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Sample records for restriction systems sophisticated

  1. Three University Case Studies Show Varying Levels of Sophistication With All Systems GO For MIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornfield, Leo

    1971-01-01

    Three university case studies - the University of Utah, Ohio State University and the University of Illinois - show varying levels of sophistication in their application, modification and practical use of management information systems. (Editor)

  2. The effect of electronic medical record system sophistication on preventive healthcare for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tundia, Namita L; Kelton, Christina M L; Cavanaugh, Teresa M; Guo, Jeff J; Hanseman, Dennis J; Heaton, Pamela C

    2013-01-01

    To observe the effect of electronic medical record (EMR) system sophistication on preventive women's healthcare. Providers in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), 2007-8, were included if they had at least one visit by a woman at least 21 years old. Based on 16 questions from NAMCS, the level of a provider's EMR system sophistication was classified as non-existent, minimal, basic, or fully functional. A two-stage residual-inclusion method was used with ordered probit regression to model the level of EMR system sophistication, and outcome-specific Poisson regressions to predict the number of examinations or tests ordered or performed. Across the providers, 29.23%, 49.34%, 15.97%, and 5.46% had no, minimal, basic, and fully functional EMR systems, respectively. The breast examination rate was 20.27%, 34.96%, 37.21%, and 44.98% for providers without or with minimal, basic, and fully functional EMR systems, respectively. For breast examinations, pelvic examinations, Pap tests, chlamydia tests, cholesterol tests, mammograms, and bone mineral density (BMD) tests, an EMR system increased the number of these tests and examinations. Furthermore, the level of sophistication increased the number of breast examinations and Pap, chlamydia, cholesterol, and BMD tests. The use of advanced EMR systems in obstetrics and gynecology was limited. Given the positive results of this study, specialists in women's health should consider investing in more sophisticated systems. The presence of an EMR system has a positive impact on preventive women's healthcare; the more functions that the system has, the greater the number of examinations and tests given or prescribed.

  3. Lexical Complexity Development from Dynamic Systems Theory Perspective: Lexical Density, Diversity, and Sophistication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Kalantari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This longitudinal case study explored Iranian EFL learners’ lexical complexity (LC through the lenses of Dynamic Systems Theory (DST. Fifty independent essays written by five intermediate to advanced female EFL learners in a TOEFL iBT preparation course over six months constituted the corpus of this study. Three Coh-Metrix indices (Graesser, McNamara, Louwerse, & Cai, 2004; McNamara & Graesser, 2012, three Lexical Complexity Analyzer indices (Lu, 2010, 2012; Lu & Ai, 2011, and four Vocabprofile indices (Cobb, 2000 were selected to measure different dimensions of LC. Results of repeated measures analysis of variance (RM ANOVA indicated an improvement with regard to only lexical sophistication. Positive and significant relationships were found between time and mean values in Academic Word List and Beyond-2000 as indicators of lexical sophistication. The remaining seven indices of LC, falling short of significance, tended to flatten over the course of this writing program. Correlation analyses among LC indices indicated that lexical density enjoyed positive correlations with lexical sophistication. However, lexical diversity revealed no significant correlations with both lexical density and lexical sophistication. This study suggests that DST perspective specifies a viable foundation for analyzing lexical complexity

  4. Nitrogen removal during leachate treatment: comparison of simple and sophisticated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasel, J L; Jupsin, H; Annachhatre, A P

    2004-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBR) have become common in treating municipal wastewaters. Applied to leachates treatment MBR were also successful with pilot scale experiments and full-scale facilities as well. We succeeded previously in designing an efficient nitrification-denitrification process with an ethylene glycol byproduct as carbon source for denitrification. Moreover, an unexpectedly high inert COD removal efficiency was also observed in the full-scale MBR facility thereby making it possible to increase the operating time of the final GAC (Granulated Activated Carbon) adsorber. Since MBR are very sophisticated systems. Simpler and "lower" cost systems can also be considered. For example it is possible to nitrify leachates from sanitary landfill using a simple infiltration-percolation technique with a low energy cost. To validate previously published laboratory experiments, a semi industrial-scale pilot installation was installed at the Montzen landfill site (Belgium). The process is based on infiltration-percolation through a granular bed. This well known process was modified to increase the load, notably by changing the support medium, adding an electric fan that is run intermittently and maintaining temperatures greater than 15 degrees C. The new material is a type of granular calcium carbonate with a large specific surface area. These technical improvements enabled the system to nitrify up to 0.4 kg NH4+-N/m3 of reactor bed per day at a hydraulic load of 0.35 m.d(-1), with an ammonia removal rate in the range of 80 to 95%. Despite the high ammonia nitrogen inlet concentrations, this system exhibits remarkable nitrification efficiency. Moreover, these performances are achieved in a batch mode system without recirculation or dilution processes. If complete nitrification is needed, it can be obtained in a second in series of bioreactors. The system can be classified as a low cost process. An international patent is pending. Possible performances of those systems

  5. Airbag 2000: 5th international symposium on sophisticated car occupant safety systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegahn, K.F. (ed.)

    2000-07-01

    Modern concepts for the protection of passengers in vehicles provide the optimal degree of safety. The most well known and technically mature system is the airbag, which uses chemical gas generators, for which the dependability and service life demands are significant. All features of the system must be directly appropriate to the profile of the passenger. (AKF)

  6. Engineering FKBP-Based Destabilizing Domains to Build Sophisticated Protein Regulation Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlin An

    Full Text Available Targeting protein stability with small molecules has emerged as an effective tool to control protein abundance in a fast, scalable and reversible manner. The technique involves tagging a protein of interest (POI with a destabilizing domain (DD specifically controlled by a small molecule. The successful construction of such fusion proteins may, however, be limited by functional interference of the DD epitope with electrostatic interactions required for full biological function of proteins. Another drawback of this approach is the remaining endogenous protein. Here, we combined the Cre-LoxP system with an advanced DD and generated a protein regulation system in which the loss of an endogenous protein, in our case the tumor suppressor PTEN, can be coupled directly with a conditionally fine-tunable DD-PTEN. This new system will consolidate and extend the use of DD-technology to control protein function precisely in living cells and animal models.

  7. Lexical Complexity Development from Dynamic Systems Theory Perspective: Lexical Density, Diversity, and Sophistication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari, Reza; Gholami, Javad

    2017-01-01

    This longitudinal case study explored Iranian EFL learners' lexical complexity (LC) through the lenses of Dynamic Systems Theory (DST). Fifty independent essays written by five intermediate to advanced female EFL learners in a TOEFL iBT preparation course over six months constituted the corpus of this study. Three Coh-Metrix indices (Graesser,…

  8. Advanced Restricted Area Entry Control System (ARAECS)

    OpenAIRE

    Appleton, Robert; Casillas, Jose; Scales, Gregory; Green, Robert; Niehoff, Mellissa; Fitzgerald, David; Ouellette, David

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The Navy requires a capability for effective and efficient entry control for restricted areas that house critical assets. This thesis describes an Advanced Restricted Area Entry Control System (ARAECS) to meet this requirement. System requirements were obtained from existing governing documentation as well as stakeholder inputs. A functional architecture was developed and then modeled using the Imagine That Inc. ExtendSim tool. Factors...

  9. Hegel's Reception of the Sophists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulakos, John

    1990-01-01

    Criticizes Hegel's "rehabilitation" of the Sophists as an example of the dangers that are inherent in judging rhetorical contents of theories by philosophical standards rather than rhetorical ones. Argues that Hegel placed the Sophists in philosophy's historical continuity by eliminating consideration of their rhetorical stances and the…

  10. Credible sources and sophisticated voters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alt, James E.; Lassen, David D.; Marshall, John

    2016-01-01

    significantly. This article randomly varies whether voters receive an aggregate unemployment forecast from the central bank, government or main opposition party using a survey experiment in Denmark linked to detailed panel data. We find that politically sophisticated voters discern differences in institutional...... credibility and the political cost of the signal and update their unemployment expectations accordingly. Despite failing to differentiate political costs, unsophisticated voters still substantially update their expectations. However, while sophisticated voters intend to engage in substantial prospective...

  11. Models of spatially restricted biochemical reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Susana R; Iyengar, Ravi

    2009-02-27

    Many reactions within the cell occur only in specific intracellular regions. Such local reaction networks give rise to microdomains of activated signaling components. The dynamics of microdomains can be visualized by live cell imaging. Computational models using partial differential equations provide mechanistic insights into the interacting factors that control microdomain dynamics. The mathematical models show that, for membrane-initiated signaling, the ratio of the surface area of the plasma membrane to the volume of the cytoplasm, the topology of the signaling network, the negative regulators, and kinetic properties of key components together define microdomain dynamics. Thus, patterns of locally restricted signaling reaction systems can be considered an emergent property of the cell.

  12. Sophistic Rhetoric: Oasis or Mirage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiappa, Edward

    1991-01-01

    Makes the case that sophistic rhetoric is a mirage which vaporizes once carefully scrutinized. Believes that the practice of reproducing incoherent historical concepts is pedagogically unsound, and alternatives should be considered. Suggests specific alternative appropriations that allow educators to retain the best contributions of sophistic…

  13. Restriction-modification systems in Mycoplasma spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Brocchi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Restriction and Modification (R-M systems are present in all Mycoplasma species sequenced so far. The presence of these genes poses barriers to gene transfer and could protect the cell against phage infections. The number and types of R-M genes between different Mycoplasma species are variable, which is characteristic of a polymorphism. The majority of the CDSs code for Type III R-M systems and particularly for methyltransferase enzymes, which suggests that functions other than the protection against the invasion of heterologous DNA may exist. A possible function of these enzymes could be the protection against the invasion of other but similar R-M systems. In Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strain J, three of the putative methyltransferase genes were clustered in a region forming a genomic island. Many R-M CDSs were mapped in the vicinity of transposable elements suggesting an association between these genes and reinforcing the idea of R-M systems as mobile selfish DNA. Also, many R-M genes present repeats within their coding sequences, indicating that their expression is under the control of phase variation mechanisms. Altogether, these data suggest that R-M systems are a remarkable characteristic of Mycoplasma species and are probably involved in the adaptation of these bacteria to different environmental conditions.

  14. Sophisticated control system. Integrated power supply systems in the Munich natural history museum building ('zoologische Staatssammlung'); Mit ausgefeilter Anlagensteuerung. Energieverbundsysteme in der zoologischen Staatssammlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottitsch, Robert [Ottitsch GmbH und Co. KG, Ingenieurbuero Gebaeudetechnik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Since 1985, the 'Zoologische Staatssammlung' of Munich, one of the world's biggest natural history collection of the world, has its own museum building in the Munich district of Obermenzing. Recently, the heating and cooling system of the building was modernised. The user, owner and projecting expert cooperated in developing a heating and cooling centre with a modern control system which is characterised by high energy efficiency and a short amortisation period. (orig.)

  15. IS-linked movement of a restriction-modification system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Takahashi

    Full Text Available Potential mobility of restriction-modification systems has been suggested by evolutionary/bioinformatic analysis of prokaryotic genomes. Here we demonstrate in vivo movement of a restriction-modification system within a genome under a laboratory condition. After blocking replication of a temperature-sensitive plasmid carrying a PaeR7I restriction-modification system in Escherichia coli cells, the plasmid was found integrated into the chromosome of the surviving cells. Sequence analysis revealed that, in the majority of products, the restriction-modification system was linked to chromosomal insertion sequences (ISs. Three types of products were: (I apparent co-integration of the plasmid and the chromosome at a chromosomal IS1 or IS5 copy (24/28 analyzed; (II de novo insertion of IS1 with the entire plasmid except for a 1-3 bp terminal deletion (2/28; and (III reciprocal crossing-over between the plasmid and the chromosome involving 1-3 bp of sequence identity (2/28. An R-negative mutation apparently decreased the efficiency of successful integration by two orders of magnitude. Reconstruction experiments demonstrated that the restriction-dependence was mainly due to selection against cells without proper integration: their growth was inhibited by the restriction enzyme action. These results demonstrate collaboration of a mobile element and a restriction-modification system for successful joint migration. This collaboration may have promoted the spread and, therefore, the long-term persistence of these complexes and restriction-modification systems in a wide range of prokaryotes.

  16. Restricted linking of emissions trading systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, Lambert; Lazarus, Michael; Lee, Carrie; Asselt, van Harro

    2017-01-01

    With over 17 emissions trading systems (ETSs) now in place across four continents, interest in linking ETSs is growing. Linking ETSs offers economic, political, and administrative benefits. It also faces major challenges. Linking can affect overall ambition, financial flows, and the location and

  17. Maintainability of manpower system with restricted recruitment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The maintainability of a manpower system is studied under a Markov framework. The classical method of controlling only one factor of flow is extended to highlight the case in which two factors are under control simultaneously. One special case of this extension, where recruitment of units faces partial embargo, is given, ...

  18. Sophisticated Thinking: Higher Order Thinking Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Tikhonova; Natalia Kudinova

    2015-01-01

    The information-based society determines that the key factor to achieve success is the development of sophisticated thinking. That said, the thinking process cannot be just a mere imitation of cognitive work, since the digital age requires the authentic skills of working with a flow of information that is being constantly updated. This paper deals with the last stage of the study devoted to the development of sophisticated thinking. It focuses on the enhancement of higher order thinking sk...

  19. Restrictive partially blind signature for resource-constrained information systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, Weidong; Gong, Zheng; Liu, Bozhong; Long, Yu; Chen, Kefei

    2010-01-01

    Restrictive partially blind signature, which is designed for privacy oriented information systems, allows a user to obtain a blind signature from a signer whilst the blind message must obey some certain rules. In order to reduce storage and communication costs, several public-key cryptosystems are

  20. Stability Analysis of Nonlinear Systems with Slope Restricted Nonlinearities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of absolute stability of Lur’e systems with sector and slope restricted nonlinearities is revisited. Novel time-domain and frequency-domain criteria are established by using the Lyapunov method and the well-known Kalman-Yakubovich-Popov (KYP lemma. The criteria strengthen some existing results. Simulations are given to illustrate the efficiency of the results.

  1. Political Trust and Sophistication: Taking Measurement Seriously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turper, Sedef; Aarts, Kees

    2017-01-01

    Political trust is an important indicator of political legitimacy. Hence, seemingly decreasing levels of political trust in Western democracies have stimulated a growing body of research on the causes and consequences of political trust. However, the neglect of potential measurement problems of political trust raises doubts about the findings of earlier studies. The current study revisits the measurement of political trust and re-examines the relationship between political trust and sophistication in the Netherlands by utilizing European Social Survey (ESS) data across five time points and four-wave panel data from the Panel Component of ESS. Our findings illustrate that high and low political sophistication groups display different levels of political trust even when measurement characteristics of political trust are taken into consideration. However, the relationship between political sophistication and political trust is weaker than it is often suggested by earlier research. Our findings also provide partial support for the argument that the gap between sophistication groups is widening over time. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, although the between-method differences between the latent means and the composite score means of political trust for high- and low sophistication groups are relatively minor, it is important to analyze the measurement characteristics of the political trust construct.

  2. Sophisticated test facility to detect land mines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, W. de; Lensen, H.A.; Janssen, Y.H.L.

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of the Dutch government humanitarian demining project 'HOM-2000', an outdoor test facility has been realized to test, improve and develop detection equipment for land mines. This sophisticated facility, allows us to access and compare the performance of the individual and of a

  3. Temporal dynamics of methyltransferase and restriction endonuclease accumulation in individual cells after introducing a restriction-modification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Natalia; Sabantsev, Anton; Bogdanova, Ekaterina; Fedorova, Yana; Maikova, Anna; Vedyaykin, Alexey; Rodic, Andjela; Djordjevic, Marko; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail; Severinov, Konstantin

    2016-01-29

    Type II restriction-modification (R-M) systems encode a restriction endonuclease that cleaves DNA at specific sites, and a methyltransferase that modifies same sites protecting them from restriction endonuclease cleavage. Type II R-M systems benefit bacteria by protecting them from bacteriophages. Many type II R-M systems are plasmid-based and thus capable of horizontal transfer. Upon the entry of such plasmids into a naïve host with unmodified genomic recognition sites, methyltransferase should be synthesized first and given sufficient time to methylate recognition sites in the bacterial genome before the toxic restriction endonuclease activity appears. Here, we directly demonstrate a delay in restriction endonuclease synthesis after transformation of Escherichia coli cells with a plasmid carrying the Esp1396I type II R-M system, using single-cell microscopy. We further demonstrate that before the appearance of the Esp1396I restriction endonuclease the intracellular concentration of Esp1396I methyltransferase undergoes a sharp peak, which should allow rapid methylation of host genome recognition sites. A mathematical model that satisfactorily describes the observed dynamics of both Esp1396I enzymes is presented. The results reported here were obtained using a functional Esp1396I type II R-M system encoding both enzymes fused to fluorescent proteins. Similar approaches should be applicable to the studies of other R-M systems at single-cell level. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. The value of multivariate model sophistication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rombouts, Jeroen; Stentoft, Lars; Violante, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    We assess the predictive accuracies of a large number of multivariate volatility models in terms of pricing options on the Dow Jones Industrial Average. We measure the value of model sophistication in terms of dollar losses by considering a set of 444 multivariate models that differ in their spec......We assess the predictive accuracies of a large number of multivariate volatility models in terms of pricing options on the Dow Jones Industrial Average. We measure the value of model sophistication in terms of dollar losses by considering a set of 444 multivariate models that differ...... in their specification of the conditional variance, conditional correlation, innovation distribution, and estimation approach. All of the models belong to the dynamic conditional correlation class, which is particularly suitable because it allows consistent estimations of the risk neutral dynamics with a manageable....... In addition to investigating the value of model sophistication in terms of dollar losses directly, we also use the model confidence set approach to statistically infer the set of models that delivers the best pricing performances....

  5. Restricted Boltzmann machine learning for solving strongly correlated quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yusuke; Darmawan, Andrew S.; Yamaji, Youhei; Imada, Masatoshi

    2017-11-01

    We develop a machine learning method to construct accurate ground-state wave functions of strongly interacting and entangled quantum spin as well as fermionic models on lattices. A restricted Boltzmann machine algorithm in the form of an artificial neural network is combined with a conventional variational Monte Carlo method with pair product (geminal) wave functions and quantum number projections. The combination allows an application of the machine learning scheme to interacting fermionic systems. The combined method substantially improves the accuracy beyond that ever achieved by each method separately, in the Heisenberg as well as Hubbard models on square lattices, thus proving its power as a highly accurate quantum many-body solver.

  6. Restrictions for the causal inferences in an interferometric system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, R.

    2017-07-01

    Causal discovery algorithms allow for the inference of causal structures from probabilistic relations of random variables. A natural field for the application of this tool is quantum mechanics, where a long-standing debate about the role of causality in the theory has flourished since its early days. In this paper, a causal discovery algorithm is applied in the search for causal models to describe a quantum version of Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment. The outputs explicitly show the restrictions for the introduction of classical concepts in this system. The exclusion of models with two hidden variables is one of them. A consequence of such a constraint is the impossibility to construct a causal model that avoids superluminal causation and assumes an objective view of the wave and particle properties simultaneously.

  7. Primary Cilia: Highly Sophisticated Biological Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissam A. Abou Alaiwi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary cilia, thin hair-like structures protruding from the apical surface of most mammalian cells, have gained the attention of many researchers over the past decade. Primary cilia are microtubule-filled sensory organelles that are enclosed within the ciliary membrane. They originate at the cell surface from the mother centriole that becomes the mature basal body. In this review, we will discuss recent literatures on the roles of cilia as sophisticated sensory organelles. With particular emphasis on vascular endothelia and renal epithelia, the mechanosensory role of cilia in sensing fluid shear stress will be discussed. Also highlighted is the ciliary involvement in cell cycle regulation, development, cell signaling and cancer. Finally, primary cilia-related disorders will be briefly described.

  8. The New Toxicology of Sophisticated Materials: Nanotoxicology and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Andrew D.; Warheit, David B.; Philbert, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the physical form of materials can mediate their toxicity—the health impacts of asbestiform materials, industrial aerosols, and ambient particulate matter are prime examples. Yet over the past 20 years, toxicology research has suggested complex and previously unrecognized associations between material physicochemistry at the nanoscale and biological interactions. With the rapid rise of the field of nanotechnology and the design and production of increasingly complex nanoscale materials, it has become ever more important to understand how the physical form and chemical composition of these materials interact synergistically to determine toxicity. As a result, a new field of research has emerged—nanotoxicology. Research within this field is highlighting the importance of material physicochemical properties in how dose is understood, how materials are characterized in a manner that enables quantitative data interpretation and comparison, and how materials move within, interact with, and are transformed by biological systems. Yet many of the substances that are the focus of current nanotoxicology studies are relatively simple materials that are at the vanguard of a new era of complex materials. Over the next 50 years, there will be a need to understand the toxicology of increasingly sophisticated materials that exhibit novel, dynamic and multifaceted functionality. If the toxicology community is to meet the challenge of ensuring the safe use of this new generation of substances, it will need to move beyond “nano” toxicology and toward a new toxicology of sophisticated materials. Here, we present a brief overview of the current state of the science on the toxicology of nanoscale materials and focus on three emerging toxicology-based challenges presented by sophisticated materials that will become increasingly important over the next 50 years: identifying relevant materials for study, physicochemical characterization, and

  9. The new toxicology of sophisticated materials: nanotoxicology and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Andrew D; Warheit, David B; Philbert, Martin A

    2011-03-01

    It has long been recognized that the physical form of materials can mediate their toxicity--the health impacts of asbestiform materials, industrial aerosols, and ambient particulate matter are prime examples. Yet over the past 20 years, toxicology research has suggested complex and previously unrecognized associations between material physicochemistry at the nanoscale and biological interactions. With the rapid rise of the field of nanotechnology and the design and production of increasingly complex nanoscale materials, it has become ever more important to understand how the physical form and chemical composition of these materials interact synergistically to determine toxicity. As a result, a new field of research has emerged--nanotoxicology. Research within this field is highlighting the importance of material physicochemical properties in how dose is understood, how materials are characterized in a manner that enables quantitative data interpretation and comparison, and how materials move within, interact with, and are transformed by biological systems. Yet many of the substances that are the focus of current nanotoxicology studies are relatively simple materials that are at the vanguard of a new era of complex materials. Over the next 50 years, there will be a need to understand the toxicology of increasingly sophisticated materials that exhibit novel, dynamic and multifaceted functionality. If the toxicology community is to meet the challenge of ensuring the safe use of this new generation of substances, it will need to move beyond "nano" toxicology and toward a new toxicology of sophisticated materials. Here, we present a brief overview of the current state of the science on the toxicology of nanoscale materials and focus on three emerging toxicology-based challenges presented by sophisticated materials that will become increasingly important over the next 50 years: identifying relevant materials for study, physicochemical characterization, and

  10. Natural C-independent expression of restriction endonuclease in a C protein-associated restriction-modification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezulak, Monika; Borsuk, Izabela; Mruk, Iwona

    2016-04-07

    Restriction-modification (R-M) systems are highly prevalent among bacteria and archaea, and appear to play crucial roles in modulating horizontal gene transfer and protection against phage. There is much to learn about these diverse enzymes systems, especially their regulation. Type II R-M systems specify two independent enzymes: a restriction endonuclease (REase) and protective DNA methyltransferase (MTase). Their activities need to be finely balanced in vivo Some R-M systems rely on specialized transcription factors called C (controller) proteins. These proteins play a vital role in the temporal regulation of R-M gene expression, and function to indirectly modulate the horizontal transfer of their genes across the species. We report novel regulation of a C-responsive R-M system that involves a C protein of a poorly-studied structural class - C.Csp231I. Here, the C and REase genes share a bicistronic transcript, and some of the transcriptional auto-control features seen in other C-regulated R-M systems are conserved. However, separate tandem promoters drive most transcription of the REase gene, a distinctive property not seen in other tested C-linked R-M systems. Further, C protein only partially controls REase expression, yet plays a role in system stability and propagation. Consequently, high REase activity was observed after deletion of the entire C gene, and cells bearing the ΔC R-M system were outcompeted in mixed culture assays by those with the WT R-M system. Overall, our data reveal unexpected regulatory variation among R-M systems. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. 15 CFR 744.3 - Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic missile systems and space launch...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic missile systems and space launch vehicles and sounding rockets) and Unmanned Air...: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.3 Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic missile...

  12. The sophisticated control of the tram bogie on track

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan DOLECEK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the problems of routing control algorithms of new conception of tram vehicle bogie. The main goal of these research activities is wear reduction of rail wheels and tracks, wear reduction of traction energy losses and increasing of running comfort. The testing experimental tram vehicle with special bogie construction powered by traction battery is utilized for these purposes. This vehicle has a rotary bogie with independent rotating wheels driven by permanent magnets synchronous motors and a solid axle. The wheel forces in bogie are measured by large amounts of the various sensors placed on the testing experimental tram vehicle. Nowadays the designed control algorithms are implemented to the vehicle superset control system. The traction requirements and track characteristics have an effect to these control algorithms. This control including sophisticated routing brings other improvements which is verified and corrected according to individual traction and driving characteristics, and opens new possibilities.

  13. Sophisticated technology for offshore weather station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2007-11-15

    A laser wind velocity measurement system has been installed by the NaiKun Wind Energy Group at its offshore wind project site at the Haida Energy Field (HEF) in the Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia. The ZephIR LiDAR was developed by QinetiQ of the United Kingdom. Compared to regular cup anemometers, this new measurement system provides a greater profile of wind resources because it measures wind speed, direction, turbulence and shear at various heights by measuring the Doppler shift of laser radiation scattered by atmospheric aerosols. The technology has been used at various research centres worldwide and wind energy developers such as Fred Olsen Renewables, Talisman Energy and Meridian Energy use the system to facilitate project development and acquire wind resource data. The HEF has some of the strongest and most consistent winds in Canada. NaiKun has access to Environment Canada's wind data which has been collected over the past decade at an onshore meteorological station in the area. The ZephIR LiDAR was actually operating at the onshore site prior to offshore installation in order to correlate the existing wind anemometer data. It is anticipated that LiDAR technology will facilitate resource profiling by quickly providing wind measurements within the entire area of a turbine blade rotation from base to hub height. Collected data will be used to optimize project design and layout of the wind turbine array. Germany-based GL Wind Test was retained by NaiKun to manage the data acquisition and analysis. 2 figs.

  14. The First Sophists and the Uses of History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarratt, Susan C.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the history of intellectual views on the Greek sophists in three phases: (1) their disparagement by Plato and Aristotle as the morally disgraceful "other"; (2) nineteenth century British positivists' reappraisal of these relativists as ethically and scientifically superior; and (3) twentieth century versions of the sophists as…

  15. The Impact of Financial Sophistication on Adjustable Rate Mortgage Ownership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Hyrum; Finke, Michael S.; Huston, Sandra J.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of a financial sophistication scale on adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) borrowing is explored. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis using recent data from the Survey of Consumer Finances reveal that ARM borrowing is driven by both the least and most financially sophisticated households but for different reasons. Less…

  16. Paul and sophistic rhetoric: a perspective on his argumentation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article Paul's argumentation is analysed from the perspective of sophistic rhetoric. In the first section the question is discussed what it means to label Paul's rhetoric in his Letter to the Galatians 'sophistic.' To that end, an attempt is made to reconstruct the view of a contemporary critical reader who did not share Paul's ...

  17. Definition and Measurement of End User Computing Sophistication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blili, Samir; And Others

    1996-01-01

    To conceptualize and measure end user computing sophistication, a three-dimensional characterization of application, usage, and end user sophistication is proposed. A preliminary operationalization using 9 variables was tested with 505 users in 5 Canadian enterprises and found to be globally reliable. Contains five tables and an appendix which…

  18. Model Reduction of Linear Switched Systems by Restricting Discrete Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastug, Mert; Petreczky, Mihaly; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2014-01-01

    We present a procedure for reducing the number of continuous states of discrete-time linear switched systems, such that the reduced system has the same behavior as the original system for a subset of switching sequences. The proposed method is expected to be useful for abstraction based control s...

  19. Effects of restricted recharge in an urban karst system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toran, Laura; Gross, Kathleen; Yang, Youa

    2009-07-01

    Urban karst systems are typically considered more vulnerable to contamination and excess storm discharge because of potential source areas, increased sediment loading, and focusing of water from impervious surfaces. However, urban hydrology can lead to unexpected patterns, such as pirating of recharge into man-made storm systems. Valley Creek Basin in southeastern Pennsylvania, presents such an urban karst system. Four springs were monitored for suspended sediment, water chemistry, and storm response for an 18-month period. The baseflow suspended sediment concentrations were low, less than 4.0 mg/l. Furthermore, trace metal analysis of baseflow water samples and spring mouth sediment showed only low concentrations. The response to storms within the system was rapid, on the order of 1-3 h. The maximum water stage increases at the urban springs were typically less than 15 cm, with springs from more commercialized areas showing stormwater systems occurs. Thus, the concept of an urban karst system as a contaminant conduit is not the only one that applies. In Valley Creek Basin, reduced infiltration due to paving led to smaller storm response and less contaminant input, and the smaller capture area due to diversion of stormwater led to short flow paths and rapid storm response. Although contaminant levels have not increased due to urbanization, the springs may be at risk for future contamination. Short flow paths may reduce flushing, which means that the system will not cleanse itself if contamination occurs.

  20. Sophistication and Performance of Italian Agri‐food Exports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Carbone

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonprice competition is increasingly important in world food markets. Recently, the expression ‘export sophistication’ has been introduced in the economic literature to refer to a wide set of attributes that increase product value. An index has been proposed to measure sophistication in an indirect way through the per capita GDP of exporting countries (Lall et al., 2006; Haussmann et al., 2007.The paper applies the sophistication measure to the Italian food export sector, moving from an analysis of trends and performance of Italian food exports. An original way to disentangle different components in the temporal variation of the sophistication index is also proposed.Results show that the sophistication index offers original insights on recent trends in world food exports and with respect to Italian core food exports.

  1. Between likeness and semblance. The reflection on the image and the capture of the sophist in Plato’s Sophist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Flórez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In Plato’s dialogue the Sophist, the subject of the image holds a central place. In fact, the sophist can be captured by the interlocutors in so far as this sophist – he him self a skilled image maker – is caught in one of the kinds of images. In order to do this, several spoken images are dealtwith in the dialogue. These images must be understood according to the dialogue’s own statements on the image. In this way, the outcome of the dialogue can be achieved only through its reflection on itselfin the realm of the image.

  2. EBR-II argon cooling system restricted fuel handling I and C upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Start, S.E.; Carlson, R.B.; Gehrman, R.L. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Engineering Div.

    1995-06-01

    The instrumentation and control of the Argon Cooling System (ACS) restricted fuel handling control system at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is being upgraded from a system comprised of many discrete components and controllers to a computerized system with a graphical user interface (GUI). This paper describes the aspects of the upgrade including reasons for the upgrade, the old control system, upgrade goals, design decisions, philosophies and rationale, and the new control system hardware and software.

  3. Sleep allostasis in chronic sleep restriction: the role of the norepinephrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsoo; Chen, Lichao; McCarley, Robert W; Strecker, Robert E

    2013-09-19

    Sleep responses to chronic sleep restriction may be very different from those observed after acute total sleep deprivation. Specifically, when sleep restriction is repeated for several consecutive days, animals express attenuated compensatory increases in sleep time and intensity during daily sleep opportunities. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying these adaptive, or more specifically, allostatic, changes in sleep homeostasis are unknown. Several lines of evidence indicate that norepinephrine may play a key role in modulating arousal states and NREM EEG delta power, which is widely recognized as a marker for sleep intensity. Therefore, we investigated time course changes in brain adrenergic receptor mRNA levels in response to chronic sleep restriction using a rat model. Here, we observed that significantly altered mRNA levels of the α1- adrenergic receptor in the basal forebrain as well as α2- and β1-adrenergic receptor in the anterior cingulate cortex only on the first sleep restriction day. On the other hand, the frontal cortex α1-, α2-, and β1-adrenergic receptor mRNA levels were reduced throughout the period of sleep restriction. Combined with our earlier findings on EEG that sleep time and intensity significantly increased only on the first sleep restriction days, these results suggest that alterations in the brain norepinephrine system in the basal forebrain and cingulate cortex may mediate allostatic changes in sleep time and intensity observed during chronic sleep restriction. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sophisticated Communication in the Brazilian Torrent Frog Hylodes japi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, Fábio P; Zina, Juliana; Haddad, Célio F B

    2016-01-01

    Intraspecific communication in frogs plays an important role in the recognition of conspecifics in general and of potential rivals or mates in particular and therefore with relevant consequences for pre-zygotic reproductive isolation. We investigate intraspecific communication in Hylodes japi, an endemic Brazilian torrent frog with territorial males and an elaborate courtship behavior. We describe its repertoire of acoustic signals as well as one of the most complex repertoires of visual displays known in anurans, including five new visual displays. Previously unknown in frogs, we also describe a bimodal inter-sexual communication system where the female stimulates the male to emit a courtship call. As another novelty for frogs, we show that in addition to choosing which limb to signal with, males choose which of their two vocal sacs will be used for visual signaling. We explain how and why this is accomplished. Control of inflation also provides additional evidence that vocal sac movement and color must be important for visual communication, even while producing sound. Through the current knowledge on visual signaling in Neotropical torrent frogs (i.e. hylodids), we discuss and highlight the behavioral diversity in the family Hylodidae. Our findings indicate that communication in species of Hylodes is undoubtedly more sophisticated than we expected and that visual communication in anurans is more widespread than previously thought. This is especially true in tropical regions, most likely due to the higher number of species and phylogenetic groups and/or to ecological factors, such as higher microhabitat diversity.

  5. Restricted and disrupted sleep : Effects on autonomic function, neuroendocrine stress systems and stress responsivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, Peter; Sgoifo, Andrea; Suchecki, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Frequently disrupted and restricted sleep is a common problem for many people in our modern around-the-clock society. In this context, it is an important question how sleep loss affects the stress systems in our bodies since these systems enable us to deal with everyday challenges. Altered activity

  6. Optimal Sensors and Actuators Placement for Large-Scale Unstable Systems via Restricted Genetic Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seyyed Sakha, Masoud; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2017-01-01

    expensive. The computational burden is significant in particular for large-scale systems. In this paper, we develop a new technique for placing sensor and actuator in large-scale systems by using Restricted Genetic Algorithm (RGA). The RGA is a kind of genetic algorithm which is developed specifically...

  7. The BsaHI restriction-modification system: Cloning, sequencing and analysis of conserved motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Richard J

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restriction and modification enzymes typically recognise short DNA sequences of between two and eight bases in length. Understanding the mechanism of this recognition represents a significant challenge that we begin to address for the BsaHI restriction-modification system, which recognises the six base sequence GRCGYC. Results The DNA sequences of the genes for the BsaHI methyltransferase, bsaHIM, and restriction endonuclease, bsaHIR, have been determined (GenBank accession #EU386360, cloned and expressed in E. coli. Both the restriction endonuclease and methyltransferase enzymes share significant similarity with a group of 6 other enzymes comprising the restriction-modification systems HgiDI and HgiGI and the putative HindVP, NlaCORFDP, NpuORFC228P and SplZORFNP restriction-modification systems. A sequence alignment of these homologues shows that their amino acid sequences are largely conserved and highlights several motifs of interest. We target one such conserved motif, reading SPERRFD, at the C-terminal end of the bsaHIR gene. A mutational analysis of these amino acids indicates that the motif is crucial for enzymatic activity. Sequence alignment of the methyltransferase gene reveals a short motif within the target recognition domain that is conserved among enzymes recognising the same sequences. Thus, this motif may be used as a diagnostic tool to define the recognition sequences of the cytosine C5 methyltransferases. Conclusion We have cloned and sequenced the BsaHI restriction and modification enzymes. We have identified a region of the R. BsaHI enzyme that is crucial for its activity. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of the BsaHI methyltransferase enzyme led us to propose two new motifs that can be used in the diagnosis of the recognition sequence of the cytosine C5-methyltransferases.

  8. Financial Literacy and Financial Sophistication in the Older Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusardi, Annamaria; Mitchell, Olivia S.; Curto, Vilsa

    2017-01-01

    Using a special-purpose module implemented in the Health and Retirement Study, we evaluate financial sophistication in the American population over the age of 50. We combine several financial literacy questions into an overall index to highlight which questions best capture financial sophistication and examine the sensitivity of financial literacy responses to framing effects. Results show that many older respondents are not financially sophisticated: they fail to grasp essential aspects of risk diversification, asset valuation, portfolio choice, and investment fees. Subgroups with notable deficits include women, the least educated, non-Whites, and those over age 75. In view of the fact that retirees increasingly must take on responsibility for their own retirement security, such meager levels of knowledge have potentially serious and negative implications. PMID:28553191

  9. Restriction-modification system with methyl-inhibited base excision and abasic-site cleavage activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyo, Masaki; Nakano, Toshiaki; Zhang, Yingbiao; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Ishikawa, Ken; Watanabe-Matsui, Miki; Yano, Hirokazu; Hamakawa, Takeshi; Ide, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2015-03-11

    The restriction-modification systems use epigenetic modification to distinguish between self and nonself DNA. A modification enzyme transfers a methyl group to a base in a specific DNA sequence while its cognate restriction enzyme introduces breaks in DNA lacking this methyl group. So far, all the restriction enzymes hydrolyze phosphodiester bonds linking the monomer units of DNA. We recently reported that a restriction enzyme (R.PabI) of the PabI superfamily with half-pipe fold has DNA glycosylase activity that excises an adenine base in the recognition sequence (5'-GTAC). We now found a second activity in this enzyme: at the resulting apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) (abasic) site (5'-GT#C, # = AP), its AP lyase activity generates an atypical strand break. Although the lyase activity is weak and lacks sequence specificity, its covalent DNA-R.PabI reaction intermediates can be trapped by NaBH4 reduction. The base excision is not coupled with the strand breakage and yet causes restriction because the restriction enzyme action can impair transformation ability of unmethylated DNA even in the absence of strand breaks in vitro. The base excision of R.PabI is inhibited by methylation of the target adenine base. These findings expand our understanding of genetic and epigenetic processes linking those in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. An intelligent flow control system for long term fluid restriction in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Can; Li, Meihua; Kawada, Toru; Uemura, Kazunori; Inagaki, Masashi; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Fluid retention is one of the most common symptoms in patients with chronic heart failure. Although fluid restriction may be a therapeutic strategy, the degree of fluid restriction necessary for the best therapeutic outcome remains unknown partly due to the lack of proper experimental method to restrict water consumption in small animals. The traditional methods that allow animals to access water only in a limited time window or within pre-determined daily volume can be stressful because the animals may become thirsty during the time of water deprivation. To provide a less stressful water restriction paradigm, we designed a feedback-control system of drinking flow to modulate the drinking behavior of small animals. This system consisted of an infrared droplet sensor for monitoring the drinking flow and a computer controlled electric valve to regulate the water availability. A light signal which synchronized with the command for opening the valve was set to establish a conditioned reflex. An animal test indicated that rats were adaptable to a precisely programmed water supply. This system may warrant investigation into the consequences of fluid restriction in chronic experimental animal study.

  11. The Parity of Set Systems under Random Restrictions with Applications to Exponential Time Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björklund, Andreas; Dell, Holger; Husfeldt, Thore

    2015-01-01

    and Husfeldt (FOCS 2013) that computes the parity of the number of Hamiltonian cycles in time 1.619^n. 2. A new result in the framework of Cygan et al. (CCC 2012) for analyzing the complexity of NP-hard problems under the Strong Exponential Time Hypothesis: If the parity of the number of Set Covers can......We reduce the problem of detecting the existence of an object to the problem of computing the parity of the number of objects in question. In particular, when given any non-empty set system, we prove that randomly restricting elements of its ground set makes the size of the restricted set system...... an odd number with significant probability. When compared to previously known reductions of this type, ours excel in their simplicity: For graph problems, restricting elements of the ground set usually corresponds to simple deletion and contraction operations, which can be encoded efficiently in most...

  12. Quantitative Analysis Method of Output Loss due to Restriction for Grid-connected PV Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yuzuru; Oozeki, Takashi; Kurokawa, Kosuke; Itou, Takamitsu; Kitamura, Kiyoyuki; Miyamoto, Yusuke; Yokota, Masaharu; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    Voltage of power distribution line will be increased due to reverse power flow from grid-connected PV systems. In the case of high density grid connection, amount of voltage increasing will be higher than the stand-alone grid connection system. To prevent the over voltage of power distribution line, PV system's output will be restricted if the voltage of power distribution line is close to the upper limit of the control range. Because of this interaction, amount of output loss will be larger in high density case. This research developed a quantitative analysis method for PV systems output and losses to clarify the behavior of grid connected PV systems. All the measured data are classified into the loss factors using 1 minute average of 1 second data instead of typical 1 hour average. Operation point on the I-V curve is estimated to quantify the loss due to the output restriction using module temperature, array output voltage, array output current and solar irradiance. As a result, loss due to output restriction is successfully quantified and behavior of output restriction is clarified.

  13. The Feasibility of Sophisticated Multicriteria Support for Clinical Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, James G; Veazie, Peter J

    2017-10-01

    Multicriteria decision-making (MCDM) methods are well-suited to serve as the foundation for clinical decision support systems. To do so, however, they need to be appropriate for use in busy clinical settings. We compared decision-making processes and outcomes of patient-level analyses done with a range of multicriteria methods that vary in ease of use and intensity of decision support, 2 factors that could affect their ease of implementation into practice. We conducted a series of Internet surveys to compare the effects of 5 multicriteria methods that differ in user interface and required user input format on decisions regarding selection of a preferred method for lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease. The study sample consisted of members of an online Internet panel maintained by Fluidsurveys, an Internet survey company. Study outcomes were changes in preferred option, decision confidence, preparation for decision making, the Values Clarification and Decisional Uncertainty subscales of the Decisional Conflict Scale, and method ease of use. The frequency of changes in the preferred option ranged from 9% to 38%, P MCDM method increased. The proportion of respondents who rated the method as easy ranged from 57% to 79% and differed significantly among MCDM methods, P = 0.003, but was not consistently related to intensity of decision support or ease of use. Decision support based on MCDM methods is not necessarily limited by decreases in ease of use. This result suggests that it is possible to develop decision support tools using sophisticated multicriteria techniques suitable for use in routine clinical care settings.

  14. The Feminist Sophistic Enterprise: From Euripides to the Vietnam War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Audrey

    1992-01-01

    Uses feminist sophistic historiography to open the doors of two distant historical movements onto each other, reading tensions between masculinity and femininity in Athens during the Peloponnesian war and in the United States during the Vietnam War. Foregrounds the possibility of forestalling arbitrary closure on gender questions which determined…

  15. SMEs and new ventures need business model sophistication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Günzel-Jensen, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    , and Spreadshirt, this article develops a framework that introduces five business model sophistication strategies: (1) uncover additional functions of your product, (2) identify strategic benefits for third parties, (3) take advantage of economies of scope, (4) utilize cross-selling opportunities, and (5) involve...

  16. Naive vs. Sophisticated Methods of Forecasting Public Library Circulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Terrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Two sophisticated--autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA), straight-line regression--and two naive--simple average, monthly average--forecasting techniques were used to forecast monthly circulation totals of 34 public libraries. Comparisons of forecasts and actual totals revealed that ARIMA and monthly average methods had smallest mean…

  17. Modified-cytosine restriction-system-induced recombinant cloning artefacts in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, M R; Doherty, J P; Woodcock, D M

    1993-01-01

    We have tested whether, and to what extent, recombinant clones from DNA segments with 5-methylation of cytosines recovered in methylation-restrictive (mcr+) hosts contain mutations. We constructed a model system in which the tetracycline-resistance-encoding gene (tet) from pBR322 was cloned into ...

  18. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy restricted to the posterior fossa in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Fabricio Guimaraes; Lamb, Leslie; Del Carpio-O' Donovan, Raquel, E-mail: goncalves.neuroradio@gmail.com [McGill University Health Center Montreal General Hospital (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is a neurological infectious disease caused by the John Cunningham polyoma virus (JCV), an opportunistic agent with worldwide distribution. This disease is frequently seen in immunosuppressed patients and rarely associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. In the central nervous system PML demyelinating lesions occur in the supratentorial compartment. The authors describe a rare case of PML secondary to SLE treatment with atypical presentation restricted to the posterior fossa (author)

  19. Level-2 Milestone 6007: Sierra Early Delivery System Deployed to Secret Restricted Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, A. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This report documents the delivery and installation of Shark, a CORAL Sierra early delivery system deployed on the LLNL SRD network. Early ASC program users have run codes on the machine in support of application porting for the final Sierra system which will be deployed at LLNL in CY2018. In addition to the SRD resource, Shark, unclassified resources, Rzmanta and Ray, have been deployed on the LLNL Restricted Zone and Collaboration Zone networks in support of application readiness for the Sierra platform.

  20. The role of DNA restriction-modification systems in the biology of Bacillus anthracis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishnan eSitaraman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Restriction-modification (R-M systems are widespread among prokaryotes and, depending on their type, may be viewed as selfish genetic elements that persist as toxin-antitoxin modules or as cellular defense systems against phage infection. Studies in the last decade have made it amply clear that these two options do not exhaust the list of possible biological roles for R-M systems. Their presence in a cell may also have a bearing on other processes such as horizontal gene transfer and gene regulation. From genome sequencing and experimental data, we know that Bacillus anthracis encodes at least three methylation-dependent (typeIV restriction endonucleases, and an orphan DNA methyltransferase. In this article, we first present an outline of our current knowledge of R-M systems in Bacillus anthracis. Based on available DNA sequence data, and on our current understanding of the functions of similar genes in other systems, we conclude with hypotheses on the possible roles of the three restriction endonucleases and the orphan DNA methyltransferase.

  1. STOCK EXCHANGE LISTING INDUCES SOPHISTICATION OF CAPITAL BUDGETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Mendes-da-Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article compares capital budgeting techniques employed in listed and unlisted companies in Brazil. We surveyed the Chief Financial Officers (CFOs of 398 listed companies and 300 large unlisted companies, and based on 91 respondents, the results suggest that the CFOs of listed companies tend to use less simplistic methods more often, for example: NPV and CAPM, and that CFOs of unlisted companies are less likely to estimate the cost of equity, despite being large companies. These findings indicate that stock exchange listing may require greater sophistication of the capital budgeting process.

  2. Biologically inspired, sophisticated motions from helically assembled, conducting fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peining; Xu, Yifan; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Guo, Wenhan; Zhang, Zhitao; Qiu, Longbin; Li, Jianfeng; Chen, Daoyong; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-02-11

    A hierarchically helical organization of carbon nanotubes into macroscopic fibers enables sophistication while controlling three-dimensional electromechanical actuations, e.g., an artificial swing and tail. The actuation generates a stress of more than 260 times that of a typical natural skeletal muscle and an accelerated velocity of more than 10 times that of a cheetah at low electric currents with high reversibility, good stability, and availability to various media. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Strategic sophistication of individuals and teams. Experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Matthias; Czermak, Simon; Feri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Many important decisions require strategic sophistication. We examine experimentally whether teams act more strategically than individuals. We let individuals and teams make choices in simple games, and also elicit first- and second-order beliefs. We find that teams play the Nash equilibrium strategy significantly more often, and their choices are more often a best response to stated first order beliefs. Distributional preferences make equilibrium play less likely. Using a mixture model, the estimated probability to play strategically is 62% for teams, but only 40% for individuals. A model of noisy introspection reveals that teams differ from individuals in higher order beliefs. PMID:24926100

  4. Pathological phenotypes and in vivo DNA cleavage by unrestrained activity of a phosphorothioate-based restriction system in Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bo; Cheng, Qiuxiang; Gu, Chen; Yao, Fen; DeMott, Michael S; Zheng, Xiaoqing; Deng, Zixin; Dedon, Peter C; You, Delin

    2014-08-01

    Prokaryotes protect their genomes from foreign DNA with a diversity of defence mechanisms, including a widespread restriction-modification (R-M) system involving phosphorothioate (PT) modification of the DNA backbone. Unlike classical R-M systems, highly partial PT modification of consensus motifs in bacterial genomes suggests an unusual mechanism of PT-dependent restriction. In Salmonella enterica, PT modification is mediated by four genes dptB-E, while restriction involves additional three genes dptF-H. Here, we performed a series of studies to characterize the PT-dependent restriction, and found that it presented several features distinct with traditional R-M systems. The presence of restriction genes in a PT-deficient mutant was not lethal, but instead resulted in several pathological phenotypes. Subsequent transcriptional profiling revealed the expression of > 600 genes was affected by restriction enzymes in cells lacking PT, including induction of bacteriophage, SOS response and DNA repair-related genes. These transcriptional responses are consistent with the observation that restriction enzymes caused extensive DNA cleavage in the absence of PT modifications in vivo. However, overexpression of restriction genes was lethal to the host in spite of the presence PT modifications. These results point to an unusual mechanism of PT-dependent DNA cleavage by restriction enzymes in the face of partial PT modification. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Pathological phenotypes and in vivo DNA cleavage by unrestrained activity of a phosphorothioate-based restriction system in Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bo; Cheng, Qiuxiang; Gu, Chen; Yao, Fen; DeMott, Michael S.; Zheng, Xiaoqing; Deng, Zixin; Dedon, Peter C.; You, Delin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Prokaryotes protect their genomes from foreign DNA with a diversity of defense mechanisms, including a widespread restriction-modification (R-M) system involving phosphorothioate (PT) modification of the DNA backbone. Unlike classical R-M systems, highly partial PT-modification of consensus motifs in bacterial genomes suggests an unusual mechanism of PT-dependent restriction. In Salmonella enterica, PT modification is mediated by four genes dptB-E, while restriction involves additional three genes dptF-H. Here, we performed a series of studies to characterize the PT-dependent restriction, and found that it presented several features distinct with traditional R-M systems. The presence of restriction genes in a PT-deficient mutant was not lethal, but instead resulted in several pathological phenotypes. Subsequent transcriptional profiling revealed the expression of >600 genes was affected by restriction enzymes in cells lacking PT, including induction of bacteriophage, SOS response and DNA repair-related genes. These transcriptional responses are consistent with the observation that restriction enzymes caused extensive DNA cleavage in the absence of PT modifications in vivo. However, over-expression of restriction genes was lethal to the host in spite of the presence PT modifications. These results point to an unusual mechanism of PT-dependent DNA cleavage by restriction enzymes in the face of partial PT modification. PMID:25040300

  6. Understanding key features of bacterial restriction-modification systems through quantitative modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodic, Andjela; Blagojevic, Bojana; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Djordjevic, Magdalena; Djordjevic, Marko

    2017-02-24

    Restriction-modification (R-M) systems are rudimentary bacterial immune systems. The main components include restriction enzyme (R), which cuts specific unmethylated DNA sequences, and the methyltransferase (M), which protects the same DNA sequences. The expression of R-M system components is considered to be tightly regulated, to ensure successful establishment in a naïve bacterial host. R-M systems are organized in different architectures (convergent or divergent) and are characterized by different features, i.e. binding cooperativities, dissociation constants of dimerization, translation rates, which ensure this tight regulation. It has been proposed that R-M systems should exhibit certain dynamical properties during the system establishment, such as: i) a delayed expression of R with respect to M, ii) fast transition of R from "OFF" to "ON" state, iii) increased stability of the toxic molecule (R) steady-state levels. It is however unclear how different R-M system features and architectures ensure these dynamical properties, particularly since it is hard to address this question experimentally. To understand design of different R-M systems, we computationally analyze two R-M systems, representative of the subset controlled by small regulators called 'C proteins', and differing in having convergent or divergent promoter architecture. We show that, in the convergent system, abolishing any of the characteristic system features adversely affects the dynamical properties outlined above. Moreover, an extreme binding cooperativity, accompanied by a very high dissociation constant of dimerization, observed in the convergent system, but absent from other R-M systems, can be explained in terms of the same properties. Furthermore, we develop the first theoretical model for dynamics of a divergent R-M system, which does not share any of the convergent system features, but has overlapping promoters. We show that i) the system dynamics exhibits the same three dynamical

  7. Sistemas multi–modales de profundidad restringida Multi-modal systems of restricted depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Sierra A.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan como extensiones del cálculo proposicional clásico, la jerarquíade sistemas deductivos SMM–n con n > 1. SMM–n es el sistema multi–modalde profundidad–n. El sistema SMM–1 es el cálculo proposicional clásico. Elsistema SMM–(n + 1 puede ser visto como el resultado de aplicar la regla denecesariedad, asociada a los razonadores con suficiente capacidad de razona-miento, una vez a los teoremas del sistema SMM–n. El sistema SMM resultade la reunión de los sistemas de la jerarquía, y puede ser visto como el sis-tema de lógica multi–modal Km con restricciones. Los sistemas SMM–n soncaracterizados con una semántica al estilo Kripke, en la cual, la longitud delas cadenas de mundos posibles se encuentra restringida.They are presented as extensions of the classical propositional logic, the hierarchy of deductive systems SMM–n with n > 1. SMM–n is the multi–modal system of depth–n. The system SMM–1 is the classical propositional logic. The system SMM–(n + 1 it can be seen as the result of applying the necesariedad rule, associated to the reasoners with enough reasoning capacity, once to the theorems of the system SMM–n. The system SMM is of the union of the systems of the hierarchy, and it can be seen as the system of logic multimodal Km with restrictions. The systems SMM–n are characterized with a semantics to the style Kripke, in the one which, the longitude of the chains of possible worlds is restricted.

  8. A Collusion-Resistant Fingerprinting System for Restricted Distribution of Digital Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Hernandez, Mario Diego; Garcia-Hernandez, Jose Juan; Morales-Sandoval, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Digital fingerprinting is a technique that consists of inserting the ID of an authorized user in the digital content that he requests. This technique has been mainly used to trace back pirate copies of multimedia content such as images, audio, and video. This study proposes the use of state-of-the-art digital fingerprinting techniques in the context of restricted distribution of digital documents. In particular, the system proposed by Kuribayashi for multimedia content is investigated. Extensive simulations show the robustness of the proposed system against average collusion attack. Perceptual transparency of the fingerprinted documents is also studied. Moreover, by using an efficient Fast Fourier Transform core and standard computer machines it is shown that the proposed system is suitable for real-world scenarios. PMID:24349165

  9. Fibroblast growth factor 23 and the antiproteinuric response to dietary sodium restriction during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, J.K.; Lambers Heerspink, H.J.; Kwakernaak, A.J.; Slagman, M.C.; Waanders, F.; Vervloet, M.G.; Wee, P.M. Ter; Navis, G.; Borst, M.H. de; Wee, P.M. ter; Vervloet, M.; Bindels, R.J.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Hillebrands, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Residual proteinuria during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade is a major renal and cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockade, but residual proteinuria remains in many

  10. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and the Antiproteinuric Response to Dietary Sodium Restriction During Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, Jelmer K; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Kwakernaak, Arjan J; Slagman, Maartje C J; Waanders, Femke; Vervloet, Marc G; Ter Wee, Pieter M; Navis, Gerarda; de Borst, Martin H

    Background: Residual proteinuria during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade is a major renal and cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockade, but residual proteinuria remains in many

  11. Musical Sophistication and the Effect of Complexity on Auditory Discrimination in Finnish Speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Caitlin; Aalto, Daniel; Šimko, Juraj; Vainio, Martti; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2017-01-01

    Musical experiences and native language are both known to affect auditory processing. The present work aims to disentangle the influences of native language phonology and musicality on behavioral and subcortical sound feature processing in a population of musically diverse Finnish speakers as well as to investigate the specificity of enhancement from musical training. Finnish speakers are highly sensitive to duration cues since in Finnish, vowel and consonant duration determine word meaning. Using a correlational approach with a set of behavioral sound feature discrimination tasks, brainstem recordings, and a musical sophistication questionnaire, we find no evidence for an association between musical sophistication and more precise duration processing in Finnish speakers either in the auditory brainstem response or in behavioral tasks, but they do show an enhanced pitch discrimination compared to Finnish speakers with less musical experience and show greater duration modulation in a complex task. These results are consistent with a ceiling effect set for certain sound features which corresponds to the phonology of the native language, leaving an opportunity for music experience-based enhancement of sound features not explicitly encoded in the language (such as pitch, which is not explicitly encoded in Finnish). Finally, the pattern of duration modulation in more musically sophisticated Finnish speakers suggests integrated feature processing for greater efficiency in a real world musical situation. These results have implications for research into the specificity of plasticity in the auditory system as well as to the effects of interaction of specific language features with musical experiences.

  12. Specialty pharmacies and other restricted drug distribution systems: financial and safety considerations for patients and health-system pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Bonnie E

    2009-12-15

    To discuss the role of restricted drug distribution systems in the implementation of risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMS), health-system pharmacists' concerns associated with the use of specialty pharmacies and other restricted drug distribution systems, reimbursement policies for high-cost specialty drugs, supply chain models for traditional and specialty drugs, and emerging trends in the management of and reimbursement for specialty pharmaceuticals. Restricted drug distribution systems established by pharmaceutical manufacturers, specialty pharmacies, or other specialty suppliers may be a component of REMS, which are required by the Food and Drug Administration for the management of known or potential serious risks from certain drugs. Concerns of health-system pharmacists using specialty suppliers include access to pharmaceuticals, operational challenges, product integrity, financial implications, continuity of care, and patient safety. An ambulatory care patient taking a specialty drug product from home to a hospital outpatient clinic or inpatient setting for administration, a practice known as "brown bagging," raises concerns about product integrity and institutional liability. An institution's finances, tolerance for liability, and ability to skillfully manage the processes involved often determine its choice between an approach that prohibits brown bagging but is costly and one that permits the practice under certain conditions and is less costly. The recent shift from a traditional supply chain model to a specialty pharmacy supply chain model for high-cost pharmaceuticals has the potential to increase pharmaceutical costs for health systems. A dialogue is needed between health-system pharmacists and group purchasing organizations to address the latter's role in mitigating the financial implications of this change and to help clarify the safety issues. Some health plans have shifted part of the cost of expensive drugs to patients by establishing a

  13. A sophisticated platform for characterization, monitoring and control of machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Peter; Bäckström, Mikael; Rantatalo, Matti; Svoboda, Ales; Kaplan, Alexander

    2006-04-01

    The potential for improving the performance of machine tools is considerable. However, for this to be achieved without tool failure or product damage, the process must be sufficiently well understood to enable real-time monitoring and control to be applied. A unique sophisticated measurement platform has been developed and applied to two different machining centres, particularly for high-speed machining up to 24 000 rpm. Characterization and on-line monitoring of the dynamic behaviour of the machining processes has been carried out using both contact-based methods (accelerometer, force sensor) and non-contact methods (laser Doppler vibrometry and magnetic shaker) and numerical simulation (finite element based modal analysis). The platform was applied both pre-process and on-line for studying an aluminium testpiece based on a thin-walled aerospace component. Stability lobe diagrams for this specific machine/component combination were generated allowing selection of optimal process parameters giving stable cutting and metal removal rates some 8-10 times higher than those possible in unstable machining. Based on dynamic characterization and monitoring, a concept for an adaptive control with constraints based machine tool controller has been developed. The developed platform can be applied in manifold machining situations. It offers a reliable way of achieving significant process improvement.

  14. Roman sophisticated surface modification methods to manufacture silver counterfeited coins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingo, G. M.; Riccucci, C.; Faraldi, F.; Pascucci, M.; Messina, E.; Fierro, G.; Di Carlo, G.

    2017-11-01

    By means of the combined use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) the surface and subsurface chemical and metallurgical features of silver counterfeited Roman Republican coins are investigated to decipher some aspects of the manufacturing methods and to evaluate the technological ability of the Roman metallurgists to produce thin silver coatings. The results demonstrate that over 2000 ago important advances in the technology of thin layer deposition on metal substrates were attained by Romans. The ancient metallurgists produced counterfeited coins by combining sophisticated micro-plating methods and tailored surface chemical modification based on the mercury-silvering process. The results reveal that Romans were able systematically to chemically and metallurgically manipulate alloys at a micro scale to produce adherent precious metal layers with a uniform thickness up to few micrometers. The results converge to reveal that the production of forgeries was aimed firstly to save expensive metals as much as possible allowing profitable large-scale production at a lower cost. The driving forces could have been a lack of precious metals, an unexpected need to circulate coins for trade and/or a combinations of social, political and economic factors that requested a change in money supply. Finally, some information on corrosion products have been achieved useful to select materials and methods for the conservation of these important witnesses of technology and economy.

  15. Cognitive sophistication does not attenuate the bias blind spot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Richard F; Meserve, Russell J; Stanovich, Keith E

    2012-09-01

    The so-called bias blind spot arises when people report that thinking biases are more prevalent in others than in themselves. Bias turns out to be relatively easy to recognize in the behaviors of others, but often difficult to detect in one's own judgments. Most previous research on the bias blind spot has focused on bias in the social domain. In 2 studies, we found replicable bias blind spots with respect to many of the classic cognitive biases studied in the heuristics and biases literature (e.g., Tversky & Kahneman, 1974). Further, we found that none of these bias blind spots were attenuated by measures of cognitive sophistication such as cognitive ability or thinking dispositions related to bias. If anything, a larger bias blind spot was associated with higher cognitive ability. Additional analyses indicated that being free of the bias blind spot does not help a person avoid the actual classic cognitive biases. We discuss these findings in terms of a generic dual-process theory of cognition.

  16. LlaFI, a Type III Restriction and Modification System in Lactococcus lactis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ping; Im, Heejeong; Hsieh, Hsiaoling; Kang’A, Simon; Dunn, Noel W.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a type III restriction and modification (R/M) system, LlaFI, in Lactococcus lactis. LlaFI is encoded by a 12-kb native plasmid, pND801, harbored in L. lactis LL42-1. Sequencing revealed two adjacent open reading frames (ORFs). One ORF encodes a 680-amino-acid polypeptide, and this ORF is followed by a second ORF which encodes an 873-amino-acid polypeptide. The two ORFs appear to be organized in an operon. A homology search revealed that the two ORFs exhibited significant similarity to type III restriction (Res) and modification (Mod) subunits. The complete amino acid sequence of the Mod subunit of LlaFI was aligned with the amino acid sequences of four previously described type III methyltransferases. Both the N-terminal regions and the C-terminal regions of the Mod proteins are conserved, while the central regions are more variable. An S-adenosyl methionine (Ado-Met) binding motif (present in all adenine methyltransferases) was found in the N-terminal region of the Mod protein. The seven conserved helicase motifs found in the previously described type III R/M systems were found at the same relative positions in the LlaFI Res sequence. LlaFI has cofactor requirements for activity that are characteristic of the previously described type III enzymes. ATP and Mg2+ are required for endonucleolytic activity; however, the activity is not strictly dependent on the presence of Ado-Met but is stimulated by it. To our knowledge, this is the first type III R/M system that has been characterized not just in lactic acid bacteria but also in gram-positive bacteria. PMID:9925601

  17. Sign restriction approach to macro stress-testing of the Croatian banking system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Erjavec

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper employs Uhlig’s sign restriction approach to stress-testing of the Croatian banking system. The analysis is based on a standard monetary VAR comprising real economic activity, inflation and short-term interest rates augmented by the ratio of non-performing loans or return on average equity, both measures representing the aggregate banking sector. In spite of the selected indicator, the results suggest a strong sensitivity of the Croatian banking sector to macroeconomic shocks. The effects are the strongest for contractionary monetary policy shocks, followed by negative demand shocks while the effects of supply shocks turned out to be statistically insignificant. Since Croatia is a small open economy with banking the dominant financial sector, the results obtained could be interesting for policy makers in Croatia and other transition economies with similar characteristics.

  18. Spatially restricted expression of candidate taste receptors in the Drosophila gustatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunipace, L; Meister, S; McNealy, C; Amrein, H

    2001-06-05

    Taste is an important sensory modality in most animals. In Drosophila, taste is perceived by gustatory neurons located in sensilla distributed on several different appendages throughout the body of the animal. Here we show that the gustatory receptors are encoded by a family of at least 54 genes (Gr genes), most of which are expressed exclusively in a small subset of taste sensilla located in narrowly defined regions of the fly's body. BLAST searches with the predicted amino acid sequences of 6 7-transmembrane-receptor genes of unknown function and 20 previously identified, putative gustatory receptor genes led to the identification of a large gene family comprising at least 54 genes. We investigated the expression of eight genes by using a Gal4 reporter gene assay and found that five of them were expressed in the gustatory system of the fly. Four genes were expressed in 1%-4% of taste sensilla, located in well-defined regions of the proboscis, the legs, or both. The fifth gene was expressed in about 20% of taste sensilla in all major gustatory organs, including the taste bristles on the anterior wing margin. Axon-tracing experiments demonstrated that neurons expressing a given Gr gene project their axons to a spatially restricted domain of the subesophageal ganglion in the fly brain. Our findings suggest that each taste sensillum represents a discrete, functional unit expressing at least one Gr receptor and that most Gr genes are expressed in spatially restricted domains of the gustatory system. These observations imply the potential for high taste discrimination of the Drosophila brain.

  19. The effect of 1-week feed restriction on performance, digestibility of nutrients and digestive system development in the growing rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tůmová, E; Volek, Z; Chodová, D; Härtlová, H; Makovický, P; Svobodová, J; Ebeid, T A; Uhlířová, L

    2016-01-01

    A 3 to 4 week feed restriction of about 20% to 25% of the free intake is widely applied in rabbit breeding systems to reduce post-weaning digestive disorders. However, a short intensive feed restriction is described in few studies and can be beneficial for growing rabbits due to a longer re-alimentation period. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ad libitum (AL) and two restriction levels of feeding (50 and 65 g/rabbit per day) applied for 1 week on performance, gastrointestinal morphology and physiological parameters during the restriction and during the re-alimentation period. Rabbits were divided into three experimental groups: AL rabbits were fed AL, R1 rabbits were restricted from 42 to 49 days of age and received 50 g daily (29% of AL) and R2 rabbits were restricted at the same age and were fed 65 g of feed daily (37% of AL). In the 1(st) week after weaning and in the weeks after restriction, all the groups were fed AL. During the restriction period, daily weight gain (DWG) in R1 significantly dropped to 11% (experiment 1) and 5% (experiment 2) compared with rabbits in the AL group, although they were fed 29% of AL, whereas in the R2 group it decreased to 20% (experiment 1) and 10% (experiment 2). In the week following feed restriction, DWG in the restricted groups increased (PDigestibilities of CP and fat were not significantly higher during the restriction period and during the 1(st) week of re-alimentation compared with the AL group. Significant interactions between feeding regime and age revealed the shortest large intestine in the AL group at 49 days of age and the longest at 70 days in the AL and R1 groups. Small intestinal villi were significantly higher and the crypts were significantly deeper in the restricted groups. It could be concluded that short intensive feed restriction increased digestible area in the small and large intestines, including the height of villi and depth of crypts, which might be involved in the compensatory

  20. Diverse Functions of Restriction-Modification Systems in Addition to Cellular Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasu, Kommireddy

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Restriction-modification (R-M) systems are ubiquitous and are often considered primitive immune systems in bacteria. Their diversity and prevalence across the prokaryotic kingdom are an indication of their success as a defense mechanism against invading genomes. However, their cellular defense function does not adequately explain the basis for their immaculate specificity in sequence recognition and nonuniform distribution, ranging from none to too many, in diverse species. The present review deals with new developments which provide insights into the roles of these enzymes in other aspects of cellular function. In this review, emphasis is placed on novel hypotheses and various findings that have not yet been dealt with in a critical review. Emerging studies indicate their role in various cellular processes other than host defense, virulence, and even controlling the rate of evolution of the organism. We also discuss how R-M systems could have successfully evolved and be involved in additional cellular portfolios, thereby increasing the relative fitness of their hosts in the population. PMID:23471617

  1. Data validation platform for the sophisticated monitoring and communication of the energy technology sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flamos, Alexandros; Doukas, Haris; Psarras, J. [Management and Decision Support Systems Lab (EPU-NTUA), School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 9, Iroon Polytechniou str., 15780, Athens (Greece)

    2010-05-15

    It has very often been stated that the difficulty and complexity of achieving green energy targets in the European Union (EU) will require strengthened measures to promote implementation of New Energy Technologies, Energy End-use Efficiency, as well as measures to support the related energy Research and Technology Development (RTD). Often forgotten is the fact, that most of all, a European-wide co-ordinated forum is needed to continuously develop and sophisticate the monitoring and methodology results, bringing together specialised statisticians, energy researchers and experts on energy socio-economics. The aim of this paper is to present the Scientific Reference System (SRS) Scorecard; a data validation platform for the sophisticated monitoring and communication of the energy technology sector. In this respect, the concept of the SRS scorecard system will be laid out, the parameters and the scoring criteria will be explained as well as the assessment system so as to provide the interested reader with the basis needed to understand the technology evaluation examples provided, as well as its critical analysis. (author)

  2. Resonance dynamics and partial averaging in a restricted three-body system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighipour, Nader

    2002-07-01

    Based on the value of the orbital eccentricity of an object and also its proximity to the exact resonant orbit in a three-body system, the pendulum approximation [S. F. Dermott and C. D. Murray, Nature (London) 319, 201 (1983)] or the second fundamental model of resonance [M. H. Andoyer, Bull. Astron. 20, 321 (1903); J. Henrard and A. Lemaître, Celest. Mech. 30, 197 (1983)] are commonly used to study the motion of that object near its resonant state. In this paper, we present the method of partial averaging as an analytical approach to study the dynamical evolution of a body near a resonance. To focus attention on the capabilities of this technique, a restricted, circular and planar three-body system is considered and the dynamics of its outer planet while captured in a resonance with the inner body is studied. It is shown that the first-order partially averaged system resembles a mathematical pendulum whose librational motion can be viewed as a geometrical interpretation of the resonance capture phenomenon. The driving force of this pendulum corresponds to the gravitational attraction of the inner body and its contribution, at different resonant states, is shown to be proportional to es, where s is the order of the resonance and e is the orbital eccentricity of the outer planet. As examples of such systems, the cases of (1:1), (1:2), and (1:3) resonances are discussed and the results are compared with known planetary systems such as the Sun-Jupiter-Trojan asteroids.

  3. Type I restriction-modification system and its resistance in electroporation efficiency in Flavobacterium columnare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, N; Zhang, L Q; Zhang, J; Liu, Z X; Huang, B; Zhang, S H; Nie, P

    2012-11-09

    Flavobacterium columnare, the causative agent of columnaris disease, infects freshwater fish worldwide. However, the pathogenicity of this bacterium is poorly understood due possibly to the lack of an efficient in-frame knockout technique. In order to improve electroporation efficiency, the type I restriction-modification system (R-M system) was cloned and its role in electroporation was examined in F. columnare G(4) strain. The complete sequence of type I R-M system in the bacterium, designated as Fcl, contains all three subunits of type I R-M system, named as fclM, fclS, fclR, respectively, with the identification of a hypothetical gene, fclX. Constitutive transcription of the three genes was observed in F. columnare G(4) by RT-PCR. The ORF of fclM and fclS was cloned into the plasmid pACYC184 and transformed into Escherichia coli TOP10. The resultant E. coli strain, designated as E. coli TOPmt, was transformed with the integrative plasmid pGL006 constructed for F. columnare G(4). The integrative plasmid was re-isolated from TOPmt and incubated with the lysate of F. columnare G(4). The re-isolated integrative plasmid, designated as pGL006', showed higher resistance than pGL006. With pGL006', the electroporation efficiency of the strain G(4) increased 2.6 times, while that of F. columnare G(18) was not obviously improved. Furthermore, a method to improve the electroporation efficiency of F. columnare G(4) was developed using the integrative plasmid methylated by E. coli TOPmt which contains the fclM and fclS gene of F. columnare G(4). Further analyses showed that the fcl gene cluster may be a unique type I R-M system in F. columnare G(4). It will be of significant interest to examine the composition and diversity of R-M systems in strains of F. columnare in order to set up a suitable genetic manipulation system for the bacterium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Specific lipidome signatures in central nervous system from methionine-restricted mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jové, Mariona; Ayala, Victòria; Ramírez-Núñez, Omar; Naudí, Alba; Cabré, Rosanna; Spickett, Corinne M; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Pamplona, Reinald

    2013-06-07

    Membrane lipid composition is an important correlate of the rate of aging of animals. Dietary methionine restriction (MetR) increases lifespan in rodents. The underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated but could include changes in tissue lipidomes. In this work, we demonstrate that 80% MetR in mice induces marked changes in the brain, spinal cord, and liver lipidomes. Further, at least 50% of the lipids changed are common in the brain and spinal cord but not in the liver, suggesting a nervous system-specific lipidomic profile of MetR. The differentially expressed lipids includes (a) specific phospholipid species, which could reflect adaptive membrane responses, (b) sphingolipids, which could lead to changes in ceramide signaling pathways, and (c) the physiologically redox-relevant ubiquinone 9, indicating adaptations in phase II antioxidant response metabolism. In addition, specific oxidation products derived from cholesterol, phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidylethanolamine were significantly decreased in the brain, spinal cord, and liver from MetR mice. These results demonstrate the importance of adaptive responses of membrane lipids leading to increased stress resistance as a major mechanistic contributor to the lowered rate of aging in MetR mice.

  5. Victimization and restricted participation among young people with disabilities in the US child welfare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Kristin L; Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Msall, Michael E; Acharya, Kruti

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of disability and victimization in young people's participation in developmentally salient activities by analyzing a nationally representative group of young people from the child welfare system (CWS). Data were obtained from interviews with young people and their parents, recorded by the second National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW II). The sample group consisted of 405 females and 270 males, ranging in age from 11 to 17 years (mean age 13y 6mo), and residing with families throughout the USA. The relationships among disability status, victimization, and participation were explored using weighted logistic regression analysis. Controlling for demographical and family-related factors, the probability of young people with disabilities (YWD), involved with the CWS, reporting two or more victimizations was 120% higher (p<0.01) than that of young people without disabilities. YWD in the CWS were almost twice as likely as young people without disabilities to report participation in only one or no developmentally salient activities. Controlling for all other variables, the odds of restricted participation were 6.8-fold higher (p<0.05) for victimized YWD in the CWS. Young people with disabilities who report victimization are significantly less likely than their typically developing peers to participate in developmentally salient activities. Without coordinated efforts to prevent victimization of YWD in the CWS, there will be significant barriers to their participation, well-being, and independent living outcomes. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  6. Parametric and cadaveric models of lumbar flexion instability and flexion restricting dynamic stabilization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Louis C; Alamin, Todd F; Voronov, Leonard I; Carandang, Gerard; Havey, Robert M; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2013-12-01

    Development of a dynamic stabilization system often involves costly and time-consuming design iterations, testing and computational modeling. The aims of this study were (1) develop a simple parametric model of lumbar flexion instability and use this model to identify the appropriate stiffness of a flexion restricting stabilization system (FRSS), and (2) in a cadaveric experiment, validate the predictive value of the parametric model. Literature was surveyed for typical parameters of intact and destabilized spines: stiffness in the high flexibility zone (HFZ) and high stiffness zone, and size of the HFZ. These values were used to construct a bilinear parametric model of flexion kinematics of intact and destabilized lumbar spines. FRSS implantation was modeled by iteratively superimposing constant flexion stiffnesses onto the parametric model. Five cadaveric lumbar spines were tested intact; after L4-L5 destabilization (nucleotomy, midline decompression); and after FRSS implantation. Specimens were loaded in flexion/extension (8 Nm/6 Nm) with 400 N follower load to characterize kinematics for comparison with the parametric model. To accomplish the goal of reducing ROM to intact levels and increasing stiffness to approximately 50 % greater than intact levels, flexion stiffness contributed by the FRSS was determined to be 0.5 Nm/deg using the parametric model. In biomechanical testing, the FRSS restored ROM of the destabilized segment from 146 ± 13 to 105 ± 21 % of intact, and stiffness in the HFZ from 41 ± 7 to 135 ± 38 % of intact. Testing demonstrated excellent predictive value of the parametric model, and that the FRSS attained the desired biomechanical performance developed with the model. A simple parametric model may allow efficient optimization of kinematic design parameters.

  7. A sophisticated mechanism for enabling real-time mobile access to PHR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koufi, Vassiliki; Malamateniou, Flora; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2013-01-01

    Faced with rapid changes, such as growing complexity in care delivery, health systems nowadays fall short in their ability to translate knowledge into practice. Mobile technology holds enormous potential for transforming healthcare delivery systems which currently involve cumbersome processes that slow down care and decrease rather than improve safety. However, the limited computing, energy and information storage capabilities of mobile devices are hampering their ability to support increasingly sophisticated applications required by certain application fields, such as healthcare. This paper is concerned with a framework which provides ubiquitous mobile access to comprehensive health information at any point of care or decision making in a way that efficient utilization of mobile device resources is achieved. To this end, a cloud-based push messaging mechanism is utilized which draws upon and enhances Google Cloud Messaging service.

  8. Using Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) Analysis to Assess Microbial Community Structure in Compost Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiquia, Sonia M.

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of PCR-amplified genes is a widely used fingerprinting technique in composting systems. This analysis is based on the restriction endonuclease digestion of fluorescently end-labeled PCR products. The digested product is mixed with a DNA size standard, itself labeled with a distinct fluorescent dye, and the fragments are then separated by capillary or gel electrophoresis using an automated sequencer. Upon analysis, only the terminal end-labeled restriction fragments are detected. An electropherogram is produced, which shows a profile of compost microbial community as a series of peaks of varying height. This technique has also been effectively used in the exploration of complex microbial environments and in the study of bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryal populations in natural habitats.

  9. Linear Time Algorithms to Restrict Insider Access using Multi-Policy Access Control Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mell, Peter; Shook, James; Harang, Richard; Gavrila, Serban

    2017-03-01

    An important way to limit malicious insiders from distributing sensitive information is to as tightly as possible limit their access to information. This has always been the goal of access control mechanisms, but individual approaches have been shown to be inadequate. Ensemble approaches of multiple methods instantiated simultaneously have been shown to more tightly restrict access, but approaches to do so have had limited scalability (resulting in exponential calculations in some cases). In this work, we take the Next Generation Access Control (NGAC) approach standardized by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and demonstrate its scalability. The existing publicly available reference implementations all use cubic algorithms and thus NGAC was widely viewed as not scalable. The primary NGAC reference implementation took, for example, several minutes to simply display the set of files accessible to a user on a moderately sized system. In our approach, we take these cubic algorithms and make them linear. We do this by reformulating the set theoretic approach of the NGAC standard into a graph theoretic approach and then apply standard graph algorithms. We thus can answer important access control decision questions (e.g., which files are available to a user and which users can access a file) using linear time graph algorithms. We also provide a default linear time mechanism to visualize and review user access rights for an ensemble of access control mechanisms. Our visualization appears to be a simple file directory hierarchy but in reality is an automatically generated structure abstracted from the underlying access control graph that works with any set of simultaneously instantiated access control policies. It also provide an implicit mechanism for symbolic linking that provides a powerful access capability. Our work thus provides the first efficient implementation of NGAC while enabling user privilege review through a novel visualization approach. This

  10. Restricted Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette; Lassen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    communities and shopping centres through mobility lenses. The article shows how different mobility systems enable and restrict the public access to private-public spaces, and it points out that proprietary communities create an unequal potential for human movement and access in the city. The main argument......Privatisation of public spaces in the contemporary city has increased during the last decades but only few studies have approached this field from a mobility perspective. Therefore the article seeks to rectify this by exploring two Australian examples of private spaces in the city; gated...... in the article is that the many mobility systems enable specialization of places that are targeted at a special section of the population. This means that various forms of motilities not only create new opportunities for urban life but it is also one of the most critical components of production of new exclusion...

  11. Modern devices the simple physics of sophisticated technology

    CERN Document Server

    Joseph, Charles L

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the principles of physics through applications of state-of-the-art technologies and advanced instruments. The authors use diagrams, sketches, and graphs coupled with equations and mathematical analysis to enhance the reader's understanding of modern devices. Readers will learn to identify common underlying physical principles that govern several types of devices, while gaining an understanding of the performance trade-off imposed by the physical limitations of various processing methods. The topics discussed in the book assume readers have taken an introductory physics course, college algebra, and have a basic understanding of calculus. * Describes the basic physics behind a large number of devices encountered in everyday life, from the air conditioner to Blu-ray discs * Covers state-of-the-art devices such as spectrographs, photoelectric image sensors, spacecraft systems, astronomical and planetary observatories, biomedical imaging instruments, particle accelerators, and jet engines * Inc...

  12. The predictors of economic sophistication: media, interpersonal communication and negative economic experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalogeropoulos, A.; Albæk, E.; de Vreese, C.H.; van Dalen, A.

    2015-01-01

    In analogy to political sophistication, it is imperative that citizens have a certain level of economic sophistication, especially in times of heated debates about the economy. This study examines the impact of different influences (media, interpersonal communication and personal experiences) on

  13. Is the Evolution of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Linked to Restriction-Modification Systems?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roer, Louise; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica bacteria are highly diverse foodborne pathogens that are subdivided into more than 1,500 serovars. The diversity is believed to result from mutational evolution, as well as intra- and interspecies recombination that potentially could be influenced by restriction...... to the conjugational mode of horizontal gene transfer in Salmonella. Thus, we conclude that other factors must be involved in shaping the evolution of bacteria....

  14. The third restriction-modification system from Thermus aquaticus YT-1: solving the riddle of two TaqII specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Piotr M; Anton, Brian P; Czajkowska, Edyta; Zebrowska, Joanna; Sulecka, Ewa; Krefft, Daria; Jezewska-Frackowiak, Joanna; Zolnierkiewicz, Olga; Witkowska, Malgorzata; Morgan, Richard D; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Fomenkov, Alexey; Roberts, Richard J; Zylicz-Stachula, Agnieszka

    2017-09-06

    Two restriction-modification systems have been previously discovered in Thermus aquaticus YT-1. TaqI is a 263-amino acid (aa) Type IIP restriction enzyme that recognizes and cleaves within the symmetric sequence 5'-TCGA-3'. TaqII, in contrast, is a 1105-aa Type IIC restriction-and-modification enzyme, one of a family of Thermus homologs. TaqII was originally reported to recognize two different asymmetric sequences: 5'-GACCGA-3' and 5'-CACCCA-3'. We previously cloned the taqIIRM gene, purified the recombinant protein from Escherichia coli, and showed that TaqII recognizes the 5'-GACCGA-3' sequence only. Here, we report the discovery, isolation, and characterization of TaqIII, the third R-M system from T. aquaticus YT-1. TaqIII is a 1101-aa Type IIC/IIL enzyme and recognizes the 5'-CACCCA-3' sequence previously attributed to TaqII. The cleavage site is 11/9 nucleotides downstream of the A residue. The enzyme exhibits striking biochemical similarity to TaqII. The 93% identity between their aa sequences suggests that they have a common evolutionary origin. The genes are located on two separate plasmids, and are probably paralogs or pseudoparalogs. Putative positions and aa that specify DNA recognition were identified and recognition motifs for 6 uncharacterized Thermus-family enzymes were predicted. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Artificial Neural Networks, and Evolutionary Algorithms as a systems biology approach to a data-base on fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Maria E; Buscema, Massimo; Smerieri, Arianna; Montanini, Luisa; Grossi, Enzo

    2013-12-01

    One of the specific aims of systems biology is to model and discover properties of cells, tissues and organisms functioning. A systems biology approach was undertaken to investigate possibly the entire system of intra-uterine growth we had available, to assess the variables of interest, discriminate those which were effectively related with appropriate or restricted intrauterine growth, and achieve an understanding of the systems in these two conditions. The Artificial Adaptive Systems, which include Artificial Neural Networks and Evolutionary Algorithms lead us to the first analyses. These analyses identified the importance of the biochemical variables IL-6, IGF-II and IGFBP-2 protein concentrations in placental lysates, and offered a new insight into placental markers of fetal growth within the IGF and cytokine systems, confirmed they had relationships and offered a critical assessment of studies previously performed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Reacting to Neighborhood Cues: Political Sophistication Moderates the Effect of Exposure to Immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danckert, Bolette; Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on insights from political psychology regarding political information processing, this paper argues that politically sophisticated individuals are less sensitive to the social cues manifested in the ethnic composition of their neighborhood when they form political opinions. This prediction...... about the ethnic composition of the immediate neighborhood, the paper finds consistent support for the hypothesis: While neighborhood exposure to non-Western immigrants reduces anti-immigration attitudes among individuals with low political sophistication, there is no effect among individuals with high...

  17. Restriction landmark cDNA scanning (RLCS): a novel cDNA display system using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H; Yaoi, T; Kawai, J; Hara, A; Kuwajima, G; Wantanabe, S

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a new method, designated restriction landmark cDNA scanning (RLCS), which displays many cDNA species quantitatively and simultaneously as two-dimensional gel spots. In this method cDNA species of uniform length were prepared for each mRNA species using restriction enzymes. After the restriction enzyme sites were radiolabeled as landmarks, the labeled fragments were subjected to high resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In analyses of cDNA samples from adult mouse liver and brain (cerebral cortex, cerebellum and brain stem) we detected approximately 500 and >1000 discrete gel spots respectively of various intensities at a time. The spot patterns of the three brain regions were very similar, although not identical, but were quite different from the pattern for the liver. RNA blot hybridization analysis using several cloned spot DNAs as probes showed that differences in intensity of the spots among RLCS profiles correlated well with expression levels of the corresponding mRNA species in the brain regions. Because the spots and their intensities reflect distinct mRNA species and their expression level respectively, the RLCS is a novel cDNA display system which provides a great deal of information and should be useful for systematic documentation of differentially expressed genes. PMID:8628652

  18. Disruption of the Hepcidin/Ferroportin Regulatory System Causes Pulmonary Iron Overload and Restrictive Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Neves

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that pulmonary iron accumulation is implicated in a spectrum of chronic lung diseases. However, the mechanism(s involved in pulmonary iron deposition and its role in the in vivo pathogenesis of lung diseases remains unknown. Here we show that a point mutation in the murine ferroportin gene, which causes hereditary hemochromatosis type 4 (Slc40a1C326S, increases iron levels in alveolar macrophages, epithelial cells lining the conducting airways and lung parenchyma, and in vascular smooth muscle cells. Pulmonary iron overload is associated with oxidative stress, restrictive lung disease with decreased total lung capacity and reduced blood oxygen saturation in homozygous Slc40a1C326S/C326S mice compared to wild-type controls. These findings implicate iron in lung pathology, which is so far not considered a classical iron-related disorder.

  19. Decoupling of sleepiness from sleep time and intensity during chronic sleep restriction: evidence for a role of the adenosine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsoo; Bolortuya, Yunren; Chen, Lichao; Basheer, Radhika; McCarley, Robert W; Strecker, Robert E

    2012-06-01

    Sleep responses to chronic sleep restriction (CSR) might be very different from those observed after short-term total sleep deprivation. For example, after sleep restriction continues for several consecutive days, animals no longer express compensatory increases in daily sleep time and sleep intensity. However, it is unknown if these allostatic, or adaptive, sleep responses to CSR are paralleled by behavioral and neurochemical measures of sleepiness. This study was designed to investigate CSR-induced changes in (1) sleep time and intensity as a measure of electrophysiological sleepiness, (2) sleep latency as a measure of behavioral sleepiness, and (3) brain adenosine A1 (A1R) and A2a receptor (A2aR) mRNA levels as a putative neurochemical correlate of sleepiness. Male Sprague-Dawley rats A 5-day sleep restriction (SR) protocol consisting of 18-h sleep deprivation and 6-h sleep opportunity each day. Unlike the first SR day, rats did not sleep longer or deeper on days 2 through 5, even though they exhibited significant elevations of behavioral sleepiness throughout all 5 SR days. For all SR days and recovery day 1, A1R mRNA in the basal forebrain was maintained at elevated levels, whereas A2aR mRNA in the frontal cortex was maintained at reduced levels. CSR LEADS TO A DECOUPLING OF SLEEPINESS FROM SLEEP TIME AND SLEEP INTENSITY, SUGGESTING THAT THERE ARE AT LEAST TWO DIFFERENT SLEEP REGULATORY SYSTEMS: one mediating sleepiness (homeostatic) and the other mediating sleep time/intensity (allostatic). The time course of changes observed in adenosine receptor mRNA levels suggests that the basal forebrain and cortical adenosine system might mediate sleepiness rather than sleep time or intensity.

  20. Diet as a system: an observational study investigating a multi-choice system of moderately restricted low-protein diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Nazha, Marta; Capizzi, Irene; Vigotti, Federica Neve; Scognamiglio, Stefania; Consiglio, Valentina; Mongilardi, Elena; Bilocati, Marilisa; Avagnina, Paolo; Versino, Elisabetta

    2016-12-07

    There is no single, gold-standard, low-protein diet (LPD) for CKD patients; the best compliance is probably obtained by personalization. This study tests the hypothesis that a multiple choice diet network allows patients to attain a good compliance level, and that, in an open-choice system, overall results are not dependent upon the specific diet, but upon the clinical characteristics of the patients. Observational study: Three LPD options were offered to all patients with severe or rapidly progressive CKD: vegan diets supplemented with alpha-ketoacids and essential aminoacids; protein-free food in substitution of normal bread and pasta; other (traditional, vegan non supplemented and tailored). Dialysis-free follow-up and survival were analyzed by Kaplan Meier curves according to diet, comorbidity and age. Compliance and metabolic control were estimated in 147 subjects on diet at March 2015, with recent complete data, prescribed protein intake 0.6 g/Kg/day. Protein intake was assessed by Maroni Mitch formula. Four hundreds and forty nine patients followed a LPD in December, 2007- March, 2015 (90% moderately restricted LPDs, 0.6 g/Kg/day of protein, 10% at lower targets); age (median 70 (19-97)) and comorbidity (Charlson index: 7) characterized our population as being in line with the usual CKD European population. Median e-GFR at start of the diet was 20 mL/min, 33.2% of the patients were diabetics. Baseline data differ significantly across diets: protein-free schemas are preferred by older, high-comorbidity patients (median age 76 years, Charlson index 8, GFR 20.5 mL/min, Proteinuria: 0.3 g/day), supplemented vegan diets by younger patients with lower GFR and higher proteinuria (median age 65 years, Charlson index 6, GFR 18.9 mL/min; Proteinuria: 1.2 g/day); other diets are chosen by an intermediate population (median age 71 years, Charlson index 6; GFR 22.5 mL/min; Proteinuria: 0.9 g/day); (p <0.001 for age, Charlson index, proteinuria, GFR

  1. Reading wild minds: A computational assay of Theory of Mind sophistication across seven primate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaine, Marie; San-Galli, Aurore; Trapanese, Cinzia; Bardino, Giulia; Hano, Christelle; Saint Jalme, Michel; Bouret, Sebastien; Masi, Shelly; Daunizeau, Jean

    2017-11-01

    Theory of Mind (ToM), i.e. the ability to understand others' mental states, endows humans with highly adaptive social skills such as teaching or deceiving. Candidate evolutionary explanations have been proposed for the unique sophistication of human ToM among primates. For example, the Machiavellian intelligence hypothesis states that the increasing complexity of social networks may have induced a demand for sophisticated ToM. This type of scenario ignores neurocognitive constraints that may eventually be crucial limiting factors for ToM evolution. In contradistinction, the cognitive scaffolding hypothesis asserts that a species' opportunity to develop sophisticated ToM is mostly determined by its general cognitive capacity (on which ToM is scaffolded). However, the actual relationships between ToM sophistication and either brain volume (a proxy for general cognitive capacity) or social group size (a proxy for social network complexity) are unclear. Here, we let 39 individuals sampled from seven non-human primate species (lemurs, macaques, mangabeys, orangutans, gorillas and chimpanzees) engage in simple dyadic games against artificial ToM players (via a familiar human caregiver). Using computational analyses of primates' choice sequences, we found that the probability of exhibiting a ToM-compatible learning style is mainly driven by species' brain volume (rather than by social group size). Moreover, primates' social cognitive sophistication culminates in a precursor form of ToM, which still falls short of human fully-developed ToM abilities.

  2. Moral foundations and political attitudes: The moderating role of political sophistication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milesi, Patrizia

    2016-08-01

    Political attitudes can be associated with moral concerns. This research investigated whether people's level of political sophistication moderates this association. Based on the Moral Foundations Theory, this article examined whether political sophistication moderates the extent to which reliance on moral foundations, as categories of moral concerns, predicts judgements about policy positions. With this aim, two studies examined four policy positions shown by previous research to be best predicted by the endorsement of Sanctity, that is, the category of moral concerns focused on the preservation of physical and spiritual purity. The results showed that reliance on Sanctity predicted political sophisticates' judgements, as opposed to those of unsophisticates, on policy positions dealing with equal rights for same-sex and unmarried couples and with euthanasia. Political sophistication also interacted with Fairness endorsement, which includes moral concerns for equal treatment of everybody and reciprocity, in predicting judgements about equal rights for unmarried couples, and interacted with reliance on Authority, which includes moral concerns for obedience and respect for traditional authorities, in predicting opposition to stem cell research. Those findings suggest that, at least for these particular issues, endorsement of moral foundations can be associated with political attitudes more strongly among sophisticates than unsophisticates. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  3. The musicality of non-musicians: an index for assessing musical sophistication in the general population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Müllensiefen

    Full Text Available Musical skills and expertise vary greatly in Western societies. Individuals can differ in their repertoire of musical behaviours as well as in the level of skill they display for any single musical behaviour. The types of musical behaviours we refer to here are broad, ranging from performance on an instrument and listening expertise, to the ability to employ music in functional settings or to communicate about music. In this paper, we first describe the concept of 'musical sophistication' which can be used to describe the multi-faceted nature of musical expertise. Next, we develop a novel measurement instrument, the Goldsmiths Musical Sophistication Index (Gold-MSI to assess self-reported musical skills and behaviours on multiple dimensions in the general population using a large Internet sample (n = 147,636. Thirdly, we report results from several lab studies, demonstrating that the Gold-MSI possesses good psychometric properties, and that self-reported musical sophistication is associated with performance on two listening tasks. Finally, we identify occupation, occupational status, age, gender, and wealth as the main socio-demographic factors associated with musical sophistication. Results are discussed in terms of theoretical accounts of implicit and statistical music learning and with regard to social conditions of sophisticated musical engagement.

  4. The musicality of non-musicians: an index for assessing musical sophistication in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllensiefen, Daniel; Gingras, Bruno; Musil, Jason; Stewart, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Musical skills and expertise vary greatly in Western societies. Individuals can differ in their repertoire of musical behaviours as well as in the level of skill they display for any single musical behaviour. The types of musical behaviours we refer to here are broad, ranging from performance on an instrument and listening expertise, to the ability to employ music in functional settings or to communicate about music. In this paper, we first describe the concept of 'musical sophistication' which can be used to describe the multi-faceted nature of musical expertise. Next, we develop a novel measurement instrument, the Goldsmiths Musical Sophistication Index (Gold-MSI) to assess self-reported musical skills and behaviours on multiple dimensions in the general population using a large Internet sample (n = 147,636). Thirdly, we report results from several lab studies, demonstrating that the Gold-MSI possesses good psychometric properties, and that self-reported musical sophistication is associated with performance on two listening tasks. Finally, we identify occupation, occupational status, age, gender, and wealth as the main socio-demographic factors associated with musical sophistication. Results are discussed in terms of theoretical accounts of implicit and statistical music learning and with regard to social conditions of sophisticated musical engagement.

  5. Reading wild minds: A computational assay of Theory of Mind sophistication across seven primate species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Devaine

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Theory of Mind (ToM, i.e. the ability to understand others' mental states, endows humans with highly adaptive social skills such as teaching or deceiving. Candidate evolutionary explanations have been proposed for the unique sophistication of human ToM among primates. For example, the Machiavellian intelligence hypothesis states that the increasing complexity of social networks may have induced a demand for sophisticated ToM. This type of scenario ignores neurocognitive constraints that may eventually be crucial limiting factors for ToM evolution. In contradistinction, the cognitive scaffolding hypothesis asserts that a species' opportunity to develop sophisticated ToM is mostly determined by its general cognitive capacity (on which ToM is scaffolded. However, the actual relationships between ToM sophistication and either brain volume (a proxy for general cognitive capacity or social group size (a proxy for social network complexity are unclear. Here, we let 39 individuals sampled from seven non-human primate species (lemurs, macaques, mangabeys, orangutans, gorillas and chimpanzees engage in simple dyadic games against artificial ToM players (via a familiar human caregiver. Using computational analyses of primates' choice sequences, we found that the probability of exhibiting a ToM-compatible learning style is mainly driven by species' brain volume (rather than by social group size. Moreover, primates' social cognitive sophistication culminates in a precursor form of ToM, which still falls short of human fully-developed ToM abilities.

  6. Cognitive multiple-antenna network in outage-restricted primary system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maham, Behrouz; Popovski, Petar

    2013-01-01

    In the commons model for the spectrum sharing, cognitive users can access the spectrum as long as the target performance in the legitimate primary system is not violated. In this paper, we consider a downlink primary multiple-input-single-output (MISO) system which operates under a controlled...... interference from the downlink MISO cognitive radio, also called secondary system. We derive exact expressions for outage probability of the primary user under Rayleigh fading, when the primary system is exposed to interference from a secondary base station. Moreover, in high-SNR scenario, a closed...

  7. Direct extraction of tetracyclines from bovine milk using restricted access carbon nanotubes in a column switching liquid chromatography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria, Henrique Dipe; Rosa, Mariana Azevedo; Silveira, Alberto Thalison; Figueiredo, Eduardo Costa

    2017-06-15

    This paper describes, for the first time, the use of restricted access carbon nanotubes (RACNTs) in the analysis of tetracyclines from milk samples, in a multidimensional liquid chromatographic system. Milk samples were initially acidified and centrifuged, and then the supernatant was directly analyzed in a column switching system in backflush configuration employing an extraction column of RACNTs. The sorbent was able to exclude all the remained proteins in less than 2.0min. The method was linear from 50 to 200μgL(-1) and the coefficients of determination (r(2)) were 0.997, 0.992, 0.994 and 0.998 for oxytetracycline (OXI), tetracycline (TC), chlortetracycline (CTC) and doxycycline (DOX), respectively. The analytical range included the maximum residue limits established by the regulatory agency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential ethnic associations between maternal flexibility and play sophistication in toddlers born very low birth weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Sarah J.; Montague, Erica Q.; Maclean, Peggy C.; Bancroft, Mary E.; Lowe, Jean R.

    2013-01-01

    Children born very low birth weight (Play is an important developmental outcome to the extent that child’s play and social communication are related to later development of self-regulation and effective functional skills, and play serves as an important avenue of early intervention. The current study investigated associations between maternal flexibility and toddler play sophistication in Caucasian, Spanish speaking Hispanic, English speaking Hispanic, and Native American toddlers (18-22 months adjusted age) in a cross-sectional cohort of 73 toddlers born VLBW and their mothers. We found that the association between maternal flexibility and toddler play sophistication differed by ethnicity (F(3,65) = 3.34, p = .02). In particular, Spanish speaking Hispanic dyads evidenced a significant positive association between maternal flexibility and play sophistication of medium effect size. Results for Native Americans were parallel to those of Spanish speaking Hispanic dyads: the relationship between flexibility and play sophistication was positive and of small-medium effect size. Findings indicate that for Caucasians and English speaking Hispanics, flexibility evidenced a non-significant (negative and small effect size) association with toddler play sophistication. Significant follow-up contrasts revealed that the associations for Caucasian and English speaking Hispanic dyads were significantly different from those of the other two ethnic groups. Results remained unchanged after adjusting for the amount of maternal language, an index of maternal engagement and stimulation; and after adjusting for birth weight, gestational age, gender, test age, cognitive ability, as well maternal age, education, and income. Our results provide preliminary evidence that ethnicity and acculturation may mediate the association between maternal interactive behavior such as flexibility and toddler developmental outcomes, as indexed by play sophistication. Addressing these association

  9. Optimal Sensors and Actuators Placement for Large-Scale Unstable Systems via Restricted Genetic Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seyyed Sakha, Masoud; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2017-01-01

    One of the fundamental problems in control systems engineering is the problem of sensors and actuators placement. Decisions in this context, play a key role in the success of control process. The methods developed for optimal placement of the sensors and actuators are known to be computationally...... for sensors and actuator placement. Unlike the other counterparts, the method not only supports unstable systems but also reduces the computational complexity significantly. The method is illustrated by numerical examples....

  10. Aperture Restriction Localisation in the LHC Arcs using an RF Mole and the LHC Beam Position Measurement System

    CERN Document Server

    Albertone, J; Boccard, C; Bogey, T; Borowiec, P; Calvo, E; Caspers, Friedhelm; Gasior, M; González, J L; Jenninger, B; Jensen, L K; Jones, O R; Kroyer, T; Weisz, S

    2008-01-01

    Ensuring that the two 27km beam pipes of the LHC do not contain aperture restrictions is of utmost importance. Most of the ring is composed of continuous cryostats, so any intervention to remove aperture restrictions when the machine is at its operating temperature of 1.9K will require a substantial amount of time. On warming-up the first cooled sector, several of the sliding contacts which provide electrical continuity for the beam image current between successive sections of the vacuum chamber were found to have buckled into the beam pipe. This led to a search for a technique to verify the integrity of a complete LHC arc (~3km) before any subsequent cool-down. In this paper the successful results from using a polycarbonate ball fitted with a 40MHz RF transmitter are presented. Propulsion of the ball is achieved by sucking filtered air through the entire arc, while its progress is traced every 54m via the LHC beam position measurement system which is auto-triggered by the RF transmitter on passage of the bal...

  11. Modeling the adenosine system as a modulator of cognitive performance and sleep patterns during sleep restriction and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew J K; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Butler, James P

    2017-10-01

    Sleep loss causes profound cognitive impairments and increases the concentrations of adenosine and adenosine A1 receptors in specific regions of the brain. Time courses for performance impairment and recovery differ between acute and chronic sleep loss, but the physiological basis for these time courses is unknown. Adenosine has been implicated in pathways that generate sleepiness and cognitive impairments, but existing mathematical models of sleep and cognitive performance do not explicitly include adenosine. Here, we developed a novel receptor-ligand model of the adenosine system to test the hypothesis that changes in both adenosine and A1 receptor concentrations can capture changes in cognitive performance during acute sleep deprivation (one prolonged wake episode), chronic sleep restriction (multiple nights with insufficient sleep), and subsequent recovery. Parameter values were estimated using biochemical data and reaction time performance on the psychomotor vigilance test (PVT). The model closely fit group-average PVT data during acute sleep deprivation, chronic sleep restriction, and recovery. We tested the model's ability to reproduce timing and duration of sleep in a separate experiment where individuals were permitted to sleep for up to 14 hours per day for 28 days. The model accurately reproduced these data, and also correctly predicted the possible emergence of a split sleep pattern (two distinct sleep episodes) under these experimental conditions. Our findings provide a physiologically plausible explanation for observed changes in cognitive performance and sleep during sleep loss and recovery, as well as a new approach for predicting sleep and cognitive performance under planned schedules.

  12. Modeling the adenosine system as a modulator of cognitive performance and sleep patterns during sleep restriction and recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J K Phillips

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sleep loss causes profound cognitive impairments and increases the concentrations of adenosine and adenosine A1 receptors in specific regions of the brain. Time courses for performance impairment and recovery differ between acute and chronic sleep loss, but the physiological basis for these time courses is unknown. Adenosine has been implicated in pathways that generate sleepiness and cognitive impairments, but existing mathematical models of sleep and cognitive performance do not explicitly include adenosine. Here, we developed a novel receptor-ligand model of the adenosine system to test the hypothesis that changes in both adenosine and A1 receptor concentrations can capture changes in cognitive performance during acute sleep deprivation (one prolonged wake episode, chronic sleep restriction (multiple nights with insufficient sleep, and subsequent recovery. Parameter values were estimated using biochemical data and reaction time performance on the psychomotor vigilance test (PVT. The model closely fit group-average PVT data during acute sleep deprivation, chronic sleep restriction, and recovery. We tested the model's ability to reproduce timing and duration of sleep in a separate experiment where individuals were permitted to sleep for up to 14 hours per day for 28 days. The model accurately reproduced these data, and also correctly predicted the possible emergence of a split sleep pattern (two distinct sleep episodes under these experimental conditions. Our findings provide a physiologically plausible explanation for observed changes in cognitive performance and sleep during sleep loss and recovery, as well as a new approach for predicting sleep and cognitive performance under planned schedules.

  13. The EcoKI Type I Restriction-Modification System in Escherichia coli Affects but Is Not an Absolute Barrier for Conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roer, Louise; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Hasman, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    results about restriction-modification systems based on phenotypic studies have been presented as reasons for a barrier to conjugation with and other means of uptake of exogenous DNA. In this study, we show that inactivation of the R.EcoKI restriction enzyme in strain Escherichia coli K-12 strain MG1655...... of the mutant recipient with a disrupted hsdR gene. This leads to the conclusion that EcoKI restriction-modification affects the uptake of DNA by conjugation but is not a major barrier to plasmid transfer....

  14. Prerequisites for Systems Analysts: Analytic and Management Demands of a New Approach to Educational Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammentorp, William

    There is much to be gained by using systems analysis in educational administration. Most administrators, presently relying on classical statistical techniques restricted to problems having few variables, should be trained to use more sophisticated tools such as systems analysis. The systems analyst, interested in the basic processes of a group or…

  15. Systemic Glucose Level Changes with a Carbohydrate-Restricted and Higher Protein Diet Combined with Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Rodney G.; Lanning, Beth A.; Doyle, Eva I.; Slonaker, Becky; Johnston, Holly M.; Scanes, Georgene

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to compare the effects of macronutrient intake on systemic glucose levels in previously sedentary participants who followed 1 of 4 diets that were either higher protein or high carbohydrate, while initiating an exercise program. Participants and Methods: The authors randomly assigned 94 sedentary…

  16. Media rating systems: do they work? Shop floor compliance with age restrictions in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselt, Jordi Franciscus; van Hoof, Joris Jasper; de Jong, Menno D.T.

    2012-01-01

    Media rating systems have been introduced in many countries to protect minors from being exposed to harmful media content. This study examines whether retailers comply with the guidelines of media ratings in the Netherlands. In a mystery shopping study, minors tried to buy or rent media products for

  17. Assessing Epistemic Sophistication by Considering Domain-Specific Absolute and Multiplicistic Beliefs Separately

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Johannes; Rosman, Tom; Mayer, Anne-Kathrin; Leichner, Nikolas; Krampen, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Background: Particularly in higher education, not only a view of science as a means of finding absolute truths (absolutism), but also a view of science as generally tentative (multiplicism) can be unsophisticated and obstructive for learning. Most quantitative epistemic belief inventories neglect this and understand epistemic sophistication as…

  18. The Musicality of Non-Musicians: An Index for Assessing Musical Sophistication in the General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllensiefen, Daniel; Gingras, Bruno; Musil, Jason; Stewart, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Musical skills and expertise vary greatly in Western societies. Individuals can differ in their repertoire of musical behaviours as well as in the level of skill they display for any single musical behaviour. The types of musical behaviours we refer to here are broad, ranging from performance on an instrument and listening expertise, to the ability to employ music in functional settings or to communicate about music. In this paper, we first describe the concept of ‘musical sophistication’ which can be used to describe the multi-faceted nature of musical expertise. Next, we develop a novel measurement instrument, the Goldsmiths Musical Sophistication Index (Gold-MSI) to assess self-reported musical skills and behaviours on multiple dimensions in the general population using a large Internet sample (n = 147,636). Thirdly, we report results from several lab studies, demonstrating that the Gold-MSI possesses good psychometric properties, and that self-reported musical sophistication is associated with performance on two listening tasks. Finally, we identify occupation, occupational status, age, gender, and wealth as the main socio-demographic factors associated with musical sophistication. Results are discussed in terms of theoretical accounts of implicit and statistical music learning and with regard to social conditions of sophisticated musical engagement. PMID:24586929

  19. The Relationship between Logistics Sophistication and Drivers of the Outsourcing of Logistics Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wanke

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A strong link has been established between operational excellence and the degree of sophistication of logistics organization, a function of factors such as performance monitoring, investment in Information Technology [IT] and the formalization of logistics organization, as proposed in the Bowersox, Daugherty, Dröge, Germain and Rogers (1992 Leading Edge model. At the same time, shippers have been increasingly outsourcing their logistics activities to third party providers. This paper, based on a survey with large Brazilian shippers, addresses a gap in the literature by investigating the relationship between dimensions of logistics organization sophistication and drivers of logistics outsourcing. To this end, the dimensions behind the logistics sophistication construct were first investigated. Results from factor analysis led to the identification of six dimensions of logistics sophistication. By means of multivariate logistical regression analyses it was possible to relate some of these dimensions, such as the formalization of the logistics organization, to certain drivers of the outsourcing of logistics activities of Brazilian shippers, such as cost savings. These results indicate the possibility of segmenting shippers according to characteristics of their logistics organization, which may be particularly useful to logistics service providers.

  20. Characteristics and Levels of Sophistication: An Analysis of Chemistry Students' Ability to Think with Mental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Yu; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2011-01-01

    This study employed a case-study approach to reveal how an ability to think with mental models contributes to differences in students' understanding of molecular geometry and polarity. We were interested in characterizing features and levels of sophistication regarding first-year university chemistry learners' mental modeling behaviors while the…

  1. Does a more sophisticated storm erosion model improve probabilistic erosion estimates?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranasinghe, R.W.M.R.J.B.; Callaghan, D.; Roelvink, D.

    2013-01-01

    The dependency between the accuracy/uncertainty of storm erosion exceedance estimates obtained via a probabilistic model and the level of sophistication of the structural function (storm erosion model) embedded in the probabilistic model is assessed via the application of Callaghan et al.'s (2008)

  2. Impacting Oral Language in Kindergarten through Sophisticated Vocabulary and the Kinesthetic Modality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopf, Sigrid D.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation describes the details of a study that explored what possible effects might occur in the area of oral language skills when kindergarten-age children from low socioeconomic backgrounds are exposed to sophisticated vocabulary and are engaged actively through dramatization and movement with a school's existing literacy curriculum. A…

  3. Close to the Clothes : Materiality and Sophisticated Archaism in Alexander van Slobbe’s Design Practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baronian, M.-A.

    2017-01-01

    This article looks at the work of contemporary Dutch fashion designer Alexander van Slobbe (1959) and examines how, since the 1990s, his fashion practices have consistently and consciously put forward a unique reflection on questions related to materiality, sophisticated archaism, luxury,

  4. Assessing Syntactic Sophistication in L2 Writing: A Usage-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Kristopher; Crossley, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 45 years, the construct of syntactic sophistication has been assessed in L2 writing using what Bulté and Housen (2012) refer to as absolute complexity (Lu, 2011; Ortega, 2003; Wolfe-Quintero, Inagaki, & Kim, 1998). However, it has been argued that making inferences about learners based on absolute complexity indices (e.g., mean…

  5. PHASIM, a sophisticated phased array antenna software simulator implemented in MATLAB 5.2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, W.P.M.N.

    1999-01-01

    A sophisticated phased array simulator software package for the design and analysis of planar phased array antennas is presented. This simulator is coded in MATLAB version 5.2. Using MATLAB, numerical engineering problems can be solved in a fraction of time of time required by programs coded in

  6. A Hybrid Approach to Processing Big Data Graphs on Memory-Restricted Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Harshvardhan,

    2015-05-01

    With the advent of big-data, processing large graphs quickly has become increasingly important. Most existing approaches either utilize in-memory processing techniques that can only process graphs that fit completely in RAM, or disk-based techniques that sacrifice performance. In this work, we propose a novel RAM-Disk hybrid approach to graph processing that can scale well from a single shared-memory node to large distributed-memory systems. It works by partitioning the graph into sub graphs that fit in RAM and uses a paging-like technique to load sub graphs. We show that without modifying the algorithms, this approach can scale from small memory-constrained systems (such as tablets) to large-scale distributed machines with 16, 000+ cores.

  7. Brain renin-angiotensin system: fetal epigenetic programming by maternal protein restriction during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Ravi; Goyal, Dipali; Leitzke, Arthur; Gheorghe, Ciprian P; Longo, Lawrence D

    2010-03-01

    Maternal protein malnutrition during pregnancy can lead to significant alterations in the systemic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the fetus. All components of the RAS are present in brain and may be altered in many disease states. Importantly, these disorders are reported to be of higher incidence in prenatally malnourished individuals. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that antenatal maternal low protein diet (MLPD) leads to epigenetic changes and alterations in gene expression of brain RAS of the mouse fetus. Mice dams were given control and 50% MLPD during second half of the gestation. We analyzed messenger RNA (mRNA), microRNA (miRNA), promoter DNA methylation, and protein expression of various RAS genes in the fetal offspring. As a consequence of 50% MLPD, fetal brains showed increased mRNA expression of angiotensinogen and angiotensin converting enzyme-1 (ACE-1), with a decrease in mRNA levels of angiotensin II type-2 (AT2) receptors. In contrast, while angiotensinogen protein expression was unaltered, the protein levels of ACE-1 and AT2 receptor genes were significantly reduced in the fetal brain from the MLPD dams. Our results also demonstrated hypomethylation of the CpG islands in the promoter regions of ACE-1 gene, and upregulation of the miRNAs, mmu-mir-27a and 27b, which regulate ACE-1 mRNA translation. Furthermore, our study showed reduced expression of the miRNA mmu-mir-330, which putatively regulates AT2 translation. For the developing fetal brain RAS, MLPD leads to significant alterations in the mRNA and protein expression, with changes in DNA methylation and miRNA, key regulators of hypertension in adults.

  8. Stability of the Moons orbits in Solar system in the restricted three-body problem

    CERN Document Server

    Ershkov, Sergey V

    2015-01-01

    We consider the equations of motion of three-body problem in a Lagrange form (which means a consideration of relative motions of 3-bodies in regard to each other). Analyzing such a system of equations, we consider in details the case of moon motion of negligible mass m3 around the 2-nd of two giant-bodies m1, m2 (which are rotating around their common centre of masses on Kepler trajectories), the mass of which is assumed to be less than the mass of central body. Under assumptions of R3BP, we obtain the equations of motion which describe the relative mutual motion of the centre of mass of 2-nd giant-body m2 (Planet) and the centre of mass of 3-rd body (Moon) with additional effective mass placed in that centre of mass. They should be rotating around their common centre of masses on Kepler elliptic orbits. For negligible effective mass it gives the equations of motion which should describe a quasi-elliptic orbit of 3-rd body (Moon) around the 2-nd body m2 (Planet) for most of the moons of the Planets in Solar s...

  9. Modeling the adenosine system as a modulator of cognitive performance and sleep patterns during sleep restriction and recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew J. K.

    2017-01-01

    Sleep loss causes profound cognitive impairments and increases the concentrations of adenosine and adenosine A1 receptors in specific regions of the brain. Time courses for performance impairment and recovery differ between acute and chronic sleep loss, but the physiological basis for these time courses is unknown. Adenosine has been implicated in pathways that generate sleepiness and cognitive impairments, but existing mathematical models of sleep and cognitive performance do not explicitly include adenosine. Here, we developed a novel receptor-ligand model of the adenosine system to test the hypothesis that changes in both adenosine and A1 receptor concentrations can capture changes in cognitive performance during acute sleep deprivation (one prolonged wake episode), chronic sleep restriction (multiple nights with insufficient sleep), and subsequent recovery. Parameter values were estimated using biochemical data and reaction time performance on the psychomotor vigilance test (PVT). The model closely fit group-average PVT data during acute sleep deprivation, chronic sleep restriction, and recovery. We tested the model’s ability to reproduce timing and duration of sleep in a separate experiment where individuals were permitted to sleep for up to 14 hours per day for 28 days. The model accurately reproduced these data, and also correctly predicted the possible emergence of a split sleep pattern (two distinct sleep episodes) under these experimental conditions. Our findings provide a physiologically plausible explanation for observed changes in cognitive performance and sleep during sleep loss and recovery, as well as a new approach for predicting sleep and cognitive performance under planned schedules. PMID:29073206

  10. Reactive polymer coatings: A robust platform towards sophisticated surface engineering for biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsien-Yeh

    Functionalized poly(p-xylylenes) or so-called reactive polymers can be synthesized via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) polymerization. The resulting ultra-thin coatings are pinhole-free and can be conformally deposited to a wide range of substrates and materials. More importantly, the equipped functional groups can served as anchoring sites for tailoring the surface properties, making these reactive coatings a robust platform that can deal with sophisticated challenges faced in biointerfaces. In this work presented herein, surface coatings presenting various functional groups were prepared by CVD process. Such surfaces include aldehyde-functionalized coating to precisely immobilize saccharide molecules onto well-defined areas and alkyne-functionalized coating to click azide-modified molecules via Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Moreover, CVD copolymerization has been conducted to prepare multifunctional coatings and their specific functions were demonstrated by the immobilization of biotin and NHS-ester molecules. By using a photodefinable coating, polyethylene oxides were immobilized onto a wide range of substrates through photo-immobilization. Spatially controlled protein resistant properties were characterized by selective adsorption of fibrinogen and bovine serum albumin as model systems. Alternatively, surface initiator coatings were used for polymer graftings of polyethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate, and the resultant protein- and cell- resistant properties were characterized by adsorption of kinesin motor proteins, fibrinogen, and murine fibroblasts (NIH3T3). Accessibility of reactive coatings within confined microgeometries was systematically studied, and the preparation of homogeneous polymer thin films within the inner surface of microchannels was demonstrated. Moreover, these advanced coatings were applied to develop a dry adhesion process for microfluidic devices. This process provides (i) excellent bonding strength, (ii) extended

  11. Impact of Nutrient Restriction on the Structure of Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Grown in a Microfluidic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamazight Cherifi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation by the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is a major concern in food industries. The aim of this work was to elucidate the effect of nutrient limitation on both biofilm architecture and on the viability of the bacteria in microfluidic growth conditions. Biofilm formation by two L. monocytogenes strains was performed in a rich medium (BHI and in a 10-fold diluted BHI (BHI/10 at 30°C for 24 h by using both static conditions and the microfluidic system Bioflux. In dynamic conditions, biofilms grown in rich and poor medium showed significant differences as well in structure and in the resulting biovolume. In BHI/10, biofilm was organized in a knitted network where cells formed long chains, whereas in the rich medium, the observed structure was homogeneous cellular multilayers. Biofilm biovolume production in BHI/10 was significantly higher than in BHI in these dynamic conditions. Interestingly, biovolume of dead cells in biofilms formed under limited nutrient conditions (BHI/10 was significantly higher than in biofilms formed in the BHI medium. In the other hand, in static conditions, biofilm is organized in a multilayer cells and dispersed cells in a rich medium BHI and poor medium BHI/10 respectively. There was significantly more biomass in the rich medium compared to BHI/10 but no difference was noted in the dead/damaged subpopulation showing how L. monocytogenes biofilm could be affected by the growth conditions. This work demonstrated that nutrient concentration affects biofilm structure and the proportion of dead cells in biofilms under microfluidic condition. Our study also showed that limited nutrients play an important role in the structural stability of L. monocytogenes biofilm by enhancing cell death and liberating extracellular DNA.

  12. A study of the blood flow restriction pressure of a tourniquet system to facilitate development of a system that can prevent musculoskeletal complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hiroyuki; Iwase, Hideaki; Kanda, Akio; Morohashi, Itaru; Kaneko, Kazuo; Maeda, Mutsuhiro; Kakinuma, Yuki; Takei, Yusuke; Amemiya, Shota; Mitsui, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    After an emergency or disaster, subsequent trauma can cause severe bleeding and this can often prove fatal, so promptly stopping that bleeding is crucial to preventing avoidable trauma deaths. A tourniquet is often used to restrict blood flow to an extremity. In operation and hospital, the tourniquet systems currently in use are pneumatically actuated by an air compressor, so they must have a steady power supply. These devices have several drawbacks: they vibrate and are noisy since they are pneumatically actuated and they are far from portable since they are large and heavy. Presumably, the drawbacks of pneumatic tourniquets could be overcome by developing a small, lightweight, vibration-free, quiet, and battery-powered tourniquet system. The current study built a small, vibration-free electrohydrodynamic (EHD) pump and then used that pump to restrict blood flow to the leg of rats in an experiment. This study explored the optimal conditions for effective restriction of blood flow by assessing biochemical and musculoskeletal complications following the restriction of blood flow, and this study also examined whether or not an EHD pump could be used to actuate a tourniquet system. A tourniquet cuff (width 12 mm × length 150 mm, material: polyolefin) was placed on the thigh of Wistar rats and pressure was applied for 2 hours by a device that uses EHD phenomena to generate pressure (an EHD pump). Animals were divided into four groups based on how much compressive pressure was applied with a tourniquet: 40 kPa (300 mm Hg, n = 13), 30 kPa (225 mm Hg, n = 12), 20 kPa (150 mm Hg, n = 15), or 0 kPa (controls, n = 25). Tissue oxygen saturation (regional oxygen saturation, denoted here as rSO2) was measured to assess the restriction of blood flow. To assess behavior once blood flow resumed, animal activity was monitored for third day and the amount of movement was counted with digital counters. Body weight was measured before and after the behavioral experiment, and changes

  13. Sophisticated Fowl: The Complex Behaviour and Cognitive Skills of Chickens and Red Junglefowl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Garnham

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The world’s most numerous bird, the domestic chicken, and their wild ancestor, the red junglefowl, have long been used as model species for animal behaviour research. Recently, this research has advanced our understanding of the social behaviour, personality, and cognition of fowl, and demonstrated their sophisticated behaviour and cognitive skills. Here, we overview some of this research, starting with describing research investigating the well-developed senses of fowl, before presenting how socially and cognitively complex they can be. The realisation that domestic chickens, our most abundant production animal, are behaviourally and cognitively sophisticated should encourage an increase in general appraise and fascination towards them. In turn, this should inspire increased use of them as both research and hobby animals, as well as improvements in their unfortunately often poor welfare.

  14. Effects of intrauterine growth restriction on sleep and the cardiovascular system: The use of melatonin as a potential therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiallourou, Stephanie R; Wallace, Euan M; Miller, Suzanne L; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2016-04-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) complicates 5-10% of pregnancies and is associated with increased risk of preterm birth, mortality and neurodevelopmental delay. The development of sleep and cardiovascular control are closely coupled and IUGR is known to alter this development. In the long-term, IUGR is associated with altered sleep and an increased risk of hypertension in adulthood. Melatonin plays an important role in the sleep-wake cycle. Experimental animal studies have shown that melatonin therapy has neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects in the IUGR fetus. Consequently, clinical trials are currently underway to assess the short and long term effects of antenatal melatonin therapy in IUGR pregnancies. Given melatonin's role in sleep regulation, this hormone could affect the developing infants' sleep-wake cycle and cardiovascular function after birth. In this review, we will 1) examine the role of melatonin as a therapy for IUGR pregnancies and the potential implications on sleep and the cardiovascular system; 2) examine the development of sleep-wake cycle in fetal and neonatal life; 3) discuss the development of cardiovascular control during sleep; 4) discuss the effect of IUGR on sleep and the cardiovascular system and 5) discuss the future implications of melatonin therapy in IUGR pregnancies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Actual and perceived financial sophistication and wealth accumulation: the role of education and gender

    OpenAIRE

    Neubert, Milena; Bannier, Christina E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the role of actual and perceived financial sophistication (i.e., financial literacy and confidence) for individuals' wealth accumulation. Using survey data from the German SAVE initiative, we find strong gender- and education-related differences in the distribution of the two variables and their effects on wealth: As financial literacy rises in formal education, whereas confidence increases in education for men but decreases for women, we observe that women become strongly...

  16. Owner’s Support, IT Sophistication and IT Adoption in Indonesian Manufacturing SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singgih Saptadi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of technology, especially information technology (IT, to businesses is widely accepted. But, different from large enterprises, small and medium enterprises (SMEs with their limited resources adopted IT slowly. Literature on technology adoption suggests that organizational readiness is one of many factors that determine the adoption of technology. This paper relates IT adoption in Indonesian manufacturing SMEs with their IT readiness represented by owners support and IT sophistication they have. In this paper, the variety of IT adoption by SMEs was explored using business process approach. The support from SMEs owner represented by owner’s IT knowledge and resource allocation. IT sophistication included management level supported by IT, IT skill and IT innovativeness of SMEs staff. Three propositions were formulated and explored using data collected from 320 SMEs. Using cluster analysis, these SMEs were classified into five type of IT adoption based on three business focus (supplier, internal and customer: early adoption, internal focus adoption, customer focus adoption, internal-customer focus adoption and balanced adoption. The results suggests wider IT adoption requires greater support from the owner and higher IT sophistication.

  17. Property Rights, Restrictions and Responsibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    Land Administration Systems are the basis for conceptualizing rights, restrictions and responsibilities related to people, policies and places. Property rights are normally concerned with ownership and tenure whereas restrictions usually control use and activities on land. Responsibilities relate...... more to a social, ethical commitment or attitude to environmental sustainability and good husbandry. This paper provides an overall understanding of the concept of land administration systems for dealing with rights, restrictions and responsibilities in future spatially enabled government. Finally...

  18. Parallel evolution of a type IV secretion system in radiating lineages of the host-restricted bacterial pathogen Bartonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Philipp; Salzburger, Walter; Liesch, Marius; Chang, Chao-Chin; Maruyama, Soichi; Lanz, Christa; Calteau, Alexandra; Lajus, Aurélie; Médigue, Claudine; Schuster, Stephan C; Dehio, Christoph

    2011-02-10

    Adaptive radiation is the rapid origination of multiple species from a single ancestor as the result of concurrent adaptation to disparate environments. This fundamental evolutionary process is considered to be responsible for the genesis of a great portion of the diversity of life. Bacteria have evolved enormous biological diversity by exploiting an exceptional range of environments, yet diversification of bacteria via adaptive radiation has been documented in a few cases only and the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we show a compelling example of adaptive radiation in pathogenic bacteria and reveal their genetic basis. Our evolutionary genomic analyses of the α-proteobacterial genus Bartonella uncover two parallel adaptive radiations within these host-restricted mammalian pathogens. We identify a horizontally-acquired protein secretion system, which has evolved to target specific bacterial effector proteins into host cells as the evolutionary key innovation triggering these parallel adaptive radiations. We show that the functional versatility and adaptive potential of the VirB type IV secretion system (T4SS), and thereby translocated Bartonella effector proteins (Beps), evolved in parallel in the two lineages prior to their radiations. Independent chromosomal fixation of the virB operon and consecutive rounds of lineage-specific bep gene duplications followed by their functional diversification characterize these parallel evolutionary trajectories. Whereas most Beps maintained their ancestral domain constitution, strikingly, a novel type of effector protein emerged convergently in both lineages. This resulted in similar arrays of host cell-targeted effector proteins in the two lineages of Bartonella as the basis of their independent radiation. The parallel molecular evolution of the VirB/Bep system displays a striking example of a key innovation involved in independent adaptive processes and the emergence of bacterial pathogens

  19. Parallel evolution of a type IV secretion system in radiating lineages of the host-restricted bacterial pathogen Bartonella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Engel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive radiation is the rapid origination of multiple species from a single ancestor as the result of concurrent adaptation to disparate environments. This fundamental evolutionary process is considered to be responsible for the genesis of a great portion of the diversity of life. Bacteria have evolved enormous biological diversity by exploiting an exceptional range of environments, yet diversification of bacteria via adaptive radiation has been documented in a few cases only and the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we show a compelling example of adaptive radiation in pathogenic bacteria and reveal their genetic basis. Our evolutionary genomic analyses of the α-proteobacterial genus Bartonella uncover two parallel adaptive radiations within these host-restricted mammalian pathogens. We identify a horizontally-acquired protein secretion system, which has evolved to target specific bacterial effector proteins into host cells as the evolutionary key innovation triggering these parallel adaptive radiations. We show that the functional versatility and adaptive potential of the VirB type IV secretion system (T4SS, and thereby translocated Bartonella effector proteins (Beps, evolved in parallel in the two lineages prior to their radiations. Independent chromosomal fixation of the virB operon and consecutive rounds of lineage-specific bep gene duplications followed by their functional diversification characterize these parallel evolutionary trajectories. Whereas most Beps maintained their ancestral domain constitution, strikingly, a novel type of effector protein emerged convergently in both lineages. This resulted in similar arrays of host cell-targeted effector proteins in the two lineages of Bartonella as the basis of their independent radiation. The parallel molecular evolution of the VirB/Bep system displays a striking example of a key innovation involved in independent adaptive processes and the emergence of bacterial

  20. Assessment of Fetal Autonomic Nervous System Activity by Fetal Magnetocardiography: Comparison of Normal Pregnancy and Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akimune Fukushima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To clarify the developmental activity of the autonomic nervous system (ANS of the normal fetus and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR cases using fetal magnetocardiography (FMCG. Subjects and Methods. Normal pregnancy (n=35 and IUGR (n=12 cases at 28–39 and 32–37 weeks of gestation, respectively, were included in this study. The R-R interval variability was used to calculate the coefficient of variance (CVRR and low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF ratio. Results. The value of CVRR in the normal pregnancy group displayed a slight increasing trend with gestational age. However, no such trend was observed in the IUGR group. In contrast, the LF/HF ratio in both the normal pregnancy group and the IUGR group clearly increased over the gestational period; the normal group showing statistical significance. Conclusion. The development of fetal ANS activity in IUGR cases might differ from that observed in the normal pregnancy group, and this may facilitate early detection of IUGR.

  1. Complementation between two tospoviruses facilitates the systemic movement of a plant virus silencing suppressor in an otherwise restrictive host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeep Bag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New viruses pathogenic to plants continue to emerge due to mutation, recombination, or reassortment among genomic segments among individual viruses. Tospoviruses cause significant economic damage to a wide range of crops in many parts of the world. The genetic or molecular basis of the continued emergence of new tospoviruses and new hosts is not well understood though it is generally accepted that reassortment and/or genetic complementation among the three genomic segments of individual viruses could be contributing to this variability since plants infected with more than one tospovirus are not uncommon in nature. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two distinct and economically important tospoviruses, Iris yellow spot virus (IYSV and Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV, were investigated for inter-virus interactions at the molecular level in dually-infected plants. Datura (Datura stramonium is a permissive host for TSWV, while it restricts the movement of IYSV to inoculated leaves. In plants infected with both viruses, however, TSWV facilitated the selective movement of the viral gene silencing suppressor (NSs gene of IYSV to the younger, uninoculated leaves. The small RNA expression profiles of IYSV and TSWV in single- and dually-infected datura plants showed that systemic leaves of dually-infected plants had reduced levels of TSWV N gene-specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs. No TSWV NSs-specific siRNAs were detected either in the inoculated or systemic leaves of dually-infected datura plants indicating a more efficient suppression of host silencing machinery in the presence of NSs from both viruses as compared to the presence of only TSWV NSs. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study identifies a new role for the viral gene silencing suppressor in potentially modulating the biology and host range of viruses and underscores the importance of virally-coded suppressors of gene silencing in virus infection of plants. This is the first

  2. Complementation between Two Tospoviruses Facilitates the Systemic Movement of a Plant Virus Silencing Suppressor in an Otherwise Restrictive Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Sahar; Pappu, Hanu R.

    2012-01-01

    Background New viruses pathogenic to plants continue to emerge due to mutation, recombination, or reassortment among genomic segments among individual viruses. Tospoviruses cause significant economic damage to a wide range of crops in many parts of the world. The genetic or molecular basis of the continued emergence of new tospoviruses and new hosts is not well understood though it is generally accepted that reassortment and/or genetic complementation among the three genomic segments of individual viruses could be contributing to this variability since plants infected with more than one tospovirus are not uncommon in nature. Methodology/Principal Findings Two distinct and economically important tospoviruses, Iris yellow spot virus (IYSV) and Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), were investigated for inter-virus interactions at the molecular level in dually-infected plants. Datura (Datura stramonium) is a permissive host for TSWV, while it restricts the movement of IYSV to inoculated leaves. In plants infected with both viruses, however, TSWV facilitated the selective movement of the viral gene silencing suppressor (NSs) gene of IYSV to the younger, uninoculated leaves. The small RNA expression profiles of IYSV and TSWV in single- and dually-infected datura plants showed that systemic leaves of dually-infected plants had reduced levels of TSWV N gene-specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). No TSWV NSs-specific siRNAs were detected either in the inoculated or systemic leaves of dually-infected datura plants indicating a more efficient suppression of host silencing machinery in the presence of NSs from both viruses as compared to the presence of only TSWV NSs. Conclusion/Significance Our study identifies a new role for the viral gene silencing suppressor in potentially modulating the biology and host range of viruses and underscores the importance of virally-coded suppressors of gene silencing in virus infection of plants. This is the first experimental evidence of

  3. Complementation between two tospoviruses facilitates the systemic movement of a plant virus silencing suppressor in an otherwise restrictive host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Sudeep; Mitter, Neena; Eid, Sahar; Pappu, Hanu R

    2012-01-01

    New viruses pathogenic to plants continue to emerge due to mutation, recombination, or reassortment among genomic segments among individual viruses. Tospoviruses cause significant economic damage to a wide range of crops in many parts of the world. The genetic or molecular basis of the continued emergence of new tospoviruses and new hosts is not well understood though it is generally accepted that reassortment and/or genetic complementation among the three genomic segments of individual viruses could be contributing to this variability since plants infected with more than one tospovirus are not uncommon in nature. Two distinct and economically important tospoviruses, Iris yellow spot virus (IYSV) and Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), were investigated for inter-virus interactions at the molecular level in dually-infected plants. Datura (Datura stramonium) is a permissive host for TSWV, while it restricts the movement of IYSV to inoculated leaves. In plants infected with both viruses, however, TSWV facilitated the selective movement of the viral gene silencing suppressor (NSs) gene of IYSV to the younger, uninoculated leaves. The small RNA expression profiles of IYSV and TSWV in single- and dually-infected datura plants showed that systemic leaves of dually-infected plants had reduced levels of TSWV N gene-specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). No TSWV NSs-specific siRNAs were detected either in the inoculated or systemic leaves of dually-infected datura plants indicating a more efficient suppression of host silencing machinery in the presence of NSs from both viruses as compared to the presence of only TSWV NSs. Our study identifies a new role for the viral gene silencing suppressor in potentially modulating the biology and host range of viruses and underscores the importance of virally-coded suppressors of gene silencing in virus infection of plants. This is the first experimental evidence of functional complementation between two distinct tospoviruses in the

  4. Effects of Dietary Sodium Restriction in Kidney Transplant Recipients Treated With Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Laura V.; Dobrowolski, Linn C.; van den Bosch, Jacqueline J. O. N.; Riphagen, Ineke J.; Krediet, C. T. Paul; Bemelman, Frederike J.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Navis, Gerjan

    2016-01-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease receiving renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade, dietary sodium restriction is an often-used treatment strategy to reduce blood pressure (BP) and albuminuria. Whether these effects extend to kidney transplant recipients is unknown. We therefore

  5. Effects of Dietary Sodium Restriction in Kidney Transplant Recipients Treated With Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade : A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Laura V; Dobrowolski, Linn C; van den Bosch, Jacqueline J O N; Riphagen, Ineke J; Krediet, C T Paul; Bemelman, Frederike J; Bakker, Stephan J L; Navis, Gerjan

    BACKGROUND: In patients with chronic kidney disease receiving renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade, dietary sodium restriction is an often-used treatment strategy to reduce blood pressure (BP) and albuminuria. Whether these effects extend to kidney transplant recipients is unknown.

  6. "SOCRATICS" AS ADDRESSES OF ISOCRATES’ EPIDEICTIC SPEECHES (Against the Sophists, Encomium of Helen, Busiris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Usacheva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the three epideictic orations of Isocrates which are in themselves a precious testimony of the quality of intellectual life at the close of the fourth century before Christ. To this period belong also the Socratics who are generally seen as an important link between Socrates and Plato. The author of this article proposes a more productive approach to the study of Antisthenes, Euclid of Megara and other so-called Socratics, revealing them not as independent thinkers but rather as adherents of the sophistic school and also as teachers, thereby, including them among those who took part in the educative activity of their time

  7. Benjamin Britten’s compositions for children and amateurs: cloaking simplicity behind the veil of sophistication.

    OpenAIRE

    Flynn, Angie

    2006-01-01

    The principal aim of this thesis is to examine a portion of Britten’s oeuvre which was intended for performance by children and amateurs and thereby to assess the extent of the composer’s success in achieving music which betrayed all the hallmarks of a sophisticated composition, yet providing a score which was accessible to its performers. Indeed, ‘because of his refusal to ‘write down’ to the child performer, although drawing on his considerable technical expertise to tailor h...

  8. The Value of Multivariate Model Sophistication: An Application to pricing Dow Jones Industrial Average options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rombouts, Jeroen V.K.; Stentoft, Lars; Violante, Francesco

    in their specification of the conditional variance, conditional correlation, and innovation distribution. All models belong to the dynamic conditional correlation class which is particularly suited because it allows to consistently estimate the risk neutral dynamics with a manageable computational effort in relatively...... innovation for a Laplace innovation assumption improves the pricing in a smaller way. Apart from investigating directly the value of model sophistication in terms of dollar losses, we also use the model condence set approach to statistically infer the set of models that delivers the best pricing performance....

  9. On Integrating Unmanned Aircraft Systems into the National Airspace System Issues, Challenges, Operational Restrictions, Certification, and Recommendations

    CERN Document Server

    Dalamagkidis, Konstantinos; Piegl, Les A

    2012-01-01

    This book presents, in a comprehensive way, current unmanned aviation regulation, airworthiness certification, special aircraft categories, pilot certification, federal aviation requirements, operation rules, airspace classes and regulation development models. It discusses unmanned aircraft systems levels of safety derived mathematically based on the corresponding levels for manned aviation. It provides an overview of the history and current status of UAS airworthiness and operational regulation worldwide. Existing regulations have been developed considering the need for a complete regulatory framework for UAS. It focuses on UAS safety assessment and functional requirements, achieved in terms of defining an “Equivalent Level of Safety”, or ELOS, with that of manned aviation, specifying what the ELOS requirement entails for UAS regulations. To accomplish this, the safety performance of manned aviation is first evaluated, followed by a novel model to derive reliability requirements for achieving target lev...

  10. The effects of exercise training and caloric restriction on the cardiac oxytocin natriuretic peptide system in the diabetic mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broderick TL

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tom L Broderick,1 Marek Jankowski,2 Jolanta Gutkowska2 1Department of Physiology, Laboratory of Diabetes and Exercise Metabolism, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Laboratory of Cardiovascular Biochemistry, Centre Hospitalier de l‘Université de Montréal-Hôtel-Dieu, Montréal, QC, Canada Background: Regular exercise training (ET and caloric restriction (CR are the frontline strategies in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus with the aim at reducing cardiometabolic risk. ET and CR improve body weight and glycemic control, and experimental studies indicate that these paradigms afford cardioprotection. In this study, the effects of combined ET and CR on the cardioprotective oxytocin (OT–natriuretic peptide (NP system were determined in the db/db mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes associated with insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and obesity. Methods: Five-week-old male db/db mice were assigned to the following groups: sedentary, ET, and ET + CR. Nonobese heterozygote littermates served as controls. ET was performed on a treadmill at moderate intensity, and CR was induced by reducing food intake by 30% of that consumed by sedentary db/db mice for a period of 8 weeks. Results: After 8 weeks, only ET + CR, but not ET, slightly improved body weight compared to sedentary db/db mice. Regardless of the treatment, db/db mice remained hyperglycemic. Hearts from db/db mice demonstrated reduced expression of genes linked to the cardiac OT–NP system. In fact, compared to control mice, mRNA expression of GATA binding protein 4 (GATA4, OT receptor, OT, brain NP, NP receptor type C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS was decreased in hearts from sedentary db/db mice. Both ET alone and ET + CR increased the mRNA expression of GATA4 compared to sedentary db/db mice. Only ET combined with CR produced increased eNOS mRNA and protein expression. Conclusion: Our data indicate that enhancement of eNOS by combined

  11. Sophisticated Clean Air Strategies Required to Mitigate Against Particulate Organic Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigas, T.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Ceburnis, D.; Moran, E.; McGovern, F. M.; Jennings, S. G.; O’Dowd, C.

    2017-01-01

    Since the 1980’s, measures mitigating the impact of transboundary air pollution have been implemented successfully as evidenced in the 1980–2014 record of atmospheric sulphur pollution over the NE-Atlantic, a key region for monitoring background northern-hemisphere pollution levels. The record reveals a 72–79% reduction in annual-average airborne sulphur pollution (SO4 and SO2, respectively) over the 35-year period. The NE-Atlantic, as observed from the Mace Head research station on the Irish coast, can be considered clean for 64% of the time during which sulphate dominates PM1 levels, contributing 42% of the mass, and for the remainder of the time, under polluted conditions, a carbonaceous (organic matter and Black Carbon) aerosol prevails, contributing 60% to 90% of the PM1 mass and exhibiting a trend whereby its contribution increases with increasing pollution levels. The carbonaceous aerosol is known to be diverse in source and nature and requires sophisticated air pollution policies underpinned by sophisticated characterisation and source apportionment capabilities to inform selective emissions-reduction strategies. Inauspiciously, however, this carbonaceous concoction is not measured in regulatory Air Quality networks. PMID:28303958

  12. [THE EFFECT OF DIETARY RESTRICTION DURING DEVELOPMENT OF DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER ON THE ACTIVITY OF ANTIOXIDANT SYSTEM ENZYMES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabuga, O G; Koliada, A K; Kukharskyy, V M; Bazhynova, A I; Vaiserman, A M

    2015-01-01

    In the previous study we demonstrated that dietary restriction only at the development stage of Drosophila melanogaster may impact the life span of adult flies. It was important that we didn't use qualitative (restriction of proteins or other macro- or microelements) and not a calorie restriction as well, but quantitative dietary restriction that was the proportional reduction of all food components in the larval medium. In the situations when the larvae were reared in the medium types, that contained protein and carbohydrate components in concentrations of 90-10% of food components compared to the standard one (100%), the males were characterised with the significant increase in the maximum life span. The average life span was also increased, but only in those male individuals that developed in the medium types, that contained 50% and 60% of food components compared to controls. Such an effect we haven't detected in the female flies. To study the biochemical changes associated with the physiological effects we have determined the activity of the antioxidant enzymes--superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. In the male flies the 50% dietary restriction implemented during the development has led to the significant increase in a SOD and catalase activity. Also the flies of both sexes reared in the medium with the 50% of food components have been characterised with the reduction in the accumulation of glycation end products. According to these results, we suggest that the changes in the activity of antioxidant enzymes may play a role in the increase of the flies life span caused by the dietary restriction during the development.

  13. Plasmid pEC156, a Naturally Occurring Escherichia coli Genetic Element That Carries Genes of the EcoVIII Restriction-Modification System, Is Mobilizable among Enterobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werbowy, Olesia; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Type II restriction-modification systems are ubiquitous in prokaryotes. Some of them are present in naturally occurring plasmids, which may facilitate the spread of these systems in bacterial populations by horizontal gene transfer. However, little is known about the routes of their dissemination. As a model to study this, we have chosen an Escherichia coli natural plasmid pEC156 that carries the EcoVIII restriction modification system. The presence of this system as well as the cis-acting cer site involved in resolution of plasmid multimers determines the stable maintenance of pEC156 not only in Escherichia coli but also in other enterobacteria. We have shown that due to the presence of oriT-type F and oriT-type R64 loci it is possible to mobilize pEC156 by conjugative plasmids (F and R64, respectively). The highest mobilization frequency was observed when pEC156-derivatives were transferred between Escherichia coli strains, Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii representing coliform bacteria. We found that a pEC156-derivative with a functional EcoVIII restriction-modification system was mobilized in enterobacteria at a frequency lower than a plasmid lacking this system. In addition, we found that bacteria that possess the EcoVIII restriction-modification system can efficiently release plasmid content to the environment. We have shown that E. coli cells can be naturally transformed with pEC156-derivatives, however, with low efficiency. The transformation protocol employed neither involved chemical agents (e.g. CaCl2) nor temperature shift which could induce plasmid DNA uptake.

  14. Plasmid pEC156, a Naturally Occurring Escherichia coli Genetic Element That Carries Genes of the EcoVIII Restriction-Modification System, Is Mobilizable among Enterobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesia Werbowy

    Full Text Available Type II restriction-modification systems are ubiquitous in prokaryotes. Some of them are present in naturally occurring plasmids, which may facilitate the spread of these systems in bacterial populations by horizontal gene transfer. However, little is known about the routes of their dissemination. As a model to study this, we have chosen an Escherichia coli natural plasmid pEC156 that carries the EcoVIII restriction modification system. The presence of this system as well as the cis-acting cer site involved in resolution of plasmid multimers determines the stable maintenance of pEC156 not only in Escherichia coli but also in other enterobacteria. We have shown that due to the presence of oriT-type F and oriT-type R64 loci it is possible to mobilize pEC156 by conjugative plasmids (F and R64, respectively. The highest mobilization frequency was observed when pEC156-derivatives were transferred between Escherichia coli strains, Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii representing coliform bacteria. We found that a pEC156-derivative with a functional EcoVIII restriction-modification system was mobilized in enterobacteria at a frequency lower than a plasmid lacking this system. In addition, we found that bacteria that possess the EcoVIII restriction-modification system can efficiently release plasmid content to the environment. We have shown that E. coli cells can be naturally transformed with pEC156-derivatives, however, with low efficiency. The transformation protocol employed neither involved chemical agents (e.g. CaCl2 nor temperature shift which could induce plasmid DNA uptake.

  15. Plasmid pEC156, a Naturally Occurring Escherichia coli Genetic Element That Carries Genes of the EcoVIII Restriction-Modification System, Is Mobilizable among Enterobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werbowy, Olesia; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Type II restriction-modification systems are ubiquitous in prokaryotes. Some of them are present in naturally occurring plasmids, which may facilitate the spread of these systems in bacterial populations by horizontal gene transfer. However, little is known about the routes of their dissemination. As a model to study this, we have chosen an Escherichia coli natural plasmid pEC156 that carries the EcoVIII restriction modification system. The presence of this system as well as the cis-acting cer site involved in resolution of plasmid multimers determines the stable maintenance of pEC156 not only in Escherichia coli but also in other enterobacteria. We have shown that due to the presence of oriT-type F and oriT-type R64 loci it is possible to mobilize pEC156 by conjugative plasmids (F and R64, respectively). The highest mobilization frequency was observed when pEC156-derivatives were transferred between Escherichia coli strains, Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii representing coliform bacteria. We found that a pEC156-derivative with a functional EcoVIII restriction-modification system was mobilized in enterobacteria at a frequency lower than a plasmid lacking this system. In addition, we found that bacteria that possess the EcoVIII restriction-modification system can efficiently release plasmid content to the environment. We have shown that E. coli cells can be naturally transformed with pEC156-derivatives, however, with low efficiency. The transformation protocol employed neither involved chemical agents (e.g. CaCl2) nor temperature shift which could induce plasmid DNA uptake. PMID:26848973

  16. The Synergistic Effect of Dietary Calcium Restriction and Exhaustive Exercise on the Antioxioxidant Enzyme System in Rat Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Hiromi, MIYAZAKI; Shuji, OH-ISHI; Tomomi, OOKAWARA; Kasumigaura Hospital, Tokyo Medical University; Department of Biochemistry, Hyogo College of Medicine; Research Center of Health, Physical Fitness and Sports, Nagoya University; Institute of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Tsukuba; Department of Hygiene, Kyorin University

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to elucidate whether dietary calcium restriction enhances exercise-induced oxidative stress in rat heart. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to either the control (C) or the calcium-restricted (1 month)(R) rats. Each group was subdivided into non-exercised (CR, RR) or acutely exercised (CE, RE) groups. The level of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), a marker of lipid peroxidation, was significantly greater in the RR rats than...

  17. JSPAM: A restricted three-body code for simulating interacting galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, J. F.; Holincheck, A. J.; Harvey, A.

    2016-07-01

    Restricted three-body codes have a proven ability to recreate much of the disturbed morphology of actual interacting galaxies. As more sophisticated n-body models were developed and computer speed increased, restricted three-body codes fell out of favor. However, their supporting role for performing wide searches of parameter space when fitting orbits to real systems demonstrates a continuing need for their use. Here we present the model and algorithm used in the JSPAM code. A precursor of this code was originally described in 1990, and was called SPAM. We have recently updated the software with an alternate potential and a treatment of dynamical friction to more closely mimic the results from n-body tree codes. The code is released publicly for use under the terms of the Academic Free License ("AFL") v. 3.0 and has been added to the Astrophysics Source Code Library.

  18. Restrictions in systemic and locomotor skeletal muscle perfusion, oxygen supply and VO2 during high-intensity whole-body exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, S.P.; Damsgaard, R.; Dawson, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    there is an extreme metabolic stimulus to vasodilate during supramaximal exercise remains unknown. To examine the regulatory limits of systemic and muscle perfusion in exercising humans, we measured systemic and leg haemodynamics, O(2) transport, and , and estimated non-locomotor tissue perfusion during constant load...... is restricted during maximal and supramaximal whole-body exercise in association with a plateau in Q and limb vascular conductance. These observations suggest that limits of cardiac function and muscle vasoconstriction underlie the inability of the circulatory system to meet the increasing metabolic demand......Perfusion to exercising skeletal muscle is regulated to match O(2) delivery to the O(2) demand, but this regulation might be compromised during or approaching maximal whole-body exercise as muscle blood flow for a given work rate is blunted. Whether muscle perfusion is restricted when...

  19. From head to heart; : the effects of fetal growth restriction and preterm birth on the cerebral and systemic circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is the condition where a fetus does not grow according to its genetic growth potential. It is estimated that 3-7% of pregnancies are complicated by FGR. FGR has been associated with many adverse outcomes, including an increased risk of perinatal and neonatal morbidity

  20. The use of sophisticated words with children with specific language impairment during shared book reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majorano, Marinella; Lavelli, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the use of sophisticated (i.e., low-frequency) words with children with specific language impairment (SLI), the present study investigates the relationship between maternal interactive support for meaning and both conversational responsiveness and lexical development of children with SLI. Fifteen Italian-speaking children with SLI (age range: 3;4-5;6) and two groups of typically developing children--15 chronological age (CA)-matched (3;8-5;8) and 15 language age (LA)-matched (1;10-3;5)--were videotaped during shared book reading with their mothers. Maternal utterances which included or were related to a sophisticated word were coded on the basis of informativeness and scaffolding provided; child utterances were coded for complexity. In addition, child's lexical development was assessed three months later. Mothers of children with SLI produced a higher percentage of directly informative utterances with gestural scaffolding than did mothers of CA-matched children, and only in the SLI group this kind of utterances were significantly followed by child's extended utterances. Child's lexical development (production) was related to direct maternal informativeness in both the SLI- and CA-matched groups, and to gestural scaffolding only in the SLI group. On the whole, these findings suggest that mothers of children with SLI attune their language to their children's linguistic limitations and that the gestural quality of the interactive scaffolding is related to these children's conversational participation and their level of lexical progress. The reader will recognize the importance of maternal support for the meaning of low-frequency words in promoting the child's conversational responsiveness and lexical development, particularly with children with SLI. These children seem to benefit when provided with direct information accompanied by gestural scaffolding. These findings, if replicated with a larger group of participants, could help clinicians develop

  1. The AplI restriction-modification system in an edible cyanobacterium, Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis NIES-39, recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-CTGCAG-3'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Hideaki; Tabuse, Yosuke

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of foreign DNAs by restriction enzymes in an edible cyanobacterium, Arthrospira platensis, is a potential barrier for gene-transfer experiments in this economically valuable organism. We overproduced in Escherichia coli the proteins involved in a putative restriction-modification system of A. platensis NIES-39. The protein produced from the putative type II restriction enzyme gene NIES39_K04640 exhibited an endonuclease activity that cleaved DNA within the sequence 5'-CTGCAG-3' between the A at the fifth position and the G at the sixth position. We designated this enzyme AplI. The protein from the adjacent gene NIES39_K04650, which encodes a putative DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase, rendered DNA molecules resistant to AplI by modifying the C at the fourth position (but not the C at the first position) in the recognition sequence. This modification enzyme, M.AplI, should be useful for converting DNA molecules into AplI-resistant forms for use in gene-transfer experiments. A summary of restriction enzymes in various Arthrospira strains is also presented in this paper.

  2. Effect of renin-angiotensin system activation by dietary sodium restriction and upright position on plasma leptin concentration in patients with essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczak, Marcin; Kokot, Franciszek; Chudek, Jerzy; Wiecek, Andrzej

    2002-07-01

    Both leptin and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are involved in the regulation of arterial blood pressure. This study was undertaken to assess the relationship between RAS and plasma leptin concentration in hypertensive patients under conditions of normal and restricted sodium supply and upright position. In 31 patients with essential hypertension (EHP - 14 F, 17 M, age 44I14 years, BMI 29.3I6.4 kg/m2) and 8 healthy subjects (NHS - 4 F, 4 M, age 37(17 years, BMI 25.3I6.6 kg/m2) plasma leptin concentration, plasma renin activity (PRA), and 24-hour urinary sodium excretion (UNa) were evaluated twice: first on a diet containing 100-120 mmol sodium per day and after 8 hours overnight bed rest, and a second time after 3 days of dietary sodium restriction (10-20 mmol daily) and 3 hours in upright position. Dietary sodium restriction and upright position was followed by a significant increase in PRA and decrease of UNa. By contrast, plasma leptin concentration showed a moderate decrease both in EHP and NHS. No significant correlation was found between PRA and plasma leptin concentrations in either of the groups examined. From the results obtained in this study we may conclude that dietary sodium restriction and upright position exerts only a moderate effect on plasma leptin concentration, in contrast to PRA, in both hypertensive and normotensive subjects.

  3. Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Homework Tips Raising Confident Kids Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) KidsHealth > For Parents > Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) Print ... is called intrauterine growth restriction, or IUGR. About IUGR IUGR is when a baby in the womb ...

  4. The EcoKI type I restriction-modification system in Escherichia coli affects but is not an absolute barrier for conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roer, Louise; Aarestrup, Frank M; Hasman, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    The rapid evolution of bacteria is crucial to their survival and is caused by exchange, transfer, and uptake of DNA, among other things. Conjugation is one of the main mechanisms by which bacteria share their DNA, and it is thought to be controlled by varied bacterial immune systems. Contradictory results about restriction-modification systems based on phenotypic studies have been presented as reasons for a barrier to conjugation with and other means of uptake of exogenous DNA. In this study, we show that inactivation of the R.EcoKI restriction enzyme in strain Escherichia coli K-12 strain MG1655 increases the conjugational transfer of plasmid pOLA52, which carriers two EcoKI recognition sites. Interestingly, the results were not absolute, and uptake of unmethylated pOLA52 was still observed in the wild-type strain (with an intact hsdR gene) but at a reduction of 85% compared to the uptake of the mutant recipient with a disrupted hsdR gene. This leads to the conclusion that EcoKI restriction-modification affects the uptake of DNA by conjugation but is not a major barrier to plasmid transfer. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Yersinia virulence factors - a sophisticated arsenal for combating host defences [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Atkinson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The human pathogens Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica cause enterocolitis, while Yersinia pestis is responsible for pneumonic, bubonic, and septicaemic plague. All three share an infection strategy that relies on a virulence factor arsenal to enable them to enter, adhere to, and colonise the host while evading host defences to avoid untimely clearance. Their arsenal includes a number of adhesins that allow the invading pathogens to establish a foothold in the host and to adhere to specific tissues later during infection. When the host innate immune system has been activated, all three pathogens produce a structure analogous to a hypodermic needle. In conjunction with the translocon, which forms a pore in the host membrane, the channel that is formed enables the transfer of six ‘effector’ proteins into the host cell cytoplasm. These proteins mimic host cell proteins but are more efficient than their native counterparts at modifying the host cell cytoskeleton, triggering the host cell suicide response. Such a sophisticated arsenal ensures that yersiniae maintain the upper hand despite the best efforts of the host to counteract the infecting pathogen.

  6. The Virtual ChemLab Project: A Realistic and Sophisticated Simulation of Inorganic Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Catlin, Heidi R.; Waddoups, Gregory L.; Moore, Melissa S.; Swan, Richard; Allen, Rob; Bodily, Greg

    2004-11-01

    We have created a set of sophisticated and realistic laboratory simulations for use in freshman- and sophomore-level chemistry classes and laboratories called Virtual ChemLab. We have completed simulations for Inorganic Qualitative Analysis, Organic Synthesis and Organic Qualitative Analysis, Experiments in Quantum Chemistry, Gas Properties, Titration Experiments, and Calorimetric and Thermochemical Experiments. The purpose of our simulations is to reinforce concepts taught in the classroom, provide an environment for creative learning, and emphasize the thinking behind instructional laboratory experiments. We have used the inorganic simulation extensively with thousands of students in our department at Brigham Young University. We have learned from our evaluation that: (i) students enjoy using these simulations and find them to be an asset in learning effective problem-solving strategies, (ii) students like the fact that they can both reproduce experimental procedures and explore various topics in ways they choose, and (iii) students naturally divide themselves into two groups: creative learners, who excel in an open-ended environment of virtual laboratories, and structured learners, who struggle in this same environment. In this article, we describe the Inorganic Qualitative Analysis simulation; we also share specific evaluation findings from using the inorganic simulation in classroom and laboratory settings.

  7. Simple Plans or Sophisticated Habits? State, Transition and Learning Interactions in the Two-Step Task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Akam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The recently developed 'two-step' behavioural task promises to differentiate model-based from model-free reinforcement learning, while generating neurophysiologically-friendly decision datasets with parametric variation of decision variables. These desirable features have prompted its widespread adoption. Here, we analyse the interactions between a range of different strategies and the structure of transitions and outcomes in order to examine constraints on what can be learned from behavioural performance. The task involves a trade-off between the need for stochasticity, to allow strategies to be discriminated, and a need for determinism, so that it is worth subjects' investment of effort to exploit the contingencies optimally. We show through simulation that under certain conditions model-free strategies can masquerade as being model-based. We first show that seemingly innocuous modifications to the task structure can induce correlations between action values at the start of the trial and the subsequent trial events in such a way that analysis based on comparing successive trials can lead to erroneous conclusions. We confirm the power of a suggested correction to the analysis that can alleviate this problem. We then consider model-free reinforcement learning strategies that exploit correlations between where rewards are obtained and which actions have high expected value. These generate behaviour that appears model-based under these, and also more sophisticated, analyses. Exploiting the full potential of the two-step task as a tool for behavioural neuroscience requires an understanding of these issues.

  8. Nurturing Opportunity Identification for Business Sophistication in a Cross-disciplinary Study Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Oganisjana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Opportunity identification is the key element of the entrepreneurial process; therefore the issue of developing this skill in students is a crucial task in contemporary European education which has recognized entrepreneurship as one of the lifelong learning key competences. The earlier opportunity identification becomes a habitual way of thinking and behavior across a broad range of contexts, the more likely that entrepreneurial disposition will steadily reside in students. In order to nurture opportunity identification in students for making them able to organize sophisticated businesses in the future, certain demands ought to be put forward as well to the teacher – the person who is to promote these qualities in their students. The paper reflects some findings of a research conducted within the frameworks of a workplace learning project for the teachers of one of Riga secondary schools (Latvia. The main goal of the project was to teach the teachers to identify hidden inner links between apparently unrelated things, phenomena and events within 10th grade study curriculum and connect them together and create new opportunities. The creation and solution of cross-disciplinary tasks were the means for achieving this goal.

  9. Ranking network of a captive rhesus macaque society: a sophisticated corporative kingdom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Fushing

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We develop a three-step computing approach to explore a hierarchical ranking network for a society of captive rhesus macaques. The computed network is sufficiently informative to address the question: Is the ranking network for a rhesus macaque society more like a kingdom or a corporation? Our computations are based on a three-step approach. These steps are devised to deal with the tremendous challenges stemming from the transitivity of dominance as a necessary constraint on the ranking relations among all individual macaques, and the very high sampling heterogeneity in the behavioral conflict data. The first step simultaneously infers the ranking potentials among all network members, which requires accommodation of heterogeneous measurement error inherent in behavioral data. Our second step estimates the social rank for all individuals by minimizing the network-wide errors in the ranking potentials. The third step provides a way to compute confidence bounds for selected empirical features in the social ranking. We apply this approach to two sets of conflict data pertaining to two captive societies of adult rhesus macaques. The resultant ranking network for each society is found to be a sophisticated mixture of both a kingdom and a corporation. Also, for validation purposes, we reanalyze conflict data from twenty longhorn sheep and demonstrate that our three-step approach is capable of correctly computing a ranking network by eliminating all ranking error.

  10. Simple Plans or Sophisticated Habits? State, Transition and Learning Interactions in the Two-Step Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akam, Thomas; Costa, Rui; Dayan, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The recently developed ‘two-step’ behavioural task promises to differentiate model-based from model-free reinforcement learning, while generating neurophysiologically-friendly decision datasets with parametric variation of decision variables. These desirable features have prompted its widespread adoption. Here, we analyse the interactions between a range of different strategies and the structure of transitions and outcomes in order to examine constraints on what can be learned from behavioural performance. The task involves a trade-off between the need for stochasticity, to allow strategies to be discriminated, and a need for determinism, so that it is worth subjects’ investment of effort to exploit the contingencies optimally. We show through simulation that under certain conditions model-free strategies can masquerade as being model-based. We first show that seemingly innocuous modifications to the task structure can induce correlations between action values at the start of the trial and the subsequent trial events in such a way that analysis based on comparing successive trials can lead to erroneous conclusions. We confirm the power of a suggested correction to the analysis that can alleviate this problem. We then consider model-free reinforcement learning strategies that exploit correlations between where rewards are obtained and which actions have high expected value. These generate behaviour that appears model-based under these, and also more sophisticated, analyses. Exploiting the full potential of the two-step task as a tool for behavioural neuroscience requires an understanding of these issues. PMID:26657806

  11. Characteristics and Levels of Sophistication: An Analysis of Chemistry Students' Ability to Think with Mental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Yu; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2011-08-01

    This study employed a case-study approach to reveal how an ability to think with mental models contributes to differences in students' understanding of molecular geometry and polarity. We were interested in characterizing features and levels of sophistication regarding first-year university chemistry learners' mental modeling behaviors while the learners were solving problems associated with spatial information. To serve this purpose, we conducted case studies on nine students who were sampled from high-scoring, moderate-scoring, and low-scoring students. Our findings point to five characteristics of mental modeling ability that distinguish students in the high-, moderate-, and low-ability groups from one another. Although the levels of mental modeling abilities have been described in categories (high, moderate, and low), they can be thought of as a continuum with the low-ability group reflecting students who have very limited ability to generate and use mental models whereas students in the high-ability group not only construct and use mental models as a thinking tool, but also analyze the problems to be solved, evaluate their mental models, and oversee entire mental modeling processes. Cross-case comparisons for students with different levels of mental modeling ability indicate that experiences of generating and manipulating a mental model based on imposed propositions are crucial for a learner's efforts to incorporate content knowledge with visual-spatial thinking skills. This paper summarizes potential factors that undermine learners' comprehension of molecular geometry and polarity and that influence mastery of this mental modeling ability.

  12. Exploring the predictive power of interaction terms in a sophisticated risk equalization model using regression trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen, S H C M; van Kleef, R C; van de Ven, W P M M; van Vliet, R C J A

    2017-05-23

    This study explores the predictive power of interaction terms between the risk adjusters in the Dutch risk equalization (RE) model of 2014. Due to the sophistication of this RE-model and the complexity of the associations in the dataset (N = ~16.7 million), there are theoretically more than a million interaction terms. We used regression tree modelling, which has been applied rarely within the field of RE, to identify interaction terms that statistically significantly explain variation in observed expenses that is not already explained by the risk adjusters in this RE-model. The interaction terms identified were used as additional risk adjusters in the RE-model. We found evidence that interaction terms can improve the prediction of expenses overall and for specific groups in the population. However, the prediction of expenses for some other selective groups may deteriorate. Thus, interactions can reduce financial incentives for risk selection for some groups but may increase them for others. Furthermore, because regression trees are not robust, additional criteria are needed to decide which interaction terms should be used in practice. These criteria could be the right incentive structure for risk selection and efficiency or the opinion of medical experts. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. A sophisticated simulation for the fracture behavior of concrete material using XFEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Changhai; Wang, Xiaomin; Kong, Jingchang; Li, Shuang; Xie, Lili

    2017-07-01

    The development of a powerful numerical model to simulate the fracture behavior of concrete material has long been one of the dominant research areas in earthquake engineering. A reliable model should be able to adequately represent the discontinuous characteristics of cracks and simulate various failure behaviors under complicated loading conditions. In this paper, a numerical formulation, which incorporates a sophisticated rigid-plastic interface constitutive model coupling cohesion softening, contact, friction and shear dilatation into the XFEM, is proposed to describe various crack behaviors of concrete material. An effective numerical integration scheme for accurately assembling the contribution to the weak form on both sides of the discontinuity is introduced. The effectiveness of the proposed method has been assessed by simulating several well-known experimental tests. It is concluded that the numerical method can successfully capture the crack paths and accurately predict the fracture behavior of concrete structures. The infl uence of mode-II parameters on the mixed-mode fracture behavior is further investigated to better determine these parameters.

  14. A sophisticated simulation for the fracture behavior of concrete material using XFEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Changhai; Wang, Xiaomin; Kong, Jingchang; Li, Shuang; Xie, Lili

    2017-10-01

    The development of a powerful numerical model to simulate the fracture behavior of concrete material has long been one of the dominant research areas in earthquake engineering. A reliable model should be able to adequately represent the discontinuous characteristics of cracks and simulate various failure behaviors under complicated loading conditions. In this paper, a numerical formulation, which incorporates a sophisticated rigid-plastic interface constitutive model coupling cohesion softening, contact, friction and shear dilatation into the XFEM, is proposed to describe various crack behaviors of concrete material. An effective numerical integration scheme for accurately assembling the contribution to the weak form on both sides of the discontinuity is introduced. The effectiveness of the proposed method has been assessed by simulating several well-known experimental tests. It is concluded that the numerical method can successfully capture the crack paths and accurately predict the fracture behavior of concrete structures. The influence of mode-II parameters on the mixed-mode fracture behavior is further investigated to better determine these parameters.

  15. The Impact of Services on Economic Complexity: Service Sophistication as Route for Economic Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkoski, Viktor; Utkovski, Zoran; Kocarev, Ljupco

    2016-01-01

    Economic complexity reflects the amount of knowledge that is embedded in the productive structure of an economy. By combining tools from network science and econometrics, a robust and stable relationship between a country's productive structure and its economic growth has been established. Here we report that not only goods but also services are important for predicting the rate at which countries will grow. By adopting a terminology which classifies manufactured goods and delivered services as products, we investigate the influence of services on the country's productive structure. In particular, we provide evidence that complexity indices for services are in general higher than those for goods, which is reflected in a general tendency to rank countries with developed service sector higher than countries with economy centred on manufacturing of goods. By focusing on country dynamics based on experimental data, we investigate the impact of services on the economic complexity of countries measured in the product space (consisting of both goods and services). Importantly, we show that diversification of service exports and its sophistication can provide an additional route for economic growth in both developing and developed countries.

  16. Restriction glycosylases: involvement of endonuclease activities in the restriction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingbiao; Matsuzaka, Tomoyuki; Yano, Hirokazu; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Nakano, Toshiaki; Ishikawa, Ken; Fukuyo, Masaki; Takahashi, Noriko; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Ide, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2017-02-17

    All restriction enzymes examined are phosphodiesterases generating 3΄-OH and 5΄-P ends, but one restriction enzyme (restriction glycosylase) excises unmethylated bases from its recognition sequence. Whether its restriction activity involves endonucleolytic cleavage remains unclear. One report on this enzyme, R.PabI from a hyperthermophile, ascribed the breakage to high temperature while another showed its weak AP lyase activity generates atypical ends. Here, we addressed this issue in mesophiles. We purified R.PabI homologs from Campylobacter coli (R.CcoLI) and Helicobacter pylori (R.HpyAXII) and demonstrated their DNA cleavage, DNA glycosylase and AP lyase activities in vitro at 37°C. The AP lyase activity is more coupled with glycosylase activity in R.CcoLI than in R.PabI. R.CcoLI/R.PabI expression caused restriction of incoming bacteriophage/plasmid DNA and endogenous chromosomal DNA within Escherichia coli at 37°C. The R.PabI-mediated restriction was promoted by AP endonuclease action in vivo or in vitro. These results reveal the role of endonucleolytic DNA cleavage in restriction and yet point to diversity among the endonucleases. The cleaved ends are difficult to repair in vivo, which may indicate their biological significance. These results support generalization of the concept of restriction–modification system to the concept of self-recognizing epigenetic system, which combines any epigenetic labeling and any DNA damaging.

  17. Use of a Night Float System to Comply With Resident Duty Hours Restrictions: Perceptions of Workplace Changes and Their Effects on Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ning-Zi; Gan, Runye; Snell, Linda; Dolmans, Diana

    2016-03-01

    Although some evidence suggests that resident duty hours reforms can lead to shift-worker mentality and loss of patient ownership, other evidence links long hours and fatigue to poor work performance and loss of empathy, suggesting the restrictions could positively affect professionalism. The authors explored perceived impacts of a 16-hour duty restriction, achieved using a night float (NF) system, on the workplace and professionalism. In 2013, the authors conducted semistructured interviews with 18 residents, 9 staff physicians, and 3 residency program directors in the McGill University core internal medicine residency program regarding their perceptions of the program's 12-hour shift-based NF system. Interviews were transcribed and coded for common themes. The authors used a descriptive qualitative methodology. Participants viewed implementation of the NF system as leading to decreased physical and mental exhaustion, more consistent interaction with patients, and more stable team structure within shifts compared with the previous 24-hour call system. These workplace changes were felt to improve teamwork and patient ownership within shifts, quality of work performed, and empathy. Across shifts, however, more frequent sign-overs, stricter application of shift time boundaries, and loose integration between daytime and NF teams were perceived as leading to emergence of shift-worker mentality around sign-over. Perceptions of optimal patient ownership changed from the traditional single-physician-24/7 model to team-based shared ownership. Duty hours restrictions, as exemplified by an NF system, have both positive and negative impacts on professionalism. Interventions and training toward effective team-based care are needed to curb emergence of shift-worker mentality.

  18. The LspC3-41I restriction-modification system is the major determinant for genetic manipulations of Lysinibacillus sphaericus C3-41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Pan; Ge, Yong; Wu, Yiming; Zhao, Ni; Yuan, Zhiming; Hu, Xiaomin

    2017-05-19

    Lysinibacillus sphaericus has been widely used in integrated mosquito control program and it is one of the minority bacterial species unable to metabolize carbohydrates. In consideration of the high genetic conservation at genomic level and difficulty of genetic horizontal transfer, it is hypothesized that effective restriction-modification (R-M) systems existed in mosquitocidal L. sphaericus. In this study, six type II R-M systems including LspC3-41I were predicted in L. sphaericus C3-41 genome. It was found that the cell free extracts (CFE) from this strain shown similar restriction and methylation activity on exogenous Bacillus/Escherichia coli shuttle vector pBU4 as the HaeIII, which is an isoschizomer of BspRI. The Bsph_0498 (encoding the predicted LspC3-41IR) knockout mutant Δ0498 and the complement strain RC0498 were constructed. It was found that the unmethylated pBU4 can be digested by the CFE of C3-41 and RC0498, but not by that of Δ0498. Furthermore, the exogenous plasmid pBU4 can be transformed at very high efficacy into Δ0498, low efficacy into RC0498, but no transformation into C3-41, indicating that LspC3-41I might be a major determinant for the genetic restriction barrier of strain C3-41. Besides, lspC3-41IR and lspC3-41IM genes are detected in other two strains besides C3-41 of the tested 16 L. sphaericus strains, which all belonging to serotype H5 and MLST sequence type (ST) 1. Furthermore, the three strains are not horizontal transferred, and this restriction could be overcome by in vitro methylation either by the host CFE or by commercial methytransferase M. HaeIII. The results provide an insight to further study the genetic restriction, modification and evolution of mosquitocidal L. sphaericus, also a theoretical basis and a method for the genetic manipulations of L. sphaericus. LspC3-41I is identified as the major determinant for the restriction barrier of L. sphaericus C3-41. Only three strains of the tested 16 L. sphaericus strains

  19. Characterization of a restriction modification system from the commensal Escherichia coli strain A0 34/86 (O83:K24:H31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryu Junichi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type I restriction-modification (R-M systems are the most complex restriction enzymes discovered to date. Recent years have witnessed a renaissance of interest in R-M enzymes Type I. The massive ongoing sequencing programmes leading to discovery of, so far, more than 1 000 putative enzymes in a broad range of microorganisms including pathogenic bacteria, revealed that these enzymes are widely represented in nature. The aim of this study was characterisation of a putative R-M system EcoA0ORF42P identified in the commensal Escherichia coli A0 34/86 (O83: K24: H31 strain, which is efficiently used at Czech paediatric clinics for prophylaxis and treatment of nosocomial infections and diarrhoea of preterm and newborn infants. Results We have characterised a restriction-modification system EcoA0ORF42P of the commensal Escherichia coli strain A0 34/86 (O83: K24: H31. This system, designated as EcoAO83I, is a new functional member of the Type IB family, whose specificity differs from those of known Type IB enzymes, as was demonstrated by an immunological cross-reactivity and a complementation assay. Using the plasmid transformation method and the RM search computer program, we identified the DNA recognition sequence of the EcoAO83I as GGA(8NATGC. In consistence with the amino acids alignment data, the 3' TRD component of the recognition sequence is identical to the sequence recognized by the EcoEI enzyme. The A-T (modified adenine distance is identical to that in the EcoAI and EcoEI recognition sites, which also indicates that this system is a Type IB member. Interestingly, the recognition sequence we determined here is identical to the previously reported prototype sequence for Eco377I and its isoschizomers. Conclusion Putative restriction-modification system EcoA0ORF42P in the commensal Escherichia coli strain A0 34/86 (O83: K24: H31 was found to be a member of the Type IB family and was designated as EcoAO83I. Combination of the

  20. License restrictions at Barnwell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autry, V.R. [S.C. Dept. of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia, SC (United States). Bureau of Radiological Health

    1991-12-31

    The State of South Carolina was delegated the authority by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to regulate the receipt, possession, use and disposal of radioactive material as an Agreement State. Since 1970, the state has been the principal regulatory authority for the Barnwell Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility operated by Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. The radioactive material license issued authorizing the receipt and disposal of low-level waste contains numerous restrictions to ensure environmental protection and compliance with shallow land disposal performance criteria. Low-level waste has evolved from minimally contaminated items to complex waste streams containing high concentrations of radionuclides and processing chemicals which necessitated these restrictions. Additionally, some waste with their specific radionuclides and concentration levels, many classified as low-level radioactive waste, are not appropriate for shallow land disposal unless additional precautions are taken. This paper will represent a number of these restrictions, the rationale for them, and how they are being dealt with at the Barnwell disposal facility.

  1. Sophisticated Online Learning Scheme for Green Resource Allocation in 5G Heterogeneous Cloud Radio Access Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Alqerm, Ismail

    2018-01-23

    5G is the upcoming evolution for the current cellular networks that aims at satisfying the future demand for data services. Heterogeneous cloud radio access networks (H-CRANs) are envisioned as a new trend of 5G that exploits the advantages of heterogeneous and cloud radio access networks to enhance spectral and energy efficiency. Remote radio heads (RRHs) are small cells utilized to provide high data rates for users with high quality of service (QoS) requirements, while high power macro base station (BS) is deployed for coverage maintenance and low QoS users service. Inter-tier interference between macro BSs and RRHs and energy efficiency are critical challenges that accompany resource allocation in H-CRANs. Therefore, we propose an efficient resource allocation scheme using online learning, which mitigates interference and maximizes energy efficiency while maintaining QoS requirements for all users. The resource allocation includes resource blocks (RBs) and power. The proposed scheme is implemented using two approaches: centralized, where the resource allocation is processed at a controller integrated with the baseband processing unit and decentralized, where macro BSs cooperate to achieve optimal resource allocation strategy. To foster the performance of such sophisticated scheme with a model free learning, we consider users\\' priority in RB allocation and compact state representation learning methodology to improve the speed of convergence and account for the curse of dimensionality during the learning process. The proposed scheme including both approaches is implemented using software defined radios testbed. The obtained results and simulation results confirm that the proposed resource allocation solution in H-CRANs increases the energy efficiency significantly and maintains users\\' QoS.

  2. Influence of Restricted Grazing Time Systems on Productive Performance and Fatty Acid Composition of Longissimus dorsi in Growing Lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Yong; Luo, Hailing; Liu, Xueliang; Liu, Kun

    2015-08-01

    Fifty 3-month-old male Tan lambs (similar in body weight) were divided into 5 groups to investigate the effects of different restricted pasture grazing times and indoor supplementation on the productive performances and fatty acid composition of the intramuscular fat in growing lambs. The lambs grazed for different periods of time (12 h/d, 8 h/d, 4 h/d, 2 h/d, and 0 h) and received various amounts of supplementary feedings during the 120-day trial. Pasture dry matter intake (DMI), total DMI, average daily gains and the live body weights of the lambs were measured during the experiment. The animals were slaughtered at the end of the study, their carcass traits were measured, and their longissimus dorsi muscles were sampled to analyze the intramuscular fat (IMF) content and fatty acid profiles. The results indicated that the different durations of grazing and supplementary feedings affected the animal performances and the composition of fatty acids. Grazing for 8 h/d or 2 h/d with the corresponding supplementary concentrate resulted in lambs with higher body weights, carcass weights and IMF contents. Lambs with longer grazing times and less concentrate accumulated more healthy fatty acids such as conjugated linoleic acid and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid and had higher n-3/n-6 ratios. Overall, a grazing allowance of 8 h/d and the corresponding concentrate was recommended to maintain a high quantity and quality of lamb meat.

  3. Influence of Restricted Grazing Time Systems on Productive Performance and Fatty Acid Composition of in Growing Lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhen Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fifty 3-month-old male Tan lambs (similar in body weight were divided into 5 groups to investigate the effects of different restricted pasture grazing times and indoor supplementation on the productive performances and fatty acid composition of the intramuscular fat in growing lambs. The lambs grazed for different periods of time (12 h/d, 8 h/d, 4 h/d, 2 h/d, and 0 h and received various amounts of supplementary feedings during the 120-day trial. Pasture dry matter intake (DMI, total DMI, average daily gains and the live body weights of the lambs were measured during the experiment. The animals were slaughtered at the end of the study, their carcass traits were measured, and their longissimus dorsi muscles were sampled to analyze the intramuscular fat (IMF content and fatty acid profiles. The results indicated that the different durations of grazing and supplementary feedings affected the animal performances and the composition of fatty acids. Grazing for 8 h/d or 2 h/d with the corresponding supplementary concentrate resulted in lambs with higher body weights, carcass weights and IMF contents. Lambs with longer grazing times and less concentrate accumulated more healthy fatty acids such as conjugated linoleic acid and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid and had higher n-3/n-6 ratios. Overall, a grazing allowance of 8 h/d and the corresponding concentrate was recommended to maintain a high quantity and quality of lamb meat.

  4. Increasing the Pedagogical Sophistication of Parents: The Basis for Improving the Education of School Pupils in the Family Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebennikov, I. V.

    1978-01-01

    Maintains that lack of pedagogical training of parents in the Soviet Union leads to errors in the education of children in the family setting. Methods to increase parents' pedagogical sophistication include media presentations about social education, community education clubs for young families, parent teacher conferences, and training sessions…

  5. Differential transcription of Barhl1 homeobox gene in restricted functional domains of the central nervous system suggests a role in brain patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachidi, Mohammed; Lopes, Carmela

    2006-02-01

    The mouse Barhl1 homeogene, member of the BarH subfamily, play a crucial role in the cerebellum development and its human ortholog BARHL1 has been proposed as a positional and functional candidate gene for the Joubert syndrome, a form of cerebellar ataxia. The Barhl1 expression has been demonstrated to be induced by the transcription factor Math1 involved in BMP responses. We isolated the mouse Barhl1 by screening of a cDNA library with the Xenopus Xvent-2, member of the BarH subfamily, which acts in the BMP4 pathway during embryonic patterning and neural plate differentiation. We studied the detailed Barhl1 expression pattern and showed its transcription in spatio-temporally and functionally restricted domains of the developing central nervous system (CNS). Using our new optical microscopy technology, we compare the transcript steady state level and cell density in the Barhl1-expressing regions. We found that Barhl1 was transcribed in superior and inferior colliculi in the dorsal mesencephalon at a relatively low transcriptional level. In the diencephalon, Barhl1 was found higher expressed first within the basal plate and later in the mammillary region. In the cerebellum, Barhl1 showed the highest transcriptional level restricted to the anterior and posterior rhombic lips giving rise to the external and internal cerebellar granular cells and to the deep nuclei. In the spinal cord, Barhl1 showed similar expression level than in the cerebellum and is delimited to a subset of dorsal interneurons. Therefore, our results indicated that Barhl1 homeodomain gene is exclusively transcribed in restricted CNS domain at differential transcription levels which suggest a highly regulated transcriptional mechanism. In addition, these regional and cellular specificities indicated that Barhl1 may be involved in the differentiation of the specific subsets of neuronal progenitors.

  6. Evaluation of Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Devices in Energy Cascade Systems under the Restriction of Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Yoichi; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    It is necessary to introduce energy cascade systems into the industrial sector in Japan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The aim of this study is to evaluate the refrigerating and air conditioning devices in cases of introducing both energy cascade systems and thermal recycling systems in industries located around urban areas. The authors have developed an energy cascade model based on linear programming so as to minimize the total system costs with carbon taxes. Five cases are investigated. Limitation of carbon dioxide emissions results in the enhancement of heat cascading, where high temperature heat is supplied for process heating while low temperature one is shifted to refrigeration. It was found that increasing the amount of garbage combustor waste heat can reduce electric power for the turbo refrigerator by promoting waste heat driven ammonia absorption refrigerator.

  7. Dynamics of change of lipid and monoamine metabolisms and the blood coagulation system during experimental atherosclerosis caused by restriction of movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvishiani, G. S.; Kobakhidze, N. G.

    1980-01-01

    Shifts in lipid, catecholamine, and blood coagulation systems following various periods (1, 2, 3, and 4 months) of experimentally induced atherosclerosis were studied. The same indices were studied in the tissues of the myocardium, liver, and brain stem-reticular formation after decapitation of the animals at the end of the experiment. Periodic motion restriction caused an increase in blood beta-lipoproteins in the rabbits at the beginning of the experiment. An increase in general cholesterol content and a decrease in the lecithincholesterol index were established at the end of the experiment. Myocardial beta-lipoprotein and brain stem reticular formation general cholesterol contents were elevated; catecholamine content was increased at the end of the experiment. In the initial months, free adrenaline basically increased, while in later months blood adrenaline decreased and blood noradrenaline increased.

  8. Identification of restriction-modification systems of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis CNCM I-2494 by SMRT sequencing and associated methylome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary O' Connell Motherway

    Full Text Available Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis CNCM I-2494 is a component of a commercialized fermented dairy product for which beneficial effects on health has been studied by clinical and preclinical trials. To date little is known about the molecular mechanisms that could explain the beneficial effects that bifidobacteria impart to the host. Restriction-modification (R-M systems have been identified as key obstacles in the genetic accessibility of bifidobacteria, and circumventing these is a prerequisite to attaining a fundamental understanding of bifidobacterial attributes, including the genes that are responsible for health-promoting properties of this clinically and industrially important group of bacteria. The complete genome sequence of B. animalis subsp. lactis CNCM I-2494 is predicted to harbour the genetic determinants for two type II R-M systems, designated BanLI and BanLII. In order to investigate the functionality and specificity of these two putative R-M systems in B. animalis subsp. lactis CNCM I-2494, we employed PacBio SMRT sequencing with associated methylome analysis. In addition, the contribution of the identified R-M systems to the genetic accessibility of this strain was assessed.

  9. Regression of cardiac hypertrophy in the SHR by combined renin-angiotensin system blockade and dietary sodium restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Abro

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Altered operation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS and dietary sodium intake have been identified as independent risk factors for cardiac hypertrophy. The way in which sodium intake and the operation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system interact in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy is poorly understood. The aims of this study were to investigate the cardiac effects of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS blockade in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR, using co-treatment with an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB and an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor with different sodium intakes. Our experiments with SHR show that, at high levels of sodium intake (4.0%, aggressive RAS blockade treatment with candesartan (3 mg/kg and perindopril (6 mg/kg does not result in regression of cardiac hypertrophy. In contrast, RAS blockade coupled with reduced sodium diet (0.2% significantly regresses cardiac hypertrophy, impairs animal growth and is associated with elevated plasma renin and dramatically suppressed plasma angiotensinogen levels. Histological analyses indicate that the differential effect of reduced sodium on heart growth during RAS blockade is not associated with any change in myocardial interstitial collagen, but reflects modification of cellular geometry. Dimensional measurements of enzymatically-isolated ventricular myocytes show that, in the RAS blocked, reduced sodium group, myocyte length and width were decreased by about 16—19% compared with myocytes from the high sodium treatment group. Our findings highlight the importance of `titrating' sodium intake with combined RAS blockade in the clinical setting to optimise therapeutic benefit.

  10. System model network for adipose tissue signatures related to weight changes in response to calorie restriction and subsequent weight maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montastier, Emilie; Villa-Vialaneix, Nathalie; Caspar-Bauguil, Sylvie; Hlavaty, Petr; Tvrzicka, Eva; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Saris, Wim H M; Langin, Dominique; Kunesova, Marie; Viguerie, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Nutrigenomics investigates relationships between nutrients and all genome-encoded molecular entities. This holistic approach requires systems biology to scrutinize the effects of diet on tissue biology. To decipher the adipose tissue (AT) response to diet induced weight changes we focused on key molecular (lipids and transcripts) AT species during a longitudinal dietary intervention. To obtain a systems model, a network approach was used to combine all sets of variables (bio-clinical, fatty acids and mRNA levels) and get an overview of their interactions. AT fatty acids and mRNA levels were quantified in 135 obese women at baseline, after an 8-week low calorie diet (LCD) and after 6 months of ad libitum weight maintenance diet (WMD). After LCD, individuals were stratified a posteriori according to weight change during WMD. A 3 steps approach was used to infer a global model involving the 3 sets of variables. It consisted in inferring intra-omic networks with sparse partial correlations and inter-omic networks with regularized canonical correlation analysis and finally combining the obtained omic-specific network in a single global model. The resulting networks were analyzed using node clustering, systematic important node extraction and cluster comparisons. Overall, AT showed both constant and phase-specific biological signatures in response to dietary intervention. AT from women regaining weight displayed growth factors, angiogenesis and proliferation signaling signatures, suggesting unfavorable tissue hyperplasia. By contrast, after LCD a strong positive relationship between AT myristoleic acid (a fatty acid with low AT level) content and de novo lipogenesis mRNAs was found. This relationship was also observed, after WMD, in the group of women that continued to lose weight. This original system biology approach provides novel insight in the AT response to weight control by highlighting the central role of myristoleic acid that may account for the beneficial

  11. System model network for adipose tissue signatures related to weight changes in response to calorie restriction and subsequent weight maintenance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Montastier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrigenomics investigates relationships between nutrients and all genome-encoded molecular entities. This holistic approach requires systems biology to scrutinize the effects of diet on tissue biology. To decipher the adipose tissue (AT response to diet induced weight changes we focused on key molecular (lipids and transcripts AT species during a longitudinal dietary intervention. To obtain a systems model, a network approach was used to combine all sets of variables (bio-clinical, fatty acids and mRNA levels and get an overview of their interactions. AT fatty acids and mRNA levels were quantified in 135 obese women at baseline, after an 8-week low calorie diet (LCD and after 6 months of ad libitum weight maintenance diet (WMD. After LCD, individuals were stratified a posteriori according to weight change during WMD. A 3 steps approach was used to infer a global model involving the 3 sets of variables. It consisted in inferring intra-omic networks with sparse partial correlations and inter-omic networks with regularized canonical correlation analysis and finally combining the obtained omic-specific network in a single global model. The resulting networks were analyzed using node clustering, systematic important node extraction and cluster comparisons. Overall, AT showed both constant and phase-specific biological signatures in response to dietary intervention. AT from women regaining weight displayed growth factors, angiogenesis and proliferation signaling signatures, suggesting unfavorable tissue hyperplasia. By contrast, after LCD a strong positive relationship between AT myristoleic acid (a fatty acid with low AT level content and de novo lipogenesis mRNAs was found. This relationship was also observed, after WMD, in the group of women that continued to lose weight. This original system biology approach provides novel insight in the AT response to weight control by highlighting the central role of myristoleic acid that may account for the

  12. System Model Network for Adipose Tissue Signatures Related to Weight Changes in Response to Calorie Restriction and Subsequent Weight Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montastier, Emilie; Villa-Vialaneix, Nathalie; Caspar-Bauguil, Sylvie; Hlavaty, Petr; Tvrzicka, Eva; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Saris, Wim H. M.; Langin, Dominique; Kunesova, Marie; Viguerie, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Nutrigenomics investigates relationships between nutrients and all genome-encoded molecular entities. This holistic approach requires systems biology to scrutinize the effects of diet on tissue biology. To decipher the adipose tissue (AT) response to diet induced weight changes we focused on key molecular (lipids and transcripts) AT species during a longitudinal dietary intervention. To obtain a systems model, a network approach was used to combine all sets of variables (bio-clinical, fatty acids and mRNA levels) and get an overview of their interactions. AT fatty acids and mRNA levels were quantified in 135 obese women at baseline, after an 8-week low calorie diet (LCD) and after 6 months of ad libitum weight maintenance diet (WMD). After LCD, individuals were stratified a posteriori according to weight change during WMD. A 3 steps approach was used to infer a global model involving the 3 sets of variables. It consisted in inferring intra-omic networks with sparse partial correlations and inter-omic networks with regularized canonical correlation analysis and finally combining the obtained omic-specific network in a single global model. The resulting networks were analyzed using node clustering, systematic important node extraction and cluster comparisons. Overall, AT showed both constant and phase-specific biological signatures in response to dietary intervention. AT from women regaining weight displayed growth factors, angiogenesis and proliferation signaling signatures, suggesting unfavorable tissue hyperplasia. By contrast, after LCD a strong positive relationship between AT myristoleic acid (a fatty acid with low AT level) content and de novo lipogenesis mRNAs was found. This relationship was also observed, after WMD, in the group of women that continued to lose weight. This original system biology approach provides novel insight in the AT response to weight control by highlighting the central role of myristoleic acid that may account for the beneficial

  13. Gentile statistics and restricted partitions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In a recent paper (Tran et al, Ann. Phys. 311, 204 (2004)), some asymptotic number theoretical results on the partitioning of an integer were derived exploiting its connection to the quantum density of states of a many-particle system. We generalise these results to obtain an asymptotic formula for the restricted or coloured ...

  14. Global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory from semidefinite programming with applications to strongly correlated quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraraghavan, Srikant; Mazziotti, David A

    2014-03-28

    We present a density matrix approach for computing global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory, based on semidefinite programming (SDP), that gives upper and lower bounds on the Hartree-Fock energy of quantum systems. While wave function approaches to Hartree-Fock theory yield an upper bound to the Hartree-Fock energy, we derive a semidefinite relaxation of Hartree-Fock theory that yields a rigorous lower bound on the Hartree-Fock energy. We also develop an upper-bound algorithm in which Hartree-Fock theory is cast as a SDP with a nonconvex constraint on the rank of the matrix variable. Equality of the upper- and lower-bound energies guarantees that the computed solution is the globally optimal solution of Hartree-Fock theory. The work extends a previously presented method for closed-shell systems [S. Veeraraghavan and D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. A 89, 010502-R (2014)]. For strongly correlated systems the SDP approach provides an alternative to the locally optimized Hartree-Fock energies and densities with a certificate of global optimality. Applications are made to the potential energy curves of C2, CN, Cr2, and NO2.

  15. Restrictions and Proportionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2009-01-01

    against host country restrictions, but which is often not recognised to the same extent by national law, and 3) the importance of also identifying and recognising an exit restriction, so that it is possible to achieve the required test of appropriateness and proportionality in relation to the rule......The article discusses three central aspects of the freedoms under European Community law, namely 1) the prohibition against restrictions as an important extension of the prohibition against discrimination, 2) a prohibition against exit restrictions which is just as important as the prohibition...

  16. HIV-1, ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins: the dialectic interactions of a virus with a sophisticated network of post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biard-Piechaczyk, Martine; Borel, Sophie; Espert, Lucile; de Bettignies, Geoffroy; Coux, Olivier

    2012-03-01

    The modification of intracellular proteins by ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like (UbL) proteins is a central mechanism for regulating and fine-tuning all cellular processes. Indeed, these modifications are widely used to control the stability, activity and localisation of many key proteins and, therefore, they are instrumental in regulating cellular functions as diverse as protein degradation, cell signalling, vesicle trafficking and immune response. It is thus no surprise that pathogens in general, and viruses in particular, have developed multiple strategies to either counteract or exploit the complex mechanisms mediated by the Ub and UbL protein conjugation pathways. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the intricate and conflicting relationships that intimately link HIV-1 and these sophisticated systems of post-translational modifications. Copyright © 2012 Soçiété Francaise des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France.

  17. Restriction Site-Associated DNA Sequencing (RAD-seq) Reveals an Extraordinary Number of Transitions among Gecko Sex-Determining Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Tony; Coryell, Jessi; Ezaz, Tariq; Lynch, Joshua; Scantlebury, Daniel P; Zarkower, David

    2015-05-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved many times in animals and studying these replicate evolutionary "experiments" can help broaden our understanding of the general forces driving the origin and evolution of sex chromosomes. However this plan of study has been hindered by the inability to identify the sex chromosome systems in the large number of species with cryptic, homomorphic sex chromosomes. Restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) is a critical enabling technology that can identify the sex chromosome systems in many species where traditional cytogenetic methods have failed. Using newly generated RAD-seq data from 12 gecko species, along with data from the literature, we reinterpret the evolution of sex-determining systems in lizards and snakes and test the hypothesis that sex chromosomes can routinely act as evolutionary traps. We uncovered between 17 and 25 transitions among gecko sex-determining systems. This is approximately one-half to two-thirds of the total number of transitions observed among all lizards and snakes. We find support for the hypothesis that sex chromosome systems can readily become trap-like and show that adding even a small number of species from understudied clades can greatly enhance hypothesis testing in a model-based phylogenetic framework. RAD-seq will undoubtedly prove useful in evaluating other species for male or female heterogamety, particularly the majority of fish, amphibian, and reptile species that lack visibly heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and will significantly accelerate the pace of biological discovery. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Sophisticated framework between cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction based on p53 dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Hamada

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor, p53, regulates several gene expressions that are related to the DNA repair protein, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction, which activates the implementation of both cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. However, it is not clear how p53 specifically regulates the implementation of these functions. By applying several well-known kinetic mathematical models, we constructed a novel model that described the influence that DNA damage has on the implementation of both the G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and the intrinsic apoptosis induction via its activation of the p53 synthesis process. The model, which consisted of 32 dependent variables and 115 kinetic parameters, was used to examine interference by DNA damage in the implementation of both G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and intrinsic apoptosis induction. A low DNA damage promoted slightly the synthesis of p53, which showed a sigmoidal behavior with time. In contrast, in the case of a high DNA damage, the p53 showed an oscillation behavior with time. Regardless of the DNA damage level, there were delays in the G2/M progression. The intrinsic apoptosis was only induced in situations where grave DNA damage produced an oscillation of p53. In addition, to wreck the equilibrium between Bcl-2 and Bax the induction of apoptosis required an extreme activation of p53 produced by the oscillation dynamics, and was only implemented after the release of the G2/M phase arrest. When the p53 oscillation is observed, there is possibility that the cell implements the apoptosis induction. Moreover, in contrast to the cell cycle arrest system, the apoptosis induction system is responsible for safeguarding the system that suppresses malignant transformations. The results of these experiments will be useful in the future for elucidating of the dominant factors that determine the cell fate such as normal cell cycles, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  19. Restricting wolves risks escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L. David; Ballard, Warren; Bangs, Ed; Ream, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Implementing the proposal set forth by Licht and colleagues (BioScience 60: 147–153) requires restricting wolves to tiny "islands," areas that are magnitudes smaller than the ranges of most wolf populations. Wolves naturally have large ranges; restricting their spatial needs increases the risk of wolves escaping, exacerbating public relations and political and legal problems.

  20. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) receptor restricts systemic dengue virus replication and prevents paralysis in IFN-α/β receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwood, Tyler R; Morar, Malika M; Zellweger, Raphaël M; Miller, Robyn; May, Monica M; Yauch, Lauren E; Lada, Steven M; Shresta, Sujan

    2012-12-01

    We previously reported that mice lacking alpha/beta and gamma interferon receptors (IFN-α/βR and -γR) uniformly exhibit paralysis following infection with the dengue virus (DENV) clinical isolate PL046, while only a subset of mice lacking the IFN-γR alone and virtually no mice lacking the IFN-α/βR alone develop paralysis. Here, using a mouse-passaged variant of PL046, strain S221, we show that in the absence of the IFN-α/βR, signaling through the IFN-γR confers approximately 140-fold greater resistance against systemic vascular leakage-associated dengue disease and virtually complete protection from dengue-induced paralysis. Viral replication in the spleen was assessed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, which revealed a reduction in the number of infected cells due to IFN-γR signaling by 2 days after infection, coincident with elevated levels of IFN-γ in the spleen and serum. By 4 days after infection, IFN-γR signaling was found to restrict DENV replication systemically. Clearance of DENV, on the other hand, occurred in the absence of IFN-γR, except in the central nervous system (CNS) (brain and spinal cord), where clearance relied on IFN-γ from CD8(+) T cells. These results demonstrate the roles of IFN-γR signaling in protection from initial systemic and subsequent CNS disease following DENV infection and demonstrate the importance of CD8(+) T cells in preventing DENV-induced CNS disease.

  1. hsdS, Belonging to the Type I Restriction-Modification System, Contributes to the Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Survival Ability in Phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Xu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2 is an important zoonotic agent in swine and humans. Anti-phagocytosis and survival in phagocytic cells and whole blood is essential for bacteria to be pathogenic. In this study, the host specificity determinant specificity subunit (coded by hsdS of the Type I Restriction-Modification system and two peptidoglycan-binding proteins (coded by lysM and lysM′, respectively, which were simultaneously found to be subjected to transcript-level influence by hsdS, were identified to facilitate the anti-phagocytosis of SS2 to a microglia cell line BV2. Furthermore, they significantly enhanced its survival in BV2, whole blood, and a peroxidation environment (H2O2 (p < 0.05, yet not in the acidic condition based on statistical analysis of the characteristic differences between gene mutants and wild-type SS2. In contrast, another specificity subunit, coded by hsdS′, that belonged to the same Type I Restriction-Modification system, only significantly reduced the survival ability of SS2 in the acidic condition when in the form of a gene-deleted mutant (p < 0.05, but it did not significantly influence the survival ability in other conditions mentioned above or have enhanced anti-phagocytosis action when compared with wild-type SS2. In addition, the mutation of hsdS significantly enhanced the secretion of nitric oxide and TNF-α by BV2 with SS2 incubation (p < 0.05. The SS2 was tested, and it failed to stimulate BV2 to produce IFN-γ. These results demonstrated that hsdS contributed to bacterial anti-phagocytosis and survival in adverse host environments through positively impacting the transcription of two peptidoglycan-binding protein genes, enhancing resistance to reactive oxygen species, and reducing the secretion of TNF-α and nitric oxide by phagocytes. These findings revealed new mechanisms of SS2 pathogenesis.

  2. Flexible and Versatile as a Chameleon—Sophisticated Functions of microRNA-199a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Gu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Although widely studied in the past decade, our knowledge of the functional role of microRNAs (miRNAs remains limited. Among the many miRNAs identified in humans, we focus on miR-199a due to its varied and important functions in diverse models and systems. Its expression is finely regulated by promoter methylation and direct binding of transcription factors such as TWIST1. During tumorigenesis, depending on the nature of the cancer, miR-199a, especially its -3p mature form, may act as either a potential tumor suppressor or an oncogene. Its 5p mature form has been shown to protect cardiomyocytes from hypoxic damage via its action on HIF1α. It also has a functional role in stem cell differentiation, embryo development, hepatitis, liver fibrosis, etc. Though it has varied biological activities, its regulation has not been reviewed. The varied and protean functions of miR-199a suggest that efforts to generalize the action of a miRNA are problematic. This review provides a comprehensive survey of the literature on miR-199a as an example of the complexity of miRNA biology and suggests future directions for miRNA research.

  3. Post-translational modifications of host proteins by Legionella pneumophila: a sophisticated survival strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolando, Monica; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2012-03-01

    Eukaryotic proteins are tightly regulated by post-translational modifications, leading to a very subtle degree of regulation in time and space. Pathogen-mediated post-translational modifications are key strategies to modulate host factors by targeting central signaling pathways in the host cell. Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular pathogen that coevolved with protozoan hosts, encodes a large arsenal of secreted effectors conferring the ability to evade host cellular defenses and to manipulate them to promote invasion and intracellular replication. Conservation of many signaling pathways of protozoa in human macrophages confers the ability of L. pneumophila to infect humans, causing a severe pneumonia called legionnaires' disease. Most of the secreted proteins are delivered by the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system and several of these have been shown to act on different cellular pathways critical for infection. Moreover, multiple effectors target a single host function to orchestrate bacterial survival. In this review, we focus on those effectors in the repertoire of L. pneumophila proteins that target key cellular pathways by specific post-translational modifications.

  4. 46 CFR 184.202 - Restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions. 184.202 Section 184.202 Shipping COAST... CONTROL AND MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Cooking and Heating § 184.202 Restrictions. (a) The use of... in § 184.240 of this part. The use of these fuels for cooking, heating, and lighting on ferry vessels...

  5. Prediction uncertainty reflects both data input quality and model software sophistication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvitski, J.

    2011-12-01

    Recently Syvitski et al. (2011, The Sedimentary Record, v. 9) put forth three concepts related to earth surface modeling: 1) Prediction, as opposed to cataloging, is a major step in the evolution of geoscience; 2) Quantitative modeling provides a framework in which researchers express their predictive ideas in a precise, consistent format; and 3) Models are an encyclopedia of what we know, and often reveal what we cannot yet quantify. This burgeoning field of earth surface science has proportioned itself into three loose fields of endeavor: 1) those that provide data for model initialization and model boundary conditions; 2) those that develop the algorithms, the numerical models and even the middle ware that links models and input data; and 3) the observational specialists that provide test case data that can be used to judge the skill of a model or parts of a model. This 'modern' way of conducting geoscience requires a team approach offering diverse expertise. Uncertainties associated with this workflow are not always understood or appreciated or transparent - leading to poor or over interpretation of model results. To avoid this perception, uncertainties associated with input data must be involved in the model runs, model-run uncertainties must also be expressed independent of the input data uncertainties, and finally model skill testing must be appreciated with full knowledge of uncertainties associated with test case data. While methods have been developed to cope with geo-model skill (ensemble model run averaging or intercomparison; data ingestion schemes to deal with model drift), workflow uncertainty studies are seldom carried out (i.e. is the expense worth the effort?). Prediction uncertainty examples will be presented based on experience from the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System 'CSDMS' community.

  6. Is the kisspeptin system involved in responses to food restriction in order to preserve reproduction in pubertal male sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Sebastián; Felip, Alicia; Zanuy, Silvia; Carrillo, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Previous works on European sea bass have determined that long-term exposure to restrictive feeding diets alters the rhythms of some reproductive/metabolic hormones, delaying maturation and increasing apoptosis during gametogenesis. However, exactly how these diets affect key genes and hormones on the brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG) axis to trigger puberty is still largely unknown. We may hypothesize that all these signals could be integrated, at least in part, by the kisspeptin system. In order to capture a glimpse of these regulatory mechanisms, kiss1 and kiss2 mRNA expression levels and those of their kiss receptors (kiss1r, kiss2r) were analyzed in different areas of the brain and in the pituitary of pubertal male sea bass during gametogenesis. Furthermore, other reproductive hormones and factors as well as the percentage of males showing full spermiation were also analyzed. Treated fish fed maintenance diets provided evidence of overexpression of the kisspeptin system in the main hypophysiotropic regions of the brain throughout the entire sexual cycle. Conversely, Gnrh1 and gonadotropin pituitary content and plasma sexual steroid levels were downregulated, except for Fsh levels, which were shown to increase during spermiation. Treated fish exhibited lower rates of spermiation as compared to control group and a delay in its accomplishment. These results demonstrate how the kisspeptin system and plasma Fsh levels are differentially affected by maintenance diets, causing a retardation, but not a full blockage of the reproductive process in the teleost fish European sea bass. This suggests that a hormonal adaptive strategy may be operating in order to preserve reproductive function in this species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation System: Changes in Development and Aging as well as due to Restriction of Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilovsky, G A; Shram, S I; Morgunova, G V; Khokhlov, A N

    2017-11-01

    It is well known that the number of dividing cells in an organism decreases with age. The average rate of cell division in tissues and organs of a mature organism sharply decreases, which is probably a trigger for accumulation of damage leading to disturbance of genome integrity. This can be a cause for the development of many age-related diseases and appearance of phenotypic and physiological signs of aging. In this connection, the protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation system, which is activated in response to appearance of various DNA damage, attracts great interest. This review summarizes and analyzes data on changes in the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation system during development and aging in vivo and in vitro, and due to restriction of cell proliferation. Special attention is given to methodological aspects of determination of activity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). Analysis of relevant publications and our own data has led us to the conclusion that PARP activity upon the addition of free DNA ends (in this review referred to as stimulated PARP activity) is steadily decreasing with age. However, the dynamics of PARP activity measured without additional activation of the enzyme (in this review referred to as unstimulated activity) does not have such a clear trend: in many studies, the presented differences are statistically non-significant, although it is well known that the number of unrepaired DNA lesions steadily increases with aging. Apparently, the cell has additional regulatory systems that limit its own capability of reacting to DNA damage. Special attention is given to the influence of the cell proliferative status on PARP activity. We have systematized and analyzed data on changes in PARP activity during development and aging of an organism, as well as data on differences in the dynamics of this activity in the presence/absence of additional stimulation and on cellular processes that are associated with activation of these enzymes. Moreover, data obtained in

  8. New detection systems of bacteria using highly selective media designed by SMART: selective medium-design algorithm restricted by two constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Takuya; Okano, Yukari; Sugawara, Kyoko; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Kakizawa, Shigeyuki; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Oshima, Kenro; Namba, Shigetou

    2011-01-27

    Culturing is an indispensable technique in microbiological research, and culturing with selective media has played a crucial role in the detection of pathogenic microorganisms and the isolation of commercially useful microorganisms from environmental samples. Although numerous selective media have been developed in empirical studies, unintended microorganisms often grow on such media probably due to the enormous numbers of microorganisms in the environment. Here, we present a novel strategy for designing highly selective media based on two selective agents, a carbon source and antimicrobials. We named our strategy SMART for highly Selective Medium-design Algorithm Restricted by Two constraints. To test whether the SMART method is applicable to a wide range of microorganisms, we developed selective media for Burkholderia glumae, Acidovorax avenae, Pectobacterium carotovorum, Ralstonia solanacearum, and Xanthomonas campestris. The series of media developed by SMART specifically allowed growth of the targeted bacteria. Because these selective media exhibited high specificity for growth of the target bacteria compared to established selective media, we applied three notable detection technologies: paper-based, flow cytometry-based, and color change-based detection systems for target bacteria species. SMART facilitates not only the development of novel techniques for detecting specific bacteria, but also our understanding of the ecology and epidemiology of the targeted bacteria.

  9. New detection systems of bacteria using highly selective media designed by SMART: selective medium-design algorithm restricted by two constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Kawanishi

    Full Text Available Culturing is an indispensable technique in microbiological research, and culturing with selective media has played a crucial role in the detection of pathogenic microorganisms and the isolation of commercially useful microorganisms from environmental samples. Although numerous selective media have been developed in empirical studies, unintended microorganisms often grow on such media probably due to the enormous numbers of microorganisms in the environment. Here, we present a novel strategy for designing highly selective media based on two selective agents, a carbon source and antimicrobials. We named our strategy SMART for highly Selective Medium-design Algorithm Restricted by Two constraints. To test whether the SMART method is applicable to a wide range of microorganisms, we developed selective media for Burkholderia glumae, Acidovorax avenae, Pectobacterium carotovorum, Ralstonia solanacearum, and Xanthomonas campestris. The series of media developed by SMART specifically allowed growth of the targeted bacteria. Because these selective media exhibited high specificity for growth of the target bacteria compared to established selective media, we applied three notable detection technologies: paper-based, flow cytometry-based, and color change-based detection systems for target bacteria species. SMART facilitates not only the development of novel techniques for detecting specific bacteria, but also our understanding of the ecology and epidemiology of the targeted bacteria.

  10. An e-Commerce like platform enabling bricks-and-mortar stores to use sophisticated product recommender systems

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Thorben; Raffelsieper, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Compared to online-retailers, bricks-and-mortar stores have only limited possibilities to understand consumer preferences, their intentions, and their feedback. The first are able to evaluate clickstream data collected on their web-pages alongside the actual purchase data to put together a comprehensive view on individual customers. Bricks-and-mortar stores on the other hand have to rely solely on the evaluation of scanner data collected at the point of sale (POS). Thus, akin to the Event Hor...

  11. Formalizing Restriction Categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Chapman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Restriction categories are an abstract axiomatic framework by Cockett and Lack for reasoning about (generalizations of the idea of partiality of functions. In a restriction category, every map defines an endomap on its domain, the corresponding partial identity map. Restriction categories cover a number of examples of different flavors and are sound and complete with respect to the more synthetic and concrete partial map categories. A partial map category is based on a given category (of total maps and a map in it is a map from a subobject of the domain. In this paper, we report on an Agda formalization of the first chapters of the theory of restriction categories, including the challenging completeness result. We explain the mathematics formalized, comment on the design decisions we made for the formalization, and illustrate them at work.

  12. Energy restriction and potential energy restriction mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolai, Sibylle; Pallauf, Kathrin; Huebbe, Patricia; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-12-01

    Energy restriction (ER; also known as caloric restriction) is the only nutritional intervention that has repeatedly been shown to increase lifespan in model organisms and may delay ageing in humans. In the present review we discuss current scientific literature on ER and its molecular, metabolic and hormonal effects. Moreover, criteria for the classification of substances that might induce positive ER-like changes without having to reduce energy intake are summarised. Additionally, the putative ER mimetics (ERM) 2-deoxy-d-glucose, metformin, rapamycin, resveratrol, spermidine and lipoic acid and their suggested molecular targets are discussed. While there are reports on these ERM candidates that describe lifespan extension in model organisms, data on longevity-inducing effects in higher organisms such as mice remain controversial or are missing. Furthermore, some of these candidates produce detrimental side effects such as immunosuppression or lactic acidosis, or have not been tested for safety in long-term studies. Up to now, there are no known ERM that could be recommended without limitations for use in humans.

  13. Temperature based Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqi; Deng, Lei; Xu, Yi; Wen, Changyun; Wang, Wei; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping

    2016-01-01

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs), which apply graphical models to learning probability distribution over a set of inputs, have attracted much attention recently since being proposed as building blocks of multi-layer learning systems called deep belief networks (DBNs). Note that temperature is a key factor of the Boltzmann distribution that RBMs originate from. However, none of existing schemes have considered the impact of temperature in the graphical model of DBNs. In this work, we propose temperature based restricted Boltzmann machines (TRBMs) which reveals that temperature is an essential parameter controlling the selectivity of the firing neurons in the hidden layers. We theoretically prove that the effect of temperature can be adjusted by setting the parameter of the sharpness of the logistic function in the proposed TRBMs. The performance of RBMs can be improved by adjusting the temperature parameter of TRBMs. This work provides a comprehensive insights into the deep belief networks and deep learning architectures from a physical point of view.

  14. A Study into the Impact of Logistics Sophistication of Brazilian Shippers in the Pattern of Contracting the Services of Logistics Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Fernando Fleury

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of the logistics sophistication of Brazilian shippers on the acquisition pattern of 3PL (third-party logistics service providers. The conceptual model of logistics sophistication and the major dimensions and variables relating to the acquisition pattern were defined and a questionnaire was sent to 218 Brazilian shippers listed on the Revista Exame ranking. Based on the 93 questionnaires returned, the analyses conducted indicate that the most sophisticated shippers are durable goods manufacturers and that they contract 3PL services providers for inventory management and higher value added services. In essence, these results indicate that the most sophisticated shippers seek 3PL service providers capable of managing logistics trade-offs such as inventory levels vs. asset utilization levels. These implications on the selection criteria of 3PL service providers are also discussed.

  15. Intrauterine growth restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardita Donoso Bernales

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that the true prevalence of intrauterine growth restriction is 3-10% of all pregnancies, making this fetal condition one of the most frequent obstetric problems, together with premature labor and premature rupture of membranes. The article stresses the importance of early diagnosis because of the associated risks.

  16. 48 CFR 552.203-71 - Restriction on Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restriction on Advertising... Restriction on Advertising. As prescribed in 503.570-2, insert the following clause: Restriction on Advertising (SEP 1999) The Contractor shall not refer to this contract in commercial advertising or similar...

  17. Sex differences in structural organization of motor systems and their dissociable links with repetitive/restricted behaviors in children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supekar, Kaustubh; Menon, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is diagnosed much less often in females than males. Emerging behavioral accounts suggest that the clinical presentation of autism is different in females and males, yet research examining sex differences in core symptoms of autism in affected children has been limited. Additionally, to date, there have been no systematic attempts to characterize neuroanatomical differences underlying the distinct behavioral profiles observed in girls and boys with ASD. This is in part because extant ASD studies have included a small number of girls. Leveraging the National Database for Autism Research (NDAR), we first analyzed symptom severity in a large sample consisting of 128 ASD girls and 614 age- and IQ-matched ASD boys. We then examined symptom severity and structural imaging data using novel multivariate pattern analysis in a well-matched group of 25 ASD girls, 25 ASD boys, 19 typically developing (TD) girls, and 19 TD boys, obtained from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE). In both the NDAR and ABIDE datasets, girls, compared to boys, with ASD showed less severe repetitive/restricted behaviors (RRBs) and comparable deficits in the social and communication domains. In the ABIDE imaging dataset, gray matter (GM) patterns in the motor cortex, supplementary motor area (SMA), cerebellum, fusiform gyrus, and amygdala accurately discriminated girls and boys with ASD. This sex difference pattern was specific to ASD as the GM in these brain regions did not discriminate TD girls and boys. Moreover, GM in the motor cortex, SMA, and crus 1 subdivision of the cerebellum was correlated with RRB in girls whereas GM in the right putamen-the region that discriminated TD girls and boys-was correlated with RRB in boys. We found robust evidence for reduced levels of RRB in girls, compared to boys, with ASD, providing the strongest evidence to date for sex differences in a core phenotypic feature of childhood ASD. Sex differences in brain morphometry

  18. Character identification by maximizing the difference between target and non-target responses in EEG without sophisticated classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Junya; Fukami, Tadanori; Shimada, Takamasa

    2013-01-01

    We propose a simple character identification method demonstrated by using an electroencephalogram (EEG) with a stimulus presentation technique. The method assigns a code maximizing the minimum Hamming distance between character codes. Character identification is achieved by increasing the difference between target and non-target responses without sophisticated classifiers such as neural network or support vector machine. Here, we introduce two kinds of scores reflecting the existence of the P300 component from the point of time and frequency domains. We then applied this method to character identification using a 3 × 3 matrix and compared the results to that of a conventional P300 speller. The accuracy of character identification with our method indicated a performance of 100% character identification from five subjects. In contrast, the correct character was detected in two subjects and a wrong one was detected for one subject. For the remaining two subjects, no character was detected within ten trials. Our method required 4.8 trials on average to detect the correct character.

  19. Is it stress? The role of stress related systems in chronic food restriction-induced augmentation of heroin seeking in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas eSedki

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction is a chronic disease characterized by recurring episodes of abstinence and relapse. The precise mechanisms underlying this pattern are yet to be elucidated, but stress is thought to be a major factor in relapse. Recently, we reported that rats under withdrawal and exposed to a mild chronic stressor, prolonged food restriction, show increased heroin seeking compared to sated controls. Previous studies demonstrated a critical role for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF and corticosterone, hormones involved in the stress response, in acute food deprivation-induced reinstatement of extinguished drug seeking. However, the role of CRF and corticosterone in chronic food restriction-induced augmentation of drug seeking remains unknown. Here, male Long-Evans rats were trained to self-administer heroin for 10 days in operant conditioning chambers. Rats were then removed from the training chambers, and subjected to 14 days of unrestricted (sated rats or a mildly restricted (FDR rats access to food, which maintained their body weight at 90% of their baseline weight. On day 14, different groups of rats were administered a selective CRF1 receptor antagonist (R121919; 0.0, 20.0 mg/kg; s.c., a non-selective CRF receptor antagonist (α-helical CRF; 0.0, 10.0, 25.0 μg/μl; i.c.v. or a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist (RU486; 0.0, 30.0 mg/kg; i.p., and underwent a 1 h drug seeking test under extinction conditions. An additional group of rats was tested following adrenalectomy. All FDR rats showed a statistically significant increase in heroin seeking compared to the sated rats. No statistically significant effects for treatment with α-helical CRF, R121919, RU486 or adrenalectomy were observed. These findings suggest that stress may not be a critical factor in the augmentation of heroin seeking in food-restricted rats.

  20. Late gestational nutrient restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tygesen, Malin Plumhoff; Nielsen, Mette Olaf; Nørgaard, Peder

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of 50% nutrient restriction during the last 6 weeks of gestation on twin-pregnant ewes' plasma glucose, non-esterified fatty acid, beta-hydroxybutyrate, insulin, IGF-1 and leptin concentrations and the effects on lamb birth weight and ewes' lactation performance. Plasma...... changes in feed intake and energy balance. It is concluded that severely reduced nutrient availability in late gestation affects fetal growth in utero and has a prolonged negative effect on lactation performance....

  1. A Snapshot of Serial Rape: An Investigation of Criminal Sophistication and Use of Force on Victim Injury and Severity of the Assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Brooke

    2016-02-01

    Prior research on rapes reported to law enforcement has identified criminal sophistication and the use of force against the victim as possible unique identifiers to serial rape versus one-time rape. This study sought to contribute to the current literature on reported serial rape by investigating how the level of criminal sophistication of the rapist and use of force used were associated with two important outcomes of rape: victim injury and overall severity of the assault. In addition, it was evaluated whether rapist and victim ethnicity affected these relationships. A nation-wide sample of serial rape cases reported to law enforcement collected by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) was analyzed (108 rapists, 543 victims). Results indicated that serial rapists typically used a limited amount of force against the victim and displayed a high degree of criminal sophistication. In addition, the more criminally sophisticated the perpetrator was, the more sexual acts he performed on his victim. Finally, rapes between a White rapist and White victim were found to exhibit higher levels of criminal sophistication and were more severe in terms of number and types of sexual acts committed. These findings provide a more in-depth understanding of serial rape that can inform both academics and practitioners in the field about contributors to victim injury and severity of the assault. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Chronic REM Sleep Restriction in Juvenile Male Rats Induces Anxiety-Like Behavior and Alters Monoamine Systems in the Amygdala and Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Rocha-Lopes, Janaína; Machado, Ricardo Borges; Suchecki, Deborah

    2017-04-28

    Adolescence is marked by major physiological changes, including those in the sleep-wake cycle, such as phase delay, which may result in reduced sleep hours. Sleep restriction and/or deprivation in adult rats activate stress response and seem to be a risk factor for triggering emotional disorders. In the present study, we sought to evaluate the behavioral and neurobiological consequences of prolonged REM sleep restriction in juvenile male rats. Immediately after weaning, on postnatal day 21, three males from each litter were submitted to REM sleep deprivation and the other three animals were maintained in their home-cages. REM sleep restriction (REMSR) was accomplished by placing the animals in the modified multiple platform method for 18 h and 6 h in the home-cage, where they could sleep freely; the sleep restriction lasted 21 consecutive days, during which all animals were measured and weighed every 3 days. After the end of this period, all animals were allowed to sleep freely for 2 days, and then the behavioral tests were performed for evaluation of depressive and anxiety-like profiles (sucrose negative contrast test and elevated plus maze, EPM). Blood sampling was performed 5 min before and 30 and 60 min after the EPM for determination of corticosterone plasma levels. The adrenals were weighed and brains collected and dissected for monoamine levels and receptor protein expression. REMSR impaired the physical development of adolescents, persisting for a further week. Animals submitted to REMSR exhibited higher basal corticosterone levels and a greater anxiety index in the EPM, characteristic of an anxious profile. These animals also exhibited higher noradrenaline levels in the amygdala and ventral hippocampus, without any change in the expression of β1-adrenergic receptors, as well as higher serotonin and reduced turnover in the dorsal hippocampus, with diminished expression of 5-HT1A. Finally, greater concentration of BDNF was observed in the dorsal

  3. Background field removal technique using regularization enabled sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data with varying kernel sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Hirohito; Kasai, Harumasa; Arai, Nobuyuki; Kunitomo, Hiroshi; Hirose, Yasujiro; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-09-01

    An effective background field removal technique is desired for more accurate quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) prior to dipole inversion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of regularization enabled sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data with varying spherical kernel sizes (REV-SHARP) method using a three-dimensional head phantom and human brain data. The proposed REV-SHARP method used the spherical mean value operation and Tikhonov regularization in the deconvolution process, with varying 2-14mm kernel sizes. The kernel sizes were gradually reduced, similar to the SHARP with varying spherical kernel (VSHARP) method. We determined the relative errors and relationships between the true local field and estimated local field in REV-SHARP, VSHARP, projection onto dipole fields (PDF), and regularization enabled SHARP (RESHARP). Human experiment was also conducted using REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP. The relative errors in the numerical phantom study were 0.386, 0.448, 0.838, and 0.452 for REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP. REV-SHARP result exhibited the highest correlation between the true local field and estimated local field. The linear regression slopes were 1.005, 1.124, 0.988, and 0.536 for REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP in regions of interest on the three-dimensional head phantom. In human experiments, no obvious errors due to artifacts were present in REV-SHARP. The proposed REV-SHARP is a new method combined with variable spherical kernel size and Tikhonov regularization. This technique might make it possible to be more accurate backgroud field removal and help to achive better accuracy of QSM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of global nutrient profiling systems for restricting the commercial marketing of foods and beverages of low nutritional quality to children in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonté, Marie-Ève; Poon, Theresa; Mulligan, Christine; Bernstein, Jodi T; Franco-Arellano, Beatriz; L'Abbé, Mary R

    2017-12-01

    Background: The Canadian government recently committed to introduce legislation to restrict the commercial marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages to children. Objective: We compared the degree of strictness and agreement between nutrient profile (NP) models relevant to marketing restrictions by applying them in the Canadian context. Design: With the use of data from the University of Toronto 2013 Food Label Information Program ( n = 15,342 prepackaged foods), 4 NP models were evaluated: the Food Standards Australia New Zealand-Nutrient Profiling Scoring Criterion (FSANZ-NPSC), the WHO Regional Office for Europe (EURO) model, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) model, and a modified version of the PAHO model (Modified-PAHO), which did not consider the extent of food processing because the application of this characteristic was prone to ambiguity. The number and proportion of foods that would be eligible for marketing to children was calculated with the use of each model, overall and by food category. Results: The Modified-PAHO and PAHO models would permit only 9.8% (95% CI: 9.4%, 10.3%) and 15.8% (95% CI: 15.3%, 16.4%) of foods, respectively, followed by the EURO model [29.8% (95% CI: 29.0%, 30.5%)]. In contrast, the FSANZ-NPSC would consider almost half of prepackaged foods as eligible for marketing to children [49.0% (95% CI: 48.2%, 49.8%)]. Cross-classification analyses showed that only 8.1% of foods would be eligible based on all models (e.g., most pastas without sauce). Subanalyses showed that each model would be more stringent when evaluating food items that specifically target children on their package ( n = 747; from 1.9% of foods eligible under Modified-PAHO to 24.2% under FSANZ-NPSC). Conclusions: The degree of strictness and agreement vary greatly between NP models applicable to marketing restrictions. The discrepancies between models highlight the importance for policy makers to carefully evaluate the characteristics underlying such models

  5. Behavioral and physiological consequences of sleep restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Siobhan; Dinges, David F

    2007-08-15

    Adequate sleep is essential for general healthy functioning. This paper reviews recent research on the effects of chronic sleep restriction on neurobehavioral and physiological functioning and discusses implications for health and lifestyle. Restricting sleep below an individual's optimal time in bed (TIB) can cause a range of neurobehavioral deficits, including lapses of attention, slowed working memory, reduced cognitive throughput, depressed mood, and perseveration of thought. Neurobehavioral deficits accumulate across days of partial sleep loss to levels equivalent to those found after 1 to 3 nights of total sleep loss. Recent experiments reveal that following days of chronic restriction of sleep duration below 7 hours per night, significant daytime cognitive dysfunction accumulates to levels comparable to that found after severe acute total sleep deprivation. Additionally, individual variability in neurobehavioral responses to sleep restriction appears to be stable, suggesting a trait-like (possibly genetic) differential vulnerability or compensatory changes in the neurobiological systems involved in cognition. A causal role for reduced sleep duration in adverse health outcomes remains unclear, but laboratory studies of healthy adults subjected to sleep restriction have found adverse effects on endocrine functions, metabolic and inflammatory responses, suggesting that sleep restriction produces physiological consequences that may be unhealthy.

  6. Inter & intra-observer reliability of grading ultrasound videoclips with hand pathology in rheumatoid arthritis by using non- sophisticated internet tools (LUMINA study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, Violeta; Berghea, Florin; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Micu, Mihaela; Damjanov, Nemanja; Skakic, Vlado; Prodanovic, Slavica; Radunovic, Goran; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Nestorova, Rodina; Petranova, Tzvetanka; Kakavouli, Jasna; Porta, Francesco; Perricone, Carlo; Ciechomska, Anna; Moller, Ingrid; Varzaru, Luminita; Peric, Porin; Dejaco, Christian; Bojinca, Mihai; Fodor, Daniela; Milicescu, Mihaela; Naredo, Esperanza

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the inter- and intraobserver agreement of a group of European rheumatologist ultrasonographers in grading musculoskeletal ultrasound videoclips posted on the Internet by using a non-sophisticated electronic environment. Forty short movie clips (less than 30 secs) were made available over the Internet to all participants. Normal and pathological RA hand joints and tendons were included in the movie clips. In the first phase 30 investigators from European countries were invited to evaluate the clips and to interpret/grade them. No instruction session was held prior to the initiation of the study. For synovitis the requested scoring system included 0 to3 grades and for tenosynovitis a binary variable 0/1; separate evaluations were performed for gray scale (GS) and Power Doppler (PD) examinations. In the second phase the responders were asked to grade the same clips in a different order without having access to their first grading scale. Light's k and Cohen's k were used to analyse inter- and intraobserver reliability. Twenty two European rheumatologists agreed to finalise both study phases. Mean Cohen's κ for intraobserver reliability was 0.614/0.689 for tenosynovitis GS/PD and 0.523/0.621 for synovitis GS/PD. Light's k for interobserver reliability was 0.503 for tenosynovitis evaluation and 0.455 for global (synovitis and tenosynovitis) evaluation. Mean global overall agreement was 84.95% (90.2% for global synovitis). An over-the-net US evaluation and grading has shown moderate to good reliability. The results could be improved if a training session is added at the beginning of the study.

  7. Tunable somatosensory stimulation for selective sleep restriction studies in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Dillon M; Staggs, Kendra E; Yaghouby, Farid; Agarwal, Anuj; O'Hara, Bruce F; Donohue, Kevin D; Blalock, Eric M; Sunderam, Sridhar

    2016-08-01

    Many methods for sleep restriction in rodents have emerged, but most are intrusive, lack fine control, and induce stress. Therefore, a versatile, non-intrusive means of sleep restriction that can alter sleep in a controlled manner could be of great value in sleep research. In previous work, we proposed a novel system for closed-loop somatosensory stimulation based on mechanical vibration and applied it to the task of restricting Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep in mice [1]. While this system was effective, it was a crude prototype and did not allow precise control over the amplitude and frequency of stimulation applied to the animal. This paper details the progression of this system from a binary, "all-or-none" version to one that allows dynamic control over perturbation to accomplish graded, state-dependent sleep restriction. Its preliminary use is described in two applications: deep sleep restriction in rats, and REM sleep restriction in mice.

  8. Training Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Asja

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) are probabilistic graphical models that can also be interpreted as stochastic neural networks. Training RBMs is known to be challenging. Computing the likelihood of the model parameters or its gradient is in general computationally intensive. Thus, training re...... of the applied sampling procedure and I will introduce a transition operator that leads to faster mixing. Finally, a different parametrisation of RBMs will be discussed that leads to better learning results and more robustness against changes in the data representation....... relies on sampling based approximations of the log-likelihood gradient. I will present an empirical and theoretical analysis of the bias of these approximations and show that the approximation error can lead to a distortion of the learning process. The bias decreases with increasing mixing rate...

  9. 48 CFR 509.405-2 - Restrictions on subcontracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on subcontracting. 509.405-2 Section 509.405-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES... Ineligibility 509.405-2 Restrictions on subcontracting. The responsibilities of the agency head under FAR 9.405...

  10. 48 CFR 609.405-2 - Restrictions on subcontracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on subcontracting. 609.405-2 Section 609.405-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE....405-2 Restrictions on subcontracting. The Procurement Executive is the agency head's designee for the...

  11. 48 CFR 2009.405-2 - Restrictions on subcontracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Restrictions on subcontracting. 2009.405-2 Section 2009.405-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Ineligibility 2009.405-2 Restrictions on subcontracting. The Head of the Contracting Activity is authorized to...

  12. 48 CFR 809.405-2 - Restrictions on subcontracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on subcontracting. 809.405-2 Section 809.405-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS....405-2 Restrictions on subcontracting. When a subcontract is subject to Government consent, authority...

  13. 48 CFR 209.405-2 - Restrictions on subcontracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on subcontracting. 209.405-2 Section 209.405-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION..., and Ineligibility 209.405-2 Restrictions on subcontracting. (a) The contracting officer shall not...

  14. 48 CFR 409.405-2 - Restrictions on subcontracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on subcontracting. 409.405-2 Section 409.405-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...-2 Restrictions on subcontracting. The HCA is authorized to approve subcontracts with debarred or...

  15. 48 CFR 2509.405-2 - Restrictions on subcontracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Restrictions on subcontracting. 2509.405-2 Section 2509.405-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... Restrictions on subcontracting. The NSF Deputy Director may authorize a contracting officer to consent to a...

  16. 48 CFR 1309.405-2 - Restrictions on subcontracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on subcontracting. 1309.405-2 Section 1309.405-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE....405-2 Restrictions on subcontracting. The designee authorized to provide, in writing, compelling...

  17. 48 CFR 1403.570 - Restrictions on contractor advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on contractor advertising. 1403.570 Section 1403.570 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... 1403.570 Restrictions on contractor advertising. ...

  18. Analysis of the safety evaluation for premarketing clinical trials of hemodialyzer and of postmarketing safety reports of hemodialyzer in Japan and the US: insights into the construction of a sophisticated premarketing evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masami; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka

    2017-03-01

    Our aim was to conduct a scoping review of the regulations for hemodialyzers in the safety evaluation in Japan and the United States, and to evaluate the criteria for premarketing clinical trials and postmarketing safety reports to inform the development of a sophisticated premarketing evaluation in Japan. Regulations for approval of hemodialyzers were identified from the databases of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare in Japan and the Federal Drug Agency (FDA) in the United States (US). The criteria for premarket clinical trials and postmarketing safety reports were evaluated for both countries. Standards in Japan required evaluation of blood compatibility and reporting of acute adverse effects by a premarketing clinical trial in 6 of 86 applications with semipermeable membrane materials deemed to be different to those of previously approved devices from 1983 to 31 August 2015. By comparison, the clinical trial was required in one of 545 approvals in the US from 1976 to 29 January 2016, but blood compatibility was not the point. All postmarketing adverse effects identified in Japan were included in the set of 'warnings'. The more stringent requirements for evaluation of blood compatibility and acute adverse effects in Japan seemed to be related to differences in the history of quality management systems for medical devices between the two countries. This study revealed that there were differences between Japan and the US in requiring the premarketing clinical trials for the hemodialyzers. Our findings could be useful for constructing sophisticated premarketing safety evaluation.

  19. A Rationale for Restrictive Rules

    OpenAIRE

    Krehbiel, Keith

    1985-01-01

    Congressmen often claim to dislike restrictions on their opportunities to offer amendments to legislation in the Committee of the Whole. Yet restrictive rules of various forms not only are quite common but often are voted into existence explicitly or implicitly. Whenever a modified closed rule from the Rules Committee receives a majority vote, members explicitly accept the restrictions that such rules place on amendments. Whenever a bill is passed under suspension of the rules, the requisite ...

  20. 48 CFR 225.7003 - Restrictions on acquisition of specialty metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on acquisition of specialty metals. 225.7003 Section 225.7003 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... Restrictions on acquisition of specialty metals. ...

  1. Adiponectin Levels Are Reduced While Markers of Systemic Inflammation and Aortic Remodelling Are Increased in Intrauterine Growth Restricted Mother-Child Couple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Visentin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study. To investigate the relationships between the adipocytokine levels, markers of inflammation, and vascular remodelling in pregnancies complicated by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR. Materials and Methods. This was a retrospective study. One hundred and forty pregnant patients were enrolled. Adiponectin, leptin, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and C reactive protein (CRP were assessed in IUGR, small for gestational age (SGA, and appropriate for gestational age (AGA mother-child couples at delivery. IUGR and SGA fetuses were defined as fetuses whose estimated fetal weight (EFW was below 10th percentile for gestational age with and without umbilical artery (UA Doppler abnormalities, respectively. Fetal aorta intima media thickness (aIMT was evaluated by ultrasound in the same fetal groups. Data were analyzed by R (version 2.15.2. Results. There were 37 IUGR mother-child couples, 33 SGA, and 70 AGA. Leptin, TNFα, IL-6, and CRP serum levels were higher in IUGR pregnant patients (P<0.05. Adiponectin levels were significantly reduced in IUGR fetuses compared to SGA and AGA, while leptin, TNFα, and IL-6 levels were higher in IUGR group (P≤0.05. Fetal aIMT was significantly higher in IUGR (P<0.05 and in this group there was a negative correlation between aIMT and adiponectin/leptin ratio (A/L ratio (P<0.05 and between adiponectin and IL-6 levels (P<0.05. Conclusions. In conclusion, compared to SGA and AGA, IUGR fetuses had reduced circulating levels of adiponectin and elevated measures of aIMT and several inflammatory markers. Moreover, adiponectin levels were negatively correlated with aIMT in IUGR fetuses suggesting a possible causal link between reduced adiponectin and vessel remodelling.

  2. Adiponectin levels are reduced while markers of systemic inflammation and aortic remodelling are increased in intrauterine growth restricted mother-child couple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visentin, Silvia; Lapolla, Annunziata; Londero, Ambrogio Pietro; Cosma, Chiara; Dalfrà, Mariagrazia; Camerin, Martina; Faggian, Diego; Plebani, Mario; Cosmi, Erich

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the relationships between the adipocytokine levels, markers of inflammation, and vascular remodelling in pregnancies complicated by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). This was a retrospective study. One hundred and forty pregnant patients were enrolled. Adiponectin, leptin, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and C reactive protein (CRP) were assessed in IUGR, small for gestational age (SGA), and appropriate for gestational age (AGA) mother-child couples at delivery. IUGR and SGA fetuses were defined as fetuses whose estimated fetal weight (EFW) was below 10th percentile for gestational age with and without umbilical artery (UA) Doppler abnormalities, respectively. Fetal aorta intima media thickness (aIMT) was evaluated by ultrasound in the same fetal groups. Data were analyzed by R (version 2.15.2). There were 37 IUGR mother-child couples, 33 SGA, and 70 AGA. Leptin, TNFα, IL-6, and CRP serum levels were higher in IUGR pregnant patients (P < 0.05). Adiponectin levels were significantly reduced in IUGR fetuses compared to SGA and AGA, while leptin, TNFα, and IL-6 levels were higher in IUGR group (P ≤ 0.05). Fetal aIMT was significantly higher in IUGR (P < 0.05) and in this group there was a negative correlation between aIMT and adiponectin/leptin ratio (A/L ratio) (P < 0.05) and between adiponectin and IL-6 levels (P < 0.05). In conclusion, compared to SGA and AGA, IUGR fetuses had reduced circulating levels of adiponectin and elevated measures of aIMT and several inflammatory markers. Moreover, adiponectin levels were negatively correlated with aIMT in IUGR fetuses suggesting a possible causal link between reduced adiponectin and vessel remodelling.

  3. The relation between exposure to sophisticated and complex language and early-adolescent English-only and language minority learners' vocabulary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez, Perla B; Lesaux, Nonie K

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between teachers' (N = 22) use of sophisticated and complex language in urban middle-school classrooms and their students' (mean age at pretest = 11.51 years; N = 782; 568 language minority and 247 English only) vocabulary knowledge. Using videotaped classroom observations, teachers' speech was transcribed and coded for their total amount of talk, vocabulary usage, and syntactic complexity. Students' vocabulary skills were assessed at the beginning and end of the school year. Results showed variation in students' vocabulary skills and teachers' language use. Hierarchical linear modeling techniques revealed that after controlling for classroom and school composition and students' beginning-of-the-year scores, students' end-of-the-year vocabulary skills were positively related to teachers' use of sophisticated vocabulary and complex syntax, but not teachers' total amount of talk. © 2012 The Authors. Child Development © 2012 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  4. Removal of a frameshift between the hsdM and hsdS genes of the EcoKI Type IA DNA restriction and modification system produces a new type of system and links the different families of Type I systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gareth A; Chen, Kai; Cooper, Laurie P; White, John H; Blakely, Garry W; Dryden, David T F

    2012-11-01

    The EcoKI DNA methyltransferase is a trimeric protein comprised of two modification subunits (M) and one sequence specificity subunit (S). This enzyme forms the core of the EcoKI restriction/modification (RM) enzyme. The 3' end of the gene encoding the M subunit overlaps by 1 nt the start of the gene for the S subunit. Translation from the two different open reading frames is translationally coupled. Mutagenesis to remove the frameshift and fuse the two subunits together produces a functional RM enzyme in vivo with the same properties as the natural EcoKI system. The fusion protein can be purified and forms an active restriction enzyme upon addition of restriction subunits and of additional M subunit. The Type I RM systems are grouped into families, IA to IE, defined by complementation, hybridization and sequence similarity. The fusion protein forms an evolutionary intermediate form lying between the Type IA family of RM enzymes and the Type IB family of RM enzymes which have the frameshift located at a different part of the gene sequence.

  5. Existence of Resonance Stability of Triangular Equilibrium Points in Circular Case of the Planar Elliptical Restricted Three-Body Problem under the Oblate and Radiating Primaries around the Binary System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Narayan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the existence of resonance stability of the triangular equilibrium points of the planar elliptical restricted three-body problem when both the primaries are oblate spheroid as well as the source of radiation under the particular case, when e=0. We have derived Hamiltonian function describing the motion of infinitesimal mass in the neighborhood of the triangular equilibrium solutions taken as a convergent series. Hamiltonian function for the system has been derived and also expanded in powers of the generalized components of momenta. We have used canonical transformation to make the Hamiltonian function independent of true anomaly. The most interesting and distinguishable results of this study are establishing the relation for determining the range of stability at and near the resonance ω2=1/2 around the binary system.

  6. Start and the restriction point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Amy; Skotheim, Jan M

    2013-12-01

    Commitment to division requires that cells sense, interpret, and respond appropriately to multiple signals. In most eukaryotes, cells commit to division in G1 before DNA replication. Beyond a point, known as Start in yeast and the restriction point in mammals, cells will proceed through the cell cycle despite changes in upstream signals. In metazoans, misregulated G1 control can lead to developmental problems or disease, so it is important to understand how cells decipher the myriad external and internal signals that contribute to the fundamental all-or-none decision to divide. Extensive study of G1 control in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian culture systems has revealed highly similar networks regulating commitment. However, protein sequences of functional orthologs often indicate a total lack of conservation suggesting significant evolution of G1 control. Here, we review recent studies defining the conserved and diverged features of G1 control and highlight systems-level aspects that may be common to other biological regulatory networks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 7 CFR 1726.17 - Restrictions on lobbying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restrictions on lobbying. 1726.17 Section 1726.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC SYSTEM CONSTRUCTION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES General § 1726.17 Restrictions on lobbying...

  8. 33 CFR 105.260 - Security measures for restricted areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Using security personnel, automatic intrusion detection devices, surveillance equipment, or surveillance... surrounding restricted areas, by the use of patrols or automatic intrusion detection devices; (3) Reducing the... systems; and (7) Protect cargo and vessel stores from tampering. (b) Designation of Restricted Areas. The...

  9. 49 CFR 236.60 - Switch shunting circuit; use restricted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Switch shunting circuit; use restricted. 236.60 Section 236.60 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Instructions: All Systems Track Circuits § 236.60 Switch shunting circuit; use restricted. Switch shunting...

  10. Restricted feedback control of one-dimensional maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kevin; Christini, David J.

    2001-04-01

    Dynamical control of biological systems is often restricted by the practical constraint of unidirectional parameter perturbations. We show that such a restriction introduces surprising complexity to the stability of one-dimensional map systems and can actually improve controllability. We present experimental cardiac control results that support these analyses. Finally, we develop new control algorithms that exploit the structure of the restricted-control stability zones to automatically adapt the control feedback parameter and thereby achieve improved robustness to noise and drifting system parameters.

  11. In silico analysis of evolutionary patterns in restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tiratha Raj; Pardasani, Kamal Raj

    2009-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases represent one of the best studied examples of DNA binding proteins. Type II restriction endonucleases recognize short sequences of foreign DNA and cleave the target on both strands with remarkable sequence specificity. Type II restriction endonucleases are part of restriction modification systems. Restriction modification systems occur ubiquitously among bacteria and archaea. Restriction endonucleases are indispensable tools in molecular biology and biotechnology. They are important model system for specific protein-nucleic acid interactions and also serve as good example for investigating structural, functional and evolutionary relationships among various biomolecules. The interaction between restriction endonucleases and their recognition sequences plays a crucial role in biochemical activities like catalytic site/metal binding, DNA repair and recombination etc. We study various patterns in restriction endonucleases type II and analyzed their structural, functional and evolutionary role. Our studies support X-ray crystallographic studies, arguing for divergence and molecular evolution. Conservation patterns of the nuclease superfamily have also been analyzed by estimating site-specific evolutionary rates for the analyzed structures related to respective chains in this study.

  12. Solitary restriction endonucleases in prokaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershova, Anna S; Karyagina, Anna S; Vasiliev, Mikhail O; Lyashchuk, Alexander M; Lunin, Vladimir G; Spirin, Sergey A; Alexeevski, Andrei V

    2012-11-01

    Prokaryotic restriction-modification (R-M) systems defend the host cell from the invasion of a foreign DNA. They comprise two enzymatic activities: specific DNA cleavage activity and DNA methylation activity preventing cleavage. Typically, these activities are provided by two separate enzymes: a DNA methyltransferase (MTase) and a restriction endonuclease (RE). In the absence of a corresponding MTase, an RE of Type II R-M system is highly toxic for the cell. Genes of the R-M system are linked in the genome in the vast majority of annotated cases. There are only a few reported cases in which the genes of MTase and RE from one R-M system are not linked. Nevertheless, a few hundreds solitary RE genes are present in the Restriction Enzyme Database (http://rebase.neb.com) annotations. Using the comparative genomic approach, we analysed 272 solitary RE genes. For 57 solitary RE genes we predicted corresponding MTase genes located distantly in a genome. Of the 272 solitary RE genes, 99 are likely to be fragments of RE genes. Various explanations for the existence of the remaining 116 solitary RE genes are also discussed.

  13. Placental Adaptations in Growth Restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Regnault, Timothy R.H.; Barker, Paige L.; Botting, Kimberley J.; McMillen, Isabella C.; McMillan, Christine M.; Roberts, Claire T.; Morrison, Janna L.

    2015-01-01

    The placenta is the primary interface between the fetus and mother and plays an important role in maintaining fetal development and growth by facilitating the transfer of substrates and participating in modulating the maternal immune response to prevent immunological rejection of the conceptus. The major substrates required for fetal growth include oxygen, glucose, amino acids and fatty acids, and their transport processes depend on morphological characteristics of the placenta, such as placental size, morphology, blood flow and vascularity. Other factors including insulin-like growth factors, apoptosis, autophagy and glucocorticoid exposure also affect placental growth and substrate transport capacity. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is often a consequence of insufficiency, and is associated with a high incidence of perinatal morbidity and mortality, as well as increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in later life. Several different experimental methods have been used to induce placental insufficiency and IUGR in animal models and a range of factors that regulate placental growth and substrate transport capacity have been demonstrated. While no model system completely recapitulates human IUGR, these animal models allow us to carefully dissect cellular and molecular mechanisms to improve our understanding and facilitate development of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25580812

  14. Placental Adaptations in Growth Restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The placenta is the primary interface between the fetus and mother and plays an important role in maintaining fetal development and growth by facilitating the transfer of substrates and participating in modulating the maternal immune response to prevent immunological rejection of the conceptus. The major substrates required for fetal growth include oxygen, glucose, amino acids and fatty acids, and their transport processes depend on morphological characteristics of the placenta, such as placental size, morphology, blood flow and vascularity. Other factors including insulin-like growth factors, apoptosis, autophagy and glucocorticoid exposure also affect placental growth and substrate transport capacity. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR is often a consequence of insufficiency, and is associated with a high incidence of perinatal morbidity and mortality, as well as increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in later life. Several different experimental methods have been used to induce placental insufficiency and IUGR in animal models and a range of factors that regulate placental growth and substrate transport capacity have been demonstrated. While no model system completely recapitulates human IUGR, these animal models allow us to carefully dissect cellular and molecular mechanisms to improve our understanding and facilitate development of therapeutic interventions.

  15. Tools for the analysis of technical and economical impacts due to budgetary restrictions in investments plans of high voltage systems; Ferramenta para analise dos impactos tecnicos e economicos por restricoes orcamentarias em planos de investimentos de sistemas de alta tensao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Josinaldo; Freire, Kleber [Universidade de Salvador (UNIFACS), BA (Brazil)]. E-mails: josinaldo@luar.nlink.com.br; kfreire@unifacs.br; Antunes, Alden; Kagan, Henrique; Guaraldo, Joao [Daimon Interplan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: alden@daimoninterplan.com.br; henkagan@uol.com.br; guaraldo@daimoninterplan.com.br; Kagan, Nelson [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica]. E-mail: nelsonk@pea.usp.br; Silveira, Cristiano [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Centro de Estudos em Regulacao e Qualidade de Energia (ENERQ)]. E-mail: cristiano@pea.usp.br

    2006-07-01

    This article deals with a computational module conceived to make possible the treatment of the problem of cut of workman ships in the segment of high-voltage distribution, motivated for budgetary restrictions. For this computational module it is possible, from a set of workmanship candidates, to effect the evaluation of the respective operational performance of the current system of the insertion of workmanship (considering adequate models of power flow and high-voltage trustworthiness of nets), respective economic valuation and posterior prioritization (for in such a way, using based appropriate techniques of optimization in genetic algorithms), respecting it considered budgetary availability. In this context, the developed computational module aims at to guide the planner in the task to discard workmanship, searching to minimize the corresponding technician-economic impact. (author)

  16. Capacity problem in the power network. Transmission System Operator Tennet restricted by regulations; Capaciteitsprobleem op het net. Netbeheerder TenneT gevangen in regelgeving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Schoonhoven, M. [Norton Rose, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-09-15

    TenneT, the Dutch Transmission System Operator (TSO) has control of the national electricity transport grid. Beside the legal tasks, they also have the obligation of connecting parties to the transport grid and to transport electricity upon their request, all of which within the system of the Electricity Act. Due to the numerous construction plans for production capacity this is not an easy task, however. Question from the Dutch Lower House have even resulted in a study by the Dutch Office of Energy Regulation (DTe) on possibilities for improving current connection regulations. [mk]. [Dutch] TenneT heeft als de Nederlandse 'Transmission System Operator' (TSO) het beheer over het landelijk elektriciteitstransportnet. Dit omvat naast de bekende wettelijke taken ook de verplichting om binnen het systeem van de Elektriciteitswet partijen op het transportnet aan te sluiten en op hun verzoek elektriciteit te transporteren. Vanwege de talrijke bouwplannen voor productievermogen is dit echter niet eenvoudig. Vragen uit de Tweede Kamer hebben er zelfs toe geleid om de Dienst uitvoering en toezicht elektriciteitswet (DTe) een onderzoek te laten starten naar mogelijke verbetering van de huidige aansluitregels.

  17. Short communication: Use of a portable, automated, open-circuit gas quantification system and the sulfur hexafluoride tracer technique for measuring enteric methane emissions in Holstein cows fed ad libitum or restricted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorich, C D; Varner, R K; Pereira, A B D; Martineau, R; Soder, K J; Brito, A F

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to measure enteric CH4 emissions using a new portable automated open-circuit gas quantification system (GQS) and the sulfur hexafluoride tracer technique (SF6) in midlactation Holstein cows housed in a tiestall barn. Sixteen cows averaging 176 ± 34 d in milk, 40.7 ± 6.1 kg of milk yield, and 685 ± 49 kg of body weight were randomly assigned to 1 out of 2 treatments according to a crossover design. Treatments were (1) ad libitum (adjusted daily to yield 10% orts) and (2) restricted feed intake [set to restrict feed by 10% of baseline dry matter intake (DMI)]. Each experimental period lasted 22d, with 14 d for treatment adaptation and 8d for data and sample collection. A common diet was fed to the cows as a total mixed ration and contained 40.4% corn silage, 11.2% grass-legume haylage, and 48.4% concentrate on a dry matter basis. Spot 5-min measurements using the GQS were taken twice daily with a 12-h interval between sampling and sampling times advanced 2h daily to account for diurnal variation in CH4 emissions. Canisters for the SF6 method were sampled twice daily before milking with 4 local background gas canisters inside the barn analyzed for background gas concentrations. Enteric CH4 emissions were not affected by treatments and averaged 472 and 458 g/d (standard error of the mean = 18 g/d) for ad libitum and restricted intake treatments, respectively (data not shown). The GQS appears to be a reliable method because of the relatively low coefficients of variation (ranging from 14.1 to 22.4%) for CH4 emissions and a moderate relationship (coefficient of determination = 0.42) between CH4 emissions and DMI. The SF6 resulted in large coefficients of variation (ranging from 16.0 to 111%) for CH4 emissions and a poor relationship (coefficient of determination = 0.17) between CH4 emissions and DMI, likely because of limited barn ventilation and high background gas concentration. Research with improved barn ventilation systems or

  18. Rapid, Efficient and Versatile Strategies for Functionally Sophisticated Polymers and Nanoparticles: Degradable Polyphosphoesters and Anisotropic Distribution of Chemical Functionalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiyi

    The overall emphasis of this dissertation research included two kinds of asymmetrically-functionalized nanoparticles with anisotropic distributions of chemical functionalities, three degradable polymers synthesized by organocatalyzed ring-opening polymerizations, and two polyphosphoester-based nanoparticle systems for various biomedical applications. Inspired by the many hierarchical assembly processes that afford complex materials in Nature, the construction of asymmetrically-functionalized nanoparticles with efficient surface chemistries and the directional organization of those building blocks into complex structures have attracted much attention. The first method generated a Janus-faced polymer nanoparticle that presented two orthogonally click-reactive surface chemistries, thiol and azido. This robust method involved reactive functional group transfer by templating against gold nanoparticle substrates. The second method produced nanoparticles with sandwich-like distribution of crown ether functionalities through a stepwise self-assembly process that utilized crown ether-ammonium supramolecular interactions to mediate inter-particle association and the local intra-particle phase separation of unlike hydrophobic polymers. With the goal to improve the efficiency of the production of degradable polymers with tunable chemical and physical properties, a new type of reactive polyphosphoester was synthesized bearing alkynyl groups by an organocatalyzed ring-opening polymerization, the chemical availability of the alkyne groups was investigated by employing "click" type azide-alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition and thiol-yne radical-mediated reactions. Based on this alkyne-functionalized polyphosphoester polymer and its two available "click" type reactions, two degradable nanoparticle systems were developed. To develop the first system, the well defined poly(ethylene oxide)-block-polyphosphester diblock copolymer was transformed into a multifunctional Paclitaxel drug

  19. Leukocyte-derived IFN-α/β and epithelial IFN-λ constitute a compartmentalized mucosal defense system that restricts enteric virus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanel Mahlakõiv

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial cells are a major port of entry for many viruses, but the molecular networks which protect barrier surfaces against viral infections are incompletely understood. Viral infections induce simultaneous production of type I (IFN-α/β and type III (IFN-λ interferons. All nucleated cells are believed to respond to IFN-α/β, whereas IFN-λ responses are largely confined to epithelial cells. We observed that intestinal epithelial cells, unlike hematopoietic cells of this organ, express only very low levels of functional IFN-α/β receptors. Accordingly, after oral infection of IFN-α/β receptor-deficient mice, human reovirus type 3 specifically infected cells in the lamina propria but, strikingly, did not productively replicate in gut epithelial cells. By contrast, reovirus replicated almost exclusively in gut epithelial cells of IFN-λ receptor-deficient mice, suggesting that the gut mucosa is equipped with a compartmentalized IFN system in which epithelial cells mainly respond to IFN-λ that they produce after viral infection, whereas other cells of the gut mostly rely on IFN-α/β for antiviral defense. In suckling mice with IFN-λ receptor deficiency, reovirus replicated in the gut epithelium and additionally infected epithelial cells lining the bile ducts, indicating that infants may use IFN-λ for the control of virus infections in various epithelia-rich tissues. Thus, IFN-λ should be regarded as an autonomous virus defense system of the gut mucosa and other epithelial barriers that may have evolved to avoid unnecessarily frequent triggering of the IFN-α/β system which would induce exacerbated inflammation.

  20. Leukocyte-derived IFN-α/β and epithelial IFN-λ constitute a compartmentalized mucosal defense system that restricts enteric virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlakõiv, Tanel; Hernandez, Pedro; Gronke, Konrad; Diefenbach, Andreas; Staeheli, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Epithelial cells are a major port of entry for many viruses, but the molecular networks which protect barrier surfaces against viral infections are incompletely understood. Viral infections induce simultaneous production of type I (IFN-α/β) and type III (IFN-λ) interferons. All nucleated cells are believed to respond to IFN-α/β, whereas IFN-λ responses are largely confined to epithelial cells. We observed that intestinal epithelial cells, unlike hematopoietic cells of this organ, express only very low levels of functional IFN-α/β receptors. Accordingly, after oral infection of IFN-α/β receptor-deficient mice, human reovirus type 3 specifically infected cells in the lamina propria but, strikingly, did not productively replicate in gut epithelial cells. By contrast, reovirus replicated almost exclusively in gut epithelial cells of IFN-λ receptor-deficient mice, suggesting that the gut mucosa is equipped with a compartmentalized IFN system in which epithelial cells mainly respond to IFN-λ that they produce after viral infection, whereas other cells of the gut mostly rely on IFN-α/β for antiviral defense. In suckling mice with IFN-λ receptor deficiency, reovirus replicated in the gut epithelium and additionally infected epithelial cells lining the bile ducts, indicating that infants may use IFN-λ for the control of virus infections in various epithelia-rich tissues. Thus, IFN-λ should be regarded as an autonomous virus defense system of the gut mucosa and other epithelial barriers that may have evolved to avoid unnecessarily frequent triggering of the IFN-α/β system which would induce exacerbated inflammation.

  1. How Harmful are Adaptation Restrictions

    OpenAIRE

    Bruin, de, H.A.R.; Dellink, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    The dominant assumption in economic models of climate policy remains that adaptation will be implemented in an optimal manner. There are, however, several reasons why optimal levels of adaptation may not be attainable. This paper investigates the effects of suboptimal levels of adaptation, i.e. adaptation restrictions, on the composition and level of climate change costs and on welfare. Several adaptation restrictions are identified and then simulated in a revised DICE model, extended with ad...

  2. 49 CFR 236.512 - Cab signal indication when locomotive enters block where restrictive conditions obtain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... where restrictive conditions obtain. 236.512 Section 236.512 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES... Systems Standards § 236.512 Cab signal indication when locomotive enters block where restrictive...

  3. 14 CFR 1203.305 - Restricted data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Classification Principles and Considerations § 1203.305 Restricted data. Restricted Data or Formerly Restricted...” published by the Department of Energy. ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: familial restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Familial restrictive cardiomyopathy Familial restrictive cardiomyopathy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Familial restrictive cardiomyopathy is a genetic form of heart disease. For ...

  5. General Purpose Data-Driven System Monitoring for Space Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Modern space propulsion and exploration system designs are becoming increasingly sophisticated and complex. Determining the health state of these systems using...

  6. Plato's patricide in the sophist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deretić Irina J.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the author attempts to elucidate validity of Plato's criticism of Parmenides' simplified monistic ontology, as well as his concept of non-being. In contrast to Parmenides, Plato introduces a more complex ontology of the megista gene and redefines Parmenides' concept of non-being as something absolutely different from being. According to Plato, not all things are in the same sense, i. e. they have the different ontological status. Additionally, he redefines Parmenides' concept of absolute non-being as 'difference' or 'otherness.' .

  7. Sophisticated Jammers and Adaptive Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    KM» PUBLIC ftn c.« DISTRIBUTION UNUlffl« »••ANw-ztt.in Sea inairwetrene an Reverse It. Security Claa » (Ttus »apart! Unclassified N. Security... Claa « rrn.a Race) Unr.l ar.s1f led It. No at 2 ^jtf»»-5 / CJ OTTrOetAl roena) tTt (4-771 (formerly N1IS-SM Oepartment a« Cetnmerte

  8. Restrictive Cardiomyopathy in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Miao Lin

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Restrictive cardiomyopathy in young children is rare and carries a poor prognosis. We report an 18-month-old girl with poor feeding and abdominal distension. Except for hepatomegaly, no other gastrointestinal abnormalities were found. She had normalsized ventricles but biatrial enlargement. Echocardiography demonstrated normal systolic but impaired diastolic function. Cardiac catheterization revealed a characteristic dip-and-plateau configuration of the right ventricular pressure tracing. The diagnosis turned out to be typical restrictive cardiomyopathy. The patient was maintained on aspirin while awaiting cardiac transplant.

  9. Advanced Restricted Area Entry Control System (Araecs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Table 19. Technology Readiness Level Maturity Assessment 2. Biometric Modalities a. Iris Recognition (1) Overview. The Iris is the colored part of an...data derived from measurement of a part of a person’s anatomy. Examples of physiological biometrics include fingerprint, hand, face, iris and retina. A... biometrics that can be used with a smart identification card include: fingerprint, hand geometry, facial recognition, iris and retina scan, and voice and

  10. maintainability of manpower system with restricted recruitment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JERRY

    led to other important results. KEY WORDS: Manpower structure, Maintainability, Factors of flow, Markov model Probability. INTRODUCTION. Maintainability is an aspect ... What is common in the above types of statistical manpower control is that only one factor of flow is controlled. ..... Journal of Mathematical Sciences, Vol.

  11. Type I restriction enzymes and their relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loenen, Wil A M; Dryden, David T F; Raleigh, Elisabeth A; Wilson, Geoffrey G

    2014-01-01

    Type I restriction enzymes (REases) are large pentameric proteins with separate restriction (R), methylation (M) and DNA sequence-recognition (S) subunits. They were the first REases to be discovered and purified, but unlike the enormously useful Type II REases, they have yet to find a place in the enzymatic toolbox of molecular biologists. Type I enzymes have been difficult to characterize, but this is changing as genome analysis reveals their genes, and methylome analysis reveals their recognition sequences. Several Type I REases have been studied in detail and what has been learned about them invites greater attention. In this article, we discuss aspects of the biochemistry, biology and regulation of Type I REases, and of the mechanisms that bacteriophages and plasmids have evolved to evade them. Type I REases have a remarkable ability to change sequence specificity by domain shuffling and rearrangements. We summarize the classic experiments and observations that led to this discovery, and we discuss how this ability depends on the modular organizations of the enzymes and of their S subunits. Finally, we describe examples of Type II restriction-modification systems that have features in common with Type I enzymes, with emphasis on the varied Type IIG enzymes.

  12. REBASE--enzymes and genes for DNA restriction and modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Richard J; Vincze, Tamas; Posfai, Janos; Macelis, Dana

    2007-01-01

    REBASE is a comprehensive database of information about restriction enzymes, DNA methyltransferases and related proteins involved in the biological process of restriction-modification. It contains fully referenced information about recognition and cleavage sites, isoschizomers, neoschizomers, commercial availability, methylation sensitivity, crystal and sequence data. Experimentally characterized homing endonucleases are also included. All newly sequenced genomes are analyzed for the presence of putative restriction systems and these data are included within the REBASE. The contents or REBASE may be browsed from the web (http://rebase.neb.com/rebase/rebase.ftp.html) and selected compilations can be downloaded by ftp (ftp.neb.com). Additionally, monthly updates can be requested via email.

  13. Restriction genes for retroviruses influence the risk of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Hansen, Bettina; Nissen, Kari K

    2013-01-01

    known for a long time. Today human restriction genes for retroviruses include amongst others TRIMs, APOBEC3s, BST2 and TREXs. We have therefore looked for a role of these retroviral restriction genes in MS using genetic epidemiology. We here report that markers in two TRIMs, TRIM5 and TRIM22......We recently described that the autoimmune, central nervous system disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), is genetically associated with the human endogenous retroviral locus, HERV-Fc1, in Scandinavians. A number of dominant human genes encoding factors that restrict retrovirus replication have been...

  14. Processing Games with Restricted Capacities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meertens, M.; Borm, P.E.M.; Reijnierse, J.H.; Quant, M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyzes processing problems and related cooperative games.In a processing problem there is a finite set of jobs, each requiring a specific amount of effort to be completed, whose costs depend linearly on their completion times.There are no restrictions whatsoever on the processing

  15. Space-restricted attribute grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Erik Meineche

    1980-01-01

    Restricting the size of attribute values, relative to the length of the string under consideration, leads to a model of attribute grammars in which grammars with both inherited and synthesized attributes can be significantly more economical than grammars with synthesized attributes only....

  16. Engineered calcium-precipitable restriction enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Josephina; Read, Timothy; Lalonde, Jean-Francois; Jensen, Phillip K; Heymann, William; Lovelace, Elijah; Zimmermann, Sarah A; Brasino, Michael; Rokicki, Joseph; Dowell, Robin D

    2014-12-19

    We have developed a simple system for tagging and purifying proteins. Recent experiments have demonstrated that RTX (Repeat in Toxin) motifs from the adenylate cyclase toxin gene (CyaA) of B. pertussis undergo a conformational change upon binding calcium, resulting in precipitation of fused proteins and making this method a viable alternative for bioseparation. We have designed an iGEM Biobrick comprised of an RTX tag that can be easily fused to any protein of interest. In this paper, we detail the process of creating an RTX tagged version of the restriction enzyme EcoRI and describe a method for expression and purification of the functional enzyme.

  17. Combined moderate and high intensity exercise with dietary restriction improves cardiac autonomic function associated with a reduction in central and systemic arterial stiffness in obese adults: a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective The present study aimed to assess the effects of exercise with dietary restriction on cardiac autonomic activity, arterial stiffness, and cardiovascular biomarkers in obese individuals. Methods Seventeen obese adults completed an 8-week exercise and dietary program. Anthropometry, body composition, and multiple biochemical markers were measured. We used carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, central blood pressure, and augmentation index (AIx to assess arterial stiffness. To determine cardiac autonomic activity, heart rate variability (HRV was analyzed by standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN, square root of the mean squared differences of successive normal-to-normal intervals (RMSSD, total power (TF, low-frequency power in normalized units (LFnu, high-frequency power in normalized units (HFnu, and low-frequency power/high-frequency power (LF/HF. Results Following the exercise and diet intervention, obese subjects had significant reductions in body weight, body mass index, body fat percentage, brachial systolic blood pressure, and resting heart rate, and they had shown improvements in blood chemistry markers such as lipid profiles, insulin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. There was a significant reduction in both cfPWV and baPWV following the intervention when compared to baseline levels. Moreover, the AIx and aortic systolic blood pressure were significantly reduced after the intervention. The diet and exercise intervention significantly increased cardiac autonomic modulation (determined by improved SDNN, RMSSD, TP LF, HF, and LF/HF, which was partly due to changes in heart rate, insulin resistance, and the inflammatory pattern. Furthermore, we observed a correlation between enhanced cardiac autonomic modulation (LF/HF and decreased arterial stiffness, as measured by central cfPWV and systemic baPWV. Discussion An 8-week combined intervention of diet and

  18. Evolutionary conflicts between viruses and restriction factors shape immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Nisha K; Emerman, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Host restriction factors are potent, widely expressed intracellular blocks to viral replication that are an important component of the innate immune response to viral infection. However, viruses have evolved mechanisms that antagonize restriction factors. Through evolutionary pressure for both host survival and virus replication, an evolutionary 'arms race' has developed that drives continuous rounds of selection for beneficial mutations in the genes encoding restriction factors and their viral antagonists. Because viruses can evolve faster than their hosts, the innate immune system of modern-day vertebrates is for the most part optimized to defend against ancient viruses, rather than newer viral threats. Thus, the evolutionary history of restriction factors might, in part, explain why humans are susceptible or resistant to the viruses present in the modern world.

  19. Acessibilidade de pessoas com deficiência ou restrição permanente de mobilidade ao SUS Accessibility for people with disabilities or permanent mobility restrictions to the Unified Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Louise Juvêncio dos Santos Amaral

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar a acessibilidade de pessoas com deficiência e restrição de mobilidade permanente ao SUS em João Pessoa (PB. Trata-se de estudo descritivo de campo, composto por amostra aleatória de 523 pessoas com deficiência ou restrição permanente de mobilidade. A coleta de dados ocorreu no período de agosto de 2007 à dezembro de 2008 e consistiu de entrevistas domiciliares. As funções neuromusculoesqueléticas e relacionadas ao movimento foram as mais prejudicadas (52%, havendo maior acometimento das estruturas corporais relacionadas ao movimento (44,2% e as do Sistema Nervoso (39,2%, com destaque para o elevado número de casos (14% decorrentes de sequela de Acidente Vascular Cerebral (AVC. Entre os entrevistados, 63,9% afirmam que de suas residências aos locais onde recebiam atendimento à Saúde não haviam meios suficientes e apropriados para diminuir os obstáculos físicos e 41,7% que não existiam adaptações nos locais de atendimento. A legislação brasileira garante direitos às pessoas com deficiência que não foram amplamente respeitados. São necessárias ações que previnam o desenvolvimento de deficiências, em especial aquelas decorrentes de sequelas de AVC.The scope of this study was to monitor the access of persons with disabilities and permanent mobility restrictions to the Unified Health System in João Pessoa, State of Pernambuco. This is a descriptive field study, consisting of a random sample of 523 people with disabilities or permanent mobility restrictions. Data collection occurred between August 2007 and December 2008 and consisted of home interviews. The neuromusculoskeletal functions and those related to movement (52% were among the most affected body functions, with a higher incidence among body structures related to movement (44.2% and those of the nervous system (39.2%, with special emphasis on the high number of cases (14% due to the sequelae from strokes. Among the respondents, 63

  20. Selection of restriction endonucleases using artificial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Roberts, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    We describe in this article an in vitro system for the selection of restriction endonucleases using artificial cells. The artificial cells are generated in the form of a water-in-oil emulsion by in vitro compartmentalization. Each aqueous compartment contains a reconstituted transcription/translation mix along with the dispersed DNA templates. In the compartments containing endonuclease genes, an endonuclease expressed in vitro cleaves its own DNA template adjacent to the gene, leaving a sticky end. The pooled DNA templates are then ligated to an adaptor with a compatible end. The endonuclease genes are then enriched by adaptor-specific PCR on the ligation mix. We demonstrate that the system can achieve at least 100-fold enrichment in a single round of selection. It is sensitive enough to enrich an active endonuclease gene from a 1:10(5) model library in 2-3 rounds of selection. Finally, we describe experiments where we selected endonuclease genes directly from a bacterial genomic DNA source in three rounds of selections: the known PstI gene from Providencia stuartii and the new TspMI gene from Thermus sp. manalii. This method provides a unique tool for cloning restriction endonuclease genes and has many other potential applications.

  1. BARHL1 homeogene, the human ortholog of the mouse Barhl1 involved in cerebellum development, shows regional and cellular specificities in restricted domains of developing human central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Carmela; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Delabar, Jean-Maurice; Rachidi, Mohammed

    2006-01-06

    The mouse homeobox gene Barhl1 plays a central role in cerebellum development and its expression is activated by the transcription factor Math1 which is involved in bone morphogenetic protein response pathways. We studied the human ortholog BARHL1 and we found that human, mouse, monkey, rat, and zebrafish orthologs were highly conserved and are members of the BarH homeogene family, containing Drosophila BarH1 and BarH2. The N-terminus of BARHL1 protein presents two FIL domains and an acidic domain rich in serine/threonine and proline, while the C-terminus contains a canonical proline-rich domain. Secondary structure analysis showed that outside the three helixes of the homeodomain, BARHL1 protein has essentially random coil structure. We isolated BARHL1 and defined its expression pattern in human embryonic and fetal central nervous system (CNS) and compared it to the mouse Barhl1 transcription. BARHL1 mRNA was found exclusively in the CNS restricted to p1-p4 prosomeres of the diencephalon, to the dorsal cells of the mesencephalon, to the dorsal dl1 sensory neurons of the spinal cord, and to the rhombic lips yielding the cerebellar anlage. Detailed analysis of BARHL1 expression in fetal cerebellar cell layers using our new optic microscopy technology showed BARHL1 expression in external and internal granular cells and also in mouse adult granular cells, in agreement to Barhl1 null mouse phenotype affecting the differentiation and migration of granular cells. These findings indicate that the regional and cellular specificities of BARHL1 transcriptional control well correspond to the mouse Barhl1 transcription and suggest a potential role of this gene in the differentiation of BARHL1-expressing neuronal progenitors involved in the pattern formation of human cerebral and cerebellar structures.

  2. Structures of storage-induced transformation products of the beer's bitter principles, revealed by sophisticated NMR spectroscopic and LC-MS techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intelmann, Daniel; Kummerlöwe, Grit; Haseleu, Gesa; Desmer, Nina; Schulze, Kerstin; Fröhlich, Roland; Frank, Oliver; Luy, Burkhard; Hofmann, Thomas

    2009-12-07

    Besides undesirable changes in the attractive aroma, a significant decrease in the intensity of the bitterness as well as a change of the taste into a lingering, harsh bitterness has long been known as a shelf-life limiting factor of beer. Multiple studies have demonstrated that the aging of beer induces a decrease of the total amount of cis- and trans-iso-alpha-acids, the well-known bitter principles of beer. Although the trans-iso-alpha-acids exclusively, not the cis-iso-alpha-acids, were found to be degraded upon storage of beer, the key transformation products formed exclusively from the trans isomers in beer are not known. In the present study, suitable model experiments followed by LC-MS/MS and sophisticated NMR spectroscopic experiments, including the measurement of residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) in gel-based alignment media as well as a novel broadband and B(1)-field-compensated incredible natural abundance double-quantum transfer experiment (INADEQUATE) pulse sequence, enabled the identification of a series of previously unknown trans-specific iso-alpha-acid transformation products, namely, tricyclocohumol, tricyclocohumene, isotricyclocohumene, tetracyclocohumol, and epitetracyclocohumol, respectively. HPLC-MS/MS analysis of these compounds, which exhibit the aforementioned harsh lingering bitter taste and have threshold concentrations ranging from 5 to 70 micromol L(-1), confirmed their generation during aging of beer and, for the first time, explained the storage-induced changes of the beer's bitter taste on a molecular level.

  3. PEMBATASAN HAK KASASI DAN KONSEKUENSI HUKUM BAGI PENCARI KEADILAN DALAM SISTEM PERADILAN TATA USAHA NEGARA DI INDONESIA / The Restriction of Cassation Right and the Consequence for Justice Seeker in Indonesian Administrative Justice System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Budi Susilo

    2016-07-01

    There were appeal legal effort, cassation and judicial review on Administrative Court. After the Supreme Court Act article 45A paragraph (2 letter c was applied, it was determined that not all administrative settlement dispute can be filled to cassation legal effort. The setting restriction poses legal problems to justice seekers. This article aims to study the solution of cassation rights setting restrictions so that it can be mutual for administrative justice seekers. Based on the analysis that has been done it can be concluded that the regulation on Supreme Court Act article 45A paragraph (2 letter c Act number 5 2014 was not clear in procedures and substantive. Thus the setting restriction in cassation legal effort has to consider the aspect of quality and cases type.

  4. Intrauterine growth restriction - part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Shastri, Sweta; Farahbakhsh, Nazanin; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-12-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a major and silent cause of various morbidity and mortality for the fetal and neonatal population. It is defined as a rate of fetal growth that is less than normal for the growth potential of that specific infant. The terms IUGR and small for gestational age (SGA) are often used interchangeably, although there exists subtle differences between the two. IUGR/SGA is an end result of various etiologies that includes maternal, placental and fetal factors and recently added genetic factors too, also contribute to IUGR. In this review article we will cover the antenatal aspect of IUGR and management with proven preventive intervention.

  5. Problem-Solving Test: Restriction Endonuclease Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    The term "restriction endonuclease mapping" covers a number of related techniques used to identify specific restriction enzyme recognition sites on small DNA molecules. A method for restriction endonuclease mapping of a 1,000-basepair (bp)-long DNA molecule is described in the fictitious experiment of this test. The most important fact needed to…

  6. Restriction Enzyme Mapping: A Simple Student Practical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Stephen J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    An experiment that uses the recombinant plasmid pX1108 to illustrate restriction mapping is described. The experiment involves three restriction enzymes and employs single and double restriction enzyme digestions. A list of needed materials, procedures, safety precautions, results, and discussion are included. (KR)

  7. Restrictive Imputation of Incomplete Survey Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323348793

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on finding plausible imputations when there is some restriction posed on the imputation model. In these restrictive situations, current imputation methodology does not lead to satisfactory imputations. The restrictions, and the resulting missing data problems are real-life

  8. 50 CFR 648.23 - Gear restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... gear, on the top of the regulated portion of a trawl net that results in an effective mesh opening of... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 648.23 Section 648.23... Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.23 Gear restrictions. (a) Mesh restrictions and exemptions...

  9. Restricting Gang Clothing in the Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, N. Denise

    1993-01-01

    Examines whether schools can or should restrict gang clothing and how to restrict gang clothing without infringing on students' constitutional rights. Concludes that a policy that stresses the importance of reducing distractions that inhibit learning is more likely to be found legal than a policy restricting gang communication via limitations on…

  10. Restrictive management of neonatal polycythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morag, Iris; Strauss, Tzipora; Lubin, Daniel; Schushan-Eisen, Irit; Kenet, Gili; Kuint, Jacob

    2011-10-01

    Partial exchange transfusion (PET) is traditionally suggested as treatment for neonates diagnosed with polycythemia. Nevertheless, justification of this treatment is controversial. We evaluated the risk for short-term complications associated with a restrictive treatment protocol for neonatal polycythemia. A retrospective cross-sectional analytical study was conducted. Three treatment groups were defined and managed according to their degree of polycythemia, defined by capillary tube filled with venous blood and manually centrifuged hematocrit: group 1, hematocrit 65 to 69% and no special treatment was recommended; group 2, hematocrit 70 to 75% and intravenous fluids were given and feedings were withheld until hematocrit decreased to polycythemia. The overall rate of short-term complications was 15% (28 neonates). Seizures, proven necrotizing enterocolitis, or thrombosis did not occur in any participating neonates. PET was performed in 31 (16%) neonates. The groups did not differ in their rate of early neonatal morbidities or length of hospitalization. Restrictive treatment for neonatal asymptomatic polycythemia is not associated with an increased risk of short-term complications. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  11. The other face of restriction: modification-dependent enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loenen, Wil A M; Raleigh, Elisabeth A

    2014-01-01

    The 1952 observation of host-induced non-hereditary variation in bacteriophages by Salvador Luria and Mary Human led to the discovery in the 1960s of modifying enzymes that glucosylate hydroxymethylcytosine in T-even phages and of genes encoding corresponding host activities that restrict non-glucosylated phage DNA: rglA and rglB (restricts glucoseless phage). In the 1980's, appreciation of the biological scope of these activities was dramatically expanded with the demonstration that plant and animal DNA was also sensitive to restriction in cloning experiments. The rgl genes were renamed mcrA and mcrBC (modified cytosine restriction). The new class of modification-dependent restriction enzymes was named Type IV, as distinct from the familiar modification-blocked Types I-III. A third Escherichia coli enzyme, mrr (modified DNA rejection and restriction) recognizes both methylcytosine and methyladenine. In recent years, the universe of modification-dependent enzymes has expanded greatly. Technical advances allow use of Type IV enzymes to study epigenetic mechanisms in mammals and plants. Type IV enzymes recognize modified DNA with low sequence selectivity and have emerged many times independently during evolution. Here, we review biochemical and structural data on these proteins, the resurgent interest in Type IV enzymes as tools for epigenetic research and the evolutionary pressures on these systems.

  12. Cell-Free and In Vivo Characterization of Lux, Las, and Rpa Quorum Activation Systems in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halleran, Andrew D; Murray, Richard M

    2017-11-28

    Synthetic biologists have turned toward quorum systems as a path for building sophisticated microbial consortia that exhibit group decision making. Currently, however, even the most complex consortium circuits rely on only one or two quorum sensing systems, greatly restricting the available design space. High-throughput characterization of available quorum sensing systems is useful for finding compatible sets of systems that are suitable for a defined circuit architecture. Recently, cell-free systems have gained popularity as a test-bed for rapid prototyping of genetic circuitry. We take advantage of the transcription-translation cell-free system to characterize three commonly used Lux-type quorum activators, Lux, Las, and Rpa. We then compare the cell-free characterization to results obtained in vivo. We find significant genetic crosstalk in both the Las and Rpa systems and substantial signal crosstalk in Lux activation. We show that cell-free characterization predicts crosstalk observed in vivo.

  13. Restricted Interval Guelph permeameter: Theory and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifeld, Barry M.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2000-02-01

    A constant head permeameter system has been developed for use in small-diameter boreholes with any orientation. It is based upon the original Guelph permeameter concept of using a Mariotte siphon reservoir to control the applied head. The new tool, called a Restricted Interval Guelph (RIG) permeameter uses either a single pneumatic packer or straddle packer to restrict the area through which water is allowed to flow so that the borehole wetted area is independent of the applied head. The RIG permeameter has been used at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in the nonwelded rhyolitic Paintbrush Tuff. Analysis of the acquired data is based upon saturated-unsaturated flow theory that relies upon the quasi-linear approximation to estimate field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (K fs) and the α parameter (sorptive number) of the exponential relative hydraulic conductivity-pressure head relationship. These results are compared with a numerical model based upon the solution of the Richards equation using a van Genuchten capillary pressure-saturation formulation. The numerical model incorporates laboratory capillary pressure versus saturation functions measured from cores taken from nearby boreholes. Comparison between the analytical and numerical approaches shows that the simple analytic model is valid for analyzing the data collected. Sensitivity analysis performed with the numerical model shows that the RIG permeameter is an effective tool for estimating permeability and sorptive number for the nonwelded Paintbrush Tuff.

  14. Communication restriction in adults who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amanda; Van Dulm, Ondene; Robb, Michael P; Ormond, Tika

    2015-07-01

    This study explored communication restriction in adults with stuttering (AWS) by means of typical language measures obtained using the Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts - New Zealand (SALT-NZ) software, as well as systemic functional linguistics (SFL) analyses. The areas of language productivity and complexity, modality (i.e. linguistic politeness) and the language of appraisal were compared between AWS and typically fluent speakers (adults with no stuttering (AWNS)). Ten-minute conversational samples were obtained from 20 AWS and 20 age- and sex-matched AWNS. Transcripts were analysed for quantity and complexity of verbal output, and frequency of use of modality and appraisal resource subtypes. Means comparison and correlation analyses were conducted using grouped data. AWS produced less language and less complex language than AWNS, measured by SALT-NZ and SFL indices. AWS also differed from AWNS in their use of modality resources to express politeness - they produced fewer modal operators and more comment adjuncts than AWNS. A smaller proportion of their language expressed the explicit appreciation of things. The linguistic patterns identified in the conversational language of AWS suggested a reduced openness to interpersonal engagement within communication exchanges, which may restrict opportunities for and the experience of such exchanges. The value of SFL to this area of research is discussed.

  15. Stillbirth and fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Radek

    2010-09-01

    The association between stillbirth and fetal growth restriction is strong and supported by a large body of evidence and clinically employed for the stillbirth prediction. However, although assessment of fetal growth is a basis of clinical practice, it is not trivial. Essentially, fetal growth is a result of the genetic growth potential of the fetus and placental function. The growth potential is the driving force of fetal growth, whereas the placenta as the sole source of nutrients and oxygen might become the rate limiting element of fetal growth if its function is impaired. Thus, placental dysfunction may prevent the fetus from reaching its full genetically determined growth potential. In this sense fetal growth and its aberration provides an insight into placental function. Fetal growth is a proxy for the test of the effectiveness of placenta, whose function is otherwise obscured during pregnancy.

  16. 48 CFR 1852.227-19 - Commercial computer software-Restricted rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Provisions and Clauses 1852.227-19 Commercial computer software—Restricted rights. (a) As prescribed in 1827... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Commercial computer software-Restricted rights. 1852.227-19 Section 1852.227-19 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL...

  17. 48 CFR 225.7015 - Restriction on overseas architect-engineer services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restriction on overseas architect-engineer services. 225.7015 Section 225.7015 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on overseas architect-engineer services. For restriction on award of architect-engineer contracts to...

  18. 48 CFR 3025.7002 - Restrictions on clothing, fabrics, and related items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on clothing, fabrics, and related items. 3025.7002 Section 3025.7002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT... ACQUISITION 3025.7002 Restrictions on clothing, fabrics, and related items. ...

  19. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of restricted Boltzmann machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Domingos S. P.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we analyze the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of a class of neural networks known as restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) in the context of unsupervised learning. We show how the network is described as a discrete Markov process and how the detailed balance condition and the Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium distribution are sufficient conditions for a complete thermodynamics description, including nonequilibrium fluctuation theorems. Numerical simulations in a fully trained RBM are performed and the heat exchange fluctuation theorem is verified with excellent agreement to the theory. We observe how the contrastive divergence functional, mostly used in unsupervised learning of RBMs, is closely related to nonequilibrium thermodynamic quantities. We also use the framework to interpret the estimation of the partition function of RBMs with the annealed importance sampling method from a thermodynamics standpoint. Finally, we argue that unsupervised learning of RBMs is equivalent to a work protocol in a system driven by the laws of thermodynamics in the absence of labeled data.

  20. Migration policy: from restriction to regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z

    1996-12-01

    This article describes the extent of rural-urban migration, the flows by province in 1992, and social policies relating to migration in China. Population movements followed several patterns: increased flows from rural-urban areas during 1945-66, reversed flows back to rural areas during the Cultural Revolution of 1966-77, and relaxed controls during 1978-87 and increased rural-urban migration. Migration policy began on a strict household registration system. Restrictions were eased to allow for regulation and allocation of surplus rural workers. Rapid industrial development helped China recover from the war. Peak movements were in 1958 during the "Great Leap Forward." An estimated 19 million rural workers were recruited during 1958-60. Supply of labor exceeded needs, and urban governments reversed this strategy in 1961. During the 1960s, the household registration system was strictly enforced. Urban population declined during 1965-76. Youth were required to reeducate themselves in farming areas. During 1978-87, China's central leadership established the household land-contract responsibility system and grain production increased. Limits on arable land resulted in surplus labor. In the mid-1980s, policy focused on nonagricultural wage labor in local factories. After 1988, the government encouraged development of cities and towns and village enterprises under the socialist market economy. It is likely that now the labor market rather than the household registration system will control the size, direction, and selectivity of migration.

  1. Calorie Restriction, Stem Cells, and Rejuvenation Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufiqurrachman Nasihun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aging may be defined as the time-dependent deterioration in function of an organism associated with or responsible for the increase in susceptibility to disease and probability of death with advancing age (Harman, 1981; Cefalu, 2011. Generally, the aging organisms are characterized by both biochemical and functional declines. Declining of basal metabolism rates, protein turnover, glucose tolerance, reproductive capacity, telomere shortening, and oxidative phosphorylation are related to the biochemical. Whilst, lung expansion volume, renal glomerular and tubular capacities, cardiovascular performance, musculoskeletal system, nerve conduction velocity, endocrine and exocrine systems, immunological defenses, and sensory systems are associated with the physiological declining (Baynes and Dominiczak, 2015. Some evidences indicated that, although members of a species develop into adults in the same way, even genetically similar or identical individuals, raised in identical conditions and eating identical food, but they may age differently (Baynes and Dominiczak, 2015. These aging differences are attributable to the life style particularly calorie and dietary restriction intakes, reactive oxygen species (ROS production, and thus its implication on severity of damage, repair capacity, and error accumulation in cellular genetic material (Baynes and Dominiczak, 2015; Mihaylova et al., 2014; Mazzoccoli et al., 2014. Therefore, in molecular terms, aging can be defined as a decline of the homeostatic mechanisms that ensure the function of cells, tissues, and organs systems (Mazzoccoli et al., 2014. Accordingly, if the homeostatic mechanism can be repaired, the result is rejuvenation.

  2. PECULIARITIES OF METHODOLOGICAL PROCESS OF FORMING RESTRICTIONS IN LAND USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tretyak A.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the practice of regulation of land relations certain requirements to formation of land use restrictions and encumbrances of land rights are formed. Their systematization process will improve the regulation of the legal regime of land use as legal provisions form the essence of the land use restrictions and encumbrances of land rights and should be considered in their formation. As land use regime with restrictions in land use and other natural resources is interconnected, it is proposed restrictions to use spatial organization as a basic classification criteria. Spatial organization is formed by environmental management structure upon which different functional types and forms of land use, with the general trends in the exploitation of natural resources, land use and protection are integrated. The article states that the restriction of land use are divided into physical and administrative. Physical limitations – a bottleneck that do not enhance the efficiency of land- and environmental management system. However, the administrative limitations are stereotypes and beliefs that cannot be questioned, combining 80 to 95% of all restrictions. It is noted that there are several types of limitations, which include: restrictions of the available potential, restrictions due to public interest, execution time limit and market limitations (balance between supply and demand. Under the subtype of land use is meant the basic direction of use of land and other natural resources. Type of land use – a set of land use subtypes that have a similar intensity of use of land and other natural resources, improving the environment. It is therefore proposed to allocate two groups of natural resource use: a resource-consuming (which modifies or destroys and b resource-saving (which saves [2]. The first group includes the following land use types: background type, multicentral and central, and the second – disperse (saving. At the regional and territorial land

  3. Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia Predicts Restricted Repetitive Behavior Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condy, Emma E.; Scarpa, Angela; Friedman, Bruce H.

    2017-01-01

    In addition to social communication deficits, restricted repetitive behaviors (RRBs) are a key diagnostic feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in ASD has been posited as a mechanism of RRBs; however, most studies investigating ANS activity in ASD have focused on its relation to social…

  4. Microvascular Imaging of Thick Placenta with Fetal Growth Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Toshiyuki; Kanenishi, Kenji; Yamamoto, Kenta; AboEllail, Mohamed Ahmed Mostafa; Mashima, Masato; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2017-08-18

    Seven normal pregnancies at 11-34 weeks and three cases of a thick placenta with fetal growth restriction (FGR) at 19, 31, and 33 weeks were studied to assess placental vascularity using two-dimensional (2D)/three-dimensional (3D)-SMI (Aplio 800 or i900, Toshiba Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Emergent Majorana Fermions and their Restricted Clifford Algebra

    OpenAIRE

    Jackiw, R.

    2014-01-01

    Dedicated to Ludwig Faddeev on his 80th birthday. Ludwig exemplifies perfectly a mathematical physicist: significant contribution to mathematics (algebraic properties of integrable systems) and physics (quantum field theory). In this note I present an exercise which bridges mathematics (restricted Clifford algebra) to physics (Majorana fermions).

  6. Partial Purification and Characterization of Restriction Endonuclease from Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    to 0.2 M while complete inactivation was seen at 0.4 M NaCl. Similar inhibitory effects were observed with Bsp obtained from Bacillus sphaericus as...Koncz, C., Kiss, A. and Venetainer, P. (1978). Biochemical characterization of restriction modification system of Bacillus sphaericus . Eur. J. Biochem. 89

  7. Assessing restrictiveness of national alcohol marketing policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Marissa B; Jernigan, David H

    2014-01-01

    To develop an approach for monitoring national alcohol marketing policies globally, an area of the World Health Organization's (WHO) Global Alcohol Strategy. Data on restrictiveness of alcohol marketing policies came from the 2002 and 2008 WHO Global Surveys on Alcohol and Health. We included four scales in a sensitivity analysis to determine optimal weights to score countries on their marketing policies and applied the selected scale to assess national marketing policy restrictiveness. Nearly, 36% of countries had no marketing restrictions. The overall restrictiveness levels were not significantly different between 2002 and 2008. The number of countries with strict marketing regulations did not differ across years. This method of monitoring alcohol marketing restrictiveness helps track progress towards implementing WHO'S Global Alcohol Strategy. Findings indicate a consistent lack of restrictive policies over time, making this a priority area for national and global action. © The Author 2014. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  8. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Singh Gulati, G., E-mail: gulatigurpreet@rediffmail.com [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Seth, S. [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Sharma, S. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India)

    2012-02-15

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  9. Measuring Regulatory Restrictions in Logistics Services

    OpenAIRE

    Claire HOLLWEG; Marn-Heong WONG

    2009-01-01

    This study measures the extent of restrictions on trade in logistics services in the ASEAN+6 economies by constructing a logistics regulatory restrictiveness index for each economy that quantifies the extent of government regulations faced by logistics service providers. This is the first study of its kind to construct a regulatory index of the entire logistics sector, which includes the main modes of international transport and customs restrictions. The indices show that large differences ex...

  10. Geometric Quantization and Epistemically Restricted Theories: The Continuous Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Contreras

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is possible to reproduce the quantum features of quantum states, starting from a classical statistical theory and then limiting the amount of knowledge that an agent can have about an individual system [5, 18].These are so called epistemic restrictions. Such restrictions have been recently formulated in terms of the symplectic geometry of the corresponding classical theory [19]. The purpose of this note is to describe, using this symplectic framework, how to obtain a C*-algebraic formulation for the epistemically restricted theories. In the case of continuous variables, following the groupoid quantization recipe of E. Hawkins, we obtain a twisted group C*-algebra which is the usual Moyal quantization of a Poisson vector space [12].

  11. Restriction genes for retroviruses influence the risk of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn A Nexø

    Full Text Available We recently described that the autoimmune, central nervous system disease, multiple sclerosis (MS, is genetically associated with the human endogenous retroviral locus, HERV-Fc1, in Scandinavians. A number of dominant human genes encoding factors that restrict retrovirus replication have been known for a long time. Today human restriction genes for retroviruses include amongst others TRIMs, APOBEC3s, BST2 and TREXs. We have therefore looked for a role of these retroviral restriction genes in MS using genetic epidemiology. We here report that markers in two TRIMs, TRIM5 and TRIM22 and a marker in BST2, associated statistically with the risk of getting MS, while markers in or near APOBEC3s and TREXs showed little or no effect. This indicates that the two TRIMs and BST2 influence the risk of disease and thus supports the hypothesis of a viral involvement.

  12. How are restrictive abortion statutes associated with unintended teen birth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Mandy S; Makino, Kevin K; Stanwood, Nancy L; Dozier, Ann; Klein, Jonathan D

    2010-08-01

    Legislation that restricts abortion access decreases abortion. It is less well understood whether these statutes affect unintended birth. Given recent increases in teen pregnancy and birth, we examined the relationship between legislation that restricts abortion access and unintended births among adolescent women. Using 2000-2005 Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System data, we examined the relationship between adolescent pregnancy intention and policies affecting abortion access: mandatory waiting periods, parental involvement laws, and Medicaid funding restrictions. Logistic regression controlled for individual characteristics, state-level factors, geographic regions, and time trends. Subgroup analyses were done for racial, ethnic, and insurance groups. In our multivariate model, minors in states with mandatory waiting periods were more than two times as likely to report an unintended birth, with even higher risk among blacks, Hispanics, and teens receiving Medicaid. Medicaid funding restrictions were associated with higher rates of unwanted birth among black teens. Parental involvement laws were associated with a trend toward more unwanted births in white minors and fewer in Hispanic minors. Mandatory waiting periods are associated with higher rates of unintended birth in teens, and funding restrictions may especially affect black adolescents. Policies limiting access to abortion appear to affect the outcomes of unintended teen pregnancy. Subsequent research should clarify the magnitude of such effects, and lead to policy changes that successfully reduce unintended teen births. (c) 2010 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Restrictions on Software for Personal and Professional Use

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    A growing number of computer security incidents detected at CERN are due to additional software installed for personal and professional use. As a consequence, the smooth operation of CERN is put at risk and often many hours are lost solving the problems. To reduce this security risk, installation and/or use of software on CERN's computing and network infrastructure needs to be restricted. Therefore: Do NOT install software for personal use Do NOT install 'free' or other software unless you have the expertise to configure and maintain it securely. Please comply to these rules to keep our computer systems safe. Further explanation of these restrictions is at http://cern.ch/security/software-restrictions Restricted software, known to cause security and/or network problems (e.g. KaZaA and other P2P/Peer-to-Peer file sharing applications, Skype P2P telephony software, ICQ, VNC, ...), is listed at: http://cern.ch/security/software-restrictions/list

  14. Repeated sleep restriction in rats leads to homeostatic and allostatic responses during recovery sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, YoungSoo; Laposky, Aaron D.; Bergmann, Bernard M.; Fred W Turek

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that chronic sleep restriction can have negative consequences for brain function and peripheral physiology and can contribute to the allostatic load throughout the body. Interestingly, few studies have examined how the sleep–wake system itself responds to repeated sleep restriction. In this study, rats were subjected to a sleep-restriction protocol consisting of 20 h of sleep deprivation (SD) followed by a 4-h sleep opportunity each day for 5 consecutive days. In respo...

  15. 48 CFR 225.7007 - Restrictions on anchor and mooring chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on anchor and mooring chain. 225.7007 Section 225.7007 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... mooring chain. ...

  16. 48 CFR 225.7005 - Restriction on certain chemical weapons antidote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restriction on certain chemical weapons antidote. 225.7005 Section 225.7005 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on certain chemical weapons antidote. ...

  17. HIERARCHICAL SCALING OF MARKETING DECISION-SUPPORT SYSTEMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERENGA, B; OPHUIS, PAMO; HUIZINGH, EKR; VANCAMPEN, PAFM

    1994-01-01

    Marketing Decision Support Systems (MDSS) show a large variety in functionality and form. In this paper a scale is developed that measures the sophistication of a Marketing Decision Support System. This scale, based on Guttman's Scalogram Analysis, is hierarchical in nature: more sophisticated MDSS

  18. Restricted Interests and Teacher Presentation of Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocco, Corey S.; Thompson, Rachel H.; Rodriguez, Nicole M.

    2011-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behavior (RRB) is more pervasive, prevalent, frequent, and severe in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) than in their typical peers. One subtype of RRB is restricted interests in items or activities, which is evident in the manner in which individuals engage with items (e.g., repetitious wheel spinning),…

  19. 45 CFR 3.42 - Restricted activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restricted activities. 3.42 Section 3.42 Public... THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Facilities and Grounds § 3.42 Restricted activities... by appropriate signs. Photographs and similar activities for advertising or commercial purposes may...

  20. 50 CFR 24.11 - General restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General restrictions. 24.11 Section 24.11 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED... § 24.11 General restrictions. No person shall import, export, or reexport plants at any place other...

  1. 50 CFR 14.11 - General restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General restrictions. 14.11 Section 14.11 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING....11 General restrictions. Except as otherwise provided in this part, no person may import or export...

  2. [Anesthesia and restrictive and obstructive pulmonary diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremerich, Dorothee H; Hachenberg, Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Restrictive and obstructive pulmonary diseases are major risk factors of perioperative morbidity and mortality. The incidence of pulmonary complications may be in the range of 3 and 40% (3), depending on the underlying disease and the type of surgery. In this review the specific pathophysiology, preoperative evaluation and suitable anesthesia procedures are discussed for patients with restrictive and obstructive pulmonary diseases.

  3. 50 CFR 648.104 - Gear restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., lines, or chafing gear, on the top of the regulated portion of a trawl net; except that, one splitting... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 648.104 Section 648.104... Flounder Fisheries § 648.104 Gear restrictions. (a) General. (1) Otter trawlers whose owners are issued a...

  4. 50 CFR 648.123 - Gear restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... limited to, nets, net strengtheners, ropes, lines, or chafing gear, on the top of the regulated portion of... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 648.123 Section 648.123... § 648.123 Gear restrictions. (a) Trawl vessel gear restrictions—(1) Minimum mesh size. No owner or...

  5. Isothermal detection of RNA with restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Nakayama, Shizuka; Yitbarek, Saron; Greenfield, Isabel; Sintim, Herman O

    2011-01-07

    Herein, we demonstrate how to detect nucleic acids that do not contain restriction endonuclease recognition sites with restriction endonucleases. We show that the topology of DNA probes used in this detection strategy remarkably affects the efficiency of RNA/DNA detection.

  6. Massively parallel characterization of restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamps-Hughes, Nick; Quimby, Aine; Zhu, Zhenyu; Johnson, Eric A

    2013-06-01

    Restriction endonucleases are highly specific in recognizing the particular DNA sequence they act on. However, their activity is affected by sequence context, enzyme concentration and buffer composition. Changes in these factors may lead to either ineffective cleavage at the cognate restriction site or relaxed specificity allowing cleavage of degenerate 'star' sites. Additionally, uncharacterized restriction endonucleases and engineered variants present novel activities. Traditionally, restriction endonuclease activity is assayed on simple substrates such as plasmids and synthesized oligonucleotides. We present and use high-throughput Illumina sequencing-based strategies to assay the sequence specificity and flanking sequence preference of restriction endonucleases. The techniques use fragmented DNA from sequenced genomes to quantify restriction endonuclease cleavage on a complex genomic DNA substrate in a single reaction. By mapping millions of restriction site-flanking reads back to the Escherichia coli and Drosophila melanogaster genomes we were able to quantitatively characterize the cognate and star site activity of EcoRI and MfeI and demonstrate genome-wide decreases in star activity with engineered high-fidelity variants EcoRI-HF and MfeI-HF, as well as quantify the influence on MfeI cleavage conferred by flanking nucleotides. The methods presented are readily applicable to all type II restriction endonucleases that cleave both strands of double-stranded DNA.

  7. 48 CFR 27.404-2 - Limited rights data and restricted computer software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... restricted computer software. 27.404-2 Section 27.404-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Data and Copyrights 27.404-2 Limited rights data and restricted computer software. (a) General. The basic clause at 52...

  8. 49 CFR 236.502 - Automatic brake application, initiation by restrictive block conditions stopping distance in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... restrictive block conditions stopping distance in advance. 236.502 Section 236.502 Transportation Other... TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING THE INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR... Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.502 Automatic brake application, initiation by restrictive block...

  9. Health plan choice in the Netherlands : Restrictive health plans preferred by young and healthy individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bes, Romy E.; Curfs, Emile C.; Groenewegen, Peter P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071985409; De Jong, Judith D.

    2017-01-01

    In a health care system based on managed competition, health insurers negotiate on quality and price with care providers and are allowed to offer restrictive health plans. It is crucial that enrolees who need care choose restrictive health plans, as otherwise health insurers cannot channel patients

  10. Health plan choice in the Netherlands: restrictive health plans preferred by young and healthy individuals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bes, R.E.; Curfs, E.C.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Jong, J.D. de

    2017-01-01

    In a health care system based on managed competition, health insurers negotiate on quality and price with care providers and are allowed to offer restrictive health plans. It is crucial that enrolees who need care choose restrictive health plans, as otherwise health insurers cannot channel patients

  11. 48 CFR 14.404-4 - Restrictions on disclosure of descriptive literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of descriptive literature. 14.404-4 Section 14.404-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Contract 14.404-4 Restrictions on disclosure of descriptive literature. When a bid is accompanied by descriptive literature (as defined in 2.101), and the bidder imposes a restriction that prevents the public...

  12. 48 CFR 225.7002 - Restrictions on food, clothing, fabrics, and hand or measuring tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on food, clothing, fabrics, and hand or measuring tools. 225.7002 Section 225.7002 Federal Acquisition Regulations... 225.7002 Restrictions on food, clothing, fabrics, and hand or measuring tools. ...

  13. 48 CFR 225.7016 - Restriction on Ballistic Missile Defense research, development, test, and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Acquisition 225.7016 Restriction on Ballistic Missile Defense research, development, test, and evaluation. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restriction on Ballistic Missile Defense research, development, test, and evaluation. 225.7016 Section 225.7016 Federal Acquisition...

  14. Urban water restrictions: Attitudes and avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Bethany; Burton, Michael; Crase, Lin

    2011-12-01

    In most urban cities across Australia, water restrictions remain the dominant policy mechanism to restrict urban water consumption. The extensive adoption of water restrictions as a means to limit demand, over several years, means that Australian urban water prices have consistently not reflected the opportunity cost of water. Given the generally strong political support for water restrictions and the likelihood that they will persist for some time, there is value in understanding households' attitudes in this context. More specifically, identifying the welfare gains associated with avoiding urban water restrictions entirely would be a nontrivial contribution to our knowledge and offer insights into the benefits of alternative policy responses. This paper describes the results from a contingent valuation study that investigates consumers' willingness to pay to avoid urban water restrictions. Importantly, the research also investigates the influence of cognitive and exogenous dimensions on the utility gain associated with avoiding water restrictions. The results provide insights into the impact of the current policy mechanism on economic welfare.

  15. Gentile statistics and restricted partitions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with a power-law energy spectrum, is analogous to ps(n), that is, the number of ways of partitioning an ... of states of a pseudofermion-like system in a power-law energy spectrum. The name pseudofermion is ..... [3] G E Andrews, The theory of partitions (Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Read- ing, Mass, 1976) p. 1.

  16. A Sophisticated Architecture Is Indeed Necessary for the Implementation of Health in All Policies but not Enough Comment on "Understanding the Role of Public Administration in Implementing Action on the Social Determinants of Health and Health Inequities".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Eric

    2016-02-29

    In this commentary, I argue that beyond a sophisticated supportive architecture to facilitate implementation of actions on the social determinants of health (SDOH) and health inequities, the Health in All Policies (HiAP) project faces two main barriers: lack of awareness within policy networks on the social determinants of population health, and a tendency of health actors to neglect investing in other sectors' complex problems. © 2016 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  17. Decoding restricted participation in sequential electricity markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knaut, Andreas; Paschmann, Martin

    2017-06-15

    Restricted participation in sequential markets may cause high price volatility and welfare losses. In this paper we therefore analyze the drivers of restricted participation in the German intraday auction which is a short-term electricity market with quarter-hourly products. Applying a fundamental electricity market model with 15-minute temporal resolution, we identify the lack of sub-hourly market coupling being the most relevant driver of restricted participation. We derive a proxy for price volatility and find that full market coupling may trigger quarter-hourly price volatility to decrease by a factor close to four.

  18. Incremental Effect of the Addition of Prescriber Restrictions on a State Medicaid's Pharmacy-Only Patient Review and Restriction Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keast, Shellie L; Pham, Timothy; Teel, Ashley; Nesser, Nancy J

    2017-08-01

    Patient review and restriction programs (PRRPs), used by state Medicaid programs to limit potential abuse and misuse of opioids and related controlled medications, often restrict members to a single pharmacy for controlled medications. While most states use a restricted pharmacy access model, not all states include restricted prescriber access. Oklahoma Medicaid (MOK) added a restricted prescriber access feature to its PRRP in July 2014. To evaluate the incremental effect that the addition of a prescriber restriction to MOK's pharmacy-only PRRP had on the pharmacy and resource utilization of the enrolled members. MOK members with at least 6 months of enrollment in the pharmacy-only PRRP were restricted to a maximum of 3 prescribers for controlled substances in July 2014 and were identified as "cases." Using a propensity score method, cases were matched to controls from the MOK non-PRRP enrolled population based on demographics and baseline health care utilization. Data from January 1, 2014, through December 31, 2014, were evaluated. Each member's monthly health care resource utilization, defined in terms of medical and pharmacy costs, prescription counts, and opioid use per member per month (PMPM), was analyzed. A difference-indifferences (DID) regression estimated the change in resource utilization following the July 2014 policy change. This study included 378 controls and 126 cases after propensity matching. No differences were noted for daily morphine equivalents, benzodiazepine prescriptions, or maintenance prescriptions. There were decreases in mean PMPM use for both groups for short-acting opioid (SAO) claims (P incremental change to SAO, prescriber, and pharmacy use in the PRPP population. Use of PRRPs may be an effective tool in reducing inappropriate use of prescription opioids within payer systems. The question remains whether these changes result in long-term changes to behavior outside the payer system. Future research into the effects of PRRPs on

  19. RNA aptamer inhibitors of a restriction endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón, Estefanía; Maher, L James

    2015-09-03

    Restriction endonucleases (REases) recognize and cleave short palindromic DNA sequences, protecting bacterial cells against bacteriophage infection by attacking foreign DNA. We are interested in the potential of folded RNA to mimic DNA, a concept that might be applied to inhibition of DNA-binding proteins. As a model system, we sought RNA aptamers against the REases BamHI, PacI and KpnI using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). After 20 rounds of selection under different stringent conditions, we identified the 10 most enriched RNA aptamers for each REase. Aptamers were screened for binding and specificity, and assayed for REase inhibition. We obtained eight high-affinity (Kd ∼12-30 nM) selective competitive inhibitors (IC50 ∼20-150 nM) for KpnI. Predicted RNA secondary structures were confirmed by in-line attack assay and a 38-nt derivative of the best anti-KpnI aptamer was sufficient for inhibition. These competitive inhibitors presumably act as KpnI binding site analogs, but lack the primary consensus KpnI cleavage sequence and are not cleaved by KpnI, making their potential mode of DNA mimicry fascinating. Anti-REase RNA aptamers could have value in studies of REase mechanism and may give clues to a code for designing RNAs that competitively inhibit DNA binding proteins including transcription factors. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. The effects of dietary restriction on oxidative stress in rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael E.; Shi, Yun; Van Remmen, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is observed during aging and in numerous age-related diseases. Dietary restriction (DR) is a regimen that protects against disease and extends lifespan in multiple species. However, it is unknown how DR mediates its protective effects. One prominent and consistent effect of DR in a number of systems is the ability to reduce oxidative stress and damage. The purpose of this review is to comprehensively examine the hypothesis that dietary restriction reduces oxidative stress in rodents by decreasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and increasing antioxidant enzyme activity, leading to an overall reduction of oxidative damage to macromolecules. The literature reveals that the effects of DR on oxidative stress are complex and likely influenced by a variety of factors, including sex, species, tissue examined, types of ROS and antioxidant enzymes examined, and duration of DR. Here we present a comprehensive review of the existing literature on the effect of DR on mitochondrial ROS generation, antioxidant enzymes and oxidative damage. In a majority of studies, dietary restriction had little effect on mitochondrial ROS production or antioxidant activity. On the other hand, DR decreased oxidative damage in the majority of cases. Although the effects of DR on endogenous antioxidants are mixed, we find that glutathione levels are the most likely antioxidant to be increased by dietary restriction, which supports the emerging redox-stress hypothesis of aging. PMID:23743291

  1. Airflow-Restricting Mask Reduces Acute Performance in Resistance Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri L. Motoyama

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to compare the number of repetitions to volitional failure, the blood lactate concentration, and the perceived exertion to resistance training with and without an airflow-restricting mask. Methods: Eight participants participated in a randomized, counterbalanced, crossover study. Participants were assigned to an airflow-restricting mask group (MASK or a control group (CONT and completed five sets of chest presses and parallel squats until failure at 75% one-repetition-maximum test (1RM with 60 s of rest between sets. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPEs, blood lactate concentrations (Lac−, and total repetitions were taken after the training session. Results: MASK total repetitions were lower than those of the CONT, and (Lac− and MASK RPEs were higher than those of the CONT in both exercises. Conclusions: We conclude that an airflow-restricting mask in combination with resistance training increase perceptions of exertion and decrease muscular performance and lactate concentrations when compared to resistance training without this accessory. This evidence shows that the airflow-restricting mask may change the central nervous system and stop the exercise beforehand to prevent some biological damage.

  2. Improving computer security for authentication of users: influence of proactive password restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Robert W; Lien, Mei-Ching; Vu, Kim-Phuong L; Schultz, E Eugene; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2002-05-01

    Entering a username-password combination is a widely used procedure for identification and authentication in computer systems. However, it is a notoriously weak method, in that the passwords adopted by many users are easy to crack. In an attempt to improve security, proactive password checking may be used, in which passwords must meet several criteria to be more resistant to cracking. In two experiments, we examined the influence of proactive password restrictions on the time that it took to generate an acceptable password and to use it subsequently to long in. The required length was a minimum of five characters in Experiment 1 and eight characters in Experiment 2. In both experiments, one condition had only the length restriction, and the other had additional restrictions. The additional restrictions greatly increased the time it took to generate the password but had only a small effect on the time it took to use it subsequently to long in. For the five-character passwords, 75% were cracked when no other restrictions were imposed, and this was reduced to 33% with the additional restrictions. For the eight-character passwords, 17% were cracked with no other restrictions, and 12.5% with restrictions. The results indicate that increasing the minimum character length reduces crackability and increases security, regardless of whether additional restrictions are imposed.

  3. EGFR Activation by Spatially Restricted Ligands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goodrich, Jennifer S

    2005-01-01

    ...) activity has been associated with an increased prognosis of breast cancer. During oogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster, local EGFR activation by the spatially restricted TGF alpha-like ligand, Gurken (Grk...

  4. Epigenetic regulation of caloric restriction in aging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Yuanyuan; Daniel, Michael; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2011-01-01

    .... The aging process is frequently affected by environmental factors, and caloric restriction is by far the most effective and established environmental manipulation for extending lifespan in various animal models...

  5. Health Benefits of Fasting and Caloric Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbidi, Saeid; Daiber, Andreas; Korac, Bato; Li, Huige; Essop, M Faadiel; Laher, Ismail

    2017-10-23

    Obesity and obesity-related diseases, largely resulting from urbanization and behavioral changes, are now of global importance. Energy restriction, though, is associated with health improvements and increased longevity. We review some important mechanisms related to calorie limitation aimed at controlling of metabolic diseases, particularly diabetes. Calorie restriction triggers a complex series of intricate events, including activation of cellular stress response elements, improved autophagy, modification of apoptosis, and alteration in hormonal balance. Intermittent fasting is not only more acceptable to patients, but it also prevents some of the adverse effects of chronic calorie restriction, especially malnutrition. There are many somatic and potentially psychologic benefits of fasting or intermittent calorie restriction. However, some behavioral modifications related to abstinence of binge eating following a fasting period are crucial in maintaining the desired favorable outcomes.

  6. Restricting query relaxation through user constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaasterland, T.

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes techniques to restrict and to heuristically control relaxation of deductive database queries. The process of query relaxation provides a user with a means to automatically identify new queries that are related to the user`s original query. However, for large databases, many relaxations may be possible. The methods to control and restrict the relaxation process introduced in this paper focus the relaxation process and make it more efficient. User restrictions over the data base domain may be expressed as user constraints. This paper describes how user constraints can restrict relaxed queries. Also, a set of heuristics based on cooperative answering techniques are presented for controlling the relaxation process. Finally, the interaction of the methods for relaxing queries, processing user constraints, and applying the heuristic rules is described.

  7. Restricted Coherent Risk Measures and Actuarial Solvency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos E. Kountzakis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove a general dual representation form for restricted coherent risk measures, and we apply it to a minimization problem of the required solvency capital for an insurance company.

  8. Compensatory mechanisms activated with intermittent energy restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, Sílvia Ribeiro; Halset, Eline Holli; Gåsbakk, Sigrid

    2017-01-01

    Background & aims: Strong compensatory responses, with reduced resting metabolic rate (RMR), increased exercise efficiency (ExEff) and appetite, are activated when weight loss (WL) is achieved with continuous energy restriction (CER), which try to restore energy balance. Intermittent energy......, respectively). No between group differences were apparent for any of the outcomes. Conclusions: The technique used to achieve energy restriction, whether it is continuous or intermittent, does not appear to modulate the compensatory mechanisms activated by weight loss. Clinical Trial Registration number: NCT...

  9. Behavioral and Physiological Consequences of Sleep Restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Banks, Siobhan; Dinges, David F.

    2007-01-01

    Adequate sleep is essential for general healthy functioning. This paper reviews recent research on the effects of chronic sleep restriction on neurobehavioral and physiological functioning and discusses implications for health and lifestyle. Restricting sleep below an individual's optimal time in bed (TIB) can cause a range of neurobehavioral deficits, including lapses of attention, slowed working memory, reduced cognitive throughput, depressed mood, and perseveration of thought. Neurobehavio...

  10. Repeating patterns of sleep restriction and recovery: Do we get used to it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Norah S; Diolombi, Moussa; Scott-Sutherland, Jennifer; Yang, Huan; Bhatt, Vrushank; Gautam, Shiva; Mullington, Janet; Haack, Monika

    2016-11-01

    Despite its prevalence in modern society, little is known about the long-term impact of restricting sleep during the week and 'catching up' on weekends. This common sleep pattern was experimentally modeled with three weeks of 5 nights of sleep restricted to 4h followed by two nights of 8-h recovery sleep. In an intra-individual design, 14 healthy adults completed both the sleep restriction and an 8-h control condition, and the subjective impact and the effects on physiological markers of stress (cortisol, the inflammatory marker IL-6, glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity) were assessed. Sleep restriction was not perceived to be subjectively stressful and some degree of resilience or resistance to the effects of sleep restriction was observed in subjective domains. In contrast, physiological stress response systems remain activated with repeated exposures to sleep restriction and limited recovery opportunity. Morning IL-6 expression in monocytes was significantly increased during week 2 and 3 of sleep restriction, and remained increased after recovery sleep in week 2 (psleep restriction, with elevated morning cortisol, and decreased cortisol in the second half of the night. Glucocorticoid sensitivity of monocytes was increased, rather than decreased, during the sleep restriction and sleep recovery portion of each week. These results suggest a disrupted interplay between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and inflammatory systems in the context of repeated exposure to sleep restriction and recovery. The observed dissociation between subjective and physiological responses may help explain why many individuals continue with the behavior pattern of restricting and recovering sleep over long time periods, despite a cumulative deleterious physiological effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Type III restriction-modification enzymes: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Desirazu N; Dryden, David T F; Bheemanaik, Shivakumara

    2014-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases interact with DNA at specific sites leading to cleavage of DNA. Bacterial DNA is protected from restriction endonuclease cleavage by modifying the DNA using a DNA methyltransferase. Based on their molecular structure, sequence recognition, cleavage position and cofactor requirements, restriction-modification (R-M) systems are classified into four groups. Type III R-M enzymes need to interact with two separate unmethylated DNA sequences in inversely repeated head-to-head orientations for efficient cleavage to occur at a defined location (25-27 bp downstream of one of the recognition sites). Like the Type I R-M enzymes, Type III R-M enzymes possess a sequence-specific ATPase activity for DNA cleavage. ATP hydrolysis is required for the long-distance communication between the sites before cleavage. Different models, based on 1D diffusion and/or 3D-DNA looping, exist to explain how the long-distance interaction between the two recognition sites takes place. Type III R-M systems are found in most sequenced bacteria. Genome sequencing of many pathogenic bacteria also shows the presence of a number of phase-variable Type III R-M systems, which play a role in virulence. A growing number of these enzymes are being subjected to biochemical and genetic studies, which, when combined with ongoing structural analyses, promise to provide details for mechanisms of DNA recognition and catalysis.

  12. Immune, inflammatory and cardiovascular consequences of sleep restriction and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraut, Brice; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Vanhamme, Luc; Kerkhofs, Myriam

    2012-04-01

    In addition to its effects on cognitive function, compelling evidence links sleep loss to alterations in the neuroendocrine, immune and inflammatory systems with potential negative public-health ramifications. The evidence to suggest that shorter sleep is associated with detrimental health outcomes comes from both epidemiological and experimental sleep deprivation studies. This review will focus on the post-sleep deprivation and recovery changes in immune and inflammatory functions in well-controlled sleep restriction laboratory studies. The data obtained indicate non-specific activation of leukocyte populations and a state of low-level systemic inflammation after sleep loss. Furthermore, one night of recovery sleep does not allow full recovery of a number of these systemic immune and inflammatory markers. We will speculate on the mechanism(s) that link(s) sleep loss to these responses and to the progression of cardiovascular disease. The immune and inflammatory responses to chronic sleep restriction suggest that chronic exposure to reduced sleep (recovery sleep could have gradual deleterious effects, over years, on cardiovascular pathogenesis with a heightened risk in women and in night and shift workers. Finally, we will examine countermeasures, e.g., napping or sleep extension, which could improve the recovery processes, in terms of alertness and immune and inflammatory parameters, after sleep restriction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. BARRIER MARKET RESTRICTIONS, THEIR ECONOMIC NATURE AND CONSEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimova Ekaterina Yurievna

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Subject: indicators of modern economic growth in construction, published by the government agencies, reflect individual directions of growth. At the same time, the analysis of the reasons for the unachieved results is conducted by various researchers primarily from the standpoint of the inadequacy of economic and other resources. This article deals with the problem of ensuring the growth of construction enterprises from the viewpoint of systemic barriers, and in this regard, these barriers are defined as the subject of the present research. Research objectives: studying the concept of barrier market restrictions, their impact on the activities of construction companies. Materials and methods: statistical data in the field of housing construction, provided by the Ministry of Construction of the Russian Federation and Rosstat, is examined to solve the given tasks set. The content of state programs and activities of state institutions in the field of support and development of construction activities is considered. Based on investigations of sustainable economic development, an understanding of the constraints and incentives for development is revealed. Results: we have identified the content of barrier market restrictions, which are not possible to overcome only by involving additional economic resources in the turnover. The ways of confronting these restrictions are shown. Conclusions: it was shown that implementation of promising activities is impossible without overcoming various systemic constraints. Their structure is described in sufficient detail. Principles of economic sustainable development are proposed. It was proved that the reserve system can serve as an effective way to overcome market barriers.

  14. Health plan choice in the Netherlands: restrictive health plans preferred by young and healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bes, Romy E; Curfs, Emile C; Groenewegen, Peter P; de Jong, Judith D

    2017-07-01

    In a health care system based on managed competition, health insurers negotiate on quality and price with care providers and are allowed to offer restrictive health plans. It is crucial that enrolees who need care choose restrictive health plans, as otherwise health insurers cannot channel patients to contracted providers and they will lose their bargaining power in negotiations with providers. We aim to explain enrolees' choice of a restrictive health plan in exchange for a lower premium. In 2014 an online survey with an experimental design was conducted on members of an access panel (response 78%; n=3,417). Results showed 37.4% of respondents willing to choose a restrictive health plan in exchange for a lower premium. This fell to 22% when the restrictive health plan also included a longer travelling time. Enrolees who choose a restrictive health plan are younger and healthier, or on lower incomes, than those preferring a non-restrictive one. This means that enrolees who use care will be unlikely to choose a restrictive health plan and, therefore, health insurers will not be able to channel them to contracted care providers. This undermines the goals of the health care system based on managed competition.

  15. Dietary restriction with and without caloric restriction for healthy aging [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changhan Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction is the most effective and reproducible dietary intervention known to regulate aging and increase the healthy lifespan in various model organisms, ranging from the unicellular yeast to worms, flies, rodents, and primates. However, caloric restriction, which in most cases entails a 20–40% reduction of food consumption relative to normal intake, is a severe intervention that results in both beneficial and detrimental effects. Specific types of chronic, intermittent, or periodic dietary restrictions without chronic caloric restriction have instead the potential to provide a significant healthspan increase while minimizing adverse effects. Improved periodic or targeted dietary restriction regimens that uncouple the challenge of food deprivation from the beneficial effects will allow a safe intervention feasible for a major portion of the population. Here we focus on healthspan interventions that are not chronic or do not require calorie restriction.

  16. Restriction endonucleases: natural and directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Capalash, Neena; Sharma, Prince

    2012-05-01

    Type II restriction endonucleases (REs) are highly sequence-specific compared with other classes of nucleases. PD-(D/E)XK nucleases, initially represented by only type II REs, now comprise a large and extremely diverse superfamily of proteins and, although sharing a structurally conserved core, typically display little or no detectable sequence similarity except for the active site motifs. Sequence similarity can only be observed in methylases and few isoschizomers. As a consequence, REs are classified according to combinations of functional properties rather than on the basis of genetic relatedness. New alignment matrices and classification systems based on structural core connectivity and cleavage mechanisms have been developed to characterize new REs and related proteins. REs recognizing more than 300 distinct specificities have been identified in RE database (REBASE: http://rebase.neb.com/cgi-bin/statlist ) but still the need for newer specificities is increasing due to the advancement in molecular biology and applications. The enzymes have undergone constant evolution through structural changes in protein scaffolds which include random mutations, homologous recombinations, insertions, and deletions of coding DNA sequences but rational mutagenesis or directed evolution delivers protein variants with new functions in accordance with defined biochemical or environmental pressures. Redesigning through random mutation, addition or deletion of amino acids, methylation-based selection, synthetic molecules, combining recognition and cleavage domains from different enzymes, or combination with domains of additional functions change the cleavage specificity or substrate preference and stability. There is a growing number of patents awarded for the creation of engineered REs with new and enhanced properties.

  17. Biomolecular computers with multiple restriction enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Sakowski

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development of conventional, silicon-based computers has several limitations, including some related to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle and the von Neumann “bottleneck”. Biomolecular computers based on DNA and proteins are largely free of these disadvantages and, along with quantum computers, are reasonable alternatives to their conventional counterparts in some applications. The idea of a DNA computer proposed by Ehud Shapiro’s group at the Weizmann Institute of Science was developed using one restriction enzyme as hardware and DNA fragments (the transition molecules as software and input/output signals. This computer represented a two-state two-symbol finite automaton that was subsequently extended by using two restriction enzymes. In this paper, we propose the idea of a multistate biomolecular computer with multiple commercially available restriction enzymes as hardware. Additionally, an algorithmic method for the construction of transition molecules in the DNA computer based on the use of multiple restriction enzymes is presented. We use this method to construct multistate, biomolecular, nondeterministic finite automata with four commercially available restriction enzymes as hardware. We also describe an experimental applicaton of this theoretical model to a biomolecular finite automaton made of four endonucleases.

  18. Biomolecular computers with multiple restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakowski, Sebastian; Krasinski, Tadeusz; Waldmajer, Jacek; Sarnik, Joanna; Blasiak, Janusz; Poplawski, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    The development of conventional, silicon-based computers has several limitations, including some related to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle and the von Neumann "bottleneck". Biomolecular computers based on DNA and proteins are largely free of these disadvantages and, along with quantum computers, are reasonable alternatives to their conventional counterparts in some applications. The idea of a DNA computer proposed by Ehud Shapiro's group at the Weizmann Institute of Science was developed using one restriction enzyme as hardware and DNA fragments (the transition molecules) as software and input/output signals. This computer represented a two-state two-symbol finite automaton that was subsequently extended by using two restriction enzymes. In this paper, we propose the idea of a multistate biomolecular computer with multiple commercially available restriction enzymes as hardware. Additionally, an algorithmic method for the construction of transition molecules in the DNA computer based on the use of multiple restriction enzymes is presented. We use this method to construct multistate, biomolecular, nondeterministic finite automata with four commercially available restriction enzymes as hardware. We also describe an experimental applicaton of this theoretical model to a biomolecular finite automaton made of four endonucleases.

  19. Effect of restricted spinal motion on gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konz, Regina; Fatone, Stefania; Gard, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Spinal orthoses are common in the treatment of various conditions that affect the spine. They encompass both the spine and pelvis and thus have implications for pelvic and lower-limb motion during walking in addition to a direct effect on spinal motion. The role of the spine in walking is largely ill-defined, and the consequences of restricted spinal motion on walking have yet to be explored. This study investigated the effect of spinal restriction on gait in able-bodied persons. Gait analyses were performed on 10 able-bodied subjects as they walked at five different speeds that were distributed across their comfortable range of speeds. Data were collected during walking with and without spinal restriction by a fiberglass body jacket, which is similar to a thoracolumbosacral orthosis (TLSO). With spinal restriction, peak-to-peak (PP) pelvic obliquity and rotation were significantly reduced across all walking speeds (p TLSO use or surgical restriction of spinal motion. An awareness of these issues will enable clinicians to monitor patients for problems that may result from decreased spine and pelvic motion.

  20. Fasting or caloric restriction for healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Stephen; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-10-01

    Aging is associated with a host of biological changes that contribute to a progressive decline in cognitive and physical function, ultimately leading to a loss of independence, and increased risk of mortality. To date, prolonged caloric restriction (i.e., a reduction in caloric intake without malnutrition) is the only non-genetic intervention that has consistently been found to extend both mean and maximal life span across a variety of species. Most individuals have difficulty sustaining prolonged caloric restriction, which has led to a search for alternative approaches that can produce similar to benefits as caloric restriction. A growing body of evidence indicates that fasting periods and intermittent fasting regimens in particular can trigger similar biological pathways as caloric restriction. For this reason, there is increasing scientific interest in further exploring the biological and metabolic effects of intermittent fasting periods, as well as whether long-term compliance may be improved by this type of dietary approach. This special will highlight the latest scientific findings related to the effects of both caloric restriction and intermittent fasting across various species including yeast, fruit flies, worms, rodents, primates, and humans. A specific emphasis is placed on translational research with findings from basic bench to bedside reviewed and practical clinical implications discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Placental Nutrient Transport and Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca eGaccioli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Intrauterine growth restriction refers to the inability of the fetus to reach its genetically determined potential size. Fetal growth restriction affects approximately 5–15% of all pregnancies in the United States and Europe. In developing countries the occurrence varies widely between 10 and 55%, impacting about 30 million newborns per year. Besides having high perinatal mortality rates these infants are at greater risk for severe adverse outcomes, such as hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and cerebral palsy. Moreover, reduced fetal growth has lifelong health consequences, including higher risks of developing metabolic and cardiovascular diseases in adulthood. Numerous reports indicate placental insufficiency as one of the underlying causes leading to altered fetal growth and impaired placental capacity of delivering nutrients to the fetus has been shown to contribute to the etiology of intrauterine growth restriction. Indeed, reduced expression and/or activity of placental nutrient transporters have been demonstrated in several conditions associated with an increased risk of delivering a small or growth restricted infant. This review focuses on human pregnancies and summarizes the changes in placental amino acid, fatty acid, and glucose transport reported in conditions associated with intrauterine growth restriction, such as pre-eclampsia and young maternal age.

  2. Newer antidiabetic drugs and calorie restriction mimicry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available De-acceleration of aging and delayed development of age-related morbidity accompanies the restriction of calories (without malnutrition in laboratory mice, nematodes, yeast, fish, and dogs. Recent results from long-term longitudinal studies conducted on primates have suggested longevity benefits of a 30% restriction of calories in rhesus monkeys as well. Among calorie restricted rhesus monkeys one of the mechanisms for the improvement in lifespan was the reduction in the development of glucose intolerance and cardiovascular disease. Although there are no comparable human studies, it is likely that metabolic and longevity benefits will accompany a reduction in calories in humans as well. However, considering the difficulties in getting healthy adults to limit food intake science has focused on understanding the biochemical processes that accompany calorie restriction (CR to formulate drugs that would mimic the effects of CR without the need to actually restrict calories. Drugs in this emerging therapeutic field are called CR mimetics. Some of the currently used anti-diabetic agents may have some CR mimetic like effects. This review focuses on the CR mimetic properties of the currently available anti-diabetic agents.

  3. Accelerated Monte Carlo simulations with restricted Boltzmann machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Wang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Despite their exceptional flexibility and popularity, Monte Carlo methods often suffer from slow mixing times for challenging statistical physics problems. We present a general strategy to overcome this difficulty by adopting ideas and techniques from the machine learning community. We fit the unnormalized probability of the physical model to a feed-forward neural network and reinterpret the architecture as a restricted Boltzmann machine. Then, exploiting its feature detection ability, we utilize the restricted Boltzmann machine to propose efficient Monte Carlo updates to speed up the simulation of the original physical system. We implement these ideas for the Falicov-Kimball model and demonstrate an improved acceptance ratio and autocorrelation time near the phase transition point.

  4. Calorie Restriction in Mammals and Simple Model Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giusi Taormina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calorie restriction (CR, which usually refers to a 20–40% reduction in calorie intake, can effectively prolong lifespan preventing most age-associated diseases in several species. However, recent data from both human and nonhumans point to the ratio of macronutrients rather than the caloric intake as a major regulator of both lifespan and health-span. In addition, specific components of the diet have recently been identified as regulators of some age-associated intracellular signaling pathways in simple model systems. The comprehension of the mechanisms underpinning these findings is crucial since it may increase the beneficial effects of calorie restriction making it accessible to a broader population as well.

  5. Restrictive extraocular myopathy: A presenting feature of acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Heireman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old man presented with binocular diplopia in primary gaze for 1 year. Orthoptic evaluation showed 10-prism diopter right eye hypotropia and 6-prism diopter right eye esotropia. The elevation and abduction of the right eye were mechanically restricted. This was associated with systemic features suggestive of acromegaly. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain demonstrated a pituitary macroadenoma. An elevated serum insulin-like growth factor I level and the failure of growth hormone suppression after an oral glucose load biochemically confirmed the diagnosis of acromegaly. Computed tomography (CT of the orbit demonstrated bilateral symmetrical enlargement of the medial rectus and inferior rectus muscle bellies. All tests regarding Graves-Basedow disease were negative. Although rare, diplopia due to a restrictive extraocular myopathy could be the presenting symptom of acromegaly.

  6. Dietary Methionine Restriction: Novel Treatment for Hormone Independent Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Epner, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    .... We used Southern blot analysis with methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes, western blot analysis, and RT-PCR to determine whether methionine restriction restored expression of growth inhibitory...

  7. Home smoking restrictions and adolescent smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proescholdbell, R J; Chassin, L; MacKinnon, D P

    2000-05-01

    The prevention of adolescent smoking has focused on peer influences to the relative neglect of parental influences. Parents socialize their children about many behaviors including smoking, and parental rules about their child's smoking have been related to lower levels of adolescent smoking. Moreover, among adults, indoor smoking restrictions have been associated with decreased smoking. Accordingly, the current study tested the relation of adolescent smoking to home smoking policy (rules regulating where adults are allowed to smoke in the home). Results showed that restrictive home smoking policies were associated with lower likelihood of trying smoking for both middle and high school students. However, for high school students this relation was restricted to homes with non-smoking parents. Home smoking policies were not associated with current regular smoking for either middle or high school students. Home smoking policies may be useful in preventing adolescent smoking experimentation, although longitudinal and experimental research is necessary to confirm this hypothesis.

  8. IFITM proteins restrict viral membrane hemifusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM protein family represents a new class of cellular restriction factors that block early stages of viral replication; the underlying mechanism is currently not known. Here we provide evidence that IFITM proteins restrict membrane fusion induced by representatives of all three classes of viral membrane fusion proteins. IFITM1 profoundly suppressed syncytia formation and cell-cell fusion induced by almost all viral fusion proteins examined; IFITM2 and IFITM3 also strongly inhibited their fusion, with efficiency somewhat dependent on cell types. Furthermore, treatment of cells with IFN also markedly inhibited viral membrane fusion and entry. By using the Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus envelope and influenza A virus hemagglutinin as models for study, we showed that IFITM-mediated restriction on membrane fusion is not at the steps of receptor- and/or low pH-mediated triggering; instead, the creation of hemifusion was essentially blocked by IFITMs. Chlorpromazine (CPZ, a chemical known to promote the transition from hemifusion to full fusion, was unable to rescue the IFITM-mediated restriction on fusion. In contrast, oleic acid (OA, a lipid analog that generates negative spontaneous curvature and thereby promotes hemifusion, virtually overcame the restriction. To explore the possible effect of IFITM proteins on membrane molecular order and fluidity, we performed fluorescence labeling with Laurdan, in conjunction with two-photon laser scanning and fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM. We observed that the generalized polarizations (GPs and fluorescence lifetimes of cell membranes expressing IFITM proteins were greatly enhanced, indicating higher molecularly ordered and less fluidized membranes. Collectively, our data demonstrated that IFITM proteins suppress viral membrane fusion before the creation of hemifusion, and suggested that they may do so by reducing membrane fluidity and conferring a positive

  9. Is fluid restriction needed in heart failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Gutiérrez, Victoria; Rada, Gabriel

    2017-01-09

    Fluid restriction is usually recommended in chronic heart failure. However, the evidence base to support this is not that clear. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases, we identified five systematic reviews evaluating 11 studies addressing the question of this article, including seven randomized trials. We extracted data, combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded fluid restriction probably decreases hospital readmission in chronic heart failure and might decrease mortality, but the certainty of the evidence for the latter is low.

  10. The ctenophore genome and the evolutionary origins of neural systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moroz, Leonid L.; Kocot, Kevin M.; Citarella, Mathew R.; Dosung, Sohn; Norekian, Tigran P.; Povolotskaya, Inna S.; Grigorenko, Anastasia P.; Dailey, Christopher; Berezikov, Eugene; Buckley, Katherine M.; Ptitsyn, Andrey; Reshetov, Denis; Mukherjee, Krishanu; Moroz, Tatiana P.; Bobkova, Yelena; Yu, Fahong; Kapitonov, Vladimir V.; Jurka, Jerzy; Bobkov, Yuri V.; Swore, Joshua J.; Girardo, David O.; Fodor, Alexander; Gusev, Fedor; Sanford, Rachel; Bruders, Rebecca; Kittler, Ellen; Mills, Claudia E.; Rast, Jonathan P.; Derelle, Romain; Solovyev, Victor V.; Kondrashov, Fyodor A.; Swalla, Billie J.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Rogaev, Evgeny I.; Halanych, Kenneth M.; Kohn, Andrea B.

    2014-01-01

    The origins of neural systems remain unresolved. In contrast to other basal metazoans, ctenophores (comb jellies) have both complex nervous and mesoderm-derived muscular systems. These holoplanktonic predators also have sophisticated ciliated locomotion, behaviour and distinct development. Here we

  11. Influence of gestational salt restriction in fetal growth and in development of diseases in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuyama, Hiroe; Katoh, Minami; Wakabayashi, Honoka; Zulli, Anthony; Kruzliak, Peter; Uehara, Yoshio

    2016-01-20

    Recent studies reported the critical role of the intrauterine environment of a fetus in growth or the development of disease in adulthood. In this article we discussed the implications of salt restriction in growth of a fetus and the development of growth-related disease in adulthood. Salt restriction causes retardation of fatal growth or intrauterine death thereby leading to low birth weight or decreased birth rate. Such retardation of growth along with the upregulation of the renin angiotensin system due to salt restriction results in the underdevelopment of cardiovascular organs or decreases the number of the nephron in the kidney and is responsible for onset of hypertension in adulthood. In addition, gestational salt restriction is associated with salt craving after weaning. Moreover, salt restriction is associated with a decrease in insulin sensitivity. A series of alterations in metabolism due to salt restriction are probably mediated by the upregulation of the renin angiotensin system and an epigenetic mechanism including proinflammatory substances or histone methylation. Part of the metabolic disease in adulthood may be programmed through such epigenetic changes. The modification of gene in a fetus may be switched on through environment factors or life style after birth. The benefits of salt restriction have been assumed thus far; however, more precise investigation is required of its influence on the health of fetuses and the onset of various diseases in adulthood.

  12. Experimental Sleep Restriction Facilitates Pain and Electrically Induced Cortical Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matre, Dagfinn; Hu, Li; Viken, Leif A; Hjelle, Ingri B; Wigemyr, Monica; Knardahl, Stein; Sand, Trond; Nilsen, Kristian Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    Sleep restriction (SR) has been hypothesized to sensitize the pain system. The current study determined whether experimental sleep restriction had an effect on experimentally induced pain and pain-elicited electroencephalographic (EEG) responses. A paired crossover study. Pain testing was performed after 2 nights of 50% SR and after 2 nights with habitual sleep (HS). Laboratory experiment at research center. Self-reported healthy volunteers (n = 21, age range: 18-31 y). Brief high-density electrical stimuli to the forearm skin produced pinprick-like pain. Subjective pain ratings increased after SR, but only in response to the highest stimulus intensity (P = 0.018). SR increased the magnitude of the pain-elicited EEG response analyzed in the time-frequency domain (P = 0.021). Habituation across blocks did not differ between HS and SR. Event-related desynchronization (ERD) was reduced after SR (P = 0.039). Pressure pain threshold of the trapezius muscle region also decreased after SR (P = 0.017). Sleep restriction (SR) increased the sensitivity to pressure pain and to electrically induced pain of moderate, but not low, intensity. The increased electrical pain could not be explained by a difference in habituation. Increased response magnitude is possibly related to reduced processing within the somatosensory cortex after partial SR. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  13. Rat Neutrophil Phagocytosis Following Feed Restriction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slapničková, Martina; Berger, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2002), s. 172-177 ISSN 0938-7714 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : circulating neutrophil * diet restriction * phagocytosis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.167, year: 2001

  14. Determination of genotype differences through restriction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tyrosinase gene or C locus has long been implicated in the coat colour determination. This gene a copper-containing enzyme located on chromosome 11q14.3 is expressed in melanocytes and controls the major steps in pigment production. In camel, C locus a restriction site provoked by the T variant of the mutation was ...

  15. 12 CFR 1805.808 - Lobbying restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lobbying restrictions. 1805.808 Section 1805.808 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS PROGRAM Terms and Conditions of Assistance § 1805.808 Lobbying...

  16. 50 CFR 16.3 - General restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... INJURIOUS WILDLIFE Introduction § 16.3 General restrictions. Any importation or transportation of live... and welfare of human beings, to the interest of forestry, agriculture, and horticulture, and to the... into or the transportation of live wildlife or eggs thereof between the continental United States, the...

  17. Restrictive cardiomyopathy. Report of seven cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca Sánchez Luis Alfonso

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Restrictive cardiomyopathy is a disease characterized by ventricular diastolic failure with elevation of end-dyastolic pressure and preserved systolic function. Materials and methods: retrospective study of patients with a diagnosis of restrictive cardiomyopathy. We carry out an analysis of demographic data, clinical presentation, and studies of patients diagnosed in the last 15 years at Instituto Nacional de Pediatría. Results: all included patients had clinical data of heart failure manifested mainly by medium-sized efforts dyspnea on schoolchildren and dyspnea by feeding in infants, as well as polypnea and diaphoresis. The most important signs were hepatomegaly, ascites, and gallop rhythm. Cardiomegaly by right atrial dilatation was the most frequent radiological data. The most frequent electrocardiographic data were dilatation of both atria, ST-segment depression and negative T waves. Echocardiogram showed in all cases binaural dilation and restrictive pattern. Conclusions: our patients were similar to those described in the specialized literature. Echocardiogram is still the best study for the diagnosis and the use of functional measurements as Doppler imaging can help to reveal early diastolic failure. In our country the heart transplant is just feasible; mortality remains 100%. Keywords: Restrictive cardiomyopathy, Heart failure, Cardiomyopathy.

  18. 18 CFR 35.39 - Affiliate restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with a market-regulated power sales affiliate if the sharing could be used to the detriment of captive... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Affiliate restrictions. 35.39 Section 35.39 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION...

  19. Restricting mutualistic partners to enforce trade reliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wyatt, G.A.K.; Kiers, E.T.; Gardner, A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutualisms are cooperative interactions between members of different species, often involving the trade of resources. Here, we suggest that otherwise-cooperative mutualists might be able to gain a benefit from actively restricting their partners' ability to obtain resources directly, hampering the

  20. Activity limitations and participation restrictions experienced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cite as: Urimubenshi G. Activity limitations and participation restrictions experienced by people with stroke in Musanze district in Rwanda. Afri Health ..... analysis in nursing research: concepts, procedures and measures to achieve trustworthiness. Nurse Education To- day 2004, 24(2), 105–112. 20. Lincoln YS, Guba EA.

  1. Perceived and experienced restrictions in participation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceived and experienced restrictions in participation and autonomy among adult survivors of stroke in Ghana. ... There were significant differences in two domains between survivors who received physiotherapy and those who received traditional rehabilitation. Over half of the survivors also perceived they would ...

  2. 50 CFR 654.22 - Gear restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 654.22 Section 654.22..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STONE CRAB FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO Management Measures § 654.22 Gear... be located on the top horizontal section of the trap. If the throat is longer in one dimension, the...

  3. Restricted Liberty, Parental Choice and Homeschooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Michael S.; Karsten, Sjoerd

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the authors carefully study the problem of liberty as it applies to school choice, and whether there ought to be restricted liberty in the case of homeschooling. They examine three prominent concerns that might be brought against homeschooling, viz., that it aggravates social inequality, worsens societal conflict and works against…

  4. Restricted liberty, parental choice and homeschooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merry, M.S.; Karsten, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the authors carefully study the problem of liberty as it applies to school choice, and whether there ought to be restricted liberty in the case of homeschooling. They examine three prominent concerns that might be brought against homeschooling, viz., that it aggravates social

  5. 7 CFR 400.407 - Restricted access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restricted access. 400.407 Section 400.407 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS General Administrative Regulations; Collection and Storage of...

  6. 32 CFR 770.6 - Restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Restrictions. 770.6 Section 770.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES RULES LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Hunting and Fishing at Marine Corps Base, Quantico, Virginia § 770.6...

  7. Preventive maintenance at opportunities of restricted duration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Dekker (Rommert); E. Smeitink

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThis article deals with the problem of setting priorities for the execution of maintenance packages at randomly occurring opportunities. These opportunities are of restricted duration, implying that only a limited number of packages can be executed. The main idea proposed is to set up a

  8. Nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics of caloric restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abete, Itziar; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Marti, Amelia; Martinez, J Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a complex disease resulting from a chronic and long-term positive energy balance in which both genetic and environmental factors are involved. Weight-reduction methods are mainly focused on dietary changes and increased physical activity. However, responses to nutritional intervention programs show a wide range of interindividual variation, which is importantly influenced by genetic determinants. In this sense, subjects carrying several obesity-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) show differences in the response to calorie-restriction programs. Furthermore, there is evidence indicating that dietary components not only fuel the body but also participate in the modulation of gene expression. Thus, the expression pattern and nutritional regulation of several obesity-related genes have been studied, as well as those that are differentially expressed by caloric restriction. The responses to caloric restriction linked to the presence of SNPs in obesity-related genes are reviewed in this chapter. Also, the influence of energy restriction on gene expression pattern in different tissues is addressed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 42 CFR 2.13 - Confidentiality restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.13 Confidentiality restrictions..., administrative, or legislative proceedings conducted by any Federal, State, or local authority. Any disclosure... place where only alcohol or drug abuse diagnosis, treatment, or referral is provided may be acknowledged...

  10. Optimal Policy under Restricted Government Spending

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Welfare ranking of policy instruments is addressed in a two-sector Ramsey model with monopoly pricing in one sector as the only distortion. When government spending is restricted, i.e. when a government is unable or unwilling to finance the required costs for implementing the optimum policy...

  11. 47 CFR 64.1200 - Delivery restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... RULES RELATING TO COMMON CARRIERS Restrictions on Telemarketing, Telephone Solicitation, and Facsimile... telemarketing call prior to at least 15 seconds or four (4) rings. (6) Abandon more than three percent of all telemarketing calls that are answered live by a person, or measured over a 30-day period. A call is “abandoned...

  12. Epigenetic regulation of caloric restriction in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanisms of aging are the subject of much research and have facilitated potential interventions to delay aging and aging-related degenerative diseases in humans. The aging process is frequently affected by environmental factors, and caloric restriction is by far the most effective and established environmental manipulation for extending lifespan in various animal models. However, the precise mechanisms by which caloric restriction affects lifespan are still not clear. Epigenetic mechanisms have recently been recognized as major contributors to nutrition-related longevity and aging control. Two primary epigenetic codes, DNA methylation and histone modification, are believed to dynamically influence chromatin structure, resulting in expression changes of relevant genes. In this review, we assess the current advances in epigenetic regulation in response to caloric restriction and how this affects cellular senescence, aging and potential extension of a healthy lifespan in humans. Enhanced understanding of the important role of epigenetics in the control of the aging process through caloric restriction may lead to clinical advances in the prevention and therapy of human aging-associated diseases.

  13. Periodic Solutions for Circular Restricted -Body Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For circular restricted -body problems, we study the motion of a sufficiently small mass point (called the zero mass point in the plane of equal masses located at the vertices of a regular polygon. By using variational minimizing methods, for some , we prove the existence of the noncollision periodic solution for the zero mass point with some fixed wingding number.

  14. Restricting temptations : Neural mechanisms of precommitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crockett, M.J.; Braams, B.R.; Clark, L.; Tobler, P.N.; Robbins, T.W.; Kalenscher, T.

    2013-01-01

    Humans can resist temptations by exerting willpower, the effortful inhibition of impulses. But willpower can be disrupted by emotions and depleted over time. Luckily, humans can deploy alternative self-control strategies like precommitment, the voluntary restriction of access to temptations. Here,

  15. Legal Status of Diplomats: Duties, Restrictions, Prohibitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigran Antonovich Zanko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides analysis of such elements of the legal status of diplomats as obligations, prohibitions, restrictions and responsibility. Elements of the legal status are evaluated through the lens of comparative research and include the experience of diplomatic service legal regulation in the former Soviet Union countries as well as in other foreign countries.

  16. Sexual Arousal, Situational Restrictiveness, and Aggressive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frodi, Ann

    1977-01-01

    Eighty male college freshmen participated in an experiment designed to investigate the hypothesis that enhanced arousal will facilitate subsequent aggressive behavior and that an increase in aggressive behavior will be more likely to occur in a setting of situational permissiveness rather than situational restrictiveness. (Editor)

  17. Restrictive lung involvement in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Michele A; Eichinger, Katy J; Donlin-Smith, Colleen M; Tawil, Rabi; Statland, Jeffery M

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have evaluated the frequency or predisposing factors for respiratory involvement in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1 (FSHD1) and type 2 (FSHD2). We performed a prospective cross-sectional observational study of 61 genetically confirmed FSHD participants (53 FSHD1 and 8 FSHD2). Participants underwent bedside pulmonary function testing in sitting and supine positions, a standard clinical history and physical assessment, and manual muscle testing. Restrictive respiratory involvement was suggested in 9.8% (95% confidence interval 2.4-17.3): 7.5% FSHD1 and 25.0% FSHD2 (P = 0.17). Participants with testing suggestive of restrictive lung involvement (n = 6) were more severely affected (P = 0.005), had weaker hip flexion (P = 0.0007), and were more likely to use a wheelchair (P = 0.01). Restrictive respiratory involvement should be considered in all moderate to severely affected FSHD patients with proximal lower extremity weakness. The higher frequency of restrictive lung disease in FSHD2 seen here requires confirmation in a larger cohort of FSHD2 patients. © Published 2014 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Restrictive dermopathy - Report of 12 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smitt, JHS; van Asperen, CJ; Niessen, CM; Beemer, FA; van Essen, AJ; Hulsmans, RFHJ; Oranje, AP; Steijlen, PM; Wesby-van Swaay, E; Tamminga, P; Breslau-Siderius, EJ

    Background: This study describes 12 cases of restrictive dermopathy seen during a period of 8 years by the Dutch Task Force on Genodermatology. We present these unique consecutive cases to provide more insight into the clinical picture and pathogenesis of the disease. Observations: Clinical features

  19. Experimental Sleep Restriction Facilitates Pain and Electrically Induced Cortical Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matre, Dagfinn; Hu, Li; Viken, Leif A.; Hjelle, Ingri B.; Wigemyr, Monica; Knardahl, Stein; Sand, Trond; Nilsen, Kristian Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep restriction (SR) has been hypothesized to sensitize the pain system. The current study determined whether experimental sleep restriction had an effect on experimentally induced pain and pain-elicited electroencephalographic (EEG) responses. Design: A paired crossover study. Intervention: Pain testing was performed after 2 nights of 50% SR and after 2 nights with habitual sleep (HS). Setting: Laboratory experiment at research center. Participants: Self-reported healthy volunteers (n = 21, age range: 18–31 y). Measurements and Results: Brief high-density electrical stimuli to the forearm skin produced pinprick-like pain. Subjective pain ratings increased after SR, but only in response to the highest stimulus intensity (P = 0.018). SR increased the magnitude of the pain-elicited EEG response analyzed in the time-frequency domain (P = 0.021). Habituation across blocks did not differ between HS and SR. Event-related desynchronization (ERD) was reduced after SR (P = 0.039). Pressure pain threshold of the trapezius muscle region also decreased after SR (P = 0.017). Conclusion: Sleep restriction (SR) increased the sensitivity to pressure pain and to electrically induced pain of moderate, but not low, intensity. The increased electrical pain could not be explained by a difference in habituation. Increased response magnitude is possibly related to reduced processing within the somatosensory cortex after partial SR. Citation: Matre D, Hu L, Viken LA, Hjelle IB, Wigemyr M, Knardahl S, Sand T, Nilsen KB. Experimental sleep restriction facilitates pain and electrically induced cortical responses. SLEEP 2015;38(10):1607–1617. PMID:26194577

  20. 7 CFR 322.28 - General requirements; restricted articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General requirements; restricted articles. 322.28... EQUIPMENT Importation and Transit of Restricted Articles § 322.28 General requirements; restricted articles. (a) The following articles from any region are restricted articles: (1) Dead bees of any genus; (2...

  1. 7 CFR 319.75-2 - Restricted articles. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restricted articles. 1 319.75-2 Section 319.75-2... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Khapra Beetle § 319.75-2 Restricted articles. 1 1 The importation of restricted articles may be subject to prohibitions or restrictions under...

  2. Repeating patterns of sleep restriction and recovery: Do we get used to it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Norah S.; Diolombi, Moussa; Scott-Sutherland, Jennifer; Yang, Huan; Bhatt, Vrushank; Gautam, Shiva; Mullington, Janet; Haack, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Despite its prevalence in modern society, little is known about the long-term impact of restricting sleep during the week and ‘catching up’ on weekends. This common sleep pattern was experimentally modeled with three weeks of 5 nights of sleep restricted to 4 hours followed by two nights of 8-hour recovery sleep. In an intra-individual design, 14 healthy adults completed both the sleep deprivation and an 8-hour control condition, and the subjective impact and the effects on physiological markers of stress (cortisol, the inflammatory marker IL-6, glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity) were assessed. Sleep restriction was not perceived to be subjectively stressful and some degree of resilience or resistance to the effects of sleep restriction was observed in subjective domains. In contrast, physiological stress response systems remain activated with repeated exposures to sleep loss and limited recovery opportunity. Morning IL-6 expression in monocytes was significantly increased during week 2 and 3 of sleep restriction, and remained increased after recovery sleep in week 2 (psleep restriction, with elevated morning cortisol, and decreased cortisol in the second half of the night. Glucocorticoid sensitivity of monocytes was increased, rather than decreased, during the sleep restriction and sleep recovery portion of each week. These results suggest a disrupted interplay between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and inflammatory systems in the context of repeated exposure to sleep restriction and recovery. The observed dissociation between subjective and physiological responses may help explain why many individuals continue with the behavior pattern of restricting and recovering sleep over long time periods, despite a cumulative deleterious physiological effect. PMID:27263430

  3. Sophistic Synthesis in JFK Assassination Rhetoric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Roger

    The rhetoric surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy offers a unique testing ground for theories about the construction of knowledge in society. One dilemma, however, is the lack of academic theorizing about the assassination. The Kennedy assassination has been left almost exclusively in the hands of "nonhistorians," i.e.,…

  4. Online purchases in an Infocomm sophisticated society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goby, Valerie Priscilla

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents a preliminary investigation of attitude and intention in relation to online shopping in Singapore. Singaporeans display high levels of Infocomm proficiency, the result of many intense government initiatives to transform the country into an Intelligent Community. Does this Internet embracing environment enhance attitude and intention to online shopping? This study considers the links between personal consequences, subjective norms, behavioral control, and personal innovativeness with attitude and intention among Singaporeans. It uses a model based on the Theory of Planned Behavior and makes some initial comparisons of its findings with those of existing studies. The effects of behavioral control and intention on actual purchase behavior are not investigated. Findings permit the tentative proposition that level of Infocomm knowledge impacts on attitude and intention.

  5. Endothelial microparticles: Sophisticated vesicles modulating vascular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Anne M; Edelberg, Jay; Jonas, Rebecca; Rogers, Wade T; Moore, Jonni S; Syed, Wajihuddin; Mohler, Emile R

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles (EMPs) belong to a family of extracellular vesicles that are dynamic, mobile, biological effectors capable of mediating vascular physiology and function. The release of EMPs can impart autocrine and paracrine effects on target cells through surface interaction, cellular fusion, and, possibly, the delivery of intra-vesicular cargo. A greater understanding of the formation, composition, and function of EMPs will broaden our understanding of endothelial communication and may expose new pathways amenable for therapeutic manipulation. PMID:23892447

  6. Butler's sophisticated constructivism: A critical assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasterling, V.L.M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate whether and in what respects the conceptions of the body and of agency that Judith Butler develops in Bodies That Matter are useful contributions to feminist theory. The discussion focuses on the clarification and critical assessment of the arguments Butler presents to

  7. Rising Trend: Complex and sophisticated attack methods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Large scale booking of domain names. Hundred thousands of domains registered in short duration via few registrars; Single registrant; Most of the domains kept unresolved; Mostly being used for spamming and malware distribution; Many domains are listed as malicious; Poor process control by Domain Registrars.

  8. Sophisticated compound droplets on fiber networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Floriane; Lismont, Marjorie; Dreesen, Laurent; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Droplets on fibers are part of our everyday lives. Indeed, many phenomena involve drops and fibers such as the formation of dew droplets on a spiderweb, the trapping of water droplets on cactus spines or the dyeing of cotton or wool fibers. Therefore, this topic has been widely studied in the recent years and it appears that droplets on fibers can be the starting point for an open digital microfluidics. We study the behavior of soapy water droplets on a fiber array. When a droplet slides along a vertical fiber and encounters a horizontal fiber, it can either stick there or continue its way. In the latter case, the droplet releases a tiny residue. We study the volume of these residues depending on the geometry of the node. By using this technique, a large number of small droplets can be trapped at the nodes of a fiber array. These residues can be encapsulated and collected by an oil droplet in order to create a multicompound droplet. Moreover, by using optical fibers, we can provoke and detect the fluorescence of the inner droplets. Fibers provide therefore an original way to study compound droplets and multiple reactions. F. Weyer is financially supported by an FNRS grant. This work is also supported by the FRFC 2.4504.12.

  9. Phase transitions in restricted Boltzmann machines with generic priors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Adriano; Genovese, Giuseppe; Sollich, Peter; Tantari, Daniele

    2017-10-01

    We study generalized restricted Boltzmann machines with generic priors for units and weights, interpolating between Boolean and Gaussian variables. We present a complete analysis of the replica symmetric phase diagram of these systems, which can be regarded as generalized Hopfield models. We underline the role of the retrieval phase for both inference and learning processes and we show that retrieval is robust for a large class of weight and unit priors, beyond the standard Hopfield scenario. Furthermore, we show how the paramagnetic phase boundary is directly related to the optimal size of the training set necessary for good generalization in a teacher-student scenario of unsupervised learning.

  10. Determination of restriction enzyme activity when cutting DNA labeled with the TOTO dye family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschmann, April; Kounovsky-Shafer, Kristy L

    2017-06-03

    Optical mapping, a single DNA molecule genome analysis platform that can determine methylation profiles, uses fluorescently labeled DNA molecules that are elongated on the surface and digested with a restriction enzyme to produce a barcode of that molecule. Understanding how the cyanine fluorochromes affect enzyme activity can lead to other fluorochromes used in the optical mapping system. The effects of restriction digestion on fluorochrome labeled DNA (Ethidium Bromide, DAPI, H33258, EthD-1, TOTO-1) have been analyzed previously. However, TOTO-1 is a part of a family of cyanine fluorochromes (YOYO-1, TOTO-1, BOBO-1, POPO-1, YOYO-3, TOTO-3, BOBO-3, and POPO-3) and the rest of the fluorochromes have not been examined in terms of their effects on restriction digestion. In order to determine if the other dyes in the TOTO-1 family inhibit restriction enzymes in the same way as TOTO-1, lambda DNA was stained with a dye from the TOTO family and digested. The restriction enzyme activity in regards to each dye, as well as each restriction enzyme, was compared to determine the extent of digestion. YOYO-1, TOTO-1, and POPO-1 fluorochromes inhibited ScaI-HF, PmlI, and EcoRI restriction enzymes. Additionally, the mobility of labeled DNA fragments in an agarose gel changed depending on which dye was intercalated.

  11. Perinatal growth restriction decreases diuretic action of furosemide in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Barent N; Pearson, Jacob; Mahmood, Tahir; Nguyen, Duc; Thornburg, Kent; Cherala, Ganesh

    2014-04-05

    Perinatal growth restriction programs higher risk for chronic disease during adulthood via morphological and physiological changes in organ systems. Perinatal growth restriction is highly correlated with a decreased nephron number, altered renal function and subsequent hypertension. We hypothesize that such renal maladaptations result in altered pharmacologic patterns for life. Maternal protein restriction during gestation and lactation was used to induce perinatal growth restriction in the current study. The diuretic response of furosemide (2mg/kg single i.p. dose) in perinatally growth restricted rats during adulthood was investigated. Diuresis, natriuresis and renal excretion of furosemide were significantly reduced relative to controls, indicative of decreased efficacy. While a modest 12% decrease in diuresis was observed in males, females experienced 26% reduction. It is important to note that the baseline urine output and natriuresis were similar between treatment groups. The in vitro renal and hepatic metabolism of furosemide, the in vivo urinary excretion of the metabolite, and the expression of renal drug transporters were unaltered. Creatinine clearance was significantly reduced by 15% and 19% in perinatally growth restricted male and female rats, respectively. Further evidence of renal insufficiency was suggested by decreased uric acid clearance. Renal protein expression of sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter, a pharmacodynamic target, was unaltered. In summary, perinatal growth restriction could permanently imprint pharmacokinetic processes affecting drug response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Different modes of retrovirus restriction by human APOBEC3A and APOBEC3G in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, Spyridon; Crawford, Daniel; Blouch, Kristin; Browne, Edward P; Kohli, Rahul M; Ross, Susan R

    2014-05-01

    The apolipoprotein B editing complex 3 (A3) cytidine deaminases are among the most highly evolutionarily selected retroviral restriction factors, both in terms of gene copy number and sequence diversity. Primate genomes encode seven A3 genes, and while A3F and 3G are widely recognized as important in the restriction of HIV, the role of the other genes, particularly A3A, is not as clear. Indeed, since human cells can express multiple A3 genes, and because of the lack of an experimentally tractable model, it is difficult to dissect the individual contribution of each gene to virus restriction in vivo. To overcome this problem, we generated human A3A and A3G transgenic mice on a mouse A3 knockout background. Using these mice, we demonstrate that both A3A and A3G restrict infection by murine retroviruses but by different mechanisms: A3G was packaged into virions and caused extensive deamination of the retrovirus genomes while A3A was not packaged and instead restricted infection when expressed in target cells. Additionally, we show that a murine leukemia virus engineered to express HIV Vif overcame the A3G-mediated restriction, thereby creating a novel model for studying the interaction between these proteins. We have thus developed an in vivo system for understanding how human A3 proteins use different modes of restriction, as well as a means for testing therapies that disrupt HIV Vif-A3G interactions.

  13. Analysis of Restrictive Environments in the South-West Oltenia Development Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Matei Cocheci

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Restrictive environments can be defined as an area within a territorial system where development is constrained either by natural factors or anthropogenic factors. This paper aims to identify restrictive environments through multi-criteria analysis of Romania’s South West Oltenia development region, known for its issues regarding open-pit mining, desertification or flood risk. In order to achieve this, I proposed a typology of restrictive environments, based on an extensive literature review of natural and anthropogenic factors that can limit development. For each of the ten environmental restrictiveness types identified, several criteria were proposed, which were then weighted as a result of a questionnaire addressed to experts in the field of territorial planning. Based on the questionnaire results, an index of environmental restrictiveness is computed at LAU 2 level for the entire South-West Oltenia development region. The territorialized index highlights the environmental restrictiveness of areas susceptible to flood risk (e.g. along the Jiu valley, but also the problems faced by mining areas (Motru-Rovinari or isolated mountain areas. The computed index represents a first step towards the definition of potential inter-communal cooperation structures, that could become the object of territorial planning instruments aimed at mitigating restrictive environments.

  14. Affective tone of mothers' statements to restrict their children's eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Megan H; Miller, Alison L; Appugliese, Danielle P; Rosenblum, Katherine L; Lumeng, Julie C

    2016-08-01

    Maternal restrictive feeding behaviors have been associated with child weight status. The affective tone of mothers' statements intended to restrict their children's eating has not been examined. The objectives of this study were to describe the affective tone of mothers' restrictive feeding behaviors (positive or negative), and to test the association of child and mother characteristics with rates of Restriction with Positive Affect, Restriction with Negative Affect and Total Restriction. A total of 237 low-income child-mother dyads (mean child age 5.9 years) participated in a videotaped standardized laboratory eating protocol, during which mothers and children were both presented with large servings of cupcakes. A coding scheme was developed to count each restrictive statement with a positive affective tone and each restrictive statement with a negative affective tone. To establish reliability, 20% of videos were double-coded. Demographics and anthropometrics were obtained. Poisson regression models were used to test the association between characteristics of the child and mother with counts of Restriction with Positive Affect, Restriction with Negative Affect, and Total Restriction. Higher rates of Restriction with Positive Affect and Total Restriction were predicted by child obese weight status, and mother non-Hispanic white race/ethnicity. Higher rates of Restriction with Negative Affect were predicted by older child age, child obese weight status, mother non-Hispanic white race/ethnicity, and lower mother education level. In conclusion, in this study mothers of obese (vs. non-obese) children had higher rates of restriction in general, but particularly higher rates of Restriction with Negative Affect. Rather than being told not to restrict, mothers may need guidance on how to sensitively restrict their child's intake. Future studies should consider the contributions of maternal affect to children's responses to maternal restriction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  15. Dietary Restriction and Nutrient Balance in Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary regimens that favour reduced calorie intake delay aging and age-associated diseases. New evidences revealed that nutritional balance of dietary components without food restriction increases lifespan. Particular nutrients as several nitrogen sources, proteins, amino acid, and ammonium are implicated in life and healthspan regulation in different model organisms from yeast to mammals. Aging and dietary restriction interact through partially overlapping mechanisms in the activation of the conserved nutrient-signalling pathways, mainly the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IIS and the Target Of Rapamycin (TOR. The specific nutrients of dietary regimens, their balance, and how they interact with different genes and pathways are currently being uncovered. Taking into account that dietary regimes can largely influence overall human health and changes in risk factors such as cholesterol level and blood pressure, these new findings are of great importance to fully comprehend the interplay between diet and humans health.

  16. Programmable DNA-Guided Artificial Restriction Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enghiad, Behnam; Zhao, Huimin

    2017-05-19

    Restriction enzymes are essential tools for recombinant DNA technology that have revolutionized modern biological research. However, they have limited sequence specificity and availability. Here we report a Pyrococcus furiosus Argonaute (PfAgo) based platform for generating artificial restriction enzymes (AREs) capable of recognizing and cleaving DNA sequences at virtually any arbitrary site and generating defined sticky ends of varying length. Short DNA guides are used to direct PfAgo to target sites for cleavage at high temperatures (>87 °C) followed by reannealing of the cleaved single stranded DNAs. We used this platform to generate over 18 AREs for DNA fingerprinting and molecular cloning of PCR-amplified or genomic DNAs. These AREs work as efficiently as their naturally occurring counterparts, and some of them even do not have any naturally occurring counterparts, demonstrating easy programmability, generality, versatility, and high efficiency for this new technology.

  17. Counting Calories in Drosophila Diet Restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyung-Jin; Flatt, Thomas; Kulaots, Indrek; Tatar, Marc

    2007-01-01

    The extension of life span by diet restriction in Drosophila has been argued to occur without limiting calories. Here we directly measure the calories assimilated by flies when maintained on full- and restricted-diets. We find that caloric intake is reduced on all diets that extend life span. Flies on low-yeast diet are long-lived and consume about half the calories of flies on high yeast diets, regardless of the energetic content of the diet itself. Since caloric intake correlates with yeast concentration and thus with the intake of every metabolite in this dietary component, it is premature to conclude for Drosophila that calories do not explain extension of life span. PMID:17125951

  18. 'Liberal' vs. 'restrictive' perioperative fluid therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, M; Secher, N H; Kehlet, H

    2009-01-01

    clinical trials and cited studies, comparing two different fixed fluid volumes on post-operative clinical outcome in major surgery. Studies were assessed for the type of surgery, primary and secondary outcome endpoints, the type and volume of administered fluid and the definition of the perioperative...... found differences in the selected outcome parameters. CONCLUSION: Liberal vs. restrictive fixed-volume regimens are not well defined in the literature regarding the definition, methodology and results, and lack the use of or information on evidence-based standardized perioperative care-principles (fast...... for fluid therapy and outcome endpoints were inconsistently defined and only two studies reported perioperative care principles and discharge criteria. Three studies found an improved outcome (morbidity/hospital stay) with a restrictive fluid regimen whereas two studies found no difference and two studies...

  19. Asymptotic properties of restricted naming games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacherjee, Biplab; Datta, Amitava; Manna, S. S.

    2017-07-01

    Asymptotic properties of the symmetric and asymmetric naming games have been studied under some restrictions in a community of agents. In one version, the vocabulary sizes of the agents are restricted to finite capacities. In this case, compared to the original naming games, the dynamics takes much longer time for achieving the consensus. In the second version, the symmetric game starts with a limited number of distinct names distributed among the agents. Three different quantities are measured for a quantitative comparison, namely, the maximum value of the total number of names in the community, the time at which the community attains the maximal number of names, and the global convergence time. Using an extensive numerical study, the entire set of three power law exponents characterizing these quantities are estimated for both the versions which are observed to be distinctly different from their counter parts of the original naming games.

  20. Preventive maintenance at opportunities of restricted duration

    OpenAIRE

    Dekker, R.; Smeitink, E.

    1991-01-01

    textabstractThis article deals with the problem of setting priorities for the execution of maintenance packages at randomly occurring opportunities. These opportunities are of restricted duration, implying that only a limited number of packages can be executed. The main idea proposed is to set up a model for determining the optimal execution time for the individual maintenance packages and to develop cost criteria for deviations from the optimal time. In this article we use the block replacem...

  1. Optimal Detection under the Restricted Bayesian Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujun Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to find a suitable decision rule for a binary composite hypothesis-testing problem with a partial or coarse prior distribution. To alleviate the negative impact of the information uncertainty, a constraint is considered that the maximum conditional risk cannot be greater than a predefined value. Therefore, the objective of this paper becomes to find the optimal decision rule to minimize the Bayes risk under the constraint. By applying the Lagrange duality, the constrained optimization problem is transformed to an unconstrained optimization problem. In doing so, the restricted Bayesian decision rule is obtained as a classical Bayesian decision rule corresponding to a modified prior distribution. Based on this transformation, the optimal restricted Bayesian decision rule is analyzed and the corresponding algorithm is developed. Furthermore, the relation between the Bayes risk and the predefined value of the constraint is also discussed. The Bayes risk obtained via the restricted Bayesian decision rule is a strictly decreasing and convex function of the constraint on the maximum conditional risk. Finally, the numerical results including a detection example are presented and agree with the theoretical results.

  2. Emergency building temperature restrictions. Final evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-11-01

    On July 5, 1979, DOE promulgated final regulations of the Emergency Building Temperature Restrictions program, placing emergency restrictions on thermostat settings for space heating, space cooling, and hot water in commercial, industrial, and nonresidential public buildings. The final regulations restricted space heating to a maximum of 65/sup 0/F, hot water temperature to a maximum of 105/sup 0/F, and cooling temperature to a minimum of 78/sup 0/F. A comprehensive evaluation of the entire EBTF program for a nine-month period from July 16, 1979 is presented. In Chapter 1, an estimate of the population of buildings covered by EBTR is presented. In Chapter 2, EBTR compliance by building type and region is reported. Exemptions are also discussed. In Chapter 3, the simulations of building energy use are explained and the relative impact of various building characteristics and effectiveness of different control strategies are estimated. Finally, in Chapter 4, the methodology for scaling the individual building energy savings to the national level is described, and estimated national energy savings are presented.

  3. Mechanistic insight into Type I restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youell, James; Firman, Keith

    2012-06-01

    Restriction and modification are two opposing activities that are used to protect bacteria from cellular invasion by DNA (e.g. bacteriophage infection). Restriction activity involves cleavage of the DNA; while modification activity is the mechanism used to "mark" host DNA and involves DNA methylation. The study of Type I restriction enzymes has often been seen as an esoteric exercise and this reflects some of their more unusual properties - non-stoichiometric (non-catalytic) cleavage of the DNA substrate, random cleavage of DNA, a massive ATPase activity, and the ability to both cleave DNA and methylate DNA. Yet these enzymes have been found in many bacteria and are very efficient as a means of protecting bacteria against bacteriophage infection, indicating they are successful enzymes. In this review, we summarise recent work on the mechanisms of action, describe switching of function and review their mechanism of action. We also discuss structural rearrangements and cellular localisation, which provide powerful mechanisms for controlling the enzyme activity. Finally, we speculate as to their involvement in recombination and discuss their relationship to helicase enzymes.

  4. Effects of the Post-Olympics Driving Restrictions on Air Quality in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Ma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To reduce congestion and air pollution, 20% driving restriction, a license plate-based traffic control measure, has been implemented in Beijing since October 2008. While the long-term impacts of this policy remain controversial, it is important to understand how and why the policy effects of driving restrictions change over time. In this paper, the short- and long-run effects of the 20% driving restrictions in Beijing and the key factors shaping the effects are analyzed using daily PM10 pollution data. The results showed that in the short run, 20% driving restriction could effectively reduce ambient PM10 levels. However, this positive effect rapidly faded away within a year due to long-term behavioral responses of residents. A modified 20% restriction, designed to replace the original 20% restriction system since April 2009, which is less stringent and provides more possibility for intertemporal driving substitution, has shown some positive influence on air quality over the long run comparing with that under the original policy design. Temporarily, the more stringent the driving restriction was, the better effects it would have on air quality. In the long-run, however, the policy was likely to cause a vicious circle, and more stringent policy might induce stronger negative incentives which would result in even worse policy effects. Lessons learned from study of the effects of driving restrictions in Beijing will help other major cities in China and abroad to use driving restrictions more prudently and effectively in the future. Decision-makers should carefully consider the pros and cons of a transport policy and conduct the ex-ante and ex-post evaluations on it.

  5. The locomotor system as seen in Brazilian medical journals: a restricted collection of papers O sistema locomotor nos periódicos médicos Brasileiros: um grupo restrito de artigos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Kirankumar Patel

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This review covers recent publications on the motor system (orthopedics and movement in Brazilian journals recently admitted to the ISI-Thomson Journal of Citations Index. Two of these are still pleading for admission into PubMed which will eventually enhance their global visibility. We offer this contribution to experts on these areas who are regular readers of Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira. Full free copies of all of them are available at www.scielo.br. The main areas covered are orthopedics of limb articulations, fractures, movement, posture, gait, exercise and animal modelsEsta revisão abrange publicações recentes sobre o sistema locomotor (ortopedia e movimento em periódicos brasileiros recentemente incluídos na plataforma de citações ISI-Thomson. Dois destes periódicos ainda estão pleiteando inclusão no PubMed o que aumentará sua visibilidade. Oferecemos esta contribuição para especialistas nestas áreas de interesse e que são leitores regulares da Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira. Cópias integrais dos artigos citados estão disponíveis gratuitamente no site www.scielo.br. Os principais temas cobertos são ortopedia e articulações dos membros, fraturas, movimento, postura, marcha e modelos animais

  6. Highlights of the DNA cutters: a short history of the restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loenen, Wil A M; Dryden, David T F; Raleigh, Elisabeth A; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Murray, Noreen E

    2014-01-01

    In the early 1950's, 'host-controlled variation in bacterial viruses' was reported as a non-hereditary phenomenon: one cycle of viral growth on certain bacterial hosts affected the ability of progeny virus to grow on other hosts by either restricting or enlarging their host range. Unlike mutation, this change was reversible, and one cycle of growth in the previous host returned the virus to its original form. These simple observations heralded the discovery of the endonuclease and methyltransferase activities of what are now termed Type I, II, III and IV DNA restriction-modification systems. The Type II restriction enzymes (e.g. EcoRI) gave rise to recombinant DNA technology that has transformed molecular biology and medicine. This review traces the discovery of restriction enzymes and their continuing impact on molecular biology and medicine.

  7. Extrachromosomal recombination substrates recapitulate beyond 12/23 restricted VDJ recombination in nonlymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, David; Bassing, Craig H; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Cheng, Hwei-Ling; Schatz, David G; Alt, Frederick W

    2003-01-01

    V(D)J recombination occurs efficiently only between gene segments flanked by recombination signals (RSs) containing 12 and 23 base pair spacers (the 12/23 rule). A further limitation "beyond the 12/23 rule" (B12/23) exists at the TCRbeta locus and ensures Dbeta usage. Herein, we show that extrachromosomal V(D)J recombination substrates recapitulate B12/23 restriction in nonlymphoid cells. We further demonstrate that the Vbeta coding flank, the 12-RS heptamer/nonamer, and the 23-RS spacer each can significantly influence B12/23 restriction. Finally, purified core RAG1 and RAG2 proteins (together with HMG2) also reproduce B12/23 restriction in a cell-free system. Our findings indicate that B12/23 restriction of V(D)J recombination is cemented at the level of interactions between the RAG proteins and TCRbeta RS sequences.

  8. Gene Therapy Strategies to Exploit TRIM Derived Restriction Factors against HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Restriction factors are a collection of antiviral proteins that form an important aspect of the innate immune system. Their constitutive expression allows immediate response to viral infection, ahead of other innate or adaptive immune responses. We review the molecular mechanism of restriction for four categories of restriction factors; TRIM5, tetherin, APOBEC3G and SAMHD1 and go on to consider how the TRIM5 and TRIMCyp proteins in particular, show promise for exploitation using gene therapy strategies. Such approaches could form an important alternative to current anti-HIV-1 drug regimens, especially if combined with strategies to eradicate HIV reservoirs. Autologous CD4+ T cells or their haematopoietic stem cell precursors engineered to express TRIMCyp restriction factors, and provided in a single therapeutic intervention could then be used to restore functional immunity with a pool of cells protected against HIV. We consider the challenges ahead and consider how early clinical phase testing may best be achieved.

  9. Effect of postnatal nutrition restriction on the oxidative status of neonates with intrauterine growth restriction in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Lianqiang; Xuan, Yue; Hu, Liang; Liu, Yan; Xu, Qin; Fang, Zhengfeng; Lin, Yan; Xu, Shengyu; Wu, De; Zhang, Keying; Chen, Daiwen

    2015-01-01

    In offspring with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), where oxidative stress may play an important role in inducing metabolic syndrome, nutrition restriction has been shown to improve oxidative status. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of postnatal nutrition restriction on the oxidative status of IUGR neonates. A total of twelve pairs of piglets, of normal birth-weight (NBW) and with IUGR (7 days old), respectively, were randomly allocated to have adequate nutritional intake (ANI) and restricted nutritional intake (RNI) for a period of 21 days, respectively. This design produced 4 experimental groups: NBW-ANI, IUGR-ANI, NBW-RNI and IUGR-RNI (n = 6 per group). Serum, ileum and liver samples were analyzed for antioxidant parameters and the mRNA expression of genes with regard to oxidative status. The data were subjected to general linear model analysis and Duncan's test with a 5% significance level. Irrespective of nutritional intake, the IUGR pigs had markedly lower activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX), gene expressions of liver mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) and ileum cytoplasmic copper/zinc (CuZn)-SOD and, accordingly, there was a markedly higher malondialdehyde concentration in the liver of these pigs compared to in the NBW pigs. Irrespective of body weight, pigs receiving ANI treatment had significantly lower activities of antioxidant enzymes in the serum (total antioxidative capability, CuZn-SOD and GPX) and liver (total SOD and glutathione reductase) and decreased gene expression of liver CuZn-SOD and Mn-SOD compared to the pigs receiving RNI. In addition, the IUGR pigs had a markedly lower concentration of liver reduced glutathione (GSH), ratio of GSH to oxidized glutathione, gene expression of ileum CuZn-SOD and extracellular SOD than the NBW pigs when receiving ANI, but not all of these differences were observed in those receiving RNI. IUGR neonates may have poor antioxidant defense systems, and postnatal

  10. Restrictive pattern on spirometry: association with cardiovascular risk and level of physical activity in asymptomatic adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandio, Evandro Fornias; Arantes, Rodolfo Leite; Matheus, Agatha Caveda; Silva, Rodrigo Pereira da; Lauria, Vinícius Tonon; Romiti, Marcello; Gagliardi, Antônio Ricardo de Toledo; Dourado, Victor Zuniga

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether a restrictive pattern on spirometry is associated with the level of physical activity in daily life (PADL), as well as with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, in asymptomatic adults. A total of 374 participants (mean age, 41 ± 14 years) underwent spirometry, which included the determination of FVC and FEV1. A restrictive pattern on spirometry was defined as an FEV1/FVC ratio > 0.7 and an FVC spirometry was found in 10% of the subjects. After multivariate logistic regression, adjusted for confounders (PADL and cardiorespiratory fitness), the following variables retained significance (OR; 95% CI) as predictors of a restrictive pattern: systemic arterial hypertension (17.5; 1.65-184.8), smoking (11.6; 1.56-87.5), physical inactivity (8.1; 1.43-46.4), larger center-of-pressure area while standing on a force platform (1.34; 1.05-1.71); and dyslipidemia (1.89; 1.12-1.98). A restrictive pattern on spirometry appears to be common in asymptomatic adults. We found that CVD risk factors, especially systemic arterial hypertension, smoking, and physical inactivity, were directly associated with a restrictive pattern, even when the analysis was adjusted for PADL and cardiorespiratory fitness. Longitudinal studies are needed in order to improve understanding of the etiology of a restrictive pattern as well as to aid in the design of preventive strategies.

  11. Post-Newtonian Circular Restricted 3-Body Problem: Schwarzschild primaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubeibe, F. L.; Lora-Clavijo, F. D.; González, G. A.

    2017-07-01

    The restricted three-body problem (RTBP) has been extensively studied to investigate the stability of the solar system, extra-solar subsystems, asteroid capture, and the dynamics of two massive black holes orbited by a sun. In the present work, we study the stability of the planar circular restricted three-body problem in the context of post-Newtonian approximations. First of all, we review the results obtained from the post-Newtonian equations of motion calculated in the framework of the Einstein-Infeld-Hoffmann formalism (EIH). Therefore, using the Fodor-Hoenselers-Perjes formalism (FHP), we have performed an expansion of the gravitational potential for two primaries, deriving a new system of equations of motion, which unlike the EIH-approach, preserves the Jacobian integral of motion. Additionally, we have obtained approximate expressions for the Lagrange points in terms of a mass parameter μ, where it is found that the deviations from the classical regime are larger for the FHP than for the EIH equations.

  12. Influence of Restrictive Ventilation Impairment on Physical Function and Activities of Homebound Elderly Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Horie

    2011-06-01

    Conclusions: Although patients with restrictive ventilation impairment were unlikely to be aware of their disorder, degradation in systemic stamina had already commenced. It appears that maintaining exercise habits prevented degradation of not only instantaneous walking ability but also of systemic stamina.

  13. 49 CFR 236.528 - Restrictive condition resulting from open hand-operated switch; requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictive condition resulting from open hand... Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND... SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and...

  14. 48 CFR 225.7011 - Restriction on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restriction on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate. 225.7011 Section 225.7011 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate. ...

  15. Alcohol and Sleep Restriction Combined Reduces Vigilant Attention, Whereas Sleep Restriction Alone Enhances Distractibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James; Manousakis, Jessica; Fielding, Joanne; Anderson, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Alcohol and sleep loss are leading causes of motor vehicle crashes, whereby attention failure is a core causal factor. Despite a plethora of data describing the effect of alcohol and sleep loss on vigilant attention, little is known about their effect on voluntary and involuntary visual attention processes. Design: Repeated-measures, counterbalanced design. Setting: Controlled laboratory setting. Participants: Sixteen young (18–27 y; M = 21.90 ± 0.60 y) healthy males. Interventions: Participants completed an attention test battery during the afternoon (13:00–14:00) under four counterbalanced conditions: (1) baseline; (2) alcohol (0.05% breath alcohol concentration); (3) sleep restriction (02:00–07:00); and (4) alcohol/sleep restriction combined. This test battery included a Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) as a measure of vigilant attention, and two ocular motor tasks—visually guided and antisaccade—to measure the involuntary and voluntary allocation of visual attention. Measurements and Results: Only the combined condition led to reductions in vigilant attention characterized by slower mean reaction time, fastest 10% responses, and increased number of lapses (P Sleep restriction alone however increased both antisaccade inhibitory errors [45.8% errors versus 185.0 msec all others) to a peripheral target (P sleep restriction combined reduces vigilant attention, whereas sleep restriction alone enhances distractibility. SLEEP 2015;38(5):765–775. PMID:25515101

  16. Ifit2 Is a Restriction Factor in Rabies Virus Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Benjamin M; Fensterl, Volker; Lawrence, Tessa M; Hudacek, Andrew W; Sen, Ganes C; Schnell, Matthias J

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the interactions between rabies virus (RABV) and individual host cell proteins is critical for the development of targeted therapies. Here we report that interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 2 (Ifit2), an interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) with possible RNA-binding capacity, is an important restriction factor for rabies virus. When Ifit2 was depleted, RABV grew more quickly in mouse neuroblastoma cells in vitro This effect was replicated in vivo, where Ifit2 knockout mice displayed a dramatically more severe disease phenotype than wild-type mice after intranasal inoculation of RABV. This increase in pathogenicity correlated to an increase in RABV mRNA and live viral load in the brain, as well as to an accelerated spread to brain regions normally affected by this RABV model. These results suggest that Ifit2 exerts its antiviral effect mainly at the level of viral replication, as opposed to functioning as a mechanism that restricts viral entry/egress or transports RABV particles through axons.IMPORTANCE Rabies is a fatal zoonotic disease with a nearly 100% case fatality rate. Although there are effective vaccines for rabies, this disease still takes the lives of about 50,000 people each year. Victims tend to be children living in regions without comprehensive medical infrastructure who present to health care workers too late for postexposure prophylaxis. The protein discussed in our report, Ifit2, is found to be an important restriction factor for rabies virus, acting directly or indirectly against viral replication. A more nuanced understanding of this interaction may reveal a step of a pathway or site at which the system could be exploited for the development of a targeted therapy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. A User-Friendly Method for Teaching Restriction Enzyme Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrman, Patrick

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a teaching progression that enhances learning through low-cost, manipulative transparencies. Discussed is instruction about restriction enzymes, plasmids, cutting plasmids, plasmid maps, recording data, and mapping restriction sites. Mapping wheels for student use is included. (CW)

  18. Generalized Photogravitational Restricted Three-Body Problem and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The formula for the locations of coplanar libration points of the restricted three-body problem when the primaries are oblate spheroid and radiating was established. Keywords: Generalized Photogravitational restricted three-body problem, coplanar libration point.

  19. Privacy-preserving restricted boltzmann machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Zhang, Yuan; Ji, Yue

    2014-01-01

    With the arrival of the big data era, it is predicted that distributed data mining will lead to an information technology revolution. To motivate different institutes to collaborate with each other, the crucial issue is to eliminate their concerns regarding data privacy. In this paper, we propose a privacy-preserving method for training a restricted boltzmann machine (RBM). The RBM can be got without revealing their private data to each other when using our privacy-preserving method. We provide a correctness and efficiency analysis of our algorithms. The comparative experiment shows that the accuracy is very close to the original RBM model.

  20. Privacy-Preserving Restricted Boltzmann Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the arrival of the big data era, it is predicted that distributed data mining will lead to an information technology revolution. To motivate different institutes to collaborate with each other, the crucial issue is to eliminate their concerns regarding data privacy. In this paper, we propose a privacy-preserving method for training a restricted boltzmann machine (RBM. The RBM can be got without revealing their private data to each other when using our privacy-preserving method. We provide a correctness and efficiency analysis of our algorithms. The comparative experiment shows that the accuracy is very close to the original RBM model.

  1. The Monetary Policy – Restrictive or Expansive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Szafarczyk

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The monetary policy plays an important role in macroeconomic policy of government. There is a question concerning type of this policy ñ expansive or restrictive (easy or tidy monetary policy. Unfortunately, we have a lot of criteria. Each of them gives us other answer. So due to equitation of Irving Fisher we have dominantly expansive monetary policy. This same situation exists when we use nominal value of rediscount interest rate of central bank. Opposite result appears when we use real value of this interest rate or level of obligatory reserve. Taking under consideration liquidity on money market we know, that level of interest rate is too high.  

  2. Removing the Restrictions Imposed on Finite State Machines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study explained in details the technology of pushdown automata, though a sophisticated type of finite state machine but has enhanced memory capabilities. The method adopted in the design involved the use of transition states called stack, state and input operations. In addition, the method specified a pushdown ...

  3. Removal of phase transfer agent leads to restricted dynamics of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. V R Rajeev Kumar1 R Mukhopadhyay2 T Pradeep1. DST Unit on Nanoscience, Department of Chemistry and Sophisticated Analytical Instrument Facility, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036; Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 ...

  4. Annual Fasting; the Early Calories Restriction for Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solat Eslami

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Essentially, people’s diet and nutritional status has been changed substantially worldwide and several lines of evidence suggest that these changes are to the detriment of their health. Additionally, it has been well documented that unhealthy diet especially the fast foods, untraditional foods or bad-eating-habits influence the human gut microbiome. The gut microbiota shapes immune responses during human life and affects his/her metabolomic profiles. Furthermore, many studies highlight the molecular pathways that mediate host and symbiont interactions that regulate proper immune function and prevention of cancer in the body. Intriguingly, if cancer forms in a human body due to the weakness of immune system in detriment of microbiome, the removal of cancer stem cells can be carried out through early Calories Restriction with Annual Fasting (AF before tumor development or progress. Besides, fasting can b balance the gut microbiome for enhancement of immune system against cancer formation.

  5. Annual fasting; the early calories restriction for cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Solat; Barzgari, Zahra; Saliani, Negar; Saeedi, Nazli; Barzegari, Abolfazl

    2012-01-01

    Essentially, people's diet and nutritional status has been changed substantially worldwide and several lines of evidence suggest that these changes are to the detriment of their health. Additionally, it has been well documented that unhealthy diet especially the fast foods, untraditional foods or bad-eating-habits influence the human gut microbiome. The gut microbiota shapes immune responses during human life and affects his/her metabolomic profiles. Furthermore, many studies highlight the molecular pathways that mediate host and symbiont interactions that regulate proper immune function and prevention of cancer in the body. Intriguingly, if cancer forms in a human body due to the weakness of immune system in detriment of microbiome, the removal of cancer stem cells can be carried out through early Calories Restriction with Annual Fasting (AF) before tumor development or progress. Besides, fasting can balance the gut microbiome for enhancement of immune system against cancer formation.

  6. Repletion of TNFα or leptin in calorically restricted mice suppresses post-restriction hyperphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Hambly

    2012-01-01

    The causes of post-restriction hyperphagia (PRH represent a target for drug-based therapies to prevent obesity. However, the factors causing PRH are poorly understood. We show that, in mice, the extent of PRH was independent of the time under restriction, but depended on its severity, suggesting that PRH was driven by signals from altered body composition. Signals related to fat mass were important drivers. Circulating levels of leptin and TNFα were significantly depleted following caloric restriction (CR. We experimentally repleted their levels to match those of controls, and found that in both treatment groups the level of PRH was significantly blunted. These data establish a role for TNFα and leptin in the non-pathological regulation of energy homeostasis. Signals from adipose tissue, including but not limited to leptin and TNFα, regulate PRH and might be targets for therapies that support people engaged in CR to reduce obesity.

  7. Repletion of TNFα or leptin in calorically restricted mice suppresses post-restriction hyperphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, Catherine; Duncan, Jacqueline S.; Archer, Zoë A.; Moar, Kim M.; Mercer, Julian G.; Speakman, John R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The causes of post-restriction hyperphagia (PRH) represent a target for drug-based therapies to prevent obesity. However, the factors causing PRH are poorly understood. We show that, in mice, the extent of PRH was independent of the time under restriction, but depended on its severity, suggesting that PRH was driven by signals from altered body composition. Signals related to fat mass were important drivers. Circulating levels of leptin and TNFα were significantly depleted following caloric restriction (CR). We experimentally repleted their levels to match those of controls, and found that in both treatment groups the level of PRH was significantly blunted. These data establish a role for TNFα and leptin in the non-pathological regulation of energy homeostasis. Signals from adipose tissue, including but not limited to leptin and TNFα, regulate PRH and might be targets for therapies that support people engaged in CR to reduce obesity. PMID:21954068

  8. Cofactor requirement of HpyAV restriction endonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu-Hong Chan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is the etiologic agent of common gastritis and a risk factor for gastric cancer. It is also one of the richest sources of Type II restriction-modification (R-M systems in microorganisms. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have cloned, expressed and purified a new restriction endonuclease HpyAV from H. pylori strain 26695. We determined the HpyAV DNA recognition sequence and cleavage site as CCTTC 6/5. In addition, we found that HpyAV has a unique metal ion requirement: its cleavage activity is higher with transition metal ions than in Mg(++. The special metal ion requirement of HpyAV can be attributed to the presence of a HNH catalytic site similar to ColE9 nuclease instead of the canonical PD-X-D/EXK catalytic site found in many other REases. Site-directed mutagenesis was carried out to verify the catalytic residues of HpyAV. Mutation of the conserved metal-binding Asn311 and His320 to alanine eliminated cleavage activity. HpyAV variant H295A displayed approximately 1% of wt activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Some HNH-type endonucleases have unique metal ion cofactor requirement for optimal activities. Homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that HpyAV is a member of the HNH nuclease family. The identification of catalytic residues in HpyAV paved the way for further engineering of the metal binding site. A survey of sequenced microbial genomes uncovered 10 putative R-M systems that show high sequence similarity to the HpyAV system, suggesting lateral transfer of a prototypic HpyAV-like R-M system among these microorganisms.

  9. Cofactor requirement of HpyAV restriction endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Siu-Hong; Opitz, Lars; Higgins, Lauren; O'loane, Diana; Xu, Shuang-Yong

    2010-02-05

    Helicobacter pylori is the etiologic agent of common gastritis and a risk factor for gastric cancer. It is also one of the richest sources of Type II restriction-modification (R-M) systems in microorganisms. We have cloned, expressed and purified a new restriction endonuclease HpyAV from H. pylori strain 26695. We determined the HpyAV DNA recognition sequence and cleavage site as CCTTC 6/5. In addition, we found that HpyAV has a unique metal ion requirement: its cleavage activity is higher with transition metal ions than in Mg(++). The special metal ion requirement of HpyAV can be attributed to the presence of a HNH catalytic site similar to ColE9 nuclease instead of the canonical PD-X-D/EXK catalytic site found in many other REases. Site-directed mutagenesis was carried out to verify the catalytic residues of HpyAV. Mutation of the conserved metal-binding Asn311 and His320 to alanine eliminated cleavage activity. HpyAV variant H295A displayed approximately 1% of wt activity. Some HNH-type endonucleases have unique metal ion cofactor requirement for optimal activities. Homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that HpyAV is a member of the HNH nuclease family. The identification of catalytic residues in HpyAV paved the way for further engineering of the metal binding site. A survey of sequenced microbial genomes uncovered 10 putative R-M systems that show high sequence similarity to the HpyAV system, suggesting lateral transfer of a prototypic HpyAV-like R-M system among these microorganisms.

  10. Amplicon restriction patterns associated with nitrogenase activity of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-10-01

    Oct 1, 2013 ... [Yanthan M and Misra AK 2013 Amplicon restriction patterns associated with nitrogenase activity of root nodules for selection of superior Myrica seedlings. J. Biosci. ... Table 1. Amplicon restriction patterns generated by restriction enzyme MboI. Profile. Samples .... The injection port, oven and de-.

  11. 49 CFR 236.785 - Position, false restrictive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Position, false restrictive. 236.785 Section 236... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING THE INSTALLATION... § 236.785 Position, false restrictive. A position of a semaphore arm that is more restrictive than it...

  12. 14 CFR 1274.929 - Restrictions on lobbying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restrictions on lobbying. 1274.929 Section... WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.929 Restrictions on lobbying. Restrictions on Lobbying July 2002 This award is subject to the provisions of 14 CFR part 1271 “New...

  13. 7 CFR 1710.125 - Restrictions on lobbying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restrictions on lobbying. 1710.125 Section 1710.125... and Basic Policies § 1710.125 Restrictions on lobbying. Borrowers are required to comply with certain requirements with respect to restrictions on lobbying activities. See 7 CFR part 3018. ...

  14. 14 CFR 1310.9 - Restrictions on lobbying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restrictions on lobbying. 1310.9 Section... CONDITION OF GUARANTEED LOAN § 1310.9 Restrictions on lobbying. (a) While the Board is not part of the... Restrictions on Lobbying”) of title 31 (“Money and Finance: Treasury”) of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR...

  15. 7 CFR 1724.8 - Restrictions on lobbying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restrictions on lobbying. 1724.8 Section 1724.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Restrictions on lobbying. Borrowers shall comply with the restrictions and requirements in connection with...

  16. 46 CFR 13.111 - Restricted tankerman endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restricted tankerman endorsement. 13.111 Section 13.111... TANKERMEN General § 13.111 Restricted tankerman endorsement. (a) An applicant may apply at an REC listed in § 10.217 of this chapter for a tankerman endorsement restricted to specific cargoes, specific vessels...

  17. 12 CFR 615.5462 - Restrictive endorsement of bearer securities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restrictive endorsement of bearer securities... Credit Securities § 615.5462 Restrictive endorsement of bearer securities. When consolidated and... restrictive endorsement shall be placed thereon in substantially the same manner and with the same effects as...

  18. 36 CFR 910.53 - Building restriction line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Building restriction line... PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT AREA Glossary of Terms § 910.53 Building restriction line. Building restriction line means a line beyond which an exterior wall of any building of a development may not be constructed...

  19. Effect of quantitative feed restriction on energy metabolism and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    huis

    During the restriction period, restricted animals lost weight and showed negative energy (EB) and nitrogen ... Keywords: Energy metabolism, feed quality, metabolizability, nitrogen retention, sheep, restriction .... continuous measurements (every 3 min) of CO2, CH4 and O2 exchange (Brouwer, 1965) in 24 h cycles. By.

  20. 33 CFR 334.80 - Narragansett Bay, RI; restricted area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Narragansett Bay, RI; restricted..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.80 Narragansett Bay, RI; restricted... regulations in this section shall be enforced by the Commander U.S. Naval Base, Newport, RI, and such agencies...

  1. 5 CFR 734.104 - Restriction of political activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restriction of political activity. 734... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) POLITICAL ACTIVITIES OF FEDERAL EMPLOYEES General Provisions § 734.104 Restriction of political activity. No further proscriptions or restrictions may be imposed upon employees covered under...

  2. 36 CFR 13.1174 - Whale water restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Whale water restrictions. 13... Vessel Operating Restrictions § 13.1174 Whale water restrictions. (a) May 15 through September 30, the following waters are designated as whale waters. (1) Waters north of a line drawn from Point Carolus to...

  3. 50 CFR 665.210 - Hawaii restricted bottomfish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hawaii restricted bottomfish species. 665... Fisheries § 665.210 Hawaii restricted bottomfish species. Hawaii restricted bottomfish species means the following species: Local name English common name Scientific name lehi silver jaw jobfish Aphareus rutilans...

  4. 19 CFR 145.58 - Other restricted and prohibited merchandise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other restricted and prohibited merchandise. 145.58 Section 145.58 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... restricted and prohibited merchandise. Other restrictions and prohibitions pertaining to certain types of...

  5. 10 CFR 1016.34 - Accountability for Secret Restricted Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. 1016.34 Section... Information § 1016.34 Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. Each permittee possessing documents containing Secret Restricted Data shall establish a document accountability procedure and shall maintain...

  6. Unravelling the structural and mechanistic basis of CRISPR-Cas systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oost, van der J.; Westra, E.R.; Jackson, R.N.; Wiedenheft, B.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea have evolved sophisticated adaptive immune systems, known as CRISPR–Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats–CRISPR-associated proteins) systems, which target and inactivate invading viruses and plasmids. Immunity is acquired by integrating short fragments

  7. Consumers' intention to use health recommendation systems to receive personalized nutrition advice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Wendel (Sonja); B.G.C. Dellaert (Benedict); A. Ronteltap (Amber); H.C.M. van Trijp (Hans)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Sophisticated recommendation systems are used more and more in the health sector to assist consumers in healthy decision making. In this study we investigate consumers' evaluation of hypothetical health recommendation systems that provide personalized nutrition advice. We

  8. Consumers’ intention to use health recommendation systems to receive personalized nutrition advice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Wendel (Sonja); B.G.C. Dellaert (Benedict); A. Ronteltap (Amber); H.C.M. van Trijp (Hans)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ __Background:__ Sophisticated recommendation systems are used more and more in the health sector to assist consumers in healthy decision making. In this study we investigate consumers' evaluation of hypothetical health recommendation systems that provide

  9. Consumers’ intention to use health recommendation systems to receive personalized nutrition advice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendel, S.; Dellaert, B.G.C.; Ronteltap, A.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sophisticated recommendation systems are used more and more in the health sector to assist consumers in healthy decision making. In this study we investigate consumers' evaluation of hypothetical health recommendation systems that provide personalized nutrition advice. We examine

  10. Peripherally restricted CB1 receptor blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorvat, Robert J

    2013-09-01

    Antagonists (inverse agonists) of the cannabinoid-1 (CB1) receptor showed promise as new therapies for controlling obesity and related metabolic function/liver disease. These agents, representing diverse chemical series, shared the property of brain penetration due to the initial belief that therapeutic benefit was mainly based on brain receptor interaction. However, undesirable CNS-based side effects of the only marketed agent in this class, rimonabant, led to its removal, and termination of the development of other clinical candidates soon followed. Re-evaluation of this approach has focused on neutral or peripherally restricted (PR) antagonists. Supporting these strategies, pharmacological evidence indicates most if not all of the properties of globally acting agents may be captured by molecules with little brain presence. Methodology that can be used to eliminate BBB penetration and the means (in vitro assays, tissue distribution and receptor occupancy determinations, behavioral paradigms) to identify potential agents with little brain presence is discussed. Focus will be on the pharmacology supporting the contention that reported agents are truly peripherally restricted. Notable examples of these types of compounds are: TM38837 (structure not disclosed); AM6545 (8); JD5037 (15b); RTI-12 (19). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabolic responses to dietary leucine restriction involve remodeling of adipose tissue and enhanced hepatic insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanders, Desiree; Stone, Kirsten P; Dille, Kelly; Simon, Jacob; Pierse, Alicia; Gettys, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    Dietary leucine was incrementally restricted to test whether limiting this essential amino acid (EAA) would fully reproduce the beneficial responses produced by dietary methionine restriction. Restricting leucine by 85% increased energy intake and expenditure within 5 to 7 days of its introduction and reduced overall accumulation of adipose tissue. Leucine restriction (LR) also improved glucose tolerance, increased hepatic release of fibroblast growth factor 21 into the blood stream, and enhanced insulin-dependent activation of Akt in liver. However, LR had no effect on hepatic lipid levels and failed to lower lipogenic gene expression in the liver. LR did affect remodeling of white and brown adipose tissues, increasing expression of both thermogenic and lipogenic genes. These findings illustrate that dietary LR reproduces many but not all of the physiological responses of methionine restriction. The primary differences occur in the liver, where methionine and LR cause opposite effects on tissue lipid levels and expression of lipogenic genes. Altogether, these findings suggest that the sensing systems which detect and respond to dietary restriction of EAAs act through mechanisms that both leucine and methionine are able to engage, and in the case of hepatic lipid metabolism, may be unique to specific EAAs such as methionine. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  12. Effects of different sleep restriction protocols on sleep architecture and daytime vigilance in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Stone, W S; Hsi, X; Zhuang, J; Huang, L; Yin, Y; Zhang, L; Zhao, Z

    2010-01-01

    Sleep is regulated by complex biological systems and environmental influences, neither of which is fully clarified. This study demonstrates differential effects of partial sleep deprivation (SD) on sleep architecture and psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) performance using two different protocols (sequentially) that each restricted daily sleep to 3 hours in healthy adult men. The protocols differed only in the period of sleep restriction; in one, sleep was restricted to a 3-hour block from 12:00 AM to 3:00 AM, and in the other, sleep was restricted to a block from 3:00 AM to 6:00 AM. Subjects in the earlier sleep restriction period showed a significantly lower percentage of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep after 4 days (17.0 vs. 25.7 %) and a longer latency to the onset of REM sleep (L-REM) after 1 day (78.8 vs. 45.5 min) than they did in the later sleep restriction period. Reaction times on PVT performance were also better (i.e. shorter) in the earlier SR period on day 4 (249.8 vs. 272 ms). These data support the view that earlier-night sleep may be more beneficial for daytime vigilance than later-night sleep. The study also showed that cumulative declines in daytime vigilance resulted from loss of total sleep time, rather than from specific stages, and underscored the reversibility of SR effects with greater amounts of sleep.

  13. Natural transformation of an engineered Helicobacter pylori strain deficient in type II restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Song; Blaser, Martin J

    2012-07-01

    Restriction-modification (RM) systems are important for bacteria to limit foreign DNA invasion. The naturally competent bacterium Helicobacter pylori has highly diverse strain-specific type II systems. To evaluate the roles of strain-specific restriction in H. pylori natural transformation, a markerless type II restriction endonuclease-deficient (REd) mutant was constructed. We deleted the genes encoding all four active type II restriction endonucleases in H. pylori strain 26695 using sacB-mediated counterselection. Transformation by donor DNA with exogenous cassettes methylated by Escherichia coli was substantially (1.7 and 2.0 log(10) for cat and aphA, respectively) increased in the REd strain. There also was significantly increased transformation of the REd strain by donor DNA from other H. pylori strains, to an extent corresponding to their shared type II R-M system strain specificity with 26695. Comparison of the REd and wild-type strains indicates that restriction did not affect the length of DNA fragment integration during natural transformation. There also were no differentials in cell growth or susceptibility to DNA damage. In total, the data indicate that the type II REd mutant has enhanced competence with no loss of growth or repair facility compared to the wild type, facilitating H. pylori mutant construction and other genetic engineering.

  14. Wetting phase transition of two segregated Bose–Einstein condensates restricted by a hard wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thu, Nguyen Van [Department of Physics, Hanoi Pedagogical University No. 2, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Phat, Tran Huu [Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission, 59 Ly Thuong Kiet, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Song, Pham The, E-mail: thesong80@icloud.com [Tay Bac University, Son La (Viet Nam)

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • System of two segregated Bose–Einstein condensates limited by a wall is studied. • Double-parabola approximation is applied to Gross–Pitaevskii theory. • Interface tension and wetting phase diagram are established. - Abstract: The wetting phase transition in the system of two segregated Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) restricted by a hard wall is studied by means of the double-parabola approximation (DPA) applied to the Gross–Pitaevskii (GP) theory. We found the interfacial tension and the wetting phase diagram which depend weakly on the spatial restriction.

  15. Acute influence of restricted ankle dorsiflexion angle on knee joint mechanics during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, S; Ueda, M; Aimoto, K; Suzuki, Y; Sigward, S M

    2014-06-01

    Restrictions in range of ankle dorsiflexion (DF) motion can persist following ankle injuries. Ankle DF is necessary during terminal stance of gait, and its restricted range may affect knee joint kinematics and kinetics. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute influence of varied levels of restricted ankle DF on knee joint sagittal and frontal plane kinematics and kinetics during gait. Thirty healthy volunteers walked with a custom-designed ankle brace that restricted ankle DF. Kinematics and kinetics were collected using a 7-camera motion analysis system and two force plates. Ankle dorsiflexion was restricted in 10-degree increments, allowing for four conditions: Free, light (LR), moderate (MR) and severe restriction (SR). Knee angles and moments were measured during terminal stance. Real peak ankle DF for Free, LR, MR, and SR were 13.7±4.8°, 11.6±5.0°, 7.5±5.3°, and 4.2±7.2°, respectively. Peak knee extension angles under the same conditions were -6.7±6.7°, -5.4±6.4°, -2.5±7.5°, and 0.6±7.8°, respectively, and the peak knee varus moment was 0.48±0.17 Nm/kg, 0.47±0.17 Nm/kg, 0.53±0.20 Nm/kg, and 0.57±0.20 Nm/kg. The knee varus moment was significantly increased from MR condition with an 8-degree restriction in ankle DF. Knee joint kinematics and kinetics in the sagittal and frontal planes were affected by reduced ankle DF during terminal stance of gait. Differences were observed with restriction in ankle DF range of approximately 8°. level III. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Moderate exercise training and chronic caloric restriction modulate redox status in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin, Katiane; da Rocha, Ricardo Fagundes; Cechetti, Fernanda; Quincozes-Santos, André; de Souza, Daniela Fraga; Nardin, Patrícia; Rodrigues, Letícia; Leite, Marina Concli; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Salbego, Christianne Gazzana; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto

    2011-11-03

    Physical activity has been related to antioxidant adaptations, which is associated with health benefits, including those to the nervous system. Additionally, available data suggest exercise and a caloric restriction regimen may reduce both the incidence and severity of neurological disorders. Therefore, our aim was to compare hippocampal redox status and glial parameters among sedentary, trained, caloric-restricted sedentary and caloric-restricted trained rats. Forty male adult rats were divided into 4 groups: ad libitum-fed sedentary (AS), ad libitum-fed exercise training (AE), calorie-restricted sedentary (RS) and calorie-restricted exercise training (RE). The caloric restriction (decrease of 30% in food intake) and exercise training (moderate in a treadmill) were carried out for 3 months. Thereafter hippocampus was surgically removed, and then redox and glial parameters were assessed. Increases in reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and total antioxidant reactivity (TAR) were observed in AE, RS and RE. The nitrite/nitrate levels decreased only in RE. We found a decrease in carbonyl content in AE, RS and RE, while no modifications were detected in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, S100B and glial fibrilary acid protein (GFAP) content did not change, but caloric restriction was able to increase glutamine synthetase (GS) activity in RS and glutamate uptake in RS and RE. Exercise training, caloric restriction and both combined can decrease oxidative damage in the hippocampus, possibly involving modulation of astroglial function, and could be used as a strategy for the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Flash File System for Resource Restricted Platforms

    OpenAIRE

    Werbet, Eriko; Brayner, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    A computing device is usually comprised of a processing unit, a volatile memory area (primary memory) and a persistent memory area (secondary memory). Nowadays, in most of mobile computing devices data are persisted in flash memory, which is a kind of non-volatile memory that may be electrically recorded and erased, i.e., an EEPROM (Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory) chip. Such memory is also used to implement memory cards, USB sticks and solid state drives. Data persisted i...

  18. Language Evolution: The View from Restricted Linguistic Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botha, Rudolf; Swart, Henriëtte de

    2008-01-01

    The chapters of this volume investigate the evolution of a range of features of language, including temporality, negation, noun combining, and functional categories. The authors adopt what is known as the “Windows Approach” to the study of language evolution. Two ideas are fundamental to this

  19. Fuzzy Networked Control Systems Design Considering Scheduling Restrictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Benítez-Pérez

    2012-01-01

    known a priory but from a dynamic real-time behavior. To do so, the use of priority dynamic Priority exchange scheduling is performed. The objective of this paper is to show a way to tackle multiple time delays that are bounded and the dynamic response from real-time scheduling approximation. The related control law is designed considering fuzzy logic approximation for nonlinear time delays coupling, where the main advantage is the integration of this behavior through extended state space representation keeping certain linear and bounded behavior and leading to a stable situation during events presentation by guaranteeing stability through Lyapunov.

  20. Type II restriction modification system methylation subunit of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Brady D.; Newby, Deborah T.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Thompson, David N.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Apel, William A.; Roberto, Francisco F.; Reed, David W.

    2018-02-13

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for modulating or altering recombination inside or outside of a cell using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and/or nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  1. Restricted calorie ketogenic diet for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroon, Joseph; Bost, Jeffrey; Amos, Austin; Zuccoli, Giulio

    2013-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults and generally considered to be universally fatal. Glioblastoma multiforme accounts for 12% to 15% of all intracranial neoplasms and affects 2 to 3 adults per every 100,000 in the United States annually. In children glioblastoma multiforme accounts for only approximately 7% to 9% of central nervous system tumors. The mean survival rate in adults after diagnosis ranges from 12 to 18 months with standard therapy and 3 to 6 months without therapy. The prognosis in children is better compared to adult tumor onset with a mean survival of approximately 4 years following gross total surgical resection and chemotherapy. There have been few advances in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme in the past 40 years beyond surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and corticosteroids. For this reason a restrictive calorie ketogenic diet, similar to that used in children to control drug resistant seizure activity, has been advanced as an alternative adjunctive treatment to help prolonged survival. This article reviews the science of tumor metabolism and discusses the mechanism of calorie restriction, cellular energy metabolism, and how dietary induced ketosis can inhibit cancer cell's energy supply to slow tumor growth.

  2. Extracardiac medical and neuromuscular implications in restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöllberger, Claudia; Finsterer, Josef

    2007-08-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCMP) is characterized by restrictive filling and reduced diastolic volume of either or both ventricles with normal or near-normal systolic function and wall thickness. It may occur idiopathically or as a cardiac manifestation of systemic diseases such as scleroderma, amyloidosis, Churg-Strauss syndrome, cystinosis, sarcoidosis, lymphoma, Gaucher's disease, hemochromatosis, Fabry's disease, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hypereosinophilic syndrome, carcinoid, Noonan's syndrome, reactive arthritis, or Werner's syndrome and various neuromuscular disorders. Whereas in idiopathic RCMP the therapeutic options are only treatment of cardiac congestion, in cases with an underlying disorder, a causal therapy may be available. Patients with RCMP should be investigated as soon as the cardiac diagnosis is established for extracardiac diseases to detect a possibly treatable cause of RCMP before the disease becomes intractable. These investigations include a diligent clinical history and examination, blood tests, and ophthalmologic, otologic, dermatologic, gastroenterologic, nephrologic, hematologic, and neurologic examinations. If extracardiac examinations do not reveal a plausible cause for RCMP, endomyocardial biopsy is indicated. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effect of Dietary Restriction and Subsequent Re-Alimentation on the Transcriptional Profile of Bovine Skeletal Muscle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keogh, Kate; Kenny, David A; Cormican, Paul; McCabe, Matthew S; Kelly, Alan K; Waters, Sinead M

    2016-01-01

    Compensatory growth (CG), an accelerated growth phenomenon which occurs following a period of dietary restriction is exploited worldwide in animal production systems as a method to lower feed costs...

  4. 48 CFR 25.702 - Prohibition on contracting with entities that conduct restricted business operations in Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prohibition on contracting with entities that conduct restricted business operations in Sudan. 25.702 Section 25.702 Federal... operations in Sudan. ...

  5. Hierarchical scaling of marketing decision support systems, Decision Support Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Wierenga (Berend); P.A.M. Oude Ophuis (Peter); K.R.E. Huizingh; P.F.A.M. Campen, van

    1994-01-01

    textabstractMarketing Decision Support Systems (MDSS) show a large variety in functionality and form. In this paper a scale is developed that measures the sophistication of a Marketing Decision Support System. This scale, based on Guttman's Scalogram Analysis, is hierarchical in nature: more

  6. An Examination of the Use of Accounting Information Systems and the Success of Small Businesses in South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracina, Tara H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between the use and sophistication of accounting information systems (AISs) and the success of small businesses in South Carolina. Additionally, this study explored the variables that influence South Carolinian small business owners/managers in the extent of adoption (sophistication) of…

  7. RestrictionDigest: A powerful Perl module for simulating genomic restriction digests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinpeng Wang

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: RestrictionDigest is an easy-to-use Perl module with flexible parameter settings. With the help of the information produced by the module, researchers can easily determine the most appropriate enzymes to construct the reduced-representation libraries to meet their experimental requirements.

  8. 10 CFR 1045.16 - Criteria for evaluation of restricted data and formerly restricted data information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... by significantly assisting potential adversaries to develop or improve a nuclear weapon capability, produce nuclear weapons materials, or make other military use of nuclear energy; (4) Whether publication... restricted data information. 1045.16 Section 1045.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NUCLEAR...

  9. Restrictive pattern on spirometry: association with cardiovascular risk and level of physical activity in asymptomatic adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Fornias Sperandio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To determine whether a restrictive pattern on spirometry is associated with the level of physical activity in daily life (PADL, as well as with cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors, in asymptomatic adults. Methods : A total of 374 participants (mean age, 41 ± 14 years underwent spirometry, which included the determination of FVC and FEV1. A restrictive pattern on spirometry was defined as an FEV1/FVC ratio > 0.7 and an FVC < 80% of the predicted value. After conducting demographic, anthropometric, and CVD risk assessments, we evaluated body composition, muscle function, and postural balance, as well as performing cardiopulmonary exercise testing and administering the six-minute walk test. The PADL was quantified with a triaxial accelerometer. Results : A restrictive pattern on spirometry was found in 10% of the subjects. After multivariate logistic regression, adjusted for confounders (PADL and cardiorespiratory fitness, the following variables retained significance (OR; 95% CI as predictors of a restrictive pattern: systemic arterial hypertension (17.5; 1.65-184.8, smoking (11.6; 1.56-87.5, physical inactivity (8.1; 1.43-46.4, larger center-of-pressure area while standing on a force platform (1.34; 1.05-1.71; and dyslipidemia (1.89; 1.12-1.98. Conclusions : A restrictive pattern on spirometry appears to be common in asymptomatic adults. We found that CVD risk factors, especially systemic arterial hypertension, smoking, and physical inactivity, were directly associated with a restrictive pattern, even when the analysis was adjusted for PADL and cardiorespiratory fitness. Longitudinal studies are needed in order to improve understanding of the etiology of a restrictive pattern as well as to aid in the design of preventive strategies.

  10. Mining for Restriction Endonucleases in Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyén S. Espinoza-Miranda

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Molecular Biology Center at the University of Central America in Nicaragua (CBM-UCA was founded in 1999 to strengthen biotechnology research capacity and education in Nicaragua and the Central American region. One of the first projects launched by the CBM-UCA was bio-prospecting for key industrial enzymes. This ongoing study seeks to discover and characterize restriction enzymes (RE in bacteria, and to create a database of microorganisms isolated and identified by 16S rDNA sequencing methodology. In this paper we highlight the importance of studying the extreme environmental conditions for building knowledge of Nicaraguan biodiversity through modern molecular biology techniques such as metagenomics. The isolation of prototype enzymes such as EcoRV and ClaI is presented as an update and extension of previously undertaken work.

  11. Restriction Enzymes in Microbiology, Biotechnology and Biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey G. Wilson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery in the nineteen-seventies, a collection of simple enzymes termed Type II restriction endonucleases, made by microbes to ward off viral infections, have transformed molecular biology, spawned the multi-billion dollar Biotechnology industry, and yielded fundamental insights into the biochemistry of life, health and disease. In this article we describe how these enzymes were discovered, and we review their properties, organizations and genetics. We summarize current ideas about the mechanism underlying their remarkable ability to recognize and bind to specific base pair sequences in DNA, and we discuss why these ideas might not be correct. We conclude by proposing an alternative explanation for sequence-recognition that resolves certain inconsistencies and provides, in our view, a more satisfactory account of the mechanism.

  12. Genetic use restriction technologies: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Luca

    2014-10-01

    Genetic use restriction technologies (GURTs), developed to secure return on investments through protection of plant varieties, are among the most controversial and opposed genetic engineering biotechnologies as they are perceived as a tool to force farmers to depend on multinational corporations' seed monopolies. In this work, the currently proposed strategies are described and compared with some of the principal techniques implemented for preventing transgene flow and/or seed saving, with a simultaneous analysis of the future perspectives of GURTs taking into account potential benefits, possible impacts on farmers and local plant genetic resources (PGR), hypothetical negative environmental issues and ethical concerns related to intellectual property that have led to the ban of this technology. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Restrictive Dermopathy: Report of Two Siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Sheng Lu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Restrictive dermopathy (RD is a rare and lethal autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by very tight, thin, and easily eroded skin and contracture of joints. We present two siblings in a family. Case 1, a female neonate, showed mild characteristic presentations of RD and survived for 16 days, and Case 2, a male neonate, was stillborn with typical severe features of RD. His skin biopsy showed typical histological findings, and genetic study revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation on the exon 6 of zinc metalloproteinase STE24 (ZMPSTE24. The exact pathogenic mechanism of RD remains poorly understood. The most recent studies on mutations in lamin A and/or ZMPSTE24 have shed some light on the pathophysiology of RD and may help direct the development of future therapeutic approaches.

  14. Epitaxial growth by monolayer restricted galvanic displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilić Rastko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a new method for epitaxial growth of metals in solution by galvanic displacement of layers pre-deposited by underpotential deposition (UPD was discussed and experimentally illustrated throughout the lecture. Cyclic voltammetry (CV and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM are employed to carry out and monitor a “quasi-perfect”, two-dimensional growth of Ag on Au(111, Cu on Ag(111, and Cu on Au(111 by repetitive galvanic displacement of underpotentially deposited monolayers. A comparative study emphasizes the displacement stoichiometry as an efficient tool for thickness control during the deposition process and as a key parameter that affects the deposit morphology. The excellent quality of layers deposited by monolayer-restricted galvanic displacement is manifested by a steady UPD voltammetry and ascertained by a flat and uniform surface morphology maintained during the entire growth process.

  15. [[Seul NP] VP] : Formalisation de la restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Raynal, Céline

    2005-01-01

    Nous proposons une formalisation de la restriction lorsque celle-ci concerne le sujet préverbal précédé alors de 'seul' ; elle fait essentiellement appel à la référence des NPs sujets concernés. L'objet de cet article est de confronter cette formalisation aux données extraites de Frantext et d'Internet. L'analyse de ces données va nous permettre d'affiner notre proposition : l'étude de 'seul' va nous amener à préciser la classification des NPs et l'emploi que nous en faisons dans la formalisa...

  16. Restricted fish feeding reduces cod otolith opacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høie, H.; Folkvord, A.; Mosegaard, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    in otolith opacity were found between individual fish both within groups and between groups. In two of the three groups significantly more translucent otolith material was deposited in response to reduced feeding. Our results show that variations in feeding and hence fish growth resulted in variation......The purpose of this work was to examine the effect of reduced feeding and constant temperature on cod otolith opacity. Three groups of juvenile cod were given restricted food rations at different times for 4 months, resulting in depressed somatic growth. Otolith opacity was measured on pictures...... of the otolith sections. The otolith carbonate deposited during the experimental period was generally opaque compared to the more translucent otolith material deposited prior to and after the experimental period, when the fish were kept in a pond and in sea-cages at higher temperatures. Large variations...

  17. The pathophysiology of restricted repetitive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mark; Kim, Soo-Jeong

    2009-06-01

    Restricted, repetitive behaviors (RRBs) are heterogeneous ranging from stereotypic body movements to rituals to restricted interests. RRBs are most strongly associated with autism but occur in a number of other clinical disorders as well as in typical development. There does not seem to be a category of RRB that is unique or specific to autism and RRB does not seem to be robustly correlated with specific cognitive, sensory or motor abnormalities in autism. Despite its clinical significance, little is known about the pathophysiology of RRB. Both clinical and animal models studies link repetitive behaviors to genetic mutations and a number of specific genetic syndromes have RRBs as part of the clinical phenotype. Genetic risk factors may interact with experiential factors resulting in the extremes in repetitive behavior phenotypic expression that characterize autism. Few studies of individuals with autism have correlated MRI findings and RRBs and no attempt has been made to associate RRB and post-mortem tissue findings. Available clinical and animal models data indicate functional and structural alterations in cortical-basal ganglia circuitry in the expression of RRB, however. Our own studies point to reduced activity of the indirect basal ganglia pathway being associated with high levels of repetitive behavior in an animal model. These findings, if generalizable, suggest specific therapeutic targets. These, and perhaps other, perturbations to cortical basal ganglia circuitry are mediated by specific molecular mechanisms (e.g., altered gene expression) that result in long-term, experience-dependent neuroadaptations that initiate and maintain repetitive behavior. A great deal more research is needed to uncover such mechanisms. Work in areas such as substance abuse, OCD, Tourette syndrome, Parkinson's disease, and dementias promise to provide findings critical for identifying neurobiological mechanisms relevant to RRB in autism. Moreover, basic research in areas such

  18. AGORA: Assembly Guided by Optical Restriction Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Henry C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome assembly is difficult due to repeated sequences within the genome, which create ambiguities and cause the final assembly to be broken up into many separate sequences (contigs. Long range linking information, such as mate-pairs or mapping data, is necessary to help assembly software resolve repeats, thereby leading to a more complete reconstruction of genomes. Prior work has used optical maps for validating assemblies and scaffolding contigs, after an initial assembly has been produced. However, optical maps have not previously been used within the genome assembly process. Here, we use optical map information within the popular de Bruijn graph assembly paradigm to eliminate paths in the de Bruijn graph which are not consistent with the optical map and help determine the correct reconstruction of the genome. Results We developed a new algorithm called AGORA: Assembly Guided by Optical Restriction Alignment. AGORA is the first algorithm to use optical map information directly within the de Bruijn graph framework to help produce an accurate assembly of a genome that is consistent with the optical map information provided. Our simulations on bacterial genomes show that AGORA is effective at producing assemblies closely matching the reference sequences. Additionally, we show that noise in the optical map can have a strong impact on the final assembly quality for some complex genomes, and we also measure how various characteristics of the starting de Bruijn graph may impact the quality of the final assembly. Lastly, we show that a proper choice of restriction enzyme for the optical map may substantially improve the quality of the final assembly. Conclusions Our work shows that optical maps can be used effectively to assemble genomes within the de Bruijn graph assembly framework. Our experiments also provide insights into the characteristics of the mapping data that most affect the performance of our algorithm, indicating the

  19. Antibiotic resistance and restriction endonucleases in fecal enterococci of chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra Linnaeus, 1758).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandžurová, A; Hrašková, I; Júdová, J; Javorský, P; Pristaš, P

    2012-07-01

    Two hundred eighty-four isolates of enterococci from feces of wild living chamois from alpine environments were tested for sensitivity to three antibiotics. Low frequency of resistance was observed in studied enterococcal populations (about 5 % for tetracycline and erythromycin and 0 % for ampicillin). In six animals, the population of enterococci lacked any detectable resistance. Our data indicated that enterococcal population in feces of the majority of studied animals did not encounter mobile genetic elements encoding antibiotic resistance probably due to spatial separation and/or due to low exposure to the antibiotics. Based on resistance profiles observed, three populations were analyzed for the presence of restriction endonucleases. The restriction enzymes from two isolates-31K and 1K-were further purified and characterized. Restriction endonuclease Efa1KI recognizes CCWGG sequence and is an isoschizomer of BstNI. Endonuclease Efc31KI, a BsmAI isoschizomer, recognizes the sequence GTCTC and it is a first restriction endonuclease identified in Enterococcus faecium. Our data indicate that restriction-modification (R-M) systems do not represent an efficient barrier for antibiotic resistance spreading; enterococcal populations colonized by antibiotics resistance genes were also colonized by the R-M systems.

  20. Autoscreening of restriction endonucleases for PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism identification of fungal species, with Pleurotus spp. as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Hui; Huang, Ji-Xiang; Yao, Yi-Jian

    2007-12-01

    A molecular method based on PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA sequences was designed to rapidly identify fungal species, with members of the genus Pleurotus as an example. Based on the results of phylogenetic analysis of ITS sequences from Pleurotus, a PCR-RFLP endonuclease autoscreening (PRE Auto) program was developed to screen restriction endonucleases for discriminating multiple sequences from different species. The PRE Auto program analyzes the endonuclease recognition sites and calculates the sizes of the fragments in the sequences that are imported into the program in groups according to species recognition. Every restriction endonuclease is scored through the calculation of the average coefficient for the sequence groups and the average coefficient for the sequences within a group, and then virtual electrophoresis maps for the selected restriction enzymes, based on the results of the scoring system, are displayed for the rapid determination of the candidate endonucleases. A total of 85 haplotypes representing 151 ITS sequences were used for the analysis, and 2,992 restriction endonucleases were screened to find the candidates for the identification of species. This method was verified by an experiment with 28 samples representing 12 species of Pleurotus. The results of the digestion by the restriction enzymes showed the same patterns of DNA fragments anticipated by the PRE Auto program, apart from those for four misidentified samples. ITS sequences from 14 samples (of which nine sequences were obtained in this study), including four originally misidentified samples, confirmed the species identities revealed by the PCR-RFLP analysis. The method developed here can be used for the identification of species of other living microorganisms.