WorldWideScience

Sample records for resultant pressure distribution

  1. Pressure locking test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  2. Pressure locking test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, open-quotes Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.close quotes Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; we will publish the results of our thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions

  3. First evaluation of experimental results describing pressure buildup and hydrogen distribution, obtained by experimental series E11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzbauer, H.; Wolf, L.; Valencia, L.

    1990-01-01

    The beginning of the core meltdown process in the reactor pressure vessel, with a supposed release position for hydrogen in the upper part of the containment, is simulated, and the influence of the plant geometry on the distribution process is studied. In addition, the release point is shifted to the lower containment area, additional hydrogen production owing to the interaction between concrete and melt is taken into account, and sump boiling is simulated. The experimental program covers analytical investigations in the form of blind post-calculations. (DG) [de

  4. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel flaw distribution development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.L.; Foulds, J.R.; Basin, S.L.

    1991-12-01

    Previous attempts to develop flaw distributions for probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses of pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessels have aimed at the estimation of a ''generic'' distribution applicable to all PWR vessels. In contrast, this report describes (1) a new flaw distribution development analytic methodology that can be applied to the analysis of vessel-specific inservice inspection (ISI) data, and (2) results of the application of the methodology to the analysis of flaw data for each vessel case (ISI data on three PWR vessels and laboratory inspection data on sections of the Midland reactor vessel). Results of this study show significant variation among the flaw distributions derived from the various data sets analyzed, strongly suggesting than a vessel-specific flaw distribution (for vessel integrity prediction under pressurized thermal shock) is preferred over a ''generic'' distribution. In addition, quantitative inspection system flaw sizing accuracy requirements have been identified for developing a flaw distribution from vessel ISI data. The new flaw data analysis methodology also permits quantifying the reliability of the flaw distribution estimate. Included in the report are identified needs for further development of several aspects of ISI data acquisition and vessel integrity prediction practice

  5. Side abutment pressure distribution by field measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian-guo Wang; Yang Song; Xing-hua He; Jian Zhang [State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, Xuzhou (China)

    2008-12-15

    Given the 7123 working face in the Qidong Coal Mine of the Wanbei Mining Group, nine dynamic roof monitors were installed in the crossheading to measure the amount and velocity of roof convergence in different positions and at different times and three steel bored stress sensors were installed in the return airway to measure rock stress at depth. On the basis of this arrangement, the rule of change of the distribution of the side abutment pressure with the advance of the working face and movement of overlying strata was studied. The rule of change and the stability of rock stress at depth were measured. Secondly, the affected area and stability time of the side abutment pressure were also studied. The results show that: 1) During working, the face advanced distance was from 157 m to 99 m, the process was not effected by mining induced pressure. When the distance was 82 m, the position of peak stress was 5 m away from the coal wall. When the distance was 37 m, the position of peak stress away from the coal wall was about 15 m to 20 m and finally reached a steady state; 2) the time and the range of the peak of side rock pressure obtained from stress sensors were consistent with the results from the dynamic roof monitors; 3) the position of the peak pressure was 25 m away from the coal wall. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Midland reactor pressure vessel flaw distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulds, J.R.; Kennedy, E.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1993-12-01

    The results of laboratory nondestructive examination (NDE), and destructive cross-sectioning of selected weldment sections of the Midland reactor pressure vessel were analyzed per a previously developed methodology in order to develop a flaw distribution. The flaw distributions developed from the NDE results obtained by two different ultrasonic test (UT) inspections (Electric Power Research Institute NDE Center and Pacific Northwest Laboratories) were not statistically significantly different. However, the distribution developed from the NDE Center's (destructive) cross-sectioning-based data was found to be significantly different than those obtained through the UT inspections. A fracture mechanics-based comparison of the flaw distributions showed that the cross-sectioning-based data, conservatively interpreted (all defects considered as flaws), gave a significantly lower vessel failure probability when compared with the failure probability values obtained using the UT-based distributions. Given that the cross-sectioning data were reportedly biased toward larger, more significant-appearing (by UT) indications, it is concluded that the nondestructive examinations produced definitively conservative results. In addition to the Midland vessel inspection-related analyses, a set of twenty-seven numerical simulations, designed to provide a preliminary quantitative assessment of the accuracy of the flaw distribution method used here, were conducted. The calculations showed that, in more than half the cases, the analysis produced reasonably accurate predictions

  7. Pirani pressure sensor with distributed temperature measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, B.R.; Bula, W.P.; Zalewski, D.R.; van Baar, J.J.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2003-01-01

    Surface micro-machined distributed Pirani pressure gauges, with designed heater-to-heat sink distances (gap-heights) of 0.35 μm and 1.10 μm, are successfully fabricated, modeled and characterized. Measurements and model response correspond within 5% of the measured value in a pressure range of 10 to

  8. Job Strain and Casual Blood Pressure Distribution: Looking beyond the Adjusted Mean and Taking Gender, Age, and Use of Antihypertensives into Account. Results from ELSA-Brasil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvanhol, Leidjaira Lopes; Melo, Enirtes Caetano Prates; Carvalho, Marilia Sá; Chor, Dóra; Mill, José Geraldo; Griep, Rosane Härter

    2017-01-01

    Methodological issues are pointed to as the main sources of inconsistencies in studies about the association between job strain and blood pressure (BP)/hypertension. Our aim was to analyze the relationship between job strain and the whole BP distribution, as well as potential differences by gender, age, and use of antihypertensives. Additionally, we addressed issues relating to the operationalization of the exposure and outcome variables that influence the study of their inter-relations. We evaluated the baseline date of 12,038 participants enrolled in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil) (2008–2010), a multicenter cohort study of 35–74-year-old civil servants. Job strain was assessed by the Demand-Control-Support Questionnaire. The distribution of casual BP by categories of job strain was compared by a combination of exploratory techniques. Participants were classified into three subgroups (normotensives, medicated hypertensives, and unmedicated hypertensives), and analyses were stratified by gender and age. The relationship between job strain and casual BP varied along the whole outcome distribution. Hypertensive participants had greater differences in casual BP by job strain category, especially medicated hypertensives. Differences in casual BP were also greater for systolic than for diastolic BP and for older participants. No differences were encountered by gender. The exclusion of participants susceptible to misclassification for the exposure and outcome variables increased the differences observed between the categories of low and high job strain. In conclusion, the relationship between job strain and casual BP varied along the whole outcome distribution and by use of antihypertensive drugs, age, and BP parameter evaluated. Misclassification for exposure and outcome variables should be considered in analyses of this topic. PMID:28441727

  9. Impossibility results for distributed computing

    CERN Document Server

    Attiya, Hagit

    2014-01-01

    To understand the power of distributed systems, it is necessary to understand their inherent limitations: what problems cannot be solved in particular systems, or without sufficient resources (such as time or space). This book presents key techniques for proving such impossibility results and applies them to a variety of different problems in a variety of different system models. Insights gained from these results are highlighted, aspects of a problem that make it difficult are isolated, features of an architecture that make it inadequate for solving certain problems efficiently are identified

  10. Water-Pressure Distribution on Seaplane Float

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, F L

    1929-01-01

    The investigation presented in this report was conducted for the purpose of determining the distribution and magnitude of water pressures likely to be experienced on seaplane hulls in service. It consisted of the development and construction of apparatus for recording water pressures lasting one one-hundredth second or longer and of flight tests to determine the water pressures on a UO-1 seaplane float under various conditions of taxiing, taking off, and landing. The apparatus developed was found to operate with satisfactory accuracy and is suitable for flight tests on other seaplanes. The tests on the UO-1 showed that maximum pressures of about 6.5 pounds per square inch occur at the step for the full width of the float bottom. Proceeding forward from the step the maximum pressures decrease in magnitude uniformly toward the bow, and the region of highest pressures narrows toward the keel. Immediately abaft the step the maximum pressures are very small, but increase in magnitude toward the stern and there once reached a value of about 5 pounds per square inch. (author)

  11. The thermal pressure distribution of a simulated cold neutral medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazol, Adriana, E-mail: a.gazol@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, A. P. 3-72, c.p. 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2014-07-01

    We numerically study the thermal pressure distribution in a gas with thermal properties similar to those of the cold neutral interstellar gas by analyzing three-dimensional hydrodynamic models in boxes with sides of 100 pc with turbulent compressible forcing at 50 pc and different Mach numbers. We find that at high pressures and for large Mach numbers, both the volume-weighted and the density-weighted distributions can be appropriately described by a log-normal distribution, whereas for small Mach numbers they are better described by a power law. Thermal pressure distributions resulting from similar simulations but with self-gravity differ only for low Mach numbers; in this case, they develop a high pressure tail.

  12. Sound pressure distribution in a long, narrow hallway: Measurements versus results from a computer model with scattering from surface roughness and diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Lily M.; Rathsam, Jonathan; Christensen, Claus Lynge

    2005-01-01

    The sound pressure level distributrion down a long, narrow hallway due to a sound source at one end does not decrease linearly along the length of the hall. This characteristic may be due to the changing behaviour of scattering that occurs down the length of the hallway, which is distance...

  13. 49 CFR 192.623 - Maximum and minimum allowable operating pressure; Low-pressure distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... distribution systems. (a) No person may operate a low-pressure distribution system at a pressure high enough to...) No person may operate a low pressure distribution system at a pressure lower than the minimum... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum and minimum allowable operating pressure...

  14. Results of reactor pressure vessels ISI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepcek, S.

    1994-01-01

    To find out the possible influence of the annealing process to reactor pressure vessel integrity, a large in-service inspection programme has been implemented as an associated activity to reactor pressure vessel annealing. In this paper the approach to the RPV in-service inspection is shown. Also, the main results and conclusions following in-service inspection are presented. (author). 3 refs, 1 fig

  15. The pressure distribution for biharmonic transmitting array: theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowska, A.

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the paper is theoretical analysis of the finite amplitude waves interaction problem for the biharmonic transmitting array. We assume that the array consists of 16 circular pistons of the same dimensions that regrouped in two sections. Two different arrangements of radiating elements were considered. In this situation the radiating surface is non-continuous without axial symmetry. The mathematical model was built on the basis of the Khokhlov - Zabolotskaya - Kuznetsov (KZK) equation. To solve the problem the finite-difference method was applied. On-axis pressure amplitude for different frequency waves as a function of distance from the source, transverse pressure distribution of these waves at fixed distances from the source and pressure amplitude distribution for them at fixed planes were examined. Especially changes of normalized pressure amplitude for difference frequency were studied. The paper presents mathematical model and some results of theoretical investigations obtained for different values of source parameters.

  16. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Operations § 192.621 Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems. (a) No person may operate a segment of a high pressure distribution system at a pressure that exceeds the... segment of a distribution system otherwise designed to operate at over 60 p.s.i. (414 kPa) gage, unless...

  17. Effects of interface pressure distribution on human sleep quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongyong Chen

    Full Text Available High sleep quality promotes efficient performance in the following day. Sleep quality is influenced by environmental factors, such as temperature, light, sound and smell. Here, we investigated whether differences in the interface pressure distribution on healthy individuals during sleep influenced sleep quality. We defined four types of pressure models by differences in the area distribution and the subjective feelings that occurred when participants slept on the mattresses. One type of model was showed "over-concentrated" distribution of pressure; one was displayed "over-evenly" distributed interface pressure while the other two models were displayed intermediate distribution of pressure. A polysomnography analysis demonstrated an increase in duration and proportion of non-rapid-eye-movement sleep stages 3 and 4, as well as decreased number of micro-arousals, in subjects sleeping on models with pressure intermediately distributed compared to models with over-concentrated or over-even distribution of pressure. Similarly, higher scores of self-reported sleep quality were obtained in subjects sleeping on the two models with intermediate pressure distribution. Thus, pressure distribution, at least to some degree, influences sleep quality and self-reported feelings of sleep-related events, though the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The regulation of pressure models imposed by external sleep environment may be a new direction for improving sleep quality. Only an appropriate interface pressure distribution is beneficial for improving sleep quality, over-concentrated or -even distribution of pressure do not help for good sleep.

  18. Water Pressure Distribution on a Twin-Float Seaplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, F L

    1930-01-01

    This is the second of a series of investigations to determine water pressure distribution on various types of seaplane floats and hulls, and was conducted on a twin-float seaplane. It consisted of measuring water pressures and accelerations on a TS-1 seaplane during numerous landing and taxiing maneuvers at various speeds and angles. The results show that water pressures as great as 10 lbs. per sq. in.may occur at the step in various maneuvers and that pressures of approximately the same magnitude occur at the stern and near the bow in hard pancake landings with the stern way down. At the other parts of the float the pressures are less and are usually zero or slightly negative for some distance abaft the step. A maximum negative pressure of 0.87 lb. Per square inch was measured immediately abaft the step. The maximum positive pressures have a duration of approximately one-twentieth to one-hundredth second at any given location and are distributed over a very limited area at any particular instant.

  19. Discrete sensors distribution for accurate plantar pressure analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claverie, Laetitia; Ille, Anne; Moretto, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of discrete sensors under the footprint for accurate plantar pressure analyses. For this purpose, two different sensor layouts have been tested and compared, to determine which was the most accurate to monitor plantar pressure with wireless devices in research and/or clinical practice. Ten healthy volunteers participated in the study (age range: 23-58 years). The barycenter of pressures (BoP) determined from the plantar pressure system (W-inshoe®) was compared to the center of pressures (CoP) determined from a force platform (AMTI) in the medial-lateral (ML) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions. Then, the vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) obtained from both W-inshoe® and force platform was compared for both layouts for each subject. The BoP and vGRF determined from the plantar pressure system data showed good correlation (SCC) with those determined from the force platform data, notably for the second sensor organization (ML SCC= 0.95; AP SCC=0.99; vGRF SCC=0.91). The study demonstrates that an adjusted placement of removable sensors is key to accurate plantar pressure analyses. These results are promising for a plantar pressure recording outside clinical or laboratory settings, for long time monitoring, real time feedback or for whatever activity requiring a low-cost system. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pressure sensor based on distributed temperature sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baar, J.J.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2002-01-01

    A differential pressure sensor has been realized with thermal readout. The thermal readout allows simultaneous measurement of the membrane deflection due to a pressure difference and measurement of the absolute pressure by operating the structure as a Pirani pressure sensor. The measuring of the

  1. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel-specific flaw distribution development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, S.T.

    1992-01-01

    Vessel integrity predictions performed through fracture mechanics analysis of a pressurized thermal shock event have been shown to be significantly sensitive to the overall flaw distribution input. It has also been shown that modem vessel in-service inspection (ISI) results can be used for development of vessel flaw distribution(s) that are more representative of US vessels. This paper describes the development and application of a methodology to analyze ISI data for the purpose of flaw distribution determination. The resultant methodology considers detection reliability, flaw sizing accuracy, and flaw detection threshold in its application. Application of the methodology was then demonstrated using four recently acquired US PWR vessel inspection data sets. Throughout the program, new insight was obtained into several key inspection performance and vessel integrity prediction practice issues that will impact future vessel integrity evaluation. For example, the potential application of a vessel-specific flaw distribution now provides at least one method by which a vessel-specific reference flaw size applicable to pressure-temperature limit curves determination can be estimated. This paper will discuss the development and application of the methodology and the impact to future vessel integrity analyses

  2. Pressure distribution in centrifugal dental casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, J P

    1978-02-01

    Equations are developed for liquid metal pressure in centrifugal dental casting, given the instantaneous rotational velocity, density, and certain dimensions of the casting machine and casting pattern. A "reference parabola" is introduced making the fluid pressure concept more understandable. A specially designed specimen demonstrates experimentally the reference parabola at freezing.

  3. Competitive pressures on income distribution in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, H.

    1999-01-01

    to explore what perfect competition would do to income distribution in China. The research analyzes this question by determining personal income distribution under hypothetical, perfectly competitive conditions, where factors are rewarded according to their marginal productivities. Comparison with

  4. Distributed pressure sensors for a urethral catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mahdi; Rajamani, Rajesh; Timm, Gerald; Sezen, A S

    2015-01-01

    A flexible strip that incorporates multiple pressure sensors and is capable of being fixed to a urethral catheter is developed. The urethral catheter thus instrumented will be useful for measurement of pressure in a human urethra during urodynamic testing in a clinic. This would help diagnose the causes of urinary incontinence in patients. Capacitive pressure sensors are fabricated on a flexible polyimide-copper substrate using surface micromachining processes and alignment/assembly of the top and bottom portions of the sensor strip. The developed sensor strip is experimentally evaluated in an in vitro test rig using a pressure chamber. The sensor strip is shown to have adequate sensitivity and repeatability. While the calibration factors for the sensors on the strip vary from one sensor to another, even the least sensitive sensor has a resolution better than 0.1 psi.

  5. comparative evaluation of pressure distribution between horizontal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    This paper presents comparative analysis between the pressure behavior of ... Green and source function were used to evaluate the performance of horizontal well and ..... Superscript. ' derivative. D = dimensionless. h = horizontal. = change.

  6. Research on axial total pressure distributions of sonic steam jet in subcooled water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xinzhuang; Li Wenjun; Yan Junjie

    2012-01-01

    The axial total pressure distributions of sonic steam jet in subcooled water were experimentally investigated for three different nozzle diameters (6.0 mm, 8.0 mm and 10.0 mm). The inlet steam pressure, and pool subcooling subcooled water temperature were in the range of 0.2-0.6 MPa and 420-860 ℃, respectively. The effect of steam pressure, subcooling water temperature and nozzle size on the axial pressure distributions were obtained, and also the characteristics of the maximum pressure and its position were studied. The results indicated that the characteristics of the maximum pressure were influenced by the nozzle size for low steam pressure, but the influence could be ignored for high steam pressure. Moreover, a correlation was given to correlate the position of the maximum pressure based on steam pressure and subcooling water temperature, and the discrepancies of predictions and experiments are within ±15%. (authors)

  7. Multiscale probability distribution of pressure fluctuations in fluidized beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasemi, Fatemeh; Sahimi, Muhammad; Reza Rahimi Tabar, M; Peinke, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of flow in fluidized beds, a common chemical reactor, is of much current interest due to its fundamental as well as industrial importance. Experimental data for the successive increments of the pressure fluctuations time series in a fluidized bed are analyzed by computing a multiscale probability density function (PDF) of the increments. The results demonstrate the evolution of the shape of the PDF from the short to long time scales. The deformation of the PDF across time scales may be modeled by the log-normal cascade model. The results are also in contrast to the previously proposed PDFs for the pressure fluctuations that include a Gaussian distribution and a PDF with a power-law tail. To understand better the properties of the pressure fluctuations, we also construct the shuffled and surrogate time series for the data and analyze them with the same method. It turns out that long-range correlations play an important role in the structure of the time series that represent the pressure fluctuation. (paper)

  8. Evaluation of spatial pressure distribution during ice-structure interaction using pressure indicating film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Hyunwook

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of ‘spatial’ pressure distribution is required to determine design loads on local structures, such as plating and framing. However, obtaining a practical ‘spatial’ pressure distribution is a hard task due to the sensitivity of the data acquisition frequency and resolution. High-resolution Pessure-Idicating Flm (PIF was applied to obtain pressure distribution and pressure magnitude using stepped crushing method. Different types of PIF were stacked at each test to creating a pressure distribution plot at specific time steps. Two different concepts of plotting ‘spatial’ pressure-area curve was introduced and evaluated. Diverse unit pixel size was chosen to investigate the effect of the resolution in data analysis. Activated area was not significantly affected by unit pixel size; however, total force was highly sensitive

  9. Algorithm describing pressure distribution of non-contact TNT explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosław Kiciński

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [b]Abstract[/b]. The aim of this study is to develop a computational algorithm, describing the shock wave pressure distribution in the space induced by non-contact TNT explosion. The procedure describes pressure distribution on a damp surface of the hull. Simulations have been carried out using Abaqus/CAE. The study also shows the pressure waveform descriptions provided by various authors and presents them in charts. The formulated conclusions convince efficiency of the algorithm application.[b]Keywords:[/b] Underwater explosion, shock wave, CAE, TNT, Kobben class submarine

  10. Stress distribution and pressure-bearing capacity of a high-pressure split-cylinder die with prism cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Li, Mingzhe; Wang, Liyan; Qu, Erhu; Yi, Zhuo

    2018-03-01

    A novel high-pressure belt-type die with a split-type cylinder is investigated with respect to extending its lifetime and improving its pressure bearing capacity. Specifically, a tungsten carbide cylinder is split into several parts along the radial direction with a prism-type cavity. In this paper, the cylinders with different split numbers are chosen to study the stress distribution and compare them with the traditional belt-type die. The simulation results indicate that the split cylinder has much smaller stress than those in the belt-type cylinder, and the statistical analysis reveals that the split-pressure cylinder is able to bear higher pressure. Experimental tests also show that the high-pressure die with a split cylinder and prism cavity has a stronger pressure-bearing capacity than a belt-type die. The split cylinder has advantages of easy manufacturing, high pressure bearing capacity, and replaceable performance.

  11. CONTEMPT, LWR Containment Pressure and Temperature Distribution in LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargroves, D.W.; Metcalfe, L.J.; Cheng, Teh-Chin; Wheat, L.L.; Mings, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: CONTEMPT-LT was developed to predict the long-term behavior of water-cooled nuclear reactor containment systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. CONTEMPT-LT calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures, mass and energy inventories, heat structure temperature distributions, and energy exchange with adjacent compartments. The program is capable of describing the effects of leakage on containment response. Models are provided for fan cooler and cooling spray engineered safety systems. One to four compartments can be modeled, and any compartment except the reactor system may have both a liquid pool region and an air-vapor atmosphere region above the pool. Each region is assumed to have a uniform temperature, but the temperatures of the two regions may be different. The user determines the compartments to be used, specifies input mass and energy additions, defines heat structure and leakage systems, and prescribes the time advancement and output control. CONTEMPT-LT/28-H (NESC0433/08) includes also models for hydrogen combustion. 2 - Method of solution: The initial conditions of the containment atmosphere are calculated from input values, and the initial temperature distributions through the containment structures are determined from the steady-state solution of the heat conduction equations. A time advancement proceeds as follows. The input water and energy rates are evaluated at the midpoint of a time interval and added to the containment system. Pressure suppression, spray system effects, and fan cooler effects are calculated using conditions at the beginning of a time-step. Leakage and heat losses or gains, extrapolated from the last time-step, are added to the containment system. Containment volume pressure and temperature are estimated by solving the mass, volume, and energy balance equations. Using these results as boundary conditions, the heat conduction equations

  12. Effects of pressurization procedures on calibration results for precise pressure transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajikawa, Hiroaki; Kobata, Tokihiko

    2010-01-01

    The output of electromechanical pressure gauges depends on not only the currently applied pressure, but also the pressurization history. Thus, the calibration results of gauges are affected by the pressurization procedure. In this paper, among several important factors influencing the results, we report the effects of the interval between the calibration cycles and the effects of the preliminary pressurizations. In order to quantitatively evaluate these effects, we developed a fully automated system that uses a pressure balance to calibrate pressure gauges. Subsequently, gauges containing quartz Bourdon-type pressure transducers were calibrated in a stepwise manner for pressures between 10 MPa and 100 MPa. The typical standard deviation of the data over three cycles was reduced to a few parts per million (ppm). The interval between the calibration cycles, which ranges from zero to more than 12 h, exerts a strong influence on the results in the process of increasing the pressure, where at 10 MPa the maximum difference between the results was approximately 40 ppm. The preliminary pressurization immediately before the calibration cycle reduces the effects of the interval on the results in certain cases. However, in turn, the influence of the waiting time between the preliminary pressurization and the main calibration cycle becomes strong. In the present paper, we outline several possible measures for obtaining calibration results with high reproducibility

  13. Wind Tunnel Tests for Wind Pressure Distribution on Gable Roof Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Gable roof buildings are widely used in industrial buildings. Based on wind tunnel tests with rigid models, wind pressure distributions on gable roof buildings with different aspect ratios were measured simultaneously. Some characteristics of the measured wind pressure field on the surfaces of the models were analyzed, including mean wind pressure, fluctuating wind pressure, peak negative wind pressure, and characteristics of proper orthogonal decomposition results of the measured wind pressure field. The results show that extremely high local suctions often occur in the leading edges of longitudinal wall and windward roof, roof corner, and roof ridge which are the severe damaged locations under strong wind. The aspect ratio of building has a certain effect on the mean wind pressure coefficients, and the effect relates to wind attack angle. Compared with experimental results, the region division of roof corner and roof ridge from AIJ2004 is more reasonable than those from CECS102:2002 and MBMA2006.The contributions of the first several eigenvectors to the overall wind pressure distributions become much bigger. The investigation can offer some basic understanding for estimating wind load distribution on gable roof buildings and facilitate wind-resistant design of cladding components and their connections considering wind load path. PMID:24082851

  14. Insects at low pressure: applications to artificial ecosystems and implications for global windborne distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, C.; Catling, D.; Waites, H.

    1999-01-01

    Insects have a number of potential roles in closed-loop life support systems. In this study we examined the tolerance of a range of insect orders and life stages to drops in atmospheric pressure using a terrestrial atmosphere. We found that all insects studied could tolerate pressures down to 100 mb. No effects on insect respiration were noted down to 500 mb. Pressure toleration was not dependent on body volume. Our studies demonstrate that insects are compatible with plants in low-pressure artificial and closed-loop ecosystems. The results also have implications for arthropod colonization and global distribution on Earth.

  15. Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) - First Results of Pressure Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, Ari-Matti; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kemppinen, Osku; Genzer, Maria; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Haberle, Robert M.; Schmidt, Walter; Savijärvi, Hannu; Rodríquez-Manfredi, Jose Antonio; Rafkin, Scott; Polkko, Jouni; Richardson, Mark; Newman, Claire; de la Torre Juárez, Manuel; Martín-Torres, Javier; Paz Zorzano-Mier, Maria; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Kauhanen, Janne; Paton, Mark; Haukka, Harri

    2013-04-01

    The Mars Science laboratory (MSL) called Curiosity made a successful landing at Gale crater early August 2012. MSL has an environmental instrument package called the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) as a part of its scientific payload. REMS comprises instrumentation for the observation of atmospheric pressure, temperature of the air, ground temperature, wind speed and direction, relative humidity, and UV measurements. The REMS instrument suite is described at length in [1]. We concentrate on describing the first results from the REMS pressure observations and comparison of the measurements with modeling results. The REMS pressure device is provided by the Finnish Meteorological Institute. It is based on silicon micro-machined capacitive pressure sensors developed by Vaisala Inc. The pressure device makes use of two transducer electronics sections placed on a single multi-layer PCB inside the REMS Instrument Control Unit (ICU) with a filter-protected ventilation inlet to the ambient atmosphere. The absolute accuracy of the pressure device (< 3 Pa) and zero-drift (< 1 Pa/year) enables the investigations of long term and seasonal cycles of the Martian atmosphere. The relative accuracy, or repeatability, in the diurnal time scale is < 1.5 Pa, less than 2 % of the observed diurnal pressure variation at the landing site. The pressure device has special sensors with very high precision (less than 0.2 Pa) that makes it a good tool to study short-term atmospheric phenomena, e.g., dust devils and other convective vortices. The observed MSL pressure data enable us to study both the long term and short-term phenomena of the Martian atmosphere. This would add knowledge of these phenomena to that gathered by earlier Mars missions and modeling experiments [2,3]. Pressure observations are revealing new information on the local atmosphere and climate at Gale crater, and will shed light on the mesoscale and micrometeorological phenomena. Pressure observations show also

  16. Experimental study of static pressure distribution and axial pressure drop in a seven wire-wrapped rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez y Fernandez, E.; Carajilescov, P.

    1980-11-01

    The fuel element of a LMFBR type reactor consists of a rod bundle in a triangular array with helicoidal spacers among which the coolant flows. By utilizing a seven wire-wrapped rod bundle, coupled to an air loop, the hydrodynamic behaviour of the flow was simulated. A series of measurements was performed in order to obtain static pressure distributions in the surface of the rods and in the walls of the hexagonal duct, for different Reynolds numbers, the axial and the angular position being varied. The axial pressure drop was also measured and the friction coefficient for different Reynolds numbers was calculated. From the results obtained, the existence of zones of low pressure on the surface of the rods was observed, as well as the non-dependence of the nondimensional static pressure on the Reynolds number. Sudden variations in the distribution of the static pressure distribution were observed and they must be taken in to account in the thermal-hydraulic design, due to the possibility of occurence of cavitation bubbles in the coolant. (I.C.R.) [pt

  17. Size distributions of micro-bubbles generated by a pressurized dissolution method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taya, C.; Maeda, Y.; Hosokawa, S.; Tomiyama, A.; Ito, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Size of micro-bubbles is widely distributed in the range of one to several hundreds micrometers and depends on generation methods, flow conditions and elapsed times after the bubble generation. Although a size distribution of micro-bubbles should be taken into account to improve accuracy in numerical simulations of flows with micro-bubbles, a variety of the size distribution makes it difficult to introduce the size distribution in the simulations. On the other hand, several models such as the Rosin-Rammler equation and the Nukiyama-Tanazawa equation have been proposed to represent the size distribution of particles or droplets. Applicability of these models to the size distribution of micro-bubbles has not been examined yet. In this study, we therefore measure size distribution of micro-bubbles generated by a pressurized dissolution method by using a phase Doppler anemometry (PDA), and investigate the applicability of the available models to the size distributions of micro-bubbles. Experimental apparatus consists of a pressurized tank in which air is dissolved in liquid under high pressure condition, a decompression nozzle in which micro-bubbles are generated due to pressure reduction, a rectangular duct and an upper tank. Experiments are conducted for several liquid volumetric fluxes in the decompression nozzle. Measurements are carried out at the downstream region of the decompression nozzle and in the upper tank. The experimental results indicate that (1) the Nukiyama-Tanasawa equation well represents the size distribution of micro-bubbles generated by the pressurized dissolution method, whereas the Rosin-Rammler equation fails in the representation, (2) the bubble size distribution of micro-bubbles can be evaluated by using the Nukiyama-Tanasawa equation without individual bubble diameters, when mean bubble diameter and skewness of the bubble distribution are given, and (3) an evaluation method of visibility based on the bubble size distribution and bubble

  18. Rod internal pressure quantification and distribution analysis using Frapcon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessee, Matthew Anderson [ORNL; Wieselquist, William A [ORNL; Ivanov, Kostadin [Pennsylvania State University, University Park

    2015-09-01

    This report documents work performed supporting the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Fuel Cycle Technologies Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) under work breakdown structure element 1.02.08.10, ST Analysis. In particular, this report fulfills the M4 milestone M4FT- 15OR0810036, Quantify effects of power uncertainty on fuel assembly characteristics, within work package FT-15OR081003 ST Analysis-ORNL. This research was also supported by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (http://www.casl.gov), an Energy Innovation Hub (http://www.energy.gov/hubs) for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors under U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. The discharge rod internal pressure (RIP) and cladding hoop stress (CHS) distributions are quantified for Watts Bar Nuclear Unit 1 (WBN1) fuel rods by modeling core cycle design data, operation data (including modeling significant trips and downpowers), and as-built fuel enrichments and densities of each fuel rod in FRAPCON-3.5. A methodology is developed which tracks inter-cycle assembly movements and assembly batch fabrication information to build individual FRAPCON inputs for each evaluated WBN1 fuel rod. An alternate model for the amount of helium released from the zirconium diboride (ZrB2) integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) layer is derived and applied to FRAPCON output data to quantify the RIP and CHS for these types of fuel rods. SCALE/Polaris is used to quantify fuel rodspecific spectral quantities and the amount of gaseous fission products produced in the fuel for use in FRAPCON inputs. Fuel rods with ZrB2 IFBA layers (i.e., IFBA rods) are determined to have RIP predictions that are elevated when compared to fuel rod without IFBA layers (i.e., standard rods) despite the fact that IFBA rods often have reduced fill pressures and annular fuel pellets. The primary contributor to elevated RIP predictions at burnups less than and greater than 30 GWd

  19. The potential for health risks from intrusion of contaminants into the distribution system from pressure transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeChevallier, Mark W; Gullick, Richard W; Karim, Mohammad R; Friedman, Melinda; Funk, James E

    2003-03-01

    The potential for public health risks associated with intrusion of contaminants into water supply distribution systems resulting from transient low or negative pressures is assessed. It is shown that transient pressure events occur in distribution systems; that during these negative pressure events pipeline leaks provide a potential portal for entry of groundwater into treated drinking water; and that faecal indicators and culturable human viruses are present in the soil and water exterior to the distribution system. To date, all observed negative pressure events have been related to power outages or other pump shutdowns. Although there are insufficient data to indicate whether pressure transients are a substantial source of risk to water quality in the distribution system, mitigation techniques can be implemented, principally the maintenance of an effective disinfectant residual throughout the distribution system, leak control, redesign of air relief venting, and more rigorous application of existing engineering standards. Use of high-speed pressure data loggers and surge modelling may have some merit, but more research is needed.

  20. Distributional and efficiency results for subset selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, van der P.

    1996-01-01

    Assume k (??k \\geq 2) populations are given. The associated independent random variables have continuous distribution functions with an unknown location parameter. The statistical selec??tion goal is to select a non??empty subset which contains the best population,?? that is the pop??ulation with

  1. Updated lattice results for parton distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Cichy, Krzysztof; Hadjiyiannakou, Kyriakos; Jansen, Karl; Steffens, Fernanda; Wiese, Christian

    2017-07-01

    We provide an analysis of the x-dependence of the bare unpolarized, helicity and transversity iso-vector parton distribution functions (PDFs) from lattice calculations employing (maximally) twisted mass fermions. The x-dependence of the calculated PDFs resembles the one of the phenomenological parameterizations, a feature that makes this approach very promising. Furthermore, we apply momentum smearing for the relevant matrix elements to compute the lattice PDFs and find a large improvement factor when compared to conventional Gaussian smearing. This allows us to extend the lattice computation of the distributions to higher values of the nucleon momentum, which is essential for the prospects of a reliable extraction of the PDFs in the future.

  2. Updated lattice results for parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrou, Constantia [Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia (Cyprus); Cichy, Krzysztof [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Poznan Univ. (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Constantinou, Martha [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hadjiyiannakou, Kyriakos [Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; Jansen, Karl; Steffens, Fernanda; Wiese, Christian [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2017-07-15

    We provide an analysis of the x-dependence of the bare unpolarized, helicity and transversity iso-vector parton distribution functions (PDFs) from lattice calculations employing (maximally) twisted mass fermions. The x-dependence of the calculated PDFs resembles the one of the phenomenological parameterizations, a feature that makes this approach very promising. Furthermore, we apply momentum smearing for the relevant matrix elements to compute the lattice PDFs and find a large improvement factor when compared to conventional Gaussian smearing. This allows us to extend the lattice computation of the distributions to higher values of the nucleon momentum, which is essential for the prospects of a reliable extraction of the PDFs in the future.

  3. Rocket Engine Turbine Blade Surface Pressure Distributions Experiment and Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Susan T.; Zoladz, Thomas F.; Dorney, Daniel J.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Understanding the unsteady aspects of turbine rotor flow fields is critical to successful future turbine designs. A technology program was conducted at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to increase the understanding of unsteady environments for rocket engine turbines. The experimental program involved instrumenting turbine rotor blades with miniature surface mounted high frequency response pressure transducers. The turbine model was then tested to measure the unsteady pressures on the rotor blades. The data obtained from the experimental program is unique in two respects. First, much more unsteady data was obtained (several minutes per set point) than has been possible in the past. Also, an extensive steady performance database existed for the turbine model. This allowed an evaluation of the effect of the on-blade instrumentation on the turbine's performance. A three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes analysis was also used to blindly predict the unsteady flow field in the turbine at the design operating conditions and at +15 degrees relative incidence to the first-stage rotor. The predicted time-averaged and unsteady pressure distributions show good agreement with the experimental data. This unique data set, the lessons learned for acquiring this type of data, and the improvements made to the data analysis and prediction tools are contributing significantly to current Space Launch Initiative turbine airflow test and blade surface pressure prediction efforts.

  4. ON THE COAGULATION AND SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF PRESSURE CONFINED CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xu; Zhou Tingtao; Lin, D. N. C.

    2013-01-01

    Observations of the Pipe Nebula have led to the discovery of dense starless cores. The mass of most cores is too small for their self-gravity to hold them together. Instead, they are thought to be pressure confined. The observed dense cores' mass function (CMF) matches well with the initial mass function of stars in young clusters. Similar CMFs are observed in other star forming regions such as the Aquila Nebula, albeit with some dispersion. The shape of these CMF provides important clues to the competing physical processes which lead to star formation and its feedback on the interstellar media. In this paper, we investigate the dynamical origin of the mass function of starless cores which are confined by a warm, less dense medium. In order to follow the evolution of the CMF, we construct a numerical method to consider the coagulation between the cold cores and their ablation due to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability induced by their relative motion through the warm medium. We are able to reproduce the observed CMF among the starless cores in the Pipe Nebula. Our results indicate that in environment similar to the Pipe Nebula: (1) before the onset of their gravitational collapse, the mass distribution of the progenitor cores is similar to that of the young stars, (2) the observed CMF is a robust consequence of dynamical equilibrium between the coagulation and ablation of cores, and (3) a break in the slope of the CMF is due to the enhancement of collisional cross section and suppression of ablation for cores with masses larger than the cores' Bonnor-Ebert mass.

  5. The Influence of Pressure Distribution on the Maximum Values of Stress in FEM Analysis of Plain Bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Cojocaru

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Several methods can be used in the FEM studies to apply the loads on a plain bearing. The paper presents a comparative analysis of maximum stress obtained for three loading scenarios: resultant force applied on the shaft – bearing assembly, variable pressure with sinusoidal distribution applied on the bearing surface, variable pressure with parabolic distribution applied on the bearing surface.

  6. Three-dimensional dynamic hip contact area and pressure distribution during activities of daily living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, H; Faust, A; Wilckens, J; Kitagawa, M; Fetto, J; Chao, Edmund Y-S

    2006-01-01

    Estimation of the hip joint contact area and pressure distribution during activities of daily living is important in predicting joint degeneration mechanism, prosthetic implant wear, providing biomechanical rationales for preoperative planning and postoperative rehabilitation. These biomechanical data were estimated utilizing a generic hip model, the Discrete Element Analysis technique, and the in vivo hip joint contact force data. The three-dimensional joint potential contact area was obtained from the anteroposterior radiograph of a subject and the actual joint contact area and pressure distribution in eight activities of daily living were calculated. During fast, normal, and slow walking, the peak pressure of moderate magnitude was located at the lateral roof of the acetabulum during mid-stance. In standing up and sitting down, and during knee bending, the peak pressures were located at the edge of the posterior horn and the magnitude of the peak pressure during sitting down was 2.8 times that of normal walking. The peak pressure was found at the lateral roof in climbing up stairs which was higher than that in going down stairs. These results can be used to rationalize rehabilitation protocols, functional restrictions after complex acetabular reconstructions, and prosthetic component wear and fatigue test set up. The same model and analysis can provide further insight to soft tissue loading and pathology such as labral injury. When the pressure distribution on the acetabulum is inverted onto the femoral head, prediction of subchondral bone collapse associated with avascular necrosis can be achieved with improved accuracy.

  7. Influence of particle size distribution on the blast pressure profile from explosives buried in saturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, S. E.; Fay, S. D.; Tyas, A.; Clarke, S. D.; Reay, J. J.; Warren, J. A.; Gant, M.; Elgy, I.

    2017-06-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of pressure and impulse from explosives buried in saturated cohesive and cohesionless soils has been measured experimentally for the first time. Ten experiments have been conducted at quarter-scale, where localised pressure loading was measured using an array of 17 Hopkinson pressure bars. The blast pressure measurements are used in conjunction with high-speed video filmed at 140,000 fps to investigate in detail the physical processes occurring at the loaded face. Two coarse cohesionless soils and one fine cohesive soil were tested: a relatively uniform sand, a well-graded sandy gravel, and a fine-grained clay. The results show that there is a single fundamental loading mechanism when explosives are detonated in saturated soil, invariant of particle size and soil cohesion. It is also shown that variability in localised loading is intrinsically linked to the particle size distribution of the surrounding soil.

  8. Influence of particle size distribution on the blast pressure profile from explosives buried in saturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, S. E.; Fay, S. D.; Tyas, A.; Clarke, S. D.; Reay, J. J.; Warren, J. A.; Gant, M.; Elgy, I.

    2018-05-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of pressure and impulse from explosives buried in saturated cohesive and cohesionless soils has been measured experimentally for the first time. Ten experiments have been conducted at quarter-scale, where localised pressure loading was measured using an array of 17 Hopkinson pressure bars. The blast pressure measurements are used in conjunction with high-speed video filmed at 140,000 fps to investigate in detail the physical processes occurring at the loaded face. Two coarse cohesionless soils and one fine cohesive soil were tested: a relatively uniform sand, a well-graded sandy gravel, and a fine-grained clay. The results show that there is a single fundamental loading mechanism when explosives are detonated in saturated soil, invariant of particle size and soil cohesion. It is also shown that variability in localised loading is intrinsically linked to the particle size distribution of the surrounding soil.

  9. A New Approach for High Pressure Pixel Polar Distribution on Off-line Signature Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús F. Vargas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Features representing information of High Pressure Points froma static image of a handwritten signature are analyzed for an offline verification system. From grayscale images, a new approach for High Pressure threshold estimation is proposed. Two images, one containingthe High Pressure Points extracted and other with a binary version ofthe original signature, are transformed to polar coordinates where a pixel density ratio between them is calculated. Polar space had been divided into angular and radial segments, which permit a local analysis of the high pressure distribution. Finally two vectors containing the density distribution ratio are calculated for nearest and farthest points from geometric center of the original signature image. Experiments were carried out using a database containing signature from 160 individual. The robustness of the analyzed system for simple forgeries is tested out with Support Vector Machines models. For the sake of completeness, a comparison of the results obtained by the proposed approach with similar works published is presented.

  10. Pressure distribution over tube surfaces of tube bundle subjected to two phase cross flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Woo Gun

    2013-01-01

    Two phase vapor liquid flows exist in many shell and tube heat exchangers such as condensers, evaporators and nuclear steam generators. To understand the fluid dynamic forces acting on a structure subjected to a two phase flow, it is essential to obtain detailed information about the characteristics of a two phase flow. The characteristics of a two phase flow and the flow parameters were introduced, and then, an experiment was performed to evaluate the pressure loss in the tube bundles and the fluid dynamic force acting on the cylinder owing to the pressure distribution. A two phase flow was pre mixed at the entrance of the test section, and the experiments were undertaken using a normal triangular array of cylinders subjected to a two phase cross flow. The pressure loss along the flow direction in the tube bundles was measured to calculate the two phase friction multiplier, and the multiplier was compared with the analytical value. Furthermore, the circular distributions of the pressure on the cylinders were measured. Based on the distribution and the fundamental theory of two phase flow, the effects of the void fraction and mass flux per unit area on the pressure coefficient and the drag coefficient were evaluated. The drag coefficient was calculated by integrating the measured pressure coefficient and the drag coefficient were evaluated. The drag coefficient was calculated by integrating the measured pressure on the tube by a numerical method. It was found that for low mass fluxes, the measured two phase friction multipliers agree well with the analytical results, and good agreement for the effect of the void fraction on the drag coefficients, as calculated by the measured pressure distributions, is shown qualitatively, as compared to the existing experimental results

  11. Influence of dental occlusion on postural control and plantar pressure distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharnweber, Benjamin; Adjami, Frederic; Schuster, Gabriele; Kopp, Stefan; Natrup, Jörg; Erbe, Christina; Ohlendorf, Daniela

    2017-11-01

    The number of studies investigating correlations between the temporomandibular system and body posture, postural control or plantar pressure distribution is continuously increasing. If a connection can be found, it is often of minor influence or for only a single parameter. However, small subject groups are critical. This study was conducted to define correlations between dental parameters, postural control and plantar pressure distribution in healthy males. In this study, 87 male subjects with an average age of 25.23 ± 3.5 years (ranging from 18 to 35 years) were examined. Dental casts of the subjects were analyzed. Postural control and plantar pressure distribution were recorded by a force platform. Possible orthodontic and orthopedic factors of influence were determined by either an anamnesis or a questionnaire. All tests performed were randomized and repeated three times each for intercuspal position (ICP) and blocked occlusion (BO). For a statistical analysis of the results, non-parametric tests (Wilcoxon-Matched-Pairs-Test, Kruskall-Wallis-Test) were used. A revision of the results via Bonferroni-Holm correction was considered. ICP increases body sway in the frontal (p ≤ 0.01) and sagittal planes (p ≤ 0.03) compared to BO, whereas all other 29 correlations were independent of the occlusion position. For both of the ICP or BO cases, Angle-class, midline-displacement, crossbite, or orthodontic therapy were found to have no influence on postural control or plantar pressure distribution (p > 0.05). However, the contact time of the left foot decreased (p ≤ 0.001) while detecting the plantar pressure distribution in each position. Persistent dental parameters have no effect on postural sway. In addition, postural control and plantar pressure distribution have been found to be independent postural criteria.

  12. Pore Pressure Distribution and Flank Instability in Hydrothermally Altered Stratovolcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J. L.; Taron, J.; Hurwitz, S.; Reid, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Field and geophysical investigations of stratovolcanoes with long-lived hydrothermal systems commonly reveal that initially permeable regions (such as brecciated layers of pyroclastic material) can become both altered and water-bearing. Hydrothermal alteration in these regions, including clay formation, can turn them into low-permeability barriers to fluid flow, which could increase pore fluid pressures resulting in flank slope instability. We examined elevated pore pressure conditions using numerical models of hydrothermal flow in stratovolcanoes, informed by geophysical data about internal structures and deposits. Idealized radially symmetric meshes were developed based on cross-sectional profiles and alteration/permeability structures of Cascade Range stratovolcanoes. We used the OpenGeoSys model to simulate variably saturated conditions in volcanoes heated only by regional heat fluxes, as well as 650°C intrusions at two km depth below the surface. Meteoric recharge was estimated from precipitation rates in the Cascade Range. Preliminary results indicate zones of elevated pore pressures form: 1) where slopes are underlain by continuous low-permeability altered layers, or 2) when the edifice has an altered core with saturated, less permeable limbs. The first scenario might control shallow collapses on the slopes above the altered layers. The second could promote deeper flank collapses that are initially limited to the summit and upper slopes, but could progress to the core of an edifice. In both scenarios, pore pressures can be further elevated by shallow intrusions, or evolve over longer time scales under forcing from regional heat flux. Geometries without confining low-permeability layers do not show these pressure effects. Our initial scenarios use radially symmetric models, but we are also simulating hydrothermal flow under real 3D geometries with asymmetric subsurface structures (Mount Adams). Simulation results will be used to inform 3D slope

  13. 49 CFR 192.197 - Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high-pressure distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high-pressure distribution systems. 192.197 Section 192.197 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... STANDARDS Design of Pipeline Components § 192.197 Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high...

  14. Rectangular Shell Plating Under Uniformly Distributed Hydrostatic Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, M; Sommer, A

    1940-01-01

    A check of the calculation methods used by Foppl and Henky for investigating the reliability of shell plating under hydrostatic pressure has proved that the formulas yield practical results within the elastic range of the material. Foppl's approximate calculation leaves one on the safe side. It further was found on the basis of the marked ductility of the shell plating under tensile stress that the strength is from 50 to 100 percent higher in the elastic range than expected by either method.

  15. A new confined high pressure rotary shear apparatus: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, D.; Coughlan, G.; Bedford, J. D.

    2017-12-01

    The frictional properties of fault zone materials, and their evolution during slip, are of paramount importance for determining the earthquake mechanics of large tectonic faults. Friction is a parameter that is difficult to determine from seismological methods so much of our understanding comes from experiment. Rotary shear apparatuses have been widely used in experimental studies to elucidate the frictional properties of faults under realistic earthquake slip velocities (0.1-10 m/s) and displacements (>20 m). However one technical limitation of rotary shear experiments at seismic slip rates has been the lack of confinement. This has led to a limit on the normal stress (due to the strength of the forcing blocks) and also a lack of control of measurements of the pore fluid pressure. Here we present the first preliminary results from a rotary shear apparatus that has been developed to attempt to address this issue. The new fully confined ring shear apparatus has a fast-acting servo-hydraulic confining pressure system of up to 200 MPa and a servo-controlled upstream and downstream pore pressure system of up to 200 MPa. Displacement rates of 0.01μ/s to 2 m/s can be achieved. Fault gouge samples can therefore be sheared at earthquake speed whilst being subject to pressures typically associated with the depth of earthquake nucleation.

  16. Integration of piezo-capacitive and piezo-electric nanoweb based pressure sensors for imaging of static and dynamic pressure distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Y J; Oh, T I; Woo, E J; Kim, K J

    2017-07-01

    Recently, highly flexible and soft pressure distribution imaging sensor is in great demand for tactile sensing, gait analysis, ubiquitous life-care based on activity recognition, and therapeutics. In this study, we integrate the piezo-capacitive and piezo-electric nanowebs with the conductive fabric sheets for detecting static and dynamic pressure distributions on a large sensing area. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and electric source imaging are applied for reconstructing pressure distribution images from measured current-voltage data on the boundary of the hybrid fabric sensor. We evaluated the piezo-capacitive nanoweb sensor, piezo-electric nanoweb sensor, and hybrid fabric sensor. The results show the feasibility of static and dynamic pressure distribution imaging from the boundary measurements of the fabric sensors.

  17. Distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the current sheet surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrie, N. P., E-mail: kyrie@fpl.gpi.ru; Markov, V. S., E-mail: natalya.kyrie@yandex.ru; Frank, A. G.; Vasilkov, D. G.; Voronova, E. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    The distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the width (the major transverse dimension) of the current sheet have been studied for the first time. The current sheets were formed in discharges in argon and helium in 2D and 3D magnetic configurations. It is found that the temperature of argon ions in both 2D and 3D magnetic configurations is almost uniform over the sheet width and that argon ions are accelerated by the Ampère force. In contrast, the distributions of the electron density and the temperature of helium ions are found to be substantially nonuniform. As a result, in the 2D magnetic configuration, the ion pressure gradient across the sheet width makes a significant contribution (comparable with the Ampère force) to the acceleration of helium ions, whereas in the 3D magnetic configuration, the Ampère force is counterbalanced by the pressure gradient.

  18. Distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the current sheet surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyrie, N. P.; Markov, V. S.; Frank, A. G.; Vasilkov, D. G.; Voronova, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    The distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the width (the major transverse dimension) of the current sheet have been studied for the first time. The current sheets were formed in discharges in argon and helium in 2D and 3D magnetic configurations. It is found that the temperature of argon ions in both 2D and 3D magnetic configurations is almost uniform over the sheet width and that argon ions are accelerated by the Ampère force. In contrast, the distributions of the electron density and the temperature of helium ions are found to be substantially nonuniform. As a result, in the 2D magnetic configuration, the ion pressure gradient across the sheet width makes a significant contribution (comparable with the Ampère force) to the acceleration of helium ions, whereas in the 3D magnetic configuration, the Ampère force is counterbalanced by the pressure gradient.

  19. Pressure distribution over an NACA 23012 airfoil with an NACA 23012 external-airfoil flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzinger, Carl J

    1938-01-01

    Report presents the results of pressure-distribution tests of an NACA 23012 airfoil with an NACA 23012 external airfoil flap made in the 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel. The pressures were measured on the upper and lower surfaces at one chord section on both the main airfoil and on the flap for several different flap deflections and at several angles of attack. A test installation was used in which the airfoil was mounted horizontally in the wind tunnel between vertical end planes so that two-dimensional flow was approximated. The data are presented in the form of pressure-distribution diagrams and as graphs of calculated coefficients for the airfoil-and-flap combination and for the flap alone.

  20. Comparison of plantar pressure distribution in subjects with normal and flat feet during gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aluisio Otavio Vargas Avila

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the possible relationship between loss of thenormal medial longitudinal arch measured by the height of the navicular bone in a static situationand variables related to plantar pressure distribution measured in a dynamic situation. Elevenmen (21 ± 3 years, 74 ± 10 kg and 175 ± 4 cm participated in the study. The Novel Emed-ATSystem was used for the acquisition of plantar pressure distribution data (peak pressure, meanpressure, contact area, and relative load at a sampling rate of 50 Hz. The navicular drop testproposed by Brody (1982 was used to assess the height of the navicular bone for classificationof the subjects. The results were compared by the Mann-Whitney U test, with the level of significanceset at p ≤ 0.05. Differences were observed between the two groups in the mid-foot regionfor all variables studied, with the observation of higher mean values in subjects with flat feet.There were also significant differences in contact area, relative load, peak pressure, and meanpressure between groups. The present study demonstrates the importance of paying attentionto subjects with flat feet because changes in plantar pressure distribution are associated withdiscomfort and injuries.

  1. Statistical parametric mapping of the regional distribution and ontogenetic scaling of foot pressures during walking in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulou, Olga; Pataky, Todd C; Hill, Zoe; Hutchinson, John R

    2012-05-01

    Foot pressure distributions during locomotion have causal links with the anatomical and structural configurations of the foot tissues and the mechanics of locomotion. Elephant feet have five toes bound in a flexible pad of fibrous tissue (digital cushion). Does this specialized foot design control peak foot pressures in such giant animals? And how does body size, such as during ontogenetic growth, influence foot pressures? We addressed these questions by studying foot pressure distributions in elephant feet and their correlation with body mass and centre of pressure trajectories, using statistical parametric mapping (SPM), a neuro-imaging technology. Our results show a positive correlation between body mass and peak pressures, with the highest pressures dominated by the distal ends of the lateral toes (digits 3, 4 and 5). We also demonstrate that pressure reduction in the elephant digital cushion is a complex interaction of its viscoelastic tissue structure and its centre of pressure trajectories, because there is a tendency to avoid rear 'heel' contact as an elephant grows. Using SPM, we present a complete map of pressure distributions in elephant feet during ontogeny by performing statistical analysis at the pixel level across the entire plantar/palmar surface. We hope that our study will build confidence in the potential clinical and scaling applications of mammalian foot pressures, given our findings in support of a link between regional peak pressures and pathogenesis in elephant feet.

  2. Effect of Pressure on the Uniformity of Nozzles Transverse Distribution and Mathematical Model Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Višacki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Timely and high-quality application of pesticides contributes to environmental protection, economical production and production of healthy food. The efficacy of pesticide application depends not only on the quality of pesticides but also the quality of the application. One of the factor that most influences the quality of applications, from the standpoint of mechanization, are nozzles. They working liquid applied on the surface the plant resulting in the same volume of pesticide is applied to the entire surface of the plants. To achieve this goal, nozzles must be performed uniform application of working liquid per unit area, or tractor sprayer working width. The variable factor in the application of pesticides may be nozzle and operating pressure. With increasing working pressure obtained smaller droplets. The paper presents test of three different nozzles. Each nozzle is characterized by a flat jet with an angle of 110° and a flow rate of 1.6 l∙min−1 at a pressure of 3 bar. Differ from each other are by the way of disintegration of the jet. Exactly this characteristic causes that with pressure change coming to changes in the uniformity of nozzles transverse distribution. So the best distribution has nozzle with a flat jet. The coefficient of variation is between roughly from 4 to 6 % at the pressure application of 2 to 4 bar. Obtained mathematical model that describes changes in the coefficient of variation depending on pressure applications can be a good basis for easy harmonization parameters in the pesticide application.

  3. Contact pressure distribution during the polishing process of ceramic tiles: A laboratory investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sani, A S A; Hamedon, Z; Azhari, A; Sousa, F J P

    2016-01-01

    During the polishing process of porcelain tiles the difference in scratching speed between innermost and peripheral abrasives leads to pressure gradients linearly distributed along the radial direction of the abrasive tool. The aim of this paper is to investigate such pressure gradient in laboratory scale. For this purpose polishing tests were performed on ceramic tiles according to the industrial practices using a custom-made CNC tribometer. Gradual wear on both abrasives and machined surface of the floor tile were measured. The experimental results suggested that the pressure gradient tends to cause an inclination of the abraded surfaces, which becomes stable after a given polishing period. In addition to the wear depth of the machined surface, the highest value of gloss and finest surface finish were observed at the lowest point of the worn out surface of the ceramic floor tile corresponding to the point of highest pressure and lowest scratching speed. (paper)

  4. A simple model for the pressure field from a distribution of hotspots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambourn, B D; Lacy, H J; Handley, C A; James, H R

    2014-01-01

    At the APS SCCM in 2009, Hill, Zimmermann and Nichols showed that assuming burn fronts propagate at constant speed from individual point hotspots distributed randomly in a volume, the reaction rate history could be determined. In this paper a simple analytic approximation is found for the time history of the pressure in the volume. Using acoustic theory, the time history of the pressure field for burning from a single spherical, isolated hotspot of finite radius is developed. Then at any point in the volume, the overall pressure history is determined from the sum of the pressure fields from all the individual hotspots. The results are shown to be in qualitative agreement with 1D mesoscale hydrocode calculations of the reaction and burning from a finite size spherical hotspot.

  5. Asymmetrical intrapleural pressure distribution: a cause for scoliosis? A computational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlager, Benedikt; Niemeyer, Frank; Galbusera, Fabio; Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2018-04-13

    The mechanical link between the pleural physiology and the development of scoliosis is still unresolved. The intrapleural pressure (IPP) which is distributed across the inner chest wall has yet been widely neglected in etiology debates. With this study, we attempted to investigate the mechanical influence of the IPP distribution on the shape of the spinal curvature. A finite element model of pleura, chest and spine was created based on CT data of a patient with no visual deformities. Different IPP distributions at a static end of expiration condition were investigated, such as the influence of an asymmetry in the IPP distribution between the left and right hemithorax. The results were then compared to clinical data. The application of the IPP resulted in a compressive force of 22.3 N and a flexion moment of 2.8 N m at S1. An asymmetrical pressure between the left and right hemithorax resulted in lateral deviation of the spine towards the side of the reduced negative pressure. In particular, the pressure within the dorsal section of the rib cage had a strong influence on the vertebral rotation, while the pressure in medial and ventral region affected the lateral displacement. An asymmetrical IPP caused spinal deformation patterns which were comparable to deformation patterns seen in scoliotic spines. The calculated reaction forces suggest that the IPP contributes in counterbalancing the weight of the intrathoracic organs. The study confirms the potential relevance of the IPP for spinal biomechanics and pathologies, such as adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

  6. Determination of pressure distribution in an aerated bed in a controlled pilot-scale compost reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solowiej, P. [Warmia and Mazury Univ., Olsztyn (Poland)

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of dealing with biological waste by composting. In particular, it examined the feasibility of recovering excess thermal energy produced in the process of composting biological waste in terms of mass and energy transport parameters required in the aerated compost bed. An experiment was performed in which a 100 dm{sup 3} adiabatic, leak-tight reactor equipped with a controlled aeration system was constructed to study the temperature and pressure distribution in the bed. Sensors were used to determine the amount and humidity of emitted gases under variable external physical conditions. The perforated bottom of the reactor allowed for bed aeration. As such, the humidity and heat were transported upwards, forced by the air pumped in and by natural convection. In terms of pressure distribution inside the composted and aerated bed, the study results showed that there were considerable differences in pressure for the selected places of the bed of the composted biological material. An increase in upwards pressure was observed in the heap throughout the experiment. Pressure differences in the same plane of the bed were also noted. The study results should facilitate the development of a model of mass and energy transport in a bed of composted material.

  7. Pressure Distribution on Inner Wall of Parabolic Nozzle in Laser Propulsion with Single Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Cunyan; Hong, Yanji; Wen, Ming; Song, Junling; Fang, Juan

    2011-11-01

    A system based of dynamic pressure sensors was established to study the time resolved pressure distribution on the inner wall of a parabolic nozzle in laser propulsion. Dynamic calibration and static calibration of the test system were made and the results showed that frequency response was up to 412 kHz and linear error was less than 10%. Experimental model was a parabolic nozzle and three test points were preset along one generating line. This study showed that experimental results agreed well with those obtained by numerical calculation way in pressure evolution tendency. The peak value of the calculation was higher than that of the experiment at each tested orifice because of the limitation of the numerical models. The results of this study were very useful for analyzing the energy deposition in laser propulsion and modifying numerical models.

  8. Dynamic modeling method of the bolted joint with uneven distribution of joint surface pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shichao; Gao, Hongli; Liu, Qi; Liu, Bokai

    2018-03-01

    The dynamic characteristics of the bolted joints have a significant influence on the dynamic characteristics of the machine tool. Therefore, establishing a reasonable bolted joint dynamics model is helpful to improve the accuracy of machine tool dynamics model. Because the pressure distribution on the joint surface is uneven under the concentrated force of bolts, a dynamic modeling method based on the uneven pressure distribution of the joint surface is presented in this paper to improve the dynamic modeling accuracy of the machine tool. The analytic formulas between the normal, tangential stiffness per unit area and the surface pressure on the joint surface can be deduced based on the Hertz contact theory, and the pressure distribution on the joint surface can be obtained by the finite element software. Futhermore, the normal and tangential stiffness distribution on the joint surface can be obtained by the analytic formula and the pressure distribution on the joint surface, and assigning it into the finite element model of the joint. Qualitatively compared the theoretical mode shapes and the experimental mode shapes, as well as quantitatively compared the theoretical modal frequencies and the experimental modal frequencies. The comparison results show that the relative error between the first four-order theoretical modal frequencies and the first four-order experimental modal frequencies is 0.2% to 4.2%. Besides, the first four-order theoretical mode shapes and the first four-order experimental mode shapes are similar and one-to-one correspondence. Therefore, the validity of the theoretical model is verified. The dynamic modeling method proposed in this paper can provide a theoretical basis for the accurate dynamic modeling of the bolted joint in machine tools.

  9. Effect of geometrical parameters on pressure distributions of impulse manufacturing technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, Ryan Carl

    major and minor strains for each sample type to compare limit strain results. Overall testing indicated decreased formability at high velocity for 304 DDQ stainless steel and increased formability at high velocity for 3003-H14 aluminum. Microstructural and fractographic analysis helped dissect and analyze the observed differences in these cases. Overall, these studies comprehensively explore the effects of geometrical parameters on magnitude and distribution of impulse manufacturing generated pressure, establishing key guidelines and models for continued development and implementation in commercial applications.

  10. Lower pressure heating steam is practical for the distributed dry dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Shuai; Zhang, Jian; Hou, Weiliang; Qureshi, Abdul Sattar; Bao, Jie

    2017-08-01

    Most studies paid more attention to the pretreatment temperature and the resulted pretreatment efficiency, while ignored the heating media and their scalability to an industry scale. This study aimed to use a relative low pressure heating steam easily provided by steam boiler to meet the requirement of distributed dry dilute acid pretreatment. The results showed that the physical properties of the pretreated corn stover were maintained stable using the steam pressure varying from 1.5, 1.7, 1.9 to 2.1MPa. Enzymatic hydrolysis and high solids loading simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) results were also satisfying. CFD simulation indicated that the high injection velocity of the low pressure steam resulted in a high steam holdup and made the mixing time of steam and solid corn stover during pretreatment much shorter in comparison with the higher pressure steam. This study provides a design basis for the boiler requirement in distributed pretreatment concept. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pressure distribution due to steam bubble collapse in a BWR suppression chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giencke, E.

    1979-01-01

    For the pressure time history at the walls of a suppression chamber due to a steam bubble collaps at the condenser pipes interests, expecially the influence of the wall elasticity and the position of the condenser pipes. Two problems are to solve: the pressure time history in the steam bubble and at the walls during the collaps and the pressure distribution at the walls. Both problems are coupled with each other, but the influence of the wall elasticity on the pressure time history in the steam bubble is usually small. Thus the two problems may be solved one after each other. For simplifying the analysis the steam bubble surface may be idealized as a sphere during the whole collaps time. Then the resulting pressure time history is be put on the fluid-structure-system. To show the influence of the containment-elasticity it is favourable to investigate both the rigid and the elastic containment. Because the condenser pipes are arranged in a regular scheme, two limit loading cases are to distinguish. Collapses occur simultaneously with the same intensity at all condenser pipes and a strong collaps occurs only at one condenser pipe or a small group of pipes. When including wall elasticity first the modes of the fluid-structure-system are to analyse and then the dynamical responses of the modes. The coupling effects between the pressure time history in the bubble and at the walls are discussed and then how the membrane and bending stiffness of the walls and the buttomstructure influence the pressure distribution, both for steel and concrete structure. Finally simple models for the analysis are derived and the analytical results are compared with experiments. (orig.)

  12. Pressure Distribution Tests on a Series of Clark Y Biplane Cellules with Special Reference to Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Richard W

    1933-01-01

    The pressure distribution data discussed in this report represents the results of part of an investigation conducted on the factors affecting the aerodynamic safety of airplanes. The present tests were made on semispan, circular-tipped Clark Y airfoil models mounted in the conventional manner on a separation plane. Pressure readings were made simultaneously at all test orifices at each of 20 angles of attack between -8 degrees and +90 degrees. The results of the tests on each wing arrangement are compared on the bases of maximum normal force coefficient, lateral stability at a low rate of roll, and relative longitudinal stability. Tabular data are also presented giving the center of pressure location of each wing.

  13. Effects of different block size distributions in pressure transient response of naturally fractured reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montazeri, G.H. [Islamic Azad University, Mahshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering], E-mail: montazeri_gh@yahoo.com; Tahami, S.A. [Mad Daneshgostar Tabnak Co. (MDT),Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradi, B.; Safari, E. [Iranian Central Oil Fields Co, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: morady.babak@gmail.com

    2011-07-15

    This paper presents a model for pressure transient and derivative analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs by a formulation of inter porosity flow incorporating variations in matrix block size, which is inversely related to fracture intensity. Geologically realistic Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of matrix block size, such as uniform, bimodal, linear and exponential distributions, are examined and pseudo-steady-state and transient models for inter porosity flow are assumed. The results have been physically interpreted, and, despite results obtained by other authors, it was found that the shape of pressure derivative curves for different PDFs are basically identical within some ranges of block size variability, inter porosity skin, PDFs parameters and matrix storage capacity. This tool can give an insight on the distribution of block sizes and shapes, together with other sources of information such as Logs and geological observations. (author)

  14. Prediction for the flow distribution and the pressure drop of a plate type fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Hark; Jo, Dea Sung; Chae, Hee Taek; Lee, Byung Chul

    2011-01-01

    A plate type fuel assembly widely used in many research reactors does not allow the coolant to mix with neighboring fuel channels due to the completely separated flow channels. If there is a serious inequality of coolant distribution among channels, it can reduce thermal-hydraulic safety margin, as well as it can cause a deformation of fuel plates by the pressure difference between neighboring channels, thus the flow uniformity in the fuel assembly should be confirmed. When designing a primary cooling system (PCS), the pressure drop through a reactor core is a dominant value to determine the PCS pump size. The major portion of reactor core pressure drop is caused by the fuel assemblies. However it is not easy to get a reasonable estimation of pressure drop due to the geometric complexity of the fuel assembly and the thin gaps between fuel assemblies. The flow rate through the gap is important part to determine the total flow rate of PCS, so it should be estimated as reasonable as possible. It requires complex and difficult jobs to get useful data. In this study CFD analysis to predict the flow distribution and the pressure drop were conducted on the plate type fuel assembly, which results would be used to be preliminary data to determine the PCS flow rate and to improve the design of a fuel assembly

  15. Study on drop pressure and flow distribution of double-tube heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Junqiang; Chen Minghui; Hu Yumin; Li Rizhu; Kong Dechun; Zhang Weijie

    2007-01-01

    The parallel connection channel pressure drop characters of the double-tube bundle heat exchange were experimentally investigated in this paper in order to find out how the flow of the heat exchanger is distributed and then to optimize the structure of heat exchanger according to the flow distribution. A double-tube bundle heat exchanger was built according to the similarity criteria. The experiment system was also built to test the optimization of the heat exchanger. The experiment results reveal that the calculating model is reliable and decreasing pipe space to optimize the heat exchanger is reasonable. (authors)

  16. Plantar pressure distribution of ostrich during locomotion on loose sand and solid ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The ostrich is a cursorial bird with extraordinary speed and endurance, especially in the desert, and thus is an ideal large-scale animal model for mechanic study of locomotion on granular substrate. Methods The plantar pressure distributions of ostriches walking/running on loose sand/solid ground were recorded using a dynamic pressure plate. Results The center of pressure (COP on loose sand mostly originated from the middle of the 3rd toe, which differed from the J-shaped COP trajectory on solid ground. At mid-stance, a high-pressure region was observed in the middle of the 3rd toe on loose sand, but three high-pressure regions were found on solid ground. The gait mode significantly affected the peak pressures of the 3rd and 4th toes (p = 1.5 × 10−6 and 2.39 × 10−8, respectively, but not that of the claw (p = 0.041. The effects of substrate were similar to those of the gait mode. Discussion Ground reaction force trials of each functional part showed the 3rd toe bore more body loads and the 4th toe undertook less loads. The pressure distributions suggest balance maintenance on loose sand was provided by the 3rd and 4th toes and the angle between their length axes. On loose sand, the middle of the 3rd toe was the first to touch the sand with a smaller attack angle to maximize the ground reaction force, but on solid ground, the lateral part was the first to touch the ground to minimize the transient loading. At push-off, the ostrich used solidification properties of granular sand under the compression of the 3rd toe to generate sufficient traction.

  17. Modeling the dynamic response of pressures in a distributed helium refrigeration system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, John Carl [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1997-12-01

    A mathematical model is created of the dynamic response of pressures caused by flow inputs to an existing distributed helium refrigeration system. The dynamic system studied consists of the suction and discharge pressure headers and compressor portions of the refrigeration system used to cool the superconducting magnets of the Tevatron accelerator at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The modeling method involves identifying the system from data recorded during a series of controlled tests, with effort made to detect locational differences in pressure response around the four mile accelerator circumference. A review of the fluid mechanics associated with the system indicates linear time invariant models are suitable for the identification, particularly since the governing equations of one dimensional fluid flow are approximated by linear differential equations. An outline of the experimental design and the data acquisition system are given, followed by a detailed description of the modeling, which utilized the Matlab programming language and associated System Identification Toolbox. Two representations of the system are presented. One, a black box model, provides a multi-input, multi-output description assembled from the results of single input step function testing. This description indicates definite variation in pressure response with distance from the flow input location, and also suggests subtle differences in response with the input location itself. A second system representation is proposed which details the relation between continuous flow changes and pressure response, and provides explanation of a previously unappreciated pressure feedback internal to the system.

  18. Modeling the dynamic response of pressures in a distributed helium refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brubaker, J.C.

    1997-12-01

    A mathematical model is created of the dynamic response of pressures caused by flow inputs to an existing distributed helium refrigeration system. The dynamic system studied consists of the suction and discharge pressure headers and compressor portions of the refrigeration system used to cool the superconducting magnets of the Tevatron accelerator at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The modeling method involves identifying the system from data recorded during a series of controlled tests, with effort made to detect locational differences in pressure response around the four mile accelerator circumference. A review of the fluid mechanics associated with the system indicates linear time invariant models are suitable for the identification, particularly since the governing equations of one dimensional fluid flow are approximated by linear differential equations. An outline of the experimental design and the data acquisition system are given, followed by a detailed description of the modeling, which utilized the Matlab programming language and associated System Identification Toolbox. Two representations of the system are presented. One, a black box model, provides a multi-input, multi-output description assembled from the results of single input step function testing. This description indicates definite variation in pressure response with distance from the flow input location, and also suggests subtle differences in response with the input location itself. A second system representation is proposed which details the relation between continuous flow changes and pressure response, and provides explanation of a previously unappreciated pressure feedback internal to the system

  19. Pressure distribution-based texture sensing by using a simple artificial mastication system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takeshi; Higashimori, Mitsuru; Nakauma, Makoto; Nakao, Satomi; Ikegami, Akira; Ishihara, Sayaka

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel texture sensing method for nursing-care gel by using an artificial mastication system, in which not only mechanical characteristics but also geometrical ones are objectively and quantitatively evaluated. When human masticates gel food, she or he perceives the changes of the shape and contact force simultaneously. Based on the impressions, they evaluate the texture. For reproducing such a procedure, the pressure distribution of gel is measured in the simple artificial mastication, and the information associated to both the geometrical and mechanical characteristics is simultaneously acquired. The relationship between the value of sensory evaluation (i.e. impression human perceives), and the pressure distribution data is numerically modeled by applying the image texture analysis. Experimental results show that the proposed method succeeds in estimating the values of sensory evaluation of nine kinds of gel with the coefficient of determination greater than 0.93.

  20. Gait performance and foot pressure distribution during wearable robot-assisted gait in elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Hyun; Lee, Hwang-Jae; Chang, Won Hyuk; Choi, Byung-Ok; Lee, Jusuk; Kim, Jeonghun; Ryu, Gyu-Ha; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2017-11-28

    A robotic exoskeleton device is an intelligent system designed to improve gait performance and quality of life for the wearer. Robotic technology has developed rapidly in recent years, and several robot-assisted gait devices were developed to enhance gait function and activities of daily living in elderly adults and patients with gait disorders. In this study, we investigated the effects of the Gait-enhancing Mechatronic System (GEMS), a new wearable robotic hip-assist device developed by Samsung Electronics Co, Ltd., Korea, on gait performance and foot pressure distribution in elderly adults. Thirty elderly adults who had no neurological or musculoskeletal abnormalities affecting gait participated in this study. A three-dimensional (3D) motion capture system, surface electromyography and the F-Scan system were used to collect data on spatiotemporal gait parameters, muscle activity and foot pressure distribution under three conditions: free gait without robot assistance (FG), robot-assisted gait with zero torque (RAG-Z) and robot-assisted gait (RAG). We found increased gait speed, cadence, stride length and single support time in the RAG condition. Reduced rectus femoris and medial gastrocnemius muscle activity throughout the terminal stance phase and reduced effort of the medial gastrocnemius muscle throughout the pre-swing phase were also observed in the RAG condition. In addition, walking with the assistance of GEMS resulted in a significant increase in foot pressure distribution, specifically in maximum force and peak pressure of the total foot, medial masks, anterior masks and posterior masks. The results of the present study reveal that GEMS may present an alternative way of restoring age-related changes in gait such as gait instability with muscle weakness, reduced step force and lower foot pressure in elderly adults. In addition, GEMS improved gait performance by improving push-off power and walking speed and reducing muscle activity in the lower

  1. Water Pressure Distribution on a Flying Boat Hull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, F L

    1931-01-01

    This is the third in a series of investigations of the water pressures on seaplane floats and hulls, and completes the present program. It consisted of determining the water pressures and accelerations on a Curtiss H-16 flying boat during landing and taxiing maneuvers in smooth and rough water.

  2. Nordic Walking Practice Might Improve Plantar Pressure Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Martinez-Nova, Alfonso; Morey-Klapsing, G.; Encarnacion-Martinez, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Nordic walking (NW), characterized by the use of two walking poles, is becoming increasingly popular (Morgulec-Adamowicz, Marszalek, & Jagustyn, 2011). We studied walking pressure patterns of 20 experienced and 30 beginner Nordic walkers. Plantar pressures from nine foot zones were measured during trials performed at two walking speeds (preferred…

  3. Shallow-crack toughness results for reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theiss, T.J.; Shum, D.K.M.; Rolfe, S.T.

    1992-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST) is investigating the influence of flaw depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. To complete this investigation, techniques were developed to determine the fracture toughness from shallow-crack specimens. A total of 38 deep and shallow-crack tests have been performed on beam specimens about 100 mm deep loaded in 3-point bending. Two crack depths (a ∼ 50 and 9 mm) and three beam thicknesses (B ∼ 50, 100, and 150 mm) have been tested. Techniques were developed to estimate the toughness in terms of both the J-integral and crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD). Analytical J-integral results were consistent with experimental J-integral results, confirming the validity of the J-estimation schemes used and the effect of flaw depth on fracture toughness. Test results indicate a significant increase in the fracture toughness associated with the shallow flaw specimens in the lower transition region compared to the deep-crack fracture toughness. There is, however, little or no difference in toughness on the lower shelf where linear-elastic conditions exist for specimens with either deep or shallow flaws. The increase in shallow-flaw toughness compared with deep-flaw results appears to be well characterized by a temperature shift of 35 degree C

  4. High temperature pressure water's blowdown into water. Experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Toshihisa; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Kasahara, Yoshiyuki; Iida, Hiromasa

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the present experimental study is to clarify the phenomena in blowdown of high temperature and pressure water in pressure vessel into the containment water for evaluation of design of an advanced marine reactor(MRX). The water blown into the containment water flushed and formed steam jet plume. The steam jet condensed in the water, but some stream penetrated to gas phase of containment and contributed to increase of containment pressure. (author)

  5. Design of a smart textile mat to study pressure distribution on multiple foam material configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donselaar, van R.; Chen, W.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a design of a smart textile pressure mat to study the pressure distribution with multiple foam material configurations for neonatal monitoring at Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU). A smart textile mat with 64 pressure sensors has been developed including software at the

  6. Temperature and pressure distributions in a 400 kW{sub t} fluidized bed straw gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erguedenler, A.; Ghaly, A.E.; Hamdullahpur, F. [Technical Univ. of Nova Scotia, Halifax (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    The temperature and pressure distribution characteristics of a 400 kW (thermal) dual-distributor type fluidized bed straw gasifier were investigated. The effects of the bed height, equivalence ratio (actual air-fuel ratio:stoichiometric air-fuel ratio) and fluidization velocity on the temperature and pressure variations in the gasifier were studied. Generally, the bed temperature reached the steady state condition within 15--20 minutes. The average temperature of the dense bed ranged from 649{degrees}C to 875{degrees}C depending on the levels of operating parameters used. The bed temperature increased linearly with increases in the equivalence ratio, higher bed temperatures were observed with lower bed height and no clear trend for the bed temperature with respect to variations in fluidization velocity was observed. The bed height, equivalence ratio and fluidization velocity affected the pressure drop in the fluidized bed gasifier. Increasing the fluidization velocity and/or decreasing the equivalence ratio resulted in higher pressure drops in the dense bed and the freeboard regions whereas increasing the bed height increased the pressure drop only in the dense bed.

  7. Numerical Simulation of the Pressure Distribution in the Reactor Vessel Downcomer Region Fluctuated by the Reactor Coolant Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Dong Hwa; Jung, Byung Ryul; Jang, Ho Cheol; Yune, Seok Jeong; Kim, Eun Kee [KEPCO EnC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study the numerical simulation of the pressure distribution in the downcomer region resulting from the pressure pulsation by the Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) is performed using the Finite Difference Method (FDM). Simulation is carried out for the cylindrical shaped 2-dimensional model equivalent to the outer surface of the Core Support Barrel (CSB) of APR1400 and a 1/2 model is adopted based on the bilateral symmetry by the inlet nozzle. The fluid temperature is 555 .deg. F and the forcing frequencies are 120Hz, 240Hz, 360Hz and 480Hz. Simulation results of the axial pressure distributions are provided as the Root Mean Square (RMS) values at the five locations of 0°, 45°, 90°, 135° and 180° in the circumferential direction from the inlet nozzle location. In the study, the numerical simulation of pressure distributions in the downcomer region induced by the RCP was performed using FDM and the results were reviewed. The interference of the waves returned from both boundaries in the axial direction and the source of the sinusoidal wave is shown on the inlet nozzle interface pressure point. It seems that the maximum pressures result from the superposition of the waves reflected from the seating surface and the waves newly arrived from the inlet nozzle interface pressure location.

  8. Numerical study on coolant flow distribution at the core inlet for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lin; Peng, Min Jun; Xia, Genglei; Lv, Xing; Li, Ren [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China)

    2017-02-15

    When an integral pressurized water reactor is operated under low power conditions, once-through steam generator group operation strategy is applied. However, group operation strategy will cause nonuniform coolant flow distribution at the core inlet and lower plenum. To help coolant flow mix more uniformly, a flow mixing chamber (FMC) has been designed. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics methods have been used to investigate the coolant distribution by the effect of FMC. Velocity and temperature characteristics under different low power conditions and optimized FMC configuration have been analyzed. The results illustrate that the FMC can help improve the nonuniform coolant temperature distribution at the core inlet effectively; at the same time, the FMC will induce more resistance in the downcomer and lower plenum.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Pressure Drop and Pressure Distribution Along a Heated Channel in Subcooled Flow Boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aharon, Y.; Hochbaum, I.; Shai, I.

    2002-01-01

    The state of knowledge relating to pressure drop in subcooled boiling region is very unsatisfactory. That pressure drop is an important factor in considering the design of nuclear reactors because of the possibility of flow excursion during a two phase flow in the channels. In operational systems with multiple flow channels, an increase in pressure drop in one flow channel, can cause the flow to be diverted to other channels. A burnout can occur in the unstable channel

  10. On the Impact of Particulate Matter Distribution on Pressure Drop of Wall-Flow Particulate Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Bermúdez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wall-flow particulate filters are a required exhaust aftertreatment system to abate particulate matter emissions and meet current and incoming regulations applying worldwide to new generations of diesel and gasoline internal combustion engines. Despite the high filtration efficiency covering the whole range of emitted particle sizes, the porous substrate constitutes a flow restriction especially relevant as particulate matter, both soot and ash, is collected. The dependence of the resulting pressure drop, and hence the fuel consumption penalty, on the particulate matter distribution along the inlet channels is discussed in this paper taking as reference experimental data obtained in water injection tests before the particulate filter. This technique is demonstrated to reduce the particulate filter pressure drop without negative effects on filtration performance. In order to justify these experimental data, the characteristics of the particulate layer are diagnosed applying modeling techniques. Different soot mass distributions along the inlet channels are analyzed combined with porosity change to assess the new properties after water injection. Their influence on the subsequent soot loading process and regeneration is assessed. The results evidence the main mechanisms of the water injection at the filter inlet to reduce pressure drop and boost the interest for control strategies able to force the re-entrainment of most of the particulate matter towards the inlet channels’ end.

  11. Study on Droplet Size and Velocity Distributions of a Pressure Swirl Atomizer Based on the Maximum Entropy Formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A predictive model for droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer has been proposed based on the maximum entropy formalism (MEF. The constraint conditions of the MEF model include the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy. The effects of liquid swirling strength, Weber number, gas-to-liquid axial velocity ratio and gas-to-liquid density ratio on the droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer are investigated. Results show that model based on maximum entropy formalism works well to predict droplet size and velocity distributions under different spray conditions. Liquid swirling strength, Weber number, gas-to-liquid axial velocity ratio and gas-to-liquid density ratio have different effects on droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer.

  12. Tidal ventilation distribution during pressure-controlled ventilation and pressure support ventilation in post-cardiac surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankman, P; VAN DER Kreeft, S M; Gommers, D

    2014-09-01

    Inhomogeneous ventilation is an important contributor to ventilator-induced lung injury. Therefore, this study examines homogeneity of lung ventilation by means of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) measurements during pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) and pressure support ventilation (PSV) using the same ventilation pressures. Twenty mechanically ventilated patients were studied after cardiac surgery. On arrival at the intensive care unit, ventilation distribution was measured with EIT just above the diaphragm for 15 min. After awakening, PCV was switched to PSV and EIT measurements were again recorded. Tidal impedance variation, a measure of tidal volume, increased during PSV compared with PCV, despite using the same ventilation pressures (P = 0.045). The distribution of tidal ventilation to the dependent lung region was more pronounced during PSV compared with PCV, especially during the first half of the inspiration. An even distribution of tidal ventilation between the dependent and non-dependent lung regions was seen during PCV at lower tidal volumes (tidal volumes (≥ 8 ml/kg). In addition, the distribution of tidal ventilation was predominantly distributed to the dependent lung during PSV at low tidal volumes. In post-cardiac surgery patients, PSV showed improved ventilation of the dependent lung region due to the contribution of the diaphragm activity, which is even more pronounced during lower assist levels. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Results of treatment for high-pressure injection hand injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyluk, A; Walaszek, I

    2000-01-01

    High-pressure injection injuries of the hand have a reputation for being dangerous for individual fingers and even for whole hand. Usually appearing innocuous at presentation because of small puncture entry wound, these injuries result in severe damage of most internal structures in finger and hand due to extensive penetration of injected substance. This paper reviews the outcome of the treatment of such injuries in 10 patients: 9 sustained injection of toxic paint, and one lead shot. All the patients were operated on: eight a few hours after injury and two with 3 days delay. The surgical technique included wide exposure from site of injection up to the farthest place in which foreign substance was seen. Thorough debridment of injected material and contaminated tissue was performed with careful preservation of neurovascular structures and tendons. Wounds were not closed, but managed by open technique. In all patients wounds healed well: in 3 by secondary intention, in 6 by delayed closure and 2 were covered by skin grafts. No amputation was performed. Final results were assessed form 1.5 to 3.5 years after initial injury (mean at 2.5 years). Two patients complained of moderate pain related to the weather, five of cold intolerance and two of impaired sensation on fingertips. Active range of motion of affected fingers was in whole group from 90% to 104% (mean 97%) of the range of motion of unaffected fingers from the other side. Range of motion of the wrist (2 patients) was 76% and 117% of range of motion of the other side. Pinch grip strength was from 81% to 116% (mean 99%), and global grip strength from 77% to 119% (mean 97%) of the other side. All patients went back to their previous jobs and periods of sick leave were from 2 weeks to 6 months (mean 3 mo). Excellent results achieved in this study--full functional recovery in 9 of 10 patients confirm the effectiveness of aggressive treatment by open wound technique of such injuries.

  14. [Factors affecting the pressure distribution underneath the foot sole in ski boots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaff, P; Kulot, M; Hauser, W; Rosemeyer, B

    1988-12-01

    The determination of pressure patterns underneath the footsole inside skiboots, may reveal reasons for footpain and injury risk. In our study, a new developed 72 point measuring mat was used in 5 different skiboots. Data were collected in 10 subjects in different forward flexion positions. In addition a determination of the pressure distribution over the instep was done by means of single measuring points. The results proof, that a proper adapting along the dorsum of the foot does lower the forefoot load during flexion. A tightly closed and well adapted boot will lead to a significant reduction of the total load on the footsole. High shaft models show similar pressure patterns even at earlier forward flexion angles. A pressure related discrimination between rear entry and traditional boots, that was found along the tibia, was not the case underneath the footsole. The force transmission is mainly performed along the shaft of the boot. The effect of orthotics designed mainly to support steerability of the ski, is therefore doubtful. The results may help to improve our knowledge of the interaction between boot and skier and lead, together with future field research, to a reduction of equipment related injuries.

  15. Learning to merge search results for efficient Distributed Information Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjin-Kam-Jet, Kien; Hiemstra, Djoerd

    2010-01-01

    Merging search results from different servers is a major problem in Distributed Information Retrieval. We used Regression-SVM and Ranking-SVM which would learn a function that merges results based on information that is readily available: i.e. the ranks, titles, summaries and URLs contained in the

  16. Spatial distribution of cavitation-shock-pressure around a jet-flow gate-valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oba, Risaburo; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ito, Yukio; Miyakura, Hideto; Nozaki, Satoru; Ishige, Tadashi; Sonoda, Shuji; Sakamoto, Kenji.

    1987-01-01

    To make clear the mechanism of cavitation erosion, the spatial distribution of cavitation shock pressures were quantitatively measured by a pressure sensitive sheet in the 1/10 scale model of a jet-flow gate-valve, for various valve-openings and cavitation numbers. The dynamic pressure response of the sheet was corrected by the shock wave generated from detonation explosives. It is made clear that the erosive shock pressures are distributed in a limited part of the whole cavitation region, and the safety region without the fatal cavitation erosion is defined. (author)

  17. Dynamic stall characterization using modal analysis of phase-averaged pressure distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Tanner; Nikoueeyan, Pourya; Naughton, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    Dynamic stall characterization by means of surface pressure measurements can simplify the time and cost associated with experimental investigation of unsteady airfoil aerodynamics. A unique test capability has been developed at University of Wyoming over the past few years that allows for time and cost efficient measurement of dynamic stall. A variety of rotorcraft and wind turbine airfoils have been tested under a variety of pitch oscillation conditions resulting in a range of dynamic stall behavior. Formation, development and separation of different flow structures are responsible for the complex aerodynamic loading behavior experienced during dynamic stall. These structures have unique signatures on the pressure distribution over the airfoil. This work investigates the statistical behavior of phase-averaged pressure distribution for different types of dynamic stall by means of modal analysis. The use of different modes to identify specific flow structures is being investigated. The use of these modes for different types of dynamic stall can provide a new approach for understanding and categorizing these flows. This work uses airfoil data acquired under Army contract W911W60160C-0021, DOE Grant DE-SC0001261, and a gift from BP Alternative Energy North America, Inc.

  18. Pressure sensor to determine spatial pressure distributions on boundary layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Cesar A.; Piroozan, Parham; Corke, Thomas C.

    1997-03-01

    The determination of pressures along the surface of a wind tunnel proves difficult with methods that must introduce devices into the flow stream. This paper presents a sensor that is part of the wall. A special interferometric reflection moire technique is developed and used to produce signals that measures pressure both in static and dynamic settings. The sensor developed is an intelligent sensor that combines optics and electronics to analyze the pressure patterns. The sensor provides the input to a control system that is capable of modifying the shape of the wall and preserve the stability of the flow.

  19. Estimation of residual stress distribution for pressurizer nozzle of Kori nuclear power plant considering safe end

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    In nuclear power plants, ferritic low alloy steel nozzle was connected with austenitic stainless steel piping system through alloy 82/182 butt weld. Accurate estimation of residual stress for weldment is important in the sense that alloy 82/182 is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. There are many results which predict residual stress distribution for alloy 82/182 weld between nozzle and pipe. However, nozzle and piping system usually connected through safe end which has short length. In this paper, residual stress distribution for pressurizer nozzle of Kori nuclear power plant was predicted using FE analysis, which considered safe end. As a result, existing residual stress profile was redistributed and residual stress of inner surface was decreased specially. It means that safe end should be considered to reduce conservatism when estimating the piping system.

  20. Calculation of Pressure Distribution at Rotary Body Surface with the Vortex Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Dergachev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vortex element method allows to simulate unsteady hydrodynamic processes in incompressible environment, taking into account the evolution of the vortex sheet, including taking into account the deformation or moving of the body or part of construction.For the calculation of the hydrodynamic characteristics of the method based on vortex element software package was developed MVE3D. Vortex element (VE in program is symmetrical Vorton-cut. For satisfying the boundary conditions at the surface used closed frame of vortons.With this software system modeled incompressible flow around a cylindrical body protection elongation L / D = 13 with a front spherical blunt with the angle of attack of 10 °. We analyzed the distribution of the pressure coefficient on the body surface of the top and bottom forming.The calculate results were compared with known Results of experiment.Considered design schemes with different number of Vorton framework. Also varied radius of VE. Calculation make possible to establish the degree of sampling surface needed to produce close to experiment results. It has been shown that an adequate reproducing the pressure distribution in the transition region spherical cylindrical surface, on the windward side requires a high degree of sampling.Based on these results Can be possible need to improve on the design scheme of body's surface, allowing more accurate to describe the flow vorticity in areas with abrupt changes of geometry streamlined body.

  1. Pressure control for minimizing leakage in water distribution systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nourhan Samir; Rawya Kansoh; Walid Elbarki; Amr Fleifle

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades water resources availability has been a major issue on the international agenda. In a situation of worsening scarcity of water resources and the rapidly increasing of water demands, the state of water losses management is part of manâs survival on earth. Leakage in water supply networks makes up a significant amount, sometimes more than 70% of the total water losses. The best practices suggest that pressure management is one of the most effective way to reduce the amount o...

  2. Influence of loading distribution on the performance of high pressure turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corriveau, Daniel

    Midspan measurements were made in a transonic wind tunnel for three High Pressure (HP) turbine blade cascades at both design and off-design incidences. Comparisons with two-dimensional numerical simulations of the cascade flow were also made. The baseline profile is the midspan section of a HP turbine blade of fairly recent design. It is considered mid-loaded. To gain a better understanding of blade loading limits and the influence of loading distributions, the profile of the baseline airfoil was modified to create two new airfoils having aft-loaded and front-loaded pressure distributions. Tests were performed for exit Mach numbers between 0.6 and 1.2. In addition, measurements were made for an extended range of Reynolds numbers for constant Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.85, 0.95 and 1.05. At the design exit Mach number of 1.05 and at design incidence, the aft-loaded airfoil showed a reduction of almost 20% in the total pressure losses compared with the baseline airfoil. Based on the analysis of wake traverse data and base pressure measurements combined with numerical results, it was found that the poorer loss performance of the baseline mid-loaded profile compared to the aft-loaded blade could be attributed to the former's higher rear suction side curvature, which resulted in higher flow velocity in that region, which, in turn, contributed to reducing the base pressure. The lower base pressure at the trailing edge resulted in a stronger trailing edge shock system for the mid-loaded blade. This shock system increased the losses for the mid-loaded baseline profile when compared to the aft-loaded profile. On the negative side, it was also found that as Mach numbers were increased beyond the design value the performance of the aft-loaded blade deteriorated rapidly. Under such conditions, the front-loaded airfoil showed generally inferior performance compared with the baseline airfoil. At off-design incidence, the aft-loaded blade maintained a superior loss performance over a

  3. Pitot-pressure distributions of the flow field of a delta-wing orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Pitot pressure distributions of the flow field of a 0.0075-scale model of a typical delta wing shuttle orbiter are presented. Results are given for the windward and leeward sides on centerline in the angle-of-attack plane from wind tunnel tests conducted in air. Distributions are shown for three axial stations X/L = .35, .60, and .98 and for angles of attack from 0 to 60 deg. The tests were made at a Mach number of 7.4 and for Reynolds numbers based on body length from 1,500,000 to 9,000,000. The windward distributions at the two survey stations forward of the body boat tail demonstrate the compressive aspects of the flow from the shock wave to the body. Conversely, the distributions at the aft station display an expansion of the flow that is attributed to body boat tail. On the lee side, results are given at low angles of attack that illustrate the complicating aspects of the canopy on the flow field, while results are given to show the effects of flow separation at high angles of attack.

  4. Simultaneous compared with sequential blood pressure measurement results in smaller inter-arm blood pressure differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hoeven, Niels V; Lodestijn, Sophie; Nanninga, Stephanie; van Montfrans, Gert A; van den Born, Bert-Jan H

    2013-11-01

    There are currently few recommendations on how to assess inter-arm blood pressure (BP) differences. The authors compared simultaneous with sequential measurement on mean BP, inter-arm BP differences, and within-visit reproducibility in 240 patients stratified according to age (simultaneous and three sequential BP measurements were taken in each patient. Starting measurement type and starting arm for sequential measurements were randomized. Mean BP and inter-arm BP differences of the first pair and reproducibility of inter-arm BP differences of the first and second pair were compared between both methods. Mean systolic BP was 1.3±7.5 mm Hg lower during sequential compared with simultaneous measurement (Psequential measurement was on average higher than the second, suggesting an order effect. Absolute systolic inter-arm BP differences were smaller on simultaneous (6.2±6.7/3.3±3.5 mm Hg) compared with sequential BP measurement (7.8±7.3/4.6±5.6 mm Hg, PSimultaneous measurement of BP at both arms reduces order effects and results in smaller inter-arm BP differences, thereby potentially reducing unnecessary referral and diagnostic procedures. ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Differential pressure distribution measurement for the development of insect-sized wings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the measurement of the differential pressure distribution over a flat, thin wing using a micro-electro-mechanical systems sensor. Sensors featuring a piezoresistive cantilever were attached to a polyimide/Cu wing. Because the weight of the cantilever element was less than 10 ng, the sensor can measure the differential pressure without interference from inertial forces, such as wing flapping motions. The dimensions of the sensor chips and the wing were 1.0 mm × 1.0 mm × 0.3 mm and 100 mm × 30 mm × 1 mm, respectively. The differential pressure distribution along the wing's chord direction was measured in a wind tunnel at an air velocity of 4.0 m s –1 by changing the angle of attack. It was confirmed that the pressure coefficient calculated by the measured differential pressure distribution was similar to the value measured by a load cell. (paper)

  6. Test beam results of a low-pressure micro-strip gas chamber with a secondary-electron emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, S.; Anderson, D.F.; Zimmerman, J.; Sbarra, C.; Salomon, M.

    1994-10-01

    We present recent results, from a beam test, on the angular dependence of the efficiency and the distribution of the signals on the anode strips of a low-pressure microstrip gas chamber with a thick CsI layer as a secondary-electron emitter. New results of CVD diamond films as secondary-electron emitters are discussed

  7. Graph based hydraulic modelling of pressure in water distribution networks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mpiana, LA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available given period of time and can be formulated as Where 𝐵 is the amount of incoming water at the node 𝑖 and 𝑡 is the delivery time period of time required. The amount of incoming water required at the node for a period of time is compared... to the water demand 𝐷𝑖 in order to decide on the operation of the pressure reduction valves. 𝐵𝑖𝑗 is the coefficient to evaluation in the required amount 𝐵 over a specific period of time. For a node 𝑖, 𝐵𝑖𝑗 is equal to 0...

  8. Robustness of parameter-less remote real-time pressure control in water distribution systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Page, Philip R

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One way of reducing water leakage, pipe bursts and water consumption in a water distribution system (WDS) is to manage the pressure to be as low as possible. This can be done by adjusting a pressure control valve (PCV) in real-time in order to keep...

  9. Pressure Distribution and Performance Impacts of Aerospike Nozzles on Rotating Detonation Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Nozzle Exit Plane at Various Pressure Ratios for the Quiescent Air Hydrogen Fuel Case, PRdesign = 10:1...81 Figure 55. Mach Number Distribution along the Nozzle Exit Plane at Various Pressure Ratios for the Supersonic...budget constraints, have spurred engineers to focus on improving the specific fuel consumption of these engines. One technology that promises

  10. Development and application of an LWR reactor pressure vessel-specific flaw distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, S.T.; Kennedy, E.L.; Foulds, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Previous efforts by the US Department of Energy have shown that the PWR reactor vessel integrity predictions performed through probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis for a pressurized thermal shock event are significantly sensitive to the overall flaw distribution input. It has also been shown that modern vessel in-service inspection (ISI) results can be used for development of vessel flaw distribution(s) that are more representative of US vessels. This paper describes the development and application of a methodology to analyze ISI data for the purpose of flaw distribution determination. The resultant methodology considers detection reliability, flaw sizing accuracy, and flaw detection threshold in its application. Application of the methodology was then demonstrated using four recently acquired US PWR vessel inspection data sets. The methodology helped provide original insight into several key inspection performance and vessel integrity prediction practice issues that will impact future vessel integrity evaluation. This paper briefly discusses the development and application of the methodology and the impact to future vessel integrity analyses

  11. Examining the effects of fill gas pressure on the distribution of copper atoms in a hollow cathode lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, D.R.; Finlayson, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    A modified Copper Hollow Cathode lamp has been used to examine the effects of fill gas pressure on the distribution of sputtered Copper atoms in the body of the lamp. The lamp was modified by placing a quartz disc above the cathode, perpendicular to both the cathode bore and the cathode-anode axis. While the lamp is operating, some of the Copper that has been sputtered out of the cathode bore is deposited on the disc. Modified lamps have been operated at a variety of pressures, and the resulting deposition profiles recorded using an optical microscope. A summary of variations between different pressures are presented

  12. Influence of operating conditions and atomizer design on circumferential liquid distribution from small pressure-swirl atomizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malý Milan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The spray symmetry is an important aspect in most practical applications. However, it is often an overlooked parameter. A measurement of circumferential distribution was carried out by a circular-sectored vessel on several pressure-swirl atomizers with spill-line over a wide range of injection pressure. The obtained results show that the spray uniformity improves markedly with the injection pressure. The increase in a number of tangential entry ports has only a minor effect on the spray uniformity. Even a small mechanical corruption of the atomizer internal parts negatively affects the spray patternation.

  13. Influence of operating conditions and atomizer design on circumferential liquid distribution from small pressure-swirl atomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malý, Milan; Janáčková, Lada; Jedelský, Jan; Jícha, Miroslav

    The spray symmetry is an important aspect in most practical applications. However, it is often an overlooked parameter. A measurement of circumferential distribution was carried out by a circular-sectored vessel on several pressure-swirl atomizers with spill-line over a wide range of injection pressure. The obtained results show that the spray uniformity improves markedly with the injection pressure. The increase in a number of tangential entry ports has only a minor effect on the spray uniformity. Even a small mechanical corruption of the atomizer internal parts negatively affects the spray patternation.

  14. High spatial resolution pressure distribution of the vaginal canal in Pompoir practitioners: A biomechanical approach for assessing the pelvic floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciari, Licia P; Pássaro, Anice C; Amorim, Amanda C; Sacco, Isabel C N

    2017-08-01

    Pompoir is a technique poorly studied in the literature that claims to improve pelvic floor strength and coordination. This study aims to investigate the pelvic floor muscles' coordination throughout the vaginal canal among Pompoir practitioners and non-practitioners by describing a high resolution map of pressure distribution. This cross-sectional, study included 40 healthy women in two groups: control and Pompoir. While these women performed both sustained and "waveform" pelvic floor muscle contractions, the spatiotemporal pressure distribution in their vaginal canals was evaluated by a non-deformable probe fully instrumented with a 10×10 matrix of capacitive transducers. Pompoir group was able to sustain the pressure levels achieved for a longer period (40% longer, moderate effect, P=0.04). During the "waveform" contraction task, Pompoir group achieved lower, earlier peak pressures (moderate effect, P=0.05) and decreased rates of contraction (small effect, P=0.04) and relaxation (large effect, P=0.01). During both tasks, Pompoir group had smaller relative contributions by the mid-region and the anteroposterior planes and greater contributions by the caudal and cranial regions and the latero-lateral planes. Results suggest that specific coordination training of the pelvic floor muscles alters the pressure distribution profile, promoting a more-symmetric distribution of pressure throughout the vaginal canal. Therefore, this study suggests that pelvic floor muscles can be trained to a degree beyond strengthening by focusing on coordination, which results in changes in symmetry of the spatiotemporal pressure distribution in the vaginal canal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Preliminary investigation of foot pressure distribution variation in men and women adults while standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyasamy, R; Mishra, A; Anand, Sneh; Ammini, A C

    2011-09-01

    Women and men are anatomically and physiologically different in a number of ways. They differ in both shape and size. These differences could potentially mean foot pressure distribution variation in men and women. The purpose of this study was to analyze standing foot pressure image to obtain the foot pressure distribution parameter - power ratio variation between men and women using image processing in frequency domain. We examined 28 healthy adult subjects (14 men and 14 women) aged between 20 and 45 years was recruited for our study. Foot pressure distribution patterns while standing are obtained by using a PedoPowerGraph plantar pressure measurement system for foot image formation, a digital camera for image capturing, a TV tuner PC-add on card, a WinDvr software for still capture and Matlab software with dedicated image processing algorithms have been developed. Various PedoPowerGraphic parameters such as percentage medial impulse (PMI), fore foot to hind foot pressure distribution ratio (F/H), big toe to fore foot pressure distribution ratio (B/F) and power ratio (PR) were evaluated. In men, contact area was significantly larger in all regions of the foot compared with women. There were significant differences in plantar pressure distribution but there was no significant difference in F/H and B/F ratio. Mean PR value was significantly greater in men than women under the hind foot and fore foot. PMI value was greater in women than men. As compared to men, women have maximum PR variations in the mid foot. Hence there is significant difference at level pfeet can provide suitable guidelines to biomedical engineers and doctor for designing orthotic devices for reliving the area of excessively high pressure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Simultaneous compared with sequential blood pressure measurement results in smaller inter-arm blood pressure differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hoeven, Niels V.; Lodestijn, Sophie; Nanninga, Stephanie; van Montfrans, Gert A.; van den Born, Bert-Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    There are currently few recommendations on how to assess inter-arm blood pressure (BP) differences. The authors compared simultaneous with sequential measurement on mean BP, inter-arm BP differences, and within-visit reproducibility in 240 patients stratified according to age ( <50 or ≥60 years) and

  17. Hadron distributions - recent results from the CERN experiment NA44

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, N.

    1996-01-01

    Proton distributions at midrapidity have been measured for 158A circ GeV/c Pb + Pb collisions in the focusing spectrometer experiment NA44 at CERN. A high degree of nuclear stopping is found in the truly heavy ion collisions. Systematic results of single particle transverse momentum distributions of pions, kaons, and protons, of 200A-GeV/c S+S and 158A circ GeV/c Pb+Pb central collisions will be addressed within the context of thermalization. By comparing these data with thermal and transport models, freeze-out parameters such as the temperature parameter T fo and mean collective flow velocity (Β) are extracted. Preliminary results of the particle ratios of K - /K + and p/p are discussed in the context of cascade models of RQMD and VENUS

  18. Comparison of CSF Distribution between Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus and Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, S; Ishikawa, M; Yamamoto, K

    2016-07-01

    CSF volumes in the basal cistern and Sylvian fissure are increased in both idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer disease, though the differences in these volumes in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer disease have not been well-described. Using CSF segmentation and volume quantification, we compared the distribution of CSF in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer disease. CSF volumes were extracted from T2-weighted 3D spin-echo sequences on 3T MR imaging and quantified semi-automatically. We compared the volumes and ratios of the ventricles and subarachnoid spaces after classification in 30 patients diagnosed with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, 10 with concurrent idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer disease, 18 with Alzheimer disease, and 26 control subjects 60 years of age or older. Brain to ventricle ratios at the anterior and posterior commissure levels and 3D volumetric convexity cistern to ventricle ratios were useful indices for the differential diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus or idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus with Alzheimer disease from Alzheimer disease, similar to the z-Evans index and callosal angle. The most distinctive characteristics of the CSF distribution in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus were small convexity subarachnoid spaces and the large volume of the basal cistern and Sylvian fissure. The distribution of the subarachnoid spaces in the idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus with Alzheimer disease group was the most deformed among these 3 groups, though the mean ventricular volume of the idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus with Alzheimer disease group was intermediate between that of the idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer disease groups. The z-axial expansion of the lateral ventricle and compression of the brain just above the ventricle were the common findings in the parameters for differentiating

  19. The pressure distribution under the bovine claw during square standing on a flat substrate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, van der P.P.J.; Metz, J.H.M.; Noordhuizen-Stassen, E.N.; Back, W.; Braam, C.R.; Weijs, W.A.

    2002-01-01

    The distribution pattern of pressure over the bovine claw was investigated to test the hypothesis that the ground reaction force is unevenly distributed and makes some regions of the claw more prone to overloading and injury than others. In eight recently trimmed Holstein Friesian cows, the

  20. Epidermis Microstructure Inspired Graphene Pressure Sensor with Random Distributed Spinosum for High Sensitivity and Large Linearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yu; Zhang, Kunning; Yang, Zhen; Jiang, Song; Ju, Zhenyi; Li, Yuxing; Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Danyang; Jian, Muqiang; Zhang, Yingying; Liang, Renrong; Tian, He; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2018-03-27

    Recently, wearable pressure sensors have attracted tremendous attention because of their potential applications in monitoring physiological signals for human healthcare. Sensitivity and linearity are the two most essential parameters for pressure sensors. Although various designed micro/nanostructure morphologies have been introduced, the trade-off between sensitivity and linearity has not been well balanced. Human skin, which contains force receptors in a reticular layer, has a high sensitivity even for large external stimuli. Herein, inspired by the skin epidermis with high-performance force sensing, we have proposed a special surface morphology with spinosum microstructure of random distribution via the combination of an abrasive paper template and reduced graphene oxide. The sensitivity of the graphene pressure sensor with random distribution spinosum (RDS) microstructure is as high as 25.1 kPa -1 in a wide linearity range of 0-2.6 kPa. Our pressure sensor exhibits superior comprehensive properties compared with previous surface-modified pressure sensors. According to simulation and mechanism analyses, the spinosum microstructure and random distribution contribute to the high sensitivity and large linearity range, respectively. In addition, the pressure sensor shows promising potential in detecting human physiological signals, such as heartbeat, respiration, phonation, and human motions of a pushup, arm bending, and walking. The wearable pressure sensor array was further used to detect gait states of supination, neutral, and pronation. The RDS microstructure provides an alternative strategy to improve the performance of pressure sensors and extend their potential applications in monitoring human activities.

  1. An analysis of system pressure and temperature distribution in self-pressurizer of SMART considering thermal stratification at intermediate cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yeon Moon; Lee, Doo Jeong; Yoon, Ju Hyun; Kim, Hwan Yeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    Because the pressurizer is in reactor vessel, the heat transfer from primary water would increase the temperatures of fluids in pressurizer to same temperature of hotleg, if no cooling equipment were supplied. Thus, heat exchanger and thermal insulator are needed to minimize heat transferred from primary water and to remove heat in pressurizer. The temperatures in cavities of pressurizer for normal operation are 70 deg C and 74 deg C for intermediate and end cavity, respectively, which considers the solubility of nitrogen gas in water. Natural convection is the mechanism of heat balance in pressurizer of SMART. In SMART, the heat exchanger in pressurizer is placed in lower part of intermediate cavity, so the heat in upper part of intermediate cavity can't be removed adequately and it can cause thermal stratification. If thermal stratification occurred, it increases heat transfers to nitrogen gas and system pressure increases as the result. Thus, proper evaluation of those effects on system pressure and ways to mitigate thermal stratification should be established. This report estimates the system pressure and temperatures in cavities of pressurizer with considering thermal stratification in intermediate cavity. The system pressure and temperatures for each cavities considered size of wet thermal insulator, temperature of upper plate of reactor vessel, parameters of heat exchanger in intermediate cavity such as flow rate and temperature of cooling water, heat transfer area, effective tube height, and location of cooling tube. In addition to the consideration of thermal stratification thermal mixing of all water in intermediate cavity also considered and compared in this report. (author). 6 refs., 60 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Comparison of Finite Element Modeling and Experimental Pressure Distribution in a Diamond Anvil Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrat'yev, Andreiy I.; Murphy, Michael J.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2002-10-01

    Ultra high pressures can be obtained in a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) device by optimizing the geometrical shape of diamond anvil and by use of high strength gasket materials. Radial pressure distribution in a diamond-coated rhenium gasket was measured by the micro-collimated X-ray diffraction techniques at NSLS, Brookhaven National Laboratory up to peak pressure of 220 GPa. The process of DAC compression was described by finite element analysis using NIKE-2D software. The mechanical properties of the diamond-coated gasket material were modeled and radial pressure distribution obtained was in good agreement with the experimental data. The calculated shear stress in diamond in the axial direction was shown to depend strongly on the yield strength of the gasket material and may limit the ultimate pressure that can be obtained with the use of high strength gasket materials. Supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant No. DMR-0203779.

  3. Study of the velocity distribution influence upon the pressure pulsations in draft tube model of hydro-turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonin, V.; Ustimenko, A.; Kuibin, P.; Litvinov, I.; Shtork, S.

    2016-11-01

    One of the mechanisms of generation of powerful pressure pulsations in the circuit of the turbine is a precessing vortex core, formed behind the runner at the operation points with partial or forced loads, when the flow has significant residual swirl. To study periodic pressure pulsations behind the runner the authors of this paper use approaches of experimental modeling and methods of computational fluid dynamics. The influence of velocity distributions at the output of the hydro turbine runner on pressure pulsations was studied based on analysis of the existing and possible velocity distributions in hydraulic turbines and selection of the distribution in the extended range. Preliminary numerical calculations have showed that the velocity distribution can be modeled without reproduction of the entire geometry of the circuit, using a combination of two blade cascades of the rotor and stator. Experimental verification of numerical results was carried out in an air bench, using the method of 3D-printing for fabrication of the blade cascades and the geometry of the draft tube of hydraulic turbine. Measurements of the velocity field at the input to a draft tube cone and registration of pressure pulsations due to precessing vortex core have allowed building correlations between the velocity distribution character and the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the pulsations.

  4. LEDA RF distribution system design and component test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roybal, W.T.; Rees, D.E.; Borchert, H.L.; McCarthy, M.; Toole, L.

    1998-01-01

    The 350 MHz and 700 MHz RF distribution systems for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) have been designed and are currently being installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Since 350 MHz is a familiar frequency used at other accelerator facilities, most of the major high-power components were available. The 700 MHz, 1.0 MW, CW RF delivery system designed for LEDA is a new development. Therefore, high-power circulators, waterloads, phase shifters, switches, and harmonic filters had to be designed and built for this applications. The final Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) RF distribution systems design will be based on much of the same technology as the LEDA systems and will have many of the RF components tested for LEDA incorporated into the design. Low power and high-power tests performed on various components of these LEDA systems and their results are presented here

  5. Distribution of Side Abutment Stress in Roadway Subjected to Dynamic Pressure and Its Engineering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Qiangling

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The borehole stress-meter was employed in this study to investigate the distribution of the side abutment stress in roadway subjected to dynamic pressure. The results demonstrate that the side abutment stress of the mining roadway reaches a peak value when the distance to the gob is 8 m and the distribution curve of the side abutment stress can be divided into three zones: stress rising zone, stress stabilizing zone, and stress decreasing zone. Further numerical investigation was carried out to study the effect of the coal mass strength, coal seam depth, immediate roof strength, and thickness on the distribution of the side abutment stress. Based on the research results, we determined the reasonable position of the mining roadway and the optimal width of the barrier pillar. The engineering application demonstrates that the retention of the barrier pillar with a width of 5 m along the gob as the haulage roadway for the next panel is feasible, which delivers favorable technological and economic benefits.

  6. Characterizing mesh size distributions (MSDs) in thermosetting materials using a high-pressure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larché, J-F; Seynaeve, J-M; Voyard, G; Bussière, P-O; Gardette, J-L

    2011-04-21

    The thermoporosimetry method was adapted to determine the mesh size distribution of an acrylate thermoset clearcoat. This goal was achieved by increasing the solvent rate transfer by increasing the pressure and temperature. A comparison of the results obtained using this approach with those obtained by DMA (dynamic mechanical analysis) underlined the accuracy of thermoporosimetry in characterizing the macromolecular architecture of thermosets. The thermoporosimetry method was also used to analyze the effects of photoaging on cross-linking, which result from the photodegradation of the acrylate thermoset. It was found that the formation of a three-dimensional network followed by densification generates a modification of the average mesh size that leads to a dramatic decrease of the meshes of the polymer.

  7. Taiwan Power Company's power distribution analysis and fuel thermal margin verification methods for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    Taiwan Power Company's (TPC's) power distribution analysis and fuel thermal margin verification methods for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are examined. The TPC and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research started a joint 5-yr project in 1989 to establish independent capabilities to perform reload design and transient analysis utilizing state-of-the-art computer programs. As part of the effort, these methods were developed to allow TPC to independently perform verifications of the local power density and departure from nucleate boiling design bases, which are required by the reload safety evaluation for the Maanshan PWR plant. The computer codes utilized were extensively validated for the intended applications. Sample calculations were performed for up to six reload cycles of the Maanshan plant, and the results were found to be quite consistent with the vendor's calculational results

  8. A jazz-based approach for optimal setting of pressure reducing valves in water distribution networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paola, Francesco; Galdiero, Enzo; Giugni, Maurizio

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a model for valve setting in water distribution networks (WDNs), with the aim of reducing the level of leakage. The approach is based on the harmony search (HS) optimization algorithm. The HS mimics a jazz improvisation process able to find the best solutions, in this case corresponding to valve settings in a WDN. The model also interfaces with the improved version of a popular hydraulic simulator, EPANET 2.0, to check the hydraulic constraints and to evaluate the performances of the solutions. Penalties are introduced in the objective function in case of violation of the hydraulic constraints. The model is applied to two case studies, and the obtained results in terms of pressure reductions are comparable with those of competitive metaheuristic algorithms (e.g. genetic algorithms). The results demonstrate the suitability of the HS algorithm for water network management and optimization.

  9. Medial stabilized and posterior stabilized TKA affect patellofemoral kinematics and retropatellar pressure distribution differently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glogaza, Alexander; Schröder, Christian; Woiczinski, Matthias; Müller, Peter; Jansson, Volkmar; Steinbrück, Arnd

    2018-06-01

    Patellofemoral kinematics and retropatellar pressure distribution change after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It was hypothesized that different TKA designs will show altered retropatellar pressure distribution patterns and different patellofemoral kinematics according to their design characteristics. Twelve fresh-frozen knee specimens were tested dynamically in a knee rig. Each specimen was measured native, after TKA with a posterior stabilized design (PS) and after TKA with a medial stabilized design (MS). Retropatellar pressure distribution was measured using a pressure sensitive foil which was subdivided into three areas (lateral and medial facet and patellar ridge). Patellofemoral kinematics were measured by an ultrasonic-based three-dimensional motion system (Zebris CMS20, Isny Germany). Significant changes in patellofemoral kinematics and retropatellar pressure distribution were found in both TKA types when compared to the native situation. Mean retropatellar contact areas were significantly smaller after TKA (native: 241.1 ± 75.6 mm 2 , MS: 197.7 ± 74.5 mm 2 , PS: 181.2 ± 56.7 mm 2 , native vs. MS p patellofemoral kinematics were found in both TKA designs when compared to the native knee during flexion and extension with a more medial patella tracking. Patellofemoral kinematics and retropatellar pressure change after TKA in different manner depending on the type of TKA used. Surgeons should be aware of influencing the risks of patellofermoral complications by the choice of the prosthesis design.

  10. Early cessation of pressure garment therapy results in scar contraction and thickening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle M DeBruler

    Full Text Available Pressure garment therapy is often prescribed to improve scar properties following full-thickness burn injuries. Pressure garment therapy is generally recommended for long periods of time following injury (1-2 years, though it is plagued by extremely low patient compliance. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of early cessation of pressure garment therapy on scar properties. Full-thickness burn injuries were created along the dorsum of red Duroc pigs. The burn eschar was excised and wound sites autografted with split-thickness skin. Scars were treated with pressure garments within 1 week of injury and pressure was maintained for either 29 weeks (continuous pressure or for 17 weeks followed by cessation of pressure for an additional 12 weeks (pressure released; scars receiving no treatment served as controls. Scars that underwent pressure garment therapy were significantly smoother and less contracted with decreased scar height compared to control scars at 17 weeks. These benefits were maintained in the continuous pressure group until week 29. In the pressure released group, grafts significantly contracted and became more raised, harder and rougher after the therapy was discontinued. Pressure cessation also resulted in large changes in collagen fiber orientation and increases in collagen fiber thickness. The results suggest that pressure garment therapy effectively improves scar properties following severe burn injury; however, early cessation of the therapy results in substantial loss of these improvements.

  11. Early cessation of pressure garment therapy results in scar contraction and thickening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruler, Danielle M; Zbinden, Jacob C; Baumann, Molly E; Blackstone, Britani N; Malara, Megan M; Bailey, J Kevin; Supp, Dorothy M; Powell, Heather M

    2018-01-01

    Pressure garment therapy is often prescribed to improve scar properties following full-thickness burn injuries. Pressure garment therapy is generally recommended for long periods of time following injury (1-2 years), though it is plagued by extremely low patient compliance. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of early cessation of pressure garment therapy on scar properties. Full-thickness burn injuries were created along the dorsum of red Duroc pigs. The burn eschar was excised and wound sites autografted with split-thickness skin. Scars were treated with pressure garments within 1 week of injury and pressure was maintained for either 29 weeks (continuous pressure) or for 17 weeks followed by cessation of pressure for an additional 12 weeks (pressure released); scars receiving no treatment served as controls. Scars that underwent pressure garment therapy were significantly smoother and less contracted with decreased scar height compared to control scars at 17 weeks. These benefits were maintained in the continuous pressure group until week 29. In the pressure released group, grafts significantly contracted and became more raised, harder and rougher after the therapy was discontinued. Pressure cessation also resulted in large changes in collagen fiber orientation and increases in collagen fiber thickness. The results suggest that pressure garment therapy effectively improves scar properties following severe burn injury; however, early cessation of the therapy results in substantial loss of these improvements.

  12. On the non-linear pressure distribution in embankment dams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Urban [Computer-aided Fluid Engineering AB, Norrkoeping (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    The main objective of this study is to evaluate if a mathematical/numerical model of the air-theory can be formulated. It is the author's view that this has been demonstrated. The model is based on relevant physical laws and principles and produces results which are in qualitative agreement with observations. However, it should be emphasised that it is a feasibility study where some empirical relations have been tuned without considering possible experimental data or findings. If a more well-founded model is to be developed it is suggested that the following points are considered: (1) Compile relevant information on permeabilities for the type of two-phase flow considered. (2) Evaluate relevant laws and coefficients for the phase exchange. (3) Verify simulations by comparisons with laboratory experiments, if available. (4) Consider the two-dimensional situation.

  13. Low cost self-made pressure distribution sensors for ergonomic chair: Are they suitable for posture monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinaitis, Arnas; Daunoraviciene, Kristina

    2018-05-18

    Long sitting causes many health problems for people. Healthy sitting monitoring systems, like real-time pressure distribution measuring, is in high demand and many methods of posture recognition were developed. Such systems are usually expensive and hardly available for the regular user. The aim of study is to develop low cost but sensitive enough pressure sensors and posture monitoring system. New self-made pressure sensors have been developed and tested, and prototype of pressure distribution measuring system was designed. Sensors measured at average noise amplitude of a = 56 mV (1.12%), average variation in sequential measurements of the same sensor s = 17 mV (0.34%). Signal variability between sensors averaged at 100 mV (2.0%). Weight to signal dependency graph was measured and hysteresis calculated. Results suggested the use of total sixteen sensors for posture monitoring system with accuracy of sensor sensitivity and repeatability are acceptable for posture monitoring, and it is possible to build low cost pressure distribution measurement system with graphical visualization without expensive equipment or complicated software.

  14. Pressure effects on distribution of solids in a PFBC-plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlovec, V.; Linzer, W. [Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria)

    1999-07-01

    With Pressurized Fluidized Beds some peculiarities have to be regarded when comparing them to atmospheric systems with the same power output. There is a significant influence on solids distribution of the growing density at increasing pressure, not only by means of density itself, but also due to changes in drag coefficients and - at pressures above approx. 16 bar - due to the pressure effect on gas properties. In addition to these effects on homogeneous fluidization there is an influence on formation and behavior of bubbles in dense beds. During the redesign of a simulation program (that had been originally designed for atmospheric conditions) towards use with elevated pressure therefore a couple of modifications had to be applied to the subroutine responsible for calculation of solids distribution. In addition a new module had to be written, for the computation of gas properties of air and flue gas at pressures up to 50 bar and temperatures up to 1200 C to prevent inaccuracies when extending simulation to pressures above 16 bar. This module utilizes a 1-fluid-approximation for an arbitrary mixture of N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and Ar, gas properties are computed by using mainly the Lee-Kesler-Pitzer approach for real gas-effects. Computations were performed with this software to demonstrate trends in fluidization behavior at higher than atmospheric pressures. A model of a pressurized system was compared to an AFB at the same superficial velocity, reaching similar fluidization states by enlarging the bed mass at higher pressures. These numeric tests were run for pressures of 10 and 20 bar. (orig.)

  15. Distribution of Vapor Pressure in the Vacuum Freeze-Drying Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwei Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the big vacuum freeze-drying equipment, the drying rate of materials is uneven at different positions. This phenomenon can be explained by the uneven distribution of vapor pressure in chamber during the freeze-drying process. In this paper, a mathematical model is developed to describe the vapor flow in the passageways either between material plates and in the channel between plate groups. The distribution of vapor pressure along flow passageway is given. Two characteristic factors of passageways are defined to express the effects of structural and process parameters on vapor pressure distribution. The affecting factors and their actions are quantitatively discussed in detail. Two examples are calculated and analyzed. The analysis method and the conclusions are useful to estimate the difference of material drying rate at different parts in equipment and to direct the choice of structural and process parameters.

  16. Radial Distribution of the Nanosecond Dielectric Barrier Discharge Current in Atmospheric-Pressure Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malashin, M. V.; Moshkunov, S. I.; Khomich, V. Yu.; Shershunova, E. A.

    2018-01-01

    Experimental results on the radial distribution of the nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) current in flat millimeter air gaps under atmospheric pressure and natural humidity of 40-60% at a voltage rise rate at the electrodes of 250 V/ns are presented. The time delay of the appearance of discharge currents was observed to increase from the center to the periphery of the air gap at discharge gap heights above 3 mm, which correlated with the appearance of constricted channels against the background of the volume DBD plasma. Based on the criterion of the avalanche-streamer transition, it is found out that the development of a nanosecond DBD in air gaps of 1-3 mm occurs by the streamer mechanism.

  17. Exploitation of Stereophotogrammetric Measurement of a Foot in Analysis of Plantar Pressure Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankova, B.; Koudelka, T.; Pavelka, K.; Janura, M.; Jelen, K.

    2016-06-01

    Stereophotogrammetry as a method for the surface scanning can be used to capture some properties of the human body parts. The objective of this study is to quantify the foot stress distribution in 3D during its quasi-static stand using a footprint into an imprinting material when knowing its mechanical properties. One foot of a female, having the mass of 65kg, was chosen for the FEM foot model construction. After obtaining her foot imprint to the dental imprinting material, its positive plaster cast was created, whose surface was possible to scan using stereophotogrammetry. The imprint surface digital model was prepared with the help of the Konica-Minolta Vivid 9i triangulation scanner. This procedure provides the measured object models in a high resolution. The resulting surface mesh of the foot imprint involved 9.600 nodes and 14.000 triangles, approximately, after reduction due to the FEM analysis. Simulation of foot imprint was solved as the 3D time dependent nonlinear mechanical problem in the ADINA software. The sum of vertical reactions calculated at the contact area nodes was 320.5 N, which corresponds to the mass of 32.67 kg. This value is in a good agreement with the subject half weight - the load of one foot during its quasi-static stand. The partial pressures resulting from this mathematical model match the real pressures on the interface of the foot and imprinting material quite closely. Principally, these simulations can be used to assess the contact pressures in practical cases, e.g., between a foot and its footwear.

  18. All-Optical Frequency Modulated High Pressure MEMS Sensor for Remote and Distributed Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Hansen, Ole

    2011-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication and characterization of a new all-optical frequency modulated pressure sensor. Using the tangential strain in a circular membrane, a waveguide with an integrated nanoscale Bragg grating is strained longitudinally proportional to the applied pressure causing...... a shift in the Bragg wavelength. The simple and robust design combined with the small chip area of 1 × 1.8 mm2 makes the sensor ideally suited for remote and distributed sensing in harsh environments and where miniaturized sensors are required. The sensor is designed for high pressure applications up...

  19. Research on the Influence of Orthopaedic Inserts on Pressure Distribution in the Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignas Rutulys

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the influence of individual orthopaedic inserts on pressure distribution in the foot. Feet deformations, types of orthopaedic inserts, materials and pressure in the foot testing methods are discussed. Experimental computer measurements of pressure in the foot before and after the use of inserts have been done. During research, the inserts made of different kinds of materials selected according to human weight, pathology, skin sensitivity and many other reasons has been used. It has been determinated that orthopaedic inserts have a more noticeable impact on children whose feet is adjusted easier if compared with those of adults.Article in Lithuanian

  20. Uniformly Distributed Graphene Domain Grows on Standing Copper via Low-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hao Chan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniformly distributed graphene domains were synthesized on standing copper foil by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition system. This method improved the distribution of the graphene domains at different positions on the same piece of copper foil along the forward direction of the gas flow. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed the average size of the graphene domains to be about ~20 m. This results show that the sheet resistance of monolayer graphene on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET substrate is about ~359 /□ whereas that of the four-layer graphene films is about ~178 /□, with a transmittance value of 88.86% at the 550 nm wavelength. Furthermore, the sheet resistance can be reduced with the addition of HNO3 resulting in a value of 84 /□. These values meet the absolute standard for touch sensor applications, so we believe that this method can be a candidate for some transparent conductive electrode applications.

  1. CONTEMPT-4MOD3, LWR Containment Long-Term Pressure Distribution and Temperature Distribution in LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.C.; Economos, C.; Lehner, J.R.; Maise, G.; Ng, K.K.; Mirsky, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: CONTEMPT-4/MOD5 describes the response of multi-compartment containment systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. The program can accommodate both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) containment systems. Also, both design basis accident (DBA) and degraded core type LOCA conditions can be analyzed. The program calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures, and mass and energy inventories due to inter-compartment mass and energy exchange taking into account user- supplied descriptions of compartments, inter-compartment junction flow areas, LOCA source terms, and user-selected problem features. Analytical models available to describe containment systems include models for containment fans and pumps, cooling sprays, heat conducting structures, sump drains, PWR ice condensers, and BWR pressure suppression systems. To accommodate degraded core type accidents, analytical models for hydrogen combustion within compartments and energy transfer due to gas radiation are also provided. CONTEMPT4/MOD6 is an update of previous CONTEMPT4 versions. Improvements in CONTEMPT4/MOD6 over CONTEMPT4/MOD3 include coding of a BWR pressure suppression system model, a hydrogen/carbon monoxide burn model, a gas radiation heat transfer model, a user specified variable junction (leakage) area as a function of pressure or time, additional heat transfer coefficient options for heat structures, generalized initial compartment conditions for inerted containment, an alternative containment spray model and spray carry-over capability. Also, the thermodynamic properties routines have been extended to accommodate the higher temperature and multicomponent gas mixtures associated with combustion. In addition, reduced running time is achieved by incorporation of an optional implicit numerical algorithm for junction flow. This makes economically feasible the analysis of very long

  2. Effect of arch support insole on plantar pressure distribution in females with mild and moderate hallux valgus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maedeh Farzadi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hallux Valgus is one of the most foot deformities which increase plantar pressure beneath big toe and first metatarsal. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of foot orthosis on plantar pressure distribution in subjects with mild and moderate Hallux Valgus. Materials & Methods: in this quasi-experimental study, females 16 with Hallux Valgus were recruited. Plantar pressure in 8 area of foot was measured by Pedar-X insole when wearing standard shoe only shoe with foot orthosis and shoe with foot orthosis after a month of using orthosis. Data were analyzed by repeated measure analysis of variance test. Results: using foot orthosis for a month leaded to decrease pressure in the big toe (P<0/019 first metatarsal and 3-5 metatarsals (P<0.001 and also increased pressure in medial mid foot (P<0.001. Conclusion: Foot orthosis decreased peak pressure in fore foot and increased it in medial mid foot. Therefore redistribute plantar pressure to the more normal pattern in Hallux Valgus subjects. So it could be one of the effective methods to prevent the progression of this deformity in its initial steps of formation.

  3. Pressure distribution of implant-supported removable partial dentures with stress-breaking attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Kentaro; Kurihara, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yasunori; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2014-04-01

    This in vitro study investigated the pressure distribution of the implant-supported removable partial dentures (RPDs) with the stress-breaking attachments under the occlusal force. The experimental model of bilateral missing premolars and molars was modified from a commercial simulation model. Five pressure sensors were embedded near the bilateral first molars, first premolars, and medio-lingual alveolar crest. Two implants were placed near the second molars, and they were connected to the denture base using the following conditions: complete separation between the denture base and implant with cover screws (CRPD), flexible connection with a stress-breaking ball (SBB) attachment, and rigid connection without stress breaking with healing caps (HC). The pressure at five different areas of the soft tissue and the displacement of the RPDs were simultaneously measured, loading up to 50 N. The coefficient of variation (CV) for each connection was calculated from all data of the pressure at five areas to evaluate the pressure distribution. The pressure on medio-lingual alveolar crest and molars of the HC was less than SBB and CRPD. In contrast, the pressure on premolars of SBB was greater than for the HC and CRPD. The CV of SBB was less than that of HC and CRPD. Denture displacement of HC and SBB was less than for CRPD. Within the in vitro limitations, precise denture settlements and pressure distribution under the denture base could be controlled using an SBB attachment. An SBB attachment might be able to protect the implant from harmful force. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Distribution of intraocular pressure and its determinants in an Iranian adult population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Hassan; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi; Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Shariati, Mohammad; Yekta, Abbasali; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the distribution of intraocular pressure (IOP) and its determinants in an Iranian population. METHODS In a cross-sectional survey, random cluster sampling was conducted from the 40-64 years old population of Shahroud, in the north of Iran. All participants had optometry and ophthalmic exams. IOP was determined using the Goldmann tonometry method and biometric components were measured. RESULTS Of the 6311 people selected for the study, 5190 (82.2%) participated. The mean age of the participants was 50.9±6.2y and 58.7% of them were female. Mean IOP was 12.87±2.27 mm Hg. In this study 0.3% of the participants had an IOP higher than 21 mm Hg. The multiple linear regression model revealed that sex (Coef=-0.30; 95% CI: -0.43 to -0.17), diabetes (Coef=0.43; 95% CI: 0.19 to 0.67), high systolic blood pressure (Coef=0.02; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.02), high body mass index (BMI) (Coef=0.03; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.04), higher education (Coef=0.02, 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.04), thicker central corneal thickness (Coef=0.01; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.02), and myopic shift in spherical equivalent (Coef=-0.14; 95% CI: -0.18 to -0.10) significantly correlated with high IOP. CONCLUSION The IOP in this 40-64 years old population is low overall. In the north of Iran, average IOP is statistically significantly correlated with female sex, diabetes, higher BMI, systolic blood pressure, higher education, thicker cornea, and myopic refractive error. PMID:27588277

  5. Some observations of the pressure distribution in a tube bank for conditions of self generated acoustic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, J.A.; Donaldson, I.S.; McKnight, W.

    1979-01-01

    The results for mean and fluctuating pressure distributions around tubes in an in-line tube bank are presented for both non-resonant and self-excited acoustic standing wave resonant flow regimes. It is readily deduced that the nature of the flow in the bank is dramatically altered with the onset of acoustic resonance. The velocity gradients which appear across the bank with the onset of resonance would suggest regions of flow recirculation in the bank although no evidence of this was found. The spectra of fluctuating pressure on the duct roof in the bank and on tubes deep in the bank exhibited coherent peaks only during resonance. (author)

  6. The Symmetry in the Selected Plantar Pressure Distribution Parameters of the Elderly Subject With Lower Limb Discrepancy (LLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghad Memar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: lower leg discrepancy is a common problem which causes the changes in the plantar pressure distribution pattern during gait. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to study the symmetry in the various plantar pressure distribution parameters in the elderly subject with leg discrepancy. Methods & Materials: Twenty-one elderly from Esfehan with leg discrepancy (1.5 to 3 cm participated in this study. Plantar pressure distribution and other related parameters were measured in the five discrete steps for each limb by “emed 2” platforms. Three successful steps from five were selected and averaged, and the plantar areas were divided into 11 marks. For each mark peak force (BW%, peak pressure (Kpa, contact area, contact time, pressure time integral and force time integral were calculated. Descriptive statistics (mean and SD to report the plantar pressure pattern, dependent sample t- test for comparison pressure data between long and short limb (P≤0.05 and symmetry index (SI% for the symmetrical status in the selected plantar pressure data of the elderly subject with LLD were used. Results: The consequence of dependent t-test showed that regardless of contact area in the forefoot region and 3th, 4th and 5th toes, there were no significant differences between long and short limb. Symmetry index (SI% also revealed that the contact time in the short limbs heel was less than long limb and peak force and peak pressure in the short limb was less in mid foot region and was greater in forefoot region than long limb. Conclusion: Given The Result Of This Study Showed That In The Short Limb, Initial Contact Time And Weight Acceptance Was Reduced, Which Cause The Increase Of The Pressure In The Forefoot And Also Which Causes The Increase Of Stress Fracture Risk In The Metatarsal Region. Therefore, It Is Suggested That LLD Subject Use Orthotic Or Shoes That Can Increase Their Heel Height And Balancing The Contact Time In The Short Limb To Resolve

  7. [Spasticity and dynamic plantar pressure distribution measurements in hemiplegic spastic children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femery, V; Moretto, P; Renaut, H; Thévenon, A

    2001-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the plantar pressure distribution in nine hemiplegic spastic children to illustrate the dynamic alteration during stance phase linked spasticity grade. The graduation of the lower limbs muscle tone related to the Aschworth spasticity scale enabled us to identify two groups of hemiplegics subjects. The groups Asch 1 and Asch 3 have respectively presented a low and a strong spasticity. The peak pressures during consecutive gait cycles were determined under the feet of 30 healthy subjects and two cerebral palsy groups using a wearable footprint analysis system. A statistical study showed a similarity between the two disabled groups. Peak pressures under the midfoot were significantly higher compared to the control group. While the plantar pressure distribution profile was specific for each group under all other anatomical structures. The significant alterations were observed under the forefoot and hallux. Spasticity modifies the foot contact to ground and leads to a specific plantar pressure distribution profile linked to the spasticity grade. The equinovarus with clawed toes deformity due to higher spasticity seems to be an important factor in terminal stance phase perturbations. However spastic hemiplegic subjects seem to adopt a gait pattern in agreement with stability optimization criteria.

  8. General results for the Marshall and Olkin's family of distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WAGNER BARRETO-SOUZA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Marshall and Olkin (1997 introduced an interesting method of adding a parameter to a well-established distribution. However, they did not investigate general mathematical properties of their family of distributions. We provide for this family of distributions general expansions for the density function, explicit expressions for the moments and moments of the order statistics. Several especial models are investigated. We discuss estimation of the model parameters. An application to a real data set is presented for illustrative purposes.

  9. Experience with the WWER-440 MW reactor pressure vessel in-service inspections and evaluation of their results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Kralovec, J.; Prepechal, J.; Sulc, J.

    1989-01-01

    The Power Machinery Plant of Skoda Works in Plzen carries out in-service inspections of WWER-440 MW reactor pressure vessels by means of remote controlled inspection equipment - the TRC reactor test system, and some other inspections devices. The results of the in-service inspections were evaluated by methods based on the fracture mechanics approach, the knowledge of stress and strain distribution, and the operating history of the pressure vessels. Examples of types of defects found and their analysis are shown. (author). 1 tab

  10. Noninvasive estimation of pulmonary arterial pressure by analysis of pulmonary blood-flow distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstam, M.A.; Strauss, H.W.; Alpert, N.M.; Miller, S.W.; Murphy, R.X.; Greene, R.E.; McKusick, K.A.

    1979-01-01

    To determine whether a correlation exists between pulmonary arterial (PA) pressure (P/sub a/) and the distribution of pulmonary blood flow, this distribution was measured in four upright dogs in the control state and during intravenous infusions of epinephrine or prostaglandin F/sub 2α/. During suspension of respiration, 15 mCi of Xe-133 were injected intravenously, and perfusion and equilibration lung images were recorded with a scintillation camera. The procedure was performed several times on each dog, with and without pharmacological elevation of PA pressure by 5 to 50 cm H 2 O. For each scintigram, the relative blood flow per unit ventilated lung volume (F) was plotted against centimeters above the hilum (h). Pulmonary arterial pressure was derived from each curve, assuming the relation F = B(P/sub a/ - hD) 2 , where B = constant and D = specific gravity of blood. Calculated PA pressure correlated strongly (r = 0.83) with measured PA pressure, suggesting a possible means of noninvasive estimation of PA pressure

  11. [Selection of occlusal scheme on the basis of pressure distribution on supporting structures under complete dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Kan; Kawano, Fumiaki; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2004-12-01

    In case of making complete dentures, we have to consider not only denture stability but also the restoration of aesthetics and function such as mastication and speech. However these are contradictory theoretically from the point of view of denture stability, and it is very difficult to satisfy both requirements in the case of a patient who has poor upper and lower alveolar ridges. We investigated the effect of artificial posterior teeth form and occlusal scheme on the distribution of pressure on supporting structures under complete dentures during mastication with upper and lower edentulous simulators. In this report, a guideline for the selection of occlusal scheme for complete dentures, based on our previous investigations, is described. The occlusal scheme remarkably affected the distribution of pressure under simulated complete dentures, as shown by comparing the distribution of pressure using two different occlusal schemes:fully balanced occlusion and lingualized occlusion. However other factors such as posterior teeth form and position affect the distribution of pressure as well, and are related to each other. Therefore, not only occlusal scheme but also posterior artificial teeth form has to be considered, and the form of posterior teeth should be carefully and comprehensively decided when making complete dentures.

  12. Calculation of pressure distribution in vacuum systems using a commercial finite element program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.; Wehrle, B.; Jostlein, H.

    1991-01-01

    The finite element method has proven to be a very useful tool for calculating pressure distributions in complex vacuum systems. A number of finite element programs have been developed for this specific task. For those who do not have access to one of these specialized programs and do not wish to develop their own program, another option is available. Any commercial finite element program with heat transfer analysis capabilities can be used to calculate pressure distributions. The approach uses an analogy between thermal conduction and gas conduction with the quantity temperature substituted for pressure. The thermal analogies for pumps, gas loads and tube conductances are described in detail. The method is illustrated for an example vacuum system. A listing of the ANSYS data input file for this example is included. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  13. Evaluation of the stress distribution on the pressure vessel head with multi-openings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.S.; Kim, T.W.; Jeong, K.H.; Lee, G.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-06-01

    This report discusses and analyzes the stress distribution on the pressure vessel head with multi-openings(3 PSV nozzles, 2 SDS nozzles and 1 Man Way) according to patterns of the opening distance. The pressurizer of Korea Standardized Nuclear Power Plant(Ulchin 3 and 4), which meets requirements of the cyclic operation and opening design defined by ASME code, was used as the basic model for that. Stress changes according to the distance between openings were investigated and the factors which should be considered for the opening design were analyzed. Also, the nozzle loads at Level A, B conditions and internal pressure were applied in order to evaluate changes of head stress distributions due to nozzle loads. (author). 6 refs., 29 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Comparison of plantar pressure distribution in CAD-CAM and prefabricated foot orthoses in patients with flexible flatfeet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaei, Banafsheh; Saeedi, Hassan; Jalali, Maryam; Farzadi, Maede; Norouzi, Ehsan

    2017-12-01

    The effect of foot orthoses on plantar pressure distribution has been proven by researchers but there are some controversies about advantages of custom-made foot orthoses to less expensive prefabricated foot orthoses. Nineteen flatfeet adults between 18 and 45 participated in this study. CAD-CAM foot orthoses were made for these patients according to their foot scan. Prefabricated foot orthoses were prepared according to their foot size. Plantar pressure, force and contact area were measured using pedar ® -x in-shoe system wearing shoe alone, wearing CAD-CAM foot orthoses and wearing prefabricated foot orthoses. Repeated measures ANOVA model with post-hoc, Bonferroni comparison were used to test differences. CAD-CAM and prefabricated foot orthoses both decreased pressure and force under 2nd, 3-5 metatarsal and heel regions comparing to shoe alone condition. CAD-CAM foot orthosis increased pressure under lateral toe region in comparison to shoe alone and prefabricated foot orthosis. Both foot orthoses increased pressure and contact area in medial midfoot region comparing to shoe alone condition. Increased forces were seen at hallux and lateral toes by prefabricated foot orthoses in comparison with CAD-CAM foot orthoses and control condition, respectively. According to the results, both foot orthoses could decrease the pressure under heel and metatarsal area. It seems that the special design of CAD-CAM foot orthoses could not make great differences in plantar pressure distribution in this sample. Further research is required to determine whether these results are associated with different scan systems or design software. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of Different Turbulence Models for Numerical Simulation of Pressure Distribution in V-Shaped Stepped Spillway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoliang Bai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available V-shaped stepped spillway is a new shaped stepped spillway, and the pressure distribution is quite different from that of the traditional stepped spillway. In this paper, five turbulence models were used to simulate the pressure distribution in the skimming flow regimes. Through comparing with the physical value, the realizable k-ε model had better precision in simulating the pressure distribution. Then, the flow pattern of V-shaped and traditional stepped spillways was given to illustrate the unique pressure distribution using realizable k-ε turbulence model.

  16. Global body posture and plantar pressure distribution in individuals with and without temporomandibular disorder: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Juliana A; Pasinato, Fernanda; Corrêa, Eliane C R; da Silva, Ana Maria T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate body posture and the distribution of plantar pressure at physiologic rest of the mandible and during maximal intercuspal positions in subjects with and without temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Fifty-one subjects were assessed by the Diagnostic Criteria for Research on Temporomandibular Disorders and divided into a symptomatic group (21) and an asymptomatic group (30). Postural analysis for both groups was conducted using photogrammetry (SAPo version 0.68; University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil). The distribution of plantar pressures was evaluated by means of baropodometry (Footwork software), at physiologic rest and maximal intercuspal positions. Of 18 angular measurements, 3 (17%) were statistically different between the groups in photogrammetric evaluation. The symptomatic group showed more pronounced cervical distance (P = .0002), valgus of the right calcaneus (P = .0122), and lower pelvic tilt (P = .0124). The baropodometry results showed the TMD subjects presented significantly higher rearfoot and lower forefoot distribution than those in the asymptomatic group. No differences were verified in maximal intercuspal position in the between-group analysis and between the 2 mandibular positions in the within-group analysis. Subjects with and without TMD presented with global body posture misalignment. Postural changes were more pronounced in the subjects with TMD. In addition, symptomatic subjects presented with abnormal plantar pressure distribution, suggesting that TMD may have an influence on the postural system. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Intrastriatal convection-enhanced delivery results in widespread perivascular distribution in a pre-clinical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barua Neil U

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Convection-enhanced delivery (CED, a direct method for drug delivery to the brain through intraparenchymal microcatheters, is a promising strategy for intracerebral pharmacological therapy. By establishing a pressure gradient at the tip of the catheter, drugs can be delivered in uniform concentration throughout a large volume of interstitial fluid. However, the variables affecting perivascular distribution of drugs delivered by CED are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether the perivascular distribution of solutes delivered by CED into the striatum of rats is affected by the molecular weight of the infused agent, by co-infusion of vasodilator, alteration of infusion rates or use of a ramping regime. We also wanted to make a preliminary comparison of the distribution of solutes with that of nanoparticles. Methods We analysed the perivascular distribution of 4, 10, 20, 70, 150 kDa fluorescein-labelled dextran and fluorescent nanoparticles at 10 min and 3 h following CED into rat striatum. We investigated the effect of local vasodilatation, slow infusion rates and ramping on the perivascular distribution of solutes. Co-localisation with perivascular basement membranes and vascular endothelial cells was identified by immunohistochemistry. The uptake of infusates by perivascular macrophages was quantified using stereological methods. Results Widespread perivascular distribution and macrophage uptake of fluorescein-labelled dextran was visible 10 min after cessation of CED irrespective of molecular weight. However, a significantly higher proportion of perivascular macrophages had taken up 4, 10 and 20 kDa fluorescein-labelled dextran than 150 kDa dextran (p Conclusions This study suggests that widespread perivascular distribution and interaction with perivascular macrophages is likely to be an inevitable consequence of CED of solutes. The potential consequences of perivascular distribution of

  18. SUPERPOSITION OF STOCHASTIC PROCESSES AND THE RESULTING PARTICLE DISTRIBUTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M.; Fahr, H.; Jokipii, J. R.; Lee, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Many observations of suprathermal and energetic particles in the solar wind and the inner heliosheath show that distribution functions scale approximately with the inverse of particle speed (v) to the fifth power. Although there are exceptions to this behavior, there is a growing need to understand why this type of distribution function appears so frequently. This paper develops the concept that a superposition of exponential and Gaussian distributions with different characteristic speeds and temperatures show power-law tails. The particular type of distribution function, f ∝ v -5 , appears in a number of different ways: (1) a series of Poisson-like processes where entropy is maximized with the rates of individual processes inversely proportional to the characteristic exponential speed, (2) a series of Gaussian distributions where the entropy is maximized with the rates of individual processes inversely proportional to temperature and the density of individual Gaussian distributions proportional to temperature, and (3) a series of different diffusively accelerated energetic particle spectra with individual spectra derived from observations (1997-2002) of a multiplicity of different shocks. Thus, we develop a proof-of-concept for the superposition of stochastic processes that give rise to power-law distribution functions.

  19. A unified definition of a vortex derived from vortical flow and the resulting pressure minimum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, K [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aichi Institute of Technology, Toyota, Aichi 470–0392 (Japan); Sugiyama, K; Takagi, S, E-mail: nakayama@aitech.ac.jp, E-mail: kazuyasu.sugiyama@riken.jp, E-mail: takagi@mech.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113–8656 (Japan)

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a novel definition of a vortex that integrates the concepts of the invariant swirling motion, the pressure minimum characteristics induced by the swirling motion and the positive Laplacian of the pressure. The current definition specifies a vortex that has a swirling motion and resulting pressure minimum feature in the swirl plane, which is simply represented by the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the velocity gradient tensor. (paper)

  20. Uranium and Iron XRF distribution and Fe speciation results

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Dataset 1: XRF image of U and Fe distribution Dataset 2: Fe linear combination fitting data. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Koster van...

  1. Comparison of Plantar Pressure Distribution in Dominant & Non-dominant leg of female Kata and Kumite National Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Dizaji

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the plantar pressure distribution of dominant and non-dominant legs of females who were participated in the kata and kumite national team. Methods: Twelve kumite and 8 kata female athletes of the Karate national team participated in this study. Plantar pressure was measured using emed platform during barefoot walking. After dividing the foot into 10 masks, peak pressure, pressure-time integral, maximum force and force-time integral were calculated. Wilcoxon and U-Mann-Witney tests were used to analyze parameters at a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Results: In comparison of kata and kumite teams it was found that, kata plantar pressure parameters in Metatarsal-2 (p=0.05 and Metatarsals-3, 4, 5 (p=0.04 were significantly less than those in kumite. Also, in comparison of dominant and non-dominant leg, plantar pressure parameters of dominant leg were less in Metatarsal-2 (p=0.04 and more in Bigtoe (p=0.04 and Toes-3, 4, 5 (p=0.03 than those in the non-dominant leg. Conclusion: Results may be indicative different of natures of the two athletic fields in that Kumite has a higher impact on plantar pressure due to higher mechanical loads. Furthermore, the unequal use of the legs may affect plantar pressure because of leg dominance. Thus, further and more comprehensive studies are necessary to prevent exercise-induced adaptations in professional levels and their treatments.

  2. Development of Extended Period Pressure-Dependent Demand Water Distribution Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judi, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mcpherson, Timothy N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-20

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has used modeling and simulation of water distribution systems for N-1 contingency analyses to assess criticality of water system assets. Critical components considered in these analyses include pumps, tanks, and supply sources, in addition to critical pipes or aqueducts. A contingency represents the complete removal of the asset from system operation. For each contingency, an extended period simulation (EPS) is run using EPANET. An EPS simulates water system behavior over a time period, typically at least 24 hours. It assesses the ability of a system to respond and recover from asset disruption through distributed storage in tanks throughout the system. Contingencies of concern are identified as those in which some portion of the water system has unmet delivery requirements. A delivery requirement is defined as an aggregation of water demands within a service area, similar to an electric power demand. The metric used to identify areas of unmet delivery requirement in these studies is a pressure threshold of 15 pounds per square inch (psi). This pressure threshold is used because it is below the required pressure for fire protection. Any location in the model with pressure that drops below this threshold at any time during an EPS is considered to have unmet service requirements and is used to determine cascading consequences. The outage area for a contingency is the aggregation of all service areas with a pressure below the threshold at any time during the EPS.

  3. Surrounding rock abutment pressure distribution and thickness effect of dynamic catastrophic in fully mechanized sublevel mining stope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, G.; Yang, K.; Chang, J.; Wang, L. [Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China)

    2006-12-15

    Numerical simulation was carried out to analyse the distribution of surrounding rock stress with coal seams of different thickness (3.0, 5.4, 8.0, 12.0 m) based on engineering geology and exploitation technology of the 151(3) fully mechanized sublevel caving face in Xieqiao colliery. The research indicates that the variation of abutment pressure has obvious difference in coal seams of different thickness. The effect of abutment pressure distribution in seams of different thickness on coal-methane outbursts was analysed. With an increase in thickness of the caving seam, the research illustrates that the elastic energy resilience is reduced and the capability of resisting damage and deformation is strengthened in coal around the stope. The results show that fully mechanized sublevel caving slows down dynamic catastrophes. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Pressure Ulcers in the United States' Inpatient Population From 2008 to 2012: Results of a Retrospective Nationwide Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Karen; Rock, Kathryn; Nazzal, Munier; Jones, Olivia; Qu, Weikai

    2016-11-01

    Pressure ulcers are common, increase patient morbidity and mortality, and costly for patients, their families, and the health care system. A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the impact of pressure ulcers on short-term outcomes in United States inpatient populations and to identify patient characteristics associated with having 1 or more pressure ulcers. The US Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database was analyzed using the International Classification of Disease, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9 CM) diagnosis codes as the screening tool for all inpatient pressure ulcers recorded from 2008 to 2012. Patient demographics and comorbid conditions, as identified by ICD-9 code, were extracted, along with primary outcomes of length of stay (LOS), total hospital charge (TC), inhospital mortality, and discharge disposition. Continuous variables with normal distribution were expressed in terms of mean and standard deviation. Group comparisons were performed using t-test or ANOVA test. Continuous nonnormal distributed variables such as LOS and TC were expressed in terms of median, and nonparametric tests were used to compare the differences between groups. Categorical data were presented in terms of percentages of the number of cases within each group. Chi-squared tests were used to compare categorical data in different groups. For multivariate analysis, linear regressions (for continuous variable) and logistic regression (for categorical variables) were used to analyze the possible risk factors for the investigated outcomes of LOS, TC, inhospital mortality, and patient disposition. Coefficients were calculated with multivariate regression with all included patients versus patients with pressure ulcers alone. The 5-year average number of admitted patients with at least 1 pressure ulcer was determined to be 670 767 (average overall rate: 1.8%). Statistically significant differences between patients with and without pressure ulcers were observed for

  5. Measurement of pressure distributions and velocity fields of water jet intake flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Eun Ho; Yoon, Sang Youl; Kwon, Seong Hoon; Chun, Ho Hwan; Kim, Mun Chan; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2002-01-01

    Waterjet propulsion system can avoid cavitation problem which is being arised conventional propeller propulsion system. The main issue of designing waterjet system is the boundary layer separation at ramp and lib of water inlet. The flow characteristics are highly depended on Jet to Velocity Ratio(JVR) as well as the intake geometry. The present study is conducted in a wind tunnel to provide accurate pressure destribution at the inlet wall and velocity field of the inlet and exit planes. Particle image velocimetry technique is used to obtain detail velocity fields. Pressure distributions and velocity field are discussed with accelerating and deaccelerating flow zones and the effect of JVR

  6. Rigorous Results for the Distribution of Money on Connected Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanchier, Nicolas; Reed, Stephanie

    2018-05-01

    This paper is concerned with general spatially explicit versions of three stochastic models for the dynamics of money that have been introduced and studied numerically by statistical physicists: the uniform reshuffling model, the immediate exchange model and the model with saving propensity. All three models consist of systems of economical agents that consecutively engage in pairwise monetary transactions. Computer simulations performed in the physics literature suggest that, when the number of agents and the average amount of money per agent are large, the limiting distribution of money as time goes to infinity approaches the exponential distribution for the first model, the gamma distribution with shape parameter two for the second model and a distribution similar but not exactly equal to a gamma distribution whose shape parameter depends on the saving propensity for the third model. The main objective of this paper is to give rigorous proofs of these conjectures and also extend these conjectures to generalizations of the first two models and a variant of the third model that include local rather than global interactions, i.e., instead of choosing the two interacting agents uniformly at random from the system, the agents are located on the vertex set of a general connected graph and can only interact with their neighbors.

  7. Reconstruction of the electron energy distribution function from probe characteristics at intermediate and high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslanbekov, R.R.; Kolokolov, N.B.; Kudryavtsev, A.A.; Khromov, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    Gorbunov et al. have developed a kinetic theory of the electron current drawn by a probe, which substantially extends the region of applicability of the probe method for determining the electron energy distribution function, enabling probes to be used for intermediate and high pressures (up to p ≤ 0.5 atm for monatomic gases). They showed that for λ var-epsilon >> a + d (where a is the probe radius, d is the sheath thickness, and λ var-epsilon is the electron energy relaxation length) the current density j e (V) drawn by the probe is related to the unperturbed distribution function by an integral equation involving the distribution function. The kernal of the integral equation can be written as a function of the diffusion parameter. In the present paper the method of quadrature sums is employed in order to obtain the electron energy distribution function from probe characteristics at intermediate and high pressures. This technique enables them to recover the distribution function from the integral equation when the diffusion parameter has an arbitrary energy dependence ψ 0 (var-epsilon) in any given energy range. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by application to both model problems and experimental data

  8. ZOCO V - a computer code for the calculation of time-dependent spatial pressure distribution in reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfeld, G.; Schally, P.

    1978-06-01

    ZOCO V is a computer code which can calculate the time- and space- dependent pressure distribution in containments of water-cooled nuclear power reactors (both full pressure containments and pressure suppression systems) following a loss-of-coolant accident, caused by the rupture of a main coolant or steam pipe

  9. Analysis of pressure distribution originated over the external plate window of the RA-10 nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gramajo, M A; Garcia, J.C

    2012-01-01

    The RA10 is a pool type multipurpose research reactor. The core consists of a rectangular array of MTR fuel type. The refrigeration system at full power and normal operations conditions is carried out by an ascendant flow through the core. To ensure the refrigeration in the sub-channel formed between two adjacent fuels, there is a window orifice over the outer fuel plate. Part of the coolant flow that gets into the fuel will be derived by the window orifice to the sub-channel. Due to the change in the coolant flow direction is necessary to establish the pressure distribution originated over the window In order to achieve this goal a CFD commercial code (FLUENT v6.3.26) was used to perform numerical simulations to obtain the pressure distribution over the window. A quarter of the fuel was modeled using proper symmetry and boundaries conditions (author)

  10. Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a rough flat plate impinged by a slot air jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meda, Adimurthy; Katti, Vadiraj V.

    2017-08-01

    The present work experimentally investigates the local distribution of wall static pressure and the heat transfer coefficient on a rough flat plate impinged by a slot air jet. The experimental parameters include, nozzle-to-plate spacing (Z /D h = 0.5-10.0), axial distance from stagnation point ( x/D h ), size of detached rib ( b = 4-12 mm) and Reynolds number ( Re = 2500-20,000). The wall static pressure on the surface is recorded using a Pitot tube and a differential pressure transmitter. Infrared thermal imaging technique is used to capture the temperature distribution on the target surface. It is observed that, the maximum wall static pressure occurs at the stagnation point ( x/D h = 0) for all nozzle-to-plate spacing ( Z/D h ) and rib dimensions studied. Coefficient of wall static pressure ( C p ) decreases monotonically with x/D h . Sub atmospheric pressure is evident in the detached rib configurations for jet to plate spacing up to 6.0 for all ribs studied. Sub atmospheric region is stronger at Z/D h = 0.5 due to the fluid accelerating under the rib. As nozzle to plate spacing ( Z/D h ) increases, the sub-atmospheric region becomes weak and vanishes gradually. Reasonable enhancement in both C p as well as Nu is observed for the detached rib configuration. Enhancement is found to decrease with the increase in the rib width. The results of the study can be used in optimizing the cooling system design.

  11. [Analysis on geographic distribution of high blood pressure prevalence in children and adolescents aged 7-18 years in China, 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Y H; Zou, Z Y; Wang, Z H; Wang, S; Yang, Z P; Chen, Y J; Ma, J

    2017-07-10

    Objective: To understand and evaluate the characteristics of geographic distribution of high blood pressure prevalence in children and adolescents aged 7-18 years in China in 2014, and provide evidence for the prevention of hypertension in children and adolescents. Methods: The data of 2014 Chinese National Surveys on Students Constitution and Health conducting 31 provinces (except Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan) were collected. A total of 216 299 children and adolescents who had complete blood pressure records were selected as study subjects. The low, middle and high prevalence areas were identified according to their high blood pressure detection rates in the children and adolescents,7 % , to analyze the geographic distribution of high blood pressure prevalence in the children and adolescents. The environmental data in the capitals of 31 provinces in 2014 were collected to analyze the correlation between environmental factors and blood pressure Z score in the children and adolescents. Results: The average detection rates of high blood pressure was 6.4 % in 31 provinces (1.5 % -14.2 % ). The high prevalence areas were mainly distributed in the eastern China, especially the Circum-Bohai sea area, low prevalence areas were mainly distributed in the central and western areas of China and some provinces in the east. Correlation analysis results showed that the annual average temperature, annual average air humidity and local altitude were negatively correlated with blood pressure Z score, including diastolic and systolic blood pressure, in both boys and girls. The annual average sunshine time, PM(2.5) and PM(10) concentrations, content of SO(2) were positively correlated with blood pressure Z score in both boys and girls. Conclusions: There was a significant difference in high blood pressure of children and adolescents among 31 provinces. More attention should be paid to the children and adolescents living high prevalence area. And it is necessary to understand

  12. Analysis of the Elastic Large Deflection Behavior for Metal Plates under Nonuniformly Distributed Lateral Pressure with In-Plane Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeom Kee Paik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Galerkin method is applied to analyze the elastic large deflection behavior of metal plates subject to a combination of in-plane loads such as biaxial loads, edge shear and biaxial inplane bending moments, and uniformly or nonuniformly distributed lateral pressure loads. The motive of the present study was initiated by the fact that metal plates of ships and ship-shaped offshore structures at sea are often subjected to non-uniformly distributed lateral pressure loads arising from cargo or water pressure, together with inplane axial loads or inplane bending moments, but the current practice of the maritime industry usually applies some simplified design methods assuming that the non-uniform pressure distribution in the plates can be replaced by an equivalence of uniform pressure distribution. Applied examples are presented, demonstrating that the current plate design methods of the maritime industry may be inappropriate when the non-uniformity of lateral pressure loads becomes more significant.

  13. Feasibility of Locating Leakages in Sewage Pressure Pipes Using the Distributed Temperature Sensing Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Apperl, Benjamin; Pressl, Alexander; Schulz, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The cost effective maintenance of underwater pressure pipes for sewage disposal in Austria requires the detection and localization of leakages. Extrusion of wastewater in lakes can heavily influence the water and bathing quality of surrounding waters. The Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology is a widely used technique for oil and gas pipeline leakage detection. While in pipeline leakage detection, fiber optic cables are installed permanently at the outside or within the protective...

  14. Distributional, differential and integral problems: Equivalence and existence results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Monteiro, Giselle Antunes; Satco, B. R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 2017, č. 7 (2017), s. 1-26 ISSN 1417-3875 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : derivative with respect to functions * distribution * Kurzweil-Stieltjes integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.926, year: 2016 http://www.math.u-szeged.hu/ejqtde/periodica.html?periodica=1¶mtipus_ertek= publication ¶m_ertek=4753

  15. Baryonic distributions in galaxy dark matter haloes - II. Final results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Emily E.; van Zee, L.; Barnes, K. L.; Staudaher, S.; Dale, D. A.; Braun, T. T.; Wavle, D. C.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Bullock, J. S.; Chandar, R.

    2018-06-01

    Re-creating the observed diversity in the organization of baryonic mass within dark matter haloes represents a key challenge for galaxy formation models. To address the growth of galaxy discs in dark matter haloes, we have constrained the distribution of baryonic and non-baryonic matter in a statistically representative sample of 44 nearby galaxies defined from the Extended Disk Galaxy Exploration Science (EDGES) Survey. The gravitational potentials of each galaxy are traced using rotation curves derived from new and archival radio synthesis observations of neutral hydrogen (H I). The measured rotation curves are decomposed into baryonic and dark matter halo components using 3.6 μm images for the stellar content, the H I observations for the atomic gas component, and, when available, CO data from the literature for the molecular gas component. The H I kinematics are supplemented with optical integral field spectroscopic (IFS) observations to measure the central ionized gas kinematics in 26 galaxies, including 13 galaxies that are presented for the first time in this paper. Distributions of baryonic-to-total mass ratios are determined from the rotation curve decompositions under different assumptions about the contribution of the stellar component and are compared to global and radial properties of the dominant stellar populations extracted from optical and near-infrared photometry. Galaxies are grouped into clusters of similar baryonic-to-total mass distributions to examine whether they also exhibit similar star and gas properties. The radial distribution of baryonic-to-total mass in a galaxy does not appear to correlate with any characteristics of its star formation history.

  16. Electron Pitch-Angle Distribution in Pressure Balance Structures Measured by Ulysses/SWOOPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Yohei; Suess, Steven T.; Sakurai, Takashi; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common feature in the high-latitude solar wind near solar minimum. From previous studies, PBSs are believed to be remnants of coronal plumes. Yamauchi et al [2002] investigated the magnetic structures of the PBSs, applying a minimum variance analysis to Ulysses/Magnetometer data. They found that PBSs contain structures like current sheets or plasmoids, and suggested that PBSs are associated with network activity such as magnetic reconnection in the photosphere at the base of polar plumes. We have investigated energetic electron data from Ulysses/SWOOPS to see whether bi-directional electron flow exists and we have found evidence supporting the earlier conclusions. We find that 45 ot of 53 PBSs show local bi-directional or isotopic electron flux or flux associated with current-sheet structure. Only five events show the pitch-angle distribution expected for Alfvenic fluctuations. We conclude that PBSs do contain magnetic structures such as current sheets or plasmoids that are expected as a result of network activity at the base of polar plumes.

  17. Computations for the 1:5 model of the THTR pressure vessel compared with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stangenberg, F.

    1972-01-01

    In this report experimental results measured at the 1:5-model of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel of the THTR-nuclear power station Schmehausen in 1971, are compared with the results of axis-symmetrical computations. Linear-elastic computations were performed as well as approximate computations for overload pressures taking into consideration the influences of the load history (prestressing, temperature, creep) and the effects of the steel components. (orig.) [de

  18. A single-stage high pressure steam injector for next generation reactors: test results and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattadori, G.; Galbiati, L.; Mazzocchi, L.; Vanini, P.

    1995-01-01

    Steam injectors can be used in advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) for high pressure makeup water supply; this solution seems to be very attractive because of the ''passive'' features of steam injectors, that would take advantage of the available energy from primary steam without the introduction of any rotating machinery. The reference application considered in this work is a high pressure safety injection system for a BWR; a water flow rate of about 60 kg/s to be delivered against primary pressures covering a quite wide range up to 9 MPa is required. Nevertheless, steam driven water injectors with similar characteristics could be used to satisfy the high pressure core coolant makeup requirements of next generation PWRs. With regard to BWR application, an instrumented steam injector prototype with a flow rate scaling factor of about 1:6 has been built and tested. The tested steam injector operates at a constant inlet water pressure (about 0.2 MPa) and inlet water temperature ranging from 15 to 37 o C, with steam pressure ranging from 2.5 to 8.7 MPa, always fulfilling the discharge pressure target (10% higher than steam pressure). To achieve these results an original double-overflow flow rate-control/startup system has been developed. (Author)

  19. Comparison of plantar pressure distribution between three different shoes and three common movements in futsal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghdad Teymouri

    Full Text Available Analysis of in-shoe pressure distribution during sport-specific movements may provide a clue to improve shoe design and prevent injuries. This study compared the mean and the peak pressures over the whole foot and ten separate areas of the foot, wearing different shoes during specific movements.Nine male adult recreational futsal players performed three trials of three sport-specific movements (shuffle, sprint and penalty kick, while they were wearing three brands of futsal shoes (Adidas, Lotto and Tiger. Plantar pressures on dominant feet were collected using the F-SCAN system. Peak and mean pressures for whole foot and each separate area were extracted. For statistical analysis, the mean differences in outcome variables between different shoes and movements were estimated using random-effects regression model using STATA ver.10.In the average calculation of the three movements, the peak pressure on the whole foot in Adidas shoe was less than Lotto [8.8% (CI95%: 4.1-13.6%] and Tiger shoes [11.8% (CI95%:7-16.7%], (P<0.001. Also, the recorded peak pressure on the whole foot in penalty kick was 61.1% (CI95%: 56.3-65.9% and 57.6% (CI95%: 52.8-62.3% less than Shuffle and Sprint tests, respectively (P<0.001.Areas with the highest peak pressure during all 3 movements were not different between all shoes. This area was medial forefoot in cases of shuffle and sprint movements and medial heel in case of penalty kick.

  20. Comparison of plantar pressure distribution between three different shoes and three common movements in futsal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymouri, Meghdad; Halabchi, Farzin; Mirshahi, Maryam; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali; Mousavi Ahranjani, Ali; Sadeghi, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of in-shoe pressure distribution during sport-specific movements may provide a clue to improve shoe design and prevent injuries. This study compared the mean and the peak pressures over the whole foot and ten separate areas of the foot, wearing different shoes during specific movements. Nine male adult recreational futsal players performed three trials of three sport-specific movements (shuffle, sprint and penalty kick), while they were wearing three brands of futsal shoes (Adidas, Lotto and Tiger). Plantar pressures on dominant feet were collected using the F-SCAN system. Peak and mean pressures for whole foot and each separate area were extracted. For statistical analysis, the mean differences in outcome variables between different shoes and movements were estimated using random-effects regression model using STATA ver.10. In the average calculation of the three movements, the peak pressure on the whole foot in Adidas shoe was less than Lotto [8.8% (CI95%: 4.1-13.6%)] and Tiger shoes [11.8% (CI95%:7-16.7%)], (P<0.001). Also, the recorded peak pressure on the whole foot in penalty kick was 61.1% (CI95%: 56.3-65.9%) and 57.6% (CI95%: 52.8-62.3%) less than Shuffle and Sprint tests, respectively (P<0.001). Areas with the highest peak pressure during all 3 movements were not different between all shoes. This area was medial forefoot in cases of shuffle and sprint movements and medial heel in case of penalty kick.

  1. Lattice results for low moments of light meson distribution amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, R.; Boyle, P.A. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). SUPA, School of Physics; Broemmel, D.; Flynn, J.M.; Rae, T.D.; Sachrajda, C.T.C. [Southampton Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Donnellan, M.A. [NIC/DESY Zeuthen (Germany); Juettner, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). Physics Dept.

    2010-12-15

    As part of the UKQCD and RBC collaborations' N{sub f} = 2+1 domain-wall fermion phenomenology programme, we calculate the first two moments of the light-cone distribution amplitudes of the pseudoscalar mesons {pi} and K and the (longitudinally-polarised) vector mesons {rho}, K{sup *} and {phi}. We obtain the desired quantities with good precision and are able to discern the expected quark-mass dependence of SU(3)-flavour breaking effects. An important ingredient of the calculation is the nonperturbative renormalisation of lattice operators using the RI{sup '}/MOM technique. (orig.)

  2. Lattice Results for Low Moments of Light Meson Distribution Amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Arthur, R; Brommel, D; Donnellan, M A; Flynn, J M; Juttner, A; Rae, T D; Sachrajda, C T.C

    2011-01-01

    As part of the UKQCD and RBC collaborations' N_f=2+1 domain-wall fermion phenomenology programme, we calculate the first two moments of the light-cone distribution amplitudes of the pseudoscalar mesons pion and kaon and the (longitudinally-polarised) vector mesons rho, K-star and phi. We obtain the desired quantities with good precision and are able to discern the expected quark-mass dependence of SU(3)-flavour breaking effects. An important ingredient of the calculation is the nonperturbative renormalisation of lattice operators using the RI'/MOM technique.

  3. Lattice results for low moments of light meson distribution amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, R.; Boyle, P.A.; Juettner, A.

    2010-12-01

    As part of the UKQCD and RBC collaborations' N f = 2+1 domain-wall fermion phenomenology programme, we calculate the first two moments of the light-cone distribution amplitudes of the pseudoscalar mesons π and K and the (longitudinally-polarised) vector mesons ρ, K * and φ. We obtain the desired quantities with good precision and are able to discern the expected quark-mass dependence of SU(3)-flavour breaking effects. An important ingredient of the calculation is the nonperturbative renormalisation of lattice operators using the RI ' /MOM technique. (orig.)

  4. Quantitative Assessment of the Impact of Blood Pulsation on Intraocular Pressure Measurement Results in Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Koprowski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Blood pulsation affects the results obtained using various medical devices in many different ways. Method. The paper proves the effect of blood pulsation on intraocular pressure measurements. Six measurements for each of the 10 healthy subjects were performed in various phases of blood pulsation. A total of 8400 corneal deformation images were recorded. The results of intraocular pressure measurements were related to the results of heartbeat phases measured with a pulse oximeter placed on the index finger of the subject’s left hand. Results. The correlation between the heartbeat phase measured with a pulse oximeter and intraocular pressure is 0.69±0.26 (p<0.05. The phase shift calculated for the maximum correlation is equal to 60±40° (p<0.05. When the moment of measuring intraocular pressure with an air-puff tonometer is not synchronized, the changes in IOP for the analysed group of subjects can vary in the range of ±2.31 mmHg (p<0.3. Conclusions. Blood pulsation has a statistically significant effect on the results of intraocular pressure measurement. For this reason, in modern ophthalmic devices, the measurement should be synchronized with the heartbeat phases. The paper proposes an additional method for synchronizing the time of pressure measurement with the blood pulsation phase.

  5. Results of Propellant Mixing Variable Study Using Precise Pressure-Based Burn Rate Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanski, Philip L.

    2014-01-01

    A designed experiment was conducted in which three mix processing variables (pre-curative addition mix temperature, pre-curative addition mixing time, and mixer speed) were varied to estimate their effects on within-mix propellant burn rate variability. The chosen discriminator for the experiment was the 2-inch diameter by 4-inch long (2x4) Center-Perforated (CP) ballistic evaluation motor. Motor nozzle throat diameters were sized to produce a common targeted chamber pressure. Initial data analysis did not show a statistically significant effect. Because propellant burn rate must be directly related to chamber pressure, a method was developed that showed statistically significant effects on chamber pressure (either maximum or average) by adjustments to the process settings. Burn rates were calculated from chamber pressures and these were then normalized to a common pressure for comparative purposes. The pressure-based method of burn rate determination showed significant reduction in error when compared to results obtained from the Brooks' modification of the propellant web-bisector burn rate determination method. Analysis of effects using burn rates calculated by the pressure-based method showed a significant correlation of within-mix burn rate dispersion to mixing duration and the quadratic of mixing duration. The findings were confirmed in a series of mixes that examined the effects of mixing time on burn rate variation, which yielded the same results.

  6. Global model analysis of negative ion generation in low-pressure inductively coupled hydrogen plasmas with bi-Maxwellian electron energy distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Sung-Ryul; Kim, Nam-Kyun; Jung, Bong-Ki; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Yong-Seok; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2015-01-01

    A global model was developed to investigate the densities of negative ions and the other species in a low-pressure inductively coupled hydrogen plasma with a bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution. Compared to a Maxwellian plasma, bi-Maxwellian plasmas have higher populations of low-energy electrons and highly vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules that are generated efficiently by high-energy electrons. This leads to a higher reaction rate of the dissociative electron attachment responsible for negative ion production. The model indicated that the bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution at low pressures is favorable for the creation of negative ions. In addition, the electron temperature, electron density, and negative ion density calculated using the model were compared with the experimental data. In the low-pressure regime, the model results of the bi-Maxwellian electron energy distributions agreed well quantitatively with the experimental measurements, unlike those of the assumed Maxwellian electron energy distributions that had discrepancies

  7. The influence of cadence and power output on force application and in-shoe pressure distribution during cycling by competitive and recreational cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, D J; Hennig, E M; Black, A H

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the response of cyclists to manipulations of cadence and power output in terms of force application and plantar pressure distribution. Two groups of cyclists, 17 recreational and 12 competitive, rode at three nominal cadences (60, 80, 100 rev x min(-1)) and four power outputs (100, 200, 300, 400 W) while simultaneous force and in-shoe pressure data were collected. Two piezoelectric triaxial force transducers mounted in the right pedal measured components of the pedal force and orientation, and a discrete transducer system with 12 transducers recorded the in-shoe pressures. Force application was characterized by calculating peak resultant and peak effective pedal forces and positive and negative impulses. In-shoe pressures were analysed as peak pressures and as the percent relative load. The force data showed no significant group effect but there was a cadence and power main effect. The impulse data showed a significant three-way interaction. Increased cadence resulted in a decreased positive impulse, while increased power output resulted in an increased impulse. The competitive group produced less positive impulse but the difference became less at higher cadences. Few between-group differences were found in pressure, notable only in the pressure under the first metatarsal region. This showed a consistent pattern of in-shoe pressure distribution, where the primary loading structures were the first metatarsal and hallux. There was no indication that pressure at specific sites influenced the pedal force application. The absence of group differences indicated that pressure distribution was not the result of training, but reflected the intrinsic relationship between the foot, the shoe and the pedal.

  8. Elasto-dynamic analysis of a gear pump-Part IV: Improvement in the pressure distribution modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.; Fernàndez del Rincòn, A.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns external gear pumps for automotive applications, which operate at high speed and low pressure. In previous works of the authors (Part I and II, [1,2]), a non-linear lumped-parameter kineto-elastodynamic model for the prediction of the dynamic behaviour of external gear pumps was presented. It takes into account the most important phenomena involved in the operation of this kind of machine. The two main sources of noise and vibration are considered: pressure pulsation and gear meshing. The model has been used in order to foresee the influence of working conditions and design modifications on vibration generation. The model experimental validation is a difficult task. Thus, Part III proposes a novel methodology for the validation carried out by the comparison of simulations and experimental results concerning forces and moments: it deals with the external and inertial components acting on the gears, estimated by the model, and the reactions and inertial components on the pump casing and the test plate, obtained by measurements. The validation is carried out by comparing the level of the time synchronous average in the time domain and the waterfall maps in the frequency domain, with particular attention to identify system resonances. The validation results are satisfactory global, but discrepancies are still present. Moreover, the assessed model has been properly modified for the application to a new virtual pump prototype with helical gears in order to foresee gear accelerations and dynamic forces. Part IV is focused on improvements in the modelling and analysis of the phenomena bound to the pressure distribution around the gears in order to achieve results closer to the measured values. As a matter of fact, the simulation results have shown that a variable meshing stiffness has a notable contribution on the dynamic behaviour of the pump but this is not as important as the pressure phenomena. As a consequence, the original model was modified with

  9. Impact of foot progression angle on the distribution of plantar pressure in normal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Pan, Hui-Fen; Chang, Wei-Ning; Hsu, Chien-Jen; Renn, Jenn-Huei

    2014-02-01

    Plantar pressure distribution during walking is affected by several gait factors, most especially the foot progression angle which has been studied in children with neuromuscular diseases. However, this relationship in normal children has only been reported in limited studies. The purpose of this study is to clarify the correlation between foot progression angle and plantar pressure distribution in normal children, as well as the impacts of age and sex on this correlation. This study retrospectively reviewed dynamic pedobarographic data that were included in the gait laboratory database of our institution. In total, 77 normally developed children aged 5-16 years who were treated between 2004 and 2009 were included. Each child's footprint was divided into 5 segments: lateral forefoot, medial forefoot, lateral midfoot, medial midfoot, and heel. The percentages of impulse exerted at the medial foot, forefoot, midfoot, and heel were calculated. The average foot progression angle was 5.03° toe-out. Most of the total impulse was exerted on the forefoot (52.0%). Toe-out gait was positively correlated with high medial (r = 0.274; P plantar pressure as part of the treatment of various foot pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Collector feedwater supply and stability of the power distribution in a pressurized-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnikov, V.I.; Kosolapov, S.V.; Kramerov, A.Ya.

    1980-01-01

    It is necessary to determine how the collector feedwater supply affects the disposition of the stability limits and the instability period for the power distribution in such a reactor. The main reason for the fluctuations in feedwater flow rate were shown by additional calculations with the general power regulator switched out to be due to instability on the fundamental in the neutron distribution. The power-level fluctuations are due to oscillation of the feed valve in the level regulator, and consequently to oscillations in the feedwater flow rate. If collector feed is to be employed, it is desirable to improve the response of the pressure control system for the separator drum, because under certain emergency conditions there will be a considerable fall in pressure in the separator drum. The deviation from saturation for the water in the separator drum tube is less in the second method than it is in the first, so the cavitation margin in the principal pumps may be reduced somewhat. Calculations show that this reduction will not occur if the time constant of the turbine synchronizer is about 10 sec. Also, the dynamic characteristics of the nuclear power station in these modes of feedwater supply are appreciably influenced by the parameters of the pressure-control system and the water-level control for the separator drum

  11. Pressure dependence of electron density distribution and d-p-π hybridization in titanate perovskite ferroelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Takamitsu; Nakamoto, Yuki; Ahart, Muhtar; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2018-04-01

    Electron density distributions of PbTi O3 , BaTi O3 , and SrTi O3 were determined by synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction up to 55 GPa at 300 K and ab initio quantum chemical molecular orbital (MO) calculations, together with a combination of maximum entropy method calculations. The intensity profiles of Bragg peaks reveal split atoms in both ferroelectric PbTi O3 and BaTi O3 , reflecting the two possible positions occupied by the Ti atom. The experimentally obtained atomic structure factor was used for the determination of the deformation in electron density and the d-p-π hybridization between dx z (and dy z) of Ti and px (and py) of O in the Ti-O bond. Ab initio MO calculations proved the change of the molecular orbital coupling and of Mulliken charges with a structure transformation. The Mulliken charge of Ti in the Ti O6 octahedron increased in the ionicity with increasing pressure in the cubic phase. The bonding nature is changed with a decrease in the hybridization of the Ti-O bond and the localization of the electron density with increasing pressure. The hybridization decreases with pressure and disappears in the cubic paraelectric phase, which has a much more localized electron density distribution.

  12. MEDEA, Steady-State Pressure and Temperature Distribution in He H2O Steam Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Ulf

    1976-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: MEDEA calculates the time-independent pressure and temperature distribution in a helium-water steam generator. The changing material properties of the fluids with pressure and temperature are treated exactly. The steam generator may consist of economizer, evaporator, superheater and reheater in variable flow patterns. In case of reheating the high-pressure turbine is taken into account. The main control circuits influencing the behaviour of the system are simulated. These are water spraying of the hot steam, load-dependent control of steam pressure at the HP-turbine inlet and valves before the LP-turbine to ensure constant pressure in the reheater section. Investigations of hydrodynamic flow stability in single tubes can be performed. 2 - Method of solution: The steam generator is calculated as a 1-dimensional model, (i.e. all parallel tubes working under equal conditions) and is divided into small heat exchanger elements with helium and water in ideal parallel or counter flow. The material and thermodynamic properties are kept constant within one element. The calculations start at the cold end of the steam generator and proceed stepwise along the water flow pattern to produce pressure and temperature distributions of helium and water. The gas outlet temperature is changed until convergence is reached with a continuous temperature profile on the gas side. MEDEA chooses the iteration scheme according to flow pattern and other special arrangements in the steam generator. The hydrodynamic stability is calculated for a single tube assuming that all tubes are exposed to the same gas temperature profile and changing the water flow in a single tube will not influence the conditions on the gas side. Varying the water flow by keeping gas temperature constant and repeating the steam generator calculations yield pressure drop and steam temperature as a function of flow rate. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maximum

  13. Contributions of mean and shape of blood pressure distribution to worldwide trends and variations in raised blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overvad, Kim

    2018-01-01

    interventions to control blood pressure in the hypertensive population). Our aim was to quantify the contributions of these two phenomena to the worldwide trends in the prevalence of raised blood pressure. Methods: We pooled 1018 population-based studies with blood pressure measurements on 88.6 million......, where relevant. We used a linear mixed effect model to quantify the association between (probit-transformed) prevalence of raised blood pressure and age-group- and sex-specific mean blood pressure. We calculated the contributions of change in mean SBP and DBP, and of change in the prevalence...... participants from 1985 to 2016. We first calculated mean systolic blood pressure (SBP), mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and prevalence of raised blood pressure by sex and 10-year age group from 20-29 years to 70-79 years in each study, taking into account complex survey design and survey sample weights...

  14. Joint reconstruction of the initial pressure and speed of sound distributions from combined photoacoustic and ultrasound tomography measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Thomas P.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2017-12-01

    The initial pressure and speed of sound (SOS) distributions cannot both be stably recovered from photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) measurements alone. Adjunct ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) measurements can be employed to estimate the SOS distribution. Under the conventional image reconstruction approach for combined PACT/USCT systems, the SOS is estimated from the USCT measurements alone and the initial pressure is estimated from the PACT measurements by use of the previously estimated SOS. This approach ignores the acoustic information in the PACT measurements and may require many USCT measurements to accurately reconstruct the SOS. In this work, a joint reconstruction method where the SOS and initial pressure distributions are simultaneously estimated from combined PACT/USCT measurements is proposed. This approach allows accurate estimation of both the initial pressure distribution and the SOS distribution while requiring few USCT measurements.

  15. Seat pan and backrest pressure distribution while sitting in office chairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemp, Roland; Taylor, William R; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, an increasing amount of time is spent seated, especially in office environments, where sitting comfort and support are increasingly important due to the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study was to develop a methodology for chair-specific sensor mat calibration, to evaluate the interconnections between specific pressure parameters and to establish those that are most meaningful and significant in order to differentiate pressure distribution measures between office chairs. The shape of the exponential calibration function was highly influenced by the material properties and geometry of the office chairs, and therefore a chair-specific calibration proved to be essential. High correlations were observed between the eight analysed pressure parameters, whereby the pressure parameters could be reduced to a set of four and three parameters for the seat pan and the backrest respectively. In order to find significant differences between office chairs, gradient parameters should be analysed for the seat pan, whereas for the backrest almost all parameters are suitable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Pressure gradient effect at distributed excitation of 3D TS waves by freestream and wall disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borodulin Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is a continuation of previous experiments (carried out in the Blasius boundary layer and devoted to quantitative investigation of influence of an adverse pressure gradient on two efficient mechanisms of excitation of 3D TS instability waves due to a distributed boundary layer receptivity to free-stream vortices. These mechanisms are associated with distributed scattering of 3D amplified free-stream vortices both on the natural boundary-layer nonuniformity (on smooth surface and on 2D surface nonuniformities (waviness. The corresponding detailed hotwire measurements were carried out in a self-similar boundary layer with Hartree parameter βH = –0.115 in a wide range of the problem parameters. Complex values of quantitative characteristics of the physical phenomenon under study (the distributed receptivity coefficients are evaluated by based on the obtained experimental data. It is found that the adverse pressure gradient leads to reduction of efficiency of the investigated vortexroughness receptivity mechanism.

  17. Dynamic plantar pressure distribution, strength capacity and postural control after Lisfranc fracture-dislocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Walther, Markus; Yilmaz, Tayfun

    2017-01-01

    of life. 17 consecutive patients suffering from a Lisfranc fracture dislocation were registered, underwent open reduction and internal fixation and were followed-up for 50.5±25.7months (Mean±SDM). Biomechanical analysis of muscle strength capacities, postural control and plantar pressure distribution......Substantial progress has been made in the operative treatment of Lisfranc fractures, however, the prognosis remains poor. We hypothesized that Lisfranc injuries change the postural control and muscle strength of the lower limb. Both are suggested to correlate with the clinical outcome and quality...... correlated well with clinical outcome. Altered postural control was evident by a significant reduction in unilateral stance time, from which we calculated a strong correlation between stance time and the isokinetic strength measurement. Plantar pressure measurements revealed a significant reduction in peak...

  18. Experimental verification of a deep drawing tool system for adaptive blank holder pressure distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Søren; Endelt, Benny Ørtoft

    2012-01-01

    In deep drawing, the strain path in the blank during the forming process can be significantly affected by application of temporal and spatial variation of the blank holder force. In this study, an active tool system capable of controlling the distribution of the blank holder force is presented...... which can be integrated into existing stacked deep drawing tools without need for modification of the press. A working system is presented consisting of a controller, designated volume displacement cavity pressure supply units and a shimming plate. It is applied to the deep drawing of a rectangular...... to the conventional shimming method using paper or metal shims between the tool plates. The tool system’s ability to influence the material flow is investigated by performing a series of deep drawing experiments. Eight different cavity pressure schemes are applied during the punch stroke and the scheme’s effects...

  19. Influence of step rate and quadriceps load distribution on patellofemoral cartilage contact pressures during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Rachel L; Smith, Colin R; Vignos, Michael F; Kaiser, Jarred; Heiderscheit, Bryan C; Thelen, Darryl G

    2015-08-20

    Interventions used to treat patellofemoral pain in runners are often designed to alter patellofemoral mechanics. This study used a computational model to investigate the influence of two interventions, step rate manipulation and quadriceps strengthening, on patellofemoral contact pressures during running. Running mechanics were analyzed using a lower extremity musculoskeletal model that included a knee with six degree-of-freedom tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints. An elastic foundation model was used to compute articular contact pressures. The lower extremity model was scaled to anthropometric dimensions of 22 healthy adults, who ran on an instrumented treadmill at 90%, 100% and 110% of their preferred step rate. Numerical optimization was then used to predict the muscle forces, secondary tibiofemoral kinematics and all patellofemoral kinematics that would generate the measured primary hip, knee and ankle joint accelerations. Mean and peak patella contact pressures reached 5.0 and 9.7MPa during the midstance phase of running. Increasing step rate by 10% significantly reduced mean contact pressures by 10.4% and contact area by 7.4%, but had small effects on lateral patellar translation and tilt. Enhancing vastus medialis strength did not substantially affect pressure magnitudes or lateral patellar translation, but did shift contact pressure medially toward the patellar median ridge. Thus, the model suggests that step rate tends to primarily modulate the magnitude of contact pressure and contact area, while vastus medialis strengthening has the potential to alter mediolateral pressure locations. These results are relevant to consider in the design of interventions used to prevent or treat patellofemoral pain in runners. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Leakage Reduction in Water Distribution Systems with Efficient Placement and Control of Pressure Reducing Valves Using Soft Computing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gupta

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of leakages in a water distribution system (WDS is one of the major concerns of water industries. Leakages depend on pressure, hence installing pressure reducing valves (PRVs in the water network is a successful techniques for reducing leakages. Determining the number of valves, their locations, and optimal control setting are the challenges faced. This paper presents a new algorithm-based rule for determining the location of valves in a WDS having a variable demand pattern, which results in more favorable optimization of PRV localization than that caused by previous techniques. A multiobjective genetic algorithm (NSGA-II was used to determine the optimized control value of PRVs and to minimize the leakage rate in the WDS. Minimum required pressure was maintained at all nodes to avoid pressure deficiency at any node. Proposed methodology is applied in a benchmark WDS and after using PRVs, the average leakage rate was reduced by 6.05 l/s (20.64%, which is more favorable than the rate obtained with the existing techniques used for leakage control in the WDS. Compared with earlier studies, a lower number of PRVs was required for optimization, thus the proposed algorithm tends to provide a more cost-effective solution. In conclusion, the proposed algorithm leads to more favorable optimized localization and control of PRV with improved leakage reduction rate.

  1. Effect of Pressurized Metered Dose Inhaler Spray Characteristics and Particle Size Distribution on Drug Delivery Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Morteza; Inthavong, Kiao; Tu, Jiyuan

    2017-10-01

    A key issue in pulmonary drug delivery is improvement of the delivery device for effective and targeted treatment. Pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) are the most popular aerosol therapy device for treating lung diseases. This article studies the effect of spray characteristics: injection velocity, spray cone angle, particle size distribution (PSD), and its mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) on drug delivery. An idealized oral airway geometry, extending from mouth to the main bronchus, was connected to a pMDI device. Inhalation flow rates of 15, 30, and 60 L/min were used and drug particle tracking was a one-way coupled Lagrangian model. The results showed that most particles deposited in the pharynx, where the airway has a reduced cross-sectional area. Particle deposition generally decreased with initial spray velocity and with increased spray cone angle for 30 and 60 L/min flow rates. However, for 15 L/min flow rate, the deposition increased slightly with an increase in the spray velocity and cone angle. The effect of spray cone angle was more significant than the initial spray velocity on particle deposition. When the MMAD of a PSD was reduced, the deposition efficiency also reduces, suggesting greater rates of particle entry into the lung. The deposition rate showed negligible change when the MMAD was more than 8 μm. Spray injection angle and velocity change the drug delivery efficacy; however, the efficiency shows more sensitivity to the injection angle. The 30 L/min airflow rate delivers spray particles to the lung more efficiently than 15 and 60 L/min airflow rate, and reducing MMAD can help increase drug delivery to the lung.

  2. Interfacing systems loss of coolant accident (ISLOCA) pressure capacity methodology and Davis-Besse results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesley, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    A loss of coolant accident resulting from the overpressurization by reactor coolant fluid of a system designed for low-pressure, low-temperature service has been identified as a potential contributor to nuclear power plant risk. In this paper, the methodology developed to assess the probability of failure as a function of internal pressure is presented, and sample results developed for the controlling failure modes and locations of four fluid systems at the Davis-Besse Plant are shown. Included in this evaluation are the tanks, heat exchangers, filters, pumps, valves, and flanged connections for each system. The variability in the probability of failure is included, and the estimated leak rates or leak areas are given for the controlling modes of failure. For this evaluation, all failures are based on quasistatic pressures since the probability of dynamic effects resulting from such causes as water hammer have been initially judged to be negligible for the Davis-Besse plant ISLOCA

  3. Drivers of extinction risk in African mammals: the interplay of distribution state, human pressure, conservation response and species biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marco, Moreno; Buchanan, Graeme M; Szantoi, Zoltan; Holmgren, Milena; Grottolo Marasini, Gabriele; Gross, Dorit; Tranquilli, Sandra; Boitani, Luigi; Rondinini, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Although conservation intervention has reversed the decline of some species, our success is outweighed by a much larger number of species moving towards extinction. Extinction risk modelling can identify correlates of risk and species not yet recognized to be threatened. Here, we use machine learning models to identify correlates of extinction risk in African terrestrial mammals using a set of variables belonging to four classes: species distribution state, human pressures, conservation response and species biology. We derived information on distribution state and human pressure from satellite-borne imagery. Variables in all four classes were identified as important predictors of extinction risk, and interactions were observed among variables in different classes (e.g. level of protection, human threats, species distribution ranges). Species biology had a key role in mediating the effect of external variables. The model was 90% accurate in classifying extinction risk status of species, but in a few cases the observed and modelled extinction risk mismatched. Species in this condition might suffer from an incorrect classification of extinction risk (hence require reassessment). An increased availability of satellite imagery combined with improved resolution and classification accuracy of the resulting maps will play a progressively greater role in conservation monitoring.

  4. A Method of Estimating Pressure and Intensity Distributions of Multielement Phased Array High Intensity Focused Ultrasonic Field at Full Power Using a Needle Hydrophone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Ying; Shen Guofeng; Bai Jingfeng; Chen Yazhu

    2011-01-01

    The pressure and intensity distribution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields at full power are critical for predicting heating patterns and ensuring safety of the therapy. With the limitations of maximum pressure at the hydrophone and damage from cavitation or thermal effects, it is hard to measure pressure and intensity directly when HIFU is at full power. HIFU-phased arrays are usually composed of large numbers of small elements and the sound power radiated from some of them at full power is measureable using a hydrophone, we grouped them based on the limitation of maximum permissible pressure at the hydrophone and the characteristics of the element arrangement in the array. Then sound field measurement of the group was carried out at full power level. Using the acoustic coherence principle, the pressure and intensity distribution of the array at full power level can be calculated from corresponding values from the groups. With this method, computer simulations and sound field measurement of a 65-element concentric distributed phased array was carried out. The simulation results demonstrate theoretically the feasibility of this method. Measurements on the 65-element phased array also verify the effectiveness of this method for estimating the pressure and intensity distribution of phased array at full power level using a needle hydrophone.

  5. Comparison of plantar pressure distribution in subjects with normal and flat feet during gait DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2010v12n4p290

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Felipe Nazario

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the possible relationship between loss of the normal medial longitudinal arch measured by the height of the navicular bone in a static situation and variables related to plantar pressure distribution measured in a dynamic situation. Eleven men (21 ± 3 years, 74 ± 10 kg and 175 ± 4 cm participated in the study. The Novel Emed-AT System was used for the acquisition of plantar pressure distribution data (peak pressure, mean pressure, contact area, and relative load at a sampling rate of 50 Hz. The navicular drop test proposed by Brody (1982 was used to assess the height of the navicular bone for classification of the subjects. The results were compared by the Mann-Whitney U test, with the level of significance set at p ≤ 0.05. Differences were observed between the two groups in the mid-foot region for all variables studied, with the observation of higher mean values in subjects with flat feet. There were also significant differences in contact area, relative load, peak pressure, and mean pressure between groups. The present study demonstrates the importance of paying attention to subjects with flat feet because changes in plantar pressure distribution are associated with discomfort and injuries.

  6. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on distribution dynamics of free amino acids in water soaked brown rice grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigematsu, T.; Hayashi, M.; Nakajima, K.; Uno, Y.; Sakano, A.; Murakami, M.; Narahara, Y.; Ueno, S.; Fujii, T.

    2010-03-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HP) with approximately below 400 MPa can induce a transformation of food materials to an alternative form, where membrane systems are damaged but certain enzymes are still active. HP treatment of water soaked brown rice grain could modify the mass transfer inside and apparent activities of enzymes, resulting in HP-dependent change of distribution of free amino acids. Thus, the distribution of free amino acids in brown rice grain during preservation after HP treatment was analyzed. Just after HP treatment at 200 MPa for 10 min, the distribution of free amino acids was not apparently different from that of untreated control. In contrast, after 1 to 4 days preservation at 25°C, amino acids, such as Ala, Glu, Gly, Asp and Val, showed higher concentrations than those in control. This result suggested that HP treatment induced proteolysis to produce free amino acids. However, Gln, Thr and Cys, showed no apparent difference, suggesting that conversion of certain amino acids produced by proteolysis occurred. Moreover, the concentration of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in HP-treated sample was higher than that in untreated control. These results suggested that HP treatment induced alteration of distribution of free amino acids of rice grains via proteolysis and certain amino acids metabolism pathways.

  7. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on distribution dynamics of free amino acids in water soaked brown rice grain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigematsu, T; Nakajima, K; Uno, Y; Sakano, A; Murakami, M; Narahara, Y; Fujii, T; Hayashi, M; Ueno, S

    2010-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HP) with approximately below 400 MPa can induce a transformation of food materials to an alternative form, where membrane systems are damaged but certain enzymes are still active. HP treatment of water soaked brown rice grain could modify the mass transfer inside and apparent activities of enzymes, resulting in HP-dependent change of distribution of free amino acids. Thus, the distribution of free amino acids in brown rice grain during preservation after HP treatment was analyzed. Just after HP treatment at 200 MPa for 10 min, the distribution of free amino acids was not apparently different from that of untreated control. In contrast, after 1 to 4 days preservation at 25 0 C, amino acids, such as Ala, Glu, Gly, Asp and Val, showed higher concentrations than those in control. This result suggested that HP treatment induced proteolysis to produce free amino acids. However, Gln, Thr and Cys, showed no apparent difference, suggesting that conversion of certain amino acids produced by proteolysis occurred. Moreover, the concentration of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in HP-treated sample was higher than that in untreated control. These results suggested that HP treatment induced alteration of distribution of free amino acids of rice grains via proteolysis and certain amino acids metabolism pathways.

  8. Experimental analysis of considering the sound pressure distribution pattern at the ear canal entrance as an unrevealed head-related localization clue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Xin; QI Na; MENG Zihou

    2018-01-01

    By analyzing the differences between binaural recording and real listening,it was deduced that there were some unrevealed auditory localization clues,and the sound pressure distribution pattern at the entrance of ear canal was probably a clue.It was proved through the listening test that the unrevealed auditory localization clues really exist with the reduction to absurdity.And the effective frequency bands of the unrevealed localization clues were induced and summed.The result of finite element based simulations showed that the pressure distribution at the entrance of ear canal was non-uniform,and the pattern was related to the direction of sound source.And it was proved that the sound pressure distribution pattern at the entrance of the ear canal carried the sound source direction information and could be used as an unrevealed localization cluc.The frequency bands in which the sound pressure distribution patterns had significant differences between front and back sound source directions were roughly matched with the effective frequency bands of unrevealed localization clues obtained from the listening tests.To some extent,it supports the hypothesis that the sound pressure distribution pattern could be a kind of unrevealed auditory localization clues.

  9. Preliminary results on Macroalgae distribution in destructive processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. OSKOLSKAYA

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown, that the destruction of the coastal strip in region of action of Mikhailovsky landslide results in change of species structure and dominant species photophilous Cystoseira barbara on sciophylous Gracilaria verrucosa. In accordance with increasing sediments amount in sea water biomass and the morpho-functional parameters of the photophilous species are reducing, and at the sciophylous are growing. Progressing phenomenon of epiphytism is observed in algal populations in the southern part of researched region which is possible to consider as response reaction, leads to increase a synthesizing surface. Decreasing physiological activity is compensated by growth of the total surface of macrophytes. The increase of a sea water sediments leads to lowering ratio of long and shortwave pigments level of ATP-ase activity and raising concentration of the total sum of pigments in thalli.

  10. ZOCO VI - a computer code to calculate the time- and space-dependent pressure distribution in full pressure containments of water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfeld, G.

    1974-12-01

    ZOCO VI is a computer code to investigate the time and space dependent pressure distribution in full pressure containment of water cooled nuclear power reactors following a loss-of-coolant accident, which is caused by the rupture of a main coolant or steam line. ZOCO VI is an improved version of the computer code ZOCO V with enlarged description of condensing events. (orig.) [de

  11. Observations of Fabric Development in Polycrystalline Ice at Basal Pressures: Methods and Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, D. J.; Baker, I.; Cole, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding and predicting the flow of polycrystalline ice is crucial to ice sheet modeling and paleoclimate reconstruction from ice cores. Ice flow rates depend strongly on the fabric (i.e. the distribution of grain sizes and crystallographic orientations) which evolves over time and enhances the flow rate in the direction of applied stress. The mechanisms for fabric evolution in ice have been extensively studied at atmospheric pressures, but little work has been done to observe these processes at the high pressures experienced deep within ice sheets where long-term changes in ice rheology are expected to have significance. We conducted compressive creep tests on a 917 kg m-3 polycrystalline ice specimen at 20 MPa hydrostatic pressure, thus simulating ~2,000 m depth. Initial specimen grain orientations were random, typical grain diameters were 1.2 mm, and the applied creep stress was 0.3 MPa. Subsequent microstructural analyses on the deformed specimen and a similarly prepared, undeformed specimen allowed characterization of crystal fabric evolution under pressure. Our microstructural analysis technique simultaneously collected grain shape and size data from Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) micrographs and obtained crystallographic orientation data via Electron BackScatter Diffraction (EBSD). Combining these measurements allows rapid analysis of the ice fabric over large numbers of grains, yielding statistically useful numbers of grain size and full c- and a-axis grain orientation data. The combined creep and microstructural data demonstrate pressure-dependent effects on the mechanical and microstructural evolution of polycrystalline ice. We discuss possible mechanisms for the observed phenomena, and future directions for hydrostatic creep testing.

  12. Temperature and stress distribution in pressure vessel by the boundary element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alujevic, A.; Apostolovic, D.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the applicability of boundary element method for the solution of temperatures and thermal stresses in the body of reactor pressure vessel of the NPP Krsko . In addition to the theory of boundary elements for thermo-elastic continua (2D, 3D) results are given of a numerically evaluated meridional cross-section. (author)

  13. Tracer studies with aortic infusion result in improper tracer distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisneski, J.A.; Brooks, G.A.; Neese, R.A.; Stanley, W.C.; Morris, D.L.; Gertz, E.W.

    1986-01-01

    It has been suggested that lactate turnover can be accurately assessed by infusing radioactive lactate tracer into the aorta and sampling blood in the vena cava. However, there may be streaming of newly infused tracer in the aorta, resulting in a nonuniform arterial specific activity (SA). Furthermore vena caval blood may not be representative of mixed venous blood. The authors examined this problem in 7 anesthetized dogs with sampling catheters in the pulmonary (PA), carotid (CA), and femoral (FA) arteries, and the superior (SVC) and inferior (IVC) vena cavi. [1- 14 C]lactate was continuously infused into the left ventricle through a catheter introduced through the femoral artery. The same SA (dpm/μmol) was found in the CA and FA, indicating adequate mixing of newly infused tracer with trace. Three dogs showed differences between SVC, IVC and PA, suggesting a mixed venous sample can not be obtained from the VC. When the catheter was moved into the aorta, wide differences in SA appeared between the CA and FA, clearly reflecting streaming of tracer. These differences also appeared in the SVC and IVC. In conclusion, adequate mixing does not occur between tracer and trace in arterial blood with aortic infusion. Further, VC sampling will not give a consistent mixed venous SA. Therefore, for practical reasons, aortic tracer infusion with vena caval sampling will lead to erroneous turnover values

  14. Effects of electrical stimulation-induced gluteal versus gluteal and hamstring muscles activation on sitting pressure distribution in persons with a spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, C A J; Haverkamp, G L G; de Groot, S; Stolwijk-Swuste, J M; Janssen, T W J

    2012-08-01

    Ten participants underwent two electrical stimulation (ES) protocols applied using a custom-made electrode garment with built-in electrodes. Interface pressure was measured using a force-sensitive area. In one protocol, both the gluteal and hamstring (g+h) muscles were activated, in the other gluteal (g) muscles only. To study and compare the effects of electrically induced activation of g+h muscles versus g muscles only on sitting pressure distribution in individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI). Ischial tuberosities interface pressure (ITs pressure) and pressure gradient. In all participants, both protocols of g and g+h ES-induced activation caused a significant decrease in IT pressure. IT pressure after g+h muscles activation was reduced significantly by 34.5% compared with rest pressure, whereas a significant reduction of 10.2% after activation of g muscles only was found. Pressure gradient reduced significantly only after stimulation of g+h muscles (49.3%). g+h muscles activation showed a decrease in pressure relief (Δ IT) over time compared with g muscles only. Both protocols of surface ES-induced of g and g+h activation gave pressure relief from the ITs. Activation of both g+h muscles in SCI resulted in better IT pressure reduction in sitting individuals with a SCI than activation of g muscles only. ES might be a promising method in preventing pressure ulcers (PUs) on the ITs in people with SCI. Further research needs to show which pressure reduction is sufficient in preventing PUs.

  15. Negative-pressure and low-pressure hydrocephalus: the role of cerebrospinal fluid leaks resulting from surgical approaches to the cranial base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippidis, Aristotelis S; Kalani, M Yashar S; Nakaji, Peter; Rekate, Harold L

    2011-11-01

    Negative-pressure and low-pressure hydrocephalus are rare clinical entities that are frequently misdiagnosed. They are characterized by recurrent episodes of shunt failure because the intracranial pressure is lower than the opening pressure of the valve. In this report the authors discuss iatrogenic CSF leaks as a cause of low- or negative-pressure hydrocephalus after approaches to the cranial base. The authors retrospectively reviewed cases of low-pressure or negative-pressure hydrocephalus presenting after cranial approaches complicated with a CSF leak at their institution. Three patients were identified. Symptoms of high intracranial pressure and ventriculomegaly were present, although the measured pressures were low or negative. A blocked communication between the ventricles and the subarachnoid space was documented in 2 of the cases and presumed in the third. Shunt revisions failed repeatedly. In all cases, temporary clinical and radiographic improvement resulted from external ventricular drainage at subatmospheric pressures. The CSF leaks were sealed and CSF communication was reestablished operatively. In 1 case, neck wrapping was used with temporary success. Negative-pressure or low-pressure hydrocephalus associated with CSF leaks, especially after cranial base approaches, is difficult to treat. The solution often requires the utilization of subatmospheric external ventricular drains to establish a lower ventricular drainage pressure than the drainage pressure created in the subarachnoid space, where the pressure is artificially lowered by the CSF leak. Treatment involves correction of the CSF leak, neck wrapping to increase brain turgor and allow the pressure in the ventricles to rise to the level of the opening pressure of the valve, and reestablishing the CSF route.

  16. Fuselage and nozzle pressure distributions on a 1/12-scale F-15 propulsion model at transonic speeds. [conducted in langley 16 foot transonic tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergraft, O. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Static pressure coefficient distributions on the forebody, afterbody, and nozzles of a 1/12 scale F-15 propulsion model were determined. The effects of nozzle power setting and horizontal tail deflection angle on the pressure coefficient distributions were investigated.

  17. Air pressure distribution and radon entry processes in east Tennessee schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, L.D.; Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.; Saultz, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Many building characteristics have been found to influence radon entry, including building size and configuration, substructure, location of utility supply lines, and design and operation of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. One of the most significant factors is room depressurization resulting from the HVAC system exhausting more than it supplies. This paper represents a preliminary assessment of HVAC characteristics and how they may relate to radon entry. During the summer of 1989, a limited survey was made of air pressure and radon levels in four schools in eastern Tennessee. Short-term samples of radon and pressure were made in all rooms in contact with the soil using alpha scintillation cells and an electronic microanometer, respectively. The pressure difference and radon concentration changes induced by operation of the building ventilation system varied among sites within individual schools

  18. The Influence of Pressure Die Casting Parameters on Distribution of Reinforcing Particles in the AlSi11/10% SiC Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasieka A.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The method of pressure die casting of composites with AlSi11 alloy matrix reinforced with 10 vol. % of SiC particles and the analysis of the distribution of particles within the matrix is presented. The composite castings were produced at various values of the piston velocity in the second stage of injection, at diverse intensification pressure values, and various injection gate width values. The distribution of particles over the entire cross-section of the tensile specimen is shown. The index of distribution was determined on the basis of particle count in elementary measuring fields. The regression equation describing the change of the considered index was found as a function of the pressure die casting parameters. The conclusion presents an analysis of the obtained results and their interpretation.

  19. Binge drinking and blood pressure: cross-sectional results of the HAPIEE study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Pajak

    Full Text Available To investigate whether binge drinking pattern influences blood pressure independently from drinking volume or whether it modifies the effect of volume of drinking.We used cross-sectional data from population samples of 7559 men and 7471 women aged 45-69 years in 2002-05, not on antihypertensive medication, from Russia, Poland and Czech Republic. Annual alcohol intake, drinking frequency and binge drinking (≥ 100 g in men and ≥ 60 g in women in one session at least once a month were estimated from graduated frequency questionnaire. Blood pressure was analysed as continuous variables (systolic and diastolic pressure and a binary outcome (≥ 140/90 mm Hg.In men, annual alcohol intake and drinking frequency were strongly associated with blood pressure. The odds ratio of high blood pressure for binge drinking in men was 1.62 (95% CI 1.45-1.82 after controlling for age, country, body mass index, education and smoking; additional adjustment for annual alcohol intake reduced it to 1.20 (1.03-1.39. In women, the fully adjusted odds ratio of high blood pressure for binge drinking was 1.31 (1.05-1.63. Binge drinking did not modify the effect of annual alcohol intake. Consuming alcohol as wine, beer or spirits had similar effects.The results suggest that the independent long-term effect of binge drinking was modest, that binge drinking did not modify the effect of alcohol intake, and that different alcoholic beverages had similar effects on blood pressure.

  20. Calibration of water distribution network of the Ramnagar zone in Nagpur City using online pressure and flow data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhao, Ramrao D.; Gupta, Rajesh

    2018-03-01

    Calibration of hydraulic model of a water distribution network is required to match the model results of flows and pressures with those obtained in the field. This is a challenging task considering the involvement of a large number of parameters. Having more precise data helps in reducing time and results in better calibration as shown herein with a case study of one hydraulic zone served from the Ramnagar Ground Service Reservoir in Nagpur City. Flow and pressure values for the entire day were obtained through data loggers. Network details regarding pipe lengths, diameters, installation year and material were obtained with the largest possible accuracy. Locations of consumers on the network were noted and average nodal consumptions were obtained from the billing records. The non-revenue water losses were uniformly allocated to all junctions. Valve positions and their operating status were noted from the field and used. The pipe roughness coefficients were adjusted to match the model values with field values of pressures at observation nodes by minimizing the sum of square of difference between them. This paper aims at describing the entire process from collection of the required data to the calibration of the network.

  1. Inverse association between gastroesophageal reflux and blood pressure: Results of a large community based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane Athene J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a cross-sectional community based study, as part of a randomised controlled trial of eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection, the association between blood pressure and symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux was examined. Methods Linear regression was used to examine the association between systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the frequency of heartburn and acid regurgitation in 4,902 of 10,537 participants aged 20–59 years. Results In multivariable analyses, adjusted mean systolic blood pressure was 4.2 (95% confidence interval 1.5 to 7.0 mm Hg lower in participants with daily acid regurgitation compared to those with less frequent symptoms. Similarly, for diastolic blood pressure, a reduction of 2.1 (0.0 to 4.3 mm Hg wasobserved. Conclusion People who experience daily symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux have lower blood pressure than people with less frequent or no symptoms. It is possible that factors influencing nitric oxide concentrations both at the lower oesophageal sphincter and within the vasculature may be involved. This hypothesis requires confirmation. Trials registration number ISRCTN44816925

  2. Pressure transients resulting from sodium-water reaction following a large leak in LMFBR steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    The study of sodium water reaction, following a large leak, concerns primarily with the estimation of pressure/flow transients that are developed in the steam generator and the associated secondary circuit. This paper describes the mathematical formulations used in SWRT (Sodium Water Reaction Transients) code developed to estimate such pressure transients for FBTR plant. The results, obtained using SWRT have been presented for a leak in economiser (20m from bottom water header) and for a leak in super heater portions. A time lag of 50 m sec was considered for rupture disc takes to burst once the pressure experienced by it exceeds the set value. Also described in annexure to this paper is the mathematical formulation for two phase transient flow for the better estimation of leak rate from the ruptured end of the damaged heat transfer tube. This leak model considers slip but assumes thermal equilibrium between the liquid and vapour phases

  3. Aging results for PRD 49 III/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamstad, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Kevlar 49/epoxy composite is growing in use as a structural material because of its high strength-to-weight ratio. Currently, it is used for the Trident rocket motor case and for various pressure vessels on the Space Shuttle. In 1979, the initial results for aging of filament-wound cylindrical pressure vessels which were manufactured with preproduction Kevlar 49 (Hamstad, 1979) were published. This preproduction fiber was called PRD 49 III. This report updates the continuing study to 10-year data and also presents 7.5-year data for spherical pressure vessels wound with production Kevlar 49. For completeness, this report will again describe the specimens of the original study with PRD 49 as well as specimens for the new study with Kevlar 49.

  4. "I Wish We Had More Time to Spend Together...": The Distribution and Predictors of Perceived Family Time Pressures among Married Men and Women in the Paid Labor Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxburgh, Susan

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I examine the distribution of time pressure associated with the roles of marital partner and parent using data from a telephone survey. Results of an analysis of open-ended responses indicate that less than a quarter of respondents are satisfied with the time they spend with their children and spouses. Women are more likely to…

  5. Influence of the excited states on the electron-energy distribution function in low-pressure microwave argon plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanguas-Gil, A.; Cotrino, J.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    In this work the influence of the excited states on the electron-energy distribution function has been determined for an argon microwave discharge at low pressure. A collisional-radiative model of argon has been developed taking into account the most recent experimental and theoretical values of argon-electron-impact excitation cross sections. The model has been solved along with the electron Boltzmann equation in order to study the influence of the inelastic collisions from the argon excited states on the electron-energy distribution function. Results show that under certain conditions the excited states can play an important role in determining the shape of the distribution function and the mean kinetic energy of the electrons, deplecting the high-energy tail due to inelastic processes from the excited states, especially from the 4s excited configuration. It has been found that from the populations of the excited states an excitation temperature can be defined. This excitation temperature, which can be experimentally determined by optical emission spectroscopy, is lower than the electron kinetic temperature obtained from the electron-energy distribution function

  6. Development of the test facilities for the measurement of core flow and pressure distribution of SMART reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Y.J.; Euh, D.J.; Youn, Y.J.; Chu, I.C.; Kwon, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    A design of SMART reactor has been developed, of which the primary system is composed of four internal circulation pumps, a core of 57 fuel assemblies, eight cassettes of steam generators, flow mixing head assemblies, and other internal structures. Since primary design features are very different from conventional reactors, the characteristics of flow and pressure distribution are expected to be different accordingly. In order to analyze the thermal margin and hydraulic design characteristics of SMART reactor, design quantification tests for flow and pressure distribution with a preservation of flow geometry are necessary. In the present study, the design feature of the test facility in order to investigate flow and pressure distribution, named “SCOP” is described. In order to preserve the flow distribution characteristics, the SCOP is linearly reduced with a scaling ratio of 1/5. The core flow rate of each fuel assembly is measured by a venturi meter attached in the lower part of the core simulator having a similarity of pressure drop for nominally scaled flow conditions. All the 57 core simulators and 8 S/G simulators are precisely calibrated in advance of assembling in test facilities. The major parameters in tests are pressures, differential pressures, and core flow distribution. (author)

  7. A numerical model for pressure drop and flow distribution in a solar collector with U-connected absorber pipes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bava, Federico; Furbo, Simon

    2016-01-01

    increased, but remained within the accuracy of the differential pressure sensor. The flow distribution was mainly affected by the flow regime in the manifolds. Turbulent regime throughout the manifolds entailed a more uniform distribution across the absorber pipes compared to laminar regime. The comparison......This study presents a numerical model calculating the pressure drop and flow distribution in a solar collector with U-type harp configuration in isothermal conditions. The flow maldistribution in the absorber pipes, caused by the different hydraulic resistances, was considered to evaluate...... the pressure drop across the collector. The model was developed in Matlab and is based on correlations found in literature for both friction losses and local losses, and was compared in terms of overall pressure drop against experimental measurements carried out on an Arcon Sunmark HT 35/10 solar collector...

  8. A study on the pressure distribution in the centrifugal compressor channel diffuser at design and off-design conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jeong Seek; Kang, Shin Hyoung

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to understand the time averaged pressure distributions in a high-speed centrifugal compressor channel diffuser at design and off-design flow rates. Pressure distributions from the impeller exit to the channel diffuser exit are measured and discussed for various flow rates from choke to near surge condition, and the effect of operating condition is discussed. The strong non-uniformity in the pressure distribution is obtained over the vaneless space and semi-vaneless space caused by the impeller-diffuser interaction. As the flow rate increases, flow separation near the throat, due to large incidence angle at the vane leading edge, increases aerodynamic blockage and reduces the aerodynamic flow area downstream. Thus the minimum pressure location occurs downstream of the geometric throat, and it is named as the aerodynamic throat. And at choke condition, normal shock occurs downstream of this aerodynamic throat. The variation in the location of the aerodynamic throat is discussed

  9. AFSC/RACE/GAP/Laman: Model Results of Aleutian Island POP distributions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data supporting the "Model Results of Aleutian Island POP distributions" manuscript are distribution and abundance of Pacific ocean perch from RACEBase,...

  10. Influence of slope steepness, foot position and turn phase on plantar pressure distribution during giant slalom alpine ski racing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Falda-Buscaiot

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the evolution of ground reaction force during alpine skiing turns. Specifically, this study investigated how turn phases and slope steepness affected the whole foot normal GRF pattern while performing giant slalom turns in a race-like setting. Moreover, the outside foot was divided into different plantar regions to see whether those parameters affected the plantar pressure distribution. Eleven skiers performed one giant slalom course at race intensity. Runs were recorded synchronously using a video camera in the frontal plane and pressure insoles under both feet's plantar surface. Turns were divided according to kinematic criteria into four consecutive phases: initiation, steering1, steering2 and completion; both steering phases being separated by the gate passage. Component of the averaged Ground Reaction Force normal to the ski's surface([Formula: see text], /BW, and Pressure Time Integral relative to the entire foot surface (relPTI, % parameters were calculated for each turn phases based on plantar pressure data. Results indicated that [Formula: see text] under the total foot surface differed significantly depending on the slope (higher in steep sections vs. flat sections, and the turn phase (higher during steering2 vs. three other phases, although such modifications were observable only on the outside foot. Moreover, [Formula: see text] under the outside foot was significantly greater than under the inside foot.RelPTI under different foot regions of the outside foot revealed a global shift from forefoot loading during initiation phase, toward heel loading during steering2 phase, but this was dependent on the slope studied. These results suggest a differentiated role played by each foot in alpine skiing turns: the outside foot has an active role in the turning process, while the inside foot may only play a role in stability.

  11. Laterality and Plantar Pressure Distribution During Gait in Healthy Children: Comment on Mayolas Pi, Arrese, Aparicio, and Masià (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zverev, Yury

    2016-08-01

    In a recent paper, Mayolas Pi, Arrese, Aparicio, and Masià reported the absence of significant bilateral differences between legs in the average plantar pressure during walking in six- to seven-year-old children. However, the authors demonstrated bilateral differences in the distribution of plantar pressure during walking independent of foot preference in three tests: kicking a ball with precision, balancing on one foot, and jumping on one foot. From the results, Mayolas Pi et al. proposed that this asymmetric pattern of plantar pressure distribution is not caused by laterality. This paper suggests that the selected age range of participants and methods of diagnosing of laterality and data analysis could have significant effects on the results. Indeed, according to the literature, laterality in humans is a multidimensional trait with poor stabilization and conformity between different dimensions in preschool and younger school children. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Distribution of intraocular pressure and its determinants in an Iranian adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Hassan; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi; Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Shariati, Mohammad; Yekta, Abbasali; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    To determine the distribution of intraocular pressure (IOP) and its determinants in an Iranian population. In a cross-sectional survey, random cluster sampling was conducted from the 40-64 years old population of Shahroud, in the north of Iran. All participants had optometry and ophthalmic exams. IOP was determined using the Goldmann tonometry method and biometric components were measured. Of the 6311 people selected for the study, 5190 (82.2%) participated. The mean age of the participants was 50.9±6.2y and 58.7% of them were female. Mean IOP was 12.87±2.27 mm Hg. In this study 0.3% of the participants had an IOP higher than 21 mm Hg. The multiple linear regression model revealed that sex (Coef=-0.30; 95% CI: -0.43 to -0.17), diabetes (Coef=0.43; 95% CI: 0.19 to 0.67), high systolic blood pressure (Coef=0.02; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.02), high body mass index (BMI) (Coef=0.03; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.04), higher education (Coef=0.02, 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.04), thicker central corneal thickness (Coef=0.01; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.02), and myopic shift in spherical equivalent (Coef=-0.14; 95% CI: -0.18 to -0.10) significantly correlated with high IOP. The IOP in this 40-64 years old population is low overall. In the north of Iran, average IOP is statistically significantly correlated with female sex, diabetes, higher BMI, systolic blood pressure, higher education, thicker cornea, and myopic refractive error.

  13. A new paradigm for macromolecular crystallography beamlines derived from high-pressure methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourme, Roger, E-mail: roger.fourme@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP 48, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Girard, Eric [IBS (UMR 5075 CEA-CNRS-UJF-PSB), 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex (France); Dhaussy, Anne-Claire [CRISMAT, ENSICAEN, 6 Boulevard du Maréchal Juin, 14000 Caen (France); Medjoubi, Kadda [Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP 48, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Prangé, Thierry [LCRB (UMR 8015 CNRS), Université Paris Descartes, Faculté de Pharmacie, 4 avenue de l’Observatoire, 75270 Paris (France); Ascone, Isabella [ENSCP (UMR CNRS 7223), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Mezouar, Mohamed [ESRF, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Kahn, Richard [IBS (UMR 5075 CEA-CNRS-UJF-PSB), 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2011-01-01

    Macromolecular crystallography at high pressure (HPMX) is a mature technique. Shorter X-ray wavelengths increase data collection efficiency on cryocooled crystals. Extending applications and exploiting spin-off of HPMX will require dedicated synchrotron radiation beamlines based on a new paradigm. Biological structures can now be investigated at high resolution by high-pressure X-ray macromolecular crystallography (HPMX). The number of HPMX studies is growing, with applications to polynucleotides, monomeric and multimeric proteins, complex assemblies and even a virus capsid. Investigations of the effects of pressure perturbation have encompassed elastic compression of the native state, study of proteins from extremophiles and trapping of higher-energy conformers that are often of biological interest; measurements of the compressibility of crystals and macromolecules were also performed. HPMX results were an incentive to investigate short and ultra-short wavelengths for standard biocrystallography. On cryocooled lysozyme crystals it was found that the data collection efficiency using 33 keV photons is increased with respect to 18 keV photons. This conclusion was extended from 33 keV down to 6.5 keV by exploiting previously published data. To be fully exploited, the potential of higher-energy photons requires detectors with a good efficiency. Accordingly, a new paradigm for MX beamlines was suggested, using conventional short and ultra-short wavelengths, aiming at the collection of very high accuracy data on crystals under standard conditions or under high pressure. The main elements of such beamlines are outlined.

  14. An analysis of system pressure and temperature distribution in self-pressurizer of SMART and calculation of sizing of wet thermal insulator and pressurizer cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yeon Moon; Lee, Doo Jeong; Yoon, Ju Hyun; Kim, Hwan Yeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    To evaluate the amount of heat transfer from coolant to gas in reactor vessel heat transfer through the structure of pressurizer and evaporation/condensation on surface of liquid pool should be considered. And, also the heat exchange by pressurizer cooler and heat transfer to upper plate of reactor vessel should be considered. Thus, overall examinations on design variables which affect the heat transfer from coolant to gas are needed to maintain the pressurizer conditions at designed value for normal operation through heatup process. The major design variables, which affect system pressure and gas temperature during heatup, and the sizes of wet thermal insulator and pressurizer cooler, and volume of gas cylinder connected to pressurizer. A computer program is developed for the prediction of system pressure and temperature of pressurizer gas region with considering volume expansion of coolant and heat transfer from coolant to gas during heatup. Using the program, this report suggests the optimized design values of wet thermal insulator, pressurizer cooler, and volume of gas cylinder to meet the target conditions for normal operation of SMART. (author). 6 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Influence of hydrostatic pressure on dynamics and spatial distribution of protein partial molar volume: time-resolved surficial Kirkwood-Buff approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Isseki; Tasaki, Tomohiro; Nakada, Kyoko; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2010-09-30

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure on the partial molar volume (PMV) of the protein apomyoglobin (AMb) was investigated by all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Using the time-resolved Kirkwood-Buff (KB) approach, the dynamic behavior of the PMV was identified. The simulated time average value of the PMV and its reduction by 3000 bar pressurization correlated with experimental data. In addition, with the aid of the surficial KB integral method, we obtained the spatial distributions of the components of PMV to elucidate the detailed mechanism of the PMV reduction. New R-dependent PMV profiles identified the regions that increase or decrease the PMV under the high pressure condition. The results indicate that besides the hydration in the vicinity of the protein surface, the outer space of the first hydration layer also significantly influences the total PMV change. These results provide a direct and detailed picture of pressure induced PMV reduction.

  16. Improved PFB operations - 400-hour turbine test results. [Pressurized Fluidized Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollbuhler, R. J.; Benford, S. M.; Zellars, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with a 400-hr small turbine test in the effluent of a pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) at an average temperature of 770 C, an average relative gas velocity of 300 m/sec, and average solid loadings of 200 ppm. Consideration is given to combustion parameters and operating procedure as well as to the turbine system and turbine test operating procedures. Emphasis is placed on erosion/corrosion results.

  17. Results of observations of the dust distribution in the F-corona of the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestakova, L. I.; Demchenko, B. I.

    2016-03-01

    The results of modeling of the distribution of dust in the circumsolar zone are presented. The dust distribution was retrieved from observations of the line-of-sight velocities in the F-corona to the distances of 7-11 solar radii during the total eclipses of the Sun in different years: on July 31, 1981; August 11, 1991; March 29, 2006; and August 1, 2008. Comparison of the results has shown that the dust composition varies from year to year and the dust is dynamically nonuniform. In addition to the dust related to the zodiacal cloud and concentrating to the ecliptic plane, the dust of retrograde motion and the ejections and accretion in the polar regions are observed. From the results of observations of eclipses on July 31, 1981, August 11, 1991, and August 1, 2008, the east-west asymmetry in a sign of the line-of-sight velocities was detected: they are negative to the east of the Sun and positive to the west. Such distribution of the velocities is indicative of the nearecliptic orbital dust motion, whose direction coincides with that of the motion of the planets. In the course of the eclipse of March 29, 2006, almost no dynamical connection with the zodiacal cloud was found. At the same time, the direction, where the observed velocities are largest in value and opposite in sign on opposite sides of the Sun, was determined, which provides evidence of the orbital motion deviating from the ecliptic plane. The results of observations in 2006 reveal a clear genetic connection of the observed orbital motion of dust with the parent comets of the Kreutz family found near the Sun close to the eclipse date. The velocities observed near the symmetry line in the plane of the sky grow by absolute value with increasing the elongation, which may take place, if the line of sight croßses an empty zone that is free of dust. The modeling of the data of observations near the symmetry plane allowed the parameters of the dust distribution near the sublimation zone to be obtained. In

  18. Results of ambulatory arterial blood pressure monitoring in children with obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Öktem

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The relationship between obesity and essential hypertension is well known. In this study, we aimed to evaluate ambulatory arterial blood pressure monitoring of obese and non-obese children who had similar demographic characteristics.Materials and methods: Seventy one children and adolescents (n=39 obesity, n=32 controls were studied. Blood pressure of the children were measured by 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring device.Results: Obese children had significantly higher mean blood pressure values (systolic 121.9±11.7 mmHg, diastolic 70.2±5.3 mmHg than control subjects (systolic 109.3±6.7 mmHg, diastolic 65.1±4.6 mmHg, p0.05. Blood pressure load was found to be increased in obese children compared to the controls (%13.6±12.9 and %2.6±3.4, respectively; p<0.05. Serum total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels of obese children (181.1±33.4 and 131.1±23.1mg/dl were significantly higher than those of the controls (134.3±11.1 and 103.3±14.2 mg/dl, p<0.05.Conclusions: Obesity in children and adolescents should not be regarded as variations of normality, but as abnormality with an extremely high risk for the development of hypertension and hyperlipidemia in adulthood.

  19. 2D modeling of moderator flow and temperature distribution around a single channel after pressure tube/calandria tube contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behdadi, A.; Luxat, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    A 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed to calculate the moderator velocity field and temperature distribution around a single channel inside the moderator of a CANDU reactor after a postulated ballooning deformation of the pressure tube (PT) into contact with the calandria tube (CT). Following contact between the hot PT and the relatively cold CT, there is a spike in heat flux to the moderator surrounding the CT which may lead to sustained CT dryout. This can detrimentally affect channel integrity if the CT post-dryout temperature becomes sufficiently high to result in thermal creep strain deformation. The present research is focused on establishing the limits for dryout occurrence on the CTs for the situation in which pressure tube-calandria tube contact occurs. In order to consider different location of the channels inside the calandria, both upward and downward flow directions have been analyzed. The standard κ - ε turbulence model associated with logarithmic wall function is applied to predict the effects of turbulence. The governing equations are solved by the finite element software package COMSOL. The buoyancy driven natural convection on the outer surface of a CT has been analyzed to predict the flow and temperature distribution around the single CT considering the local moderator subcooling, wall temperature and heat flux. The model also shows the effect of high CT temperature on the flow and subcooling around the CTs at higher/lower elevation depending on the flow direction in the domain. According to the flow pattern and temperature distribution, it is predicted that stable film boiling generates in the stagnation region on the cylinder. (author)

  20. Global direct pressures on biodiversity by large-scale metal mining: Spatial distribution and implications for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murguía, Diego I; Bringezu, Stefan; Schaldach, Rüdiger

    2016-09-15

    Biodiversity loss is widely recognized as a serious global environmental change process. While large-scale metal mining activities do not belong to the top drivers of such change, these operations exert or may intensify pressures on biodiversity by adversely changing habitats, directly and indirectly, at local and regional scales. So far, analyses of global spatial dynamics of mining and its burden on biodiversity focused on the overlap between mines and protected areas or areas of high value for conservation. However, it is less clear how operating metal mines are globally exerting pressure on zones of different biodiversity richness; a similar gap exists for unmined but known mineral deposits. By using vascular plants' diversity as a proxy to quantify overall biodiversity, this study provides a first examination of the global spatial distribution of mines and deposits for five key metals across different biodiversity zones. The results indicate that mines and deposits are not randomly distributed, but concentrated within intermediate and high diversity zones, especially bauxite and silver. In contrast, iron, gold, and copper mines and deposits are closer to a more proportional distribution while showing a high concentration in the intermediate biodiversity zone. Considering the five metals together, 63% and 61% of available mines and deposits, respectively, are located in intermediate diversity zones, comprising 52% of the global land terrestrial surface. 23% of mines and 20% of ore deposits are located in areas of high plant diversity, covering 17% of the land. 13% of mines and 19% of deposits are in areas of low plant diversity, comprising 31% of the land surface. Thus, there seems to be potential for opening new mines in areas of low biodiversity in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Integrity assessment of TAPS reactor pressure vessel at extended EOL using surveillance test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Shah, Priti Kotak

    2008-05-01

    Integrity assessment of pressure vessels of nuclear reactors (RPV) primarily concentrates on the prevention of brittle failure and conditions are defined under which brittle failure can be excluded. Accordingly, two approaches based on Transition Temperature Concept and Fracture Mechanics Concept were adopted using the impact test results of three credible surveillance data sets obtained from the surveillance specimens of Tarapur Atomic Power Station. RT NDT data towards end of life (EOL) were estimated from the impact test results in accordance with the procedures of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2 and were used as primary input for assessment of the vessel integrity. SA302B (nickel modified) steel cladded with stainless steel is used as the pressure vessel material for the two 210 MWe boiling water reactors of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS). The reactors were commissioned during the year 1969. The chemical compositions of SA302B (modified) steel used in fabricating the vessel and the specified tensile property and the Charpy impact property requirements of the steel broadly meet ASME specified requirements. Therefore, the pressure temperature limit curves prescribed by General Electric (G.E.) were compared with those as obtained using procedures of ASME Section XII, Appendix G. The tensile and the Charpy impact properties at 60 EFPY of vessel operation as derived from the surveillance specimens even fulfilled the specified requirements for the virgin material of ASME. Integrity assessment carried out using the two approaches indicated the safety of the vessel for continued operation up to 60 EFPY. (author)

  2. Improvement of the prediction of fluid pressure from the results of techno-geophysical studies under complex geological conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksandrov, B.L.; Esipko, O.A.; Dakhkilgov, T.D.

    1981-12-01

    Results of statistical processing of the data of prediction of pore pressures in the course of well sinking, according to the material of oil field and geophysical investigations in different areas, are presented. Likewise, the errors of pressure prediction, their causes, geological models of series with anomalously high formation pressure, and methods for prediction of pore and formation pressures under different geological conditions are considered. 12 refs.

  3. Low-pressure injection molding of alumina ceramics using a carnauba wax binder: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quevedo Nogueira, R.E.F.; Bezerra, A.C.; Santos, F.C. dos [Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica, Centro de Tecnologia-UFC, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Sousa, M.R. de; Acchar, W. [Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica, Univ. Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, UFRN-Campus Univ., Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2001-07-01

    Carnauba wax, a natural product from Northeastern Brazil, has found application in the processing of ceramics. However, the use of pure carnauba wax is not recommended due to its narrow melting range and poor mechanical properties. In the present work carnauba wax based organic vehicles with the addition of low-density polyethylene and stearic acid were developed for use in the low-pressure injection molding of alumina ceramics. Viscosimetric testing was employed for the determination of optimal composition of the organic vehicle. The optimal content of ceramic powder in the mixture was also determined. All the materials used are easily available in the Brazilian market. A simple ceramic part was injected at low pressures (0.6 MPa) using a semi-automatic injection molding machine. For this purpose a double cavity mold was designed and built. Preliminary results demonstrate the technical viability of the process using the organic vehicle developed. (orig.)

  4. Acoustic emission results obtained from testing the ZB-1 intermediate scale pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Kurtz, R.J.; Pappas, R.A.; Dawson, J.F.; Dake, L.S.; Skorpik, J.R.

    1985-09-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of flaw growth in an intermediate scale vessel during cyclic loading at 65 0 C and 288 0 C is described in this report. The report deals with background, methodology, and results. The work discussed is of major significance in a program supported by NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. Several areas of technical concern are addressed. Results support the feasibility of effective continuous monitoring

  5. Pressure drop and flow distribution characteristics of single and parallel serpentine flow fields for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seung Man; Kim, Charn Jung; Jeon, Dong Hyup; Nam, Jin Hyun

    2012-01-01

    This study numerically investigates pressure drop and flow distribution characteristics of serpentine flow fields (SFFs) that are designed for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, which consider the Poiseuille flow with secondary pressure drop in the gas channel (GC) and the Darcy flow in the porous gas diffusion layer (GDL). The numerical results for a conventional SFF agreed well with those obtained via computational fluid dynamics simulations, thus proving the validity of the present flow network model. This model is employed to characterize various single and parallel SFFs, including multi-pass serpentine flow fields (MPSFFs). Findings reveal that under rib convection (convective flow through GDL under an interconnector rib) is an important transport process for conventional SFFs, with its intensity being significantly enhanced as GDL permeability increases. The results also indicate that under rib convection can be significantly improved by employing MPSFFs as the reactant flow field, because of the closely interlaced structure of GC regions that have different path lengths from the inlet. However, reactant flow rate through GCs proportionally decreases as under rib convection intensity increases, suggesting that proper optimization is required between the flow velocity in GCs and the under rib convection intensity in GDLs

  6. Approximations to the electron energy distribution and positive column models for low-pressure discharge light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, G G; Sheverev, V A; Uhrlandt, D

    2002-01-01

    The applicability of 'fluid' models based on analytic approximations of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and of kinetic models for low-pressure discharge light sources is discussed. Traditionally, 'fluid' models of fluorescent lamps assume that the EEDF is Maxwellian up to the energy of the first excited state. It is shown that such an approach is sufficiently accurate in most cases of conventional as well as of 'highly loaded' fluorescent lamps. However, this assumption is strongly violated for many rare gas glow discharges for mercury free light sources. As an example, a neon dc discharge is studied. The densities of the four lowest excited states and the electric field have been measured. The experimental results can be fairly well reproduced by a kinetic positive column model. This article was scheduled to appear in issue 14 of J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. To access this special issue please follow this link: http://stacks.iop.org/0022-3727/35/i=14/

  7. Brine migration resulting from pressure increases in a layered subsurface system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfs, Jens-Olaf; Nordbeck, Johannes; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Brine originating from the deep subsurface impairs parts of the freshwater resources in the North German Basin. Some of the deep porous formations (esp. Trias and Jurassic) exhibit considerable storage capacities for waste fluids (CO2, brine from oil production or cavern leaching), raising concerns among water providers that this type of deep subsurface utilization might impair drinking water supplies. On the one hand, overpressures induced by fluid injections and the geothermal gradient support brine migration from deep into shallow formations. On the other hand, the rising brine is denser than the surrounding less-saline formation waters and, therefore, tends to settle down. Aim of this work is to investigate the conditions under which pressurized formation brine from deep formations can reach shallow freshwater resources. Especially, the role of intermediate porous formations between the storage formation and the groundwater is studied. For this, complex thermohaline simulations using a coupled numerical process model are necessary and performed in this study, in which fluid density depends on fluid pressure, temperature and salt content and the governing partial differential equations are coupled. The model setup is 2D and contains a hypothetic series of aquifers and barriers, each with a thickness of 200 m. Formation pressure is increased at depths of about 2000 m in proximity to a salt wall and a permeable fault. The domain size reaches up to tens of kilometers horizontally to the salt wall. The fault connects the injection formation and the freshwater aquifer such that conditions can be considered as extremely favorable for induced brine migration (worst case scenarios). Brine, heat, and salt fluxes are quantified with reference to hydraulic permeabilities, storage capacities (in terms of domain size), initial salt and heat distribution, and operation pressures. The simulations reveal the development of a stagnation point in the fault region in each

  8. Foot Placement Characteristics and Plantar Pressure Distribution Patterns during Stepping on Ground in Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sylos-Labini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Stepping on ground can be evoked in human neonates, though it is rather irregular and stereotyped heel-to-toe roll-over pattern is lacking. Such investigations can provide insights into the role of contact- or load-related proprioceptive feedback during early development of locomotion. However, the detailed characteristics of foot placements and their association with motor patterns are still incompletely documented. We elicited stepping in 33 neonates supported on a table. Unilateral limb kinematics, bilateral plantar pressure distribution and EMG activity from up to 11 ipsilateral leg muscles were recorded. Foot placement characteristics in neonates showed a wide variation. In ~25% of steps, the swinging foot stepped onto the contralateral foot due to generally small step width. In the remaining steps with separate foot placements, the stance phase could start with forefoot (28%, midfoot (47%, or heel (25% touchdowns. Despite forefoot or heel initial contacts, the kinematic and loading patterns markedly differed relatively to toe-walking or adult-like two-peaked vertical force profile. Furthermore, while the general stepping parameters (cycle duration, step length, range of motion of proximal joints were similar, the initial foot contact was consistently associated with specific center-of-pressure excursion, range of motion in the ankle joint, and the center-of-activity of extensor muscles (being shifted by ~5% of cycle toward the end of stance in the “heel” relative to “forefoot” condition. In sum, we found a variety of footfall patterns in conjunction with associated changes in motor patterns. These findings suggest the potential contribution of load-related proprioceptive feedback and/or the expression of variations in the locomotor program already during early manifestations of stepping on ground in human babies.

  9. Mean Blood Pressure Assessment during Post-Exercise: Result from Two Different Methods of Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianmarco Sainas, Raffaele Milia, Girolamo Palazzolo, Gianfranco Ibba, Elisabetta Marongiu, Silvana Roberto, Virginia Pinna, Giovanna Ghiani, Filippo Tocco, Antonio Crisafulli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available At rest the proportion between systolic and diastolic periods of the cardiac cycle is about 1/3 and 2/3 respectively. Therefore, mean blood pressure (MBP is usually calculated with a standard formula (SF as follows: MBP = diastolic blood pressure (DBP + 1/3 [systolic blood pressure (SBP – DBP]. However, during exercise this proportion is lost because of tachycardia, which shortens diastole more than systole. We analysed the difference in MBP calculation between the SF and a corrected formula (CF which takes into account changes in the diastolic and systolic periods caused by exercise-induced tachycardia. Our hypothesis was that the SF potentially induce a systematic error in MBP assessment during recovery after exercise. Ten healthy males underwent two exercise-recovery tests on a cycle-ergometer at mild-moderate and moderate-heavy workloads. Hemodynamics and MBP were monitored for 30 minutes after exercise bouts. The main result was that the SF on average underestimated MBP by –4.1 mmHg with respect to the CF. Moreover, in the period immediately after exercise, when sustained tachycardia occurred, the difference between SF and CF was large (in the order of -20-30 mmHg. Likewise, a systematic error in systemic vascular resistance assessment was present. It was concluded that the SF introduces a substantial error in MBP estimation in the period immediately following effort. This equation should not be used in this situation.

  10. [Determination of arm circumference for correct measurement of blood pressure. Results of an intervention study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveras Puig, A; Dalfó-Pibernat, A; Jdid Rosàs, N; Mayor Isaac, E; Pérez-Romero, L; Gibert Llorach, E; Dalfó-Baqué, A

    2015-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of an intervention to promote standardized arm circumference measurement as way to choose appropriate cuff size to measure blood pressure. A before-after intervention study was performed in a basic health care area in Barcelona. Doctors, nurses and pharmacy staff participated by filling out an anonymous self-administered questionnaire pre- and post-intervention (3m). Variables included: demographics, type of professional, years since they finished their studies, availability of different cuff sizes, if arm circumference measurement were obtained or not, knowledge about the cutoff values for each cuff size and type of blood pressure monitor. The written results were given to the participants and presented in sessions. Pre- and post-intervention: 74.3 and 67.3% answered the questionnaires (P=ns), respectively. Determination of arm circumference varied from 1.3 to 19.1% (P=.009). A total of 37.3% and 44.1% declared that they had 2 or more available cuff sizes (P=ns). Knowledge about the correct measurement of the cuffs was 2.7 to 33.8% regarding the standard cuff size (P=.0198) and 0 to 23.5% for obese subjects (P<.05). When more than one cuff was available, reasons for the choice went from: «making a rough guess» or «when velcro stops sticking» before and after the intervention. All blood pressure devices in our primary health care center were electronic and automatic as were those of the 9 pharmacies. The intervention increased the determination of arm circumference prior to the reading of the blood pressure and the knowledge about the cutoff interval for standard and obese cuff size after intervention. There was greater availability of different sized cuffs. Despite this, the choice of the appropriate cuff size was not made based on arm circumference. Copyright © 2014 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. bcc transition metals under pressure: results from ultrasonic interferometry and diamond-cell experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katahara, K.W.; Manghnani, M.H.; Ming, L.C.; Fisher, E.S.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure derivatives of the single-crystal elastic moduli, dC/sub ij//dP, have been measured ultrasonically for b.c.c. Nb--Mo and Ta--W solid solutions. The composition dependence of various electronic properties of these alloys is known to be reasonably well approximated by a rigid-electron-band filling model where e/a, the electron per atom ratio, is the primary parameter. The results indicate that the elastic moduli and their pressure derivatives may also be calculated in such a model. In particular, the dC/sub ij//dP show relatively sharp increases at e/a compositions of 5.4 for Nb--Mo and 5.7 for Ta--W. Both compositions correspond to changes in Fermi surface topology, as deduced from existing band calculations and the rigid band assumption. The results are discussed in the light of related electronic properties and possible geophysical applications. A comparison is also made between ultrasonic results and X-ray diffraction data for Nb. Using diamond-anvil pressure cell, compression of Nb was determined by X-ray diffraction up to 55 kbar in a liquid medium under purely hydrostatic conditions, and up to 175 kbar in a solid medium under nonhydrostatic conditions. The data obtained under hydrostatic conditions agree well with the ultrasonic equation of state and shock wave data, whereas the nonhydrostatic results tend to imply either a higher bulk modulus K/sub s/ or a higher (par. deltaK/sub s//par. deltaP)/sub T/

  12. A numerical model for pressure drop and flow distribution in a solar collector with U-connected absorber pipes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bava, Federico; Furbo, Simon

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a numerical model calculating the pressure drop and flow distribution in a solar collector with U-type harp configuration in isothermal conditions. The flow maldistribution in the absorber pipes, caused by the different hydraulic resistances, was considered to evaluate...... the pressure drop across the collector. The model was developed in Matlab and is based on correlations found in literature for both friction losses and local losses, and was compared in terms of overall pressure drop against experimental measurements carried out on an Arcon Sunmark HT 35/10 solar collector...

  13. The trend of pressure ulcer prevalence rates in German hospitals: results of seven cross-sectional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, Jan; Wilborn, Doris; Dassen, Theo; Lahmann, Nils

    2009-05-01

    Pressure ulcer prevalence rates provide useful information about the magnitude of this health problem. Only limited information on pressure ulcers in Germany was available before 2001. The purpose of this study was to compare results of seven pressure ulcer prevalence surveys which were conducted annually between 2001 and 2007 and to explore whether pressure ulcer prevalence rates decreased. The second aim was to evaluate if the measured prevalence rates of our sample could be generalised for all German hospitals. Results of seven point pressure ulcer prevalence studies conducted in 225 German hospitals were analysed. Chi-square tests, chi-square trend tests and one-way ANOVA to assess differences and trends across the years were applied. The sample was stratified according to pressure ulcer risk and speciality. Finally, study samples were compared with the potential population. In total data of 40,247 hospital patients were analysed. The overall pressure ulcer prevalence rate in German hospitals was 10.2%. Patient samples of each year were comparable regarding gender, age and pressure ulcer risk. Pressure ulcer prevalence rates decreased from 13.9% (year 2001) to 7.3% (year 2007) (pcare units remained stable. With some limitations our study results are representative for all hospitals within Germany. It is highly probable that the decrease of prevalence rates was due to an increased awareness of the pressure ulcer problem in Germany and subsequent efforts to improve pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. The quality of clinical practice regarding pressure ulcer prevention and treatment has improved. However, pressure ulcers are still relevant and require attention. In 2007, one out of 10 hospital patients who were at pressure ulcer risk had at least one pressure related skin damage.

  14. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 1: Pressure distribution. Part 2: Wall shear stress. Part 3: Simplified formulas for the prediction of surface pressures and skin friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Liou, M. S.; Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    An asymptotic description is derived for the interaction between a shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer in transonic flow, for a particular limiting case. The dimensionless difference between the external flow velocity and critical sound speed is taken to be much smaller than one, but large in comparison with the dimensionless friction velocity. The basic results are derived for a flat plate, and corrections for longitudinal wall curvature and for flow in a circular pipe are also shown. Solutions are given for the wall pressure distribution and the shape of the shock wave. Solutions for the wall shear stress are obtained, and a criterion for incipient separation is derived. Simplified solutions for both the wall pressure and skin friction distributions in the interaction region are given. These results are presented in a form suitable for use in computer programs.

  15. Permeability of shale at elevated temperature and pressure: Test methodology and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myer, L.R.; Christian, T.L.

    1987-05-01

    A method of measuring the hydraulic conductivity of low permeability shale as a function of pressure and temperature has been developed and successfully demonstrated. Measurements have been performed on samples of Green River Formation up to a temperature of 140 0 C. For flow parallel to bedding hydraulic conductivities increased nonlinearly from 1.75 x 10 -16 m/s (1.6 x 10 -23 m 2 ) at 25 0 C, to 5.6 x 10 -15 m/s (1.4 x 10 -22 m 2 ) at 140 0 C. This increase in permeability with temperature may reflect an increase in microcrack porosity resulting from the heating

  16. Characteristic of intraocular pressure distribution in population of 1115 Tibetan aged 40 years old or more

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-Qin Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze of characteristic of intraocular pressure(IOPdistribution in population of 1115 Tibetan aged 40 years old or more and its correlative factors such as ages, gender and anterior chamber depth in Tibetan plateau area. METHODS: A total of 1115 Tibetan permanent residents aged 40 years or older from the towns and villages of Qushui County were divided into four age groups: ≥40~RESULTS: The mean IOP of 1115(2145 eyesTibetan permanent residents aged 40 years or older was 12.9±2.7mmHg, 13.2±2.8mmHg in men and 12.7±2.5mmHg in women. The results showed that the participants with anterior chamber depth of 1/2 corneal thickness had 68.8% in 1115(2128 eyesTibetan permanent residents and anterior chamber depth decreases significantly with age(PPCONCLUSION: The mean IOP of plateau subjects was significantly lower from that of plain subjects by approximately 3 mmHg. There are lower pressure, deeper anterior chamber depth in this population of 1115 Tibetan permanent residents. The more attention should be paid to screening for glaucoma in high plateau.

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid pressures resulting from experimental traumatic spinal cord injuries in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Claire F; Lee, Jae H T; Burstyn, Uri; Okon, Elena B; Kwon, Brian K; Cripton, Peter A

    2013-10-01

    Despite considerable effort over the last four decades, research has failed to translate into consistently effective treatment options for spinal cord injury (SCI). This is partly attributed to differences between the injury response of humans and rodent models. Some of this difference could be because the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layer of the human spine is relatively large, while that of the rodents is extremely thin. We sought to characterize the fluid impulse induced in the CSF by experimental SCIs of moderate and high human-like severity, and to compare this with previous studies in which fluid impulse has been associated with neural tissue injury. We used a new in vivo pig model (n = 6 per injury group, mean age 124.5 days, 20.9 kg) incorporating four miniature pressure transducers that were implanted in pairs in the subarachnoid space, cranial, and caudal to the injury at 30 mm and 100 mm. Tissue sparing was assessed with Eriochrome Cyanine and Neutral Red staining. The median peak pressures near the injury were 522.5 and 868.8 mmHg (range 96.7-1430.0) and far from the injury were 7.6 and 36.3 mmHg (range 3.8-83.7), for the moderate and high injury severities, respectively. Pressure impulse (mmHg.ms), apparent wave speed, and apparent attenuation factor were also evaluated. The data indicates that the fluid pressure wave may be sufficient to affect the severity and extent of primary tissue damage close to the injury site. However, the CSF pressure was close to normal physiologic values at 100 mm from the injury. The high injury severity animals had less tissue sparing than the moderate injury severity animals; this difference was statistically significant only within 1.6 mm of the epicenter. These results indicate that future research seeking to elucidate the mechanical origins of primary tissue damage in SCI should consider the effects of CSF. This pig model provides advantages for basic and preclinical SCI research due to its

  18. A perspective on thermal annealing of reactor pressure vessel materials from the viewpoint of experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    It is believed that in the next decade or so, several nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) may exceed the reference temperature limits set by the pressurized thermal shock screening criteria. One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on RPVs is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes recent experimental results from work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the annealing response, or ''recovery'' of several irradiated RPV steels. The fracture toughness is one of the important properties used in the evaluation of the integrity of RPVs. Optimally, the fracture toughness is measured directly by fracture toughness specimens, such as compact tension or precracked Charpy specimens, but is often inferred from the results of Charpy V-notch impact specimens. The experimental results are compared to the predictions of models for embrittlement recovery which have been developed by Eason et al. Some of the issues in annealing that still need to be resolved are discussed

  19. pressure distribution in a layered reservoir with gas-cap and bottom

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-07-02

    Jul 2, 2012 ... Finally, only fluid ratios is recommended as adequate to reveal which ... pressure derivatives, interlayer cross flow, heterogeneity, reservoir characterization, pressure ... sure derivatives to thoroughly understand movement.

  20. Quantification of the toughness distribution in a heavy section submerged arc multilayer reactor pressure vessel weldment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerjak, H.; Prader, R.

    1999-01-01

    In a working procedure qualification test weld representing a heavy section circumferential reactor pressure vessel (RPV) weld tested in 1968, lower toughness values were observed in the top layer region compared to those found in the filler region. Gleeble simulation, extensive microscopic evaluation, diligent Charpy V-notch testing and modelling of the bead sequence and distribution of alloying elements was applied to explain this effect. It could be revealed that the microstructure of the weld metal is the most important factor influencing the toughness. When an 'as welded' microstructure is partly or fully reaustenitised by the adjacent multilayer beads, the microstructure transforms and the toughness increases. In the filler region, 85% of the cross-section consists from transformed microstructure, whereas in the top layer only 20% are transformed. It is quite evident that, accidentally, the notch tip of Charpy samples in 1968 were placed in untransformed microstructures. When the top layer on the inner surface of the RPV is weld cladded by austenitic stainless steel, full transformation occurs and the toughness representing the filler region can be taken into account for safety evaluations. (orig.)

  1. Measurement of electric field distribution along the plasma column in Microwave jet discharges at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razzak, M. Abdur; Takamura, Shuichi; Tsujikawa, Takayuki; Shibata, Hideto; Hatakeyama, Yuto

    2009-01-01

    A new technique for the direct measurement of electric field distribution along the plasma column in microwave jet discharges is developed and employed. The technique is based on a servomotor-controlled reciprocating antenna moving along the nozzle axis and plasma column. The measurement technique is applied to a rectangular waveguide-based 2.45 GHz argon and helium plasma jets generated by using the modified TIAGO nozzle at atmospheric pressure with a microwave power of less than 500 W. The measurement has been done with and without igniting the plasma jet in order to investigate the standing wave propagation along the nozzle axis and plasma column. It is observed that the electric field decay occurs slowly in space with plasma ignition than that of without plasma, which indicates the surface electromagnetic wave propagation along the plasma column in order to sustain the plasma jet. This study enables one to design, determine and optimize the size and structure of launcher nozzle, which plays an important role for the stable and efficient microwave plasma generators. (author)

  2. Aerodynamics of yacht sails: viscous flow features and surface pressure distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Ignazio Maria

    2014-11-01

    The present paper presents the first Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) on a yacht sails. Wind tunnel experiments on a 1:15th model-scale sailing yacht with an asymmetric spinnaker (fore sail) and a mainsails (aft sail) were modelled using several time and grid resolutions. Also the Reynolds-average Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations were solved for comparison with DES. The computed forces and surface pressure distributions were compared with those measured with both flexible and rigid sails in the wind tunnel and good agreement was found. For the first time it was possible to recognise the coherent and steady nature of the leading edge vortex that develops on the leeward side of the asymmetric spinnaker and which significantly contributes to the overall drive force. The leading edge vortex increases in diameter from the foot to the head of the sail, where it becomes the tip vortex and convects downstream in the direction of the far field velocity. The tip vortex from the head of the mainsail rolls around the one of the spinnaker. The spanwise twist of the spinnaker leads to a mid-span helicoidal vortex, which has never been reported by previous authors, with an horizontal axis and rotating in the same direction of the tip vortex.

  3. A low-pressure cloud chamber to study the spatial distribution of ionizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodges, D.C.; Marshall, M.

    1977-01-01

    To further the understanding of the biological effects of radiation a knowledge of the spatial distribution of ionizations in small volumes is required. A cloud chamber capable of resolving the droplets formed on individual ions in the tracks of low-energy electrons has been constructed. It is made to high-vacuum specifications and contains a mixture of permanent gases and vapours, unsaturated before expansion, at a total pressure of 10 kPa. Condensation efficiencies close to 100% are obtained without significant background from condensation on uncharged particles and molecular aggregates. This paper describes the chamber, associated equipment and method of operation and discusses the performance of the system. Photographs of the droplets produced from the interaction of low-energy X-rays in the chamber gas for various modes of operation are presented. The mean energy loss per ion pair for electrons produced by the interaction of Al X-rays in the chamber gas (8130 Pa H 2 , 700 Pa C 2 H 5 OH, 690 Pa H 2 O, 400 Pa He, 70 Pa air) has been measured as 29.8 +- 0.7 eV per ion pair compared with a calculated value of 29.6 +- 0.4 eV per ion pair. (author)

  4. Feasibility of Locating Leakages in Sewage Pressure Pipes Using the Distributed Temperature Sensing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apperl, Benjamin; Pressl, Alexander; Schulz, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The cost effective maintenance of underwater pressure pipes for sewage disposal in Austria requires the detection and localization of leakages. Extrusion of wastewater in lakes can heavily influence the water and bathing quality of surrounding waters. The Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology is a widely used technique for oil and gas pipeline leakage detection. While in pipeline leakage detection, fiber optic cables are installed permanently at the outside or within the protective sheathing of the pipe; this paper aims at testing the feasibility of detecting leakages with temporary introduced fiber optic cable inside the pipe. The detection and localization were tested in a laboratory experiment. The intrusion of water from leakages into the pipe, producing a local temperature drop, served as indicator for leakages. Measurements were taken under varying measurement conditions, including the number of leakages as well as the positioning of the fiber optic cable. Experiments showed that leakages could be detected accurately with the proposed methodology, when measuring resolution, temperature gradient and measurement time were properly selected. Despite the successful application of DTS for leakage detection in this lab environment, challenges in real system applications may arise from temperature gradients within the pipe system over longer distances and the placement of the cable into the real pipe system.

  5. Comparison of analytical and experimental subsonic steady and unsteady pressure distributions for a high-aspect-ratio-supercritical wing model with oscillating control surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccain, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    The results of a comparative study using the unsteady aerodynamic lifting surface theory, known as the Doublet Lattice method, and experimental subsonic steady- and unsteady-pressure measurements, are presented for a high-aspect-ratio supercritical wing model. Comparisons of pressure distributions due to wing angle of attack and control-surface deflections were made. In general, good correlation existed between experimental and theoretical data over most of the wing planform. The more significant deviations found between experimental and theoretical data were in the vicinity of control surfaces for both static and oscillatory control-surface deflections.

  6. Blade Surface Pressure Distributions in a Rocket Engine Turbine: Experimental Work With On-Blade Pressure Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Susan T.; Zoladz, Thomas F.; Griffin, Lisa W.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding the unsteady aspects of turbine rotor flowfields is critical to successful future turbine designs. A technology program was conducted at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to increase the understanding of unsteady environments for rocket engine turbines. The experimental program involved instrumenting turbine rotor blades with surface-mounted high frequency response pressure transducers. The turbine model was then tested to measure the unsteady pressures on the rotor blades. The data obtained from the experimental program is unique in three respects. First, much more unsteady data was obtained (several minutes per set point) than has been possible in the past. Also, two independent unsteady data acquisition systems and fundamental signal processing approaches were used. Finally, an extensive steady performance database existed for the turbine model. This allowed an evaluation of the effect of the on-blade instrumentation on the turbine's performance. This unique data set, the lessons learned for acquiring this type of data, and the improvements made to the data analysis and prediction tools will contribute to future turbine programs such as those for reusable launch vehicles.

  7. First experimental results on the kinetic processes in a surface-wave-sustained argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzada, M.D.; Gamero, A.; Sola, A.

    1995-01-01

    This communication presents an advance of the results of an experimental study of the kinetic processes in a surface-wave-sustained argon discharge at atmospheric pressure. We utilize the study developed by Fujimoto on the population and depopulation processes of the excited levels of atoms and ions. This theory has been applied by S. Daviaud and A. Hirabayashi to explain the kinetic processes in helium plasma at low pressure. Fujimoto has studied the ionization and recombination mechanisms of the plasma under various conditions and its relation to the population density distributions. This study establishes, for an hydrogenic ion with a core charge z, different zones in the atomic system (level map). Each zone is characterized by the dominant mechanisms of the population and depopulation of their excited levels, A level is characterized for the effective principal quantum number p, where p = z (E H /|E p |) 1/2 , E H is the hydrogen ionization energy and |E p | is the energy required to ionize the atom from the level considered. The population of each level p can be expressed in terms of the parameter b(p) defined as n(p)/n SB (p), n(p) and n SB (p) being the actual population and the Saha-Boltzmann equilibrium population of the level, respectively. Figure I shows the population and depopulation processes of a level p, which are both collisional and radiative that are characterized by their respective coefficients

  8. Cold leg injection reflood test results in the SCTF Core-I under constant system pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hiromichi; Iwamura, Takamichi; Sobajima, Makoto; Osakabe, Masahiro; Ohnuki, Akira; Abe, Yutaka; Murao, Yoshio.

    1990-08-01

    The Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) was constructed to investigate two-dimensional thermal-hydrodynamics in the core and the interaction in fluid behavior between the core and the upper plenum during the last part of blowdown, refill and reflood phases of a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The present report describes the analytical results on the system behavior observed in the SCTF Core-I cold leg injection tests, S1-14 (Run 520), S1-15 (521), S1-16 (522), S1-17 (523), S1-20 (530), S1-21 (531), S1-23 (536) and S1-24 (537), performed under constant system pressure condition during transient. Major discussion items are: (1) steam binding, (2) U-tube oscillations, (3) bypass of ECC water (4) core cooling behavior, (5) effect of vent valve and (6) other parameter effects. These results give us very useful information and suggestion on reflood behavior. (author)

  9. Burn-out, Circumferential Film Flow Distribution and Pressure Drop for an Eccentric Annulus with Heated Rod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P. S.; Jensen, A.; Mannov, G.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of (1) burn-out, (2) circumferential film flow distribution, and (3) pressure drop in a 17 × 27.2 × 3500 mm concentric and eccentric annulus geometry are presented. The eccentric displacement was varied between 0 and 3 mm. The working fluid was water. Burn-out curves at 70 bar...... flow variation on burn-out is discussed....

  10. Thin Air Resulting in High Pressure: Mountain Sickness and Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Manuel; Tello, Khodr; Sommer, Natascha; Gall, Henning; Ghofrani, Hossein Ardeschir

    2017-01-01

    With rising altitude the partial pressure of oxygen falls. This phenomenon leads to hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude. Since more than 140 million people permanently live at heights above 2500 m and more than 35 million travel to these heights each year, understanding the mechanisms resulting in acute or chronic maladaptation of the human body to these circumstances is crucial. This review summarizes current knowledge of the body's acute response to these circumstances, possible complications and their treatment, and health care issues resulting from long-term exposure to high altitude. It furthermore describes the characteristic mechanisms of adaptation to life in hypobaric hypoxia expressed by the three major ethnic groups permanently dwelling at high altitude. We additionally summarize current knowledge regarding possible treatment options for hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension by reviewing in vitro, rodent, and human studies in this area of research. PMID:28522921

  11. Plasma discharge in N2 + CH4 at low pressures - Experimental results and applications to Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Henry, Todd J.; Schwartz, Joel M.; Khare, B. N.; Sagan, Carl

    1991-01-01

    Results are reported from laboratory continuous-flow plasma-discharge experiments designed to simulate the formation of hydrocarbons and nitriles from N2 and CH4 in the atmosphere of Titan. Gas-chromatography and mass-spectrometry data were obtained in experiments lasting up to 100 h at temperature 295 K and pressure 17 or 0.24 mbar, modeling (1) cosmic-ray-induced processes in the Titan troposphere and (2) processes related to stratospheric aurorae excited by energetic electrons and ions from the Saturn magnetosphere, respectively. The results are presented in extensive tables and graphs, and the 0.24-mbar yields are incorporated into an eddy-mixing model to give stratospheric column abundances and mole fractions in good agreement with Voyager IRIS observations.

  12. Influence of excited state spatial distributions on plasma diagnostics: Atmospheric pressure laser-induced He-H2 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfared, Shabnam K.; Hüwel, Lutz

    2012-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas in helium-hydrogen mixtures with H2 molar concentrations ranging from 0.13% to 19.7% were investigated at times from 1 to 25 μs after formation by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Spatially integrated electron density values are obtained using time resolved optical emission spectroscopic techniques. Depending on mixture concentration and delay time, electron densities vary from almost 1017 cm-3 to about 1014 cm-3. Helium based results agree reasonably well with each other, as do values extracted from the Hα and Hβ emission lines. However, in particular for delays up to about 7 μs and in mixtures with less than 1% hydrogen, large discrepancies are observed between results obtained from the two species. Differences decrease with increasing hydrogen partial pressure and/or increasing delay time. In mixtures with molecular hydrogen fraction of 7% or more, all methods yield electron densities that are in good agreement. These findings seemingly contradict the well-established idea that addition of small amounts of hydrogen for diagnostic purposes does not perturb the plasma. Using Abel inversion analysis of the experimental data and a semi-empirical numerical model, we demonstrate that the major part of the detected discrepancies can be traced to differences in the spatial distributions of excited helium and hydrogen neutrals. The model yields spatially resolved emission intensities and electron density profiles that are in qualitative agreement with experiment. For the test case of a 1% H2 mixture at 5 μs delay, our model suggests that high electron temperatures cause an elevated degree of ionization and thus a reduction of excited hydrogen concentration relative to that of helium near the plasma center. As a result, spatially integrated analysis of hydrogen emission lines leads to oversampling of the plasma perimeter and thus to lower electron density values compared to those obtained from helium lines.

  13. Pressurized thermal shocks: the JRC Ispra experimental test rig and analytical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, A.; Lucia, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    The paper tackles some issues of particular interest for the remanent (remaining) life prediction for the pressurized components exposed to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) loads, that have been tackled in analytical work performed in the framework of the MPA - JRC collaboration for the PTS experimental research at the JRC Ispra. These issues regard in general application of damage mechanics, fracture mechanics and artificial intelligence (including the treatment of uncertainties in the PTS analysis and experiments). The considered issues are essential for further understanding and modelling of the crack behaviour and of the component response in PTS conditions. In particular, the development of the FRAP preprocessor and development and implementation of a methodology for analysis of local non-stationary heat transfer coefficients during a PTS, have been explained more in detail. FRAP is used as a frontend, for the finite element code ABAQUS, for the heat transfer, stress and fracture mechanics analyses. The ABAQUS results are used further on, for the probabilistic fatigue crack growth analysis performed by the COVASTOL code. (author)

  14. Preliminary results from a high-pressure imaging spectroscopic proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, C.J.; Bazzano, A.; Lewis, R.A.; Parker, B.; Ubertini, P.; Worgan, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    A new type of high-pressure proportional counter, with both spatial resolution and spectroscopic capabilities is being jointly developed by the Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale (CNR), Frascati, Italy and the SERC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, UK. The characteristics of the detector can be optimized for the particular requirement of the experiment, either for x-ray astronomy observations from space, or for the high count rate applications associated with a synchrotron light source. In its baseline configuration, the detector is filled to 5 bar with a xenon/quench gas mixture and will be sensitive over the energy range 5 keV to 150 keV (2.5 to 0.08 A). The positional resolution will range from 500 μm at the lower energies to around 1 mm at the higher end of the energy range. The current prototype has a sensitive area of 200x200 mm. The final version is hoped to have an area closer to 425x425 mm. The very small photon absorption length in the higher pressure gas allows the parallax effect, a feature of 1 atmosphere detectors, to be greatly reduced. The timing resolution (150 ns) of the detector enables both a high-rate capability and the possibility of the escape gate technique to achieve higher spectral resolution at energies > the Xe K edge. Preliminary results are presented showing the spectral and positional resolution for the prototype detector

  15. Results of pressurized-slot measurements in the G-Tunnel underground facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Mann, K.L.; Dodds, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    A rock-mechanics field-testing program is underway at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as part of the YMP. SNL has the responsibility for assessing the repository design and performance as well as characterizing the geomechanical behavior of the rock. SNL has conducted field experiments in G-Tunnel in Rainier Mesa at the NTS, where tuffs similar to those at Yucca Mountain, the potential repository site, are found. Later experiments are planned as part of the YMP Exploratory Shaft investigations at Yucca Mountain. Major geomechanical factors in repository developments are determinations of the stress state and the deformability of the rock mass (described by the modulus of deformation). One feature of SNL's rock-mechanics program was the development of a testing program for cutting thin slots in a jointed welded tuff and utilizing flatjacks for pressurizing these thin-slots on a relatively, large scale. Objectives in the pressurized-slot testing in G-Tunnel have been to apply and possibly improve methods for (1) utilizing the flatjack cancellation (FC) method for measuring stresses normal to the slot and (2) measuring the modulus of deformation of the jointed rock surrounding the slot. This paper discusses the results of field measurements in and around a single slot and evaluates potential applications and limitations. 10 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  16. Effects of naloxone distribution to likely bystanders: Results of an agent-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Christopher; Egan, James E; Hawk, Mary

    2018-05-01

    Opioid overdose deaths in the US rose dramatically in the past 16 years, creating an urgent national health crisis with no signs of immediate relief. In 2017, the President of the US officially declared the opioid epidemic to be a national emergency and called for additional resources to respond to the crisis. Distributing naloxone to community laypersons and people at high risk for opioid overdose can prevent overdose death, but optimal distribution methods have not yet been pinpointed. We conducted a sequential exploratory mixed methods design using qualitative data to inform an agent-based model to improve understanding of effective community-based naloxone distribution to laypersons to reverse opioid overdose. The individuals in the model were endowed with cognitive and behavioral variables and accessed naloxone via community sites such as pharmacies, hospitals, and urgent-care centers. We compared overdose deaths over a simulated 6-month period while varying the number of distribution sites (0, 1, and 10) and number of kits given to individuals per visit (1 versus 10). Specifically, we ran thirty simulations for each of thirteen distribution models and report average overdose deaths for each. The baseline comparator was no naloxone distribution. Our simulations explored the effects of distribution through syringe exchange sites with and without secondary distribution, which refers to distribution of naloxone kits by laypersons within their social networks and enables ten additional laypersons to administer naloxone to reverse opioid overdose. Our baseline model with no naloxone distribution predicted there would be 167.9 deaths in a six month period. A single distribution site, even with 10 kits picked up per visit, decreased overdose deaths by only 8.3% relative to baseline. However, adding secondary distribution through social networks to a single site resulted in 42.5% fewer overdose deaths relative to baseline. That is slightly higher than the 39

  17. Distribution of internal pressure around bony prominences: implications to deep tissue injury and effectiveness of intermittent electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Leandro R; Liggins, Adrian; Uwiera, Richard R E; Poppe, Niek; Pehowich, Enid; Seres, Peter; Thompson, Richard B; Mushahwar, Vivian K

    2012-08-01

    The overall goal of this project is to develop interventions for the prevention of deep tissue injury (DTI), a form of pressure ulcers that originates in deep tissue around bony prominences. The present study focused on: (1) obtaining detailed measures of the distribution of pressure experienced by tissue around the ischial tuberosities, and (2) investigating the effectiveness of intermittent electrical stimulation (IES), a novel strategy for the prevention of DTI, in alleviating pressure in regions at risk of breakdown due to sustained loading. The experiments were conducted in adult pigs. Five animals had intact spinal cords and healthy muscles and one had a spinal cord injury that led to substantial muscle atrophy at the time of the experiment. A force-controlled servomotor was used to load the region of the buttocks to levels corresponding to 25%, 50% or 75% of each animal's body weight. A pressure transducer embedded in a catheter was advanced into the tissue to measure pressure along a three dimensional grid around the ischial tuberosity of one hind leg. For all levels of external loading in intact animals, average peak internal pressure was 2.01 ± 0.08 times larger than the maximal interfacial pressure measured at the level of the skin. In the animal with spinal cord injury, similar absolute values of internal pressure as that in intact animals were recorded, but the substantial muscle atrophy produced larger maximal interfacial pressures. Average peak internal pressure in this animal was 1.43 ± 0.055 times larger than the maximal interfacial pressure. Peak internal pressure was localized within a ±2 cm region medio-laterally and dorso-ventrally from the bone in intact animals and ±1 cm in the animal with spinal cord injury. IES significantly redistributed internal pressure, shifting the peak values away from the bone in spinally intact and injured animals. These findings provide critical information regarding the relationship between internal and

  18. Effect of unstable layer depth on the pore pressure distribution, case study of the Slano Blato landslide (Slovenia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askarinejad, Amin; Secchi, Bandar; Macek, Matej; Petkovsek, Ana; Springman, Sarah

    2013-04-01

    The Slano Blato landslide is one of the largest landslides in Slovenia with a volume of more than 1 mio m3 of moving debris. The landslide is located at the border of Triassic limestone and Eocene flysch formations. Flysch is composed of layers of marls and sandstones. The sliding mass consists mainly of clay and clayey gravel of highly weathered and deteriorated flysch, while a minor part represents grains and blocks of limestones. (Petkovšek et al., 2009). The first documentation of an instability event dates back to 1789 and the landslide was reactivated during a heavy rain period in November 2000. Since then, the ground surface level above the unstable material on the upper zones of the landslide is significantly decreasing so that the current slope surface is now more than 10 m below the terrain surveyed in 1998. The new landslide topography results in different pore pressure distributions in the slope, which were anticipated to have a detrimental effect on the stability and movement regime of the slope. The main goal of this work is to investigate the effect of the overlying debris depth on the pore water pressure distribution during a predefined precipitation scenario. The behaviour of the unsaturated soil and the effects of fissures in the bedrock are also considered in the analysis. Hydro-mechanical simulations were performed using 2D finite element software (PLAXIS) and numerical results are compared with results from analytical models, which use a 1D steady state formulation for the hydraulic part and a 2D limit equilibrium approach to calculate the safety factors. The numerical studies show significant change in the pore water pressure distribution in the landslide body with variation of the debris depth. An increase in the debris depth leads to higher suction due to the deeper location of the water table. Higher suction increases landslide stability due to: i) increase of the effective stress and hence the shear strength of the material and ii

  19. Application of the results of experimental and numerical turbulent flow researches based on pressure pulsations analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalnogov, Vladislav N.; Fedorov, Ruslan V.; Khakhalev, Yuri A.; Khakhaleva, Larisa V.; Chukalin, Andrei V.

    2017-07-01

    The numerical investigation of the turbulent flow with the impacts, based on a modified Prandtl mixing-length model with using of the analysis of pulsations of pressure, calculation of structure and a friction factor of a turbulent flow is made. These results under the study allowed us to propose a new design of a cooled turbine blade and gas turbine mobile. The turbine blade comprises a combined cooling and cylindrical cavity on the blade surface, and on the inner surfaces of the cooling channels too damping cavity located on the guide vanes of the compressor of a gas turbine engine, increase the supply of gas-dynamic stability of the compressor of a gas turbine engine, reduce the resistance of the guide blades, and increase the efficiency of the turbine engine.

  20. Transferability of results of PTS experiments to the integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, E.; Eisele, U.; Stumpfrock, L.

    1997-01-01

    The integrity assessment of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is based on the fracture mechanics concept as provided in the code. However this concept covers only the linear-elastic fracture mechanics regime on the basis of the reference temperature RT NDT as derived from charpy impact and drop-weight test. The conservatism of this concept was demonstrated for a variety of different materials covering optimized and lower bound material states with regard to unirradiated and irradiated conditions. For the elastic-plastic regime, methodologies have been developed to describe ductile crack initiation and stable crack growth. The transferability of both, the linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics concept was investigated with the help of large scale specimens focusing on complex loading situations as they result from postulated thermal shock events for the RPV. A series of pressurized thermal shock (PTS) experiments were performed in which the applicability of the fracture mechanics parameters derived from small scale specimen testing could be demonstrated. This includes brittle (static and dynamic) crack initiation and crack arrest in the low charpy energy regime as well as stable crack initiation, stable crack growth and crack arrest in the upper shelf toughness regime. The paper provides the basic material data, the load paths, representative for large complex components as well as experimental and theoretical results of PTS experiments. From these data it can be concluded that the available fracture mechanics concepts can be used to describe the component behavior under transient loading conditions. (author). 26 refs, 12 figs, 1 tab

  1. Transferability of results of PTS experiments to the integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E; Eisele, U; Stumpfrock, L [MPA Stuttgart (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    The integrity assessment of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is based on the fracture mechanics concept as provided in the code. However this concept covers only the linear-elastic fracture mechanics regime on the basis of the reference temperature RT{sub NDT} as derived from charpy impact and drop-weight test. The conservatism of this concept was demonstrated for a variety of different materials covering optimized and lower bound material states with regard to unirradiated and irradiated conditions. For the elastic-plastic regime, methodologies have been developed to describe ductile crack initiation and stable crack growth. The transferability of both, the linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics concept was investigated with the help of large scale specimens focusing on complex loading situations as they result from postulated thermal shock events for the RPV. A series of pressurized thermal shock (PTS) experiments were performed in which the applicability of the fracture mechanics parameters derived from small scale specimen testing could be demonstrated. This includes brittle (static and dynamic) crack initiation and crack arrest in the low charpy energy regime as well as stable crack initiation, stable crack growth and crack arrest in the upper shelf toughness regime. The paper provides the basic material data, the load paths, representative for large complex components as well as experimental and theoretical results of PTS experiments. From these data it can be concluded that the available fracture mechanics concepts can be used to describe the component behavior under transient loading conditions. (author). 26 refs, 12 figs, 1 tab.

  2. Unimodal tree size distributions possibly result from relatively strong conservatism in intermediate size classes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Bin

    Full Text Available Tree size distributions have long been of interest to ecologists and foresters because they reflect fundamental demographic processes. Previous studies have assumed that size distributions are often associated with population trends or with the degree of shade tolerance. We tested these associations for 31 tree species in a 20 ha plot in a Dinghushan south subtropical forest in China. These species varied widely in growth form and shade-tolerance. We used 2005 and 2010 census data from that plot. We found that 23 species had reversed J shaped size distributions, and eight species had unimodal size distributions in 2005. On average, modal species had lower recruitment rates than reversed J species, while showing no significant difference in mortality rates, per capita population growth rates or shade-tolerance. We compared the observed size distributions with the equilibrium distributions projected from observed size-dependent growth and mortality. We found that observed distributions generally had the same shape as predicted equilibrium distributions in both unimodal and reversed J species, but there were statistically significant, important quantitative differences between observed and projected equilibrium size distributions in most species, suggesting that these populations are not at equilibrium and that this forest is changing over time. Almost all modal species had U-shaped size-dependent mortality and/or growth functions, with turning points of both mortality and growth at intermediate size classes close to the peak in the size distribution. These results show that modal size distributions do not necessarily indicate either population decline or shade-intolerance. Instead, the modal species in our study were characterized by a life history strategy of relatively strong conservatism in an intermediate size class, leading to very low growth and mortality in that size class, and thus to a peak in the size distribution at intermediate sizes.

  3. Stress State of Elastic Thick-Walled Ring With Self-Balanced Pressures Distributed on Its Internal and External Borders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravchuk Aleksandr Stepanovich

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available For the first time with the help of the theory of analytic functions and Kolosov-Muskhelishvili formulas the problem of the two-dimensional theory of elasticity for a thickwalled ring with the uneven pressures, acting on its borders, was solved. The pressure on the inner and outer boundaries is represented by Fourier series. The authors represent the two complex functions which solve boundary problem in the form of Laurent series. The logarithmic terms in these series are absent because the boundary problem has the self-balancing loads on each boundary of ring. The coefficients in the Laurent series are calculated by the boundary conditions. Firstly, the equations were obtained in the general form. But the hypothesis about even distributions of pressures at borders of ring was used for constructing an example. It leads to the fact that all coefficients of analytic functions represented in Laurent series have to be only real. As a solving example, the representation of pressures in equivalent hypotrochoids was used. The application of the computer algebra system Mathematica greatly simplifies the calculation of the distribution of stresses and displacements in ring. It does not require manual formal separation of real and imaginary parts in terms of Kolosov-Muskhelishvili to display the distribution of the physical parameters. It separates them only for calculated numbers with the help of built-in functions.

  4. Pressure-reducing interventions among persons with pressure ulcers: results from the first three national pressure ulcer prevalence surveys in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bååth, Carina; Idvall, Ewa; Gunningberg, Lena; Hommel, Ami

    2014-02-01

    The overall aim of this study was to describe preventive interventions among persons with pressure ulcer (PU) in three nationwide PU prevalence surveys in Sweden. A cross-sectional research design was used; more than 70 000 persons from different hospitals and nursing homes participated in the three prevalence surveys conducted in March 2011, October 2011 and March 2012. The methodology used was that recommended by the European Pressure Ulcers Advisory Panel. The overall prevalence of PU categories I-IV in hospitals was 16.6%, 14.4% and 16.1%, respectively. Corresponding figures for nursing homes were 14.5%, 14.2% and 11.8%, respectively. Heel protection/floating heels and sliding sheets were more frequently planned for persons with PU category I. Despite the three prevalence studies that have showed high prevalence of PU the use of preventing interventions is still not on an acceptable level. Heel protection/floating heels and sliding sheets were more frequently planned for persons with PUs, and individual-planned repositioning also increased. However, when persons already have a PU they should all have pressure-reducing preventive interventions to prevent the development of more PUs. Preventing PUs presents a challenge even when facilities have prevention programmes. A PU prevention programme requires an enthusiastic leader who will maintain the team's focus and direction for all staff involved in patient care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Tailoring electron energy distribution functions through energy confinement in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, C.; Waskoenig, J. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Gans, T. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-08

    A multi-scale numerical model based on hydrodynamic equations with semi-kinetic treatment of electrons is used to investigate the influence of dual frequency excitation on the effective electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma. It is found that variations of power density, voltage ratio, and phase relationship provide separate control over the electron density and the mean electron energy. This is exploited to directly influence both the phase dependent and time averaged effective EEDF. This enables tailoring the EEDF for enhanced control of non-equilibrium plasma chemical kinetics at ambient pressure and temperature.

  6. Effect of dimensional error of metallic bipolar plate on the GDL pressure distribution in the PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dong' an; Peng, Linfa; Lai, Xinmin [State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2009-01-15

    Recently, the metallic bipolar plate (BPP) has received considerable attention because of its advantageous electrical and mechanical properties. In this study, a methodology based on FEA model and Monte Carlo simulation is developed to investigate the effect of dimensional error of the metallic BPP on the pressure distribution of gas diffusion layer (GDL). At first, a parameterized FEA model of metallic BPP/GDL assembly is established, and heights of the channel and rib are considered to be randomly varying parameters of normal distribution due to the dimensional error. Then, GDL pressure distributions with different dimensional errors are obtained respectively based on the Monte Carlo simulation, and the desirability function method is employed to evaluate them. At last, a regression equation between the GDL pressure distribution and the dimensional error is modeled. With the regression equation, the allowed maximum dimensional error for the metallic BPP is calculated. The methodology in this study can be applied to guide the design and manufacturing of the metallic BPP. (author)

  7. Variables predicting elevated portal pressure in alcoholic liver disease. Results of a multivariate analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, K; Christensen, E; Gluud, C

    1987-01-01

    In 46 alcoholic patients the association of wedged-to-free hepatic-vein pressure with other variables (clinical, histologic, hemodynamic, and liver function data) was studied by means of multiple regression analysis, taking the wedged-to-free hepatic-vein pressure as the dependent variable. Four ...

  8. Implementation of a new policy results in a decrease of pressure ulcer frequency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, E.H. de; Schoonhoven, L.; Pickkers, P.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Achterberg, T. van

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of a new policy on the efficiency of pressure ulcer care. DESIGN: Series of 1-day pressure ulcer surveys before and after the implementation. SETTING: A 900-bed University Medical Centre in The Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: On the days of the surveys, 657 patients

  9. Vulnerability of sandy coasts to climate change and anthropic pressures: methodology and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idier, D.; Poumadère, M.; Vinchon, C.; Romieu, E.; Oliveros, C.

    2009-04-01

    medium-term (decades), whereas the space scales range from several tens of meters to several tens of kilometers. The project is based on the study of representative coastal units: 4 sites characterised by low-lying linear sandy beaches but different, representative, hydrodynamic and socio-economic environments. These sites are located in: Mediterranean Sea (Lido of Sète), Atlantic coast (Truc Vert beach and Noirmoutier island) and English channel coast (Est of Dunkerque). Each of these sites is studied following the same methodology, on both the physical and socio-economic dimensions, the aim being to identify vulnerability indicators regarding climate change and anthropic pressure. 2 - METHODOLOGY The work is based on the following methodology, for every site: 1) The compartments of the unit are defined: shoreface, coastline, backshore, hinterland, from a physical and socio-economical point of view. 2) The available data are analysed in order to provide some information on the present trend of the coastal unit, regarding climate change and anthropic pressure, but also to support the model validation. 3) The vulnerability is studied. On one hand, the socio-economic dimension is assessed and, in a risk governance perspective, stake holders are identified and involved. This part of the project combines the study of social perceptions of dangers along with a deliberative workshop. On the other hand, numerical models of the physical behaviour of shoreface and coastline are applied. The selected models cover a time scale from short-term (storm time scale) to long-term (decades). Then, vulnerability can be studied: the vulnerability of coast/beach is defined and studied based on in-situ observations and model results. Most of these models needs some forcing conditions (waves at the boundary of the computational domains for instance). The present day conditions can be potentially modified by climate change. However, the model and literature review on climate change show that

  10. Can Pillow Height Effect the Body Pressure Distribution and Sleep Comfort: a Study of Quinquagenarian Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinzhu; Hu, Huimin; Liao, Su

    2018-03-01

    A proper sleeping pillow can relax the neck muscles during sleep, yet does not impose stress on the spine or other tissues. By analyzing the different body pressure and subjective comfort evaluation of quinquagenarian women with different pillow heights (3cm, 7cm, 11cm and 15cm), this paper found that as the pillow height increased, the neck contact pressure, contact area and force increased at the same time, as well as the peak force and peak contact pressure gradually shifted from the head to the hip area. It was shown that the pillow with a height of 7cm was the most comfortable for supine positions.

  11. A lattice Boltzmann investigation of steady-state fluid distribution, capillary pressure and relative permeability of a porous medium: Effects of fluid and geometrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi; Galindo-Torres, Sergio; Yan, Guanxi; Scheuermann, Alexander; Li, Ling

    2018-06-01

    Simulations of simultaneous steady-state two-phase flow in the capillary force-dominated regime were conducted using the state-of-the-art Shan-Chen multi-component lattice Boltzmann model (SCMC-LBM) based on two-dimensional porous media. We focused on analyzing the fluid distribution (i.e., WP fluid-solid, NP fluid-solid and fluid-fluid interfacial areas) as well as the capillary pressure versus saturation curve which was affected by fluid and geometrical properties (i.e., wettability, adhesive strength, pore size distribution and specific surface area). How these properties influenced the relative permeability versus saturation relation through apparent effective permeability and threshold pressure gradient was also explored. The SCMC-LBM simulations showed that, a thin WP fluid film formed around the solid surface due to the adhesive fluid-solid interaction, resulting in discrete WP fluid distributions and reduction of the WP fluid mobility. Also, the adhesive interaction provided another source of capillary pressure in addition to capillary force, which, however, did not affect the mobility of the NP fluid. The film fluid effect could be enhanced by large adhesive strength and fine pores in heterogeneous porous media. In the steady-state infiltration, not only the NP fluid but also the WP fluid were subjected to the capillary resistance. The capillary pressure effect could be alleviated by decreased wettability, large average pore radius and improved fluid connectivity in heterogeneous porous media. The present work based on the SCMC-LBM investigations elucidated the role of film fluid as well as capillary pressure in the two-phase flow system. The findings have implications for ways to improve the macroscopic flow equation based on balance of force for the steady-state infiltration.

  12. Full scale test results for ship ice impact forces and pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoneim, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    A set of full scale impact tests were carried out for the icebreakers Canmar Kigoriak and Robert LeMeur in first and multi-year ice conditions in the southern Beaufort Sea. Preliminary results of the testing program were published in Ghoneim et al. (1984). This paper presents some salient results of further analysis of the data. This includes a description of the different types of ice ramming mechanisms and the corresponding ice force time histories and ship response. A comparison between the bow force peak values for the kigoriak and the Robert LeMeur is made and the reasons for the difference are evaluated. The question of dynamic magnification of the response is investigated. The relationship between the peak impact force and the ramming velocity is evaluated for both ships and compared with theoretical and empirical formulations. Other parametric relationships are presented, including such parameters as force duration and relative magnitude of the impact and beaching bow forces. The added mass is evaluated from measured accelerations and calculated bow forces and are shown to be time dependent. The relationship between ice pressure and corresponding contact area is discussed. Finally, conclusions and recommendations are presented

  13. Heat-transfer and pressure distributions for laminar separated flows downstream of rearward-facing steps with and without mass suction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. D.; Jakubowski, A. K.

    1974-01-01

    Heat-transfer and pressure distributions were measured for laminar separated flows downstream of rearward-facing steps with and without mass suction. The flow conditions were such that the boundary-layer thickness was comparable to or larger than the step height. For both suction and no-suction cases, an increase in the step height resulted in a sharp decrease in the initial heat-transfer rates behind the step. Downstream, however, the heat transfer gradually recovered back to less than or near attached-flow values. Mass suction from the step base area increased the local heat-transfer rates; however, this effect was relatively weak for the laminar flows considered. Even removal of the entire approaching boundary layer raised the post-step heat-transfer rates only about 10 percent above the flatplate values. Post-step pressure distributions were found to depend on the entrainment conditions at separation. In the case of the solid-faced step, a sharp pressure drop behind the step was followed by a very short plateau and relatively fast recompression. For the slotted-step connected to a large plenum but without suction, the pressure drop at the base was much smaller and the downstream recompression more gradual than that for solid-faced step.

  14. Studies of the pressure dependence of the charge density distribution in cerium phosphide by the maximum-entropy method

    CERN Document Server

    Ishimatsu, N; Takata, M; Nishibori, E; Sakata, M; Hayashi, J; Shirotani, I; Shimomura, O

    2002-01-01

    The physical properties relating to 4f electrons in cerium phosphide, especially the temperature dependence and the isomorphous transition that occurs at around 10 GPa, were studied by means of x-ray powder diffraction and charge density distribution maps derived by the maximum-entropy method. The compressibility of CeP was exactly determined using a helium pressure medium and the anomaly that indicated the isomorphous transition was observed in the compressibility. We also discuss the anisotropic charge density distribution of Ce ions and its temperature dependence.

  15. Research on the internal pressure behavior of metal gas distribution pipelines with different types of tubing defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Stefan Mihai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to approach an important subject related to natural gas distribution networks which, depending on the expansion of the localities, are composed of intercommunicating pipes, pressure reducing stations and branch connections fittings. The urban networks are the most complex ones and the rural areas networks are the simplest. However, irrespective of their installation, they must meet the safety operating requirements as much as possible. According to standards, all these components must be tight and pressure resistant. In this regard, we intend to approach a very important issue related to the behavior of the tubular steel material showing corrosion and/or material defects, and to the internal stress caused by the gas pressure on the walls of the tubing material.

  16. Effects of Drought, Pest Pressure and Light Availability on Seedling Establishment and Growth: Their Role for Distribution of Tree Species across a Tropical Rainfall Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaviria, Julian; Engelbrecht, Bettina M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Tree species distributions associated with rainfall are among the most prominent patterns in tropical forests. Understanding the mechanisms shaping these patterns is important to project impacts of global climate change on tree distributions and diversity in the tropics. Beside direct effects of water availability, additional factors co-varying with rainfall have been hypothesized to play an important role, including pest pressure and light availability. While low water availability is expected to exclude drought-intolerant wet forest species from drier forests (physiological tolerance hypothesis), high pest pressure or low light availability are hypothesized to exclude dry forest species from wetter forests (pest pressure gradient and light availability hypothesis, respectively). To test these hypotheses at the seed-to-seedling transition, the potentially most critical stage for species discrimination, we conducted a reciprocal transplant experiment combined with a pest exclosure treatment at a wet and a dry forest site in Panama with seeds of 26 species with contrasting origin. Establishment success after one year did not reflect species distribution patterns. However, in the wet forest, wet origin species had a home advantage over dry forest species through higher growth rates. At the same time, drought limited survival of wet origin species in the dry forest, supporting the physiological tolerance hypothesis. Together these processes sort species over longer time frames, and exclude species outside their respective home range. Although we found pronounced effects of pests and some effects of light availability on the seedlings, they did not corroborate the pest pressure nor light availability hypotheses at the seed-to-seedling transition. Our results underline that changes in water availability due to climate change will have direct consequences on tree regeneration and distributions along tropical rainfall gradients, while indirect effects of light and pests

  17. Consumption of alcohol and blood pressure: Results of the ELSA-Brasil study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Nathália Miguel Teixeira; Mill, José Geraldo; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo; Moreira, Alexandra Dias; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; Viana, Maria Carmen; Molina, Maria Del Carmen Bisi

    2018-01-01

    Prevention and reduction of excessive use of alcohol represents damages to society in general. In turn, arterial hypertension is the main attributable risk factor premature life lost years and disability. To investigate the relationship between alcohol consumption and high blood pressure in participants of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). A baseline data of total of 7,655 participants volunteers between 35 and 74 years of age, of both genders, in six educational and research institutions of three different regions of the country were interviewed between 2008-2010. Socioeconomic, haemodynamic, anthropometric and health data were collected in the research centers of ELSA-Brasil. The presence of high blood pressure was identified when the systolic blood pressure was ≥140 mm Hg and/or the diastolic was ≥90 mm Hg. Alcohol consumption was estimated and categorized regarding consumption and pattern of ingestion. The Student's t-test, chi-squared and logistic regression tests were used for analysis, including potential co-variables of the model, and a 5% significance level was adopted. A dose-response relation was observed for the consumption of alcohol (g/week) in systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. Alcohol consumption was associated with high blood pressure in men who reported moderate (OR = 1.69; 95%CI 1.35-2.11) and excessive (OR = 2.70; 95%CI 2.04-3.59) consumption. Women have nearly three times more chance of presenting elevated blood pressure when presenting excessive consumption (OR = 2.86, 95%CI 1.77-4.63), and binge drinkers who drink more than 2 to 3 times a month have approximately 70% more chance of presenting with elevated blood pressure, after adjusting for consumption of drinks with meals. The consumption of alcohol beverages increases the odds of elevated blood pressure, especially among excessive drinkers. Therefore alcohol consumption needs a more robust regulation in view of its impact on population

  18. Distribution of Problems, Medications and Lab Results in Electronic Health Records: The Pareto Principle at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Bates, David W

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many natural phenomena demonstrate power-law distributions, where very common items predominate. Problems, medications and lab results represent some of the most important data elements in medicine, but their overall distribution has not been reported. OBJECTIVE: Our objective is to determine whether problems, medications and lab results demonstrate a power law distribution. METHODS: Retrospective review of electronic medical record data for 100,000 randomly selected patients seen at least twice in 2006 and 2007 at the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and its affiliated medical practices. RESULTS: All three data types exhibited a power law distribution. The 12.5% most frequently used problems account for 80% of all patient problems, the top 11.8% of medications account for 80% of all medication orders and the top 4.5% of lab result types account for all lab results. CONCLUSION: These three data elements exhibited power law distributions with a small number of common items representing a substantial proportion of all orders and observations, which has implications for electronic health record design.

  19. Results of the non-nulling calibration of five-hole pressure probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereznai, J.; Mlynár, P.; Masaryk, M.

    2017-09-01

    In the laboratory of the Institute of Energy Machinery, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering in Bratislava were produced amount of pressure probes of different designs. Special position among themselves are five-hole pressure probe with tip of sphere or wedge used to determine the velocity vector in a unknown flow fields. Such probes have to be calibrated during blowing an air stream of known velocity magnitude and components of the velocity vector at different angles of attack, when the characteristic information about pressures on a sensitive part of the measuring probe is obtained.

  20. Experimental approaches for distribution and behavior of water in PEMFC under flow direction and differential pressure using neutron imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, TaeJoo; Kim, JongRok; Sim, CheulMuu; Lee, SeungWook; Kaviany, Massound; Son, SangYoung; Kim, MooHwan

    2009-01-01

    In this investigation, we prepared a 3-parallel serpentine single PEMFC which has an active area of 25 cm 2 and a flow channel cross section of 1x1 mm. Distribution and transport of water in an operating PEMFC were observed by varying the flow directions (co-current and counter-current) in each channel and the differential pressures (100, 200, 300 kPa) applied between the anode and cathode channels. This investigation was performed at the neutron imaging facility at the NIST of which the collimation ratio and neutron fluence rate are 600, 7.2x10 6 n/s/cm 2 , respectively. Neutron image was continuously recorded by an amorphous silicon flat panel detector every 1 s during the operation of the fuel cell. It has been observed that the differential pressure affects the total amount of water produced while the flow direction affects the spatial distribution of water when the neutron images were analyzed for several different operating conditions. More specifically, the amount of water production in the fuel cell increased as the partial pressure increases at a given current density and the water production was more uniform for the counter current than the co-current case. It is shown that the neutron imaging technique is a powerful tool to visualize the PEMFC. The information on the water distribution and behavior at an operating PEMFC helps improve the efficiency of PEMFC.

  1. High pressure treatment under subfreezing temperature results in drastic inactivation of enveloped and non-enveloped viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, T; Cui, F-D; Ohgitani, E; Gao, F; Hayakawa, K; Mazda, O

    2013-08-01

    Some viruses are sensitive to high pressure. The freeze-pressure generation method (FPGM) applies pressure as high as 250 MPa on a substance, simply by freezing a pressure-resistant reservoir in which the substance is immersed in water. Here we examined whether the FPGM successfully inactivates herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), an enveloped DNA virus belonging to the human Herpesviridae, and encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), an envelope-free RNA virus belonging to the Picornaviridae. After the treatment, HSV-1 drastically reduced the ability to form plaque in Vero cells in vitro as well as to kill mice in vivo. EMCV that had been pressurized failed to proliferate in HeLa cells and induce interferon response. The results suggest that the FPGM provides a feasible procedure to inactivate a broad spectrum of viruses.

  2. The multi-layered ring under parabolic distribution of radial stresses combined with uniform internal and external pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos F. Markides

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A recently introduced solution for the stress- and displacement-fields, developed in a multi-layered circular ring, composed of a finite number of linearly elastic concentric layers, subjected to a parabolic distribution of ra-dial stresses, is here extended to encompass a more general loading scheme, closer to actual conditions. The loading scheme includes, besides the para¬-bolic radial stresses, a combination of uniform pressures acting along the outer- and inner- most boundaries of the layered ring. The analytic solution of the problem is achieved by adopting Savin’s pioneering approach for an infinite plate with a hole strengthened by rings. Taking advantage of the results provided by the ana¬lytic solution, a numerical model, simulating the configuration of a three-layered ring (quite commonly encountered in practic¬al applications is validated. The numerical model is then used for a parametric analysis enlightening some crucial aspects of the overall response of the ring.

  3. First results on nitriding aluminium alloys in a low-pressure RF plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fewell, M.P.; Priest, J.M.; Collins, G.A.; Short, K.T.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Aluminium alloys are now well established as materials of choice for many commercial applications, especially where strength-to-weight ratio is a critical parameter. However, their more widespread use is inhibited by their low surface hardness. For steels, similar problems can be overcome by nitriding. The nitrogen-rich surface layer has high hardness and load-bearing capacity, and is very well bonded to the substrate. The development of a similar surface-treatment process for aluminium alloys is clearly a desirable goal. It is therefore not surprising that many research groups worldwide have attempted to nitride aluminium. Much of this work studied pure aluminium, a material of no interest for structural applications. Previous investigations into nitriding aluminium alloys' had indifferent results. However, they have served to identify the key issues, which are the importance of a pre-cleaning steps to remove the surface oxide, of impurity control during the nitriding and the desirability of using as low a process temperature as possible. In all of these areas, our process using a low-pressure RF plasma is likely to be competitive. In view of this, we have undertaken a comparative study of a range of commercially available aluminium alloys. All treatments were carried out in the hot-wall nitriding reactor at ANSTO. The samples consist of disks 25mm in diameter and ∼3mm thick which were polished and ultrasonically cleaned in alcohol prior to treatment. The samples were stored in air at all times except when in the nitriding reactor. In a series of treatments, the treatment time was varied in the range 1-16 h and the temperature in the range 350-500 deg C. All treatments were preceeded by a plasma cleaning step in a H 2 /50%Ar mixture for a duration of 1.5-2.0 h while the reactor reached processing temperature. The treatments all used pure N 2 at a pressure of 0.4Pa and a nitrogen flow rate of 12μmol s -1 , with 245W of rf power at 13.56MHz applied to

  4. Atmospheric Pressure and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture: Results From a Time Series Analysis and Case-Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning de Vries, Bas B L; Kolkert, Joé L P; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Groenwold, Rolf H H

    2017-10-01

    Associations between atmospheric pressure and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture risk have been reported, but empirical evidence is inconclusive and largely derived from studies that did not account for possible nonlinearity, seasonality, and confounding by temperature. Associations between atmospheric pressure and AAA rupture risk were investigated using local meteorological data and a case series of 358 patients admitted to hospital for ruptured AAA during the study period, January 2002 to December 2012. Two analyses were performed-a time series analysis and a case-crossover study. Results from the 2 analyses were similar; neither the time series analysis nor the case-crossover study showed a significant association between atmospheric pressure ( P = .627 and P = .625, respectively, for mean daily atmospheric pressure) or atmospheric pressure variation ( P = .464 and P = .816, respectively, for 24-hour change in mean daily atmospheric pressure) and AAA rupture risk. This study failed to support claims that atmospheric pressure causally affects AAA rupture risk. In interpreting our results, one should be aware that the range of atmospheric pressure observed in this study is not representative of the atmospheric pressure to which patients with AAA may be exposed, for example, during air travel or travel to high altitudes in the mountains. Making firm claims regarding these conditions in relation to AAA rupture risk is difficult at best. Furthermore, despite the fact that we used one of the largest case series to date to investigate the effect of atmospheric pressure on AAA rupture risk, it is possible that this study is simply too small to demonstrate a causal link.

  5. Sound pressure distribution within natural and artificial human ear canals: forward stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravicz, Michael E; Tao Cheng, Jeffrey; Rosowski, John J

    2014-12-01

    This work is part of a study of the interaction of sound pressure in the ear canal (EC) with tympanic membrane (TM) surface displacement. Sound pressures were measured with 0.5-2 mm spacing at three locations within the shortened natural EC or an artificial EC in human temporal bones: near the TM surface, within the tympanic ring plane, and in a plane transverse to the long axis of the EC. Sound pressure was also measured at 2-mm intervals along the long EC axis. The sound field is described well by the size and direction of planar sound pressure gradients, the location and orientation of standing-wave nodal lines, and the location of longitudinal standing waves along the EC axis. Standing-wave nodal lines perpendicular to the long EC axis are present on the TM surface >11-16 kHz in the natural or artificial EC. The range of sound pressures was larger in the tympanic ring plane than at the TM surface or in the transverse EC plane. Longitudinal standing-wave patterns were stretched. The tympanic-ring sound field is a useful approximation of the TM sound field, and the artificial EC approximates the natural EC.

  6. Differential pressure distribution measurement with an MEMS sensor on a free-flying butterfly wing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao; Tanaka, Hiroto

    2012-01-01

    An insect can perform various flight maneuvers. However, the aerodynamic force generated by real insect wings during free flight has never been measured directly. In this study, we present the direct measurement of the four points of the differential pressures acting on the wing surface of a flying insect. A small-scale differential pressure sensor of 1.0 mm × 1.0 mm × 0.3 mm in size was developed using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and was attached to a butterfly wing. Total weight of the sensor chip and the flexible electrode on the wing was 4.5 mg, which was less than 10% of the wing weight. Four points on the wing were chosen as measurement points, and one sensor chip was attached in each flight experiment. During takeoff, the wing's flapping motion induced a periodic and symmetric differential pressure between upstroke and downstroke. The average absolute value of the local differential pressure differed significantly with the location: 7.4 Pa at the forewing tip, 5.5 Pa at the forewing center, 2.1 Pa at the forewing root and 2.1 Pa at the hindwing center. The instantaneous pressure at the forewing tip reached 10 Pa, which was ten times larger than wing loading of the butterfly. (paper)

  7. Distribution of blood pressure & correlates of hypertension in school children aged 5-14 years from North East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Prasanta Kr; Devi, Utpala; Biswas, Dipankar; Kalita, Hem Ch; Sharma, Meenakshi; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2015-09-01

    Elevated blood pressure (BP) in the young predicts serious cardiovascular events in the adults. High prevalence of adult hypertension reported from Assam, North East (NE) India may be linked with elevated blood pressure in the childhood. The present study was an attempt to describe the distribution of BP and correlates of hypertension in children aged 5-14 yr. A total of 10,003 school children from 99 schools of Dibrugarh district, Assam, NE India, were surveyed by stratified random cluster method. Blood pressure, demographic and anthropometric information were recorded. Blood pressure was categorized in to normal, prehypertension, stage I and stage II hypertension. Girls had significantly higher (104.2 ± 12.0 vs. 103.2 ± 11.6 mm Hg, p0 <0.001) mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) than boys. Both SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) revealed significant correlation with age, height, weight and BMI in overall and in gender specific analysis. Hypertension was found in 7.6 per cent school children (Boys: 7.3%, Girls: 7.8%). In multivariable analysis older age (OR 3.3, 95% CI: 2.82-3.91), children from tea garden community (OR 1.3, 95% CI: 1.08-1.55) and other community (OR 1.4, 95% CI: 1.18-1.73) and overweight (OR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1-2.1) were independently associated with hypertension. Mean blood pressure in the young school children of 5-14 yr was high. A programme comprising screening, early detection and health promotion through school health programmes may help prevent future complications of hypertension.

  8. A Numerical Procedure for Flow Distribution and Pressure Drops for U and Z Type Configurations Plate Heat Exchangers with Variable Coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López, R; Lecuona, A; Ventas, R; Vereda, C

    2012-01-01

    In Plate Heat Exchangers it is important to determine the flow distribution and pressure drops, because they affect directly the performance of a heat exchanger. This work proposes an incompressible, one-dimensional, steady state, discrete model allowing for variable overall momentum coefficients to determine these magnitudes. The model consists on a modified version of the Bajura and Jones model for dividing and combining flow manifolds. The numerical procedure is based on the finite differences approximation approach proposed by Datta and Majumdar. A linear overall momentum coefficient distribution is used in the dividing manifold, but the model is not limited to linear distributions. Comparisons are made with experimental, numerical and analytical data, yielding good results.

  9. Jellyfish: the origin and distribution of extreme ram-pressure stripping events in massive galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, Conor; Ebeling, Harald; Roediger, Elke; Blumenthal, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the observational signatures and physical origin of ram-pressure stripping (RPS) in 63 massive galaxy clusters at z = 0.3-0.7, based on images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. Using a training set of a dozen `jellyfish' galaxies identified earlier in the same imaging data, we define morphological criteria to select 211 additional, less obvious cases of RPS. Spectroscopic follow-up observations of 124 candidates so far confirmed 53 as cluster members. For the brightest and most favourably aligned systems, we visually derive estimates of the projected direction of motion based on the orientation of apparent compression shocks and debris trails. Our findings suggest that the onset of these events occurs primarily at large distances from the cluster core (>400 kpc), and that the trajectories of the affected galaxies feature high-impact parameters. Simple models show that such trajectories are highly improbable for galaxy infall along filaments but common for infall at high velocities, even after observational biases are accounted for, provided the duration of the resulting RPS events is ≲500 Myr. We thus tentatively conclude that extreme RPS events are preferentially triggered by cluster mergers, an interpretation that is supported by the disturbed dynamical state of many of the host clusters. This hypothesis implies that extreme RPS might occur also near the cores of merging poor clusters or even merging groups of galaxies. Finally, we present nine additional `jellyfish" galaxies at z > 0.3 discovered by us, thereby doubling the number of such systems known at intermediate redshift.

  10. Effects of Mie tip-vane on pressure distribution of rotor blade and power augmentation of horizontal axis wind turbine; Yokutan shoyoku Mie ben ni yoru suiheijiku fusha yokumenjo no atsuryoku bunpu no kaizen to seino kojo tono kankei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Y.; Maeda, T.; Kamada, Y. [Mie Univ., Mie (Japan); Seto, H. [Mitsubishi Motors Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-04-01

    By recent developments of exclusive rotor blade, the efficiency of wind turbine is improved substantially. By measuring pressure on rotor blades of horizontal axis wind turbines rotating in wind tunnels, this report clarified relation between improvement of pressure distribution on main rotor blades by Mie vane and upgrade of wind turbine performance. The results under mentioned have been got by measuring pressure distribution on rotor blades, visualization by tuft, and measuring resistance of Mie vane. (1) The difference of pressure between suction surface and pressure surface on the end of rotor blade increase, and output power of wind turbine improves. (2) Vortex of blade end is inhibited by Mie vane. (3) The reason of reduction on wind turbine performance with Mie vane in aria of high rotating speed ratio is the increase of Mie vane flow resistance.(NEDO)

  11. Hydropyrolysis of a Turkish lignite (Tuncbilek) and effect of temperature and pressure on product distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canel, M.; Misirlioglu, Z.; Sinag, A. [Ankara University, Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Science

    2005-08-01

    The hydropyrolysis of a Turkish lignite (Tuncbilek) in a swept fixed bed reactor connected with a thermo-balance was performed at a heating rate of 3 C/min up to 950 C under 0.5MPa, 1MPa and 10MPa hydrogen pressures. The formation rates of gaseous hydrocarbons, carbon oxides, water and tar were determined. The difference between the weight loss due to tar formation of the non-condensable total and the weight loss of the sample recorded continuously with the thermo-balance showed the corresponding curve of tar formation rate as a function of temperature. It was shown that the total conversion and the formation rate of the products during hydropyrolysis could be influenced by varying the pressure. On the other hand, the volatile matter evolved during pyrolysis was substantially increased in the presence of hydrogen and especially when elevated hydrogen pressure was used.

  12. Effects of distributed teamwork and time pressure on collaborative planning quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleij, R. van der; Rasker, P.C.; Lijkwan, J.T.E.; Dreu, C.K.W. de

    2006-01-01

    Distributed teamwork is not without its difficulties. The detrimental aspects of geographical dispersion of team members on effective teamwork are often invoked to justify reluctance 'to go virtual', despite the fact that for some tasks, and under some conditions, distributed environments may be as

  13. Matching the results of a theoretical model with failure rates obtained from a population of non-nuclear pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrop, L.P.

    1982-02-01

    Failure rates for non-nuclear pressure vessel populations are often regarded as showing a decrease with time. Empirical evidence can be cited which supports this view. On the other hand theoretical predictions of PWR type reactor pressure vessel failure rates have shown an increasing failure rate with time. It is shown that these two situations are not necessarily incompatible. If adjustments are made to the input data of the theoretical model to treat a non-nuclear pressure vessel population, the model can produce a failure rate which decreases with time. These adjustments are explained and the results obtained are shown. (author)

  14. Numerical simulation of the plantar pressure distribution in the diabetic foot during the push-off stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Ricardo L; Ventura, Liliana B; Smith, Kirk E; Commean, Paul K; Lott, Donovan J; Pilgram, Thomas K; Mueller, Michael J

    2006-08-01

    The primary objective of conservative care for the diabetic foot is to protect the foot from excessive pressures. Pressure reduction and redistribution may be achieved by designing and fabricating orthotic devices based on foot structure, tissue mechanics, and external loads on the diabetic foot. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process used for the development of patient-specific mathematical models of the second and third rays of the foot, their solution by the finite element method, and their sensitivity to model parameters and assumptions. We hypothesized that the least complex model to capture the pressure distribution in the region of the metatarsal heads would include the bony structure segmented as toe, metatarsal and support, with cartilage between the bones, plantar fascia and soft tissue. To check the hypothesis, several models were constructed with different levels of details. The process of numerical simulation is comprised of three constituent parts: model definition, numerical solution and prediction. In this paper the main considerations relating model selection and computation of approximate solutions by the finite element method are considered. The fit of forefoot plantar pressures estimated using the FEA models and those explicitly tested were good as evidenced by high Pearson correlations (r=0.70-0.98) and small bias and dispersion. We concluded that incorporating bone support, metatarsal and toes with linear material properties, tendon and fascia with linear material properties, soft tissue with nonlinear material properties, is sufficient for the determination of the pressure distribution in the metatarsal head region in the push-off position, both barefoot and with shoe and total contact insert. Patient-specific examples are presented.

  15. [Asymmetries in dynamic plantar pressure distribution measurement in able-bodied gait: application to the study of the gait asymmetries in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femery, V; Moretto, P; Renaut, H; Lensel, G; Thevenon, A

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse, firstly, the plantar pressure distribution in healthy subjects in order to validate or invalidate the previous studies results on the asymmetrical profile of the stance phase. The studies of asymmetries was based on the identification of a propulsive foot and a loading foot from a concept introduced by Viel. Secondly, the approach was applied to the study of gait asymmetries in two children with hemiplegic cerebral plasy. Thirty healthy control subjects and two hemiplegic children (H1 and H2) performed a walking test at self selected speed. The recordings of dynamic parameters were realized thanks to an in-shoe plantar pressure analysis system (Parotec, by Paromed Medizintechnik, GMBH, Germany). The pressure peaks were determined from the recording of pressures under eight footprint locations. A program calculated the sum of forces under the heel and determined the loading foot. By defect, the second foot is the propulsive foot. The asymmetrical profile of the human normal stance phase was validated. Under the heel, the pressure peaks lower by 28 % were noticed beneath the loading foot compared to the propulsive foot. Inversely, under the metatarsal heads and the hallux, the pressure peaks were greater by 32 % beneath the propulsive foot. For the two hemiplegic children, the plantar pressure profile equally highlighted significant differences between the unaffected and affected feet. The pressure peaks under the affected heel were respectively lower by 21 % and 97 % for H1 and H2. The loading function was found and associated to the affected limb. The propulsive function was not systematically found under the unaffected foot. The analysis of plantar pressure measurements during able-bodied gait showed differences between the two lower limbs. These dynamic asymmetries are the results of a natural functional organization of the supports differentiating a loading foot and a propulsive foot and corroborating the concept proposed by

  16. Fluid mechanics of needle valves with rounded components Part III: Pressure distributions on walls

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesař, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 248, September (2016), s. 138-147 ISSN 0924-4247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-23046S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : needle valves * pressure measurements * valves Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.499, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924424716303417

  17. Test results of distributed ion pump designs for the PEP-II Asymmetric B-Factory collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, M.; Holdener, F.; Peterson, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-01

    The testing facility measurement methods and results of prototype distributed ion pump (DIP) designs for the PEP-II B-Factory High Energy Ring are presented. Two basic designs with 5- or 7-anode plates were tested at LLNL with penning cell sizes of 15, 18, and 21 mm. Direct comparison of 5- and 7-plate anodes with 18 mm holes shows increased pumping speed with the 7-plate design. The 5-plate, 18 mm and 7-plate, 15 mm designs both gave an average pumping speed of 135 1/s/m at 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} Torr nitrogen base pressure in a varying 0.18 T peak B-field. Comparison of the three hole sizes indicates that cells smaller than the 15 mm tested can be efficiently used to obtain higher pumping speeds for the same anode plate sizes used.

  18. Test results of distributed ion pump designs for the PEP-II Asymmetric B-Factory collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderon, M.; Holdener, F.; Peterson, D.

    1994-07-01

    The testing facility measurement methods and results of prototype distributed ion pump (DIP) designs for the PEP-II B-Factory High Energy Ring are presented. Two basic designs with 5- or 7-anode plates were tested at LLNL with penning cell sizes of 15, 18, and 21 mm. Direct comparison of 5- and 7-plate anodes with 18 mm holes shows increased pumping speed with the 7-plate design. The 5-plate, 18 mm and 7-plate, 15 mm designs both gave an average pumping speed of 135 1/s/m at 1 x 10 -8 Torr nitrogen base pressure in a varying 0.18 T peak B-field. Comparison of the three hole sizes indicates that cells smaller than the 15 mm tested can be efficiently used to obtain higher pumping speeds for the same anode plate sizes used

  19. Characterization of Medication Velocity and Size Distribution from Pressurized Metered-Dose Inhalers by Phase Doppler Anemometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatrash, Abubaker; Matida, Edgar

    2016-12-01

    Particle size and velocity are two of the most significant factors that impact the deposition of pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) sprays in the mouth cavity. pMDIs are prominently used around the world in the treatment of patients suffering from a variety of lung diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Since their introduction in the field, and as a result of their effectiveness and simplicity of usage, pMDIs are considered to be the most widely prescribed medical aerosol delivery system. In the current study, particle velocity and size distribution were measured at three different locations along the centerline of a pMDI spray using Phase Doppler Anemometry. pMDIs from four different pharmaceutical companies were tested, each using salbutamol sulfate as the medication. Measurements along at the pMDI centerline (at 0, 75, and 100 mm downstream of the inhaler mouthpiece) showed that the spray velocities were bimodal in time for all four pMDI brands. The first peak occurred as the spray was leaving the mouthpiece, while the second peak (at the same location, 0 mm) occurred at around 60, 95, 95, and 115 milliseconds later, respectively, for the four tested inhalers, with a drop in the velocity between the two peaks. Three probability density functions (PDFs) were tested, and the Rosin-Rammler PDF best fit the empirical data, as determined using a chi-squared test. These results suggest that there is a difference in the mean particle velocities at the centerline for the tested pMDIs and the diameter of released particles varied statistically for each brand.

  20. Distribution of Off-Diagonal Cross Sections in Quantum Chaotic Scattering: Exact Results and Data Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Dietz, Barbara; Guhr, Thomas; Richter, Achim

    2017-12-15

    The recently derived distributions for the scattering-matrix elements in quantum chaotic systems are not accessible in the majority of experiments, whereas the cross sections are. We analytically compute distributions for the off-diagonal cross sections in the Heidelberg approach, which is applicable to a wide range of quantum chaotic systems. Thus, eventually, we fully solve a problem that already arose more than half a century ago in compound-nucleus scattering. We compare our results with data from microwave and compound-nucleus experiments, particularly addressing the transition from isolated resonances towards the Ericson regime of strongly overlapping ones.

  1. Results on the neutron energy distribution measurements at the RECH-1 Chilean nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilera, P., E-mail: paguilera87@gmail.com; Romero-Barrientos, J. [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Nueva Bilbao 12501, La Reina, Santiago (Chile); Universidad de Chile, Dpto. de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Las Palmeras 3425, Nuñoa, Santiago (Chile); Molina, F. [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Nueva Bilbao 12501, La Reina, Santiago (Chile)

    2016-07-07

    Neutron activations experiments has been perform at the RECH-1 Chilean Nuclear Reactor to measure its neutron flux energy distribution. Samples of pure elements was activated to obtain the saturation activities for each reaction. Using - ray spectroscopy we identify and measure the activity of the reaction product nuclei, obtaining the saturation activities of 20 reactions. GEANT4 and MCNP was used to compute the self shielding factor to correct the cross section for each element. With the Expectation-Maximization algorithm (EM) we were able to unfold the neutron flux energy distribution at dry tube position, near the RECH-1 core. In this work, we present the unfolding results using the EM algorithm.

  2. On Design of Anisotropy Distributions, Applying Lamina Formulas for 2d Result Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pauli; Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2015-01-01

    transformation for these practical quantities. The research background for optimal anisotropic constitutive matrices is shortly presented. Then design results are applied in a 2D visualization of optimized constitutive matrices, that are distributed in a finite element (FE) model where each element has......In rotational transformation of constitutive matrices, some practical quantities are often termed invariants, but the invariance relates to an unchanged reference direction. Rotating this reference direction, the practical quantities do change and this point is clarified with derived rotational...... a specific reference direction. The visualized distributions of physical quantities are; stiffest material direction, material stiffest longitudinal constitutive component, level of anisotropy, absolute or relative shear stiffness and orthotropy test....

  3. Variations of Blood Pressure in Stroke Unit Patients May Result from Alternating Body Positions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aries, M.J.H.; Elting, Jan Willem; Stewart, Roy E.; de Keyser, Jacques; Thien, Theo; Kremer, Berry P.; Vroomen, Patrick C. A. J.

    Background: Blood pressure (BP) is one of the major vital parameters monitored in the stroke unit. The accuracy of indirect BP measurement is strongly influenced by the position of both patient and arm during the measurement. Acute stroke patients are often nursed in lateral decubitus positions. The

  4. Effect of Preferential Solvation of Polymer Chains on Vapor-Pressure Osmometry Results. Computer Simulation Study.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin; Limpouchová, Z.; Procházka, Karel

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 3 (2018), s. 244-251 ISSN 1023-666X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19542S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : vapor-pressure osmometry * simulation * solvatation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry

  5. Ventilation distribution measured with EIT at varying levels of pressure support and Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist in patients with ALI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankman, Paul; Hasan, Djo; van Mourik, Martijn S; Gommers, Diederik

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of varying levels of assist during pressure support (PSV) and Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) on the aeration of the dependent and non-dependent lung regions by means of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). We studied ten mechanically ventilated patients with Acute Lung Injury (ALI). Positive-End Expiratory Pressure (PEEP) and PSV levels were both 10 cm H₂O during the initial PSV step. Thereafter, we changed the inspiratory pressure to 15 and 5 cm H₂O during PSV. The electrical activity of the diaphragm (EAdi) during pressure support ten was used to define the initial NAVA gain (100 %). Thereafter, we changed NAVA gain to 150 and 50 %, respectively. After each step the assist level was switched back to PSV 10 cm H₂O or NAVA 100 % to get a new baseline. The EIT registration was performed continuously. Tidal impedance variation significantly decreased during descending PSV levels within patients, whereas not during NAVA. The dorsal-to-ventral impedance distribution, expressed according to the center of gravity index, was lower during PSV compared to NAVA. Ventilation contribution of the dependent lung region was equally in balance with the non-dependent lung region during PSV 5 cm H₂O, NAVA 50 and 100 %. Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist ventilation had a beneficial effect on the ventilation of the dependent lung region and showed less over-assistance compared to PSV in patients with ALI.

  6. Modified model of neutron resonance widths distribution. Results of total gamma-widths approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhovoj, A.M.; Khitrov, V.A.

    2011-01-01

    Functional dependences of probability to observe given Γ n 0 value and algorithms for determination of the most probable magnitudes of the modified model of resonance parameter distributions were used for analysis of the experimental data on the total radiative widths of neutron resonances. As in the case of neutron widths, precise description of the Γ γ spectra requires a superposition of three and more probability distributions for squares of the random normally distributed values with different nonzero average and nonunit dispersion. This result confirms the preliminary conclusion obtained earlier at analysis of Γ n 0 that practically in all 56 tested sets of total gamma widths there are several groups noticeably differing from each other by the structure of their wave functions. In addition, it was determined that radiative widths are much more sensitive than the neutron ones to resonance wave functions structure. Analysis of early obtained neutron reduced widths distribution parameters for 157 resonance sets in the mass region of nuclei 35 ≤ A ≤ 249 was also performed. It was shown that the experimental values of widths can correspond with high probability to superposition of several expected independent distributions with their nonzero mean values and nonunit dispersion

  7. Safety implications associated with in-plant pressurized gas storage and distribution systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guymon, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    Storage and handling of compressed gases at nuclear power plants were studied to identify any potential safety hazards. Gases investigated were air, acetylene, carbon dioxide, chlorine, Halon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, propane, and sulfur hexafluoride. Physical properties of gases were reviewed, as were applicable industrial codes and standards. Incidents involving pressurized gases in general industry and in the nuclear industry were studied. In this report general hazards, such as missiles from ruptures, rocketing of cylinders, fires, explosions, asphyxiation, and toxicity, are discussed. Even though some serious injuries and deaths have occurred over the years in industries handling and using pressurized gases, the industrial codes, standards, practices, and procedures are very comprehensive. The most important step one can take to ensure the safe handling of gases is to enforce these well-known and established methods

  8. Investigation of Drag and Pressure Distribution of Windshields at High Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1942-01-01

    sharp nega~ive pressure .peaks.and by 10V positivs preqsuro gradisnts-o?er the tail. Of the windshields rppresonted In-figure 11, the -“ &&rne ~nea...extension of the field with Mach number. In the quantitative discus~.on of Interference, it Is convenient to consider the velocity-increment coeffl- , 19...Before the effect of Interference due to the wing and fuselage can be quantitatively estimated, the veloci- ty increments due to these bodies must be

  9. Approximate Pressure Distribution in an Accelerating Launch-Vehicle Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed derivation of the equations governing the pressure in a generic liquid-fuel launch vehicle tank subjected to uniformly accelerated motion is presented. The equations obtained are then for the Space Shuttle Superlightweight Liquid-Oxygen Tank at approximately 70 seconds into flight. This generic derivation is applicable to any fuel tank in the form of a surface of revolution and should be useful in the design of future launch vehicles

  10. Teaching the effects of gravity and intravascular and alveolar pressures on the distribution of pulmonary blood flow using a classic paper by West et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitzky, Michael G

    2006-03-01

    "Distribution of blood flow in isolated lung; relation to vascular and alveolar pressures" by J. B. West, C. T. Dollery, and A. Naimark (J Appl Physiol 19: 713-724, 1964) is a classic paper, although it has not yet been included in the Essays on the American Physiological Society Classic Papers Project (http://www.the-aps.org/publications/classics/). This is the paper that originally described the "zones of the lung." The final figure in the paper, which synthesizes the results and discussion, is now seen in most textbooks of physiology or respiratory physiology. The paper is also a model of clear, concise writing. The paper and its final figure can be used to teach or review a number of physiological concepts. These include the effects of gravity on pulmonary blood flow and pulmonary vascular resistance; recruitment and distention of pulmonary vessels; the importance of the transmural pressure on the diameter of collapsible distensible vessels; the Starling resistor; the interplay of the pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein, and alveolar pressures; and the vascular waterfall. In addition, the figure can be used to generate discovery learning and discussion of several physiological or pathophysiological effects on pulmonary vascular resistance and the distribution of pulmonary blood flow.

  11. The Influence of Body Mass Index, Sex, & Muscle Activation on Pressure Distribution During Lateral Falls on the Hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretty, Steven P; Martel, Daniel R; Laing, Andrew C

    2017-12-01

    Hip fracture incidence rates are influenced by body mass index (BMI) and sex, likely through mechanistic pathways that influence dynamics of the pelvis-femur system during fall-related impacts. The goal of this study was to extend our understanding of these impact dynamics by investigating the effects of BMI, sex, and local muscle activation on pressure distribution over the hip region during lateral impacts. Twenty participants underwent "pelvis-release experiments" (which simulate a lateral fall onto the hip), including muscle-'relaxed' and 'contracted' trials. Males and low-BMI individuals exhibited 44 and 55% greater peak pressure, as well as 66 and 56% lower peripheral hip force, compared to females and high-BMI individuals, respectively. Local muscle activation increased peak force by 10%, contact area by 17%, and peripheral hip force by 11% compared to relaxed trials. In summary, males and low-BMI individuals exhibited more concentrated loading over the greater trochanter. Muscle activation increased peak force, but this force was distributed over a larger area, preventing increased localized loading over the greater trochanter. These findings suggest potential value in incorporating sex, gender, and muscle activation-specific force distributions as inputs into computational tissue-level models, and have implications for the design of personalized protective devices including wearable hip protectors.

  12. Effects of non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution function on two-stream instability in low-pressure discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydorenko, D.; Smolyakov, A.; Kaganovich, I.; Raitses, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Electron emission from discharge chamber walls is important for plasma maintenance in many low-pressure discharges. The electrons emitted from the walls are accelerated by the sheath electric field and are injected into the plasma as an electron beam. Penetration of this beam through the plasma is subject to the two-stream instability, which tends to slow down the beam electrons and heat the plasma electrons. In the present paper, a one-dimensional particle-in-cell code is used to simulate these effects both in a collisionless plasma slab with immobile ions and in a cross-field discharge of a Hall thruster. The two-stream instability occurs if the total electron velocity distribution function of the plasma-beam system is a nonmonotonic function of electron speed. Low-pressure plasmas can be depleted of electrons with energy above the plasma potential. This study reveals that under such conditions the two-stream instability depends crucially on the velocity distribution function of electron emission. It is shown that propagation of the secondary electron beams in Hall thrusters may be free of the two-stream instability if the velocity distribution of secondary electron emission is a monotonically decaying function of speed. In this case, the beams propagate between the walls with minimal loss of the beam current and the secondary electron emission does not affect the thruster plasma properties

  13. A Flexible Sensor Technology for the Distributed Measurement of Interaction Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Marco; Vitiello, Nicola; De Rossi, Stefano Marco Maria; Lenzi, Tommaso; Crea, Simona; Persichetti, Alessandro; Giovacchini, Francesco; Koopman, Bram; Podobnik, Janez; Munih, Marko; Carrozza, Maria Chiara

    2013-01-01

    We present a sensor technology for the measure of the physical human-robot interaction pressure developed in the last years at Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna. The system is composed of flexible matrices of opto-electronic sensors covered by a soft silicone cover. This sensory system is completely modular and scalable, allowing one to cover areas of any sizes and shapes, and to measure different pressure ranges. In this work we present the main application areas for this technology. A first generation of the system was used to monitor human-robot interaction in upper- (NEUROExos; Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna) and lower-limb (LOPES; University of Twente) exoskeletons for rehabilitation. A second generation, with increased resolution and wireless connection, was used to develop a pressure-sensitive foot insole and an improved human-robot interaction measurement systems. The experimental characterization of the latter system along with its validation on three healthy subjects is presented here for the first time. A perspective on future uses and development of the technology is finally drafted. PMID:23322104

  14. Surface Heat Flux and Pressure Distribution on a Hypersonic Blunt Body With DEAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, I. I.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Oliveira, A. C.; Channes, J. B.

    2008-04-01

    With the currently growing interest for advanced technologies to enable hypersonic flight comes the Direct Energy Air Spike concept, where pulsed beamed laser energy is focused upstream of a blunt flight vehicle to disrupt the flow structure creating a virtual, slender body geometry. This allies in the vehicle both advantages of a blunt body (lower thermal stresses) to that of a slender geometry (lower wave drag). The research conducted at the Henry T. Nagamatsu Laboratory for Aerodynamics and Hypersonics focused on the measurement of the surface pressure and heat transfer rates on a blunt model. The hypersonic flight conditions were simulated at the HTN Laboratory's 0.3 m T2 Hypersonic Shock Tunnel. During the tests, the laser energy was focused upstream the model by an infrared telescope to create the DEAS effect, which was supplied by a TEA CO2 laser. Piezoelectric pressure transducers were used for the pressure measurements and fast response coaxial thermocouples were used for the measurement of surface temperature, which was later used for the estimation of the wall heat transfer using the inverse heat conduction theory.

  15. Cervical spine disease may result in a negative lumbar spinal drainage trial in normal pressure hydrocephalus: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komotar, Ricardo J; Zacharia, Brad E; Mocco, J; Kaiser, Michael G; Frucht, Stephen J; McKhann, Guy M

    2008-10-01

    In this case report, we present a patient with normal pressure hydrocephalus in whom a lumbar drainage trial yielded a false-negative result secondary to cervical spondylosis. An 80-year-old woman presented with classic symptoms of normal pressure hydrocephalus as well as evidence of cervical myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spine showed enlarged ventricles and single-level cervical canal narrowing. An initial lumbar drainage trial was performed, which revealed negative results. The patient then underwent cervical decompression and fusion. Despite this procedure, the patient's symptoms continued to worsen. A repeat lumbar drainage trial was performed with positive results. Subsequently, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was placed, resulting in significant improvement of her symptoms. This case report illustrates how altered cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics may impact the accuracy of the lumbar spinal drainage trial in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus.

  16. Association between vitamin D and pressure ulcers in older ambulatory adults: results of a matched case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalava UR

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Usha R Kalava1, Stephen S Cha2, Paul Y Takahashi1,31Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, 2Department of Biostatistics, 3Kogod Center of Aging, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USABackground: Pressure ulcers are common among older adults, but knowledge about nutritional risk factors is still developing. Vitamin D deficiency is common in the elderly population and is required for normal skin proliferation. The role of vitamin D in pressure ulceration and wound healing is not known. The purpose of this case–control study was to determine the association between vitamin D levels and pressure ulceration in an older community-dwelling cohort.Methods: All cases and controls were community-dwelling elderly older than 60 years in a primary care panel in Olmsted County, MN. Pressure ulcer cases were defined clinically. The controls were age-matched and gender-matched to controls without pressure ulceration. The main exposure variable was 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in both groups. The other exposure variable was the Charlson Comorbidity Index used to measure medical comorbidity. The analysis included univariate and conditional logistic regression for 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.Results: The average (standard deviation age of the study participants with a pressure ulcer was 80.46 years (±8.67, and the average vitamin D level was 30.92 ng/mL (±12.46. In univariate analysis, Vitamin D deficiency (levels < 25 ng/mL was associated with pressure ulcers (odds ratio: 1.871, P = 0.0154. Comorbidities of the subjects calculated using the Charlson Comorbidity Index were also associated with pressure ulcers (odds ratio: 1.136, P < 0.001. In the final conditional logistical regression model, the association of Vitamin D and pressure ulcers became nonsignificant after adjustment for comorbid illness.Conclusion: Medical comorbidities increased the risk of pressure ulceration. Vitamin D deficiency was not an independent risk factor

  17. Distribution of subcutaneous fat and the relationship with blood pressure in obese children and adolescents in Shandong, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-xiu; Wang, Shu-rong

    2015-03-01

    The association between elevated blood pressure (BP) and childhood obesity has been documented in several studies. However, the association between BP and body fat distribution in obese children remains poorly understood. We examined the distribution of subcutaneous fat and its association with BP in obese children and adolescents. Data for this study were obtained from a large cross-sectional survey of school children. A total of 38,873 students (19,485 boys and 19,388 girls) aged 7-17 years participated in this study. Height, weight, BP, subscapular and triceps skinfold thicknesses (SFT) of all subjects were measured. Obesity was defined by using body mass index (BMI) criteria recommended by the Working Group on Obesity in China. A total of 3,579 obese children and adolescents (2,367 boys and 1,212 girls) were examined. Most of the obese children and adolescents had high subcutaneous fat. However, a small number of the obese individuals had a lower SFT levels. Obese children and adolescents with high SFT and central distribution had higher BP levels than those with low SFT and peripheral distribution. Obese children and adolescents assessed by BMI might not necessarily have a high SFT level. The BP level of obese individuals is associated with the level and distribution pattern of SFT. Additional measurement of SFT is better than BMI alone to help identify high BP risks. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. CFD Prediction on the Pressure Distribution and Streamlines around an Isolated Single-Storey House Considering the Effect of Topographic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, J.; Zaini, S. S.; Aziz, M. S. A.; Majid, T. A.; Deraman, S. N. C.; Yahya, W. N. W.

    2018-04-01

    Single-storey houses are classified as low rise building and vulnerable to damages under windstorm event. This study was carried out with the aim to investigate the pressure distribution and streamlines around an isolated house by considering the effect of terrain characteristics. The topographic features such as flat, depression, ridge, and valley, are considered in this study. This simulation were analysed with Ansys FLUENT 14.0 software package. The result showed the topography characteristics influence the value of pressure coefficient and streamlines especially when the house was located at ridge terrain. The findings strongly suggested that wind analysis should include all topographic features in the analysis in order to establish the true wind force exerted on any structure.

  19. A global analysis of recent experimental results: How well determined are the parton distribution functions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morfin, J.G.

    1990-08-01

    Following is a brief summary of the results of an analysis of experimental data performed to extract the patron distribution functions. In contrast to other global analyses, this study investigated how the fit results depend on: Experimental Systematic Errors; Kinematic Cuts on the Analyzed Data and Choice of Initial Functional Forms, with a prime goal being a close look at the range of low-x behavior allowed by data. This is crucial for predictions for the SSC/LHC, HERA, and even at Tevatron Collider energies. Since all details can be found in the just released Fermilab preprint Parton Distributions from a Global QCD Analysis of Deep Inelastic Scattering and Lepton-Pair Production by J. G. M. and Wu-Ki Tung, this summary will be only a brief outline of major results. 11 refs., 13 figs

  20. Exxon nuclear power distribution control for pressurized water reactors: Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, J.S.; Burnside, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The power distribution control procedure, denoted PDC-II, described in this report enables nuclear plants to manage core power distributions such that Technical Specification Limits on F/sub Q//sup T/ are not violated during normal operation and limits on MDNBR are not violated during steady-state, load-follow, and anticipated transients. The PDC-II data base described provides the means for predicting the maximum F/sub Q//sup T/(z) distribution anticipated during operation under the PDC-II procedure taking into account the incore measured equilibrium power distribution data for the reactor in question. A comparison of this distribution with the Technical Specification limit curve determines whether the Technical Specification limit can be protected by PDC-II procedure. If such protection can be confirmed for a given operating cycle interval, APDMS monitoring is not necessary over this interval and the excore monitored constant axial offset limits will protect the Technical Specification F/sub Q//sup T/ limits. This document describes the maximum possible variation in F/sub Q//sup T/(z) which can occur during operation when following the PDC-II procedures. This bounding variation in F/sub Q//sup T/(z) is referred to as V(z). This V(z) distribution represents the maximun variation in F/sub Q//sup T/(z) when the axial offset is maintained within the range defined in this report [+- 5% at full power condition

  1. Zinc injection on the EDF pressurized light water reactors. Current results and operating experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piana, Olivier; Duval, Arnaud; Moleiro, Edgar; Benfarah, Moez; Bretelle, Jean-Luc; Chaigne, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, zinc injection, as well as pH management and hydrogen control, is increasingly considered as an essential element of PWR Primary Water Chemistry worldwide. After a first implementation of zinc injection at Bugey 2 since 2004 and Bugey 4 since 2006, EDF decided to extend this practice, which constitutes a modification of primary circuit chemical conditioning, to other units of its fleet. Currently, 15 among the 58 reactors of the French fleet are injecting depleted zinc acetate into the primary coolant water. Three main goals were identified at the beginning of this program. Indeed, the expected benefits of zinc injection were: Reduction of the rate of generalized corrosion and mitigation of stress corrosion cracking initiation on nickel based alloys (Material goal). Curative or preventive reduction of radiation sources to which workers are exposed (Radiation fields' goal). Mitigation of the AOA or CIPS risks by reduction of corrosion products releases and mitigation of crud deposition (Fuel protection goal). To monitor the zinc addition, EDF has defined a complete survey program concerning: chemistry and radiochemistry responses (primary coolant monitoring of corrosion and fission products and calculation of zinc injected, zinc removed and zinc incorporated in RCS surfaces) ; radiation fields (dose rates and deposited activities measurements) ; materials (statistical analysis of SG tube cracks) ; fuel (oxide thickness measurements and visual exams) ; effluents (corrosion products releases and isotopic distribution follow up) ; wastes (radiochemical characterization of filters). This paper will detail the present results of this monitoring program. It appears that the expected benefits of zinc injection have yet to be fully realized; further operating experience will be required in order to fully evaluate its impact. (author)

  2. Lewis pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion program. Data and calculated results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollbuhler, R. J.

    1982-03-01

    A 200 kilowatt (thermal), pressurized, fluidized bed (PFB) reactor and research test facility were designed, constructed, and operated. The facility was established to assess and evaluate the effect of PFB hot gas effluent on aircraft turbine engine materials that may have applications in stationary powerplant turbogenerators. The facility was intended for research and development work and was designed to operate over a wide range of conditions. These conditions included the type and rate of consumption of fuel (e.g., coal) and sulfur reacting sorbent material: the ratio of feed fuel to sorbent material; the ratio of feed fuel to combustion airflow; the depth of the fluidized reaction bed; the temperature and pressure in the reaction bed; and the type of test unit that was exposed to the combustion exhaust gases.

  3. INVESTIGATION RESULTS PERTAINING TO DETERMINATION OF REVERSE FLOW PRESSURE ON TREATED FLAT SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Zhuk

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The executed investigations have shown that it is possible to prepare sheet-like material for laser cutting economically viable and with small amount of power expenditure while using reverse jet cleaning for surface treatment. As compared to conventional jet cleaning technologies efficiency of the reverse jet cleaning is attributed to significant pressure increase (by 25–50 % when the jet is interacting with the treated surface. The paper proposes a mathematical model on the basis of approximate energy method (upper-bound method and the model is used for calculation of fracture pressure due to action of the reverse jet on the treated surface which consists of a corrosion deposit layer. A variational problem was solved within a framework of the developed model and the problem solution has made it possible to obtain a theoretical dependence for calculation of minimum fracture pressure value pmin in the point reverse jet impact with a barrier oretical dependence and it has taken into account yielding point of the deformed material ss, density of fractured material med material r, jet velocity uстр and parameter of reverse flowing – jet reduction ratio l. Comparison theoretical data and experimental ones (experimental data have been obtained while using a differential pressure transducer ЭДП-30 and a spring dynamometer with measuring limits 25 and 80 MPa, respectively has shown difference by 4–15 %. Determined insignificant difference between a theory and an experiment demonstrates that the obtained theoretical dependence is considered as a quite correct one and it can be used in engineering practice for prediction of power and kinematics parameters which are necessary for selection of the required pump equipment designed for realization of reverse-jet cleaning process.

  4. Experimental Results For Hydrocarbon Refrigerant Vaporization In Brazed Plate Heat Exchangers at High Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Desideri, Adriano; Schmidt Ommen, Torben; Wronski, Jorrit; Quoilin, Sylvain; Lemort, Vincent; Haglind, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution, the experimental heat transfer coefficient  and the pressure drop measured during HFC refrigerants vaporization inside small brazed plate heat exchanger (PHE) at typical evaporation temperature for organic Rankine cycle systems for low thermal energy quality applications are presented. Scientific work focusing on the heat transfer in PHEs has been carried out since the late 19th century. More recent publications have been focusing on vaporization and condensation of ref...

  5. ALOAD - a code to determine the concentrated forces equivalent with a distributed pressure field for a FEM analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae APOSTOLESCU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to describe a code for calculating an equivalent systemof concentrate loads for a FEM analysis. The tables from the Aerodynamic Department containpressure field for a whole bearing surface, and integrated quantities both for the whole surface andfor fixed and mobile part. Usually in a FEM analysis the external loads as concentrated loadsequivalent to the distributed pressure field are introduced. These concentrated forces can also be usedin static tests. Commercial codes provide solutions for this problem, but what we intend to develop isa code adapted to the user’s specific needs.

  6. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. I - Pressure distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic solutions are derived for the pressure distribution in the interaction of a weak normal shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer. The undisturbed boundary layer is characterized by the law of the wall and the law of the wake for compressible flow. In the limiting case considered, for 'high' transonic speeds, the sonic line is very close to the wall. Comparisons with experiment are shown, with corrections included for the effect of longitudinal wall curvature and for the boundary-layer displacement effect in a circular pipe.

  7. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 1: Pressure distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiter, A. F.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical solutions are derived which incorporate additional physical effects as higher order terms for the case when the sonic line is very close to the wall. The functional form used for the undisturbed velocity profile is described to indicate how various parameters will be calculated for later comparison with experiment. The basic solutions for the pressure distribution are derived. Corrections are added for flow along a wall having longitudinal curvature and for flow in a circular pipe, and comparisons with available experimental data are shown.

  8. High-pressure pair distribution function (PDF) measurement using high-energy focused x-ray beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Xinguo, E-mail: xhong@bnl.gov; Weidner, Donald J. [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Ehm, Lars [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Zhong, Zhong; Ghose, Sanjit [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Duffy, Thomas S. [Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    In this paper, we report recent development of the high-pressure pair distribution function (HP-PDF) measurement technique using a focused high-energy X-ray beam coupled with a diamond anvil cell (DAC). The focusing optics consist of a sagittally bent Laue monochromator and Kirkpatrick-Baez (K–B) mirrors. This combination provides a clean high-energy X-ray beam suitable for HP-PDF research. Demonstration of the HP-PDF technique for nanocrystalline platinum under quasi-hydrostatic condition above 30 GPa is presented.

  9. Dynamic lift measurements on a FX79W151A airfoil via pressure distribution on the wind tunnel walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolken-Moehlmann, Gerrit [ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research, University of Oldenburg (Germany); Knebel, Pascal [ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research, University of Oldenburg (Germany); Barth, Stephan [ECN Wind Energy, Energy research Centre of the (Netherlands); Peinke, Joachim [ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research, University of Oldenburg (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    We report on an experimental setup for measurements of dynamic stall for airfoils via the pressure distribution over wind tunnel walls. This measuring technique, hitherto used for lift measurements under static conditions, is also an adequate method for dynamic conditions until stall occurs. A step motor is used, allowing for sinusoidal as well as non-sinusoidal and stochastic pitching to simulate fast fluctuating flow conditions. Measurements with sinusoidal pitching and constant angular velocities were done and show dynamic stall characteristics. Under dynamic stall conditions, maximum lift coefficients were up to 80% higher than the maximum for static lift.

  10. Transient temperature and stress distributions in the pressure vessel's wall of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, G.A. da

    1979-01-01

    In order to calculate the temperature distribution in a reactor vessel wall which is under the effect of gamma radiation originated in the reactor core, a numerical solution is proposed. This problem may arise from a reactor cooling pump failure .The thermal stresses are also calculated. (Author) [pt

  11. In vitro pressure manifolding distribution evaluation of ABThera™ Active Abdominal Therapy System, V.A.C.® Abdominal Dressing System, and Barker’s vacuum packing technique conducted under dynamic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Delgado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Temporary abdominal closure methods allow for management of open abdomens where immediate primary closure is not possible and/or where repeat abdominal entries are necessary. We assessed pressure mapping and fluid extraction efficiency of three open abdomen dressing systems: ABThera™ Active Abdominal Therapy System, V.A.C.® Abdominal Dressing System, and Barker’s vacuum packing technique. Methods: An in vitro test model was designed to simulate physical conditions present in an open abdomen. The model consisted of a rigid rest platform with elevated central region and a flexible outer layer with centrally located incision. Constant −125 mmHg negative pressure was applied according to the type of system, under simulated dynamic conditions, using albumin-based solution with a viscosity of 14 cP. Data were collected by pressure sensors located circumferentially into three concentric zones: Zone 1 (closest to negative pressure source, Zone 2 (immediately outside of manifolding material edge, and Zone 3 (area most distal from negative pressure source. Each value was the result of approximately 100 pressure readings/zone/experiment with a total of three experiments for each system. Results: Pressure distribution of ABThera Therapy was significantly (p < 0.05 superior to Barker’s vacuum packing technique in all three evaluated zones. Similarly, V.A.C. Abdominal Dressing System pressure distribution was significantly (p < 0.05 improved compared to Barker’s vacuum packing technique in all zones. There were no pressure distribution differences in Zone 1 between ABThera Therapy and V.A.C. Abdominal Dressing System; however, in Zones 2 and 3, ABThera Therapy was significantly (p < 0.05 superior to V.A.C. Abdominal Dressing System. Conclusions: These data suggest that all approaches to negative pressure therapy for open abdomen treatment are not equal. Additional research should be conducted to elucidate clinical

  12. 3D Model Studies on the Effect of Bed and Powder Type Upon Radial Static Pressure and Powder Distribution in Metallurgical Shaft Furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panic B.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The flow of gases in metallurgical shaft furnaces has a decisive influence on the course and process efficiency. Radial changes in porosity of the bed cause uneven flow of gas along the radius of the reactor, which sometimes is deliberate and intentional. However, holdup of solid particles in descending packed beds of metallurgical shaft furnaces can lead to unintentional changes in porosity of the bed along the radial reactor. Unintentional changes in porosity often disrupt the flow of gas causing poor performance of the furnace. Such disruptions of flow may occur in the blast furnace due to high level of powder content in gas caused by large amount of coal dust/powder insufflated as fuel substitute. The paper describes the model test results of radial distribution of static pressure and powder hold up within metallurgical reactor. The measurements were carried out with the use of 3D physical model of two-phase flow gas-powder in the moving (descending packed bed. Sinter or blast furnace pellets were used as packed bed while carbon powder or iron powder were used as the powder. Wide diversity within both static pressure distribution and powder distribution along the radius of the reactor were observed once the change in the type of powder occurred.

  13. Effect of Spinal Manipulation of Upper Cervical Vertebrae on Blood Pressure: Results of a Pilot Sham-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, Christine M; Salsbury, Stacie A; Vining, Robert D; Long, Cynthia R; Pohlman, Katherine A; Weeks, William B; Lamas, Gervasio A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this pilot sham-controlled clinical trial was to estimate the treatment effect and safety of toggle recoil spinal manipulation for blood pressure management. Fifty-one participants with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension (systolic blood pressure ranging from 135 to 159 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure ranging from 85 to 99 mm Hg) were allocated by an adaptive design to 2 treatments: toggle recoil spinal manipulation or a sham procedure. Participants were seen by a doctor of chiropractic twice weekly for 6 weeks and remained on their antihypertensive medications, as prescribed, throughout the trial. Blood pressure was assessed at baseline and after study visits 1, 6 (week 3), and 12 (week 6), with the primary end point at week 6. Analysis of covariance was used to compare mean blood pressure changes from baseline between groups at each end point, controlling for sex, age, body mass index, and baseline blood pressure. Adjusted mean change from baseline to week 6 was greater in the sham group (systolic, -4.2 mm Hg; diastolic, -1.6 mm Hg) than in the spinal manipulation group (systolic, 0.6 mm Hg; diastolic, 0.7 mm Hg), but the difference was not statistically significant. No serious and few adverse events were noted. Six weeks of toggle recoil spinal manipulation did not lower systolic or diastolic blood pressure when compared with a sham procedure. No serious adverse events from either treatment were reported. Our results do not support a larger clinical trial. Further research to understand the potential mechanisms of action involving upper cervical manipulation on blood pressure is warranted before additional clinical investigations are conducted. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Results on the gravity of quantum Fermi pressure of localized matter: A new test of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unnikrishnan, C.S.; Gillies, G.T.

    2006-01-01

    Recently Ehlers, Ozsvath, and Schucking discussed whether pressure contributes to active gravitational mass as required by general relativity. They pointed out that there is no experimental information on this available, though precision measurement of the gravitational constant should provide a test of this foundational aspect of gravity. We had used a similar argument earlier to test the contribution of leptons to the active gravitational mass. In this paper we use the result from the Zuerich gravitational constant experiment to provide the first adequate experimental input regarding the active gravitational mass of Fermi pressure. Apart from confirming the equality of the passive and active gravitational roles of the pressure term in general relativity within an accuracy of 5%, our results are consistent with the theoretical expectation of the cancellation of the gravity of pressure by the gravity of the surface tension of confined matter. This result on the active gravitational mass of the quantum zero-point Fermi pressure in the atomic nucleus is also interesting from the point of view of studying the interplay between quantum physics and classical gravity

  15. Some important results from the air pollution distribution model STACKS (1988-1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbrink, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is paid to the results of the study on the distribution of air pollutants by high chimney-stacks of electric power plants. An important product of the study is the integrated distribution model STACKS (Short Term Air-pollutant Concentrations Kema modelling System). The improvements and the extensions of STACKS are described in relation to the National Model, which has been used to estimate the environmental effects of individual chimney-stacks. The National Model shows unacceptable variations for high pollutant sources. Based on the results of STACKS revision of the National model has been taken into consideration. By means of the revised National Model a more realistic estimation of the environmental effects of electric power plants can be carried out

  16. Bubble formation occurs in insulin pumps in response to changes in ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure but not as a result of vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Prudence E; King, Bruce R; Goss, Peter W; Chockalingam, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Bubble formation in insulin pump giving sets is a common problem. We studied change in temperature, change in atmospheric pressure, and vibration as potential mechanisms of bubble formation. 5 Animas 2020 pumps with 2 mL cartridges and Inset II infusion systems, 5 Medtronic Paradigm pumps with 1.8 mL cartridge and Quickset and 3 Roche Accu-chek pumps with 3.15 mL cartridges were used. Temperature study: insulin pumps were exposed to a temperature change from 4°C to 37°C. Pressure study: insulin pumps were taken to an altitude of 300 m. Vibration study: insulin pumps were vigorously shaken. All were observed for bubble formation. Bubble formation was observed with changes in temperature and atmospheric pressure. Bubble formation did not occur with vibration. Changes in insulin temperature and atmospheric pressure are common and may result in bubble formation. Vibration may distribute bubbles but does not cause bubble formation.

  17. First results with twisted mass fermions towards the computation of parton distribution functions on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Cyprus Institute, Nicosia; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron; Cichy, Krzysztof; Poznan Univ.; Drach, Vincent; Garcia-Ramos, Elena; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin; Hadjiyiannakou, Kyriakos; Jansen, Karl; Steffens, Fernanda; Wiese, Christian

    2014-11-01

    We report on our exploratory study for the evaluation of the parton distribution functions from lattice QCD, based on a new method proposed in Ref.∝arXiv:1305.1539. Using the example of the nucleon, we compare two different methods to compute the matrix elements needed, and investigate the application of gauge link smearing. We also present first results from a large production ensemble and discuss the future challenges related to this method.

  18. The influence of dose distributions on the results of UV-biodosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabaj, A.; Sommer, R.; Kundi, M.

    1996-01-01

    Disinfection of drinking water with ultraviolet radiation has become a common method in Austria and in many other countries. The water usually is disinfected in flow through systems with low pressure mercury lamps as UV source, which emit predominantly UV radiation with wavelength 253.7 nm. Because of varying residence times of microorganizms and the special distribution of fluence rate in the irradiation volume, caused by different distances from the radiation source, by absorption of radiation in the water and by reflexion at the walls of the reactor, the microorganizms passing through in a turbulent flow, receive different fluences. In Austria UV-disinfection plants for drinking water must deliver a minimal dose of 400 Jm -2 for radiation of wavelength 253.7 nm. The fulfillment of this demand is proved during type testing. As dosimeter suspensions of bacterial spores are used whose UV-susceptibility has to be measured in a laboratory irradiation device. The dose, determined in this way, is called Reduction Equivalent Dose'. (author)

  19. Towards 4-loop NSPT result for a 3-dimensional condensate-contribution to hot QCD pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Torrero, C.; Schroder, Y.; Di Renzo, F.; Miccio, V.

    2007-01-01

    Thanks to dimensional reduction, the contributions to the hot QCD pressure coming from so-called soft modes can be studied via an effective three-dimensional theory named Electrostatic QCD (spatial Yang-Mills fields plus an adjoint Higgs scalar). The poor convergence of the perturbative series within EQCD suggests to perform lattice measurements of some of the associated gluon condensates. These turn out, however, to be plagued by large discretization artifacts. We discuss how Numerical Stochastic Perturbation Theory can be exploited to determine the full lattice spacing dependence of one of these condensates up to 4-loop order, and sharpen our tools on a concrete 2-loop example.

  20. Changes in Angiotensin Receptor Distribution and in Aortic Morphology Are Associated with Blood Pressure Control in Aged Metabolic Syndrome Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Guarner-Lans

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS in blood pressure regulation in MS during aging is unknown. It participates in metabolic syndrome (MS and aging regulating vascular tone and remodeling. RAS might participate in a compensatory mechanism decreasing blood pressure and allowing MS rats to reach 18 months of age and it might form part of therapeutical procedures to ameliorate MS. We studied histological changes and distribution of RAS receptors in aortas of MS aged rats. Electron microscopy images showed premature aging in MS since the increased fibrosis, enlarged endothelium, and invasion of this layer by muscle cells that was present in control 18-month-old aortas were also found in 6-month-old aortas from MS rats. AT1, AT2, and Mas receptors mediate the effects of Ang II and Ang 1-7, respectively. Fluorescence from AT2 decreased with age in control and MS aortas, while fluorescence of AT1 increased in aortas from MS rats at 6 months and diminished during aging. Mas expression increased in MS rats and remained unchanged in control rats. In conclusion, there is premature aging in the aortas from MS rats and the elevated expression of Mas receptor might contribute to decrease blood pressure during aging in MS.

  1. The effect of moderate running on foot posture index and plantar pressure distribution in male recreational runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla-Martínez, Elena; Martínez-Nova, Alfonso; Gómez-Martín, Beatriz; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Raquel; Fernández-Seguín, Lourdes María

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue due to running has been shown to contribute to changes in plantar pressure distribution. However, little is known about changes in foot posture after running. We sought to compare the foot posture index before and after moderate exercise and to relate any changes to plantar pressure patterns. A baropodometric evaluation was made, using the FootScan platform (RSscan International, Olen, Belgium), of 30 men who were regular runners and their foot posture was examined using the Foot Posture Index before and after a 60-min continuous run at a moderate pace (3.3 m/sec). Foot posture showed a tendency toward pronation after the 60-min run, gaining 2 points in the foot posture index. The total support and medial heel contact areas increased, as did pressures under the second metatarsal head and medial heel. Continuous running at a moderate speed (3.3 m/sec) induced changes in heel strike related to enhanced pronation posture, indicative of greater stress on that zone after physical activity. This observation may help us understand the functioning of the foot, prevent injuries, and design effective plantar orthoses in sport.

  2. Contributions of mean and shape of blood pressure distribution to worldwide trends and variations in raised blood pressure: a pooled analysis of 1018 population-based measurement studies with 88.6 million participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-19

    Change in the prevalence of raised blood pressure could be due to both shifts in the entire distribution of blood pressure (representing the combined effects of public health interventions and secular trends) and changes in its high-blood-pressure tail (representing successful clinical interventions to control blood pressure in the hypertensive population). Our aim was to quantify the contributions of these two phenomena to the worldwide trends in the prevalence of raised blood pressure. We pooled 1018 population-based studies with blood pressure measurements on 88.6 million participants from 1985 to 2016. We first calculated mean systolic blood pressure (SBP), mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and prevalence of raised blood pressure by sex and 10-year age group from 20-29 years to 70-79 years in each study, taking into account complex survey design and survey sample weights, where relevant. We used a linear mixed effect model to quantify the association between (probit-transformed) prevalence of raised blood pressure and age-group- and sex-specific mean blood pressure. We calculated the contributions of change in mean SBP and DBP, and of change in the prevalence-mean association, to the change in prevalence of raised blood pressure. In 2005-16, at the same level of population mean SBP and DBP, men and women in South Asia and in Central Asia, the Middle East and North Africa would have the highest prevalence of raised blood pressure, and men and women in the high-income Asia Pacific and high-income Western regions would have the lowest. In most region-sex-age groups where the prevalence of raised blood pressure declined, one half or more of the decline was due to the decline in mean blood pressure. Where prevalence of raised blood pressure has increased, the change was entirely driven by increasing mean blood pressure, offset partly by the change in the prevalence-mean association. Change in mean blood pressure is the main driver of the worldwide change in

  3. Stability results for stochastic delayed recurrent neural networks with discrete and distributed delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guiling; Li, Dingshi; Shi, Lin; van Gaans, Onno; Verduyn Lunel, Sjoerd

    2018-03-01

    We present new conditions for asymptotic stability and exponential stability of a class of stochastic recurrent neural networks with discrete and distributed time varying delays. Our approach is based on the method using fixed point theory, which do not resort to any Liapunov function or Liapunov functional. Our results neither require the boundedness, monotonicity and differentiability of the activation functions nor differentiability of the time varying delays. In particular, a class of neural networks without stochastic perturbations is also considered. Examples are given to illustrate our main results.

  4. Effects of induced Na+/Ca2+ exchanger overexpression on the spatial distribution of L-type Ca2+ channels and junctophilin-2 in pressure-overloaded hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujihara, Yoshihiro; Mohri, Satoshi; Katanosaka, Yuki

    2016-11-25

    The Na + /Ca 2+ exchanger 1 (NCX1) is an essential Ca 2+ efflux system in cardiomyocytes. Although NCX1 is distributed throughout the sarcolemma, a subpopulation of NCX1 is localized to transverse (T)-tubules. There is growing evidence that T-tubule disorganization is a causal event that shifts the transition from hypertrophy to heart failure (HF). However, the detailed molecular mechanisms have not been clarified. Previously, we showed that induced NCX1 expression in pressure-overloaded hearts attenuates defective excitation-contraction coupling and HF progression. Here, we examined the effects of induced NCX1 overexpression on the spatial distribution of L-type Ca 2+ channels (LTCCs) and junctophilin-2 (JP2), a structural protein that connects the T-tubule and sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane, in pressure-overloaded hearts. Quantitative analysis showed that the regularity of NCX1 localization was significantly decreased at 8 weeks after transverse aortic constriction (TAC)-surgery; however, T-tubule organization and the regularities of LTCC and JP2 immunofluorescent signals were maintained at this time point. These observations demonstrated that release of NCX1 from the T-tubule area occurred before the onset of T-tubule disorganization and LTCC and JP2 mislocalization. Moreover, induced NCX1 overexpression at 8 weeks post-TAC not only recovered NCX1 regularity but also prevented the decrease in LTCC and JP2 regularities at 16 weeks post-TAC. These results suggested that NCX1 may play an important role in the proper spatial distribution of LTCC and JP2 in T-tubules in the context of pressure-overloading. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Planck intermediate results: V. Pressure profiles of galaxy clusters from the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, J.G.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.

    2013-01-01

    that most clusters are individually detected at least out to R500. By stacking the radial profiles, we have statistically detected the radial SZ signal out to 3 × R500, i.e., at a density contrast of about 50-100, though the dispersion about the mean profile dominates the statistical errors across the whole......Taking advantage of the all-sky coverage and broadfrequency range of the Planck satellite, we study the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) and pressure profiles of 62 nearby massive clusters detected at high significance in the 14-month nominal survey. Careful reconstruction of the SZ signal indicates...... flatter than most predictions from numerical simulations. Combining the SZ and X-ray observed profiles into a joint fit to a generalised pressure profile gives best-fit parameters [P0,c500,γ, α,β] = [6.41,1.81,0.31,1.33,4.13]. Using a reasonable hypothesis for the gas temperature in the cluster outskirts...

  6. Pressurized-thermal-shock experiments: PTSE-1 results and PTSE-2 plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, R.H.; Nanstad, R.K.; Wanner, R.; Merkle, J.G.; Robinson, G.C.; Whitman, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    The first pressurized-thermal-shock experiment (PTSE-1) was performed with a vessel with a 1-m-long flaw in a plug of specially tempered steel having the composition of SA-508 forging steel. The second experiment (PTSE-2) will have a similar arrangement, but the material in which the flaw will be implanted is being prepared to have low tearing resistance. Special tempering of a 2 1/4 Cr - 1 Mo steel plate has been shown to induce a low Charpy impact energy in the upper-shelf temperature range. The purpose of PTSE-2 is to investigate the fracture behavior of low-upper-shelf material in a vessel under the combined loading of concurrent pressure and thermal shock. The primary objective of the experimental plan is to induce a rapidly propagating cleavage fracture under conditions that are likely to induce a ductile tearing instability at the time of arrest of the cleavage fracture. The secondary objective of the test is to extend the range of the investigation of warm prestressing. 11 figs

  7. Impact of droplet evaporation rate on resulting in vitro performance parameters of pressurized metered dose inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Poonam; Grimes, Matthew R; Stein, Stephen W; Myrdal, Paul B

    2017-08-07

    Pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) are widely used for the treatment of pulmonary diseases. The overall efficiency of pMDI drug delivery may be defined by in vitro parameters such as the amount of drug that deposits on the model throat and the proportion of the emitted dose that has particles that are sufficiently small to deposit in the lung (i.e., fine particle fraction, FPF). The study presented examines product performance of ten solution pMDI formulations containing a variety of cosolvents with diverse chemical characteristics by cascade impaction with three inlets (USP induction port, Alberta Idealized Throat, and a large volume chamber). Through the data generated in support of this study, it was demonstrated that throat deposition, cascade impactor deposition, FPF, and mass median aerodynamic diameter of solution pMDIs depend on the concentration and vapor pressure of the cosolvent, and the selection of model throat. Theoretical droplet lifetimes were calculated for each formulation using a discrete two-stage evaporation process model and it was determined that the droplet lifetime is highly correlated to throat deposition and FPF indicating that evaporation kinetics significantly influences pMDI drug delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Theoretical and experimental results of a mesoscale electric power generation system from pressurized gas flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krähenbühl, D; Kolar, J W; Zwyssig, C; Weser, H

    2009-01-01

    In many process applications where throttling is used to reduce pressure, the potential to obtain net work output is sacrificed to the throttling process. Examples are throttling valves of gas pipelines and conventional throttles in automotive applications or turbo expanders as used in cryogenic plants. With a new pressure reduction system that produces electricity while expanding the gas, the lost potential to obtain work output can be recovered. To achieve a high power density, this energy generation system requires an increased operating speed of the electrical machine and the turbomachinery. This paper presents a miniature compressed-air-to-electric-power system, based on a radial turbine with a rated rotational speed of 490 000 rpm and a rated electric power output of 150 W. A comprehensive description including turbine, diffuser and permanent magnet (PM) generator is given. Finally, measurements of the compressed-air-to-electric-power system with a maximum rotational speed of over 600 000 rpm, a maximum electric output power of 170 W, a maximum torque of 5.2 mN m and a turbine efficiency of 52% are presented

  9. A coupled diffusion-fluid pressure model to predict cell density distribution for cells encapsulated in a porous hydrogel scaffold under mechanical loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feihu; Vaughan, Ted J; Mc Garrigle, Myles J; McNamara, Laoise M

    2017-10-01

    Tissue formation within tissue engineering (TE) scaffolds is preceded by growth of the cells throughout the scaffold volume and attachment of cells to the scaffold substrate. It is known that mechanical stimulation, in the form of fluid perfusion or mechanical strain, enhances cell differentiation and overall tissue formation. However, due to the complex multi-physics environment of cells within TE scaffolds, cell transport under mechanical stimulation is not fully understood. Therefore, in this study, we have developed a coupled multiphysics model to predict cell density distribution in a TE scaffold. In this model, cell transport is modelled as a thermal conduction process, which is driven by the pore fluid pressure under applied loading. As a case study, the model is investigated to predict the cell density patterns of pre-osteoblasts MC3T3-e1 cells under a range of different loading regimes, to obtain an understanding of desirable mechanical stimulation that will enhance cell density distribution within TE scaffolds. The results of this study have demonstrated that fluid perfusion can result in a higher cell density in the scaffold region closed to the outlet, while cell density distribution under mechanical compression was similar with static condition. More importantly, the study provides a novel computational approach to predict cell distribution in TE scaffolds under mechanical loading. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrasonic test results for the reactor pressure vessel of the HTTR. Longitudinal welding line of bottom dome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojiri, Naoki; Ohwada, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yasushi

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes the inspection method, the measured area, etc. of the ultrasonic test of the in-service inspection (ISI) for welding lines of the reactor pressure vessel of the HTTR and the inspection results of the longitudinal welding line of the bottom dome. The pre-service inspection (PSI) results for estimation of occurrence and progression of defects to compare the ISI results is described also. (author)

  11. Impact of renal denervation on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure: results from SYMPLICITY HTN-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakris, George L; Townsend, Raymond R; Liu, Minglei; Cohen, Sidney A; D'Agostino, Ralph; Flack, John M; Kandzari, David E; Katzen, Barry T; Leon, Martin B; Mauri, Laura; Negoita, Manuela; O'Neill, William W; Oparil, Suzanne; Rocha-Singh, Krishna; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2014-09-16

    Prior studies of catheter-based renal artery denervation have not systematically performed ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) to assess the efficacy of the procedure. SYMPLICITY HTN-3 (Renal Denervation in Patients With Uncontrolled Hypertension) was a prospective, blinded, randomized, sham-controlled trial. The current analysis details the effect of renal denervation or a sham procedure on ABPM measurements 6 months post-randomization. Patients with resistant hypertension were randomized 2:1 to renal denervation or sham control. Patients were on a stable antihypertensive regimen including maximally tolerated doses of at least 3 drugs including a diuretic before randomization. The powered secondary efficacy endpoint was a change in mean 24-h ambulatory systolic blood pressure (SBP). Nondipper to dipper (nighttime blood pressure [BP] 10% to 20% lower than daytime BP) conversion was calculated at 6 months. The 24-h ambulatory SBP changed -6.8 ± 15.1 mm Hg in the denervation group and -4.8 ± 17.3 mm Hg in the sham group: difference of -2.0 mm Hg (95% confidence interval [CI]: -5.0 to 1.1; p = 0.98 with a 2 mm Hg superiority margin). The daytime ambulatory SBP change difference between groups was -1.1 (95% CI: -4.3 to 2.2; p = 0.52). The nocturnal ambulatory SBP change difference between groups was -3.3 (95 CI: -6.7 to 0.1; p = 0.06). The percent of nondippers converted to dippers was 21.2% in the denervation group and 15.0% in the sham group (95% CI: -3.8% to 16.2%; p = 0.30). Change in 24-h heart rate was -1.4 ± 7.4 in the denervation group and -1.3 ± 7.3 in the sham group; (95% CI: -1.5 to 1.4; p = 0.94). This trial did not demonstrate a benefit of renal artery denervation on reduction in ambulatory BP in either the 24-h or day and night periods compared with sham (Renal Denervation in Patients With Uncontrolled Hypertension [SYMPLICITY HTN-3]; NCT01418261). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by

  12. A new predictive indicator for development of pressure ulcers in bedridden patients based on common laboratory tests results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, N; Yamamoto, Y; Ichihara, K; Mastuo, S; Nakamura, Y; Watanabe, M; Iwatani, Y

    2008-04-01

    Various scales have been devised to predict development of pressure ulcers on the basis of clinical and laboratory data, such as the Braden Scale (Braden score), which is used to monitor activity and skin conditions of bedridden patients. However, none of these scales facilitates clinically reliable prediction. To develop a clinical laboratory data-based predictive equation for the development of pressure ulcers. Subjects were 149 hospitalised patients with respiratory disorders who were monitored for the development of pressure ulcers over a 3-month period. The proportional hazards model (Cox regression) was used to analyse the results of 12 basic laboratory tests on the day of hospitalisation in comparison with Braden score. Pressure ulcers developed in 38 patients within the study period. A Cox regression model consisting solely of Braden scale items showed that none of these items contributed to significantly predicting pressure ulcers. Rather, a combination of haemoglobin (Hb), C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin (Alb), age, and gender produced the best model for prediction. Using the set of explanatory variables, we created a new indicator based on a multiple logistic regression equation. The new indicator showed high sensitivity (0.73) and specificity (0.70), and its diagnostic power was higher than that of Alb, Hb, CRP, or the Braden score alone. The new indicator may become a more useful clinical tool for predicting presser ulcers than Braden score. The new indicator warrants verification studies to facilitate its clinical implementation in the future.

  13. Quantitative angiography of the left anterior descending coronary artery: correlations with pressure gradient and results of exercise thallium scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijns, W.; Serruys, P.W.; Reiber, J.H.; van den Brand, M.; Simoons, M.L.; Kooijman, C.J.; Balakumaran, K.; Hugenholtz, P.G.

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate, during cardiac catheterization, what constitutes a physiologically significant obstruction to blood flow in the human coronary system, computer-based quantitative analysis of coronary angiograms was performed on the angiograms of 31 patients with isolated disease of the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery. The angiographic severity of stenosis was compared with the transstenotic pressure gradient measured with the dilation catheter during angioplasty and with the results of exercise thallium scintigraphy. A curvilinear relationship was found between the pressure gradient across the stenosis (normalized for the mean aortic pressure) and the residual minimal area of obstruction (after subtracting the area of the angioplasty catheter). This relationship was best fitted by the equation: normalized mean pressure gradient . a + b . log [obstruction area], r . .74. The measurements of the percent area of stenosis (cutoff 80%) and of the transstenotic pressure gradient (cutoff 0.30) obtained at rest correctly predicted the occurrence of thallium perfusion defects induced by exercise in 83% of the patients

  14. Retrieval of temperature and pressure using broadband solar occultation: SOFIE approach and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Marshall

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of atmospheric temperature as a function of pressure, T(P, is key to understanding many atmospheric processes and a prerequisite for retrieving gas mixing ratios and other parameters from solar occultation measurements. This paper gives a brief overview of the solar occultation measurement technique followed by a detailed discussion of the mechanisms that make the measurement sensitive to temperature. Methods for retrieving T(P using both broadband transmittance and refraction are discussed. Investigations using measurements of broadband transmittance in two CO2 absorption bands (the 4.3 and 2.7 μm bands and refractive bending are then presented. These investigations include sensitivity studies, simulated retrieval studies, and examples from SOFIE.

  15. Effect of preemptive weld overlay sequence on residual stress distribution for dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant pressurizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hong Yeol; Song, Tae Kwang; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation method which arrest crack. An overlay weld sued in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). PWOL was good for distribution of residual stress of Dissimilar Metal Weld(DMW) by previous research. Because range of overlay welding is wide relatively, residual stress distribution on PWR is affected by welding sequence. In order to examine the effect of welding sequence, PWOL was applied to a specific DMW of KORI nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, the welding direction that from nozzle to pipe is better good for residual stress distribution on PWR.

  16. Effect of preemptive weld overlay sequence on residual stress distribution for dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Hong Yeol; Song, Tae Kwang; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong

    2008-01-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation method which arrest crack. An overlay weld sued in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). PWOL was good for distribution of residual stress of Dissimilar Metal Weld(DMW) by previous research. Because range of overlay welding is wide relatively, residual stress distribution on PWR is affected by welding sequence. In order to examine the effect of welding sequence, PWOL was applied to a specific DMW of KORI nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, the welding direction that from nozzle to pipe is better good for residual stress distribution on PWR

  17. Experimental results of current distribution in Rutherford-type LHC cables

    CERN Document Server

    Verweij, A P

    2000-01-01

    Current distribution among the wires of multi-strand superconducting cables is an important item for accelerator magnets. A non-uniform distribution could cause additional field distortions in the magnet bore and can as well be one of the reasons of premature quenching. Since two years electrical measurements on superconducting Rutherford-type cables are performed at CERN as part of the reception tests for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Cable samples of 2.4 m length are tested at currents up to 32 kA, temperatures around 1.9 and 4.3 K, and fields up to 10 T, applied perpendicularly as well as parallel to the broad face of the cable. Last year, an array of 24 Hall probes was installed in the test set-up in order to measure the self-field of the cable samples along one cable pitch. Each of the probes measures the local field generated by the current in the strands close by, and the results of the all probes reflect therefore the distribution of the strand currents. Experiments are done varying the applied fie...

  18. Application and results of whole-body autoradiography in distribution studies of organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, K

    1983-01-01

    With the growing concern for the health hazards of occupational exposure to toxic substances attention has been focused on the organic solvents, which are associated with both deleterious nervous system effects and specific tissue injuries. Relatively little is known about the distribution of organic solvents and their metabolites in the living organism. Knowledge of the specific tissue localizations and retention of solvents and solvent metabolites is of great value in revealing and understanding the sites and mechanisms of organic solvent toxicity. Whole-body autoradiography has been modified and applied to distribution studies of benzene, toluene, m-xylene, styrene, methylene chloride, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene and carbon disulfide. The high volatility of these substances has led to the development of cryo-techniques. Whole-body autoradiographic techniques applicable to the study of volatile substances are reviewed. The localizations of nonvolatile solvent metabolites and firmly bound metabolites have also been examined. The obtained results are discussed in relation to toxic effects and evaluated by comparison with other techniques used in distribution studies of organic solvents and their metabolites.

  19. Lumped versus distributed thermoregulatory control: results from a three-dimensional dynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, J; Buse, M; Foegen, A

    1989-01-01

    In this study we use a three-dimensional model of the human thermal system, the spatial grid of which is 0.5 ... 1.0 cm. The model is based on well-known physical heat-transfer equations, and all parameters of the passive system have definite physical values. According to the number of substantially different areas and organs, 54 spatially different values are attributed to each physical parameter. Compatibility of simulation and experiment was achieved solely on the basis of physical considerations and physiological basic data. The equations were solved using a modification of the alternating direction implicit method. On the basis of this complex description of the passive system close to reality, various lumped and distributed parameter control equations were tested for control of metabolic heat production, blood flow and sweat production. The simplest control equations delivering results on closed-loop control compatible with experimental evidence were determined. It was concluded that it is essential to take into account the spatial distribution of heat production, blood flow and sweat production, and that at least for control of shivering, distributed controller gains different from the pattern of distribution of muscle tissue are required. For sweat production this is not so obvious, so that for simulation of sweating control after homogeneous heat load a lumped parameter control may be justified. Based on these conclusions three-dimensional temperature profiles for cold and heat load and the dynamics for changes of the environmental conditions were computed. In view of the exact simulation of the passive system and the compatibility with experimentally attainable variables there is good evidence that those values extrapolated by the simulation are adequately determined. The model may be used both for further analysis of the real thermoregulatory mechanisms and for special applications in environmental and clinical health care.

  20. Lateral distribution of cosmic ray muons underground. Results from the CosmoALEPH experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tcaciuc, R.

    2006-01-01

    The CosmoALEPH experiment, located underground at the LEP e + e - storage ring at CERN at a depth of 320 m water equivalent, was used to study the chemical composition of primary cosmic rays up to 10 PeV energies from the measurement of high energy muons, created in extensive air showers by interactions of primary nuclei in the atmosphere. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the Hadron Calorimeter of the ALEPH detector and six scintillator stations located at distances up to 1 km from each other were used to analyse the decoherence curve, multiplicity and transverse momentum distributions of energetic cosmic muons. The experimental data were compared with predictions from different Monte Carlo (MC) models and mass composition approaches. From a comparison between the measured decoherence distribution with CosmoALEPH and the MC predicted decoherence curves for proton, helium and iron, a primary composition of (77±11) % protons and (23±11) % iron nuclei with a χ 2 -probability of 84 % was determined, based on the predictions of the VENUS model with the constant mass composition approach. The analysis of the decoherence curve, with consideration of correlations between the measured CosmoALEPH parameters, leads to a composition of (88±8) % protons and (12±8) % iron nuclei for cosmic rays with a χ 2 -probability of 53 %. The absolute comparison between the measured multiplicity and transverse momentum distributions in the TPC and those predicted by different Monte Carlo models results also in a dominant light composition. The experimental data are in a good agreement with MC data lying between proton and helium primaries. The results obtained for the primary composition of cosmic rays up to the knee region are consistent with the results from other experiments. (orig.)

  1. Lateral distribution of cosmic ray muons underground. Results from the CosmoALEPH experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tcaciuc, R.

    2006-07-01

    The CosmoALEPH experiment, located underground at the LEP e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring at CERN at a depth of 320 m water equivalent, was used to study the chemical composition of primary cosmic rays up to 10 PeV energies from the measurement of high energy muons, created in extensive air showers by interactions of primary nuclei in the atmosphere. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the Hadron Calorimeter of the ALEPH detector and six scintillator stations located at distances up to 1 km from each other were used to analyse the decoherence curve, multiplicity and transverse momentum distributions of energetic cosmic muons. The experimental data were compared with predictions from different Monte Carlo (MC) models and mass composition approaches. From a comparison between the measured decoherence distribution with CosmoALEPH and the MC predicted decoherence curves for proton, helium and iron, a primary composition of (77{+-}11) % protons and (23{+-}11) % iron nuclei with a {chi}{sup 2}-probability of 84 % was determined, based on the predictions of the VENUS model with the constant mass composition approach. The analysis of the decoherence curve, with consideration of correlations between the measured CosmoALEPH parameters, leads to a composition of (88{+-}8) % protons and (12{+-}8) % iron nuclei for cosmic rays with a {chi}{sup 2} -probability of 53 %. The absolute comparison between the measured multiplicity and transverse momentum distributions in the TPC and those predicted by different Monte Carlo models results also in a dominant light composition. The experimental data are in a good agreement with MC data lying between proton and helium primaries. The results obtained for the primary composition of cosmic rays up to the knee region are consistent with the results from other experiments. (orig.)

  2. Distribution of Rare Earth Metals in Technogenic Wastes of Energy Enterprises (Results of the Laboratory Studies)

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandr Ivanovich Khanchuk; Aleksandr Alekseevich Yudakov; Mikhail Azaryevich Medkov; Leonid Nikolayevich Alekseyko; Andrey Vasilyevich Taskin; Sergey Igorevich Ivannikov

    2016-01-01

    The results of the research interaction between ash and slag samples from Vladivostok TPP’s landfills saturated with underburning and ammonium hydrodifluoride were given. It was found out that the reactions of the main components of a concentrate with NH4HF2 are flowing with creation of complex ammonium fluoro-metalate. It is shown that the distribution of REM (rare earth metals) between foam and heavier products is going during the flotation process of carbon-containing ash and slag samples ...

  3. The vertical ground reaction force and the pressure distribution on the claws of dairy cows while walking on a flat substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, van der P.P.J.; Metz, J.H.M.; Noordhuizen-Stassen, E.N.; Back, W.; Braam, C.R.; Weijs, W.A.

    2003-01-01

    The pressure distribution under the bovine claw while walking was measured to test the hypotheses that the vertical ground reaction force is unevenly distributed and makes some (regions of the) claws more prone to injuries due to overloading than others. Each limb of nine recently trimmed Holstein

  4. Effects of neuroendocrine changes on results of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oświecimska, Joanna; Ziora, Katarzyna; Adamczyk, Piotr; Roczniak, Wojciech; Pikiewicz-Koch, Anna; Stojewska, Małgorzata; Dyduch, Antoni

    2007-08-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is characterized by marked neuroendocrine and autonomic dysfunctions. In the recent studies using automatic blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), lower BP values and lack of circardian variation of BP in anorectic patients were demonstrated. Unfortunately effects of hormonal changes, that may explain BP abnormalities were not analysed together. The aim of our study was the assessment of ABPM and hormonal status in anorectic girls. The study was performed on hospitalized 25 female anorectic adolescents aged 12-18 years. Control group was 17 age and height matched girls with normal weight and negative history for hypertension. ABPM was performed between 5 and 7 day of hospitalization, every 30 minutes during active period and every 60 minutes during sleep. Hormones (FSH, LH, estradiol, cortisol and fT4) serum concentrations were also evaluated. Mean systolic BP values were significantly lower in patients with AN in comparison to controls. Maximal diastolic and mean arterial pressure values for the whole day and active period but not for sleep were lower in AN than in controls. Anorectic girls showed tendency to night-time bradycardia. Moreover, there were no physiological circadian variations of BP in AN. We conclude that hormonal regulation of blood pressure and heart rate in anorectic patients is at least partially preserved. Lower blood pressure values, bradycardia and lack of physiological night fall of BP in anorectic patients may result from altered autonomic system function resulting from hormonal disturbances and other centrally mediated mechanisms.

  5. TexiCare: an innovative embedded device for pressure ulcer prevention. Preliminary results with a paraplegic volunteer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenu, Olivier; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Bucki, Marek; Diot, Bruno; Cannard, Francis; Payan, Yohan

    2013-08-01

    This paper introduces the recently developed TexiCare device that aims at preventing pressure ulcers for people with spinal cord injury. This embedded device is aimed to be mounted on the user wheelchair. Its sensor is 100% textile and allows the measurement of pressures at the interface between the cushion and the buttocks. It is comfortable, washable and low cost. It is connected to a cigarette-box sized unit that (i) measures the pressures in real time, (ii) estimates the risk for internal over-strains, and (iii) alerts the wheelchair user whenever necessary. The alert method has been defined as a result of a utility/usability/acceptability study conducted with representative end users. It is based on a tactile-visual feedback (via a watch or a smartphone for example): the tactile modality is used to discreetly alarm the person while the visual modality conveys an informative message. In order to evaluate the usability of the TexiCare device, a paraplegic volunteer equipped his wheelchair at home during a six months period. Interestingly, the first results revealed bad habits such as an inadequate posture when watching TV, rare relief maneuvers, and the occurrence of abnormal high pressures. Copyright © 2013 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Research on Normal Human Plantar Pressure Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xi Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FSR400 pressure sensor, nRF905 wireless transceiver and MSP40 SCM are used to design the insole pressure collection system, LabVIEW is used to make HMI of data acquisition, collecting a certain amount of normal human foot pressure data, statistical analysis of pressure distribution relations about five stages of swing phase during walking, using the grid closeness degree to identify plantar pressure distribution pattern recognition, and the algorithm simulation, experimental results demonstrated this method feasible.

  7. Experimental results for the extraction of essential oil from Lippia sidoides cham. using pressurized carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa EMBD.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The odoriferous species Lippia sidoides Cham. is abundant in the Brazilian Northeast. Its essential oil possesses antiseptic activity due to the presence of thymol. In this work, thermodynamic and kinetic data were experimentally determined for the CO2 + L. sidoides system. Solubility was determined using the dynamic method at pressures of 66.7 and 78.5 bar and temperatures of 283.15, 288.15, 293.15, 295.15, and 298.15 K. SFE kinetic data were obtained at 288.15 K and 66.7 bar. The composition of the multicomponent solute mixture was determined by GC-MS and compared to the composition of both the volatile oil obtained by steam distillation and the oleoresin obtained using ethanol. The SFE process yield was higher than the yield of either the steam distillation or the ethanol extraction. The solubilities were correlated using the Peng-Robinson equation of state with one binary interaction parameter for the attractive term, considering the essential oil as a pseudo-component. Sovová?s model quantitatively described the overall extraction curve.

  8. Effect of assembly error of bipolar plate on the contact pressure distribution and stress failure of membrane electrode assembly in proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dong' an; Peng, Linfa; Lai, Xinmin [State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2010-07-01

    In practice, the assembly error of the bipolar plate (BPP) in a PEM fuel cell stack is unavoidable based on the current assembly process. However its effect on the performance of the PEM fuel cell stack is not reported yet. In this study, a methodology based on FEA model, ''least squares-support vector machine (LS-SVM)'' simulation and statistical analysis is developed to investigate the effect of the assembly error of the BPP on the pressure distribution and stress failure of membrane electrode assembly (MEA). At first, a parameterized FEA model of a metallic BPP/MEA assembly is established. Then, the LS-SVM simulation process is conducted based on the FEA model, and datasets for the pressure distribution and Von Mises stress of MEA are obtained, respectively for each assembly error. At last, the effect of the assembly error is obtained by applying the statistical analysis to the LS-SVM results. A regression equation between the stress failure and the assembly error is also built, and the allowed maximum assembly error is calculated based on the equation. The methodology in this study is beneficial to understand the mechanism of the assembly error and can be applied to guide the assembly process for the PEM fuel cell stack. (author)

  9. Pressure of a partially ionized hydrogen gas: numerical results from exact low temperature expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alastuey, A. [Laboratoire de Physique, ENS Lyon, CNRS, Lyon (France); Ballenegger, V. [Institut UTINAM, Universite de Franche-Comte, CNRS, Besancon (France)

    2010-01-15

    We consider a partially ionized hydrogen gas at low densities, where it reduces almost to an ideal mixture made with hydrogen atoms in their ground-state, ionized protons and ionized electrons. By performing systematic low-temperature expansions within the physical picture, in which the system is described as a quantum electron-proton plasma interacting via the Coulomb potential, exact formulae for the first.ve leading corrections to the ideal Saha equation of state have been derived[A. Alastuey, V. Ballenegger et al., J. Stat. Phys. 130, 1119 (2008)]. Those corrections account for all effects of interactions and thermal excitations up to order exp(E{sub H} /kT) included, where E{sub H} {approx_equal} -13.6 eV is the ground state energy of the hydrogen atom. Among the.ve leading corrections, three are easy to evaluate, while the remaining ones involve suitably truncated internal partition functions of H{sub 2} molecules and H{sup -} and H{sub 2}{sup +} ions, for which no analytical formulae are available in closed form. We estimate those partitions functions at.nite temperature via a simple phenomenology based on known values of rotational and vibrational energies. This allows us to compute numerically the leading deviations to the Saha pressure along several isotherms and isochores. Our values are compared with those of the OPAL tables (for pure hydrogen) calculated within the ACTEX method (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Thermal-hydraulics of wave propagation and pressure distribution under hypothetical steam explosion conditions in the ANS reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; N-Valenit, S.; Kim, S.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes salient aspects of the modeling and analysis framework for evaluation of dynamic loads, wave propagation, and pressure distributions (under hypothetical steam explosion conditions) around key structural boundaries of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor core region. A staged approach was followed, using simple thermodynamic models for bounding loads and the CTH code for evaluating realistic estimates in a staged multidimensional framework. Effects of nodalization, melt dispersal into coolant during explosion, single versus multidirectional dissipation, energy level of melt, and rate of energy deposition into coolant were studied. The importance of capturing multidimensional effects that simultaneously account for fluid-structural interactions was demonstrated. As opposed to using bounding loads from thermodynamic evaluations, it was revealed that the ANS reactor system will not be vulnerable to vertically generated missiles that threaten containment if realistic estimates of energetics are used (from CTH calculations for thermally generated steam explosions without significant aluminum ignition).

  11. Variation in size frequency distribution of coral populations under different fishing pressures in two contrasting locations in the Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsditch, G; Pisapia, C; Huck, M; Karisa, J; Obura, D; Sweet, M

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to assess how the size-frequency distributions of coral genera varied between reefs under different fishing pressures in two contrasting Indian Ocean locations (the Maldives and East Africa). Using generalized linear mixed models, we were able to demonstrate that complex interactions occurred between coral genera, coral size class and fishing pressure. In both locations, we found Acropora coral species to be more abundant in non-fished compared to fished sites (a pattern which was consistent for nearly all the assessed size classes). Coral genera classified as 'stress tolerant' showed a contrasting pattern i.e. were higher in abundance in fished compared to non-fished sites. Site specific variations were also observed. For example, Maldivian reefs exhibited a significantly higher abundance in all size classes of 'competitive' corals compared to East Africa. This possibly indicates that East African reefs have already been subjected to higher levels of stress and are therefore less suitable environments for 'competitive' corals. This study also highlights the potential structure and composition of reefs under future degradation scenarios, for example with a loss of Acropora corals and an increase in dominance of 'stress tolerant' and 'generalist' coral genera. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Modelling effects of tyre inflation pressure on the stress distribution near the soil-tyre interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; Lamandé, Mathieu; Tøgersen, Frede A

    2008-01-01

    stress in the contact area for two radial-ply agricultural trailer tyres (650/65R30.5 and 800/50R34) loaded with 60 kN. The study took place on a sandy soil at a water content slightly less than field capacity. We tested the effect of three different inflation pressures (50, 100 and 240 k......Pa) in a randomised block design with three replicates. The vertical stress was measured with load cells located in 0.1 m soil depth. The vertical stress data were used also for identifying the soil area in contact with the tyre, i.e. the tyre footprint. A model (named FRIDA) is proposed that describes the tyre...... footprint by a super ellipse and the stress distribution by a combined exponential (perpendicular to the driving direction) and power-law (along the driving direction) function. The contact area doubled when the inflation pressure was reduced from 240 to 50 kPa. For both tyres, the measured peak stress...

  13. Classification of Forefoot Plantar Pressure Distribution in Persons with Diabetes: A Novel Perspective for the Mechanical Management of Diabetic Foot?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Kevin; Matricali, Giovanni Arnoldo; Roosen, Philip; Desloovere, Kaat; Bruyninckx, Herman; Spaepen, Pieter; Nobels, Frank; Tits, Jos; Flour, Mieke; Staes, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify groups of subjects with similar patterns of forefoot loading and verify if specific groups of patients with diabetes could be isolated from non-diabetics. Methodology/Principal Findings Ninety-seven patients with diabetes and 33 control participants between 45 and 70 years were prospectively recruited in two Belgian Diabetic Foot Clinics. Barefoot plantar pressure measurements were recorded and subsequently analysed using a semi-automatic total mapping technique. Kmeans cluster analysis was applied on relative regional impulses of six forefoot segments in order to pursue a classification for the control group separately, the diabetic group separately and both groups together. Cluster analysis led to identification of three distinct groups when considering only the control group. For the diabetic group, and the computation considering both groups together, four distinct groups were isolated. Compared to the cluster analysis of the control group an additional forefoot loading pattern was identified. This group comprised diabetic feet only. The relevance of the reported clusters was supported by ANOVA statistics indicating significant differences between different regions of interest and different clusters. Conclusion/s Significance There seems to emerge a new era in diabetic foot medicine which embraces the classification of diabetic patients according to their biomechanical profile. Classification of the plantar pressure distribution has the potential to provide a means to determine mechanical interventions for the prevention and/or treatment of the diabetic foot. PMID:24278219

  14. Successful continuous injection of coal into gasification and PFBC system operating pressures exceeding 500 psi - DOE funded program results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, T.; Aldred, D.; Rutkowski, M. [Stamet Inc., North Holywood, CA (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The current US energy program is focussed towards commercialisation of coal-based power and IGCC technologies that offer significant improvements in efficiency and reductions in emissions. For gasification and pressurised fluidized bed combustors to be widely accepted, certain operational components need to be significantly improved. One of the most pressing is provision of reliable, controlled and cost-effective solid fuel feeding into the pressure environment. The US Department of Energy has funded research to develop the unique Stamet 'Posimetric{reg_sign} Solids Pump' to be capable of feeding coal into current gasification and PFBC operating pressures. The research objective is a mechanical rotary device able to continuously feed and meter coal into pressured environments of at least 34 bar (500 psi). The research program comprised an initial design and testing phase to feed coal into 20 bar (300 psi) and a second phase for feeding into 34 bar (500 psi). The first phase target was achieved in December 2003. Following modification and optimization, in January 2005, the Stamet Pump achieved a world-record pressure level for continuous injection of coal of 38 bar (560 psi). Research is now targeting 69 bar (1000 psi). The paper reviews the successful pump design, optimisations and results of the testing. 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Experimental study of the tritium distribution in the effluents resulting from the sodium hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassery, A. [CEA, DEN, Centre de Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Universite de Toulouse, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, Toulouse (France); Lorcet, H.; Godlewski, J; Liger, K.; Latge, C. [CEA, DEN, Centre de Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Joulia, X. [Universite de Toulouse, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, Toulouse (France)

    2015-03-15

    Within the framework of the dismantling of fast breeder reactors in France several processes are under investigation regarding sodium disposal. One of them, called ELA (radioactive sodium waste treatment process), is based on the implementation of the sodium-water reaction, in a controlled and progressive way, to remove residual sodium. This sodium contains impurities such as sodium hydride, sodium oxide and tritiated sodium hydride. The hydrolysis of these various chemical species leads to the production of a liquid effluent, mainly composed of an aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide, and a gaseous effluent, mainly composed of nitrogen (inert gas), hydrogen and steam. The tritium is distributed between these effluents, and, within the gaseous effluent, according to its forms HT and HTO (tritiated water). HTO being 10,000 times more radio-toxic than HT, a precise knowledge of the mechanisms governing the phase distribution of tritium is necessary. This paper presents the first experimental results from a parametric study on the tritium distribution between the various effluents generated during hydrolysis operations. A series of experiments have been performed in order to study the influence of water flow rate, argon flow rate, initial mass and specific activity of the hydrolyzed sodium sample. An important influence of the total tritium concentration in the hydrolyzed sample has been highlighted. As for the phenomena suspected to be responsible for the phase change of tritiated water, in the studied range of parameters, vaporization induced by the heat of reactions seems to be dominant over the evaporation induced by the inert gas flow rate.

  16. Spatial Distribution of Wave Pressures on Seawave Slot-cone Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicinanza, Diego; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents results on loading acting on an innovative caisson breakwater for electricity production. The work reported here is part of the European Union Sixth Framework programme priority 6.1 (Sustainable Energy System), contract 019831, titled "Full-scale demonstration of robust and hi...

  17. Estimation of Hydrodynamic Impact Loads and Pressure Distributions on Bodies Approximating Elliptical Cylinders with Special Reference to Water Landings of Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Emanuel; Hathaway, Melvin E

    1953-01-01

    An approximate method for computing water loads and pressure distributions on lightly loaded elliptical cylinders during oblique water impacts is presented. The method is of special interest for the case of emergency water landings of helicopters. This method makes use of theory developed and checked for landing impacts of seaplanes having bottom cross sections of V and scalloped contours. An illustrative example is given to show typical results obtained from the use of the proposed method of computation. The accuracy of the approximate method was evaluated through comparison with limited experimental data for two-dimensional drops of a rigid circular cylinder at a trim of 0 degrees and a flight -path angle of 90 degrees. The applicability of the proposed formulas to the design of rigid hulls is indicated by the rough agreement obtained between the computed and experimental results. A detailed computational procedure is included as an appendix.

  18. Pressure suppression system (PSS) for nuclear ships. Experimental results obtained at the GKSS PSS-test-facillity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aust, E.; Niemann, H.R.; Schwan, H.; Vollbrandt, J.

    1978-01-01

    The PSS-test facility is shortly presented which was designed to show experimentally the operation of the pressure suppression containment for the NCS 80 concept. The results of the experimental LOCA-simulation tests in the PSS-test facility are illustrated by diagrams. The observed phenomena as chugging and pessure oscillations immediately after vent clearing are reported as well as the thermohydraulic loadings of the total system. Finally a short view is given on the future test program

  19. Numerical results from a study of LiH: the proposed standard material for the high pressure shock experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, F.J.

    1975-01-01

    It is proposed to send a high pressure shock wave through a layer of LiH and then into a sample of high Z-material, resulting in a reflected shock wave back into the LiH. If the Hugoniot and some reflected Hugoniots for LiH are known the EOS of the sample can be obtained from the ''impedance matching method.'' The theory and its range of validity are described

  20. Pressure drop variation as a function of axial and radial power distribution in CANDU fuel channel with standard and CANFLEX 43 bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catana, Alexandru; Department of Energy Danila, Nicolae; Prisecaru, Ilie; Dupleac, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    CANDU 600 nuclear reactors are usually fuelled with STANDARD (STD), 37 rods fuel bundles. Natural uranium (NU) dioxide (UO 2 ), is used as fuel composition. A new fuel bundle geometry called CANFLEX (CFX) with 43 rods is proposed and some new fuel composition are considered. Flexibility is the key word for the attempt to use some different fuel geometries and compositions for CANDU 600 nuclear reactors as well as for innovative ACR-700/1000 nuclear reactors. The fuel bundle considered in this paper is CFX-RU-0.90 that encodes the CANFLEX geometry, recycled dioxide uranium (RU) with 0.90% enrichment. The goal of this proposal is ambitious: a higher average discharge burn-up up to 14000 MWd/tU and, for the same amount of generated electric power, reduction in nuclear fuel fabrication, reduction of spent nuclear fuel radioactive waste and reduction of refueling operational work by using fewer bundles. An improved sub-channel approach for thermal-hydraulic analysis is used in this paper to compute some flow parameters, mainly the pressure drop along the CANDU 600 fuel channel when STD or CFX-RU-0.90 fuel bundles. Also an intermediate CFX-NU fuel bundle are used, for gradual comparison. For CFX-RU- 0.90 four fuel bundle shift refueling scheme is used instead of eight, that will determine different axial power distributions. At the same time radial power distribution is affected by the geometry and by the fuel composition of fuel bundle type used. Some other thermal-hydraulic flow parameters will be influenced, too. One of the most important parameter is pressure drop (PD) along the fuel channel because of its importance in drag force evaluation. We start with an axial power distribution, which is characteristic for a refueling scheme of eight or four fuel bundles on a shift. Comparative results are presented between STD37, CFX-NU CFX-RU-0.90 fuel bundles in a CANDU nuclear reactor operating conditions. Neutron flux distribution analysis shows that four bundle shift

  1. Development of Distributed Research Center for monitoring and projecting regional climatic and environmental changes: first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordov, Evgeny; Shiklomanov, Alexander; Okladinikov, Igor; Prusevich, Alex; Titov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Description and first results of the cooperative project "Development of Distributed Research Center for monitoring and projecting of regional climatic and environmental changes" recently started by SCERT IMCES and ESRC UNH are reported. The project is aimed at development of hardware and software platform prototype of Distributed Research Center (DRC) for monitoring and projecting regional climatic and environmental changes over the areas of mutual interest and demonstration the benefits of such collaboration that complements skills and regional knowledge across the northern extratropics. In the framework of the project, innovative approaches of "cloud" processing and analysis of large geospatial datasets will be developed on the technical platforms of two U.S. and Russian leading institutions involved in research of climate change and its consequences. Anticipated results will create a pathway for development and deployment of thematic international virtual research centers focused on interdisciplinary environmental studies by international research teams. DRC under development will comprise best features and functionality of earlier developed by the cooperating teams' information-computational systems RIMS (http://rims.unh.edu) and CLIMATE(http://climate.scert.ru/), which are widely used in Northern Eurasia environment studies. The project includes several major directions of research (Tasks) listed below. 1. Development of architecture and defining major hardware and software components of DRC for monitoring and projecting of regional environmental changes. 2. Development of an information database and computing software suite for distributed processing and analysis of large geospatial data hosted at ESRC and IMCES SB RAS. 3. Development of geoportal, thematic web client and web services providing international research teams with an access to "cloud" computing resources at DRC; two options will be executed: access through a basic graphical web browser and

  2. Wing pressure distributions from subsonic tests of a high-wing transport model. [in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.; Takallu, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted on a generic, high-wing transport model in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. This report contains pressure data that document effects of various model configurations and free-stream conditions on wing pressure distributions. The untwisted wing incorporated a full-span, leading-edge Krueger flap and a part-span, double-slotted trailing-edge flap system. The trailing-edge flap was tested at four different deflection angles (20 deg, 30 deg, 40 deg, and 60 deg). Four wing configurations were tested: cruise, flaps only, Krueger flap only, and high lift (Krueger flap and flaps deployed). Tests were conducted at free-stream dynamic pressures of 20 psf to 60 psf with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 1.22 x 10(exp 6) to 2.11 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers of 0.12 to 0.20. The angles of attack presented range from 0 deg to 20 deg and were determined by wing configuration. The angle of sideslip ranged from minus 20 deg to 20 deg. In general, pressure distributions were relatively insensitive to free-stream speed with exceptions primarily at high angles of attack or high flap deflections. Increasing trailing-edge Krueger flap significantly reduced peak suction pressures and steep gradients on the wing at high angles of attack. Installation of the empennage had no effect on wing pressure distributions. Unpowered engine nacelles reduced suction pressures on the wing and the flaps.

  3. Temporally resolved ozone distribution of a time modulated RF atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet: flow, chemical reaction, and transient vortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S; Sobota, A; Van Veldhuizen, E M; Bruggeman, P J

    2015-01-01

    The ozone density distribution in the effluent of a time modulated RF atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is investigated by time and spatially resolved by UV absorption spectroscopy. The plasma jet is operated with an averaged dissipated power of 6.5 W and gas flow rate 2 slm argon  +2% O 2 . The modulation frequency of the RF power is 50 Hz with a duty cycle of 50%. To investigate the production and destruction mechanism of ozone in the plasma effluent, the atomic oxygen and gas temperature is also obtained by TALIF and Rayleigh scattering, respectively. A temporal increase in ozone density is observed close to the quartz tube exit when the plasma is switched off due to the decrease in O density and gas temperature. Ozone absorption at different axial positions indicates that the ozone distribution is dominated by the convection induced by the gas flow and allows estimating the on-axis local gas velocity in the jet effluent. Transient vortex structures occurring during the switch on and off of the RF power also significantly affect the ozone density in the far effluent. (paper)

  4. Preliminary results on the distribution of some pollutants in the Baltic 1980 and 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruegmann, L.; Rohde, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    In September/October 1980 complex field studies on the distribution of heavy metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbon and radionuclides were carried out on 24 stations in the Baltic Sea. Samples of different compartments of the marine environment were taken. The analyses for some heavy metals in water were performed directly on board. First results including mean values and concentration ranges for Hg, Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, Sr-90 and Cs-137 in Baltic waters and for petroleum hydrocarbons, PCBs, DDT metabolites, HCB, α-HCH and γ-HCH in water and surface film samples are given. In most cases the data confirm recently published results. Relatively low concentrations were found for mercury. The investigations were repeated in May/June 1981 covering the Baltic Sea and parts of the North Atlantic. The resultant data for heavy metals and petroleum hydrocarbons agree widely with the results from 1980. An estimation of the relative pollutant burden of the Baltic Sea related to the investigated parts of the North Atlantic is given. (author)

  5. Oscillation for equations with positive and negative coefficients and with distributed delay I: General results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Berezansky

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available We study a scalar delay differential equation with a bounded distributed delay, $$ dot{x}(t+ int_{h(t}^t x(s,d_s R(t,s - int_{g(t}^t x(s,d_s T(t,s=0, $$ where $R(t,s$, $T(t,s$ are nonnegative nondecreasing in $s$ for any $t$, $$ R(t,h(t=T(t,g(t=0, quad R(t,s geq T(t,s. $$ We establish a connection between non-oscillation of this differential equation and the corresponding differential inequalities, and between positiveness of the fundamental function and the existence of a nonnegative solution for a nonlinear integral inequality that constructed explicitly. We also present comparison theorems, and explicit non-oscillation and oscillation results. In a separate publication (part II, we will consider applications of this theory to differential equations with several concentrated delays, integrodifferential, and mixed equations.

  6. The detection and mapping of the spatial distribution of insect defense compounds by desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Hanus, Robert; Vaikkinen, Anu; Haapala, Markus; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto; Cvačka, Josef

    2015-07-30

    Many insects use chemicals synthesized in exocrine glands and stored in reservoirs to protect themselves. Two chemically defended insects were used as models for the development of a new rapid analytical method based on desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (DAPPI-MS). The distribution of defensive chemicals on the insect body surface was studied. Since these chemicals are predominantly nonpolar, DAPPI was a suitable analytical method. Repeatability of DAPPI-MS signals and effects related to non-planarity and roughness of samples were investigated using acrylic sheets uniformly covered with an analyte. After that, analytical figures of merit of the technique were determined. The spatial distribution of (E)-1-nitropentadec-1-ene, a toxic nitro compound synthesized by soldiers of the termite Prorhinotermes simplex, was investigated. Then, the spatial distribution of the unsaturated aldehydes (E)-hex-2-enal, (E)-4-oxohex-2-enal, (E)-oct-2-enal, (E,E)-deca-2,4-dienal and (E)-dec-2-enal was monitored in the stink bug Graphosoma lineatum. Chemicals present on the body surface were scanned along the median line of the insect from the head to the abdomen and vice versa, employing either the MS or MS(2) mode. In this fast and simple way, the opening of the frontal gland on the frons of termite soldiers and the position of the frontal gland reservoir, extending deep into the abdominal cavity, were localized. In the stink bug, the opening of the metathoracic scent glands (ostiole) on the ventral side of the thorax as well as the gland reservoir in the median position under the ventral surface of the anterior abdomen were detected and localized. The developed method has future prospects in routine laboratory use in life sciences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Some techniques and results from high-pressure shock-wave experiments utilizing the radiation from shocked transparent materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQueen, R.G.; Fritz, J.N.

    1981-01-01

    It has been known for many years that some transparent materials emit radiation when shocked to high pressures. This property was used to determine the temperature of shocked fused and crystal quartz, which in turn allowed the thermal expansion of SiO 2 at high pressure and also the specific heat to be calculated. Once the radiative energy as a function of pressure is known for one material it is shown how this can be used to determine the temperature of other transparent materials. By the nature of the experiments very accurate shock velocities can be measured and hence high quality equation of state data obtained. Some techniques and results are presented on measuring sound velocities from symmetrical impact of nontransparent materials using radiation emitting transparent analyzers, and on nonsymmetrical impact experiments on transparent materials. Because of special requirements in the later experiments, techniques were developed that lead to very high-precision shock-wave data. Preliminary results, using these techniques are presented for making estimates of the melting region and the yield strength of some metals under strong shock conditions

  8. Overview of experimental results obtained under the Prestressed Concrete Nuclear Pressure Vessel Development Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    Under the Prestressed Concrete Nuclear Pressure Vessel Development Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, various aspects of Prestressed Concrete Pressure Vessels (PCPVs) are investigated and evaluated with respect to reliability, structural performance, constructability, and economy. Based upon identified needs, analytical and experimental investigations are conducted. Areas of interest include finite-element analysis development, materials and structural behavior tests, instrumentation evaluation and development, and structural model tests. Studies have been recently completed in the following areas: concrete embedment instrumentation systems for PCPVs, grouted-nongrouted prestressing systems, acoustic emission as a technique for structural integrity monitoring, and model tests of steam-generator cavity closure plugs for a Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). An overview of results is presented

  9. Measurement of pressure ridges in SAR images of sea ice - Preliminary results on scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Smith, M. P.; Daida, J. M.; Samadani, R.; Camiso, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    Sea ice ridges and keels (hummocks and bummocks) are important in sea ice research for both scientific and practical reasons. A long-term objective is to make quantitative measurements of sea ice ridges using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The preliminary results of a scattering model for sea ice ridge are reported. The approach is through the ridge height variance spectrum Psi(K), where K is the spatial wavenumber, and the two-scale scattering model. The height spectrum model is constructed to mimic height statistics observed with an airborne optical laser. The spectrum model is used to drive a two-scale scattering model. Model results for ridges observed at C- and X-band yield normalized radar cross sections that are 10 to 15 dB larger than the observed cross sections of multiyear ice over the range of angles of incidence from 10 to 70 deg.

  10. Acid mine drainage abatement resulting from pressure grouting of buried bituminous mine spoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheetz, B.; Silsbee, M.; Schueck, J.

    1998-01-01

    A 37 acre surface coal mine located in Clinton County, PA, USA, was mined and reclaimed between 1974 and 1977. Buried pyrite-rich pit floor cleanings and tipple refuse were found to be producing severe acid mine drainage. The pyritic material is located in discrete piles or pods in the backfill. The pods and the resulting contaminant plumes were initially defined using geophysical techniques and confirmed by drilling. The approach taken was to use a cementitious grout, composed of fluidized bed combustion ash and water, which would be placed in a manner which would prevent water and oxygen from contacting the pyritic materials. Statistically significant water quality improvements have been noted as a result of the grouting. After four years of post-grouting monitoring, reductions in concentrations of most of the mine drainage parameters range from 40 to 90%. 12 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  11. Analyses and results from standard surveillance programmes of WWER 440/V-213C reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcnik, M; Brumovsky, M; Pav, T [Czech Nuclear Society, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31

    In Czech and Slovak republics, six units of WWER 440/C type reactors are monitored by surveillance specimens programmes; the specimens are determined for static tensile testing, impact notch toughness testing and fracture toughness evaluation. Results of mechanical properties of these specimens after irradiation in intervals between 1 and 5 years of operation, are summarized and discussed with respect to the effect of individual heats and welded joints, radiation embrittlement, and annealing recovery. (authors). 3 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Intermittent cardiac overload results in adaptive hypertrophy and provides protection against left ventricular acute pressure overload insult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago; Fonseca, Hélder; Ferreira, Rita; Padrão, Ana Isabel; Santa, Cátia; Vieira, Sara; Silva, Ana Filipa; Amado, Francisco; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Duarte, José Alberto

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to test whether a chronic intermittent workload could induce an adaptive cardiac phenotype Chronic intermittent workload induced features of adaptive hypertrophy This was paralleled by protection against acute pressure overload insult The heart may adapt favourably to balanced demands, regardless of the nature of the stimuli. The present study aimed to test whether submitting the healthy heart to intermittent and tolerable amounts of workload, independently of its nature, could result in an adaptive cardiac phenotype. Male Wistar rats were subjected to treadmill running (Ex) (n = 20), intermittent cardiac overload with dobutamine (ITO) (2 mg kg(-1) , s.c.; n = 20) or placebo administration (Cont) (n = 20) for 5 days week(-1) for 8 weeks. Animals were then killed for histological and biochemical analysis or subjected to left ventricular haemodynamic evaluation under baseline conditions, in response to isovolumetric contractions and to sustained LV acute pressure overload (35% increase in peak systolic pressure maintained for 2 h). Baseline cardiac function was enhanced only in Ex, whereas the response to isovolumetric heartbeats was improved in both ITO and Ex. By contrast to the Cont group, in which rats developed diastolic dysfunction with sustained acute pressure overload, ITO and Ex showed increased tolerance to this stress test. Both ITO and Ex developed cardiomyocyte hypertrophy without fibrosis, no overexpression of osteopontin-1 or β-myosin heavy chain, and increased expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) protein. Regarding hypertrophic pathways, ITO and Ex showed activation of the protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway but not calcineurin. Mitochondrial complex IV and V activities were also increased in ITO and Ex. Chronic submission to controlled intermittent cardiac overload, independently of its nature, results in an adaptive cardiac phenotype. Features of the cardiac overload, such as the duration and

  13. Experimental results for hydrocarbon refrigerant vaporization inside brazed plate heat exchangers at high pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desideri, Adriano; Ommen, Torben Schmidt; Wronski, Jorrit

    2016-01-01

    fluids at typical working conditions of ORC systems for low temperature waste heat recovery (WHR) applications. Based on these premises, a novel testrig has been recently designed and built at the Technical University of Denmark to simulate the evaporating condition occurring in a small capacity ORC...... power unit. In this contribution the preliminary experimental results obtained from the first experimental campaign carried out on the rig are reported. HFC-134a was selected as working fluid. The experiments were carried out at saturation temperature of 60, 70 and 80 °C and inlet and outlet qualities...

  14. Preliminary results of scoop samples analysis from reactor pressure vessels of Bohunice V-1 NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupca, L.

    1997-01-01

    In the paper are presented the main goals and results from the scoop specimen analysis performed on the both RPVs WWER-440/230 in Jaslovske Bohunice V-1 NPPs. Main tasks of this complex activity were: model experiments for analysis procedures optimisation; chemical analysis; hardness measurements on the RPV and bulk samples; microstructure analysis; scanning electron microscope and microprobe analysis; gamma spectrometry; brittle fracture temperature evaluation; trends of brittle fracture temperature growth after annealing procedure. In conclusions and recommendations are discussed the planned activities in the field of both RPVs integrity evaluation for the future operation of the NPP Jaslovske Bohunice V-1. (author)

  15. Delay-time distribution of core-collapse supernovae with late events resulting from binary interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapartas, E.; de Mink, S. E.; Izzard, R. G.; Yoon, S.-C.; Badenes, C.; Götberg, Y.; de Koter, A.; Neijssel, C. J.; Renzo, M.; Schootemeijer, A.; Shrotriya, T. S.

    2017-05-01

    Most massive stars, the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae, are in close binary systems and may interact with their companion through mass transfer or merging. We undertake a population synthesis study to compute the delay-time distribution of core-collapse supernovae, that is, the supernova rate versus time following a starburst, taking into account binary interactions. We test the systematic robustness of our results by running various simulations to account for the uncertainties in our standard assumptions. We find that a significant fraction, %, of core-collapse supernovae are "late", that is, they occur 50-200 Myr after birth, when all massive single stars have already exploded. These late events originate predominantly from binary systems with at least one, or, in most cases, with both stars initially being of intermediate mass (4-8 M⊙). The main evolutionary channels that contribute often involve either the merging of the initially more massive primary star with its companion or the engulfment of the remaining core of the primary by the expanding secondary that has accreted mass at an earlier evolutionary stage. Also, the total number of core-collapse supernovae increases by % because of binarity for the same initial stellar mass. The high rate implies that we should have already observed such late core-collapse supernovae, but have not recognized them as such. We argue that φ Persei is a likely progenitor and that eccentric neutron star - white dwarf systems are likely descendants. Late events can help explain the discrepancy in the delay-time distributions derived from supernova remnants in the Magellanic Clouds and extragalactic type Ia events, lowering the contribution of prompt Ia events. We discuss ways to test these predictions and speculate on the implications for supernova feedback in simulations of galaxy evolution.

  16. Simulation and analysis of the thermal and deformation behaviour of `as-received` and `hydrided` pressure tubes used in the circumferential temperature distribution experiments (end of life/pressure tube behaviour)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muir, W C; Bayoumi, M H [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    It is postulated that in-reactor pressure tubes may be subjected to radiation damage and dissolved deuterium which could change the pressure tube characteristics and lead to different behaviour than that of as-received pressure tubes under large LOCA (loss of coolant) conditions. A hydrided pressure tube was used to study the effect of dissolved hydrogen on thermal-mechanical behaviour. In the experiment, simulating an in-reactor (hydrided) pressure tube with circumferential differential temperature under boil-off conditions, the pressure tube ballooned into contact with the calandria tube. The pressure tube used in this experiment was hydrided in a furnace to a nominal value of 200 {mu}g/g dissolved hydrogen. This test was a repeat of the first supplementary boil-off test (S-5-1) which used an as-received pressure tube. The objective of this paper is to analyze the results obtained from the simulation of this Boil-Off test using the SMARTT computer code and to examine the effect of hydriding on the thermal and ballooning behaviour of the pressure tube by comparison with the results obtained from test S-5-1. A discussion of the results obtained from this comparison is presented together with an analysis of their application to the analysis of pressure tube behaviour in CANDU reactors. (author). 13 refs., 1 tab., 16 figs.

  17. Simulation and analysis of the thermal and deformation behaviour of 'as-received' and 'hydrided' pressure tubes used in the circumferential temperature distribution experiments (end of life/pressure tube behaviour)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, W.C.; Bayoumi, M.H.

    1995-01-01

    It is postulated that in-reactor pressure tubes may be subjected to radiation damage and dissolved deuterium which could change the pressure tube characteristics and lead to different behaviour than that of as-received pressure tubes under large LOCA (loss of coolant) conditions. A hydrided pressure tube was used to study the effect of dissolved hydrogen on thermal-mechanical behaviour. In the experiment, simulating an in-reactor (hydrided) pressure tube with circumferential differential temperature under boil-off conditions, the pressure tube ballooned into contact with the calandria tube. The pressure tube used in this experiment was hydrided in a furnace to a nominal value of 200 μg/g dissolved hydrogen. This test was a repeat of the first supplementary boil-off test (S-5-1) which used an as-received pressure tube. The objective of this paper is to analyze the results obtained from the simulation of this Boil-Off test using the SMARTT computer code and to examine the effect of hydriding on the thermal and ballooning behaviour of the pressure tube by comparison with the results obtained from test S-5-1. A discussion of the results obtained from this comparison is presented together with an analysis of their application to the analysis of pressure tube behaviour in CANDU reactors. (author). 13 refs., 1 tab., 16 figs

  18. Non-Maxwellian electron distributions resulting from direct laser acceleration in near-critical plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Toncian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The irradiation of few-nm-thick targets by a finite-contrast high-intensity short-pulse laser results in a strong pre-expansion of these targets at the arrival time of the main pulse. The targets decompress to near and lower than critical densities with plasmas extending over few micrometers, i.e. multiple wavelengths. The interaction of the main pulse with such a highly localized but inhomogeneous target leads to the generation of a short channel and further self-focusing of the laser beam. Experiments at the Glass Hybrid OPCPA Scaled Test-bed (GHOST laser system at University of Texas, Austin using such targets measured non-Maxwellian, peaked electron distribution with large bunch charge and high electron density in the laser propagation direction. These results are reproduced in 2D PIC simulations using the EPOCH code, identifying direct laser acceleration (DLA [1] as the responsible mechanism. This is the first time that DLA has been observed to produce peaked spectra as opposed to broad, Maxwellian spectra observed in earlier experiments [2]. This high-density electrons have potential applications as injector beams for a further wakefield acceleration stage as well as for pump-probe applications.

  19. Assessment of the potential for high-pressure melt ejection resulting from a Surry station blackout transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudson, D.L.; Dobbe, C.A.

    1993-11-01

    Containment integrity could be challenged by direct heating associated with a high pressure melt ejection (HPME) of core materials following reactor vessel breach during certain severe accidents. Intentional reactor coolant system (RCS) depressurization, where operators latch pressurizer relief valves open, has been proposed as an accident management strategy to reduce risks by mitigating the severity of HPME. However, decay heat levels, valve capacities, and other plant-specific characteristics determine whether the required operator action will be effective. Without operator action, natural circulation flows could heat ex-vessel RCS pressure boundaries (surge line and hot leg piping, steam generator tubes, etc.) to the point of failure before vessel breach, providing an alternate mechanism for RCS depressurization and HPME mitigation. This report contains an assessment of the potential for HPME during a Surry station blackout transient without operator action and without recovery. The assessment included a detailed transient analysis using the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 computer code to calculate the plant response with and without hot leg countercurrent natural circulation, with and without reactor coolant pump seal leakage, and with variations on selected core damage progression parameters. RCS depressurization-related probabilities were also evaluated, primarily based on the code results

  20. Effect of medial arch support foot orthosis on plantar pressure distribution in females with mild-to-moderate hallux valgus after one month of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzadi, Maede; Safaeepour, Zahra; Mousavi, Mohammad E; Saeedi, Hassan

    2015-04-01

    Higher plantar pressures at the medial forefoot are reported in hallux valgus. Foot orthoses with medial arch support are considered as an intervention in this pathology. However, little is known about the effect of foot orthoses on plantar pressure distribution in hallux valgus. To investigate the effect of a foot orthosis with medial arch support on pressure distribution in females with mild-to-moderate hallux valgus. Quasi-experimental. Sixteen female volunteers with mild-to-moderate hallux valgus participated in this study and used a medial arch support foot orthosis for 4 weeks. Plantar pressure for each participant was assessed using the Pedar-X(®) in-shoe system in four conditions including shoe-only and foot orthosis before and after the intervention. The use of the foot orthosis for 1 month led to a decrease in peak pressure and maximum force under the hallux, first metatarsal, and metatarsals 3-5 (p hallux and the first metatarsal head by transferring the load to the other regions. It would appear that this type of foot orthosis can be an effective method of intervention in this pathology. Findings of this study will improve the clinical knowledge about the effect of the medial arch support foot orthosis used on plantar pressure distribution in hallux valgus pathology. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  1. Traumatic neuralgia from pressure-point strikes in the martial arts: results from a retrospective online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael D

    2008-06-01

    Many techniques in Asian martial arts hand-to-hand combat systems emphasize hitting or striking specific sites on the body that correlate with exposed portions of peripheral nerves. To evaluate the prevalence and clinical effects of this unique sports-related injury. An anonymous self-administered retrospective 20-question electronic survey was posted on a high-traffic martial arts Web site. Primary outcome measures were demographic and medical history data, including martial arts experience and neuropathic symptoms associated with injury from this form of combat. Risk of symptoms was calculated by dividing the number of individuals with symptoms in each pressure-point area by the number of individuals who were struck in these areas during martial arts training. Of the 651 survey responses received, 605 met inclusion criteria. Neuropathic symptoms were reported by 291 subjects. Most symptoms occurred in individuals aged between 20 and 30 years as well as in individuals with less than 1 year of martial arts training. The majority of respondents with neuropathic symptoms reported a symptom duration of less than 1 year (207 [71%]). Individuals with more than 5 years of combat training experience had a greater risk of chronic symptoms than individuals with less experience. Strikes to pressure points on the back had the greatest risk of inducing neuropathic symptoms. Symptoms of neurapraxia can occur in individuals as a result of practicing martial arts involving strikes on pressure points. Although the majority of symptoms resolve within 1 year, individuals with prolonged exposure to pressure-point strikes may be more likely to have chronic symptoms.

  2. Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horschel, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix

  3. Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horschel, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix.

  4. THE IMPACT OF SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL RESOLUTIONS IN TROPICAL SUMMER RAINFALL DISTRIBUTION: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The abundance or lack of rainfall affects peoples’ life and activities. As a major component of the global hydrological cycle (Chokngamwong & Chiu, 2007, accurate representations at various spatial and temporal scales are crucial for a lot of decision making processes. Climate models show a warmer and wetter climate due to increases of Greenhouse Gases (GHG. However, the models’ resolutions are often too coarse to be directly applicable to local scales that are useful for mitigation purposes. Hence disaggregation (downscaling procedures are needed to transfer the coarse scale products to higher spatial and temporal resolutions. The aim of this paper is to examine the changes in the statistical parameters of rainfall at various spatial and temporal resolutions. The TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA at 0.25 degree, 3 hourly grid rainfall data for a summer is aggregated to 0.5,1.0, 2.0 and 2.5 degree and at 6, 12, 24 hourly, pentad (five days and monthly resolutions. The probability distributions (PDF and cumulative distribution functions(CDF of rain amount at these resolutions are computed and modeled as a mixed distribution. Parameters of the PDFs are compared using the Kolmogrov-Smironov (KS test, both for the mixed and the marginal distribution. These distributions are shown to be distinct. The marginal distributions are fitted with Lognormal and Gamma distributions and it is found that the Gamma distributions fit much better than the Lognormal.

  5. The Impact of Spatial and Temporal Resolutions in Tropical Summer Rainfall Distribution: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; Chiu, L. S.; Hao, X.

    2017-10-01

    The abundance or lack of rainfall affects peoples' life and activities. As a major component of the global hydrological cycle (Chokngamwong & Chiu, 2007), accurate representations at various spatial and temporal scales are crucial for a lot of decision making processes. Climate models show a warmer and wetter climate due to increases of Greenhouse Gases (GHG). However, the models' resolutions are often too coarse to be directly applicable to local scales that are useful for mitigation purposes. Hence disaggregation (downscaling) procedures are needed to transfer the coarse scale products to higher spatial and temporal resolutions. The aim of this paper is to examine the changes in the statistical parameters of rainfall at various spatial and temporal resolutions. The TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) at 0.25 degree, 3 hourly grid rainfall data for a summer is aggregated to 0.5,1.0, 2.0 and 2.5 degree and at 6, 12, 24 hourly, pentad (five days) and monthly resolutions. The probability distributions (PDF) and cumulative distribution functions(CDF) of rain amount at these resolutions are computed and modeled as a mixed distribution. Parameters of the PDFs are compared using the Kolmogrov-Smironov (KS) test, both for the mixed and the marginal distribution. These distributions are shown to be distinct. The marginal distributions are fitted with Lognormal and Gamma distributions and it is found that the Gamma distributions fit much better than the Lognormal.

  6. Pressure distribution data from tests of 2.29 M (7.5 feet) span EET high-lift transport aircraft model in the Ames 12-foot pressure tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjelgaard, S. O.; Morgan, H. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A high-lift transport aircraft model equipped with full-span leading-edge slat and part-span double-slotted trailing-edge flap was tested in the Ames 12-ft pressure tunnel to determine the low-speed performance characteristics of a representative high-aspect-ratio supercritical wing. These tests were performed in support of the Energy Efficient Transport (EET) program which is one element of the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) project. Static longitudinal forces and moments and chordwise pressure distributions at three spanwise stations were measured for cruise, climb, two take-off flap, and two landing flap wing configurations. The tabulated and plotted pressure distribution data is presented without analysis or discussion.

  7. Measurement of ion beam angular distribution at different helium gas pressures in a plasma focus device by large-area polycarbonate detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohrabi, M.; Habibi, M., E-mail: mortezahabibi@gmail.com; Ramezani, V. [Amirkabir University of Technology, Energy Engineering and Physics Department (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The paper presents an experimental study and analysis of full helium ion density angular distributions in a 4-kJ plasma focus device (PFD) at pressures of 10, 15, 25, and 30 mbar using large-area polycarbonate track detectors (PCTDs) (15-cm etchable diameter) processed by 50-Hz-HV electrochemical etching (ECE). Helium ion track distributions at different pressures, in particular, at the main axis of the PFD are presented. Maximum ion track density of ~4.4 × 10{sup 4} tracks/cm{sup 2} was obtained in the PCTD placed 6 cm from the anode. The ion distributions for all pressures applied are ring-shaped, which is possibly due to the hollow cylindrical copper anode used. The large-area PCTD processed by ECE proves, at the present state-of-theart, a superior method for direct observation and analysis of ion distributions at a glance with minimum efforts and time. Some observations of the ion density distributions at different pressures are reported and discussed.

  8. [Blood pressure lowering efficacy of telmisartan and amlodipine taking on the morning or at bedtime: ABPM results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Gui-cheng; Wang, Yi-fang; Xiao, Yong; Chen, Jian-fu; Yang, Yu; Ye, Yu-liang; Sai, Shuang-qiao; Huang, Jin-xiang

    2013-06-01

    To observe the blood lowering effect of telmisartan and amlodipine taking on the morning or at bedtime in hypertensive patients. A total of 108 individuals with hypertension (grade 2 or above) were randomized to receive telmisartan and amlodipine in one of the following four therapeutic schemes: Group A (26 cases): both medications taken on the morning; Group B (28 cases): both medication taken at bedtime; Group C (27 cases): telmisartan on the morning and amlodipine at bedtime; or Group D (27 cases): amlodipine on the morning and telmisartan at bedtime. ABPM was performed before and after 8 weeks treatment. BP was significantly reduced in 4 groups and the value of 24 hours SBP/DBP decline for each group after treatment was 29.94/16.32, 31.37/18.35, 29.49/17.30 and 25.80/15.51 mm Hg (1 mm Hg = 0.133 kPa) respectively (P 0.05). The night-time BP decline and the distributive difference of dipper, non-dipper, extreme dipper and reverse dipper pattern were similar among groups at both baseline and after various treatment regimens (all P > 0.05) . Morning blood pressure surge (MBPS) after treatment in group B declined more significantly than other groups (P < 0.05). Telmisartan/amlodipine administered either on the morning or at bedtime can effectively reduce blood pressure. The efficacy of BP lowering is independent of the drug taking time. There is a trend both in better BP lowering and less BP variability when two medications are administered at bedtime.

  9. Aero thermal test results obtained on the n. C 5 EL 4 Cluster in the atmospheric pressure cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasc, B.

    1964-01-01

    In the framework of thermal studies on the EL-4 cluster, the full-scale tests at atmospheric pressure are designed to permit measurement of local values of the wall temperature, of the velocity and of the temperature in the fluid. The experimental results, obtained with the help of an original measuring apparatus, make it possible to follow the changes in these values along the cluster and to predict in much detail the in-pile thermal behaviour. In particular it is shown that changes in the wall temperature along the cluster are greatly influenced by disruption of the flow caused by grids and supports. (author) [fr

  10. Short-term step-to-step correlation in plantar pressure distributions during treadmill walking, and implications for footprint trail analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, Todd C; Savage, Russell; Bates, Karl T; Sellers, William I; Crompton, Robin H

    2013-09-01

    The gait cycle is continuous, but for practical reasons one is often forced to analyze one or only a few adjacent cycles, for example in non-treadmill laboratory investigations and in fossilized footprint analysis. The nature of variability in long-term gait cycle dynamics has been well-investigated, but short-term variability, and specifically correlation, which are highly relevant to short gait bouts, have not. We presently tested for step-to-step autocorrelation in a total of 5243 plantar pressure (PP) distributions from ten subjects who walked at 1.1m/s on an instrumented treadmill. Following spatial foot alignment, data were analyzed both from three points of interest (POI): heel, central metatarsals, and hallux, and for the foot surface as a whole, in a mass-univariate manner. POI results revealed low average step-to-step autocorrelation coefficients (r=0.327±0.094; mean±st. dev.). Formal statistical testing of the whole-foot r distributions reached significance over an average of only 0.42±0.52% of the foot's surface, even for a highly conservative uncorrected threshold of p<0.05. The common assumption, that short gait bouts consist of independent cycles, is therefore not refuted by the present PP results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Spatiotemporal distribution of interplate slip following the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake deduced from ocean bottom pressure gauges and onland GNSS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Y.; Nishimura, T.; Ariyoshi, K.; Matsumoto, H.

    2017-12-01

    period, spatiotemporal interplate slip following them and viscoelastic relaxation due to these slips. We estimated these slip distribution using 7.5 years long onland GNSS and OBP data. In the presentation, we'll discuss spatiotemporal evolution of interplate slip and the healing process of the megathrust fault, which is expected to vary with space, as the previous result suggested.

  12. DNA breathing dynamics: analytic results for distribution functions of relevant Brownian functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Malay; Gupta, Shamik; Segal, Dvira

    2011-03-01

    We investigate DNA breathing dynamics by suggesting and examining several Brownian functionals associated with bubble lifetime and reactivity. Bubble dynamics is described as an overdamped random walk in the number of broken base pairs. The walk takes place on the Poland-Scheraga free-energy landscape. We suggest several probability distribution functions that characterize the breathing process, and adopt the recently studied backward Fokker-Planck method and the path decomposition method as elegant and flexible tools for deriving these distributions. In particular, for a bubble of an initial size x₀, we derive analytical expressions for (i) the distribution P(t{f}|x₀) of the first-passage time t{f}, characterizing the bubble lifetime, (ii) the distribution P(A|x₀) of the area A until the first-passage time, providing information about the effective reactivity of the bubble to processes within the DNA, (iii) the distribution P(M) of the maximum bubble size M attained before the first-passage time, and (iv) the joint probability distribution P(M,t{m}) of the maximum bubble size M and the time t{m} of its occurrence before the first-passage time. These distributions are analyzed in the limit of small and large bubble sizes. We supplement our analytical predictions with direct numericalsimulations of the related Langevin equation, and obtain a very good agreement in the appropriate limits. The nontrivial scaling behavior of the various quantities analyzed here can, in principle, be explored experimentally.

  13. An impaired metabolic response to hydrostatic pressure explains Alcanivorax borkumensis recorded distribution in the deep marine water column

    KAUST Repository

    Scoma, Alberto

    2016-08-12

    Alcanivorax borkumensis is an ubiquitous model organism for hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria, which dominates polluted surface waters. Its negligible presence in oil-contaminated deep waters (as observed during the Deepwater Horizon accident) raises the hypothesis that it may lack adaptive mechanisms to hydrostatic pressure (HP). The type strain SK2 was tested under 0.1, 5 and 10 MPa (corresponding to surface water, 500 and 1000 m depth, respectively). While 5 MPa essentially inactivated SK2, further increase to 10 MPa triggered some resistance mechanism, as indicated by higher total and intact cell numbers. Under 10 MPa, SK2 upregulated the synthetic pathway of the osmolyte ectoine, whose concentration increased from 0.45 to 4.71 fmoles cell-1. Central biosynthetic pathways such as cell replication, glyoxylate and Krebs cycles, amino acids metabolism and fatty acids biosynthesis, but not β-oxidation, were upregulated or unaffected at 10 MPa, although total cell number was remarkably lower with respect to 0.1 MPa. Concomitantly, expression of more than 50% of SK2 genes was downregulated, including genes related to ATP generation, respiration and protein translation. Thus, A. borkumensis lacks proper adaptation to HP but activates resistance mechanisms. These consist in poorly efficient biosynthetic rather than energy-yielding degradation-related pathways, and suggest that HP does represent a major driver for its distribution at deep-sea.

  14. Pressure-Fed LOX/LCH4 Reaction Control System for Spacecraft: Transient Modeling and Thermal Vacuum Hotfire Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, Matthew J.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Melcher, J. C.; Morehead, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    An integrated cryogenic liquid oxygen, liquid methane (LOX/LCH4) reaction control system (RCS) was tested at NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) under vacuum and thermal vacuum conditions. The RCS is a subsystem of the Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article (ICPTA), a pressure-fed LOX/LCH4 propulsion system composed of a single 2,800 lbf main engine, two 28 lbf RCS engines, and two 7 lbf RCS engines. Propellants are stored in four 48 inch diameter 5083 aluminum tanks that feed both the main engine and RCS engines in parallel. Helium stored cryogenically in a composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) flows through a heat exchanger on the main engine before being used to pressurize the propellant tanks to a design operating pressure of 325 psi. The ICPTA is capable of simultaneous main engine and RCS operation. The RCS engines utilize a coil-on-plug (COP) ignition system designed for operation in a vacuum environment, eliminating corona discharge issues associated with a high voltage lead. There are two RCS pods on the ICPTA, with two engines on each pod. One of these two engines is a heritage flight engine from Project Morpheus. Its sea level nozzle was removed and replaced by an 85:1 nozzle machined using Inconel 718, resulting in a maximum thrust of 28 lbf under altitude conditions. The other engine is a scaled down version of the 28 lbf engine, designed to match the core and overall mixture ratios as well as other injector characteristics. This engine can produce a maximum thrust of 7 lbf with an 85:1 nozzle that was additively manufactured using Inconel 718. Both engines are film-cooled and capable of limited duration gas-gas and gas-liquid operation, as well as steady-state liquid-liquid operation. Each pod contains one of each version, such that two engines of the same thrust level can be fired as a couple on opposite pods. The RCS feed system is composed of symmetrical 3/8 inch lines

  15. Structural plasticity: how intermetallics deform themselves in response to chemical pressure, and the complex structures that result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Veronica M; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2014-10-06

    Interfaces between periodic domains play a crucial role in the properties of metallic materials, as is vividly illustrated by the way in which the familiar malleability of many metals arises from the formation and migration of dislocations. In complex intermetallics, such interfaces can occur as an integral part of the ground-state crystal structure, rather than as defects, resulting in such marvels as the NaCd2 structure (whose giant cubic unit cell contains more than 1000 atoms). However, the sources of the periodic interfaces in intermetallics remain mysterious, unlike the dislocations in simple metals, which can be associated with the exertion of physical stresses. In this Article, we propose and explore the concept of structural plasticity, the hypothesis that interfaces in complex intermetallic structures similarly result from stresses, but ones that are inherent in a defect-free parent structure, rather than being externally applied. Using DFT-chemical pressure analysis, we show how the complex structures of Ca2Ag7 (Yb2Ag7 type), Ca14Cd51 (Gd14Ag51 type), and the 1/1 Tsai-type quasicrystal approximant CaCd6 (YCd6 type) can all be traced to large negative pressures around the Ca atoms of a common progenitor structure, the CaCu5 type with its simple hexagonal 6-atom unit cell. Two structural paths are found by which the compounds provide relief to the Ca atoms' negative pressures: a Ca-rich pathway, where lower coordination numbers are achieved through defects eliminating transition metal (TM) atoms from the structure; and a TM-rich path, along which the addition of spacer Cd atoms provides the Ca coordination environments greater independence from each other as they contract. The common origins of these structures in the presence of stresses within a single parent structure highlights the diverse paths by which intermetallics can cope with competing interactions, and the role that structural plasticity may play in navigating this diversity.

  16. Real-time adjustment of pressure to demand in water distribution systems: Parameter-less P-controller algorithm

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Page, Philip R

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Remote real-time control is currently the most advanced form of pressure management. Here the parameters describing pressure control valves (or pumps) are changed in real-time in such a way to provide the most optimal pressure in the water...

  17. Final air test results for the 1/5-scale Mark I boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, E.K.; Lai, W.

    1977-01-01

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a boiling-water reactor (BWR) power plant has never occurred. However, because this type of accident is particularly severe, it is used as a principal basis for design. During a hypothetical LOCA in a Mark I BWR, air followed by steam is injected from a drywell into a toroidal wetwell about half-filled with water. A series of consistent, versatile, and accurate air-water tests simulating LOCA conditions was completed in the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory 1/5-Scale Mark I BWR Pressure Suppression Experimental Facility. Results from this test series were used to quantify the vertical loading function and to study the associated fluid dynamic phenomena. Detailed histories of vertical loads on the wetwell are shown. In particular, variations of hydrodynamic-generated vertical loads with changes in drywell pressurization rate, downcomer submergence, and the vent-line loss coefficient are established. Initial drywell overpressure, which partially preclears the downcomers of water, substantially reduces the peak vertical loads. Scaling relationships, developed from dimensional analysis and verified by bench-top experiments, allow the 1/5-scale results to be applied to a full-scale BWR power plant. This analysis leads to dimensionless groupings which are invariant. These groupongs show that if water is used as the working fluid, the magnitude of the forces in a scaled facility is reduced by the cube of the scale factor; the time when these forces occur is reduced by the square root of the scale factor

  18. Invited paper: distributed energy store railgun system experimental results and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, L.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Center for Electromechanics (CEM-UT) has constructed a distributed energy store railgun facility. The facility contains a 33-in. railgun with four current feed connection points and a 142-in. railgun with connections for all ten of the capacitor bank modules with pulse forming inductors that are used to power the railguns. Each of the ten capacitor bank modules can supply up to 200 kA with a maximum energy of 60 kJ. Each capacitor bank is turned on as the projectile moves down the bore of the gun as detected by magnetic pickup coils. Designed to achieve velocities in excess of 10 kmats, the guns are accelerating 3/8-in. Lexan cubes weighing between 0.5 and 1.0 g. This system has been operated at over 500 kA for repeated shots from zero initial velocity or a single set of rails. A theoretical analysis of the DES railgun system has been made. This includes a two-dimensional current diffusion analysis which has resulted in a simple approximate formula for rail resistance. The theoretical model is a two-dimensional steady state solution. The current feed points to the rails move along the rails with the same velocity as the armature. This model is reasonably approximated by a DES railgun and allows the use of steady state solution techniques. The approximate formula for the rail resistance has been used to predict maximum allowable current levels per unit height of the rails. Current levels greater than 50% of the predicted limits have been tested in the railguns. A simple modeling technique for determining the driving inductance of a railgun is presented

  19. The state of survivorship care in radiation oncology: Results from a nationally distributed survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Melissa A; Rosenthal, Seth A; Vapiwala, Neha; Monzon, Brian T; Berman, Abigail T

    2018-04-18

    Survivorship care has become an increasingly critical component of oncologic care as well as a quality practice and reimbursement metric. To the authors' knowledge, the current climate of survivorship medicine in radiation oncology has not been investigated fully. An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based survey examining practices and preparedness in survivorship care was distributed to radiation oncology practices participating in the American College of Radiology Radiation Oncology Practice Accreditation program between November 2016 and January 2017. A total of 78 surveys were completed. Among these, 2 were nonphysicians, resulting in 76 evaluable responses. Radiation oncologists (ROs) frequently reported that they are the primary provider in the evaluation of late toxicities and the recurrence of primary cancer. Although approximately 68% of ROs frequently discuss plans for future care with survivors, few provide a written survivorship care plan to their patients (18%) or the patients' primary care providers (24%). Patient prognosis, disease site, and reimbursement factors often influence the provision of survivorship care. Although ROs report that several platforms offer training in survivorship medicine, the quality of these resources is variable and extensive instruction is rare. Fewer than one-half of ROs believe they are expertly trained in survivorship care. ROs play an active role within the multidisciplinary team in the cancer-related follow-up care of survivors. Investigation of barriers to the provision of survivorship care and optimization of service delivery should be pursued further. The development of high-quality, easily accessible educational programming is needed so that ROs can participate more effectively in the care of cancer survivors. Cancer 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  20. Blood pressure shifts resulting from a concealed arteriovenous fistula associated with an iliac aneurysm: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Shintaro; Motoyama, Yoshiaki; Ito, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    A solitary iliac aneurysm (SIA) is more uncommon than an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The aneurysm is located in the deep pelvis and is diagnosed when it reaches a large size with symptoms of compression around adjacent structures and organs or when it ruptures. A definite diagnosis of an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) associated with a SIA is difficult preoperatively because there might not be enough symptoms and time for diagnosis. Here, we present a patient with asymptomatic rupture of SIA into the common iliac vein with characteristic blood pressure shifts. A 41-year-old man with a huge SIA underwent aortobifemoral graft replacement. Preoperatively, his blood pressure showed characteristic shifts for one or two heartbeats out of five beats, indicating that an AVF was present and that the shunt was about to having a high flow. During surgery, an AVF associated with the SIA was found to be concealed owing to compression from the huge iliac artery aneurysm, and the shunt showed a high flow, resulting in shock during the surgery. No complications were noted after aortobifemoral graft replacement. Postoperatively, we noted an enhanced paravertebral vein on computed tomography (CT), which indicated the presence of an AVF. Definite diagnosis of an AVF offers advantages in surgical and anesthetic management. We emphasize that a large SIA can push the iliac vein and occlude an AVF laceration, concealing the enhancement of the veins in the arterial phase on CT. Blood pressure shifts might predict the existence of a concealed AVF that has a large shunt. Even if the vena cava and the iliac veins are not enhanced on CT, anesthesiologists should carefully determine whether their distal branches are enhanced.

  1. Calculation of control rod oscillations in a hexagonal flow channel by means of the non-stationary pressure distribution around the rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunwald, G.; Mueller, E.

    1983-08-01

    For the computation of control rod oscillations in a flow channel we set up the differential equations for the non-stationary pressure distribution around the control elements which are coupled with the motion equations of the rods. The equation system is solved by means of a finite difference method. An example shows the efficiency of the numerical calculation procedure. (author)

  2. Prevalence and control of high blood pressure in primary care: results from the German Metabolic and Cardiovascular Risk Study (GEMCAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balijepalli, Chakrapani; Bramlage, Peter; Lösch, Christian; Zemmrich, Claudia; Humphries, Karin H; Moebus, Susanne

    2014-06-01

    Contemporary epidemiological data on blood pressure readings, hypertension prevalence and control in unselected patient populations covering a broad age range are scarce. The aim here is to report the prevalence of high blood pressure and to identify factors associated with blood pressure control in a large German primary care sample. We used data from the German Metabolic and Cardiovascular Risk Study including 35 869 patients aged 18-99 years. High blood pressure was defined as systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mm Hg or using antihypertensive therapy. Factors associated with blood pressure control among patients receiving antihypertensive therapy were examined using multiple logistic regressions to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. The prevalence of high blood pressure, uncontrolled high blood pressure and untreated high blood pressure was 54.8%, 21.3% and 17.6%, respectively. Age >50 years (1.52; 1.40-1.65), male sex (1.30; 1.20-1.41), elevated waist circumference (1.55; 1.45-1.65), high cholesterol (1.24; 1.16-1.33), high triglycerides (1.11; 1.04-1.19) and concomitant diabetes (1.29; 1.20-1.40) were independently associated with uncontrolled high blood pressure. In a majority of patients we observed hypertension despite treatment for high blood pressures. Studies examining the reasons for treatment failure are highly warranted.

  3. Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Jones

    1985-01-01

    Quaking aspen is the most widely distributed native North American tree species (Little 1971, Sargent 1890). It grows in a great diversity of regions, environments, and communities (Harshberger 1911). Only one deciduous tree species in the world, the closely related Eurasian aspen (Populus tremula), has a wider range (Weigle and Frothingham 1911)....

  4. [Determination of the distribution of relative molecular mass of organic matter by high pressure size exclusion chromatography with UV and TOC detectors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Dong, Bing-Zhi

    2012-09-01

    An on-line high pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) with UV and TOC detectors was adapted to examine the distribution of relative molecular mass of natural organic matter (NOM). Through synchronous determination of UV254 and TOC responses in a wide range of relative molecular mass, it was possible to accurately characterize the structure of NOM, especially for some non-aromatic and non-conjugated double bond organics which have low response to UV. It was found that, TOC detector was capable of detecting all kinds of organic matters, including sucrose, sodium alginate and other hydrophilic organic compounds. The sample volume had a positively linear correlation with the TOC response, indicating that the larger volume would produce stronger responses. The effect of ion strength was relatively low, shown by the small decrease of peak area (1.2% ) from none to 0.2 mol x L(-1) NaCl. The pH value of tested samples should be adjusted to neutral or acidic because when the samples were alkaline, the results might be inaccurate. Compared to the sample solvents adopted as ultrapure water, the samples prepared by mobile phase solvents had less interference to salt boundary peak. The on-line HPSEC-UV-TOC can be used accurately to characterize the distribution of relative molecular mass and its four fractions in River Xiang.

  5. Stresses and strains in the steel containment resulting from transient pressure and temperature loading during loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruner, P.; Kuntze, W.M.; Jansky, J.

    1985-01-01

    Posttest calculations of stresses and strains in the steel containment of the German research reactor HDR were performed for a simulated LOCA. The results of the theoretical investigations are presented and compared to experimental findings. The pressure and temperature loading of the shell was determined with the thermodynamic code COFLOW on the basis of a multi-compartment model. Using a three-dimensional finite element model the temporal behaviour of the containment was calculated employing the structural mechanics code ASKA. Global bending deformations and local negative straining of the steel shell is discussed. Theoretical and experimental results agree in most cases rather well. Reasons for deviations will be discussed. The specific behaviour of strains found in the vicinity of locally heated areas will be explained by means of analytical considerations. (orig.)

  6. Ion distributions upstream and downstream of the Earth's bow shock: first results from Vlasiator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pokhotelov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel hybrid-Vlasov code, Vlasiator, is developed for global simulations of magnetospheric plasma kinetics. The code is applied to model the collisionless bow shock on scales of the Earth's magnetosphere in two spatial dimensions and three dimensions in velocity space retrieving ion distribution functions over the entire foreshock and magnetosheath regions with unprecedented detail. The hybrid-Vlasov approach produces noise-free uniformly discretized ion distribution functions comparable to those measured in situ by spacecraft. Vlasiator can reproduce features of the ion foreshock and magnetosheath well known from spacecraft observations, such as compressional magnetosonic waves generated by backstreaming ion populations in the foreshock and mirror modes in the magnetosheath. An overview of ion distributions from various regions of the bow shock is presented, demonstrating the great opportunities for comparison with multi-spacecraft observations.

  7. Distribution of Steps with Finite-Range Interactions: Analytic Approximations and Numerical Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    GonzáLez, Diego Luis; Jaramillo, Diego Felipe; TéLlez, Gabriel; Einstein, T. L.

    2013-03-01

    While most Monte Carlo simulations assume only nearest-neighbor steps interact elastically, most analytic frameworks (especially the generalized Wigner distribution) posit that each step elastically repels all others. In addition to the elastic repulsions, we allow for possible surface-state-mediated interactions. We investigate analytically and numerically how next-nearest neighbor (NNN) interactions and, more generally, interactions out to q'th nearest neighbor alter the form of the terrace-width distribution and of pair correlation functions (i.e. the sum over n'th neighbor distribution functions, which we investigated recently.[2] For physically plausible interactions, we find modest changes when NNN interactions are included and generally negligible changes when more distant interactions are allowed. We discuss methods for extracting from simulated experimental data the characteristic scale-setting terms in assumed potential forms.

  8. Partial dissociative emission cross sections and product state distributions of the resulting photofragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picconi, David; Grebenshchikov, Sergy Yu., E-mail: Sergy.Grebenshchikov@ch.tum.de

    2016-12-20

    This paper relates the partial cross section of a continuous optical emission into a given scattering channel of the lower electronic state to the photofragment population. This allows one to infer partial emission cross sections ‘non-optically’ from product state distributions; in computations, explicit construction of exact scattering states is therefore avoided. Applications to the emission spectra of NaI, CO{sub 2}, and pyrrole are given. It is also demonstrated that a similar relationship holds between partial cross sections of dissociative photoionization and distributions of ionic fragments over final product channels.

  9. Axial distribution of deformation in the cladding of pressurized water reactor fuel rods in a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, K.M.; Mann, C.A.; Hindle, E.D.

    1979-01-01

    In the event of a loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor, the cladding of the fuel rods would undergo a temperature excursion while being subject to tensile hoop stress. The deformation behavior of 470-mm lengths of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding has been studied experimentally; under a range of stress levels in the high-alpha range of zirconium (600 to 850 0 C), diametral strains of up to 70% were observed over the greater part of their length. A negative-feedback mechanism is suggested, based on the reduction of secondary creep rate following cooling by enhanced heat loss at swelling areas. An approximate analysis based on this mechanism was found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. A computer modeling code is being developed to predict cladding deformation under realistic conditions

  10. Axial distribution of deformation in the cladding of pressurized water reactor fuel rods in a loss-of-coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K.M.; Mann, C.A.; Hindle, E.D.

    1979-12-01

    In the event of a loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor, the cladding of the fuel rods would undergo a temperature excursion while being subject to tensile hoop stress. The deformation behavior of 470-mm lengths of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding has been studied experimentally; under a range of stress levels in the high-alpha range of zirconium (600 to 850/sup 0/C), diametral strains of up to 70% were observed over the greater part of their length. A negative-feedback mechanism is suggested, based on the reduction of secondary creep rate following cooling by enhanced heat loss at swelling areas. An approximate analysis based on this mechanism was found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. A computer modeling code is being developed to predict cladding deformation under realistic conditions.

  11. Fluid Distribution Pattern in Adult-Onset Congenital, Idiopathic, and Secondary Normal-Pressure Hydrocephalus: Implications for Clinical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shigeki; Ishikawa, Masatsune; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    In spite of growing evidence of idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), a viewpoint about clinical care for idiopathic NPH is still controversial. A continuous divergence of viewpoints might be due to confusing classifications of idiopathic and adult-onset congenital NPH. To elucidate the classification of NPH, we propose that adult-onset congenital NPH should be explicitly distinguished from idiopathic and secondary NPH. On the basis of conventional CT scan or MRI, idiopathic NPH was defined as narrow sulci at the high convexity in concurrent with enlargement of the ventricles, basal cistern and Sylvian fissure, whereas adult-onset congenital NPH was defined as huge ventricles without high-convexity tightness. We compared clinical characteristics and cerebrospinal fluid distribution among 85 patients diagnosed with idiopathic NPH, 17 patients with secondary NPH, and 7 patients with adult-onset congenital NPH. All patients underwent 3-T MRI examinations and tap-tests. The volumes of ventricles and subarachnoid spaces were measured using a 3D workstation based on T2-weighted 3D sequences. The mean intracranial volume for the patients with adult-onset congenital NPH was almost 100 mL larger than the volumes for patients with idiopathic and secondary NPH. Compared with the patients with idiopathic or secondary NPH, patients with adult-onset congenital NPH exhibited larger ventricles but normal sized subarachnoid spaces. The mean volume ratio of the high-convexity subarachnoid space was significantly less in idiopathic NPH than in adult-onset congenital NPH, whereas the mean volume ratio of the basal cistern and Sylvian fissure in idiopathic NPH was >2 times larger than that in adult-onset congenital NPH. The symptoms of gait disturbance, cognitive impairment, and urinary incontinence in patients with adult-onset congenital NPH tended to progress more slowly compared to their progress in patients with idiopathic NPH. Cerebrospinal fluid distributions and

  12. Automated Energy Distribution and Reliability System: Validation Integration - Results of Future Architecture Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buche, D. L.

    2008-06-01

    This report describes Northern Indiana Public Service Co. project efforts to develop an automated energy distribution and reliability system. The purpose of this project was to implement a database-driven GIS solution that would manage all of the company's gas, electric, and landbase objects. This report is second in a series of reports detailing this effort.

  13. Better Water Demand and Pipe Description Improve the Distribution Network Modeling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distribution system modeling simplifies pipe network in skeletonization and simulates the flow and water quality by using generalized water demand patterns. While widely used, the approach has not been examined fully on how it impacts the modeling fidelity. This study intends to ...

  14. Is the wide distribution of aspen a result of its stress tolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    V. J. Lieffers; S. M. Landhausser; E. H. Hogg

    2001-01-01

    Populus tremuloides is distributed from drought-prone fringes of the Great Plains to extremely cold sites at arctic treeline. To occupy these conditions aspen appears to be more tolerant of stress than the other North American species of the genus Populus. Cold winters, cold soil conditions during the growing season, periodic drought, insect defoliation, and...

  15. Planck intermediate results: XLIII. Spectral energy distribution of dust in clusters of galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.

    2016-01-01

    Although infrared (IR) overall dust emission from clusters of galaxies has been statistically detected using data from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), it has not been possible to sample the spectral energy distribution (SED) of this emission over its peak, and thus to break the degene...

  16. Geophysical research results of buried relief and distribution groundwater runoff of the Aragats massif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Vardanyan

    2017-03-01

    Overall, the new data concerning the structure of the buried relief of Aragats massif and the distribution of its underground runoff allow to develop effective measures for the selection of underground waters and their rational usage for the purpose of water supply and irrigation.

  17. Condensate induced water hammer in a steam distribution system results in fatality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debban, H.L.; Eyre, L.E.

    1996-02-01

    Water hammer event s in steam distribution piping interrupt service and have the potential to cause serious injury and property damage. Conditions of condensation induced water hammer are discussed and recommendations aimed to improve safety of steam systems are presented. Condensate induced water hammer events at Hanford, a DOE facility, are examined

  18. Distributed Pair Programming Using Collaboration Scripts: An Educational System and Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsompanoudi, Despina; Satratzemi, Maya; Xinogalos, Stelios

    2015-01-01

    Since pair programming appeared in the literature as an effective method of teaching computer programming, many systems were developed to cover the application of pair programming over distance. Today's systems serve personal, professional and educational purposes allowing distributed teams to work together on the same programming project. The…

  19. Polling Systems with Two-Phase Gated Service: Heavy Traffic Results for the Waiting Time Distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.D. van der Mei (Rob); J.A.C. Resing

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractWe study an asymmetric cyclic polling system with Poisson arrivals, general service-time and switch-over time distributions, and with so-called two-phase gated service at each queue, an interleaving scheme that aims to enforce some level of "fairness" among the different customer

  20. Pressure/cross-sectional area relations in the proximal urethra of healthy males: the time dependent pressure response following forced dilation. Part IV: results in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagi, Per; Bøtker-Rasmussen; Kristensen, Jørgen Kvist

    2002-01-01

    The significance of the anatomical location and age on the urethral response to a sudden forced dilation was studied in 30 healthy males aged 23-85 years. The pressure decay after dilation was fitted with a double exponential function of the form: P(t) = P(equ) + P(alpha)e(-t/tau(alpha) + P...

  1. Multidimensional modeling of the effect of fuel injection pressure on temperature distribution in cylinder of a turbocharged DI diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Emami

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, maintaining a constant fuel rate, injection pressure of 275 bar to 1000 bar (275×102 kPa to 1000×102 kPa, has been changed. Effect of injection pressure, the pressure inside the cylinder on the free energy, power, engine indicators, particularly indicators of fuel consumption, pollutants and their effects on parameters affecting the output of the engine combustion chamber have been studied in droplet diameter. Finally, the effects of fuel mixture equivalence, Cantor temperature, soot and NOx due to the increase of injection pressure, engine efficiency and emissions have been examined.

  2. Comparison between theoretical and experimental results of the 1/6 scale concrete model under internal pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riviere, J.; Barbe, B.; Millard, A.; Koundy, V.

    1988-01-01

    The prevision of the behavior of the 1/6 scale concrete model under internal pressure was realized by means of two computations, the first one with an infinite soil rigidity, the second one with a soil rigidity equal to 61.26 MPa/m. These two computations, that assumed a perfectly axisymetric structure gave theoretical and experimental results in good agreement, except the raft of which the theoretical uplift was three times higher than the experimental one. The main conclusions of this study are as follow: the soil stiffness has no influence on the ultimate behavior of the model, the dead concrete rigidity decreases the raft uplift in an important way, the model is destroyed because the hoop stress reaches the ultimate strength

  3. The relationship between red blood cell distribution width and blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dada OA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Olusola Akinola Dada,1 Ebele Uche,2 Akinsegun Akinbami,2 Majeed Odesanya,3 Sarah John-Olabode,4 Adewumi Adediran,5 Olajumoke Oshinaike,1 Anthonia Okeoghene Ogbera,1 Olaitan Okunoye,6 Olanrewaju Arogundade,2 Kingsley Aile,7 Timothy Ekwere8 1Department of Medicine, Lagos State University, 2Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Lagos State University, College of Medicine, Ikeja, Nigeria; 3Oak Hospitals, Ikorodu, Lagos, Nigeria; 4Department of Haematology, Ben Carson School of Medicine, Babcock University, Ilisan-Remo, Ogun State, 5Department of Haematology, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idiaraba, 6Department of Medicine, University of Port Harcourt, River State, 7Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, Nigeria; 8Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, University of Uyo, Akwa Ibom, Nigeria Background: High red blood cell distribution width (RDW is related to impairment of erythropoiesis, reflecting chronic inflammation and increased levels of oxidative stress, both of which are telltale signs of type 2 diabetics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the RDW and fasting blood sugar/blood pressure, and compare the results from diabetics with nondiabetic controls. Methods: This was an unmatched case-control study involving 200 participants consisting of 100 diabetics and 100 nondiabetic controls. Blood (4.5 mL was collected from all of the diabetics and nondiabetic controls, and placed into EDTA anticoagulant tubes. A full blood count was performed using the Sysmex KX-21N, a three-part auto analyzer able to run 19 parameters per sample, including RDW. Blood pressure was measured during sample collection and in a sitting position. Results: The mean fasting blood sugar level was 95.20±30.10 mg/dL in the controls, and 147.85±72.54 mg/dL in the diabetics. The mean blood pressures for diabetics was 138/90 mm

  4. Angular distribution of atoms emitted from a SrZrO3 target by laser ablation under different laser fluences and oxygen pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konomi, I.; Motohiro, T.; Azuma, H.; Asaoka, T.; Nakazato, T.; Sato, E.; Shimizu, T.; Fujioka, S.; Sarukura, N.; Nishimura, H.

    2010-01-01

    Angular distributions of atoms emitted by laser ablation of perovskite-type oxide SrZrO 3 have been investigated using electron probe microanalysis with wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy and charge-coupled device photography with an interference filter. Each constituent element has been analyzed as a two-modal distribution composed of a broad cos m θ distribution and a narrow cos n θ distribution. The exponent n characterizes the component of laser ablation while the exponent m characterizes that of thermal evaporation, where a larger n or m means a narrower angular distribution. In vacuum, O (n=6) showed a broader distribution than those of Sr (n=16) and Zr (n=17), and Sr + exhibited a spatial distribution similar to that of Sr. As the laser fluence was increased from 1.1 to 4.4 J/cm 2 , the angular distribution of Sr became narrower. In the laser fluence range of 1.1-4.4 J/cm 2 , broadening of the angular distribution of Sr was observed only at the fluence of 1.1 J/cm 2 under the oxygen pressure of 10 Pa. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to estimate approximately the energy of emitted atoms, focusing on the broadening of the angular distribution under the oxygen pressure of 10 Pa. The energies of emitted atoms were estimated to be 1-20 eV for the laser fluence of 1.1 J/cm 2 , and more than 100 eV for 2.2 and 4.4 J/cm 2 .

  5. Pressure recovery in a diffuser for gas centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanzawa, Masatoshi; Takashima, Yoichi; Mikami, Hisashi

    1977-01-01

    The pressure recovery of supersonic flow at very low density was studied in a vane-island type diffuser for gas centrifuge. A tester of diffuser with a rapidly rotating cylinder was used in experiments. Wall static pressures were measured at many points in the diffuser to observe the static pressure distribution. The change of pressure distribution with back pressure and the effect of flow rate were investigated. Pressure distribution showed that the pressure recovery occurred in the converging section. The pressure ratio increased linearly with the back pressure in this experimental range and the effect of flow rate was not observed. A numerical analysis of the pressure recovery in the channel section of the diffuser was made by applying the finite difference method to the slender-channel equations. The pressure distribution obtained in experiments could be explained as a result of supersonic compression with reverse flow. (auth.)

  6. Patient informed governance of distributed research networks: results and discussion from six patient focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Laura A; Browe, Dennis K; Logan, Holly C; Kim, Katherine K

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how to govern emerging distributed research networks is essential to their success. Distributed research networks aggregate patient medical data from many institutions leaving data within the local provider security system. While much is known about patients' views on secondary medical research, little is known about their views on governance of research networks. We conducted six focus groups with patients from three medical centers across the U.S. to understand their perspectives on privacy, consent, and ethical concerns of sharing their data as part of research networks. Participants positively endorsed sharing their health data with these networks believing that doing so could advance healthcare knowledge. However, patients expressed several concerns regarding security and broader ethical issues such as commercialism, public benefit, and social responsibility. We suggest that network governance guidelines move beyond strict technical requirements and address wider socio-ethical concerns by fully including patients in governance processes.

  7. Dynamic optimization of distribution networks. Closed loop operation results; Dynamische Optimierung der Verteilnetze. Closed loop Betriebsergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilo, Albana [Siemens AG, Wien (Austria); Schaffer, Walter; Rieder, Thomas [Salzburg Netz GmbH, Salzburg (Austria); Dzafic, Izudin [Siemens AG, Nuernberg (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A holistic approach of power system control that includes all voltage levels from highest to low voltage is provided. The power grid is conceived as a supply chain. The medium voltage grid represents the central link. The implemented automatic voltage control and the dynamic operation optimization are based on Distribution System State Estimator (DSSE) and Volt/Var Control (VVC) applications. The last one realizes the dynamic optimization of distribution network combining the reactive power of the decentralized generation, capacitors and voltage set points of on-line tap changers. Application of this method has shown, that by using the dynamic voltage control the grid can be stable operated near the low voltage limit. The conservation voltage reduction can be applied in real time. Furthermore the integration of the decentralized generation is facilitated with minimal costs. Until now in this regard required network expansion can be prevented or delayed. (orig.)

  8. Geophysical research results of buried relief and distribution groundwater runoff of the Aragats massif

    OpenAIRE

    V.P. Vardanyan; A.H. Hovhannisyan

    2017-01-01

    Based on the synthesis and reinterpretation of long-term data of geophysical studies together with the hydrology - hydrological materials it has been received new data about the buried topography and spatial distribution of groundwater runoff of the Aragats massif. First of all, it requires to determine the structure of its buried relief, which is basically a regional relief aquitard. The underground water sources are considered to be precipitation on the massif (approximately 83% of the tota...

  9. CFD Simulation On The Pressure Distribution For An Isolated Single-Story House With Extension: Grid Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, W. N. W.; Zaini, S. S.; Ismail, M. A.; Majid, T. A.; Deraman, S. N. C.; Abdullah, J.

    2018-04-01

    Damage due to wind-related disasters is increasing due to global climate change. Many studies have been conducted to study the wind effect surrounding low-rise building using wind tunnel tests or numerical simulations. The use of numerical simulation is relatively cheap but requires very good command in handling the software, acquiring the correct input parameters and obtaining the optimum grid or mesh. However, before a study can be conducted, a grid sensitivity test must be conducted to get a suitable cell number for the final to ensure an accurate result with lesser computing time. This study demonstrates the numerical procedures for conducting a grid sensitivity analysis using five models with different grid schemes. The pressure coefficients (CP) were observed along the wall and roof profile and compared between the models. The results showed that medium grid scheme can be used and able to produce high accuracy results compared to finer grid scheme as the difference in terms of the CP values was found to be insignificant.

  10. Baryon Distribution in Galaxy Clusters as a Result of Sedimentation of Helium Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin; Wu

    2000-01-20

    Heavy particles in galaxy clusters tend to be more centrally concentrated than light ones according to the Boltzmann distribution. An estimate of the drift velocity suggests that it is possible that the helium nuclei may have entirely or partially sedimented into the cluster core within the Hubble time. We demonstrate this scenario using the Navarro-Frenk-White profile as the dark matter distribution of clusters and assuming that the intracluster gas is isothermal and in hydrostatic equilibrium. We find that a greater fraction of baryonic matter is distributed at small radii than at large radii, which challenges the prevailing claim that the baryon fraction increases monotonically with cluster radius. It shows that the conventional mass estimate using X-ray measurements of intracluster gas along with a constant mean molecular weight may have underestimated the total cluster mass by approximately 20%, which in turn leads to an overestimate of the total baryon fraction by the same percentage. Additionally, it is pointed out that the sedimentation of helium nuclei toward cluster cores may at least partially account for the sharp peaks in the central X-ray emissions observed in some clusters.

  11. Gender and Social Pressure to Change Drinking Behavior: Results from the National Alcohol Surveys from 1984-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcin, Douglas L; Korcha, Rachael A; Kerr, William C; Greenfield, Thomas K; Bond, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Research shows social and institutional pressure influences drinking, yet determinants of who receives pressure are understudied. This paper examines age, time period, and birth cohort (APC) effects on pressure to stop or reduce drinking among U.S. men and women. Data were drawn from six National Alcohol Surveys (NAS) conducted from 1984 to 2010 (N=32,534). Receipt of pressure during the past year to quit or change drinking from formal (police, doctor, work) and informal (spouse, family, friends) sources was assessed. Determinants of pressure were similar for men and women but varied in strength. They included younger age, less education, and younger cohort groups. Cohort effects were stronger for women than men. Cohort effects among women may be due to increased alcohol marketing to younger women and the changing social contexts of their drinking. Future studies should assess associations between drinking contexts, pressures, and outcomes.

  12. Flat feet, happy feet? Comparison of the dynamic plantar pressure distribution and static medial foot geometry between Malawian and Dutch adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niki M Stolwijk

    Full Text Available In contrast to western countries, foot complaints are rare in Africa. This is remarkable, as many African adults walk many hours each day, often barefoot or with worn-out shoes. The reason why Africans can withstand such loading without developing foot complaints might be related to the way the foot is loaded. Therefore, static foot geometry and dynamic plantar pressure distribution of 77 adults from Malawi were compared to 77 adults from the Netherlands. None of the subjects had a history of foot complaints. The plantar pressure pattern as well as the Arch Index (AI and the trajectory of the center of pressure during the stance phase were calculated and compared between both groups. Standardized pictures were taken from the feet to assess the height of the Medial Longitudinal Arch (MLA. We found that Malawian adults: (1 loaded the midfoot for a longer and the forefoot for a shorter period during roll off, (2 had significantly lower plantar pressures under the heel and a part of the forefoot, and (3 had a larger AI and a lower MLA compared to the Dutch. These findings demonstrate that differences in static foot geometry, foot loading, and roll off technique exist between the two groups. The advantage of the foot loading pattern as shown by the Malawian group is that the plantar pressure is distributed more equally over the foot. This might prevent foot complaints.

  13. Influence of FGR complexity modelling on the practical results in gas pressure calculation of selected fuel elements from Dukovany NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahodova, M.

    2001-01-01

    A modernization fuel system and advanced fuel for operation up to the high burnup are used in present time in Dukovany NPP. Reloading of the cores are evaluated using computer codes for thermomechanical behavior of the most loaded fuel rods. The paper presents results of parametric calculations performed by the NRI Rez integral code PIN, version 2000 (PIN2k) to assess influence of fission gas release modelling complexity on achieved results. The representative Dukovany NPP fuel rod irradiation history data are used and two cases of fuel parameter variables (soft and hard) are chosen for the comparison. Involved FGR models where the GASREL diffusion model developed in the NRI Rez plc and standard Weisman model that is recommended in the previous version of the PIN integral code. FGR calculation by PIN2k with GASREL model represents more realistic results than standard Weisman's model. Results for linear power, fuel centre temperature, FGR and gas pressure versus burnup are given for two fuel rods

  14. Effects of short-term pressure-controlled ventilation on gas exchange, airway pressures, and gas distribution in patients with acute lung injury/ARDS: comparison with volume-controlled ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prella, Maura; Feihl, François; Domenighetti, Guido

    2002-10-01

    The potential clinical benefits of pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) over volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) or ARDS still remain debated. We compared PCV with VCV in patients with ALI/ARDS with respect to the following physiologic end points: (1) gas exchange and airway pressures, and (2) CT scan intrapulmonary gas distribution at end-expiration. Prospective, observational study. A multidisciplinary ICU in a nonuniversity, acute-care hospital. Ten patients with ALI or ARDS (9 men and 1 woman; age range, 17 to 80 years). Sequential ventilation in PCV and VCV with a constant inspiratory/expiratory ratio, tidal volume, respiratory rate, and total positive end-expiratory pressure; measurement of gas exchange and airway pressures; and achievement of CT sections at lung base, hilum, and apex for the quantitative analysis of lung densities and of aerated vs nonaerated zones. PaO(2), PaCO(2), and PaO(2)/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio levels did not differ between PCV and VCV. Peak airway pressure (Ppeak) was significantly lower in PCV compared with VCV (26 +/- 2 cm H(2)O vs 31 +/- 2 cm H(2)O; p mean +/- SEM). The surface areas of the nonaerated zones as well as the total areas at each section level were unchanged in PCV compared with VCV, except at the apex level, where there was a significantly greater nonaerated area in VCV (11 +/- 2 cm(2) vs 9 +/- 2 cm(2); p mean CT number of each lung (20 lungs from 10 patients) was similar in the two modes, as were the density values at the basal and apical levels; the hilum mean CT number was - 442 +/- 28 Hounsfield units (HU) in VCV and - 430 +/- 26 HU in PCV (p lower Ppeaks through the precise titration of the lung distending pressure, and might be applied to avoid regional overdistension by means of a more homogeneous gas distribution.

  15. PFS/Mars Express first results: water vapour and carbon monoxide global distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatiev, N. I.; Titov, D. V.; Formisano, V.; Moroz, V. I.; Lellouch, E.; Encrenaz, Th.; Fouchet, T.; Grassi, D.; Giuranna, M.; Atreya, S.; Pfs Team

    Planetary Fourier Spectrometer onboard Mars Express, with its wide spectral range (1.2--45 um) and high spectral resolution (1.4 cm-1), makes it possible to study in a self-consistent manner the Martian atmosphere by means of simultaneous analysis of spectral features in several spectral regions. As concerned small species, we observe 30--50, 6.3, 2.56, 1.87 and 1.38 μ m H2O bands, and 4.7 and 2.35 μ m CO bands. The most favourable, with respect to the instrument performance, 2.56 μ m H2O and 4.7 μ m CO bands, are used to study the variations of column abundance of water vapour and carbon monoxide on a global scale from pole to pole. All necessary atmospheric parameters, namely temperature profiles, surface pressure, and dust density are obtained from the same spectra, whenever possible.

  16. Standardization of a fluconazole bioassay and correlation of results with those obtained by high-pressure liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rex, J H; Hanson, L H; Amantea, M A; Stevens, D A; Bennett, J E

    1991-01-01

    An improved bioassay for fluconazole was developed. This assay is sensitive in the clinically relevant range (2 to 40 micrograms/ml) and analyzes plasma, serum, and cerebrospinal fluid specimens; bioassay results correlate with results obtained by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Bioassay and HPLC analyses of spiked plasma, serum, and cerebrospinal fluid samples (run as unknowns) gave good agreement with expected values. Analysis of specimens from patients gave equivalent results by both HPLC and bioassay. HPLC had a lower within-run coefficient of variation (less than 2.5% for HPLC versus less than 11% for bioassay) and a lower between-run coefficient of variation (less than 5% versus less than 12% for bioassay) and was more sensitive (lower limit of detection, 0.1 micrograms/ml [versus 2 micrograms/ml for bioassay]). The bioassay is, however, sufficiently accurate and sensitive for clinical specimens, and its relative simplicity, low sample volume requirement, and low equipment cost should make it the technique of choice for analysis of routine clinical specimens. PMID:1854166

  17. Results from the decontamination of and the shielding arrangements in the reactor pressure vessel in Oskarshamn 1-1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowendahl, B. [OKG Aktiebolag, Figeholm (Sweden)

    1995-03-01

    In September 1992 Oskarshamn 1 was shut down in order to carry out measures to correct discovered deficiencies in the emergency cooling systems. Due to the results of a comprehensive non destructive test programme it was decided to perform a major replacement of pipes in the primary systems including a full system decontamination using the Siemens CORD process. The paper briefly presents the satisfying result of the decontamination performed in May-June 1993. When in late June 1993 cracks also were detected in the feed-water pipes situated inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) the plans were reconsidered and a large project was formed with the aim, in a first phase, to verify the integrity of the RPV. In order to make it possible to perform work manually inside the RPV special radiation protection measures had to be carried out. In January 1994 the lower region of the RPV was decontaminated, again using the CORD-process, followed by the installation of a special shielding construction in the RPV. The surprisingly good results of these efforts are also briefly described in the paper.

  18. Traffic-related air pollution and noise and children's blood pressure: results from the PIAMA birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilenko, Natalya; van Rossem, Lenie; Brunekreef, Bert; Beelen, Rob; Eeftens, Marloes; Hoek, Gerard; Houthuijs, Danny; de Jongste, Johan C; van Kempen, Elise; Koppelman, Gerard H; Meliefste, Kees; Oldenwening, Marieke; Smit, Henriette A; Wijga, Alet H; Gehring, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Elevation of a child's blood pressure may cause possible health risks in later life. There is evidence for adverse effects of exposure to air pollution and noise on blood pressure in adults. Little is known about these associations in children. We investigated the associations of air pollution and noise exposure with blood pressure in 12-year-olds. Blood pressure was measured at age 12 years in 1432 participants of the PIAMA birth cohort study. Annual average exposure to traffic-related air pollution [NO2, mass concentrations of particulate matter with diameters of less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5) and less than 10 µm (PM10), and PM2.5 absorbance] at the participants' home and school addresses at the time of blood pressure measurements was estimated by land-use regression models. Air pollution exposure on the days preceding blood pressure measurements was estimated from routine air monitoring data. Long-term noise exposure was assessed by linking addresses to modelled equivalent road traffic noise levels. Associations of exposures with blood pressure were analysed by linear regression. Effects are presented for an interquartile range increase in exposure. Long-term exposure to NO2 and PM2.5 absorbance were associated with increased diastolic blood pressure, in children who lived at the same address since birth [adjusted mean difference (95% confidence interval) [mmHg] 0.83 (0.06 to 1.61) and 0.75 (-0.08 to 1.58), respectively], but not with systolic blood pressure. We found no association of blood pressure with short-term air pollution or noise exposure. Long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution may increase diastolic blood pressure in children. © The European Society of Cardiology 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. Value Distribution and Uniqueness Results of Zero-Order Meromorphic Functions to Their q-Shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiwa Guan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate value distribution and uniqueness problems of meromorphic functions with their q-shift. We obtain that if f is a transcendental meromorphic (or entire function of zero order, and Q(z is a polynomial, then afn(qz+f(z−Q(z has infinitely many zeros, where q∈ℂ∖{0}, a is nonzero constant, and n≥5 (or n≥3. We also obtain that zero-order meromorphic function share is three distinct values IM with its q-difference polynomial P(f, and if limsup r→∞(N(r,f/T(r,f<1, then f≡P(f.

  20. THE EFFECT OF HORMONE THERAPY ON MEAN BLOOD PRESSURE AND VISIT-TO-VISIT BLOOD PRESSURE VARIABILITY IN POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN: RESULTS FROM THE WOMEN’S HEALTH INITIATIVE RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimbo, Daichi; Wang, Lu; Lamonte, Michael J.; Allison, Matthew; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Bavry, Anthony A.; Martin, Lisa W.; Aragaki, Aaron; Newman, Jonathan D.; Swica, Yael; Rossouw, Jacques E.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Mean and visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of blood pressure are associated with an increased cardiovascular disease risk. We examined the effect of hormone therapy on mean and VVV of blood pressure in postmenopausal women from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) randomized controlled trials. Methods Blood pressure was measured at baseline and annually in the two WHI hormone therapy trials in which 10,739 and 16,608 postmenopausal women were randomized to conjugated equine estrogens (CEE, 0.625 mg/day) or placebo, and CEE plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA, 2.5 mg/day) or placebo, respectively. Results At the first annual visit (Year 1), mean systolic blood pressure was 1.04 mmHg (95% CI 0.58, 1.50) and 1.35 mmHg (95% CI 0.99, 1.72) higher in the CEE and CEE+MPA arms respectively compared to corresponding placebos. These effects remained stable after Year 1. CEE also increased VVV of systolic blood pressure (ratio of VVV in CEE vs. placebo, 1.03, Pblood pressure increased at Year 1, and the differences in the CEE and CEE+MPA arms vs. placebos also continued to increase after Year 1. Further, both CEE and CEE+MPA significantly increased VVV of systolic blood pressure (ratio of VVV in CEE vs. placebo, 1.04, Pblood pressure. PMID:24991872

  1. Follow-up of Antihypertensive Therapy Improves Blood Pressure Control: Results of HYT (HYperTension survey) Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fici, F; Seravalle, G; Koylan, N; Nalbantgil, I; Cagla, N; Korkut, Y; Quarti-Trevano, F; Makel, W; Grassi, G

    2017-09-01

    Although improved during the past few years, blood pressure control remains sub optimal. The impact of follow-up assessment on blood pressure control was evaluated in a group of patients of the HYT (HYperTension survey), treated with a combination of different dihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers (CCBs regimen) and inhibitors of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and with uncontrolled blood pressure. This was obtained assessing (a) the rate of blood pressure control at 3 and 6 months of follow-up in the whole group of patients, (b) the rate of blood pressure control and the average blood pressure values in subjects treated with different DHP-CCBs regimen. From the 4993 patients with uncontrolled blood pressure, (BP ≥ 140/90 or ≥140/85 in patients with diabetes), 3729 (mean age 61.2 ± 11.5 years), maintained CCBs regimen combined wih RAAS blockers and were evaluated at 3 and 6 months follow-up. At each visit BP (semiautomatic device, Omron-M6, 3 measurements), heart rate, adverse events and treatment persistence were collected. At 1st and 2nd follow-up the rate of controlled BP was 63.5 and 72.8% respectively (p blood pressure control; (b) there is no significant difference in the antihypertensive effect between different CCBs regimen; (c) lipophilic CCBs induce less ankle edema.

  2. Traffic-related air pollution and noise and children's blood pressure : Results from the PIAMA birth cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilenko, Natalya; van Rossem, Lenie; Brunekreef, Bert; Beelen, Rob; Eeftens, Marloes; Hoek, Gerard; Houthuijs, Danny; de Jongste, Johan C.; van Kempen, Elise; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Meliefste, Kees; Oldenwening, Marieke; Smit, Henriette A.; Wijga, Alet H.; Gehring, Ulrike

    Aims Elevation of a child's blood pressure may cause possible health risks in later life. There is evidence for adverse effects of exposure to air pollution and noise on blood pressure in adults. Little is known about these associations in children. We investigated the associations of air pollution

  3. Effects of Climate Change on Drinking Water Distribution Network Integrity : Predicting Pipe Failure Resulting from Differential Soil Settlement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wols, B.A.; Van Daal, K.; Van Thienen, P.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change may result in lowering of ground water levels and consolidation of the soil. The resulting (differential) settlements, associated with soil property transitions, may damage underground pipe infrastructure, such as drinking water distribution sys- tems. The work presented here offers

  4. Temperature field downstream of an heated bundle mock-up results for different power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, J.P.; Buravand, Y.

    1982-10-01

    The aim of these peculiar experiments performed on the ML4 loop in ISPRA is to evaluate the characteristics of the temperature field over a length of 20 to 30 dias downstream of a rod bundle for different temperatures profiles at the bundle outlet. The final purpose of this work will be to establish either directly or through models whether it is possible or not to detect subassembly failures using suitable of the subassembly outlet temperature signal. 15 hours of digital and analog recording were taped for five different power distributions in the bundle. The total power dissipation remained constant during the whole run. Two flow rates and seven axial location were investigated. It is shown that the different temperature profiles produce slight differences in the variance and skewness of the temperature signal measured along the axis of the pipe over 20 dias

  5. Planck early results. XV. Spectral energy distributions and radio continuum spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aatrokoski, J.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lavonen, N.

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources, based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) and simultaneous multifrequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz......, are complemented by a set of simultaneous observations ranging from radio to gamma-rays. This is the first extensive frequency coverage in the radio and millimetre domains for an essentially complete sample of extragalactic radio sources, and it shows how the individual shocks, each in their own phase...... of development, shape the radio spectra as they move in the relativistic jet. The SEDs presented in this paper were fitted with second and third degree polynomials to estimate the frequencies of the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) peaks, and the spectral indices of low and high frequency radio data...

  6. Dependence of Ozone Generation on Gas Temperature Distribution in AC Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Go; Akashi, Haruaki

    AC atmospheric pressure multi-filament dielectric barrier discharge in oxygen has been simulated using two dimensional fluid model. In the discharge, three kinds of streamers have been obtained. They are primary streamers, small scale streamers and secondary streamers. The primary streamers are main streamers in the discharge and the small scale streamers are formed after the ceasing of the primary streamers. And the secondary streamers are formed on the trace of the primary streamers. In these streamers, the primary and the small scale streamers are very effective to generate O(3P) oxygen atoms which are precursor of ozone. And the ozone is generated mainly in the vicinity of the dielectrics. In high gas temperature region, ozone generation decreases in general. However, increase of the O(3P) oxygen atom density in high gas temperature region compensates decrease of ozone generation rate coefficient. As a result, amount of ozone generation has not changed. But if the effect of gas temperature was neglected, amount of ozone generation increases 10%.

  7. Distribution of blood pressure & correlates of hypertension in school children aged 5-14 years from North East India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanta Kr Borah

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions:Mean blood pressure in the young school children of 5-14 yr was high. A programme comprising screening, early detection and health promotion through school health programmes may help prevent future complications of hypertension.

  8. Correlation between atmospheric pressure changes and abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture: results of a single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molacek, Jiri; Treska, Vladislav; Kasik, Miroslav; Houdek, Karel; Baxa, Jan

    2013-09-01

    There is much interest in all factors that influence the etiopathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture. Apart from the well-established factors such as arterial hypertension, smoking, age, and genetic predisposition, less common factors that may play a role in the mechanism of the rupture are the subject of much discussion. These include atmospheric conditions, temperature, and atmospheric pressure. We conducted this study to investigate the effects of the absolute value of atmospheric pressure and its changes on the frequency of AAA rupture. We retrospectively examined 54 patients who underwent treatment for a ruptured AAA at the Clinic of Surgery in the University Hospital in Pilsen between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2009. We collected data on the atmospheric pressure in this period from the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute in Pilsen. We did not find a significant difference in atmospheric pressure values between the days when the rupture occurred versus the other days (p atmospheric pressure during the 48 h preceding the rupture (Student's test p atmospheric pressure in that month. These findings suggest that atmospheric pressure and its changes do not affect the pathogenesis of AAA rupture.

  9. Measurements of angular and energy distributions of gamma-rays resulting from neutron interactions in shielding barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarious, A.S.; Maayouf, R.M.A.; Megahid, R.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of both angular and energy distributions of secondary gamma resulting from interactions of neutrons emerging from one of the ET-RR-1 reactor beam holes, in barriers from iron, lead and water are reported. The measurements were carried out, both with a bare neutron beam and with the beam being transmitted through a B4C. Filter, using a stilbene crystal gamma spectrometer. The spectrometer applies discrimination between neutrons and gammas according to the difference in decay times of the scintillations produced by them in stilbene. The described angular distributions resulted from measurements made at different angles of neutron incidence and with three different thicknesses of each sample

  10. Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Redshift distributions of the weak lensing source galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyle, B.; et al.

    2017-08-04

    We describe the derivation and validation of redshift distribution estimates and their uncertainties for the galaxies used as weak lensing sources in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 1 cosmological analyses. The Bayesian Photometric Redshift (BPZ) code is used to assign galaxies to four redshift bins between z=0.2 and 1.3, and to produce initial estimates of the lensing-weighted redshift distributions $n^i_{PZ}(z)$ for bin i. Accurate determination of cosmological parameters depends critically on knowledge of $n^i$ but is insensitive to bin assignments or redshift errors for individual galaxies. The cosmological analyses allow for shifts $n^i(z)=n^i_{PZ}(z-\\Delta z^i)$ to correct the mean redshift of $n^i(z)$ for biases in $n^i_{\\rm PZ}$. The $\\Delta z^i$ are constrained by comparison of independently estimated 30-band photometric redshifts of galaxies in the COSMOS field to BPZ estimates made from the DES griz fluxes, for a sample matched in fluxes, pre-seeing size, and lensing weight to the DES weak-lensing sources. In companion papers, the $\\Delta z^i$ are further constrained by the angular clustering of the source galaxies around red galaxies with secure photometric redshifts at 0.15

  11. Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Redshift distributions of the weak lensing source galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, B.; Gruen, D.; Bernstein, G. M.; Rau, M. M.; De Vicente, J.; Hartley, W. G.; Gaztanaga, E.; DeRose, J.; Troxel, M. A.; Davis, C.; Alarcon, A.; MacCrann, N.; Prat, J.; Sánchez, C.; Sheldon, E.; Wechsler, R. H.; Asorey, J.; Becker, M. R.; Bonnett, C.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carollo, D.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Castander, F. J.; Cawthon, R.; Chang, C.; Childress, M.; Davis, T. M.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Gatti, M.; Glazebrook, K.; Gschwend, J.; Hinton, S. R.; Hoormann, J. K.; Kim, A. G.; King, A.; Kuehn, K.; Lewis, G.; Lidman, C.; Lin, H.; Macaulay, E.; Maia, M. A. G.; Martini, P.; Mudd, D.; Möller, A.; Nichol, R. C.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Rollins, R. P.; Roodman, A.; Ross, A. J.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Samuroff, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sharp, R.; Sommer, N. E.; Tucker, B. E.; Uddin, S. A.; Varga, T. N.; Vielzeuf, P.; Yuan, F.; Zhang, B.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Bechtol, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Busha, M. T.; Capozzi, D.; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Kirk, D.; Krause, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; O'Neill, C. R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.; Wolf, R. C.; Yanny, B.; Zuntz, J.; DES Collaboration

    2018-04-01

    We describe the derivation and validation of redshift distribution estimates and their uncertainties for the populations of galaxies used as weak lensing sources in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 1 cosmological analyses. The Bayesian Photometric Redshift (BPZ) code is used to assign galaxies to four redshift bins between z ≈ 0.2 and ≈1.3, and to produce initial estimates of the lensing-weighted redshift distributions n^i_PZ(z)∝ dn^i/dz for members of bin i. Accurate determination of cosmological parameters depends critically on knowledge of ni but is insensitive to bin assignments or redshift errors for individual galaxies. The cosmological analyses allow for shifts n^i(z)=n^i_PZ(z-Δ z^i) to correct the mean redshift of ni(z) for biases in n^i_PZ. The Δzi are constrained by comparison of independently estimated 30-band photometric redshifts of galaxies in the COSMOS field to BPZ estimates made from the DES griz fluxes, for a sample matched in fluxes, pre-seeing size, and lensing weight to the DES weak-lensing sources. In companion papers, the Δzi of the three lowest redshift bins are further constrained by the angular clustering of the source galaxies around red galaxies with secure photometric redshifts at 0.15 < z < 0.9. This paper details the BPZ and COSMOS procedures, and demonstrates that the cosmological inference is insensitive to details of the ni(z) beyond the choice of Δzi. The clustering and COSMOS validation methods produce consistent estimates of Δzi in the bins where both can be applied, with combined uncertainties of σ _{Δ z^i}=0.015, 0.013, 0.011, and 0.022 in the four bins. Repeating the photo-z proceedure instead using the Directional Neighborhood Fitting (DNF) algorithm, or using the ni(z) estimated from the matched sample in COSMOS, yields no discernible difference in cosmological inferences.

  12. Electrostatic Properties of PE and PTFE Subjected to Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment; Correlation of Experimental Results with Atomistic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigwell, Steve; Boucher, Derrick; Calle, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The use of an atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasma was used at KSC to increase the hydrophilicity of spaceport materials to enhance their surface charge dissipation and prevent possible ESD in spaceport operations. Significant decreases in charge decay times were observed after tribocharging the materials using the standard KSC tribocharging test. The polarity and amount of charge transferred was dependent upon the effective work function differences between the respective materials. In this study, polyethylene (PE) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were exposed to a He+O2 APGD. The pre and post treatment surface chemistry was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. Semi-empirical and ab initio calculations were performed to correlate the experimental results with some plausible molecular and electronic structure features of the oxidation process. For the PE, significant surface oxidation was observed, as indicated by XPS showing C-O, C=O, and O-C=O bonding, and a decrease in the surface contact angle from 98.9 deg to 61.2 deg. For the PTFE, no C-O bonding appeared and the surface contact angle increased indicating the APGD only succeeded in cleaning the PTFE surface without affecting the surface structure. The calculations using the PM3 and DFT methods were performed on single and multiple oligomers to simulate a wide variety of oxidation scenarios. Calculated work function results suggest that regardless of oxidation mechanism, e.g. -OH, =0 or a combination thereof, the experimentally observed levels of surface oxidation are unlikely to lead to a significant change in the electronic structure of PE and that its increased hydrophilic properties are the primary reason for the observed changes in its electrostatic behavior. The calculations for PTFE argue strongly against significant oxidation of that material, as confirmed by the XPS results.

  13. Attachment Anxiety, Verbal Immediacy, and Blood Pressure: Results from a Laboratory-Analogue Study Following Marital Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lauren A.; Sbarra, David A.; Mason, Ashley E.; Law, Rita W.

    2011-01-01

    Marital separation and divorce increase risk for all-cause morbidity and mortality. Using a laboratory analogue paradigm, the present study examined attachment anxiety, language use, and blood pressure (BP) reactivity among 119 (n = 43 men, 76 women) recently separated adults who were asked to mentally reflect on their relationship history and separation experience. We created a language use composite of verbal immediacy from participants’ stream-of-consciousness recordings about their separation experience as a behavioral index of attachment-related hyperactivation. Verbal immediacy moderated the association between attachment anxiety and BP at the beginning of a divorce-specific activation task. Participants reporting high attachment anxiety who discussed their separation in a first-person, present-oriented and highly engaged manner evidenced the highest levels of BP at the start of the divorce-specific task. Results provide a deeper understanding of the association between marital dissolution and health and suggest that verbal immediacy may be a useful behavioral index of hyperactivating coping strategies. PMID:21647240

  14. Recent results of three-dimensional CFD simulations of coolant mixing in VVER-440/213 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, B.; Boros, I.; Aszodi, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Institute of Nuclear Techniques has been working since 2001 on the three-dimensional CFD model of the reactor pressure vessel of the VVER-440 type reactor. During this time period - due to the development of the available computational capacity - a very complex and detailed model of the RPV has been developed. The aim of the construction of the new model is to describe further internal structures of the RPV (e.g. correct modeling of brake tubes, or internals in the upper mixing chamber) and to perform an extensive sensitivity analysis on the different modeling and calculation parameters (e.g. porous region models vs. detailed modeling, or n different turbulence models). The new model can be applied for steady state calculation during normal operational condition and for different transient analyses as well. One interesting application is the participation in a planned benchmark exercise on the start-up of the sixth main coolant pump, which is aimed to compare the capabilities of mixing models of one-dimensional system codes with the results of CFD simulation. (authors)

  15. Attachment Anxiety, Verbal Immediacy, and Blood Pressure: Results from a Laboratory-Analogue Study Following Marital Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lauren A; Sbarra, David A; Mason, Ashley E; Law, Rita W

    2011-06-01

    Marital separation and divorce increase risk for all-cause morbidity and mortality. Using a laboratory analogue paradigm, the present study examined attachment anxiety, language use, and blood pressure (BP) reactivity among 119 (n = 43 men, 76 women) recently separated adults who were asked to mentally reflect on their relationship history and separation experience. We created a language use composite of verbal immediacy from participants' stream-of-consciousness recordings about their separation experience as a behavioral index of attachment-related hyperactivation. Verbal immediacy moderated the association between attachment anxiety and BP at the beginning of a divorce-specific activation task. Participants reporting high attachment anxiety who discussed their separation in a first-person, present-oriented and highly engaged manner evidenced the highest levels of BP at the start of the divorce-specific task. Results provide a deeper understanding of the association between marital dissolution and health and suggest that verbal immediacy may be a useful behavioral index of hyperactivating coping strategies.

  16. Lateral distribution of cosmic ray muons underground: Results from the CosmoALEPH experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tcaciuc, Rodica

    2006-01-01

    The CosmoALEPH experiment, located underground at the LEP e + e − storage ring at CERN at a depth of 320 m water equivalent, was used to study the chemical composition of primary cosmic rays up to 10 PeV e nergies from the measurement of high energy muons, created in extensive a ir showers by interactions of primary nuclei in the atmosphere. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the Hadron Calorimete r of the ALEPH detector and six scintillator stations located at dis tances up to 1 km from each other were used to analyse the decoherence curve, m ultiplicity and transverse momentum distributions of energetic cosmic muo ns. The experimental data were compared with predictions from d ifferent Monte Carlo (MC) models and mass composition approaches. From a comparison between the measured decoherence distrib ution with CosmoALEPH and the MC predicted decoherence curves for prot on, helium and iron, a primary composition of (77 ± 11) % protons and (23 ± 11) % iron nuclei with a χ 2 - probability of 84 % was d...

  17. Planck Early Results. XV. Spectral Energy Distributions and Radio Continuum Spectra of Northern Extragalactic Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aatrokoski, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Amaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources. based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) and simultaneous multi frequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous observations ranging from radio to gamma-rays. This is the first extensive frequency coverage in the radio and millimetre domains for an essentially complete sample of extragalactic radio sources, and it shows how the individual shocks, each in their own phase of development, shape the radio spectra as they move in the relativistic jet. The SEDs presented in this paper were fitted with second and third degree polynomials to estimate the frequencies of the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) peaks, and the spectral indices of low and high frequency radio data, including the Planck ERCSC data, were calculated. SED modelling methods are discussed, with an emphasis on proper. physical modelling of the synchrotron bump using multiple components. Planck ERCSC data also suggest that the original accelerated electron energy spectrum could be much harder than commonly thought, with power-law index around 1.5 instead of the canonical 2.5. The implications of this are discussed for the acceleration mechanisms effective in blazar shock. Furthermore in many cases the Planck data indicate that gamma-ray emission must originate in the same shocks that produce the radio emission.

  18. Spatiotemporal Distribution of β-Amyloid in Alzheimer Disease Is the Result of Heterogeneous Regional Carrying Capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Alex; Sharp, David J; Gunn, Roger N

    2018-05-01

    β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation in the brain is 1 of 2 pathologic hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD), and the spatial distribution of Aβ has been studied extensively ex vivo. Methods: We applied mathematical modeling to Aβ in vivo PET imaging data to investigate competing theories of Aβ spread in AD. Results: Our results provided evidence that Aβ accumulation starts in all brain regions simultaneously and that its spatiotemporal distribution is due to heterogeneous regional carrying capacities (regional maximum possible concentration of Aβ) for the aggregated protein rather than to longer-term spreading from seed regions. Conclusion: The in vivo spatiotemporal distribution of Aβ in AD can be mathematically modeled using a logistic growth model in which the Aβ carrying capacity is heterogeneous across the brain but the exponential growth rate and time of half maximal Aβ concentration are constant. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  19. Atmospheric Pressure and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture : Results from a Time Series Analysis and Case-Crossover Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning De Vries, Bas B.L.; Kolkert, Joé L.P.; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Groenwold, Rolf H.H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Associations between atmospheric pressure and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture risk have been reported, but empirical evidence is inconclusive and largely derived from studies that did not account for possible nonlinearity, seasonality, and confounding by temperature. Methods:

  20. Reconstruction of national distribution of indoor radon concentration in Russia using results of regional indoor radon measurement programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarmoshenko, I.; Malinovsky, G.; Vasilyev, A.; Zhukovsky, M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the paper is a reconstruction of the national distribution and estimation of the arithmetic average indoor radon concentration in Russia using the data of official annual 4-DOZ reports. Annual 4-DOZ reports summarize results of radiation measurements in 83 regions of Russian Federation. Information on more than 400 000 indoor radon measurements includes the average indoor radon isotopes equilibrium equivalent concentration (EEC) and number of measurements by regions and by three main types of houses: wooden, one-storey non-wooden, and multi-storey non-wooden houses. To reconstruct the national distribution, all-Russian model sample was generated by integration of sub-samples created using the results of each annual regional program of indoor radon measurements in each type of buildings. Acco