% and 97% of participants unable to achieve guideline consistent ventilation rates and tidal volumes respectively. Reduced levels of suboptimal ventilation arouse from the use of the smaller bag with a 27% reduction in suboptimal tidal volumes (p = 0.015) and 23% reduction in suboptimal minute volumes (p = 0.045). Smaller self-inflating bags reduce the incidence of suboptimal tidal volumes and minute volumes and produce greater guideline consistent results for cardiac arrest patients.

  19. Latin American Consensus for Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation 2017: Latin American Pediatric Critical Care Society Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce, Jesús; Almonte, Enma; Alvarado, Manuel; Bogado, Norma Beatriz; Cyunel, Mariana; Escalante, Raffo; Finardi, Christiane; Guzmán, Gustavo; Jaramillo-Bustamante, Juan C; Madrid, Claudia C; Matamoros, Martha; Moya, Luis Augusto; Obando, Grania; Reboredo, Gaspar; López, Lissette R; Scheu, Christian; Valenzuela, Alejandro; Yerovi, Rocío; Yock-Corrales, Adriana

    2018-03-01

    To develop a Latin American Consensus about Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. To clarify, reinforce, and adapt some specific recommendations for pediatric patients and to stimulate the implementation of these recommendations in clinical practice. Expert consensus recommendations with Delphi methodology. Latin American countries. Experts in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation from 19 Latin American countries. Delphi methodology for expert consensus. The goal was to reach consensus with all the participating experts for every recommendation. An agreement of at least 80% of the participating experts had to exist in order to deliver a recommendation. Two Delphi voting rounds were sent out electronically. The experts were asked to score between 1 and 9 their level of agreement for each recommendation. The score was then classified into three groups: strong agreement (score 7-9), moderate agreement (score 4-6), and disagreement (score 1-3). Nineteen experts from 19 countries participated in both voting rounds and in the whole process of drafting the recommendations. Sixteen recommendations about organization of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, prevention, basic resuscitation, advanced resuscitation, and postresuscitation measures were approved. Ten of them had a consensus of 100%. Four of them were agreed by all the participants except one (94.7% consensus). One recommendation was agreed by all except two experts (89.4%), and finally, one was agreed by all except three experts (84.2%). All the recommendations reached a level of agreement. This consensus adapts 16 international recommendations to Latin America in order to improve the practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children. Studies should be conducted to analyze the effectiveness of the implementation of these recommendations.

  20. Comparison of continuous compression with regular ventilations versus 30:2 compressions-ventilations strategy during mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengfei; Liu, Qingyu; Zheng, Guanghui; Liu, Zhifeng; Jiang, Longyuan; Lin, Qing; Chen, Rui; Tang, Wanchun

    2017-09-01

    A compression-ventilation (C:V) ratio of 30:2 is recommended for adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by the current American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines. However, continuous chest compression (CCC) is an alternative strategy for CPR that minimizes interruption especially when an advanced airway exists. In this study, we investigated the effects of 30:2 mechanical CPR when compared with CCC in combination with regular ventilation in a porcine model. Sixteen male domestic pigs weighing 39±2 kg were utilized. Ventricular fibrillation was induced and untreated for 7 min. The animals were then randomly assigned to receive CCC combined with regular ventilation (CCC group) or 30:2 CPR (VC group). Mechanical chest compression was implemented with a miniaturized mechanical chest compressor. At the same time of beginning of precordial compression, the animals were mechanically ventilated at a rate of 10 breaths-per-minute in the CCC group or with a 30:2 C:V ratio in the VC group. Defibrillation was delivered by a single 150 J shock after 5 min of CPR. If failed to resuscitation, CPR was resumed for 2 min before the next shock. The protocol was stopped if successful resuscitation or at a total of 15 min. The resuscitated animals were observed for 72 h. Coronary perfusion pressure, end-tidal carbon dioxide and carotid blood flow in the VC group were similar to those achieved in the CCC group during CPR. No significant differences were observed in arterial blood gas parameters between two groups at baseline, VF 6 min, CPR 4 min and 30, 120 and 360 min post-resuscitation. Although extravascular lung water index of both groups significantly increased after resuscitation, no distinct difference was found between CCC and VC groups. All animals were successfully resuscitated and survived for 72 h with favorable neurologic outcomes in both groups. However, obviously more numbers of rib fracture were observed in CCC animals in comparison with VC animals. There was no

  1. Acute kidney injury in critically burned patients resuscitated with a protocol that includes low doses of Hydroxyethyl Starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sánchez, M; Garcia-de-Lorenzo, A; Cachafeiro, L; Herrero, E; Asensio, M J; Agrifoglio, A; Flores, E; Estebanez, B; Extremera, P; Iglesias, C; Martinez, J R

    2016-09-30

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important complication in burn patients. Recently, it has been recommended that hydroxyethyl starch (HES) be avoided in burn patients because it increases the incidence of AKI. Our purpose was to study incidence of AKI in critically ill burn patients resuscitated with Ringer's solution and supplements of HES. We conducted an observational study of 165 patients admitted to the critical care burn unit (with 30 ± 15% TBSA burned). The main outcome measures were incidence of AKI, contributions of colloids and crystalloids, various severity scores, comorbidities, complications and mortality. According to the RIFLE criteria, 10 (6.1%) patients presented with Risk, 11 (6.7%) presented with Injury and 11 (6.7%) presented with Failure. According to the AKIN criteria, 9.7% presented stage I, 3% stage II and 10.3% stage III. Replacement therapy (RRT) was performed in 15 patients (9.1%), but in 6 of them RRT was employed in the final stages of multi-organ failure. The incidence of AKI in severe burn patients is high according to the RIFLE or AKIN criteria and these patients experience more complications and higher mortality. Our study suggests that the use of HES in low doses in the burn resuscitation phase does not cause more AKI than resuscitation without HES, but further evaluation is required. Further studies should be conducted.

  2. Standardized End Point Definitions for Coronary Intervention Trials: The Academic Research Consortium-2 Consensus Document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; McFadden, Eugène P; Farb, Andrew; Mehran, Roxana; Stone, Gregg W; Spertus, John; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Morel, Marie-Angèle; van Es, Gerrit-Anne; Zuckerman, Bram; Fearon, William F; Taggart, David; Kappetein, Arie-Pieter; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Vranckx, Pascal; Windecker, Stephan; Cutlip, Donald; Serruys, Patrick W

    2018-06-14

    The Academic Research Consortium (ARC)-2 initiative revisited the clinical and angiographic end point definitions in coronary device trials, proposed in 2007, to make them more suitable for use in clinical trials that include increasingly complex lesion and patient populations and incorporate novel devices such as bioresorbable vascular scaffolds. In addition, recommendations for the incorporation of patient-related outcomes in clinical trials are proposed. Academic Research Consortium-2 is a collaborative effort between academic research organizations in the United States and Europe, device manufacturers, and European, US, and Asian regulatory bodies. Several in-person meetings were held to discuss the changes that have occurred in the device landscape and in clinical trials and regulatory pathways in the last decade. The consensus-based end point definitions in this document are endorsed by the stakeholders of this document and strongly advocated for clinical trial purposes. This Academic Research Consortium-2 document provides further standardization of end point definitions for coronary device trials, incorporating advances in technology and knowledge. Their use will aid interpretation of trial outcomes and comparison among studies, thus facilitating the evaluation of the safety and effectiveness of these devices.

  3. Do co-intoxicants increase adverse event rates in the first 24 hours in patients resuscitated from acute opioid overdose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirakbari, Seyed Mostafa; Innes, Grant D; Christenson, Jim; Tilley, Jessica; Wong, Hubert

    2003-01-01

    Patients frequently arrive in emergency departments (EDs) after being resuscitated from opioid overdose. Autopsy studies suggest that multidrug intoxication is a major risk factor for adverse outcomes after acute heroin overdose in patients. If this is true, there may be high-risk drug combinations that identify patients who require more intensive monitoring and prolonged observation. Our objective was to determine the impact of co-intoxication with alcohol, cocaine, or CNS depressant drugs on short-term adverse event rates in patients resuscitated from acute opioid overdose. Data were extracted from the database of a prospective opioid overdose cohort study conducted between May 1997 and 1999. Patients were prospectively enrolled if they received naloxone for presumed opioid overdose. Investigators gathered clinical, demographic, and other predictor variables, including co-intoxicants used. Patients were followed to identify prespecified adverse outcome events occurring within 24 h, and multiple logistic regression was used to determine the association of concomitant drug use on short-term adverse event rates. Of 1155 patients studied, 58 (5%) had pure opioid overdose and 922 (80%) reported co-intoxicants, including alcohol, cocaine, and CNS depressants. Overall, out of 1056 patients with known outcome status there were 123 major adverse events (11.6%) and 194 minor adverse events (18.4%). After adjustment for age, gender, HIV status, cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease and diabetes, we found that coadministration of alcohol, cocaine, or CNS depressants, alone or in combination, was not associated with increased risk of death or adverse events during the 24 h follow-up period. In patients resuscitated from acute opioid overdose, short-term outcomes are similar for patients with pure opioid overdose and multidrug intoxications. A history of cointoxication cannot be used to identify high-risk patients who require more intensive ED monitoring or prolonged

  4. Impact of a novel, resource appropriate resuscitation curriculum on Nicaraguan resident physician’s management of cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breena R. Taira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Project Strengthening Emergency Medicine, Investing in Learners in Latin America (SEMILLA created a novel, language and resource appropriate course for the resuscitation of cardiac arrest for Nicaraguan resident physicians. We hypothesized that participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program would significantly improve the physician’s management of simulated code scenarios. Methods: Thirteen Nicaraguan resident physicians were evaluated while managing simulated cardiac arrest scenarios before, immediately, and at 6 months after participating in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program. This project was completed in 2014 in Leon, Nicaragua. The Cardiac Arrest Simulation Test (CASTest, a validated scoring system, was used to evaluate performance on a standardized simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Mixed effect logistic regression models were constructed to assess outcomes. Results: On the pre-course simulation exam, only 7.7% of subjects passed the test. Immediately post-course, the subjects achieved a 30.8% pass rate and at 6 months after the course, the pass rate was 46.2%. Compared with pre-test scores, the odds of passing the CASTest at 6 months after the course were 21.7 times higher (95% CI 4.2 to 112.8, P<0.001. Statistically significant improvement was also seen on the number of critical items completed (OR=3.75, 95% CI 2.71-5.19, total items completed (OR=4.55, 95% CI 3.4-6.11, and number of “excellent” scores on a Likert scale (OR=2.66, 95% CI 1.85-3.81. Conclusions: Nicaraguan resident physicians demonstrate improved ability to manage simulated cardiac arrest scenarios after participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation course and retain these skills.

  5. The Consortium for Dark Sky Studies: A Transdisciplinary Institute for Understanding the Loss of the Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barentine, John; Kieda, David; Goldsmith, Stephen; Foott, Bettymaya; Muir, Janet

    2018-01-01

    Research into the effects of artificial light at night (ALAN) has grown from a niche speciality into a broad field touching on aspects of life science, physics, astronomy, social science, and more, reflecting the highly interconnected subjects whose common characteristic is the alteration of the natural nighttime environment by anthropogenic light pollution. Until recently, there was no focal point for these diverse efforts to foster connections between researchers and initiate new topics of study in ALAN research. In 2016, the Consortium for Dark Sky Studies (CDSS), the world’s first organization dedicated to the study of the night and the influence of human nighttime activities on the integrity of natural darkness, was founded at the University of Utah. We describe the motivations for establishing the Consortium, its early activities, and initial outcomes of the effort.

  6. An advisory statement from the Pediatric Working Group of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattwinkel, J; Niermeyer, S; Nadkarni, V; Tibballs, J; Phillips, B; Zideman, D; Van Reempts, P; Osmond, M

    1999-04-01

    The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR), with representation from North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Africa, and South America, was formed in 1992 to provide a forum for liaison between resuscitation organizations in the developed world. This consensus document on resuscitation extends previously published ILCOR advisory statements on resuscitation to address the unique and changing physiology of the newly born infant within the first few hours after birth and the techniques for providing advanced life support. After careful review of the international resuscitation literature and after discussion of key and controversial issues, consensus was reached on almost all aspects of neonatal resuscitation, and areas of controversy and high priority for additional research were delineated. Consensus on resuscitation for the newly born infant included the following principles: Common or controversial medications (epinephrine, volume expansion, naloxone, bicarbonate), special resuscitation circumstances affecting care of the newly born, continuing care of the newly born after resuscitation, and ethical considerations for initiation and discontinuation of resuscitation are discussed. There was agreement that insufficient data exist to recommend changes to current guidelines regarding the use of 21% versus 100% oxygen, neuroprotective interventions such as cerebral hypothermia, use of a laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and use of high-dose epinephrine. Areas of controversy are identified, as is the need for additional research to improve the scientific justification of each component of current and future resuscitation guidelines.

  7. End-tidal carbon dioxide output in manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation versus active compression-decompression device during prehospital quality controlled resuscitation: a case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setälä, Piritta Anniina; Virkkunen, Ilkka Tapani; Kämäräinen, Antti Jaakko; Huhtala, Heini Sisko Annamari; Virta, Janne Severi; Yli-Hankala, Arvi Mikael; Hoppu, Sanna Elisa

    2018-05-16

    Active compression-decompression (ACD) devices have enhanced end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO 2 ) output in experimental cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) studies. However, the results in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients have shown inconsistent outcomes, and earlier studies lacked quality control of CPR attempts. We compared manual CPR with ACD-CPR by measuring ETCO 2 output using an audiovisual feedback defibrillator to ensure continuous high quality resuscitation attempts. 10 witnessed OHCAs were resuscitated, rotating a 2 min cycle with manual CPR and a 2 min cycle of ACD-CPR. Patients were intubated and the ventilation rate was held constant during CPR. CPR quality parameters and ETCO 2 values were collected continuously with the defibrillator. Differences in ETCO 2 output between manual CPR and ACD-CPR were analysed using a linear mixed model where ETCO 2 output produced by a summary of the 2 min cycles was included as the dependent variable, the patient as a random factor and method as a fixed effect. These comparisons were made within each OHCA case to minimise confounding factors between the cases. Mean length of the CPR episodes was 37 (SD 8) min. Mean compression depth was 76 (SD 1.3) mm versus 71 (SD1.0) mm, and mean compression rate was 100 per min (SD 6.7) versus 105 per min (SD 4.9) between ACD-CPR and manual CPR, respectively. For ETCO 2 output, the interaction between the method and the patient was significant (P<0.001). ETCO 2 output was higher with manual CPR in 6 of the 10 cases. This study suggests that quality controlled ACD-CPR is not superior to quality controlled manual CPR when ETCO 2 is used as a quantitative measure of CPR effectiveness. NCT00951704; Results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Aims, organization and activities of the consortium for underground storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stucky, G.

    1977-01-01

    The consortium of Swiss authorities interested in underground storage (the petroleum oil and gas industries, for fuel storage; the nuclear industry for radioactive waste disposal), was initiated in 1972. The author outlines the motives behind the formation of the consortium and outlines its structure and objectives. The envisaged projects are outlined. (F.Q.)

  9. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-04-01

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

  10. Management of foetal asphyxia by intrauterine foetal resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velayudhareddy, S.; Kirankumar, H

    2010-01-01

    Management of foetal distress is a subject of gynaecological interest, but an anaesthesiologist should know about resuscitation, because he should be able to treat the patient, whenever he is directly involved in managing the parturient patient during labour analgesia and before an emergency operative delivery. Progressive asphyxia is known as foetal distress; the foetus does not breathe directly from the atmosphere, but depends on maternal circulation for its oxygen requirement. The oxygen delivery to the foetus depends on the placental (maternal side), placental transfer and foetal circulation. Oxygen transport to the foetus is reduced physiologically during uterine contractions in labour. Significant impairment of oxygen transport to the foetus, either temporary or permanent may cause foetal distress, resulting in progressive hypoxia and acidosis. Intrauterine foetal resuscitation comprises of applying measures to a mother in active labour, with the intention of improving oxygen delivery to the distressed foetus to the base line, if the placenta is functioning normally. These measures include left lateral recumbent position, high flow oxygen administration, tocolysis to reduce uterine contractions, rapid intravenous fluid administration, vasopressors for correction of maternal hypotension and amnioinfusion for improving uterine blood flow. Intrauterine Foetal Resuscitation measures are easy to perform and do not require extensive resources, but the results are encouraging in improving the foetal well-being. The anaesthesiologist plays a major role in the application of intrauterine foetal resuscitation measures. PMID:21189876

  11. Emergency medical treatment and 'do not resuscitate' orders: When ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    underlying fatal conditions that are incurable (e.g. terminal chronic illnesses). [3] DNR ... (DNR) orders require that certain patients should not be given cardiopulmonary resuscitation to save their lives. Whether there is a conflict ... palliative and other medical care for the patient,[7] although the latter may be discontinued in ...

  12. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Araujo G. Ferreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify literature evidences related to actions to promote family's presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children hospitalized in pediatric and neonatal critical care units. Data sources : Integrative literature review in PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases, from 2002 to 2012, with the following inclusion criteria: research article in Medicine, or Nursing, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, using the keywords "family", "invasive procedures", "cardiopulmonary resuscitation", "health staff", and "Pediatrics". Articles that did not refer to the presence of the family in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures were excluded. Therefore, 15 articles were analyzed. Data synthesis : Most articles were published in the United States (80%, in Medicine and Nursing (46%, and were surveys (72% with healthcare team members (67% as participants. From the critical analysis, four themes related to the actions to promote family's presence in invasive procedures and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were obtained: a to develop a sensitizing program for healthcare team; b to educate the healthcare team to include the family in these circumstances; c to develop a written institutional policy; d to ensure the attendance of family's needs. Conclusions: Researches on these issues must be encouraged in order to help healthcare team to modify their practice, implementing the principles of the Patient and Family Centered Care model, especially during critical episodes.

  13. Retention of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills in Nigerian Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective: For effective bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), retention of CPR skills after the training is central. The objective of this study was to find out how much of the CPR skills a group of Nigerian secondary school students would retain six weeks after their first exposure to the conventional CPR training. Materials…

  14. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: biomedical and biophysical analysis (Chapter XXX)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noordergraaf, G.J; Ottesen, Johnny T.; Scheffer, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of the human in caring for others is reflected in the development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Superstition, divine intervention and finally science have contributed to the development of a technique which may allow any person to save another’s life. Fully 50% of the firs...

  15. Hæmostatisk resuscitation til blødende traumepatienter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Jakob; Johansson, Pär I; Steinmetz, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    of plasma and one pool of platelets (equal to ratio 1:1:1 in USA). Haemostatic resuscitation also includes a restricted use of crystalloids, early tranexamic acid, and a goal-directed transfusion therapy by using viscoelastic haemostatic assays to detect coagulopathy and the need for additional transfusions...

  16. Management of foetal asphyxia by intrauterine foetal resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Velayudhareddy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of foetal distress is a subject of gynaecological interest, but an anaesthesiologist should know about resuscitation, because he should be able to treat the patient, whenever he is directly involved in managing the parturient patient during labour analgesia and before an emergency operative delivery. Progressive asphyxia is known as foetal distress; the foetus does not breathe directly from the atmosphere, but depends on maternal circulation for its oxygen requirement. The oxygen delivery to the foetus depends on the placental (maternal side, placental transfer and foetal circulation. Oxygen transport to the foetus is reduced physiologically during uterine contractions in labour. Significant impairment of oxygen transport to the foetus, either temporary or permanent may cause foetal distress, resulting in progressive hypoxia and acidosis. Intrauterine foetal resuscitation comprises of applying measures to a mother in active labour, with the intention of improving oxygen delivery to the distressed foetus to the base line, if the placenta is functioning normally. These measures include left lateral recumbent position, high flow oxygen administration, tocolysis to reduce uterine contractions, rapid intravenous fluid administration, vasopressors for correction of maternal hypotension and amnioinfusion for improving uterine blood flow. Intrauterine Foetal Resuscitation measures are easy to perform and do not require extensive resources, but the results are encouraging in improving the foetal well-being. The anaesthesiologist plays a major role in the application of intrauterine foetal resuscitation measures.

  17. A Wireless Text Messaging System Improves Communication for Neonatal Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes Driscoll, Colleen A; Schub, Jamie A; Pollard, Kristi; El-Metwally, Dina

    Handoffs for neonatal resuscitation involve communicating critical delivery information (CDI). The authors sought to achieve ≥95% communication of CDI during resuscitation team requests. CDI included name of caller, urgency of request, location of delivery, gestation of fetus, status of amniotic fluid, and indication for presence of the resuscitation team. Three interventions were implemented: verbal scripted handoff, Spök text messaging, and Engage text messaging. Percentages of CDI communications were analyzed using statistical process control. Following implementation of Engage, the communication of all CDI, except for indication, was ≥95%; communication of indication occurred 93% of the time. Control limits for most CDI were narrower with Engage, indicating greater reliability of communication compared to the verbal handoff and Spök. Delayed resuscitation team arrival, a countermeasure, was not higher with text messaging compared to verbal handoff ( P = 1.00). Text messaging improved communication during high-risk deliveries, and it may represent an effective tool for other delivery centers.

  18. The future of resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion in combat operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shane A; Hilsden, R; Beckett, A; McAlister, V C

    2017-08-09

    Damage control resuscitation and early thoracotomy have been used to increase survival after severe injury in combat. There has been a renewed interest in resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) in both civilian and military medical practices. REBOA may result in visceral and limb ischaemia that could be harmful if use of REBOA is premature or prolonged. The purpose of this paper is to align our experience of combat injuries with the known capability of REBOA to suggest an implementation strategy for the use of REBOA in combat care. It may replace the resuscitative effect of thoracotomy; can provide haemostasis of non-compressible torso injuries such as the junctional and pelvic haemorrhage caused by improvised explosive devices. However, prehospital use of REBOA must be in the context of an overall surgical plan and should be restricted to deployment in the distal aorta. Although REBOA is technically easier than a thoracotomy, it requires operator training and skill to add to the beneficial effect of damage control resuscitation and surgery. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. A profile of resuscitations at the Kalafong Hospital Emergency Unit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gunshot wounds and car accidents were the major causes of serious injuries. Conclusions: The disease profile of the resuscitation patients reflects the medical and social problems of our society. A holistic, bio-psychosocial approach to health care in the primary health care setting could prevent resultant mortality and ...

  20. Team communication patterns in emergency resuscitation: a mixed methods qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Lisa Anne; Mastoras, George; Rahimpour, Mitra; Sohmer, Benjamin; Weitzman, Brian; Cwinn, A Adam; Hobin, Tara; Parush, Avi

    2017-12-01

    In order to enhance patient safety during resuscitation of critically ill patients, we need to optimize team communication and enhance team situational awareness but little is known about resuscitation team communication patterns. The objective of this study is to understand how teams communicate during resuscitation; specifically to assess for a shared mental model (organized understanding of a team's relationships) and information needs. We triangulated 3 methods to evaluate resuscitation team communication at a tertiary care academic trauma center: (1) interviews; (2) simulated resuscitation observations; (3) live resuscitation observations. We interviewed 18 resuscitation team members about shared mental models, roles and goals of team members and procedural expectations. We observed 30 simulated resuscitation video recordings and documented the timing, source and destination of communication and the information category. We observed 12 live resuscitations in the emergency department and recorded baseline characteristics of the type of resuscitations, nature of teams present and type and content of information exchanges. The data were analyzed using a qualitative communication analysis method. We found that resuscitation team members described a shared mental model. Respondents understood the roles and goals of each team member in order to provide rapid, efficient and life-saving care with an overall need for situational awareness. The information flow described in the interviews was reflected during the simulated and live resuscitations with the most responsible physician and charting nurse being central to team communication. We consolidated communicated information into six categories: (1) time; (2) patient status; (3) patient history; (4) interventions; (5) assistance and consultations; 6) team members present. Resuscitation team members expressed a shared mental model and prioritized situational awareness. Our findings support a need for cognitive aids to

  1. The use of the laryngeal tube disposable (LT-D) by paramedics during out-of-hospital resuscitation-an observational study concerning ERC guidelines 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, C H R; Semmel, T; Müller, J U; Bahr, J; Ocker, H; Graf, B M

    2009-02-01

    In the current guidelines of the European Resuscitation Council (ERC), tracheal intubation, as an instrument for securing the airway during resuscitation, has become less important for persons not trained in this method. For those persons, different supraglottic airway devices are recommended by the ERC. The present investigation deals with the application of the laryngeal tube disposable (LT-D) during pre-hospital resuscitation by paramedics. During a period of 2 years (2006-2008), we registered all cardiac arrest situations in which the LT-D had been applied according to the ERC guidelines 2005. Therefore, we investigated one emergency medical system in Germany. During the defined period, 92 resuscitation attempts, recorded on standardised data sheets, were included. The LT-D was used in 46% of all cardiac arrest situations. Overall, the LT-D was successfully inserted in more than 90% of all cases on first attempt. In 95% of all cases, no problems concerning ventilation of the patient were described. As an alternative airway device recommended by the ERC in 2005, the LT-D may enable airway control rapidly and effectively. Additionally, by using the LT-D, a reduced "no-flow-time" and a better outcome may be possible.

  2. [Efficacy of high versus low plasma: red blood cell ratio resuscitation in patients with severe trauma requiring massive blood transfusion: a meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang; Zhong, Tao; Wu, Gang

    2017-01-20

    To evaluate the efficacy of high (≥1:2) and low (ratio resuscitation in patients with severe trauma requiring massive blood transfusion. The databases including the Cochrane Library, Pubmed, Web of Science, and EMBASE were systemically searched for relevant studies published between January, 2009 and April, 2016. The selection of studies, assessment of methodological quality and data extraction were performed by two researchers independently according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The main endpoint was 24-h mortality, 30-day mortality and 24-h survival rate. Five observational studies reporting outcomes of 1024 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Four studies documented civilian cases and one study had a military setting. No significant differences were found in the Injury Severity Score (ISS) between patient groups receiving high and low plasma: RBC ratio resuscitation. Compared with the low-ratio group, the patients with high-ratio resuscitation showed a significant reduction in the 24-h mortality rate (OR=0.35, 95%CI [0.25, 0.48], Pratio resuscitation within the initial 24 h following the trauma (HR=2.34, 95%CI [1.46, 3.73], P=0.00001). Raising the plasma: RBC ratio to 0.5 or higher may decrease the mortality rate of the patients with severe trauma who need massive blood transfusion.

  3. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1995 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 127 publications. Three Master`s Degrees and 9 Doctor`s of Philosophy Degrees were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in January and July); the third MISCON Summer School held in July; 12 external speakers; 81 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 54 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temp superconductors.

  4. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1995 Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 127 publications. Three Master's Degrees and 9 Doctor's of Philosophy Degrees were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in January and July); the third MISCON Summer School held in July; 12 external speakers; 81 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 54 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temp superconductors

  5. The International Human Epigenome Consortium Data Portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujold, David; Morais, David Anderson de Lima; Gauthier, Carol; Côté, Catherine; Caron, Maxime; Kwan, Tony; Chen, Kuang Chung; Laperle, Jonathan; Markovits, Alexei Nordell; Pastinen, Tomi; Caron, Bryan; Veilleux, Alain; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Bourque, Guillaume

    2016-11-23

    The International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC) coordinates the production of reference epigenome maps through the characterization of the regulome, methylome, and transcriptome from a wide range of tissues and cell types. To define conventions ensuring the compatibility of datasets and establish an infrastructure enabling data integration, analysis, and sharing, we developed the IHEC Data Portal (http://epigenomesportal.ca/ihec). The portal provides access to >7,000 reference epigenomic datasets, generated from >600 tissues, which have been contributed by seven international consortia: ENCODE, NIH Roadmap, CEEHRC, Blueprint, DEEP, AMED-CREST, and KNIH. The portal enhances the utility of these reference maps by facilitating the discovery, visualization, analysis, download, and sharing of epigenomics data. The IHEC Data Portal is the official source to navigate through IHEC datasets and represents a strategy for unifying the distributed data produced by international research consortia. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Perspectives of International Human Epigenome Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Bum Bae

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available As the International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC launched officially at the 2010 Washington meeting, a giant step toward the conquest of unexplored regions of the human genome has begun. IHEC aims at the production of 1,000 reference epigenomes to the international scientific community for next 7-10 years. Seven member institutions, including South Korea, Korea National Institute of Health (KNIH, will produce 25-200 reference epigenomes individually, and the produced data will be publically available by using a data center. Epigenome data will cover from whole genome bisulfite sequencing, histone modification, and chromatin access information to miRNA-seq. The final goal of IHEC is the production of reference maps of human epigenomes for key cellular status relevant to health and disease.

  7. Functional consortium for denitrifying sulfide removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Lihong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2010-03-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process simultaneously converts sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial wastewaters to elemental sulfur, nitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. This investigation utilizes a dilution-to-extinction approach at 10(-2) to 10(-6) dilutions to elucidate the correlation between the composition of the microbial community and the DSR performance. In the original suspension and in 10(-2) dilution, the strains Stenotrophomonas sp., Thauera sp., and Azoarcus sp. are the heterotrophic denitrifiers and the strains Paracoccus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. are the sulfide-oxidizing denitrifers. The 10(-4) dilution is identified as the functional consortium for the present DSR system, which comprises two functional strains, Stenotrophomonas sp. strain Paracoccus sp. At 10(-6) dilution, all DSR performance was lost. The functions of the constituent cells in the DSR granules were discussed based on data obtained using the dilution-to-extinction approach.

  8. Where no guideline has gone before: retrospective analysis of resuscitation in the 24th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörburger, David; Haslinger, Julia; Bickel, Hubert; Graf, Nikolaus; Schober, Andreas; Testori, Christoph; Weiser, Christoph; Sterz, Fritz; Haugk, Moritz

    2014-12-01

    Evaluation of the treatment, epidemiology and outcome of cardiac arrest in the television franchise Star Trek. Retrospective cohort study of prospective events. Screening of all episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Star Trek: Voyager for cardiac arrest events. Documentation was performed according to the Utstein guidelines for cardiac arrest documentation. All adult, single person cardiac arrests were included. Patients were excluded if cardiac arrest occurred during mass casualties, if the victims were annihilated by energy weapons or were murdered and nobody besides the assassin could provide first aid. Epidemiological data, treatment and outcome of cardiac arrest victims in the 24th century were studied. Ninety-six cardiac arrests were included. Twenty-three individuals were female (24%). Cardiac arrest was witnessed in 91 cases (95%), trauma was the leading cause (n = 38; 40%). Resuscitation was initiated in 17 cases (18%) and 12 patients (13%) had return of spontaneous circulation. Favorable neurological outcome and long-term survival was documented in nine patients (9%). Technically diagnosed cardiac arrest was associated with higher rates of favorable neurological outcome and long-term survival. Neurological outcome and survival did not depend on cardiac arrest location. Cardiac arrest remains a critical event in the 24th century. We observed a change of etiology from cardiac toward traumatic origin. Quick access to medical help and new prognostic tools were established to treat cardiac arrest.

  9. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training Rates in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Monique L.; Cox, Margueritte; Al-Khatib, Sana M.; Nichol, Graham; Thomas, Kevin L.; Chan, Paul S.; Saha-Chaudhuri, Paramita; Fosbol, Emil L.; Eigel, Brian; Clendenen, Bill; Peterson, Eric D.

    2014-01-01

    Context Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves the likelihood of surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), yet treatment rates differ by a community’s racial and income composition. Objective To determine if CPR training differs by the race and income of communities across the United States (U.S.). Design, Setting, and Participants We analyzed county-level CPR training rates from 2010–2011 using CPR training data from the American Heart Association, the American Red Cross, and the Health and Safety Institute. We utilized multivariable logistic regression models to examine the association of annual adult CPR training rates with a county’s proportion of black residents and median household income (categorized as tertiles), as well as other demographic, geographic, and healthcare characteristics. Main Outcome Measure CPR training rate. Results From 07/01/2010–06/30/2011, 13.1 million persons in 3143 U.S. counties received CPR training. The median county training rate ranged from 0.00%–1.29% (median=0.51%) in the lower tertile, 1.29%–4.07% (median=2.39%) in the middle tertile, and >4.07% (median=6.81%) in the upper tertile. Counties that were most likely to have CPR training rates in the lower tertile included those with a higher proportion of rural (odds ratio [OR] 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10, 1.15 per 5 percentage point [PP] change), black (OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.06, 1.13 per 5 PP change), and Hispanic residents (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02, 1.11 per 5 PP change); those with a lower median household income (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.04, 1.34 per $10,000 decrease); those with a higher median age (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04, 1.53 per 10 year change); and those located in the South. Conclusions Counties with a higher proportion of rural, black, Hispanic, and lower income residents had lower CPR training rates. Differences in CPR training by race and income may contribute to recognized disparities in bystander CPR treatment and OHCA survival, and

  10. Predicting medical professionals' intention to allow family presence during resuscitation: A cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Meng-Kuan; Aritejo, Bayu Aji; Tang, Jing-Shia; Chen, Chien-Liang; Chuang, Chia-Chang

    2017-05-01

    Family presence during resuscitation is an emerging trend, yet it remains controversial, even in countries with relatively high acceptance of family presence during resuscitation among medical professionals. Family presence during resuscitation is not common in many countries, and medical professionals in these regions are unfamiliar with family presence during resuscitation. Therefore, this study predicted the medical professionals' intention to allow family presence during resuscitation by applying the theory of planned behaviour. A cross-sectional survey. A single medical centre in southern Taiwan. Medical staffs including physicians and nurses in a single medical centre (n=714). A questionnaire was constructed to measure the theory of planned behaviour constructs of attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, and behavioural intentions as well as the awareness of family presence during resuscitation and demographics. In total, 950 questionnaires were distributed to doctors and nurses in a medical centre. Among the 714 valid questionnaires, only 11 participants were aware of any association in Taiwan that promotes family presence during resuscitation; 94.7% replied that they were unsure (30.4%) or that their unit did not have a family presence during resuscitation policy (74.8%). Regression analysis was performed to predict medical professionals' intention to allow family presence during resuscitation. The results indicated that only positive attitudes and subjective norms regarding family presence during resuscitation and clinical tenure could predict the intention to allow family presence during resuscitation. Because Family presence during resuscitation practice is not common in Taiwan and only 26.19% of the participants agreed to both items measuring the intention to allow family presence during resuscitation, we recommend the implementation of a family presence during resuscitation education program that will enhance the positive beliefs

  11. Principles of primary survey and resuscitation in cases of pediatric trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Jafarpour

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Trauma is a common cause of death and disability in children. Proper approach to pediatric trauma involves adherence to ABCDE sequence in the primary survey and resuscitation in order to promptly recognize and manage life-threatening conditions immediately. This readily reviewed sequence includes A: establishment and maintenance of a patent airway while maintaining cervical spine immobilization; B: evaluation of breathing, ventilation and oxygenation, immediate treatment of tension pneumothorax, open pneumothorax and massive hemothorax; C: evaluation and treatment of circulatory compromise and shock; D: Disability and Neurologic Status, assessment of signs of increased intracranial pressure and impending cerebral herniation; and E: Exposure while preventing hypothermia. Implementing these assessment and management priorities can result in more favorable outcomes.

  12. Principles of primary survey and resuscitation in cases of pediatric trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Jafarpour

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Trauma is a common cause of death and disability in children. Proper approach to pediatric trauma involves adherence to ABCDE sequence in the primary survey and resuscitation in order to promptly recognize and manage immediately life threatening conditions. This readily reviewed sequence includes A: establishment and maintenance of a patent airway while maintaining cervical spine immobilization; B: evaluation of breathing, ventilation and oxygenation, immediate treatment of tension pneumothorax, open pneumothorax and massive hemothorax; C: evaluation and treatment of circulatory compromise and shock; D: Disability and Neurologic Status, assessment of signs of increased intracranial pressure and impending cerebral herniation; and E: Exposure while preventing hypothermia. Implementing these assessment and management priorities can result in more favorable outcomes.

  13. Advances in Metal Supported Cells in the METSOFC EU Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenna, Brandon J.; Christiansen, Niels; Schauperl, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Employing a mechanically robust metal support as the structural element in SOFC has been the objective of various development efforts. The EU-sponsored project “METSOFC”, completed at the end of 2011, resulted in a number of advancements towards implementing this strategy. These include robust me...... outcomes of the METSOFC consortium are covered, along with associated work supported by the Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation.......Employing a mechanically robust metal support as the structural element in SOFC has been the objective of various development efforts. The EU-sponsored project “METSOFC”, completed at the end of 2011, resulted in a number of advancements towards implementing this strategy. These include robust...... metal supported cells (MSCs) having low ASR at low temperature, incorporation into small stacks of powers approaching ½kW, and stack tolerance to various operation cycles. DTU Energy Conversion's (formerly Risø DTU) research into planar MSCs has produced an advanced cell design with high performance...

  14. Critical care considerations in the management of the trauma patient following initial resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shere-Wolfe Roger F

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care of the polytrauma patient does not end in the operating room or resuscitation bay. The patient presenting to the intensive care unit following initial resuscitation and damage control surgery may be far from stable with ongoing hemorrhage, resuscitation needs, and injuries still requiring definitive repair. The intensive care physician must understand the respiratory, cardiovascular, metabolic, and immunologic consequences of trauma resuscitation and massive transfusion in order to evaluate and adjust the ongoing resuscitative needs of the patient and address potential complications. In this review, we address ongoing resuscitation in the intensive care unit along with potential complications in the trauma patient after initial resuscitation. Complications such as abdominal compartment syndrome, transfusion related patterns of acute lung injury and metabolic consequences subsequent to post-trauma resuscitation are presented. Methods A non-systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews up to May 2012. Results and conclusion Polytrauma patients with severe shock from hemorrhage and massive tissue injury present major challenges for management and resuscitation in the intensive care setting. Many of the current recommendations for “damage control resuscitation” including the use of fixed ratios in the treatment of trauma induced coagulopathy remain controversial. A lack of large, randomized, controlled trials leaves most recommendations at the level of consensus, expert opinion. Ongoing trials and improvements in monitoring and resuscitation technologies will further influence how we manage these complex and challenging patients.

  15. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions-A nationwide prospective feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2010-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...... providers assisted by paramedics, nurse anesthetists or physician-manned ambulances (Advanced Life Support (ALS) capability) in a nationwide, unselected cohort of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases....

  16. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions--a nationwide prospective feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2011-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...... providers assisted by paramedics, nurse anesthetists or physician-manned ambulances (Advanced Life Support (ALS) capability) in a nationwide, unselected cohort of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases....

  17. Relationship between arterial partial oxygen pressure after resuscitation from cardiac arrest and mortality in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Lee P; Durward, Andrew; Tibby, Shane M

    2012-07-17

    Observational studies in adults have shown a worse outcome associated with hyperoxia after resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Extrapolating from adult data, current pediatric resuscitation guidelines recommend avoiding hyperoxia. We investigated the relationship between arterial partial oxygen pressure and survival in patients admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) after cardiac arrest. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the Pediatric Intensive Care Audit Network (PICANet) database between 2003 and 2010 (n=122,521). Patients aged oxygen status and outcome was modeled with logistic regression, with nonlinearities explored via multivariable fractional polynomials. Covariates included age, sex, ethnicity, congenital heart disease, out-of-hospital arrest, year, Pediatric Index of Mortality-2 (PIM2) mortality risk, and organ supportive therapies. Of 1875 patients, 735 (39%) died in PICU. Based on the first arterial gas, 207 patients (11%) had hyperoxia (Pa(O)(2) ≥300 mm Hg) and 448 (24%) had hypoxia (Pa(O)(2) <60 mm Hg). We found a significant nonlinear relationship between Pa(O)(2) and PICU mortality. After covariate adjustment, risk of death increased sharply with increasing hypoxia (odds ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.80-2.21 at Pa(O)(2) of 23 mm Hg). There was also an association with increasing hyperoxia, although not as dramatic as that for hypoxia (odds ratio, 1.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.37 at 600 mm Hg). We observed an increasing mortality risk with advancing age, which was more pronounced in the presence of congenital heart disease. Both severe hypoxia and, to a lesser extent, hyperoxia are associated with an increased risk of death after PICU admission after cardiac arrest.

  18. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a Danish health region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjølner, J; Greisen, J; Jørgensen, M R S; Terkelsen, C J; Ilkjaer, L B; Hansen, T M; Eiskjaer, H; Christensen, S; Gjedsted, J

    2017-02-01

    Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (ECPR) has emerged as a feasible rescue therapy for refractory, normothermic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Reported survival rates vary and comparison between studies is hampered by heterogeneous study populations, differences in bystander intervention and in pre-hospital emergency service organisation. We aimed to describe the first experiences, treatment details, complications and outcome with ECPR for OHCA in a Danish health region. Retrospective study of adult patients admitted at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark between 1 January 2011 and 1 July 2015 with witnessed, refractory, normothermic OHCA treated with ECPR. OHCA was managed with pre-hospital advanced airway management and mechanical chest compression during transport. Relevant pre-hospital and in-hospital data were collected with special focus on low-flow time and ECPR duration. Survival to hospital discharge with Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) of 1 and 2 at hospital discharge was the primary endpoint. Twenty-one patients were included. Median pre-hospital low-flow time was 54 min [range 5-100] and median total low-flow time was 121 min [range 55-192]. Seven patients survived (33%). Survivors had a CPC score of 1 or 2 at hospital discharge. Five survivors had a shockable initial rhythm. In all survivors coronary occlusion was the presumed cause of cardiac arrest. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation is feasible as a rescue therapy in normothermic refractory OHCA in highly selected patients. Low-flow time was longer than previously reported. Survival with favourable neurological outcome is possible despite prolonged low-flow duration. © 2016 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation (ARISE) trial statistical analysis plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Anthony P; Peake, Sandra L; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Cameron, Peter; Holdgate, Anna; Howe, Belinda; Higgins, Alisa; Presneill, Jeffrey; Webb, Steve

    2013-09-01

    The Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation (ARISE) study is an international, multicentre, randomised, controlled trial designed to evaluate the effectiveness of early goal-directed therapy compared with standard care for patients presenting to the emergency department with severe sepsis. In keeping with current practice, and considering aspects of trial design and reporting specific to non-pharmacological interventions, our plan outlines the principles and methods for analysing and reporting the trial results. The document is prepared before completion of recruitment into the ARISE study, without knowledge of the results of the interim analysis conducted by the data safety and monitoring committee and before completion of the two related international studies. Our statistical analysis plan was designed by the ARISE chief investigators, and reviewed and approved by the ARISE steering committee. We reviewed the data collected by the research team as specified in the study protocol and detailed in the study case report form. We describe information related to baseline characteristics, characteristics of delivery of the trial interventions, details of resuscitation, other related therapies and other relevant data with appropriate comparisons between groups. We define the primary, secondary and tertiary outcomes for the study, with description of the planned statistical analyses. We have developed a statistical analysis plan with a trial profile, mock-up tables and figures. We describe a plan for presenting baseline characteristics, microbiological and antibiotic therapy, details of the interventions, processes of care and concomitant therapies and adverse events. We describe the primary, secondary and tertiary outcomes with identification of subgroups to be analysed. We have developed a statistical analysis plan for the ARISE study, available in the public domain, before the completion of recruitment into the study. This will minimise analytical bias and

  20. Easy-to-learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation training programme: a randomised controlled trial on laypeople's resuscitation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Rachel Jia Min; Lim, Swee Han; Wu, Vivien Xi; Leong, Tak Yam; Liaw, Sok Ying

    2018-04-01

    Simplifying the learning of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is advocated to improve skill acquisition and retention. A simplified CPR training programme focusing on continuous chest compression, with a simple landmark tracing technique, was introduced to laypeople. The study aimed to examine the effectiveness of the simplified CPR training in improving lay rescuers' CPR performance as compared to standard CPR. A total of 85 laypeople (aged 21-60 years) were recruited and randomly assigned to undertake either a two-hour simplified or standard CPR training session. They were tested two months after the training on a simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Participants' performance on the sequence of CPR steps was observed and evaluated using a validated CPR algorithm checklist. The quality of chest compression and ventilation was assessed from the recording manikins. The simplified CPR group performed significantly better on the CPR algorithm when compared to the standard CPR group (p CPR. However, a significantly higher number of compressions and proportion of adequate compressions was demonstrated by the simplified group than the standard group (p CPR group than in the standard CPR group (p CPR by focusing on continuous chest compressions, with simple hand placement for chest compression, could lead to better acquisition and retention of CPR algorithms, and better quality of chest compressions than standard CPR. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  1. Renewable Generators' Consortium: ensuring a market for green electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    This project summary focuses on the objectives and key achievements of the Renewable Generators Consortium (RGC) which was established to help renewable energy projects under the Non-Fossil Fuel Obligation (NFFO) to continue to generate in the open liberated post-1998 electricity market. The background to the NFFO is traced, and the development of the Consortium, and the attitudes of generators and suppliers to the Consortium are discussed along with the advantages of collective negotiations through the RGC, the Heads of Terms negotiations, and the success of RGC which has demonstrated the demand for green electricity

  2. Establishing an International Soil Modelling Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, Harry; Schnepf, Andrea; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    -change-feedback processes, bridge basic soil science research and management, and facilitate the communication between science and society . To meet these challenges an international community effort is required, similar to initiatives in systems biology, hydrology, and climate and crop research. We therefore propose to establish an international soil modelling consortium with the aims of 1) bringing together leading experts in modelling soil processes within all major soil disciplines, 2) addressing major scientific gaps in describing key processes and their long term impacts with respect to the different functions and ecosystem services provided by soil, 3) intercomparing soil model performance based on standardized and harmonized data sets, 4) identifying interactions with other relevant platforms related to common data formats, protocols and ontologies, 5) developing new approaches to inverse modelling, calibration, and validation of soil models, 6) integrating soil modelling expertise and state of the art knowledge on soil processes in climate, land surface, ecological, crop and contaminant models, and 7) linking process models with new observation, measurement and data evaluation technologies for mapping and characterizing soil properties across scales. Our consortium will bring together modelers and experimental soil scientists at the forefront of new technologies and approaches to characterize soils. By addressing these aims, the consortium will contribute to improve the role of soil modeling as a knowledge dissemination instrument in addressing key global issues and stimulate the development of translational research activities. This presentation will provide a compelling case for this much-needed effort, with a focus on tangible benefits to the scientific and food security communities.

  3. Decrease in delivery room intubation rates after use of nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation in the delivery room for resuscitation of very low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biniwale, Manoj; Wertheimer, Fiona

    2017-07-01

    The literature supports minimizing duration of invasive ventilation to decrease lung injury in premature infants. Neonatal Resuscitation Program recommended use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in delivery room for infants requiring prolonged respiratory support. To evaluate the impact of implementation of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) using nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) for resuscitation in very low birth infants. Retrospective study was performed after NIPPV was introduced in the delivery room and compared with infants receiving face mask to provide positive pressure ventilation for resuscitation of very low birth weight infants prior to its use. Data collected from 119 infants resuscitated using NIPPV and 102 infants resuscitated with a face mask in a single institution. The primary outcome was the need for endotracheal intubation in the delivery room. Data was analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics software version 24. A total of 31% of infants were intubated in the delivery room in the NIPPV group compared to 85% in the Face mask group (p=rates were 11% in the NIPPV group and 31% in the Face mask group (p<0.001). Epinephrine administration was also lower in NIPPV group (2% vs. 8%; P=0.03). Only 38% infants remained intubated at 24hours of age in the NIPPV group compared to 66% in the Face mask group (p<0.001). Median duration of invasive ventilation in the NIPPV group was shorter (2days) compared to the Face mask group (11days) (p=0.01). The incidence of air-leaks was not significant between the two groups. NIPPV was safely and effectively used in the delivery room settings to provide respiratory support for VLBW infants with less need for intubation, chest compressions, epinephrine administration and subsequent invasive ventilation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayman Hawari; Nolan Hertel; Mohamed Al-Sheikhly; Laurence Miller; Abdel-Moeze Bayoumi; Ali Haghighat; Kenneth Lewis

    2010-12-29

    2 Project Summary: The Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium (MUSIC) was established in response to the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program. MUSIC was established as a consortium composed of academic members and national laboratory partners. The members of MUSIC are the nuclear engineering programs and research reactors of Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), North Carolina State University (NCSU), University of Maryland (UMD), University of South Carolina (USC), and University of Tennessee (UTK). The University of Florida (UF), and South Carolina State University (SCSU) were added to the MUSIC membership in the second year. In addition, to ensure proper coordination between the academic community and the nation’s premier research and development centers in the fields of nuclear science and engineering, MUSIC created strategic partnerships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project and the Joint Institute for Neutron Scattering (JINS), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A partnership was also created with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) with the aim of utilizing their reactor in research if funding becomes available. Consequently, there are three university research reactors (URRs) within MUSIC, which are located at NCSU (1-MW PULSTAR), UMD (0.25-MW TRIGA) and UF (0.10-MW Argonaut), and the AFRRI reactor (1-MW TRIGA MARK F). The overall objectives of MUSIC are: a) Demonstrate that University Research Reactors (URR) can be used as modern and innovative instruments of research in the basic and applied sciences, which include applications in fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, nondestructive examination, elemental analysis, and contributions to research in the health and medical sciences, b) Establish a strong technical collaboration between the nuclear engineering

  5. Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawari, Ayman; Hertel, Nolan; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamed; Miller, Laurence; Bayoumi, Abdel-Moeze; Haghighat, Ali; Lewis, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium (MUSIC) was established in response to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program. MUSIC was established as a consortium composed of academic members and national laboratory partners. The members of MUSIC are the nuclear engineering programs and research reactors of Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), North Carolina State University (NCSU), University of Maryland (UMD), University of South Carolina (USC), and University of Tennessee (UTK). The University of Florida (UF), and South Carolina State University (SCSU) were added to the MUSIC membership in the second year. In addition, to ensure proper coordination between the academic community and the nation's premier research and development centers in the fields of nuclear science and engineering, MUSIC created strategic partnerships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project and the Joint Institute for Neutron Scattering (JINS), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A partnership was also created with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) with the aim of utilizing their reactor in research if funding becomes available. Consequently, there are three university research reactors (URRs) within MUSIC, which are located at NCSU (1-MW PULSTAR), UMD (0.25-MW TRIGA) and UF (0.10-MW Argonaut), and the AFRRI reactor (1-MW TRIGA MARK F). The overall objectives of MUSIC are: (a) Demonstrate that University Research Reactors (URR) can be used as modern and innovative instruments of research in the basic and applied sciences, which include applications in fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, nondestructive examination, elemental analysis, and contributions to research in the health and medical sciences, (b) Establish a strong technical collaboration between the nuclear engineering faculty and the MUSIC URRs

  6. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Joel [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industry-driven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  7. Correlations between technical skills and behavioral skills in simulated neonatal resuscitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, T; Leonard, D; Sierocka-Castaneda, A; Chan, D; Thompson, M

    2014-10-01

    Neonatal resuscitation requires both technical and behavioral skills. Key behavioral skills in neonatal resuscitation have been identified by the Neonatal Resuscitation Program. Correlations and interactions between technical skills and behavioral skills in neonatal resuscitation were investigated. Behavioral skills were evaluated via blinded video review of 45 simulated neonatal resuscitations using a validated assessment tool. These were statistically correlated with previously obtained technical skill performance data. Technical skills and behavioral skills were strongly correlated (ρ=0.48; P=0.001). The strongest correlations were seen in distribution of workload (ρ=0.60; P=0.01), utilization of information (ρ=0.55; P=0.03) and utilization of resources (ρ=0.61; P=0.01). Teams with superior behavioral skills also demonstrated superior technical skills, and vice versa. Technical and behavioral skills were highly correlated during simulated neonatal resuscitations. Individual behavioral skill correlations are likely dependent on both intrinsic and extrinsic factors.

  8. Adherence to AHA Guidelines When Adapted for Augmented Reality Glasses for Assisted Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Johan N; Ehrler, Frederic; Gervaix, Alain; Haddad, Kevin; Lacroix, Laurence; Schrurs, Philippe; Sahin, Ayhan; Lovis, Christian; Manzano, Sergio

    2017-05-29

    The American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are nowadays recognized as the world's most authoritative resuscitation guidelines. Adherence to these guidelines optimizes the management of critically ill patients and increases their chances of survival after cardiac arrest. Despite their availability, suboptimal quality of CPR is still common. Currently, the median hospital survival rate after pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest is 36%, whereas it falls below 10% for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Among emerging information technologies and devices able to support caregivers during resuscitation and increase adherence to AHA guidelines, augmented reality (AR) glasses have not yet been assessed. In order to assess their potential, we adapted AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) guidelines for AR glasses. The study aimed to determine whether adapting AHA guidelines for AR glasses increased adherence by reducing deviation and time to initiation of critical life-saving maneuvers during pediatric CPR when compared with the use of PALS pocket reference cards. We conducted a randomized controlled trial with two parallel groups of voluntary pediatric residents, comparing AR glasses to PALS pocket reference cards during a simulation-based pediatric cardiac arrest scenario-pulseless ventricular tachycardia (pVT). The primary outcome was the elapsed time in seconds in each allocation group, from onset of pVT to the first defibrillation attempt. Secondary outcomes were time elapsed to (1) initiation of chest compression, (2) subsequent defibrillation attempts, and (3) administration of drugs, as well as the time intervals between defibrillation attempts and drug doses, shock doses, and number of shocks. All these outcomes were assessed for deviation from AHA guidelines. Twenty residents were randomized into 2 groups. Time to first defibrillation attempt (mean: 146 s) and adherence to AHA guidelines in terms of time to other

  9. Examining the Use of a Social Media Campaign to Increase Engagement for the American Heart Association 2017 Resuscitation Science Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Marion; McGovern, Shaun; Dainty, Katie N; Doshi, Ankur A; Blewer, Audrey L; Kurz, Michael C; Rittenberger, Jon C; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Reynolds, Joshua C

    2018-04-13

    The Resuscitation Science Symposium (ReSS) is the dedicated international forum for resuscitation science at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions. In an attempt to increase curated content and social media presence during ReSS 2017, the Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA) coordinated an inaugural social media campaign. Before ReSS, 8 resuscitation science professionals were recruited from a convenience sample of attendees at ReSS 2017. Each blogger was assigned to either a morning or an afternoon session, responsible for "live tweeting" with the associated hashtags #ReSS17 and #AHA17. Twitter analytics from the 8 bloggers were collected from November 10 to 13, 2017. The primary outcome was Twitter impressions. Secondary outcomes included Twitter engagement and Twitter engagement rate. In total, 8 bloggers (63% male) generated 591 tweets that garnered 261 050 impressions, 8013 engagements, 928 retweets, 1653 likes, 292 hashtag clicks, and a median engagement rate of 2.4%. Total engagement, likes, and hashtag clicks were highest on day 2; total impressions were highest on day 3, and retweets were highest on day 4. Total impressions were highly correlated with the total number of tweets ( r =0.87; P =0.005) and baseline number of Twitter followers for each blogger ( r =0.78; P =0.02). In this inaugural social media campaign for the 2017 American Heart Association ReSS, the degree of online engagement with this content by end users was quite good when evaluated by social media standards. Benchmarks for end-user interactions in the scientific community are undefined and will require further study. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  10. Contingent leadership and effectiveness of trauma resuscitation teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seokhwa; Faraj, Samer; Sims, Henry P

    2005-11-01

    This research investigated leadership and effectiveness of teams operating in a high-velocity environment, specifically trauma resuscitation teams. On the basis of the literature and their own ethnographic work, the authors proposed and tested a contingency model in which the influence of leadership on team effectiveness during trauma resuscitation differs according to the situation. Results indicated that empowering leadership was more effective when trauma severity was low and when team experience was high. Directive leadership was more effective when trauma severity was high or when the team was inexperienced. Findings also suggested that an empowering leader provided more learning opportunities than did a directive leader. The major contribution of this article is the linkage of leadership to team effectiveness, as moderated by relatively specific situational contingencies. ((c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Cardiorespiratory monitoring during neonatal resuscitation for direct feedback and audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Johannes van Vonderen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal resuscitation is one of the most frequently performed procedures and it is often successful if the ventilation applied is adequate. Over the last decade, interest in seeking objectivity in evaluating the infant’s condition at birth or the adequacy and effect of the interventions applied has markedly increased. Clinical parameters such as heart rate, colour and chest excursions are difficult to interpret and can be very subjective and subtle. The use of ECG, pulse oximetry, capnography and respiratory function monitoring can add objectivity to the clinical assessment. These physiological parameters, with or without the combination of video recordings, can be used directly to guide care, but can also be used later for audit and teaching purposes. Further studies are needed to investigate whether this will improve the quality of delivery room management. In this review we will give an update of the current developments in monitoring neonatal resuscitation.

  12. Voice advisory manikin versus instructor facilitated training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isbye, Dan L; Høiby, Pernilla; Rasmussen, Maria B

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Training of healthcare staff in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is time-consuming and costly. It has been suggested to replace instructor facilitated (IF) training with an automated voice advisory manikin (VAM), which increases skill level by continuous verbal feedback during...... individual training. AIMS: To compare a VAM (ResusciAnne CPR skills station, Laerdal Medical A/S, Norway) with IF training in CPR using a bag-valve-mask (BVM) in terms of skills retention after 3 months. METHODS: Forty-three second year medical students were included and CPR performance (ERC Guidelines...... for Resuscitation 2005) was assessed in a 2 min test before randomisation to either IF training in groups of 8 or individual VAM training. Immediately after training and after 3 months, CPR performance was assessed in identical 2 min tests. Laerdal PC Skill Reporting System 2.0 was used to collect data. To quantify...

  13. Astroparticle Physics European Consortium Town Meeting Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The Astroparticle Physics European Consortium (APPEC) invites you to a town meeting at the Grand Amphithéatre de Sorbonne in Paris on the 6th and 7th April 2016 to discuss an update of the 2011 APPEC Astroparticle Physics roadmap, to be published in September 2016. In 2014 APPEC decided to launch an update of the 2011 Roadmap, transforming it to a “resource aware” roadmap. The intention was to gauge the financial impact of the beginnings of operation of the large global scale observatories put forward in the previous roadmap and to examine the possibilities of international coordination of future global initiatives. The APPEC Scientific Advisory Committee examined the field and prepared a set of recommendations. Based on these recommendations, the APPEC General Assembly drafted a set of “considerations” to be published by end of February 2016 and be debated in an open dialogue with the community, through the web page but primarily at the town meeting of 6-7 April. Based on this debate the final re...

  14. The nation's first consortium to address waste management issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikel, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    On July 26, 1989, the secretary of the Department of Energy (DOE), Admiral James Watkins, announced approval of the Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC). The consortium is composed of New Mexico State University (NMSU), the University of New Mexico, the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. This pilot program is expected to form a model for other regional and national programs. The WERC mission is to expand the national capability to address issues associated with the management of hazardous, radioactive, and solid waste. Research, technology transfer, and education/training are the three areas that have been identified to accomplish the objectives set by the consortium. The members of the consortium will reach out to the DOE facilities, other government agencies and facilities, and private institutions across the country. Their goal is to provide resources for solutions to waste management problems

  15. Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium (E2C2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium studies the etiology of this common cancer and build on resources from existing studies by combining data across studies in order to advance the understanding of the etiology of this disease.

  16. Regional Development and the European Consortium of Innovative Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Saskia Loer; Kokkeler, Ben; van der Sijde, P. C.

    2002-01-01

    The European Consortium of Innovative Universities is a network that shares information not just among universities but with affiliated incubators, research parks, and other regional entities. The learning network contributes to regional development.(JOW)

  17. Tape measure to aid prescription in paediatric resuscitation.

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, G; Spoudeas, H; Kovar, I Z; Millington, H T

    1990-01-01

    A tape measure, based on 50th centile weight for height and designed to permit easy drug dosage calculation, endotracheal tube size and DC cardioversion current dosages in childrens' emergencies, was tested for reliability by medical and nursing staff with varying paediatric experience. We found that the tape measure gave a reproducible estimate of weight and suggest that its use would facilitate decision making by inexperienced medical and nursing staff in paediatric resuscitation when there...

  18. Variable Saline Concentrations for Initial Resuscitation Following Polytrauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    AFRL-SA-WP-TR-2017-0008 Variable Saline Concentrations for Initial Resuscitation Following Polytrauma Dr. Michael Goodman...Following Polytrauma 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-10-2-6140 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA8650-14-2-6B29 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Michael...established. We investigated the utility of standard variable saline concentrations (0.9%, 3%, 23.4%) in a murine polytrauma model of traumatic brain injury

  19. Strategy analysis of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in the community

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Li; Lu, Yuan-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a crucial therapy for sudden cardiac arrest. This appreciation produced immense efforts by professional organizations to train laypeople for CPR skills. However, the rate of CPR training is low and varies widely across communities. Several strategies are used in order to improve the rate of CPR training and are performed in some advanced countries. The Chinese CPR training in communities could gain enlightenment from them.

  20. Traumatic Pancreatitis: A Rare Complication of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Muhammad

    2017-08-17

    An elderly gentleman was successfully revived after undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for cardiac arrest. Post CPR, the patient developed acute pancreatitis which was likely complication of inappropriately delivered chest compressions which caused further complications and resulted in the death of the patient. This case underlines the importance of quality chest compressions that includes correct placement of hands by the operator giving chest compressions to avoid lethal injuries to the receiver.

  1. Pulmonary air leak associated with CPAP at term birth resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishikawa, Kenji; Goishi, Keiji; Fujiwara, Takeo; Kaneshige, Masao; Ito, Yushi; Sago, Haruhiko

    2015-09-01

    The Japan Resuscitation Council (JRC) Guidelines 2010 for neonatal resuscitation introduced continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in delivery room. The present study evaluated the effect of CPAP for pulmonary air leak at term birth. This retrospective single-centre study used the data of term neonates who were born without major congenital anomalies at our centre between 2008 and 2009, and between 2011 and 2012. Resuscitation according to the JRC Guidelines 2010. We examined the association between the JRC Guidelines 2010, CPAP by face mask and pulmonary air leak. A total of 5038 infants were analysed. The frequency of CPAP by face mask increased after the update of the JRC Guidelines in 2010 (1.7% vs 11.1%; pneonates (37 weeks: adjusted OR (aOR) 4.37; 95% CI 1.40 to 17.45; 38 weeks: aOR 2.80; 95% CI 1.04 to 8.91), but this association disappeared while adjusting for face mask CPAP additionally (37 weeks: aOR 1.90; 95% CI 0.47 to 8.71; 38 weeks: aOR 1.66; 95% CI 0.54 to 5.77). Following the update of the JRC guidelines on neonatal resuscitation, we observed an increased use of CPAP via face mask, which was associated with a higher prevalence of pulmonary air leak in early-term neonates in our centre. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Implementation and execution of military forward resuscitation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Timothy J; Nadler, Roy; Badloe, John; Butler, Frank K; Glassberg, Elon

    2014-05-01

    Through necessity, military medicine has been the driver of medical innovation throughout history. The battlefield presents challenges, such as the requirement to provide care while under threat, resource limitation, and prolonged evacuation times, which must be overcome to improve casualty survival. Focus must also be placed on identifying the causes, and timing, of death within the battlefield. By doing so, military medical doctrine can be shaped, appropriate goals set, new concepts adopted, and relevant technologies investigated and implemented. The majority of battlefield casualties still die in the prehospital environment, before reaching a medical treatment facility, and hemorrhage remains the leading cause of potentially survivable death. Many countries have adopted policies that push damage control resuscitation forward into the prehospital setting, while understanding the need for timely medical evacuation. Although these policies vary according to country, the majority share many common principles. These include the need for early catastrophic hemorrhage control at point-of-wounding, judicious use of fluid resuscitation, use of blood products as far forward as possible, and early evacuation to a surgical facility. Some countries place medical providers with the ability, and resources, for advanced resuscitation with the forward fighting units (perhaps at company level), whereas others have established en route resuscitation capabilities. If we are to continue to improve battlefield casualty survival, we must continue to work together and learn from each other. We must also carry on working alongside our civilian colleagues so that the benefits of translational experience are not lost. This review describes several countries current military approaches to prehospital trauma care. These approaches, refined through a decade of experience, merit consideration for integration into civilian prehospital care practice.

  3. Fluid resuscitation does not improve renal oxygenation during hemorrhagic shock in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Legrand, Matthieu; Mik, Egbert; Balestra, Gianmarco; Lutter, Rene; Pirracchio, Romain; Payen, Didier; Ince, Can

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The resuscitation strategy for hemorrhagic shock remains controversial, with the kidney being especially prone to hypoxia. Methods: The authors used a three-phase hemorrhagic shock model to investigate the effects of fluid resuscitation on renal oxygenation. After a 1-h shock phase, rats were randomized into four groups to receive either normal saline or hypertonic saline targeting a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of either 40 or 80 mmHg. After such resuscitation, rats w...

  4. Hemodynamic–directed cardiopulmonary resuscitation during in–hospital cardiac arrest*

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, Robert M.; Friess, Stuart H.; Maltese, Matthew R.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Bratinov, George; Weiland, Theodore R.; Garuccio, Mia; Bhalala, Utpal; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Becker, Lance B.; Berg, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines assume that cardiac arrest victims can be treated with a uniform chest compression (CC) depth and a standardized interval administration of vasopressor drugs. This non-personalized approach does not incorporate a patient’s individualized response into ongoing resuscitative efforts. In previously reported porcine models of hypoxic and normoxic ventricular fibrillation (VF), a hemodynamic-directed resuscitation improved short-term survival compared...

  5. European cardiovascular nurses' and allied professionals' knowledge and practical skills regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Trond R; Mårtensson, Jan; Axelsson, Åsa; Jørgensen, Marianne; Strömberg, Anna; Thompson, David R; Norekvål, Tone M

    2018-04-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) remains a cornerstone in the treatment of cardiac arrest, and is directly linked to survival rates. Nurses are often first responders and need to be skilled in the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. As cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills deteriorate rapidly, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether there was an association between participants' cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and their practical cardiopulmonary resuscitation test results. This comparative study was conducted at the 2014 EuroHeartCare meeting in Stavanger ( n=133) and the 2008 Spring Meeting on Cardiovascular Nursing in Malmö ( n=85). Participants performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation for three consecutive minutes CPR training manikins from Laerdal Medical®. Data were collected with a questionnaire on demographics and participants' level of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. Most participants were female (78%) nurses (91%) from Nordic countries (77%), whose main role was in nursing practice (63%), and 71% had more than 11 years' experience ( n=218). Participants who conducted cardiopulmonary resuscitation training once a year or more ( n=154) performed better regarding ventilation volume than those who trained less (859 ml vs. 1111 ml, p=0.002). Those who had cardiopulmonary resuscitation training offered at their workplace ( n=161) also performed better regarding ventilation volume (889 ml vs. 1081 ml, p=0.003) and compression rate per minute (100 vs. 91, p=0.04) than those who had not. Our study indicates a positive association between participants' performance on the practical cardiopulmonary resuscitation test and the frequency of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and whether cardiopulmonary resuscitation training was offered in the workplace. Large ventilation volumes were the most common error at both measuring points.

  6. The Solar Energy Consortium of New York Photovoltaic Research and Development Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Petra M.

    2012-10-15

    Project Objective: To lead New York State to increase its usage of solar electric systems. The expected outcome is that appropriate technologies will be made available which in turn will help to eliminate barriers to solar energy usage in New York State. Background: The Solar Energy Consortium has been created to lead New York State research on solar systems specifically directed at doubling the efficiency, halving the cost and reducing the cost of installation as well as developing unique form factors for the New York City urban environment.

  7. Burst stimulation improves hemodynamics during resuscitation after prolonged ventricular fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walcott, Gregory; Melnick, Sharon; Killingsworth, Cheryl; Ideker, Raymond

    2009-02-01

    Although return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) is frequently achieved during resuscitation for sudden cardiac arrest, systolic blood pressure can then decrease, requiring additional myocardial support. Previous studies have shown that a series of 1-ms electrical pulses delivered through the defibrillation patches during ventricular fibrillation (VF) can stimulate the autonomic nervous system to increase myocardial function following defibrillation. We hypothesized that a similar series of electrical pulses could increase myocardial function and blood pressure during the early post-resuscitation period. Six swine were studied that underwent 6-7 min. Each animal received 5, 10, 15, or 20 pulse packets consisting of 6 10 A, 1-ms pulses every 3-4 s in random order whenever systolic blood pressure became less than 50 mmHg. All four sets of pulse packets were delivered to each animal. Systolic blood pressure and cardiac function (left ventricular +dP/dt) were increased to pre-stimulation levels or above by all four sets of pulse packets. The increases were significantly greater for the longer than the shorter number of pulse packets. The mean+/-SD duration of the time that the systolic pressure remained above 50 mmHg following pulse delivery was 4.2+/-2.5 min. Electrical stimulation during regular rhythm following prolonged VF and resuscitation can increase blood pressure and cardiac function to above prestimulation levels.

  8. Neonatal resuscitation equipment: A hidden risk for our babies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winckworth, Lucinda C; McLaren, Emma; Lingeswaran, Arvin; Kelsey, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Neonatal infections carry a heavy burden of morbidity and mortality. Poor practice can result in unintentional colonisation of medical equipment with potentially pathogenic organisms. This study will determine the prevalence and type of bacterial contamination on exposed neonatal resuscitation equipment in different clinical settings and explore simple measures to reduce contamination risk. A survey determined the rates of resuscitation equipment usage. All environmentally exposed items were identified on resuscitaires hospital-wide and swabbed for bacterial contamination. A new cleaning and storage policy was implemented and the prevalence of environmentally exposed equipment re-measured post-intervention. Resuscitation equipment was used in 28% of neonatal deliveries. Bacterial colony forming units were present on 44% of the 236 exposed equipment pieces swabbed. There was no significant difference in contamination rates between equipment types. Coagulase negative staphylococcus was the most prevalent species (59 pieces, 25%) followed by Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae (20 pieces, 9% each). Opened items stored inside plastic remained sterile, whilst those in low-use areas had significantly less contamination than those in high-use areas (22% vs. 51%, P reducing microbial colonisation opportunities. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  9. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation already in Egypt 5,000 years ago?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocklitz, A

    1997-06-06

    In light of the medically relevant features of the ancient Egyptian mouth-opening ceremony, the question of the effectiveness of medical practices in Egypt thousands of years ago is examined, whereby the religious and cultural framework also plays a significant role. In the Land on the Nile myth and reality clearly generated special conditions which favoured the systematic treatment of questions of resuscitation. Numerous examples show that this had practical consequences in the area of everyday medicine. In addition, rebirth and resurrection were central elements of the cult of the dead which had exact medical equivalents. These equivalents may demonstrate the advanced state of resuscitation practices in Egypt at that time. In this context, a reconstruction of an ancient Egyptian mouth-opening instrument is presented. In the cult of the dead, this instrument played a role which can be compared to the function of a modern laryngoscope. It appears possible that at the time of the pyramids the Egyptians already had an understanding of the technology required to perform instrument-aided artificial respiration. Whether or not they actually possessed a fundamental knowledge of the principles of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation remains unclear. Nevertheless, the astonishingly functional characteristics of the reconstructed mouth-opening instrument suggest that it was developed for more than purely symbolic purposes.

  10. Gradually Increased Oxygen Administration Improved Oxygenation and Mitigated Oxidative Stress after Resuscitation from Severe Hemorrhagic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xin; Yin, Yujing; You, Guoxing; Chen, Gan; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Jingxiang; Wang, Bo; Zhao, Lian; Zhou, Hong

    2015-11-01

    The optimal oxygen administration strategy during resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock (HS) is still controversial. Improving oxygenation and mitigating oxidative stress simultaneously seem to be contradictory goals. To maximize oxygen delivery while minimizing oxidative damage, the authors proposed the notion of gradually increased oxygen administration (GIOA), which entails making the arterial blood hypoxemic early in resuscitation and subsequently gradually increasing to hyperoxic, and compared its effects with normoxic resuscitation, hyperoxic resuscitation, and hypoxemic resuscitation in severe HS. Rats were subjected to HS, and on resuscitation, the rats were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 8): the normoxic, the hyperoxic, the hypoxemic, and the GIOA groups. Rats were observed for an additional 1 h. Hemodynamics, acid-base status, oxygenation, and oxidative injury were observed and evaluated. Central venous oxygen saturation promptly recovered only in the hyperoxic and the GIOA groups, and the liver tissue partial pressure of oxygen was highest in the GIOA group after resuscitation. Oxidative stress in GIOA group was significantly reduced compared with the hyperoxic group as indicated by the reduced malondialdehyde content, increased catalase activity, and the lower histologic injury scores in the liver. In addition, the tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 expressions in the liver were markedly decreased in the GIOA group than in the hyperoxic and normoxic groups as shown by the immunohistochemical staining. GIOA improved systemic/tissue oxygenation and mitigated oxidative stress simultaneously after resuscitation from severe HS. GIOA may be a promising strategy to improve resuscitation from HS and deserves further investigation.

  11. Strategies for Small Volume Resuscitation: Hyperosmotic-Hyperoncotic Solutions, Hemoglobin Based Oxygen Carriers and Closed-Loop Resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, George C.; Wade, Charles E.; Dubick, Michael A.; Atkins, James L.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Logistic constraints on combat casualty care preclude traditional resuscitation strategies which can require volumes and weights 3 fold or greater than hemorrhaged volume. We present a review of quantitative analyses of clinical and animal data on small volume strategies using 1) hypertonic-hyperosmotic solutions (HHS); 2) hemoglobin based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) and 3) closed-loop infusion regimens.Methods and Results: Literature searches and recent queries to industry and academic researchers have allowed us to evaluate the record of 81 human HHS studies (12 trauma trials), 19 human HBOCs studies (3trauma trials) and two clinical studies of closed-loop resuscitation.There are several hundreds animal studies and at least 82 clinical trials and reports evaluating small volume7.2%-7.5% hypertonic saline (HS) most often combined with colloids, e.g., dextran (HSD) or hetastarch(HSS). HSD and HSS data has been published for 1,108 and 392 patients, respectively. Human studies have documented volume sparing and hemodynamic improvements. Meta-analyses suggest improved survival for hypotensive trauma patients treated with HSD with significant reductions in mortality found for patients with blood pressure blood use and lower mortality compared to historic controls of patients refusing blood. Transfusion reductions with HBOC use have been modest. Two HBOCs (Hemopure and Polyheme) are now in new or planned large-scale multicenter prehospital trials of trauma treatment. A new implementation of small volume resuscitation is closed-loop resuscitation (CLR), which employs microprocessors to titrate just enough fluid to reach a physiologic target . Animal studies suggest less risk of rebleeding in uncontrolled hemorrhage and a reduction in fluid needs with CLR. The first clinical application of CLR was treatment of burn shock and the US Army. Conclusions: Independently sponsored civilian trauma trials and clinical evaluations in operational combat conditions of

  12. Comparison of different doses of epinephrine on myocardial perfusion and resuscitation success during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, K H; Ahnefeld, F W; Bowdler, I M

    1991-01-01

    Published results of dose-response effects of adrenergic drugs (epinephrine [E]) vary so much between studies because of differences in animal models and duration of ischemia before drug administration. In this investigation the effects of different doses of E on coronary perfusion pressure (CPP), left ventricular myocardial blood flow (MBF) and resuscitation success were compared during closed-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after a 4-minute period of ventricular fibrillation in 28 pigs. MBF was measured during normal sinus rhythm using tracer microspheres. After 4 minutes of ventricular fibrillation CPR was performed with the use of a pneumatic piston compressor. After 4 minutes of mechanical measures only, the animals were randomly allocated into four groups of seven, receiving 0.015, 0.030, 0.045, and 0.090 mg/kg E intravenously respectively. MBF measurements were started 45 seconds after E administration; hemodynamic measurements after 90 seconds. Four minutes after the first administration, the same E dose was given before defibrillation. The CPP of animals given 0.015, 0.030, 0.045 and 0.090 mg/kg E were as follows: 16.3 +/- 6.1, 25.6 +/- 5.8, 33.2 +/- 8.4 and 30.4 +/- 6.3 mm Hg. The left ventricular MBF values were: 14 +/- 9, 27 +/- 11, 43 +/- 6, 46 +/- 10 mL/min/100 g. The differences between the groups receiving 0.015 and 0.045 mg/kg and between the groups receiving 0.015 mg/kg and 0.090 mg/kg were statistically significant (P less than .05). Resuscitation success was 14.3%, 42.9%, 100% and 86.7% respectively. A significant difference in resuscitation success was found only between 0.015 mg/kg and 0.045 mg/kg E.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. A pilot program of knowledge translation and implementation for newborn resuscitation using US Peace Corps Volunteers in rural Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Kristin; Karel, Michele; White, Michelle

    2016-11-16

    Prevention of adverse perinatal outcome using the Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) neonatal resuscitation algorithm can reduce perinatal mortality in low income settings. Mercy Ships is a non-governmental organisation providing free healthcare education in sub-Saharan Africa and in an attempt to reach more rural areas of Madagascar with our neonatal resuscitation training we designed a novel approach in collaboration with US Peace Corps Volunteers (PCV). PCVs work in rural areas and contribute to locally determined public health initiatives. We used a model of knowledge translation and implementation to train non-medical PCVs in HBB who would then train rural healthcare workers. Bulb suction and a self-inflating bag were donated to each health centre. We evaluated knowledge translation and behaviour change at 4 months using the Kirkpatrick model of evaluation. Ten PCVs received training and then trained 42 healthcare workers in 10 rural health centres serving a combined population of over 1 million. Both PCVs and rural healthcare workers showed significant increases in knowledge and skills (p patient outcome. Our novel method of training, including the provision of essential equipment, may be another tool in the armamentarium of those seeking to disseminate good practice to the most rural areas.

  14. Randomized controlled trial of a video decision support tool for cardiopulmonary resuscitation decision making in advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volandes, Angelo E; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Mitchell, Susan L; El-Jawahri, Areej; Davis, Aretha Delight; Barry, Michael J; Hartshorn, Kevan L; Jackson, Vicki Ann; Gillick, Muriel R; Walker-Corkery, Elizabeth S; Chang, Yuchiao; López, Lenny; Kemeny, Margaret; Bulone, Linda; Mann, Eileen; Misra, Sumi; Peachey, Matt; Abbo, Elmer D; Eichler, April F; Epstein, Andrew S; Noy, Ariela; Levin, Tomer T; Temel, Jennifer S

    2013-01-20

    Decision making regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is challenging. This study examined the effect of a video decision support tool on CPR preferences among patients with advanced cancer. We performed a randomized controlled trial of 150 patients with advanced cancer from four oncology centers. Participants in the control arm (n = 80) listened to a verbal narrative describing CPR and the likelihood of successful resuscitation. Participants in the intervention arm (n = 70) listened to the identical narrative and viewed a 3-minute video depicting a patient on a ventilator and CPR being performed on a simulated patient. The primary outcome was participants' preference for or against CPR measured immediately after exposure to either modality. Secondary outcomes were participants' knowledge of CPR (score range of 0 to 4, with higher score indicating more knowledge) and comfort with video. The mean age of participants was 62 years (standard deviation, 11 years); 49% were women, 44% were African American or Latino, and 47% had lung or colon cancer. After the verbal narrative, in the control arm, 38 participants (48%) wanted CPR, 41 (51%) wanted no CPR, and one (1%) was uncertain. In contrast, in the intervention arm, 14 participants (20%) wanted CPR, 55 (79%) wanted no CPR, and 1 (1%) was uncertain (unadjusted odds ratio, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.7 to 7.2; P advanced cancer who viewed a video of CPR were less likely to opt for CPR than those who listened to a verbal narrative.

  15. Survival of the very-low-birth-weight infants after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostelanetz, Anna S; Dhanireddy, Ramasubbareddy

    2004-05-01

    To assess whether advances in neonatal care in the last decade have altered the outcome of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Medical records of all VLBW infants (n=283, body weight (BW)=1066+/-281 g, gestational age (GA)=28.3+/-2.9 weeks) admitted to the NICU between 1999 and 2002 were reviewed. In all, 29 (10.25%) infants received CPR in the NICU. Only one of these infants survived. After adjusting for GA, the clinical variables significantly associated with the need for CPR in the NICU were (adjusted odds ratio; 95% CI): pulmonary hemorrhage (7.89; 3.06 to 20.28), pulmonary air leak syndrome (23.90; 7.58 to 75.4), and delivery by Cesarian section (0.26; 0.1 to 0.66). The results were similar when the data were reanalyzed matching the 28 infants in the CPR group with 28 infants of identical GA in the non-CPR group. Survival rate for the infants who require CPR in the NICU remains extremely poor. This poor outcome needs to be discussed with parents and the option of the "do not resuscitate" (DNR) order may be appropriate for these infants, especially for those infants with multiple organ failure unresponsive to therapy.

  16. Milrinone and esmolol decrease cardiac damage after resuscitation from prolonged cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoerner, F; Lennmyr, F; Wiklund, L; Martijn, C; Semenas, E

    2015-04-01

    Long-term survival after cardiac arrest (CA) due to shock-refractory ventricular fibrillation (VF) is low. Clearly, there is a need for new pharmacological interventions in the setting of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to improve outcome. Here, hemodynamic parameters and cardiac damage are compared between the treatment group (milrinone, esmolol and vasopressin) and controls (vasopressin only) during resuscitation from prolonged CA in piglets. A total of 26 immature male piglets were subjected to 12-min VF followed by 8-min CPR. The treatment group (n=13) received i.v. (intravenous) boluses vasopressin 0.4 U/kg, esmolol 250 μg/kg and milrinone 25 μg/kg after 13 min, followed by i.v. boluses esmolol 375 μg/kg and milrinone 25 μg/kg after 18 min and continuous esmolol 15 μg/kg/h infusion during 180 min reperfusion, whereas controls (n=13) received equal amounts of vasopressin and saline. A 200 J monophasic counter-shock was delivered to achieve resumption of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after 8 min CPR. If ROSC was not achieved, another 200 J defibrillation and bolus vasopressin 0.4 U/kg would be administered in both groups. Direct current shocks at 360 J were applied as one shot per minute over maximally 5 min. Hemodynamic variables and troponin I as a marker of cardiac injury were recorded. Troponin I levels after 180 min reperfusion were lower in the treatment group than in controls (Pmilrinone, esmolol and vasopressin decreased cardiac injury compared with vasopressin alone. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Smaller self-inflating bags produce greater guideline consistent ventilation in simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle Malcolm J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suboptimal bag ventilation in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR has demonstrated detrimental physiological outcomes for cardiac arrest patients. In light of recent guideline changes for resuscitation, there is a need to identify the efficacy of bag ventilation by prehospital care providers. The objective of this study was to evaluate bag ventilation in relation to operator ability to achieve guideline consistent ventilation rate, tidal volume and minute volume when using two different capacity self-inflating bags in an undergraduate paramedic cohort. Methods An experimental study using a mechanical lung model and a simulated adult cardiac arrest to assess the ventilation ability of third year Monash University undergraduate paramedic students. Participants were instructed to ventilate using 1600 ml and 1000 ml bags for a length of two minutes at the correct rate and tidal volume for a patient undergoing CPR with an advanced airway. Ventilation rate and tidal volume were recorded using an analogue scale with mean values calculated. Ethics approval was granted. Results Suboptimal ventilation with the use of conventional 1600 ml bag was common, with 77% and 97% of participants unable to achieve guideline consistent ventilation rates and tidal volumes respectively. Reduced levels of suboptimal ventilation arouse from the use of the smaller bag with a 27% reduction in suboptimal tidal volumes (p = 0.015 and 23% reduction in suboptimal minute volumes (p = 0.045. Conclusion Smaller self-inflating bags reduce the incidence of suboptimal tidal volumes and minute volumes and produce greater guideline consistent results for cardiac arrest patients.

  18. Current and Future Status of Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Rohit K; Singal, Deepa; Bednarczyk, Joseph; Lamarche, Yoan; Singh, Gurmeet; Rao, Vivek; Kanji, Hussein D; Arora, Rakesh C; Manji, Rizwan A; Fan, Eddy; Nagpal, A Dave

    2017-01-01

    Numerous series, propensity-matched trials, and meta-analyses suggest that appropriate use of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (E-CPR) for in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) can be lifesaving. Even with an antecedent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) duration in excess of 45 minutes, 30-day survival with favourable neurologic outcome using E-CPR is approximately 35%-45%. Survival may be related to age, duration of CPR, or etiology. Associated complications include sepsis, renal failure, limb and neurologic complications, hemorrhage, and thrombosis. However, methodological biases-including small sample size, selection bias, publication bias, and inability to control for confounders-in these series prevent definitive conclusions. As such, the 2015 American Heart Association Advanced Cardiac Life Support guidelines update recommended E-CPR as a Level of Evidence IIb recommendation in appropriate cases. The absence of high-quality evidence presents an opportunity for clinician/scientists to generate practice-defining data through collaborative investigation and prospective trials. A multidisciplinary dialogue is required to standardize the field and promote multicentre investigation of E-CPR with data sharing and the development of a foundation for high-quality trials. The objectives of this review are to (1) provide an overview of the strengths and limitations of currently available studies investigating the use of E-CPR in patients with IHCA and highlight knowledge gaps; (2) create a framework for the standardization of terminology, clinical practice, data collection, and investigation of E-CPR for patients with IHCA that will help ensure congruence in future work in this area; and (3) propose suggestions to guide future research by the cardiovascular community to advance this important field. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Real-time tracheal ultrasonography for confirmation of endotracheal tube placement during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Hao-Chang; Chong, Kah-Meng; Sim, Shyh-Shyong; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Liu, Shih-Hung; Chen, Nai-Chuan; Wu, Meng-Che; Fu, Chia-Ming; Wang, Chih-Hung; Lee, Chien-Chang; Lien, Wan-Ching; Chen, Shyr-Chyr

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of tracheal ultrasonography for assessing endotracheal tube position during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We performed a prospective observational study of patients undergoing emergency intubation during CPR. Real-time tracheal ultrasonography was performed during the intubation with the transducer placed transversely just above the suprasternal notch, to assess for endotracheal tube positioning and exclude esophageal intubation. The position of trachea was identified by a hyperechoic air-mucosa (A-M) interface with posterior reverberation artifact (comet-tail artifact). The endotracheal tube position was defined as endotracheal if single A-M interface with comet-tail artifact was observed. Endotracheal tube position was defined as intraesophageal if a second A-M interface appeared, suggesting a false second airway (double tract sign). The gold standard of correct endotracheal intubation was the combination of clinical auscultation and quantitative waveform capnography. The main outcome was the accuracy of tracheal ultrasonography in assessing endotracheal tube position during CPR. Among the 89 patients enrolled, 7 (7.8%) had esophageal intubations. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of tracheal ultrasonography were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 94.4-100%), 85.7% (95% CI: 42.0-99.2%), 98.8% (95% CI: 92.5-99.0%) and 100% (95% CI: 54.7-100%), respectively. Positive and negative likelihood ratios were 7.0 (95% CI: 1.1-43.0) and 0.0, respectively. Real-time tracheal ultrasonography is an accurate method for identifying endotracheal tube position during CPR without the need for interruption of chest compression. Tracheal ultrasonography in resuscitation management may serve as a powerful adjunct in trained hands. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 25 CFR 1000.73 - Once a Tribe/Consortium has been awarded a grant, may the Tribe/Consortium obtain information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Once a Tribe/Consortium has been awarded a grant, may the Tribe/Consortium obtain information from a non-BIA bureau? 1000.73 Section 1000.73 Indians OFFICE OF THE... § 1000.73 Once a Tribe/Consortium has been awarded a grant, may the Tribe/Consortium obtain information...

  1. A survey on training in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Latin America, Spain, and Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce, Jesús; Carrillo, Angel

    2011-09-01

    To determine how training in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation is provided in the Iberoamerican countries. Survey. Latin America, Spain, and Portugal. Experts in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation education. A questionnaire was sent to experts in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in 21 countries in Latin America, Spain, and Portugal; we received 15 replies. Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training is not included in medical undergraduate or nursing training in any of these countries and pediatric residents receive systematic cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in only four countries. Basic pediatric life support courses, pediatric advanced life support courses, and pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructors courses are given in 13 of 15, 14 of 15, and 11 of 15 respondent countries, respectively. Course duration and the number of hours of practical training were variable: basic life support, 5 hrs (range, 4-8 hrs); practical training, 4 hrs (range, 2-5 hrs); advanced life support, 18 hrs (range, 10-30 hrs); and practical training, 14 hrs (range, 5-18 hrs). Only nine countries (60%) had a national group that organized pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. Thirteen countries (86.6%) had fewer than five centers offering pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. Respondents considered the main obstacles to the expansion of training in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation to be the shortage of instructors (28.5%), students' lack of financial resources (21.4%), and deficiencies in educational organization (21.4%). Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training is not uniform across the majority of Iberoamerican countries, with poor organization and little institutional involvement. National groups should be created in each country to plan and coordinate pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and to coordinate with other Iberoamerican countries.

  2. Effect of a checklist on advanced trauma life support workflow deviations during trauma resuscitations without pre-arrival notification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelleher, D.C.; Jagadeesh Chandra Bose, R.P.; Waterhouse, L.J.; Carter, E.A.; Burd, R.S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trauma resuscitations without pre-arrival notification are often initially chaotic, which can potentially compromise patient care. We hypothesized that trauma resuscitations without pre-arrival notification are performed with more variable adherence to ATLS protocol and that

  3. Effect of active compression-decompression resuscitation (ACD-CPR) on survival: a combined analysis using individual patient data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauer, Dietmar; Nolan, Jerry; Plaisance, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, compression, decompression, cardiac arrest, emergency medical service, advanced cardiac life support, survival......Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, compression, decompression, cardiac arrest, emergency medical service, advanced cardiac life support, survival...

  4. Can Telemedicine Improve Adherence to Resuscitation Guidelines for Critically Ill Children at Community Hospitals? A Randomized Controlled Trial Using High-Fidelity Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chris P; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Shilkofski, Nicole; Dudas, Robert; Egbuta, Chinyere; Schwartz, Jamie M

    2017-07-01

    Children transferred from community hospitals lacking specialized pediatric care are more seriously ill than those presenting to pediatric centers. Pediatric consultation and adherence to management guidelines improve outcomes. The aims of the study were (1) to assess whether telemedicine consultation in critical situations is feasible and (2) to compare the impact of pediatric critical care medicine (PCCM) consultation via telemedicine versus telephone on community hospital adherence to resuscitation guidelines through a randomized controlled telemedicine trial. In situ, high-fidelity simulation scenarios of critically ill children presenting to a community hospital and progressing to cardiopulmonary arrest were performed. Scenarios were randomized to PCCM consultation via telephone (control) or telemedicine (intervention). Primary outcome measure was proportion of teams who successfully defibrillated in 180 seconds or less from presentation of pulseless ventricular tachycardia. The following 30 scenarios were completed: 15 control and 15 intervention. Only 11 (37%) of 30 teams, defibrillated in 180 seconds or less from presentation of pulseless ventricular tachycardia; control: 6 (40%) of 15 versus intervention: 5 (33%) of 15, P = 0.7. Request for or use of backboard during cardiopulmonary resuscitation occurred in 24 (80%) of 30 scenarios; control: 9 (60%) of 15 versus intervention: 15 (100%) of 15, P = 0.006. Request for or use of stepstool during cardiopulmonary resuscitation occurred in 6 (20%) of 30 scenarios; control: 1 (7%) of 15 versus intervention: 5 (33%) of 15, P = 0.07. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using telemedicine to support acute management of children who present to community hospitals. Neither study arm adhered to current resuscitation guidelines and telemedicine consultation with PCCM experts was not associated with improvement. However, further research on optimizing telemedicine impact on the quality of pediatric care at

  5. Maternal BMI at the start of pregnancy and offspring epigenome-wide DNA methylation : Findings from the pregnancy and childhood epigenetics (PACE) consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharp, Gemma C.; Salas, Lucas A.; Monnereau, Claire; Allard, Catherine; Yousefi, Paul; Everson, Todd M.; Bohlin, Jon; Xu, Zongli; Huang, Rae Chi; Reese, Sarah E.; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Baïz, Nour; Hoyo, Cathrine; Agha, Golareh; Roy, Ritu; Holloway, John W.; Ghantous, Akram; Merid, Simon K.; Bakulski, Kelly M.; Küpers, Leanne K.; Zhang, Hongmei; Richmond, Rebecca C.; Page, Christian M.; Duijts, Liesbeth; Lie, Rolv T.; Melton, Phillip E.; Vonk, Judith M.; Nohr, Ellen A.; Williams-DeVane, Clar Lynda; Huen, Karen; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.; Ruiz-Arenas, Carlos; Gonseth, Semira; Rezwan, Faisal I.; Herceg, Zdenko; Ekström, Sandra; Croen, Lisa; Falahi, Fahimeh; Perron, Patrice; Karagas, Margaret R; Quraishi, Bilal M.; Suderman, Matthew J.; Magnus, Maria C.; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Taylor, Jack A; Anderson, Denise; Zhao, Shanshan; Smit, Henriette A.; Josey, Michele J.; Bradman, Asa; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Bustamante, Mariona; Håberg, Siri E.; Pershagen, Göran; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Newschaffer, Craig; Corpeleijn, Eva; Bouchard, Luigi; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Maguire, Rachel L.; Barcellos, Lisa F.; Smith, George Davey; Eskenazi, Brenda; Karmaus, Wilfried; Marsit, Carmen J.; Hivert, Marie-France; Snieder, Harold; Fallin, M. Daniele; Melén, Erik; Munthe-Kaas, Monica C.; Arshad, S Hasan; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Vrijheid, Martine; Oken, Emily; Holland, Nina; Murphy, Susan K.; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Koppelman, Gerard H; Newnham, John P; Wilcox, Allen J.; Nystad, Wenche; London, Stephanie J.; Felix, Janine F.; Relton, Caroline L

    2017-01-01

    Pre-pregnancy maternal obesity is associated with adverse offspring outcomes at birth and later in life. Individual studies have shown that epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation could contribute. Within the Pregnancy and Childhood Epigenetics (PACE) Consortium, we meta-analysed the

  6. Visions and Options: A Report on Five Forums Introducing the Research Consortium on Building Vocational Education and Training Provider Capability. Occasional Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Berwyn; Robinson, Pauline

    2008-01-01

    This publication outlines the outcomes of forums held in 2005 to introduce the consortium research program which has investigated ways of building vocational education and training (VET) provider capability. It found a range of issues were of concern to participants as they considered how registered training organisations might position themselves…

  7. Maternal BMI at the start of pregnancy and offspring epigenome-wide DNA methylation : findings from the pregnancy and childhood epigenetics (PACE) consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharp, Gemma C; Salas, Lucas A; Monnereau, Claire; Allard, Catherine; Yousefi, Paul; Everson, Todd M; Bohlin, Jon; Xu, Zongli; Huang, Rae-Chi; Reese, Sarah E; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Baïz, Nour; Hoyo, Cathrine; Agha, Golareh; Roy, Ritu; Holloway, John W; Ghantous, Akram; Merid, Simon K; Bakulski, Kelly M; Küpers, Leanne K; Zhang, Hongmei; Richmond, Rebecca C; Page, Christian M; Duijts, Liesbeth; Lie, Rolv T; Melton, Phillip E; Vonk, Judith M; Nohr, Ellen A; Williams-DeVane, ClarLynda; Huen, Karen; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L; Ruiz-Arenas, Carlos; Gonseth, Semira; Rezwan, Faisal I; Herceg, Zdenko; Ekström, Sandra; Croen, Lisa; Falahi, Fahimeh; Perron, Patrice; Karagas, Margaret R; Quraishi, Bilal M; Suderman, Matthew; Magnus, Maria C; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Taylor, Jack A; Anderson, Denise; Zhao, Shanshan; Smit, Henriette A; Josey, Michele J; Bradman, Asa; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Bustamante, Mariona; Håberg, Siri E; Pershagen, Göran; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Newschaffer, Craig; Corpeleijn, Eva; Bouchard, Luigi; Lawlor, Debbie A; Maguire, Rachel L; Barcellos, Lisa F; Davey Smith, George; Eskenazi, Brenda; Karmaus, Wilfried; Marsit, Carmen J; Hivert, Marie-France; Snieder, Harold; Fallin, M Daniele; Melén, Erik; Munthe-Kaas, Monica C; Arshad, Hasan; Wiemels, Joseph L; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Vrijheid, Martine; Oken, Emily; Holland, Nina; Murphy, Susan K; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Koppelman, Gerard H; Newnham, John P; Wilcox, Allen J; Nystad, Wenche; London, Stephanie J; Felix, Janine F; Relton, Caroline L

    2017-01-01

    Pre-pregnancy maternal obesity is associated with adverse offspring outcomes at birth and later in life. Individual studies have shown that epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation could contribute. Within the Pregnancy and Childhood Epigenetics (PACE) Consortium, we meta-analysed the

  8. Strategies for Small Volume Resuscitation: Hyperosmotic-Hyperoncotic Solutions, Hemoglobin Based Oxygen Carriers and Closed-Loop Resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, George C.; Wade, Charles E.; Dubick, Michael A.; Atkins, James L.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Logistic constraints on combat casualty care preclude traditional resuscitation strategies which can require volumes and weights 3 fold or greater than hemorrhaged volume. We present a review of quantitative analyses of clinical and animal data on small volume strategies using 1) hypertonic-hyperosmotic solutions (HHS); 2) hemoglobin based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) and 3) closed-loop infusion regimens.Methods and Results: Literature searches and recent queries to industry and academic researchers have allowed us to evaluate the record of 81 human HHS studies (12 trauma trials), 19 human HBOCs studies (3trauma trials) and two clinical studies of closed-loop resuscitation.There are several hundreds animal studies and at least 82 clinical trials and reports evaluating small volume7.2%-7.5% hypertonic saline (HS) most often combined with colloids, e.g., dextran (HSD) or hetastarch(HSS). HSD and HSS data has been published for 1,108 and 392 patients, respectively. Human studies have documented volume sparing and hemodynamic improvements. Meta-analyses suggest improved survival for hypotensive trauma patients treated with HSD with significant reductions in mortality found for patients with blood pressure surgery. HSD and HSS have received regulatory approval in 14 and 3 countries, respectively, with 81,000+ units sold. The primary reported use was head injury and trauma resuscitation. Complications and reported adverse events are surprisingly rare and not significantly different from other solutions.HBOCs are potent volume expanders in addition to oxygen carriers with volume expansion greater than standard colloids. Several investigators have evaluated small volume hyperoncotic HBOCs or HS-HBOC formulations for hypotensive and normotensive resuscitation in animals. A consistent finding in resuscitation with HBOCs is depressed cardiac output. There is some evidence that HBOCs more efficiently unload oxygen from plasma hemoglobin as well as facilitate RBC

  9. When Terminal Illness Is Worse Than Death: A Multicenter Study of Health-Care Providers' Resuscitation Desires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Luis O; Einav, Sharon; Varon, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    To investigate how a terminal illness may affect the health-care providers' resuscitation preferences. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 9 health-care institutions located in 4 geographical regions in North and Central America, investigating attitudes toward end-of-life practices in health-care providers. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and χ 2 test for the presence of associations ( P < 0.05 being significant) and Cramer V for the strength of