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Sample records for restrict heart field

  1. The LIM Protein Ajuba Restricts the Second Heart Field Progenitor Pool by Regulating Isl1 Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Hagen R.; Jungblut, Benno; Choe, Chong Pyo; Crump, J. Gage; Braun, Thomas; Dobreva, Gergana

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Morphogenesis of the heart requires tight control of cardiac progenitor cell specification, expansion, and differentiation. Retinoic acid (RA) signaling restricts expansion of the second heart field (SHF), serving as an important morphogen in heart development. Here, we identify the LIM domain protein Ajuba as a crucial regulator of the SHF progenitor cell specification and expansion. Ajuba-deficient zebra-fish embryos show an increased pool of Isl1+ cardiac progenitors and, subsequently, dramatically increased numbers of cardiomyocytes at the arterial and venous poles. Furthermore, we show that Ajuba binds Isl1, represses its transcriptional activity, and is also required for autorepression of Isl1 expression in an RA-dependent manner. Lack of Ajuba abrogates the RA-dependent restriction of Isl1+ cardiac cells. We conclude that Ajuba plays a central role in regulating the SHF during heart development by linking RA signaling to the function of Isl1, a key transcription factor in cardiac progenitor cells. PMID:22771034

  2. The LIM protein Ajuba restricts the second heart field progenitor pool by regulating Isl1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Hagen R; Jungblut, Benno; Choe, Chong Pyo; Crump, J Gage; Braun, Thomas; Dobreva, Gergana

    2012-07-17

    Morphogenesis of the heart requires tight control of cardiac progenitor cell specification, expansion, and differentiation. Retinoic acid (RA) signaling restricts expansion of the second heart field (SHF), serving as an important morphogen in heart development. Here, we identify the LIM domain protein Ajuba as a crucial regulator of the SHF progenitor cell specification and expansion. Ajuba-deficient zebrafish embryos show an increased pool of Isl1(+) cardiac progenitors and, subsequently, dramatically increased numbers of cardiomyocytes at the arterial and venous poles. Furthermore, we show that Ajuba binds Isl1, represses its transcriptional activity, and is also required for autorepression of Isl1 expression in an RA-dependent manner. Lack of Ajuba abrogates the RA-dependent restriction of Isl1(+) cardiac cells. We conclude that Ajuba plays a central role in regulating the SHF during heart development by linking RA signaling to the function of Isl1, a key transcription factor in cardiac progenitor cells.

  3. Electromagnetic Fields Restrictions and Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Katsenelenbaum, Boris Z

    2003-01-01

    The fields scattered by metallic bodies or radiated by some types of antennas are created by the surfaces currents and therefore they are subject to some restrictions. The book is the first one where the properties of these fields are investigated in details. The properties have the important significance for the antenna synthesis, body shape reconstruction and other diffraction problems. The material of the book lies in the meetingpoint of the antenna theory, highfrequency electrodynamics and inverse scattering problems. The author is an internationally renowned investigator in the field of e

  4. Does Evidence Drive Fluid Volume Restriction in Chronic Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robin K; Thornton, Nathaniel

    2017-06-01

    Chronic heart failure is a chronic condition that is associated with increased health care expenditures and high rates of morbidity and mortality. Mainstay in heart failure management has been the prescription of a fluid restriction. The purpose of this article is to review the available evidence for fluid restriction in chronic heart failure patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Heart fields and cardiac morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Robert G; Buckingham, Margaret E; Moorman, Antoon F

    2014-10-01

    In this review, we focus on two important steps in the formation of the embryonic heart: (i) the progressive addition of late differentiating progenitor cells from the second heart field that drives heart tube extension during looping morphogenesis, and (ii) the emergence of patterned proliferation within the embryonic myocardium that generates distinct cardiac chambers. During the transition between these steps, the major site of proliferation switches from progenitor cells outside the early heart to proliferation within the embryonic myocardium. The second heart field and ballooning morphogenesis concepts have major repercussions on our understanding of human heart development and disease. In particular, they provide a framework to dissect the origin of congenital heart defects and the regulation of myocardial proliferation and differentiation of relevance for cardiac repair.

  6. Heart Morphometry in Rats with Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Joffre Fríaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that cardiovascular disease in adulthood is influenced by prenatal or early postnatal events, regardless of lifestyle-related risk factors. Objective: to characterize the heart morphometry in Wistar rats with intrauterine growth restriction and to determine the differences between adolescents and adults of both sexes as well as the association with some morphometric variables at birth. Methods: a total of 80 rats in the control group and 80 in the experimental group were studied. The following morphometric variables were analyzed in the newborns: weight, height in addition to size, weight and volume of the heart, all in millimeters. Results: low birth weight resulting from intrauterine growth restriction caused changes in heart morphometry, especially in heart weight and thickness of the left ventricle. These changes were observed in both sexes during adolescence and showed a slight predominance in adult males. Conclusions: these results led to an increased knowledge of the events involved in heart development in response to nutrient restriction in utero, which could contribute to the design of health strategies to reduce morbidity and perinatal mortality from heart diseases.

  7. Transcriptional pathways in second heart field development

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Brian L.

    2007-01-01

    The heart is the first organ to form and function during vertebrate development and is absolutely essential for life. The left ventricle is derived from the classical primary or first heart field (FHF), while the right ventricle and outflow tract are derived from a distinct second heart field (SHF). The recent discovery of the SHF has raised several fundamental and important questions about how the two heart fields are integrated into a single organ and whether unique molecular programs contr...

  8. New developments in the second heart field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffran, Stéphane; Kelly, Robert G

    2012-07-01

    During cardiac looping the heart tube elongates by addition of progenitor cells from adjacent pharyngeal mesoderm to the arterial and venous poles. This cell population, termed the second heart field, was first identified ten years ago and many studies in the intervening decade have refined our understanding of how heart tube elongation takes place and identified signaling pathways that regulate proliferation and differentiation during progressive contribution of second heart field cells to the embryonic heart. It has also become apparent that defective second heart field development results in common congenital heart anomalies affecting both the conotruncal region and venous pole of the heart, including atrial and atrioventricular septal defects. In this review we focus on a series of recent papers that have identified new regulators of second heart field development, in particular the retinoic acid signaling pathway and HOX, SIX and EYA transcription factors. We also discuss new findings concerning the regulation of fibroblast growth factor signaling during second heart field deployment and studies that have implicated FGF10 and FGF3 in outflow tract development in addition to FGF8. Second heart field derived parts of the heart share common progenitor cells in pharyngeal mesoderm with craniofacial skeletal muscles and recent findings from xenopus, zebrafish and the protochordate Ciona intestinalis provide insights into the evolution of the second heart field during vertebrate radiation.

  9. Fluid restriction in patients with heart failure : how should we think?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johansson, Peter; van der Wal, Martje H. L.; Stromberg, Anna; Waldreus, Nana; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim: Fluid restriction has long been considered one of the cornerstones in self-care management of patients with heart failure. The aim of this discussion paper is to discuss fluid restriction in heart failure and propose advice about fluid intake in heart failure patients. Results: Altho

  10. Islet1 derivatives in the heart are of both neural crest and second heart field origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engleka, Kurt A.; Manderfield, Lauren J.; Brust, Rachael D.; Li, Li; Cohen, Ashley; Dymecki, Susan M.; Epstein, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Islet1 (Isl1) has been proposed as a marker of cardiac progenitor cells derived from the second heart field and is utilized to identify and purify cardiac progenitors from murine and human specimens for ex vivo expansion. The use of Isl1 as a specific second heart field marker is dependent on its exclusion from other cardiac lineages such as neural crest. Objective Determine if Isl1 is expressed by cardiac neural crest. Methods and Results We used an intersectional fate-mapping system employing the RC::FrePe allele which reports dual Flpe and Cre recombination. Combining Isl11Cre/+, a SHF driver, and Wnt1::Flpe, a neural crest driver, with Rc::FrePe reveals that some Isl1 derivatives in the cardiac outflow tract derive from Wnt1-expressing neural crest progenitors. In contrast, no overlap was observed between Wnt1-derived neural crest and an alternative second heart field driver, Mef2c-AHF-Cre. Conclusions Isl1 is not restricted to second heart field progenitors in the developing heart but also labels cardiac neural crest. The intersection of Isl1 and Wnt1 lineages within the heart provides a caveat to using Isl1 as an exclusive second heart field cardiac progenitor marker and suggests that some Isl1-expressing progenitor cells derived from embryos, ES or iPS cultures may be of neural crest lineage. PMID:22394517

  11. Fluid restriction in patients with heart failure: how should we think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Peter; van der Wal, Martje Hl; Strömberg, Anna; Waldréus, Nana; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2016-08-01

    Fluid restriction has long been considered one of the cornerstones in self-care management of patients with heart failure. The aim of this discussion paper is to discuss fluid restriction in heart failure and propose advice about fluid intake in heart failure patients. Although there have been seven randomised studies on fluid restriction in heart failure patients, the effect of fluid restriction on its own were only evaluated in two studies. In both studies, a stringent fluid restriction compared to a liberal fluid intake was not more beneficial with regard to clinical stability or body weight. In the other studies fluid restriction was part of a larger study intervention including, for example, individualised dietary recommendations and follow-up by telephone. Thus, the effect of fluid restriction on its own has been poorly evaluated. Fluid restriction should not be recommended to all heart failure patients. However, temporary fluid restriction can be considered in decompensated heart failure and/or patients with hyponatremia. Tailored fluid restriction based on body weight (30 ml/kg per day) seems to be most reasonable. To increase adherence to temporary fluid restriction, education, support and planned evaluations can be recommended. © The European Society of Cardiology 2016.

  12. Heart rate variability for evaluating vigilant attention in partial chronic sleep restriction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henelius, Andreas; Sallinen, Mikael; Huotilainen, Minna; Müller, Kiti; Virkkala, Jussi; Puolamäki, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Examine the use of spectral heart rate variability (HRV) metrics in measuring sleepiness under chronic partial sleep restriction, and identify underlying relationships between HRV, Karolinska Sleepiness Scale ratings (KSS...

  13. Obstacle crossing with lower visual field restriction: Shifts in strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.E.M.; Toet, A.; Werkhoven, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated how restriction of the vertical viewing angle influences obstacle-crossing behavior. Twelve participants stepped over obstacles of different dimensions while wearing visual-field-restricting goggles. Using full-body motion capture, several kinematic measures w

  14. RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY AND SECONDARY CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE IN A MCDOWELL'S CARPET PYTHON (MORELIA SPILOTA MCDOWELLI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilliger, Lionel; Chetboul, Valérie; Damoiseaux, Cécile; Nicolier, Alexandra

    2016-12-01

    Echocardiography is an established and noninvasive diagnostic tool used in herpetologic cardiology. Various cardiac lesions have been previously described in reptiles with the exception of restrictive cardiomyopathy. In this case report, restrictive cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure associated with left atrial and sinus venosus dilation were diagnosed in a 2-yr-old captive lethargic McDowell's carpet python ( Morelia spilota mcdowelli), based on echocardiographic, Doppler, and histopathologic examinations. This cardiomyopathy was also associated with thrombosis within the sinus venosus.

  15. Restriction estimates for the paraboloid over finite fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lewko, Allison

    2010-01-01

    We prove certain endpoint restriction estimates for the paraboloid over finite fields in three and higher dimensions. Working in the bilinear setting, we are able to pass from estimates for characteristic functions to estimates for general functions while avoiding the extra logarithmic power of the field size which is introduced by the dyadic pigeonhole approach. This allows us to remove logarithmic factors from the estimates obtained by Mockenhaupt and Tao in three dimensions and those obtained by Iosevich and Koh in higher dimensions.

  16. Tandem action of exercise training and food restriction completely preserves ischemic preconditioning in the aging heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abete, P; Testa, G; Galizia, G; Mazzella, F; Della Morte, D; de Santis, D; Calabrese, C; Cacciatore, F; Gargiulo, G; Ferrara, N; Rengo, G; Sica, V; Napoli, C; Rengo, F

    2005-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IP) has been proposed as an endogenous form of protection against ischemia reperfusion injury. IP, however, does not prevent post-ischemic dysfunction in the aging heart but may be partially corrected by exercise training and food restriction. We investigated the role of exercise training combined with food restriction on restoring IP in the aging heart. Effects of IP against ischemia-reperfusion injury in isolated hearts from adult (A, 6 months old), sedentary 'ad libitum' fed (SL), trained ad libitum fed (TL), sedentary food-restricted (SR), trained- and food-restricted senescent rats (TR) (24 months old) were investigated. Norepinephrine release in coronary effluent was determined by high performance liquid cromatography. IP significantly improved final recovery of percent developed pressure in hearts from A (p<0.01) but not in those from SL (p=NS) vs unconditioned controls. Developed pressure recovery was partial in hearts from TL and SR (64.3 and 67.3%, respectively; p<0.05 vs controls) but it was total in those from TR (82.3%, p=NS vs A; p<0.05 vs hearts from TL and SR). Similarly, IP determined a similar increase of norepinephrine release in A (p<0.001) and in TR (p<0.001, p=NS vs adult). IP was abolished by depletion of myocardial norepinephrine stores by reserpine in all groups. Thus, IP reduces post-ischemic dysfunction in A but not in SL. Moreover, IP was preserved partially in TR and SR and totally in TR. Complete IP maybe due to full restoration of norepinephrine release in response to IP stimulus.

  17. Prognostic importance of a restrictive transmitral filling pattern in patients with symptomatic congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raunsø, Jakob; Møller, Jacob Eifer; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Restrictive diastolic filling pattern is associated with increased mortality in patients with myocardial infarction and heart failure. Most studies have excluded patients with atrial fibrillation. The aim of the present study was to assess the prognostic value of a restrictive filling...... pattern in patients with atrial fibrillation. METHODS: Doppler echocardiography including pulsed wave Doppler assessment of transmitral flow was performed in 880 patients with a clinical diagnosis of heart failure on hospital admission. Filling was considered restrictive when the mitral deceleration time...

  18. Salt and fluid restriction is effective in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipson, Henriette; Ekman, Inger; Forslund, Heléne B; Swedberg, Karl; Schaufelberger, Maria

    2013-11-01

    European and American guidelines have recommended salt and fluid restriction for patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) despite scarce scientific evidence. Therefore, we investigated the effects of salt and fluid restriction in patients with CHF. Ninety-seven stable patients in NYHA class II-IV, on optimal medication, with previous signs of fluid retention, treated with either >40 mg (NYHA III-IV) or >80 mg (NYHA II-IV) of furosemide daily were randomized to either individualized salt and fluid restriction or information given by the nurse-led heart failure clinics, e.g. be aware not to drink too much and use salt with caution, and followed for 12 weeks. Fluid was restricted to 1.5 L and salt to 5 g daily, and individualized dietary advice and support was given. The 24 h dietary recall procedure, urine collection on three consecutive days, and para-aminobenzoic acid 80 mg t.i.d. was used to assess adherence to diet and completeness of urine collection. The primary endpoint was a composite variable consisting of NYHA class, hospitalization, weight, peripheral oedema, quality of life (QoL), thirst, and diuretics. Results After 12 weeks, significantly more patients in the intervention than in the control group improved on the composite endpoint (51% vs. 16%; P fluid restriction can improve signs and symptoms of CHF with no negative effects on thirst, appetite, or QoL in patients with moderate to severe CHF and previous signs of fluid retention.

  19. THE ROLE OF MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES IN PROCESSES OF HEART RE-MODELING IN CHILDREN WITH RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Bershova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCMP is heart disorder with unclear etiology; it can be characterized as disease with disorder of diastolic myocardium function of left ventricle, conditioned by restriction. The chronic heart failure as a syndrome of RCMP can develop as a result of disbalance in system of complex biochemical, structural, and geometrical mechanisms of myocardium re-modeling. Extra cellular matrix play significant role in heart structure and geometry breaking. The destruction of heart is realized by matrix metalloproteinases (MMP. The activity of MMP, in its turn, is controlled by its tissue inhibitors. The present study analyzed the role of MMP in process of collagen’s synthesis and catabolism deregulation, myocardium fibrosis, change of heart chambers, and development of diastolic dysfunction in children with RCMP.Key words: children, chronic heart failure, restrictive cardiomyopathy, matrix metalloproteinases.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(5:36-39

  20. Retinoic acid deficiency alters second heart field formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryckebusch, Lucile; Wang, Zengxin; Bertrand, Nicolas; Lin, Song-Chang; Chi, Xuan; Schwartz, Robert; Zaffran, Stéphane; Niederreither, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the active derivative of vitamin A, has been implicated in various steps of cardiovascular development. The retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (RALDH2) enzyme catalyzes the second oxidative step in RA biosynthesis and its loss of function creates a severe embryonic RA deficiency. Raldh2−/− knockout embryos fail to undergo heart looping and have impaired atrial and sinus venosus development. To understand the mechanism(s) producing these changes, we examined the contribution of the second heart field (SHF) to pharyngeal mesoderm, atria, and outflow tract in Raldh2−/− embryos. RA deficiency alters SHF gene expression in two ways. First, Raldh2−/− embryos exhibited a posterior expansion of anterior markers of the SHF, including Tbx1, Fgf8, and the Mlc1v-nlacZ-24/Fgf10 reporter transgene as well as of Islet1. This occurred at early somite stages, when cardiac defects became irreversible in an avian vitamin A-deficiency model, indicating that endogenous RA is required to restrict the SHF posteriorly. Explant studies showed that this expanded progenitor population cannot differentiate properly. Second, RA up-regulated cardiac Bmp expression levels at the looping stage. The contribution of the SHF to both inflow and outflow poles was perturbed under RA deficiency, creating a disorganization of the heart tube. We also investigated genetic cross-talk between Nkx2.5 and RA signaling by generating double mutant mice. Strikingly, Nkx2.5 deficiency was able to rescue molecular defects in the posterior region of the Raldh2−/− mutant heart, in a gene dosage-dependent manner. PMID:18287057

  1. Aggressive fluid and sodium restriction in acute decompensated heart failure: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliti, Graziella Badin; Rabelo, Eneida R; Clausell, Nadine; Rohde, Luís E; Biolo, Andreia; Beck-da-Silva, Luis

    2013-06-24

    The benefits of fluid and sodium restriction in patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) are unclear. To compare the effects of a fluid-restricted (maximum fluid intake, 800 mL/d) and sodium-restricted (maximum dietary intake, 800 mg/d) diet (intervention group [IG]) vs a diet with no such restrictions (control group [CG]) on weight loss and clinical stability during a 3-day period in patients hospitalized with ADHF. Randomized, parallel-group clinical trial with blinded outcome assessments. Emergency room, wards, and intensive care unit. Adult inpatients with ADHF, systolic dysfunction, and a length of stay of 36 hours or less. Fluid restriction (maximum fluid intake, 800 mL/d) and additional sodium restriction (maximum dietary intake, 800 mg/d) were carried out until the seventh hospital day or, in patients whose length of stay was less than 7 days, until discharge. The CG received a standard hospital diet, with liberal fluid and sodium intake. Weight loss and clinical stability at 3-day assessment, daily perception of thirst, and readmissions within 30 days. Seventy-five patients were enrolled (IG, 38; CG, 37). Most were male; ischemic heart disease was the predominant cause of heart failure (17 patients [23%]), and the mean (SD) left ventricular ejection fraction was 26% (8.7%). The groups were homogeneous in terms of baseline characteristics. Weight loss was similar in both groups (between-group difference in variation of 0.25 kg [95% CI, -1.95 to 2.45]; P = .82) as well as change in clinical congestion score (between-group difference in variation of 0.59 points [95% CI, -2.21 to 1.03]; P = .47) at 3 days. Thirst was significantly worse in the IG (5.1 [2.9]) than the CG (3.44 [2.0]) at the end of the study period (between-group difference, 1.66 points; time × group interaction; P = .01). There were no significant between-group differences in the readmission rate at 30 days (IG, 11 patients [29%]; CG, 7 patients [19%]; P = .41

  2. Cultural factors influencing dietary and fluid restriction behaviour: perceptions of older Chinese patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Xiaoshan; Peng, Youqing; Yu, Hai-Ping; Li, Dan

    2017-03-01

    To explore the cultural factors related to dietary and fluid restriction behaviours among older Chinese patients. Excess dietary sodium and fluid intake are risk factors contributing to the worsening and rehospitalisation for heart failure in older patients. Managing the complex fluid and diet requirements of heart failure patients is challenging and is made more complicated by cultural variations in self-management behaviours in response to a health threat. Qualitative study using semi-structured in interviews and framework analysis. The design of this study is qualitative descriptive. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 15 heart failure patients. Data were analysed through content analysis. Seven cultural themes emerged from the qualitative data: the values placed on health and illness, customary way of life, preference for folk care and the Chinese healthcare system, and factors related to kinship and social ties, religion, economics and education. Dietary change and management in response to illness, including heart failure, is closely related to individuals' cultural background. Healthcare providers should have a good understanding of cultural aspects that can influence patients' conformity to medical recommendations. Heart failure patients need support that considers their cultural needs. Healthcare providers must have a good understanding of the experiences of people from diverse cultural backgrounds. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Cardiac development: the posterior heart field and atrioventricular reentry tachycardia

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is separated in two parts (Part I and Part II) in which normal and abnormal heart development are studied and related to congenital heart disease, in particular to the etiology of supraventricular arrhythmias in fetuses and neonates. Part I describes the development of the posterior heart field derived venous pole of the heart specifically in correlation to the role of Shox2 and podoplanin in that particular area. Furthermore, the developmental processes in this region seem to hav...

  4. Hand2 Function in Second Heart Field Progenitors is Essential for Cardiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchihashi, Takatoshi; Maeda, Jun; Shin, Chong; Ivey, Kathryn N.; Black, Brian; Olson, Eric N.; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Srivastava, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Cardiogenesis involves the contributions of multiple progenitor pools, including mesoderm-derived cardiac progenitors known as the first and second heart fields. Disruption of genetic pathways regulating individual subsets of cardiac progenitors likely underlies many forms of human cardiac malformations. Hand2 is a member of the basic helix loop helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors and is expressed in numerous cell lineages that contribute to the developing heart. However, the early embryonic lethality of Hand2-null mice has precluded lineage-specific study of its function in myocardial progenitors. Here, we generated and used a floxed allele of Hand2 to ablate its expression in specific cardiac cell populations at defined developmental points. We found that Hand2 expression within the mesoderm-derived second heart field progenitors was required for their survival and deletion in this domain recapitulated the complete Hand2-null phenotype. Loss of Hand2 at later stages of development and in restricted domains of the second heart field revealed a spectrum of cardiac anomalies resembling forms of human congenital heart disease. Molecular analyses of Hand2 mutant cells revealed several genes by which Hand2 may influence expansion of the cardiac progenitors. These findings demonstrate that Hand2 is essential for survival of second heart field progenitors and that the graded loss of Hand2 function in this cardiac progenitor pool can cause a spectrum of congenital heart malformation. PMID:21185281

  5. Consistency restrictions on maximal electric-field strength in quantum field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, S P; Gitman, D M

    2008-09-26

    Quantum field theory with an external background can be considered as a consistent model only if backreaction is relatively small with respect to the background. To find the corresponding consistency restrictions on an external electric field and its duration in QED and QCD, we analyze the mean-energy density of quantized fields for an arbitrary constant electric field E, acting during a large but finite time T. Using the corresponding asymptotics with respect to the dimensionless parameter eET2, one can see that the leading contributions to the energy are due to the creation of particles by the electric field. Assuming that these contributions are small in comparison with the energy density of the electric background, we establish the above-mentioned restrictions, which determine, in fact, the time scales from above of depletion of an electric field due to the backreaction.

  6. New computerized fetal heart rate analysis for surveillance of intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, E A; Lobmaier, S; Fischer, T; Schneider, R; Bauer, A; Schneider, K T; Schmidt, G

    2011-05-01

    Decreased fetal heart rate variability is associated with higher perinatal morbidity and mortality in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). This study used a new method [phase-rectified signal averaging (PRSA)] to calculate acceleration- and deceleration-related fluctuations of the fetal heart rate. Cardiotocograms from 74 growth-restricted and 161 normal fetuses were included. Both groups were matched for gestational age. The transformed PRSA signal was quantified by the acceleration-related parameter-averaged acceleration capacity (AAC) and compared to the standard short-term variation (STV). Mann-Whitney test and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves were used for statistical analysis. For AAC, the median values of the IUGR group and control group were 1.97 bpm [interquartile range (IQR): 1.66-2.23] and 2.49 bpm (IQR: 2.24-2.72), respectively. For STV, these values were 5.44 ms (IQR: 4.49-7.38) and 7.79 ms (IQR: 6.35-9.66), respectively. The area under the ROC curve was 81.4% for AAC and 70.5% for STV. The results of AAC are in both groups comparable to STV. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate the association of AAC with the clinical outcome of the newborn. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Severe Calorie Restriction Reduces Cardiometabolic Risk Factors and Protects Rat Hearts from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Dirceu S.; Costa-Pereira, Liliane V.; Santos, Carina S.; Mendes, Bruno F.; Costa, Karine B.; Santos, Cynthia Fernandes F.; Rocha-Vieira, Etel; Magalhães, Flávio C.; Esteves, Elizabethe A.; Ferreira, Anderson J.; Guatimosim, Sílvia; Dias-Peixoto, Marco F.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Recent studies have proposed that if a severe caloric restriction (SCR) is initiated at the earliest period of postnatal life, it can lead to beneficial cardiac adaptations later on. We investigated the effects of SCR in Wistar rats from birth to adult age on risk factors for cardiac diseases (CD), as well as cardiac function, redox status, and HSP72 content in response to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Methods and Results: From birth to the age of 3 months, CR50 rats were fed 50% of the food that the ad libitum group (AL) was fed. Food intake was assessed daily and body weight were assessed weekly. In the last week of the SCR protocol, systolic blood pressure and heart rate were measured and the double product index was calculated. Also, oral glucose and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance tests were performed. Thereafter, rats were decapitated, visceral fat was weighed, and blood and hearts were harvested for biochemical, functional, tissue redox status, and western blot analyzes. Compared to AL, CR50 rats had reduced the main risk factors for CD. Moreover, the FR50 rats showed increased cardiac function both at baseline conditions (45% > AL rats) and during the post-ischemic period (60% > AL rats) which may be explained by a decreased cardiac oxidative stress and increased HSP72 content. Conclusion: SCR from birth to adult age reduced risk factors for CD, increased basal cardiac function and protected hearts from the I/R, possibly by a mechanism involving ROS. PMID:27092082

  8. Temporally Distinct Six2-Positive Second Heart Field Progenitors Regulate Mammalian Heart Development and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengfang; Wang, Jingying; Guo, Chaoshe; Chang, Weiting; Zhuang, Jian; Zhu, Ping; Li, Xue

    2017-01-24

    The embryonic process of forming a complex structure such as the heart remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Six2 marks a dynamic subset of second heart field progenitors. Six2-positive (Six2(+)) progenitors are rapidly recruited and assigned, and their descendants are allocated successively to regions of the heart from the right ventricle (RV) to the pulmonary trunk. Global ablation of Six2(+) progenitors resulted in RV hypoplasia and pulmonary atresia. An early stage-specific ablation of a small subset of Six2(+) progenitors did not cause any apparent structural defect at birth but rather resulted in adult-onset cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. Furthermore, Six2 expression depends in part on Shh signaling, and Shh deletion resulted in severe deficiency of Six2(+) progenitors. Collectively, these findings unveil the chronological features of cardiogenesis, in which the mammalian heart is built sequentially by temporally distinct populations of cardiac progenitors, and provide insights into late-onset congenital heart disease.

  9. Early Chordate Origins of the Vertebrate Second Heart Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolfi, Alberto; Gainous, T. Blair; Young, John J.; Mori, Alessandro; Levine, Michael; Christiaen, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate heart is formed from diverse embryonic territories, including the first and second heart fields. The second heart field (SHF) gives rise to the right ventricle and outflow tract, yet its evolutionary origins are unclear. We found that heart progenitor cells of the simple chordate Ciona intestinalis also generate precursors of the atrial siphon muscles (ASMs). These precursors express Islet and Tbx1/10, evocative of the splanchnic mesoderm that produces the lower jaw muscles and SHF of vertebrates. Evidence is presented that the transcription factor COE is a critical determinant of ASM fate. We propose that the last common ancestor of tunicates and vertebrates possessed multipotent cardiopharyngeal muscle precursors, and that their reallocation might have contributed to the emergence of the SHF. PMID:20671188

  10. Arid3b is essential for second heart field cell deployment and heart patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Verónica; Badía-Careaga, Claudio; Casanova, Jesús C; Domínguez, Jorge N; de la Pompa, José Luis; Sanz-Ezquerro, Juan José

    2014-11-01

    Arid3b, a member of the conserved ARID family of transcription factors, is essential for mouse embryonic development but its precise roles are poorly understood. Here, we show that Arid3b is expressed in the myocardium of the tubular heart and in second heart field progenitors. Arid3b-deficient embryos show cardiac abnormalities, including a notable shortening of the poles, absence of myocardial differentiation and altered patterning of the atrioventricular canal, which also lacks epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Proliferation and death of progenitors as well as early patterning of the heart appear normal. However, DiI labelling of second heart field progenitors revealed a defect in the addition of cells to the heart. RNA microarray analysis uncovered a set of differentially expressed genes in Arid3b-deficient tissues, including Bhlhb2, a regulator of cardiomyocyte differentiation, and Lims2, a gene involved in cell migration. Arid3b is thus required for heart development by regulating the motility and differentiation of heart progenitors. These findings identify Arid3b as a candidate gene involved in the aetiology of human congenital malformations.

  11. Liberal versus restricted fluid administration in heart failure patients. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Fu, Biao; Qian, Xiaoxian

    2015-01-01

    Restrictive fluid intake is recommended, in addition to standard pharmacologic treatment, in the treatment of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). However, this recommendation lacks firm scientific evidence. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials to estimate the effect of fluid restriction in patients with heart failure.Randomized controlled trials were identified in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases using the search-keywords "fluid" and "heart failure". Outcomes were compared in heart failure patients with liberal and restricted fluid intake. Pooled risk ratios (RR) and weighted mean differences (WMD) were calculated using random effects models. Studies focusing on decompensated heart failure were analyzed separately.Six small randomized trials comparing liberal and restricted fluid intake met the inclusion criteria. Significant heterogeneity was noted in the reported studies for several outcomes. There were no differences in readmission rate (5 studies, pooled RR = 1.32; 95% CI: 0.86 to 2.01; P = 0.2), mortality rate (5 studies, pooled RR = 1.50; 95% CI: 0.87 to 2.57; P = 0.14), perceived thirst (4 studies, WMD = -0.7; 95% CI: -2.58 to 1.17; P = 0.46), duration of intravenous diuretics (2 studies, WMD = 0.17; 95% CI: -1.26 to 1.6; P = 0.81) or serum sodium levels (WMD = -1.61; 95% CI: -3.28 to 0.07; P = 0.06) between the liberal fluid intake group and the restrictive fluid intake group. Mean serum creatinine and BNP levels were significantly higher in the liberal fluid group: WMD 0.20 (95% CI: 0.15 to 0.25; P fluid intake. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  12. Isolating the benefits of fluid restriction in patients with heart failure: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Carolyn Miller; Higgins, Melinda; Smith, Andrew; Culler, Steven D; Dunbar, Sandra B

    2015-12-01

    Fluid restriction (FR) in persons with heart failure (HF) is often prescribed, yet self-regulation and the troublesome symptom of thirst are difficult for patients to manage. The purpose of this pilot study was to test an educational and behavioral intervention (EBI) on adherence with prescribed FR and outcome measures of fluid congestion, symptom distress, and health related quality of life (HRQL). Secondary aims were to describe the relationships between self-reported and objectively measured determinants of fluid status and symptoms, and assess the psychometric properties of piloted instruments, and intervention effect sizes. NYHA Class II-IV (n=25, 44-83 years, 56% male, 20% minority, mean EF 23.0+11.7%) participants were randomized to the EBI or attention control (AC) and evaluated at baseline, 3 and 6 months. EBI patients trended toward decreasing fluid ingestion (p=0.08), experienced less HF symptom frequency (p=0.13) and severity (p=0.06), and increased symptoms of thirst (pfluid congestion between groups. These outcomes suggest that patients receiving the EBI drank slightly less fluid, experienced less typical HF symptoms, greater thirst distress and stable HRQOL. Moderate to large effect sizes for the measures used were observed, and outcomes suggest that a randomized trial of various levels of FR would not potentiate fluid congestion but should specifically address preservation of HRQOL and thirst symptoms. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  13. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiomyopathy - restrictive; Infiltrative cardiomyopathy; Idiopathic myocardial fibrosis ... In a case of restrictive cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle is of normal size or slightly enlarged. Most of the time, it also pumps normally. However, it does ...

  14. Comparison of restriction enzymes for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Moraxella catarrhalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Sara; Puig, Carmen; Domenech, Arnau; Liñares, Josefina; Ardanuy, Carmen

    2013-07-01

    NotI, the most prevalent restriction enzyme used for typing Moraxella catarrhalis, failed to digest genomic DNA from respiratory samples. An improved pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) methodology determined SpeI as the best choice for typing this bacterial species, with a good restriction of clinical samples and a good clustering correlation with NotI.

  15. Hox genes define distinct progenitor sub-domains within the second heart field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Nicolas; Roux, Marine; Ryckebüsch, Lucile; Niederreither, Karen; Dollé, Pascal; Moon, Anne; Capecchi, Mario; Zaffran, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Much of the heart, including the atria, right ventricle and outflow tract (OFT) is derived from a progenitor cell population termed the second heart field (SHF) that contributes progressively to the embryonic heart during cardiac looping. Several studies have revealed anterior-posterior patterning of the SHF, since the anterior region (anterior heart field) contributes to right ventricular and OFT myocardium whereas the posterior region gives rise to the atria. We have previously shown that Retinoic Acid (RA) signal participates to this patterning. We now show that Hoxb1, Hoxa1, and Hoxa3, as downstream RA targets, are expressed in distinct sub-domains within the SHF. Our genetic lineage tracing analysis revealed that Hoxb1, Hoxa1 and Hoxa3-expressing cardiac progenitor cells contribute to both atria and the inferior wall of the OFT, which subsequently gives rise to myocardium at the base of pulmonary trunk. By contrast to Hoxb1Cre, the contribution of Hoxa1-enhIII-Cre and Hoxa3Cre-labeled cells is restricted to the distal regions of the OFT suggesting that proximo-distal patterning of the OFT is related to SHF sub-domains characterized by combinatorial Hox genes expression. Manipulation of RA signaling pathways showed that RA is required for the correct deployment of Hox-expressing SHF cells. This report provides new insights into the regulatory gene network in SHF cells contributing to the atria and sub-pulmonary myocardium. PMID:21385575

  16. Temporally Distinct Six2-Positive Second Heart Field Progenitors Regulate Mammalian Heart Development and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengfang Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The embryonic process of forming a complex structure such as the heart remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Six2 marks a dynamic subset of second heart field progenitors. Six2-positive (Six2+ progenitors are rapidly recruited and assigned, and their descendants are allocated successively to regions of the heart from the right ventricle (RV to the pulmonary trunk. Global ablation of Six2+ progenitors resulted in RV hypoplasia and pulmonary atresia. An early stage-specific ablation of a small subset of Six2+ progenitors did not cause any apparent structural defect at birth but rather resulted in adult-onset cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. Furthermore, Six2 expression depends in part on Shh signaling, and Shh deletion resulted in severe deficiency of Six2+ progenitors. Collectively, these findings unveil the chronological features of cardiogenesis, in which the mammalian heart is built sequentially by temporally distinct populations of cardiac progenitors, and provide insights into late-onset congenital heart disease.

  17. Cardiac-Restricted Expression of VCP/TER94 RNAi or Disease Alleles Perturbs Drosophila Heart Structure and Impairs Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Meera C.; Blice-Baum, Anna C.; Sang, Tzu-Kang; Cammarato, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Valosin-containing protein (VCP) is a highly conserved mechanoenzyme that helps maintain protein homeostasis in all cells and serves specialized functions in distinct cell types. In skeletal muscle, it is critical for myofibrillogenesis and atrophy. However, little is known about VCP's role(s) in the heart. Its functional diversity is determined by differential binding of distinct cofactors/adapters, which is likely disrupted during disease. VCP mutations cause multisystem proteinopathy (MSP), a pleiotropic degenerative disorder that involves inclusion body myopathy. MSP patients display progressive muscle weakness. They also exhibit cardiomyopathy and die from cardiac and respiratory failure, which are consistent with critical myocardial roles for the enzyme. Nonetheless, efficient models to interrogate VCP in cardiac muscle remain underdeveloped and poorly studied. Here, we investigated the significance of VCP and mutant VCP in the Drosophila heart. Cardiac-restricted RNAi-mediated knockdown of TER94, the Drosophila VCP homolog, severely perturbed myofibrillar organization and heart function in adult flies. Furthermore, expression of MSP disease-causing alleles engendered cardiomyopathy in adults and structural defects in embryonic hearts. Drosophila may therefore serve as a valuable model for examining role(s) of VCP in cardiogenesis and for identifying novel heart-specific VCP interactions, which when disrupted via mutation, contribute to or elicit cardiac pathology. PMID:27500162

  18. Cardiac-Restricted Expression of VCP/TER94 RNAi or Disease Alleles Perturbs Drosophila Heart Structure and Impairs Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera C. Viswanathan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Valosin-containing protein (VCP is a highly conserved mechanoenzyme that helps maintain protein homeostasis in all cells and serves specialized functions in distinct cell types. In skeletal muscle, it is critical for myofibrillogenesis and atrophy. However, little is known about VCP’s role(s in the heart. Its functional diversity is determined by differential binding of distinct cofactors/adapters, which is likely disrupted during disease. VCP mutations cause multisystem proteinopathy (MSP, a pleiotropic degenerative disorder that involves inclusion body myopathy. MSP patients display progressive muscle weakness. They also exhibit cardiomyopathy and die from cardiac and respiratory failure, which are consistent with critical myocardial roles for the enzyme. Nonetheless, efficient models to interrogate VCP in cardiac muscle remain underdeveloped and poorly studied. Here, we investigated the significance of VCP and mutant VCP in the Drosophila heart. Cardiac-restricted RNAi-mediated knockdown of TER94, the Drosophila VCP homolog, severely perturbed myofibrillar organization and heart function in adult flies. Furthermore, expression of MSP disease-causing alleles engendered cardiomyopathy in adults and structural defects in embryonic hearts. Drosophila may therefore serve as a valuable model for examining role(s of VCP in cardiogenesis and for identifying novel heart-specific VCP interactions, which when disrupted via mutation, contribute to or elicit cardiac pathology.

  19. Amotl1 mediates sequestration of the Hippo effector Yap1 downstream of Fat4 to restrict heart growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragni, Chiara V.; Diguet, Nicolas; Le Garrec, Jean-François; Novotova, Marta; Resende, Tatiana P.; Pop, Sorin; Charon, Nicolas; Guillemot, Laurent; Kitasato, Lisa; Badouel, Caroline; Dufour, Alexandre; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Trouvé, Alain; McNeill, Helen; Meilhac, Sigolène M

    2017-01-01

    Although in flies the atypical cadherin Fat is an upstream regulator of Hippo signalling, the closest mammalian homologue, Fat4, has been shown to regulate tissue polarity rather than growth. Here we show in the mouse heart that Fat4 modulates Hippo signalling to restrict growth. Fat4 mutant myocardium is thicker, with increased cardiomyocyte size and proliferation, and this is mediated by an upregulation of the transcriptional activity of Yap1, an effector of the Hippo pathway. Fat4 is not required for the canonical activation of Hippo kinases but it sequesters a partner of Yap1, Amotl1, out of the nucleus. The nuclear translocation of Amotl1 is accompanied by Yap1 to promote cardiomyocyte proliferation. We, therefore, identify Amotl1, which is not present in flies, as a mammalian intermediate for non-canonical Hippo signalling, downstream of Fat4. This work uncovers a mechanism for the restriction of heart growth at birth, a process which impedes the regenerative potential of the mammalian heart. PMID:28239148

  20. Congenital Heart Defects in Adults : A Field Guide for Cardiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romfh, Anitra; Pluchinotta, Francesca Romana; Porayette, Prashob; Valente, Anne Marie; Sanders, Stephen P

    2012-06-15

    Advances in cardiology and cardiac surgery allow a large proportion of patients with congenital heart defects to survive into adulthood. These patients frequently develop complications characteristic of the defect or its treatment. Consequently, adult cardiologists participating in the care of these patients need a working knowledge of the more common defects. Occasionally, patients with congenital heart defects such as atrial septal defect, Ebstein anomaly or physiologically corrected transposition of the great arteries present for the first time in adulthood. More often patients previously treated in pediatric cardiology centers have transitioned to adult congenital heart disease centers for ongoing care. Some of the more important defects in this category are tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, functionally single ventricle defects, and coarctation. Through this field guide, we provide an overview of the anatomy of selected defects commonly seen in an adult congenital practice using pathology specimens and clinical imaging studies. In addition, we describe the physiology, clinical presentation to the adult cardiologist, possible complications, treatment options, and outcomes.

  1. Renal dysfunction, restrictive left ventricular filling pattern and mortality risk in patients admitted with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is associated with a variety of cardiac alterations including left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, LV dilation, and reduction in systolic and diastolic function. It is common and associated with an increased mortality risk in heart failure (HF) patients. This study was designed to...

  2. The effects of fixation and restricted visual field on vection-induced motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Robert M.; Hu, Senqi; Anderson, Richard B.; Leibowitz, Herschel W.; Koch, Kenneth L.

    1990-01-01

    Approximately 60 percent of healthy human subjects experience motion sickness when exposed to a rotating optokinetic drum. Here, the effects of certain visual factors on susceptibility to motion sickness were determined. Vection data (illusory self-motion), horizontal eye movement recordings, subjective motion sickness report, and a measure of gastric myoelectric activity were obtained from 45 subjects, who were randomly divided into the following three groups: a control group that observed the entire visual field with no fixation, a group that fixated on a central target, and a third group that had a visual field restricted to 15 deg. The experimental session was divided into three 12-min periods: baseline, drum rotation, and recovery. The results showed that fixation greatly reduced nystagmus and slightly reduced vection. The restricted visual field slightly reduced nystagmus and greatly reduced vection. Both of these manipulations significantly reduced symptoms of motion sickness and abnormal gastric myoelectric activity.

  3. Second heart field and the development of the outflow tract in human embryonic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan-Ping; Li, Hai-Rong; Cao, Xi-Mei; Wang, Qin-Xue; Qiao, Cong-Jin; Ya, Jing

    2013-04-01

    The second heart field (SHF) is indicated to contribute to the embryonic heart development. However, less knowledge is available about SHF development of human embryo due to the difficulty of collecting embryos. In this study, serial sections of human embryos from Carnegie stage 10 (CS10) to CS16 were stained with antibodies against Islet-1 (Isl-1), Nkx2.5, GATA4, myosin heavy chain (MHC) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) to observe spatiotemporal distribution of SHF and its contribution to the development of the arterial pole of cardiac tube. Our findings suggest that during CS10 to CS12, SHF of the human embryo is composed of the bilateral pharyngeal mesenchyme, the central mesenchyme of the branchial arch and splanchnic mesoderm of the pericardial cavity dorsal wall. With development, SHF translocates and consists of ventral pharyngeal mesenchyme and dorsal wall of the pericardial cavity. Hence, the SHF of human embryo shows a dynamic spatiotemporal distribution pattern. The formation of the Isl-1 positive condense cell prongs provides an explanation for the saddle structure formation at the distal pole of the outflow tract. In human embryo, the Isl-1 positive cells of SHF may contribute to the formation of myocardial outflow tract (OFT) and the septum during different development stages.

  4. Improvement in coronary heart disease risk factors during an intermittent fasting/calorie restriction regimen: Relationship to adipokine modulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroeger Cynthia M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of an intermittent fasting (IF-calorie restriction (CR regimen (with or without liquid meals to modulate adipokines in a way that is protective against coronary heart disease (CHD has yet to be tested. Objective Accordingly, we examined the effects of an IFCR diet on adipokine profile, body composition, and markers of CHD risk in obese women. Methods Subjects (n = 54 were randomized to either the IFCR-liquid (IFCR-L or IFCR-food based (IFCR-F diet for 10 weeks. Results Greater decreases in body weight and waist circumference were noted in the IFCR-L group (4 ± 1 kg; 6 ± 1 cm versus the IFCR-F group (3 ± 1 kg; 4 ± 1 cm. Similar reductions (P Conclusion These findings suggest that IFCR with a liquid diet favorably modulates visceral fat and adipokines in a way that may confer protection against CHD.

  5. Endothelial cells regulate neural crest and second heart field morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom-Hoffman, Michal; Michailovici, Inbal; Ferrara, Napoleone; Zelzer, Elazar; Tzahor, Eldad

    2014-07-04

    Cardiac and craniofacial developmental programs are intricately linked during early embryogenesis, which is also reflected by a high frequency of birth defects affecting both regions. The molecular nature of the crosstalk between mesoderm and neural crest progenitors and the involvement of endothelial cells within the cardio-craniofacial field are largely unclear. Here we show in the mouse that genetic ablation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Flk1) in the mesoderm results in early embryonic lethality, severe deformation of the cardio-craniofacial field, lack of endothelial cells and a poorly formed vascular system. We provide evidence that endothelial cells are required for migration and survival of cranial neural crest cells and consequently for the deployment of second heart field progenitors into the cardiac outflow tract. Insights into the molecular mechanisms reveal marked reduction in Transforming growth factor beta 1 (Tgfb1) along with changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Our collective findings in both mouse and avian models suggest that endothelial cells coordinate cardio-craniofacial morphogenesis, in part via a conserved signaling circuit regulating ECM remodeling by Tgfb1.

  6. Endothelial cells regulate neural crest and second heart field morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Milgrom-Hoffman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac and craniofacial developmental programs are intricately linked during early embryogenesis, which is also reflected by a high frequency of birth defects affecting both regions. The molecular nature of the crosstalk between mesoderm and neural crest progenitors and the involvement of endothelial cells within the cardio–craniofacial field are largely unclear. Here we show in the mouse that genetic ablation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Flk1 in the mesoderm results in early embryonic lethality, severe deformation of the cardio–craniofacial field, lack of endothelial cells and a poorly formed vascular system. We provide evidence that endothelial cells are required for migration and survival of cranial neural crest cells and consequently for the deployment of second heart field progenitors into the cardiac outflow tract. Insights into the molecular mechanisms reveal marked reduction in Transforming growth factor beta 1 (Tgfb1 along with changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM composition. Our collective findings in both mouse and avian models suggest that endothelial cells coordinate cardio–craniofacial morphogenesis, in part via a conserved signaling circuit regulating ECM remodeling by Tgfb1.

  7. Acute resistance exercise with blood flow restriction effects on heart rate, double product, oxygen saturation and perceived exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Gabriel R; Sousa, Maria S C; Costa e Silva, Gabriel V; Gil, Ana L S; Salles, Belmiro F; Novaes, Jefferson S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the acute effect of resistance exercise (RE) with and without blood flow restriction (BFR) on heart rate (HR), double product (DP), oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Twenty-four men (21·79 ± 3·21 years) performed three experimental protocols in a random order (crossover): (i) high-intensity RE at 80% of 1RM (HI), (ii) low-intensity RE at 20% of 1RM (LI) and (iii) low-intensity RE at 20% of 1RM combined with partial blood flow restriction (LI+BFR). HR, blood pressure, SpO2 and RPE were assessed. The data were analysed using repeated measures analysis of variance and the Wilcoxon test for RPE. The results indicated that all protocols significantly increased HR, both immediately postexercise and during the subsequent 60 min (Pexercise and increase HR and DP while maintaining a perception of greater exertion on the lower limbs. © 2014 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Pulmonary endoderm, second heart field and the morphogenesis of distal outflow tract in mouse embryonic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shi; Li, Hui-Chao; Wang, Yun-Xiu; Wu, Shan-Shan; Cai, Yu-Jin; Cui, Hui-Lin; Yang, Yan-Ping; Ya, Jing

    2014-05-01

    The second heart field (SHF), foregut endoderm and sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway are all reported to associate with normal morphogenesis and septation of outflow tract (OFT). However, the morphological relationships of the development of foregut endoderm and expression of SHH signaling pathway members with the development of surrounding SHF and OFT are seldom described. In this study, serial sections of mouse embryos from ED9 to ED13 (midgestation) were stained with a series of marker antibodies for specifically highlighting SHF (Isl-1), endoderm (Foxa2), basement membrane (Laminin), myocardium (MHC) and smooth muscle (α-SMA) respectively, or SHH receptors antibodies including patched1 (Ptc1), patched2 (Ptc2) and smoothened, to observe the spatiotemporal relationship between them and their contributions to OFT morphogenesis. Our results demonstrated that the development of an Isl-1 positive field in the splanchnic mesoderm ventral to foregut, a subset of SHF, is closely coupled with pulmonary endoderm or tracheal groove, the Isl-1 positive cells surrounding pulmonary endoderm are distributed in a special cone-shaped pattern and take part in the formation of the lateral walls of the intrapericardial aorta and pulmonary trunk and the transient aortic-pulmonary septum, and Ptc1 and Ptc2 are exclusively expressed in pulmonary endoderm during this Isl-l positive field development, suggesting special roles played in inducing the Isl-l positive field formation by pulmonary endoderm. It is indicated that pulmonary endoderm plays a role in the development and specification of SHF in midgestation, and that pulmonary endoderm-associated Isl-l positive field is involved in patterning the morphogenesis and septation of the intrapericardial arterial trunks.

  9. Pulmonary endoderm, second heart field and the morphogenesis of distal outflow tract in mouse embryonic heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Liang; JING Ya; LI Huichao; WANG Yunxiu; WU Shanshan; CAI Yujin; CUI Huilin; YANG Yanping

    2015-01-01

    Objective:The second heart field ( SHF) , foregut endoderm and sonic hedgehog ( SHH) signa-ling pathway are associate with normal morphogenesis and septation of outflow tract ( OFT) . However, the morpho-logical relationships of the development of foregut endoderm and expression of SHH signaling pathway members with the development of surrounding SHF and OFT are seldom described. In this study, serial sections of mouse embryos from ED9 to ED13 ( midgestation) were stained with a series of marker antibodies for specifically highlighting SHF ( Isl-1 ) , endoderm ( Foxa2 ) , basement membrane ( Laminin ) , myocardium ( MHC ) and smooth muscle (α-SMA) respectively, or SHH receptors antibodies including patched1 (Ptc1), patched2 (Ptc2) and smoothened, to observe the spatiotemporal relationship between them and their contributions to OFT morphogenesis. Results: Our results demonstrated that the development of an Isl-1 positive field in the splanchnic mesoderm ventral to foregut, a subset of SHF, was closely coupled with pulmonary endoderm or tracheal groove, the Isl-1 positive cells sur-rounding pulmonary endoderm were distributed in a special cone-shaped pattern and contributed to the formation of the lateral walls of the intrapericardial aorta and pulmonary trunk and the transient aortic-pulmonary septum, and Ptc1 and Ptc2 were exclusively expressed in pulmonary endoderm during this Isl-l positive field development, suggesting special roles played in inducing the Isl-l positive field formation by pulmonary endoderm. Conclusions: Pulmonary endoderm plays a role in the development and specification of SHF in midgestation, and that pulmonary endoderm-associated Isl-l positive field is involved in patterning the morphogenesis and septation of the intrapericardial arterial trunks.

  10. Hes1 is expressed in the second heart field and is required for outflow tract development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Rochais

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapid growth of the embryonic heart occurs by addition of progenitor cells of the second heart field to the poles of the elongating heart tube. Failure or perturbation of this process leads to congenital heart defects. In order to provide further insight into second heart field development we characterized the insertion site of a transgene expressed in the second heart field and outflow tract as the result of an integration site position effect. RESULTS: Here we show that the integration site of the A17-Myf5-nlacZ-T55 transgene lies upstream of Hes1, encoding a basic helix-loop-helix containing transcriptional repressor required for the maintenance of diverse progenitor cell populations during embryonic development. Transgene expression in a subset of Hes1 expression sites, including the CNS, pharyngeal epithelia, pericardium, limb bud and lung endoderm suggests that Hes1 is the endogenous target of regulatory elements trapped by the transgene. Hes1 is expressed in pharyngeal endoderm and mesoderm including the second heart field. Analysis of Hes1 mutant hearts at embryonic day 15.5 reveals outflow tract alignment defects including ventricular septal defects and overriding aorta. At earlier developmental stages, Hes1 mutant embryos display defects in second heart field proliferation, a reduction in cardiac neural crest cells and failure to completely extend the outflow tract. CONCLUSIONS: Hes1 is expressed in cardiac progenitor cells in the early embryo and is required for development of the arterial pole of the heart.

  11. Hes1 Is Expressed in the Second Heart Field and Is Required for Outflow Tract Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, Karim; Jarry, Thérèse; Mattei, Marie-Geneviève; Kelly, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Background Rapid growth of the embryonic heart occurs by addition of progenitor cells of the second heart field to the poles of the elongating heart tube. Failure or perturbation of this process leads to congenital heart defects. In order to provide further insight into second heart field development we characterized the insertion site of a transgene expressed in the second heart field and outflow tract as the result of an integration site position effect. Results Here we show that the integration site of the A17-Myf5-nlacZ-T55 transgene lies upstream of Hes1, encoding a basic helix-loop-helix containing transcriptional repressor required for the maintenance of diverse progenitor cell populations during embryonic development. Transgene expression in a subset of Hes1 expression sites, including the CNS, pharyngeal epithelia, pericardium, limb bud and lung endoderm suggests that Hes1 is the endogenous target of regulatory elements trapped by the transgene. Hes1 is expressed in pharyngeal endoderm and mesoderm including the second heart field. Analysis of Hes1 mutant hearts at embryonic day 15.5 reveals outflow tract alignment defects including ventricular septal defects and overriding aorta. At earlier developmental stages, Hes1 mutant embryos display defects in second heart field proliferation, a reduction in cardiac neural crest cells and failure to completely extend the outflow tract. Conclusions Hes1 is expressed in cardiac progenitor cells in the early embryo and is required for development of the arterial pole of the heart. PMID:19609448

  12. Wnt5a and Wnt11 are essential for second heart field progenitor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ethan David; Miller, Mayumi F.; Wang, Zichao; Moon, Randall T.; Morrisey, Edward E.

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin has a biphasic effect on cardiogenesis, promoting the induction of cardiac progenitors but later inhibiting their differentiation. Second heart field progenitors and expression of the second heart field transcription factor Islet1 are inhibited by the loss of β-catenin, indicating that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is necessary for second heart field development. However, expressing a constitutively active β-catenin with Islet1-Cre also inhibits endogenous Islet1 expression, reflecting the inhibitory effect of prolonged Wnt/β-catenin signaling on second heart field development. We show that two non-canonical Wnt ligands, Wnt5a and Wnt11, are co-required to regulate second heart field development in mice. Loss of Wnt5a and Wnt11 leads to a dramatic loss of second heart field progenitors in the developing heart. Importantly, this loss of Wnt5a and Wnt11 is accompanied by an increase in Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and ectopic Wnt5a/Wnt11 inhibits β-catenin signaling and promotes cardiac progenitor development in differentiating embryonic stem cells. These data show that Wnt5a and Wnt11 are essential regulators of the response of second heart field progenitors to Wnt/β-catenin signaling and that they act by restraining Wnt/β-catenin signaling during cardiac development. PMID:22569553

  13. Cardiac development : the posterior heart field and atrioventricular reentry tachycardia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hahurij, Nathan Dominggus

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is separated in two parts (Part I and Part II) in which normal and abnormal heart development are studied and related to congenital heart disease, in particular to the etiology of supraventricular arrhythmias in fetuses and neonates. Part I describes the development of the posterior hear

  14. Cardiac development : the posterior heart field and atrioventricular reentry tachycardia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hahurij, Nathan Dominggus

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is separated in two parts (Part I and Part II) in which normal and abnormal heart development are studied and related to congenital heart disease, in particular to the etiology of supraventricular arrhythmias in fetuses and neonates. Part I describes the development of the posterior

  15. Fetal growth restriction and the programming of heart growth and cardiac insulin-like growth factor 2 expression in the lamb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kimberley C W; Zhang, Lei; McMillen, I Caroline; Botting, Kimberley J; Duffield, Jaime A; Zhang, Song; Suter, Catherine M; Brooks, Doug A; Morrison, Janna L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Reduced growth in fetal life together with accelerated growth in childhood, results in a ∼50% greater risk of coronary heart disease in adult life. It is unclear why changes in patterns of body and heart growth in early life can lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. We aimed to investigate the role of the insulin-like growth factors in heart growth in the growth-restricted fetus and lamb. Hearts were collected from control and placentally restricted (PR) fetuses at 137–144 days gestation and from average (ABW) and low (LBW) birth weight lambs at 21 days of age. We quantified cardiac mRNA expression of IGF-1, IGF-2 and their receptors, IGF-1R and IGF-2R, using real-time RT-PCR and protein expression of IGF-1R and IGF-2R using Western blotting. Combined bisulphite restriction analysis was used to assess DNA methylation in the differentially methylated region (DMR) of the IGF-2/H19 locus and of the IGF-2R gene. In PR fetal sheep, IGF-2, IGF-1R and IGF-2R mRNA expression was increased in the heart compared to controls. LBW lambs had a greater left ventricle weight relative to body weight as well as increased IGF-2 and IGF-2R mRNA expression in the heart, when compared to ABW lambs. No changes in the percentage of methylation of the DMRs of IGF-2/H19 or IGF-2R were found between PR and LBW when compared to their respective controls. In conclusion, a programmed increased in cardiac gene expression of IGF-2 and IGF-2R may represent an adaptive response to reduced substrate supply (e.g. glucose and/or oxygen) in order to maintain heart growth and may be the underlying cause for increased ventricular hypertrophy and the associated susceptibility of cardiomyocytes to ischaemic damage later in life. PMID:21807611

  16. Fetal growth restriction and the programming of heart growth and cardiac insulin-like growth factor 2 expression in the lamb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kimberley C W; Zhang, Lei; McMillen, I Caroline; Botting, Kimberley J; Duffield, Jaime A; Zhang, Song; Suter, Catherine M; Brooks, Doug A; Morrison, Janna L

    2011-10-01

    Reduced growth in fetal life together with accelerated growth in childhood, results in a ~50% greater risk of coronary heart disease in adult life. It is unclear why changes in patterns of body and heart growth in early life can lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. We aimed to investigate the role of the insulin-like growth factors in heart growth in the growth-restricted fetus and lamb. Hearts were collected from control and placentally restricted (PR) fetuses at 137-144 days gestation and from average (ABW) and low (LBW) birth weight lambs at 21 days of age. We quantified cardiac mRNA expression of IGF-1, IGF-2 and their receptors, IGF-1R and IGF-2R, using real-time RT-PCR and protein expression of IGF-1R and IGF-2R using Western blotting. Combined bisulphite restriction analysis was used to assess DNA methylation in the differentially methylated region (DMR) of the IGF-2/H19 locus and of the IGF-2R gene. In PR fetal sheep, IGF-2, IGF-1R and IGF-2R mRNA expression was increased in the heart compared to controls. LBW lambs had a greater left ventricle weight relative to body weight as well as increased IGF-2 and IGF-2R mRNA expression in the heart, when compared to ABW lambs. No changes in the percentage of methylation of the DMRs of IGF-2/H19 or IGF-2R were found between PR and LBW when compared to their respective controls. In conclusion, a programmed increased in cardiac gene expression of IGF-2 and IGF-2R may represent an adaptive response to reduced substrate supply (e.g. glucose and/or oxygen) in order to maintain heart growth and may be the underlying cause for increased ventricular hypertrophy and the associated susceptibility of cardiomyocytes to ischaemic damage later in life.

  17. Pathological behavior of the open-shell restricted self-consistent-field equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moscardo, F.; Alvarez-Collado, J.R.

    1979-02-01

    The possible solutions of open-shell restricted self-consistent-field equations for a doublet are studied for Li and Na atoms, according to the values of the parameters implied in those equations. A similar behavior, characterized by the presence of several variational solutions is observed in both atoms. Some of these solutions can be assigned to excited configurations. Excitation energies are in good agreement with experimental data. Doublet stability for the solutions obtained has been studied, discussing the saddle-point character present in those solutions associated to excited configurations.

  18. Mesodermal Nkx2.5 is necessary and sufficient for early second heart field development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Nomura-Kitabayashi, Aya; Sultana, Nishat; Cai, Weibin; Cai, Xiaoqiang; Moon, Anne M; Cai, Chen-Leng

    2014-06-01

    The vertebrate heart develops from mesoderm and requires inductive signals secreted from early endoderm. During embryogenesis, Nkx2.5 acts as a key transcription factor and plays essential roles for heart formation from Drosophila to human. In mice, Nkx2.5 is expressed in the early first heart field, second heart field pharyngeal mesoderm, as well as pharyngeal endodermal cells underlying the second heart field. Currently, the specific requirements for Nkx2.5 in the endoderm versus mesoderm with regard to early heart formation are incompletely understood. Here, we performed tissue-specific deletion in mice to dissect the roles of Nkx2.5 in the pharyngeal endoderm and mesoderm. We found that heart development appeared normal after endodermal deletion of Nkx2.5 whereas mesodermal deletion engendered cardiac defects almost identical to those observed on Nkx2.5 null embryos (Nkx2.5(-/-)). Furthermore, re-expression of Nkx2.5 in the mesoderm rescued Nkx2.5(-/-) heart defects. Our findings reveal that Nkx2.5 in the mesoderm is essential while endodermal expression is dispensable for early heart formation in mammals.

  19. Bidirectional Fusion of the Heart-forming Fields in the Developing Chick Embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Rodriguez, R.A.; Krug, E.L.; Reyes, L.; Villavicencio, L.; Mjaatvedt, C.H.; Markwald, R.R.

    2007-01-01

    It is generally thought that the early pre-tubular chick heart is formed by fusion of the anterior or cephalic limits of the paired cardiogenic fields. However, this study shows that the heart fields initially fuse at their midpoint to form a transitory “butterfly”-shaped, cardiogenic structure. Fusion then progresses bi-directionally along the longitudinal axis in both cranial and caudal directions. Using in vivo labeling, we demonstrate that cells along the ventral fusion line are highly motile, crossing future primitive segments. We found that mesoderm cells migrated cephalically from the unfused tips of the anterior/cephalic wings into the head mesenchyme in the region that has been called the secondary heart field. Perturbing the anterior/cranial fusion results in formation of a biconal heart. A theoretical role of the ventral fusion line acting as a “heart organizer” and its role in cardia bifida is discussed. PMID:16252277

  20. An FGF autocrine loop initiated in second heart field mesoderm regulates morphogenesis at the arterial pole of the heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eon Joo; Watanabe, Yusuke; Smyth, Graham; Miyagawa-Tomita, Sachiko; Meyers, Erik; Klingensmith, John; Camenisch, Todd; Buckingham, Margaret; Moon, Anne M.

    2009-01-01

    In order to understand how secreted signals regulate complex morphogenetic events, it is crucial to identify their cellular targets. By conditional inactivation of Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 and overexpression of the FGF antagonist sprouty 2 in different cell types, we have dissected the role of FGF signaling during heart outflow tract development in mouse. Contrary to expectation, cardiac neural crest and endothelial cells are not primary paracrine targets. FGF signaling within second heart field mesoderm is required for remodeling of the outflow tract: when disrupted, outflow myocardium fails to produce extracellular matrix and TGFβ and BMP signals essential for endothelial cell transformation and invasion of cardiac neural crest. We conclude that an autocrine regulatory loop, initiated by the reception of FGF signals by the mesoderm, regulates correct morphogenesis at the arterial pole of the heart. These findings provide new insight into how FGF signaling regulates context-dependent cellular responses during development. PMID:18832392

  1. The cognitive implications of virtual locomotion with a restricted field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, William E.; Kelly, Jonathan W.; Dark, Veronica J.; Oliver, James H.

    2012-03-01

    A study was conducted to examine the impact, in terms of cognitive demands, of a restricted field of view (FOV) on semi-natural locomotion in virtual reality (VR). Participants were divided into two groups: high-FOV and low-FOV. They were asked to perform basic movements using a locomotion interface while simultaneously performing one of two memory tasks (spatial or verbal) or no memory task. The memory tasks were intended to simulate the competing demands when a user has primary tasks to perform while using an unnatural interface to move through the virtual world. Results show that participants remembered fewer spatial or verbal items when performing locomotion movements with a low FOV than with a high FOV. This equivalent verbal and spatial detriment may indicate that locomotion movements with a restricted FOV require additional general cognitive resources as opposed to spatial or verbal resource pools. This also emphasizes the importance of this research, as users of a system may allow primary task performance to suffer when performing locomotion. Movement start and completion times were also measured to examine resource requirements of specific aspects of movements. Understanding specific performance problems resulting from concurrent tasks can inform the design of systems.

  2. Spherically restricted motion of a charge in the field of a magnetic dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Cortés, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    We study the restricted motion of an electric charge in a spherical surface in the field of a magnetic dipole. This is the classical non-relativistic St\\"oermer problem within a sphere, with the dipole in its centre. We start from a Lagrangian approach which allows us to analyze the dynamical properties of the system, such as the role of a velocity dependent potential, the symmetries and the conservation properties. We derive the Hamilton equations of motion and observe that in this restricted case the equations can be reduced to a quadrature. From the Hamiltonian function we find for the polar angle an equivalent one-dimensional system of a particle in the presence of an effective potential. This equivalent potential function, which is a double well potential, allows us to get a clear description of this dynamical problem. We are able to find closed horizontal trajectories, as well as their period. Depending on initial conditions, we can find also some bands covered by non-periodic trajectories, as well as t...

  3. Second heart field cardiac progenitor cells in the early mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francou, Alexandre; Saint-Michel, Edouard; Mesbah, Karim; Théveniau-Ruissy, Magali; Rana, M Sameer; Christoffels, Vincent M; Kelly, Robert G

    2013-04-01

    At the end of the first week of mouse gestation, cardiomyocyte differentiation initiates in the cardiac crescent to give rise to the linear heart tube. The heart tube subsequently elongates by addition of cardiac progenitor cells from adjacent pharyngeal mesoderm to the growing arterial and venous poles. These progenitor cells, termed the second heart field, originate in splanchnic mesoderm medial to cells of the cardiac crescent and are patterned into anterior and posterior domains adjacent to the arterial and venous poles of the heart, respectively. Perturbation of second heart field cell deployment results in a spectrum of congenital heart anomalies including conotruncal and atrial septal defects seen in human patients. Here, we briefly review current knowledge of how the properties of second heart field cells are controlled by a network of transcriptional regulators and intercellular signaling pathways. Focus will be on 1) the regulation of cardiac progenitor cell proliferation in pharyngeal mesoderm, 2) the control of progressive progenitor cell differentiation and 3) the patterning of cardiac progenitor cells in the dorsal pericardial wall. Coordination of these three processes in the early embryo drives progressive heart tube elongation during cardiac morphogenesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Cardiac Pathways of Differentiation, Metabolism and Contraction.

  4. Generating and evaluating a ranked candidate gene list for potential vertebrate heart field regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Musso

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The vertebrate heart develops from two distinct lineages of cardiomyocytes that arise from the first and second heart fields (FHF and SHF, respectively. The FHF forms the primitive heart tube, while adding cells from the SHF allows elongation at both poles of the tube. Initially seen as an exclusive characteristic of higher vertebrates, recent work has demonstrated the presence of a distinct FHF and SHF in lower vertebrates, including zebrafish. We found that key transcription factors that regulate septation and chamber formation in higher vertebrates, including Tbx5 and Pitx2, influence relative FHF and SHF contributions to the zebrafish heart tube. To identify molecular modulators of heart field migration, we used microarray-based expression profiling following inhibition of tbx5a and pitx2ab in embryonic zebrafish (Mosimann & Panakova, et al, 2015; GSE70750. Here, we describe in more detail the procedure used to process, prioritize, and analyze the expression data for functional enrichment.

  5. Latent TGFβ binding protein 3 identifies a second heart field in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Cashman, Timothy J.; Nevis, Kathleen R.; Obregon, Pablo; Carney, Sara A.; Liu, Yan; Gu, Aihua; Mosimann, Christian; Sondalle, Samuel; Peterson, Richard E.; Heideman, Warren; Burns, Caroline E.; Burns, C. Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    The four-chambered mammalian heart develops from two fields of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) distinguished by their spatiotemporal patterns of differentiation and contributions to the definitive heart [1–3]. The first heart field differentiates earlier in lateral plate mesoderm, generates the linear heart tube and ultimately gives rise to the left ventricle. The second heart field (SHF) differentiates later in pharyngeal mesoderm, elongates the heart tube, and gives rise to the outflow tract (OFT) and much of the right ventricle. Because hearts in lower vertebrates contain a rudimentary OFT but not a right ventricle [4], the existence and function of SHF-like cells in these species has remained a topic of speculation [4–10]. Here we provide direct evidence from Cre/Lox-mediated lineage tracing and loss of function studies in zebrafish, a lower vertebrate with a single ventricle, that latent-TGFβ binding protein 3 (ltbp3) transcripts mark a field of CPCs with defining characteristics of the anterior SHF in mammals. Specifically, ltbp3+ cells differentiate in pharyngeal mesoderm after formation of the heart tube, elongate the heart tube at the outflow pole, and give rise to three cardiovascular lineages in the OFT and myocardium in the distal ventricle. In addition to expressing Ltbp3, a protein that regulates the bioavailability of TGFβ ligands [11], zebrafish SHF cells co-express nkx2.5, an evolutionarily conserved marker of CPCs in both fields [4]. Embryos devoid of ltbp3 lack the same cardiac structures derived from ltbp3+ cells due to compromised progenitor proliferation. Additionally, small-molecule inhibition of TGFβ signaling phenocopies the ltbp3-morphant phenotype whereas expression of a constitutively active TGFβ type I receptor rescues it. Taken together, our findings uncover a requirement for ltbp3-TGFβ signaling during zebrafish SHF development, a process that serves to enlarge the single ventricular chamber in this species. PMID:21623370

  6. Regular Exercise or Food Restriction, Which is Better in the Event of Heart Failure? An Approach to Oxidative Stress and Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Moradi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to investigate whether food restriction combined with exercise training could attenuate the oxidative stress and promote angiogenesis in a rat model of heart failure. 50 male wistar rats weighing 250-300 g were randomly divided into 5 groups including: 1 sham; they were fed ad libitum food, n=10. 2 Heart failure group; 3 Exercise group; they run on a treadmill 5 days per week for 4 weeks, n=10. 4 Food restricted group; they were fed with 60% of their daily average food intake, n=10. 5 Food restricted plus exercise group; as well as feeding with 60% of their daily average food intake for 8 weeks and run on a treadmill 5 days for the 4 next weeks, n=10. Subcutaneous injection of isoproterenol (130 mg/kg was used to induce experimental heart failure. Echocardiographic parameters were monitored. Plasma levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and prooxidant/ antioxidant balance (PAB, as oxidative parameters were measured. In continue gene expression of angiogenic factors such as hypoxia inducible factor-1a (HIF-1a, vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS as well as histopathological examination were investigated. Isoproterenol-treated hearts showed lower functional indexes including LVEDd; Left Ventricular End Diastolic dimension (p<0.05, FS; Fractional Shortening (p<0.001, EF; Ejection Fraction, (p<0.001. In addition, significant increase in plasma levels of MDA (p<0.001 and PAB (p<0.001 were observed. Food restriction and exercise significantly improved all measured parameters. The protective role of food restriction and exercise training on myocardial damage was further confirmed by promoting the gene expression of angiogenic factors (p<0.001 in left ventricle and reducing the myocardial fibrosis (p<0.05. Our results suggest that combined food restriction with exercise training is superior to either therapy alone for improving functional indexes, strengthen balance of

  7. Heart Rate and Energy Expenditure in Division I Field Hockey Players During Competitive Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Katie M; Ledesma, Allison B

    2016-08-01

    Sell, KM and Ledesma, AB. Heart rate and energy expenditure in Division I field hockey players during competitive play. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2122-2128, 2016-The purpose of this study was to quantify energy expenditure and heart rate data for Division I female field hockey players during competitive play. Ten female Division I collegiate field hockey athletes (19.8 ± 1.6 years; 166.4 ± 6.1 cm; 58.2 ± 5.3 kg) completed the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test to determine maximal heart rate. One week later, all subjects wore a heart rate monitor during a series of 3 matches in an off-season competition. Average heart rate (AvHR), average percentage of maximal heart rate (AvHR%), peak exercise heart rate (PExHR), and percentage of maximal heart rate (PExHR%), time spent in each of the predetermined heart rate zones, and caloric expenditure per minute of exercise (kcalM) were determined for all players. Differences between positions (backs, midfielders, and forwards) were assessed. No significant differences in AvHR, AvHR%, PExHR, PExHR%, and %TM were observed between playing positions. The AvHR% and PExHR% for each position fell into zones 4 (77-93% HRmax) and 5 (>93% HRmax), respectively, and significantly more time was spent in zone 4 compared with zones 1, 2, 3, and 5 across all players (p ≤ 0.05). The kcalM reflected very heavy intensity exercise. The results of this study will contribute toward understanding the sport-specific physiological demands of women's field hockey and has specific implications for the duration and schedule of training regimens.

  8. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory for bosonic many-body systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévêque, Camille; Bojer Madsen, Lars

    2017-04-01

    We develop an ab initio time-dependent wavefunction based theory for the description of a many-body system of cold interacting bosons. Like the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method for bosons (MCTDHB), the theory is based on a configurational interaction Ansatz for the many-body wavefunction with time-dependent self-consistent-field orbitals. The theory generalizes the MCTDHB method by incorporating restrictions on the active space of the orbital excitations. The restrictions are specified based on the physical situation at hand. The equations of motion of this time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-RASSCF) theory are derived. The similarity between the formal development of the theory for bosons and fermions is discussed. The restrictions on the active space allow the theory to be evaluated under conditions where other wavefunction based methods due to exponential scaling in the numerical effort cannot, and to clearly identify the excitations that are important for an accurate description, significantly beyond the mean-field approach. For ground state calculations we find it to be important to allow a few particles to have the freedom to move in many orbitals, an insight facilitated by the flexibility of the restricted-active-space Ansatz. Moreover, we find that a high accuracy can be obtained by including only even excitations in the many-body self-consistent-field wavefunction. Time-dependent simulations of harmonically trapped bosons subject to a quenching of their noncontact interaction, show failure of the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii approach within a fraction of a harmonic oscillation period. The TD-RASSCF theory remains accurate at much reduced computational cost compared to the MCTDHB method. Exploring the effect of changes of the restricted-active-space allows us to identify that even self-consistent-field excitations are mainly responsible for the accuracy of the method.

  9. Restrictive Atrial Septum Defect Becomes a Risk Factor for Norwood Palliation of Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome Only When It Is Combined with Mitral or Aortic Atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, Sojiro; Sinzobahamvya, Nicodème; Arenz, Claudia; Zartner, Peter; Asfour, Boulos; Hraska, Viktor

    2015-08-01

    Restrictive atrial septal defect (ASD) is described as risk factor for Norwood procedure because of elevated pulmonary resistance. We hypothesized that it invariably could not cause pulmonary hypertension, unless it was combined with mitral valve or aortic valve atresia. We investigated how restrictive ASD influenced survival of patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) who underwent Norwood operation. A total of 118 HLHS patients who underwent surgery between January 2005 and December 2012 were grouped into three groups. Group 1 included 31 patients with restrictive ASD combined with mitral or aortic atresia; Group 2 composed of 12 patients with restrictive ASD and mitral and aortic stenosis; Group 3 (n = 75) had no ASD restriction. Survival was determined for each group. Multivariate analysis was conducted to test risk factors for mortality. Mean follow-up was 26.3 ± 24.1 months. Survival was 78.7% ± 4.2% at 30-month interval and onward after Norwood procedure for the whole cohort; it was 43.8% ± 10.0%, 91.7% ± 8.0%, and 77.3% ± 5.0% for Group 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The difference was significant between Group 1 and Group 2 and 3: p < 0.001. Survival was similar for Group 2 and Group 3: p = 0.45. Combination of restrictive ASD and mitral or aortic atresia was found to be the sole risk factor for early and late mortality (odds ratio: 3.5, 95% confidence interval: 1.8-7.1, p < 0.001). Restrictive ASD only affects survival of HLHS patients following Norwood procedure if it is associated with mitral or aortic atresia. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Isl2b regulates anterior second heart field development in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Hagen R; Cheedipudi, Sirisha; Gao, Rui; Stainier, Didier Y R; Dobreva, Gergana D

    2017-01-20

    After initial formation, the heart tube grows by addition of second heart field progenitor cells to its poles. The transcription factor Isl1 is expressed in the entire second heart field in mouse, and Isl1-deficient mouse embryos show defects in arterial and venous pole development. The expression of Isl1 is conserved in zebrafish cardiac progenitors; however, Isl1 is required for cardiomyocyte differentiation only at the venous pole. Here we show that Isl1 homologues are expressed in specific patterns in the developing zebrafish heart and play distinct roles during cardiac morphogenesis. In zebrafish, isl2a mutants show defects in cardiac looping, whereas isl2b is required for arterial pole development. Moreover, Isl2b controls the expression of key cardiac transcription factors including mef2ca, mef2cb, hand2 and tbx20. The specific roles of individual Islet family members in the development of distinct regions of the zebrafish heart renders this system particularly well-suited for dissecting Islet-dependent gene regulatory networks controlling the behavior and function of second heart field progenitors in distinct steps of cardiac development.

  11. The Effects of Prenatal Protein Restriction on β-Adrenergic Signalling of the Adult Rat Heart during Ischaemia Reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J. P. Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A maternal low-protein diet (MLP fed during pregnancy leads to hypertension in adult rat offspring. Hypertension is a major risk factor for ischaemic heart disease. This study examined the capacity of hearts from MLP-exposed offspring to recover from myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion (IR and related this to cardiac expression of β-adrenergic receptors (β-AR and their associated G proteins. Pregnant rats were fed control (CON or MLP diets (n=12 each group throughout pregnancy. When aged 6 months, hearts from offspring underwent Langendorff cannulation to assess contractile function during baseline perfusion, 30 min ischemia and 60 min reperfusion. CON male hearts demonstrated impaired recovery in left ventricular pressure (LVP and dP/dtmax (P<0.01 during reperfusion when compared to MLP male hearts. Maternal diet had no effect on female hearts to recover from IR. MLP males exhibited greater membrane expression of β2-AR following reperfusion and urinary excretion of noradrenaline and dopamine was lower in MLP and CON female rats versus CON males. In conclusion, the improved cardiac recovery in MLP male offspring following IR was attributed to greater membrane expression of β2-AR and reduced noradrenaline and dopamine levels. In contrast, females exhibiting both decreased membrane expression of β2-AR and catecholamine levels were protected from IR injury.

  12. Effects of electromagnetic field exposure on the heart: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmas, Onur

    2016-01-01

    The use of electrical devices has gradually increased throughout the last century, and scientists have suggested that electromagnetic fields (EMF) generated by such devices may have harmful effects on living creatures. This work represents a systematic review of collective scholarly literature examining the effects of EMFs on the heart. Although most works describing effects of EMF exposure have been carried out using city electric frequencies (50-60 Hz), a consensus has not been reached about whether long- or short-term exposure to 50-60 Hz EMF negatively affects the heart. Studies have indicated that EMFs produced at cell-phone frequencies cause no-effect on the heart. Differences between results of studies may be due to a compensatory response developed by the body over time. At greater EMF strengths or shorter exposures, the ability of the body to develop compensation mechanisms is reduced and the potential for heart-related effects increases. It is noteworthy that diseases of heart tissues such as myocardial ischemia can also be successfully treated using EMF. Despite the substantial volume of data that has been collected on heart-related effects of EMFs, additional studies are needed at the cellular and molecular level to fully clarify the subject. Until the effects of EMF on heart tissue are more fully explored, electronic devices generating EMFs should be approached with caution.

  13. Effect of electromagnetic field emitted by cellular phones on fetal heart rate patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Onder; Hascalik, Seyma

    2004-01-15

    The study was planned to determine the effects of electromagnetic fields produced by cellular phones on baseline fetal heart rate, acceleration and deceleration. Forty pregnant women undergoing non-stress test were admitted to the study. Non-stress test was obtained while the subjects were holding the CP on stand by mode and on dialing mode, each for 5 min. Similar recordings were taken while there were no phones around for 10 min. Electromagnetic fields produced by cellular phones do not cause any demonstrable affect in fetal heart rate, acceleration and deceleration.

  14. Expression of Id2 in the Second Heart Field and Cardiac Defects in Id2 Knock-Out Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, M. R. M.; Vicente-Steijn, R.; Douglas, Y. L.; Wisse, L. J.; Mori, K.; Yokota, Y.; Bartelings, M. M.; Schalij, M. J.; Mahtab, E. A.; Poelmann, R. E.; Gittenberger-De Groot, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    The inhibitor of differentiation Id2 is expressed in mesoderm of the second heart field, which contributes myocardial and mesenchymal cells to the primary heart tube. The role of Id2 in cardiac development is insufficiently known. Heart development was studied in sequential developmental stages in I

  15. Treatment with oral beta-blockers during pregnancy complicated by maternal heart disease increases the risk of fetal growth restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersbøll, A S; Hedegaard, M; Søndergaard, L

    2014-01-01

    standard hypothesis tests. Associations were estimated by correlational analysis and multivariable regression. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Proportion of infants born small for gestational age (SGA). RESULTS: More of the infants exposed to beta-blockers were SGA compared with non-exposed infants (29.4 versus 15......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect on fetal growth of treatment with oral beta-blockers during pregnancy in women with congenital or acquired heart disease. DESIGN: Historical matched cohort study. SETTING: Centre for Pregnant Women with Heart Disease, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark...

  16. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory for laser-driven many-electron dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2013-01-01

    We present the time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-RASSCF) theory as a framework for the time-dependent many-electron problem. The theory generalizes the multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) theory by incorporating the restricted-active-space scheme...... well known in time-independent quantum chemistry. Optimization of the orbitals as well as the expansion coefficients at each time step makes it possible to construct the wave function accurately while using only a relatively small number of electronic configurations. In numerical calculations of high...

  17. Mathematical model of the anatomy and fibre orientation field of the left ventricle of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdin, Sergey F; Berdyshev, Vitaly I; Panfilov, Alexander V; Katsnelson, Leonid B; Solovyova, Olga; Markhasin, Vladimir S

    2013-06-18

    One of the main factors affecting propagation of electrical waves and contraction in ventricles of the heart is anisotropy of cardiac tissue. Anisotropy is determined by orientation of myocardial fibres. Determining fibre orientation field and shape of the heart is important for anatomically accurate modelling of electrical and mechanical function of the heart. The aim of this paper is to introduce a theoretical rule-based model for anatomy and fibre orientation of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart and to compare it with experimental data. We suggest explicit analytical formulae that allow us to obtain the left ventricle form and its fibre direction field. The ventricle band concept of cardiac architecture given by Torrent-Guasp is chosen as the model postulate. In our approach, anisotropy of the heart is derived from some general principles. The LV is considered as a set of identical spiral surfaces, each of which can be produced from the other by rotation around one vertical axis. Each spiral surface is filled with non-intersecting curves which represent myocardial fibres.For model verification, we use experimental data on fibre orientation in human and canine hearts. LV shape and anisotropy are represented by explicit analytical expressions in a curvilinear 3-D coordinate system. The derived fibre orientation field shows good qualitative agreement with experimental data. The model reveals the most thorough quantitative simulation of fibre angles at the LV middle zone. Our analysis shows that the band concept can generate realistic anisotropy of the LV. Our model shows good qualitative agreement between the simulated fibre orientation field and the experimental data on LV anisotropy, and the model can be used for various numerical simulations to study the effects of anisotropy on cardiac excitation and mechanical function.

  18. Field Validity of Heart Rate Variability Metrics Produced by QRSTool and CMetX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbert, Anita S.; Weinberg, Anna; Klonsky, E. David

    2012-01-01

    Interest in heart rate variability (HRV) metrics as markers of physiological and psychological health continues to grow beyond those with psychophysiological expertise, increasing the importance of developing suitable tools for researchers new to the field. Allen, Chambers, and Towers (2007) developed QRSTool and CMetX software as simple,…

  19. Field Validity of Heart Rate Variability Metrics Produced by QRSTool and CMetX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbert, Anita S.; Weinberg, Anna; Klonsky, E. David

    2012-01-01

    Interest in heart rate variability (HRV) metrics as markers of physiological and psychological health continues to grow beyond those with psychophysiological expertise, increasing the importance of developing suitable tools for researchers new to the field. Allen, Chambers, and Towers (2007) developed QRSTool and CMetX software as simple,…

  20. A boolean model of the cardiac gene regulatory network determining first and second heart field identity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Herrmann

    Full Text Available Two types of distinct cardiac progenitor cell populations can be identified during early heart development: the first heart field (FHF and second heart field (SHF lineage that later form the mature heart. They can be characterized by differential expression of transcription and signaling factors. These regulatory factors influence each other forming a gene regulatory network. Here, we present a core gene regulatory network for early cardiac development based on published temporal and spatial expression data of genes and their interactions. This gene regulatory network was implemented in a Boolean computational model. Simulations reveal stable states within the network model, which correspond to the regulatory states of the FHF and the SHF lineages. Furthermore, we are able to reproduce the expected temporal expression patterns of early cardiac factors mimicking developmental progression. Additionally, simulations of knock-down experiments within our model resemble published phenotypes of mutant mice. Consequently, this gene regulatory network retraces the early steps and requirements of cardiogenic mesoderm determination in a way appropriate to enhance the understanding of heart development.

  1. A Boolean Model of the Cardiac Gene Regulatory Network Determining First and Second Heart Field Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dao; Kestler, Hans A.; Kühl, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Two types of distinct cardiac progenitor cell populations can be identified during early heart development: the first heart field (FHF) and second heart field (SHF) lineage that later form the mature heart. They can be characterized by differential expression of transcription and signaling factors. These regulatory factors influence each other forming a gene regulatory network. Here, we present a core gene regulatory network for early cardiac development based on published temporal and spatial expression data of genes and their interactions. This gene regulatory network was implemented in a Boolean computational model. Simulations reveal stable states within the network model, which correspond to the regulatory states of the FHF and the SHF lineages. Furthermore, we are able to reproduce the expected temporal expression patterns of early cardiac factors mimicking developmental progression. Additionally, simulations of knock-down experiments within our model resemble published phenotypes of mutant mice. Consequently, this gene regulatory network retraces the early steps and requirements of cardiogenic mesoderm determination in a way appropriate to enhance the understanding of heart development. PMID:23056457

  2. Time-dependent multiconfiguration self-consistent-field method based on occupation restricted multiple active space model for multielectron dynamics in intense laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    The time-dependent multiconfiguration self-consistent-field method based on the occupation-restricted multiple active space model is proposed (TD-ORMAS) for multielectron dynamics in intense laser fields. Extending the previously proposed time-dependent complete-active-space self-consistent-field method [TD-CASSCF; Phys. Rev. A, {\\bf 88}, 023402 (2013)], which divides the occupied orbitals into core and active orbitals, the TD-ORMAS method {\\it further} subdivides the active orbitals into an arbitrary number of subgroups, and poses the {\\it occupation restriction} by giving the minimum and maximum number of electrons distributed in each subgroup. This enables highly flexible construction of the configuration interaction (CI) space, allowing a large-active-space simulation of dynamics, e.g., the core excitation or ionization. The equations of motion both for CI coefficients and spatial orbitals are derived based on the time-dependent variational principle, and an efficient algorithm is proposed to solve for th...

  3. Effect of fluid and dietary sodium restriction in the management of patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Almeida, Karina S M; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida R; Souza, Gabriela C; Trojahn, Melina M; Barilli, Sofia L S; Mansson, Jessica V; Biolo, Andreia; Rohde, Luis E P; Clausell, Nadine; Beck-da-Silva, Luís

    2014-09-04

    Although half of all patients with heart failure (HF) have a normal or near-normal ejection fraction and their prognosis differs little from that of patients with a reduced ejection fraction, the pathophysiology of HF with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF) is still poorly understood, and its management poorly supported by clinical trials. Sodium and fluid restriction is the most common self-care measure prescribed to HF patients for management of congestive episodes. However, its role in the treatment of HF-PEF remains unclear. This trial seeks to compare the effects of a sodium- and fluid-restricted diet versus an unrestricted diet on weight loss, neurohormonal activation, and clinical stability in patients admitted for decompensated HF-PEF. This is a randomized, parallel trial with blinded outcome assessment. The sample will include adult patients (aged ≥18 years) with a diagnosis of HF-PEF admitted for HF decompensation. The patients will be randomized to receive a diet with sodium and fluid intake restricted to 0.8 g/day and 800 mL/day respectively (intervention group) or an unrestricted diet, with 4 g/day sodium and unlimited fluid intake (control group), and followed for 7 days or until hospital discharge. The primary outcome shall consist of weight loss at 7 days or discharge. The secondary outcome includes assessment of clinical stability, neurohormonal activation, daily perception of thirst and readmission rate at 30 days. Assessment of the effects of sodium and fluid restriction on neurohormonal activation and clinical course of HF-PEF can promote a deeper understanding of the pathophysiology and progression of this complex syndrome. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01896908 (date of registration: 8 August 2013).

  4. Spatial regulation of cell cohesion by Wnt5a during second heart field progenitor deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ding; Sinha, Tanvi; Ajima, Rieko; Seo, Hwa-Seon; Yamaguchi, Terry P; Wang, Jianbo

    2016-04-01

    Wnt5a, a non-canonical Wnt ligand critical for outflow tract (OFT) morphogenesis, is expressed specifically in second heart field (SHF) progenitors in the caudal splanchnic mesoderm (SpM) near the inflow tract (IFT). Using a conditional Wnt5a gain of function (GOF) allele and Islet1-Cre, we broadly over-expressed Wnt5a throughout the SHF lineage, including the entire SpM between the IFT and OFT. Wnt5a over-expression in Wnt5a null mutants can rescue the cell polarity and actin polymerization defects as well as severe SpM shortening, but fails to rescue OFT shortening. Moreover, Wnt5a over-expression in wild-type background is able to cause OFT shortening. We find that Wnt5a over-expression does not perturb SHF cell proliferation, apoptosis or differentiation, but affects the deployment of SHF cells by causing them to accumulate into a large bulge at the rostral SpM and fail to enter the OFT. Our immunostaining analyses suggest an inverse correlation between cell cohesion and Wnt5a level in the wild-type SpM. Ectopic Wnt5a expression in the rostral SpM of Wn5a-GOF mutants diminishes the upregulation of adherens junction; whereas loss of Wnt5a in Wnt5a null mutants causes premature increase in adherens junction level in the caudal SpM. Over-expression of mouse Wnt5a in Xenopus animal cap cells also reduces C-cadherin distribution on the plasma membrane without affecting its overall protein level, suggesting that Wnt5a may play an evolutionarily conserved role in controlling the cell surface level of cadherin to modulate cell cohesion during tissue morphogenesis. Collectively, our data indicate that restricted expression of Wnt5a in the caudal SpM is essential for normal OFT morphogenesis, and uncover a novel function of spatially regulated cell cohesion by Wnt5a in driving the deployment of SHF cells from the SpM into the OFT.

  5. A retinoic acid responsive Hoxa3 transgene expressed in embryonic pharyngeal endoderm, cardiac neural crest and a subdomain of the second heart field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nata Y S-G Diman

    Full Text Available A transgenic mouse line harbouring a β-galacdosidase reporter gene controlled by the proximal 2 kb promoter of Hoxa3 was previously generated to investigate the regulatory cues governing Hoxa3 expression in the mouse. Examination of transgenic embryos from embryonic day (E 8.0 to E15.5 revealed regionally restricted reporter activity in the developing heart. Indeed, transgene expression specifically delineated cells from three distinct lineages: a subpopulation of the second heart field contributing to outflow tract myocardium, the cardiac neural crest cells and the pharyngeal endoderm. Manipulation of the Retinoic Acid (RA signaling pathway showed that RA is required for correct expression of the transgene. Therefore, this transgenic line may serve as a cardiosensor line of particular interest for further analysis of outflow tract development.

  6. A Retinoic Acid Responsive Hoxa3 Transgene Expressed in Embryonic Pharyngeal Endoderm, Cardiac Neural Crest and a Subdomain of the Second Heart Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diman, Nata Y. S.-G.; Remacle, Sophie; Bertrand, Nicolas; Picard, Jacques J.; Zaffran, Stéphane; Rezsohazy, René

    2011-01-01

    A transgenic mouse line harbouring a β-galacdosidase reporter gene controlled by the proximal 2 kb promoter of Hoxa3 was previously generated to investigate the regulatory cues governing Hoxa3 expression in the mouse. Examination of transgenic embryos from embryonic day (E) 8.0 to E15.5 revealed regionally restricted reporter activity in the developing heart. Indeed, transgene expression specifically delineated cells from three distinct lineages: a subpopulation of the second heart field contributing to outflow tract myocardium, the cardiac neural crest cells and the pharyngeal endoderm. Manipulation of the Retinoic Acid (RA) signaling pathway showed that RA is required for correct expression of the transgene. Therefore, this transgenic line may serve as a cardiosensor line of particular interest for further analysis of outflow tract development. PMID:22110697

  7. How dose sparing of cardiac structures correlates with in-field heart volume and sternal displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeho; Reardon, Kelli; Trifiletti, Daniel M; Geesey, Constance; Sukovich, Kaitlyn; Crandley, Edwin; Read, Paul W; Wijesooriya, Krishni

    2016-11-08

    Cardiac irradiation increases the risk of coronary artery disease in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Techniques exist to reduce cardiac irradiation, but the optimum technique depends on individual patient anatomy and physiology. We investigated the correlation of delta heart volume in field (dHVIF) and sternal excursion with dose sparing in heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD) to develop quantitative predictive models for expected dose to heart and LAD. A treatment planning study was performed on 97 left-breast cancer patients who underwent whole breast radiotherapy (prescription dose = 50 Gy) under deep inspiratory breath hold (DIBH). Two CT datasets, free breathing (FB) and DIBH, were utilized for treatment planning and for determination of the internal anatomy-based DIBH amplitude. The mean heart and LAD dose were compared between FB and DIBH plans and dose to the heart and LAD as a function of dHVIF and sternal excursion were determined. The [Average (STD); Range] mean heart doses from free breathing and DIBH are [120.5(65.2); 28.9 ~ 393.8] cGy and [67.5(25.1); 19.7 ~ 145.6] cGy, respectively. The mean LAD doses from free breathing and DIBH are [571.0(582.2); 42.2 ~ 2332.2] cGy and [185.9(127.0); 41.2 ~ 898.4] cGy, respectively. The mean dose reductions with DIBH are [53.1(50.6); -15.4 ~ 295.1] cGy for the heart and [385.1(513.4); -0.6 ~ 2105.8] cGy for LAD. Percent mean dose reductions to the heart and LAD with DIBH are 44% (p < 0.0001) and 67% (p < 0.0001), respectively, compared to FB. The dHVIF mean dose reduction correlation is 8.1 cGy/cc for the heart and 81.6 cGy/cc for LAD (with linear trend and y intercept: 26.0 cGy for the heart, 109.1 cGy for LAD). DIBH amplitude using sternal position was [1.3(.48); .38 ~ 2.5] cm. The DIBH amplitude mean dose reduction correlation is 14 cGy/cm for the heart and 212cGy/cm for LAD (with linear trend with y intercept: 35.6 cGy for the heart, 102.4 cGy for LAD). The strong correlation of dose sparing

  8. TBX1 regulates epithelial polarity and dynamic basal filopodia in the second heart field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francou, Alexandre; Saint-Michel, Edouard; Mesbah, Karim; Kelly, Robert G

    2014-11-01

    Elongation of the vertebrate heart occurs by progressive addition of second heart field (SHF) cardiac progenitor cells from pharyngeal mesoderm to the poles of the heart tube. The importance of these cells in the etiology of congenital heart defects has led to extensive research into the regulation of SHF deployment by signaling pathways and transcription factors. However, the basic cellular features of these progenitor cells, including epithelial polarity, cell shape and cell dynamics, remain poorly characterized. Here, using immunofluorescence, live imaging and embryo culture, we demonstrate that SHF cells constitute an atypical, apicobasally polarized epithelium in the dorsal pericardial wall, characterized by apical monocilia and dynamic actin-rich basal filopodia. We identify the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome gene Tbx1, required in the SHF for outflow tract development, as a regulator of the epithelial properties of SHF cells. Cell shape changes in mutant embryos include increased circularity, a reduced basolateral membrane domain and impaired filopodial activity, and are associated with elevated aPKCζ levels. Activation of aPKCζ in embryo culture similarly impairs filopodia activity and phenocopies proliferative defects and ectopic differentiation observed in the SHF of Tbx1 null embryos. Our results reveal that epithelial and progenitor cell status are coupled in the SHF, identifying control of cell shape as a regulatory step in heart tube elongation and outflow tract morphogenesis.

  9. Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field Conditioning Protects against I/R Injury and Contractile Dysfunction in the Isolated Rat Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialy, Dariusz; Wawrzynska, Magdalena; Bil-Lula, Iwona; Krzywonos-Zawadzka, Anna; Wozniak, Mieczyslaw; Cadete, Virgilio J J; Sawicki, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Low frequency electromagnetic field (LF-EMF) decreases the formation of reactive oxygen species, which are key mediators of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Therefore, we hypothesized that the LF-EMF protects contractility of hearts subjected to I/R injury. Isolated rat hearts were subjected to 20 min of global no-flow ischemia, followed by 30 min reperfusion, in the presence or absence of LF-EMF. Coronary flow, heart rate, left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), and rate pressure product (RPP) were determined for evaluation of heart mechanical function. The activity of cardiac matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and the contents of coronary effluent troponin I (TnI) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured as markers of heart injury. LF-EMF prevented decreased RPP in I/R hearts, while having no effect on coronary flow. In addition, hearts subjected to I/R exhibited significantly increased LVDP when subjected to LF-EMF. Although TnI and IL-6 levels were increased in I/R hearts, their levels returned to baseline aerobic levels in I/R hearts subjected to LF-EMF. The reduced activity of MMP-2 in I/R hearts was reversed in hearts subjected to LF-EMF. The data presented here indicate that acute exposure to LF-EMF protects mechanical function of I/R hearts and reduces I/R injury.

  10. Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field Conditioning Protects against I/R Injury and Contractile Dysfunction in the Isolated Rat Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Bialy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low frequency electromagnetic field (LF-EMF decreases the formation of reactive oxygen species, which are key mediators of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. Therefore, we hypothesized that the LF-EMF protects contractility of hearts subjected to I/R injury. Isolated rat hearts were subjected to 20 min of global no-flow ischemia, followed by 30 min reperfusion, in the presence or absence of LF-EMF. Coronary flow, heart rate, left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP, and rate pressure product (RPP were determined for evaluation of heart mechanical function. The activity of cardiac matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 and the contents of coronary effluent troponin I (TnI and interleukin-6 (IL-6 were measured as markers of heart injury. LF-EMF prevented decreased RPP in I/R hearts, while having no effect on coronary flow. In addition, hearts subjected to I/R exhibited significantly increased LVDP when subjected to LF-EMF. Although TnI and IL-6 levels were increased in I/R hearts, their levels returned to baseline aerobic levels in I/R hearts subjected to LF-EMF. The reduced activity of MMP-2 in I/R hearts was reversed in hearts subjected to LF-EMF. The data presented here indicate that acute exposure to LF-EMF protects mechanical function of I/R hearts and reduces I/R injury.

  11. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory for laser-driven many-electron dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2013-01-01

    We present the time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-RASSCF) theory as a framework for the time-dependent many-electron problem. The theory generalizes the multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) theory by incorporating the restricted-active-space scheme...... well known in time-independent quantum chemistry. Optimization of the orbitals as well as the expansion coefficients at each time step makes it possible to construct the wave function accurately while using only a relatively small number of electronic configurations. In numerical calculations of high......-order harmonic generation spectra of a one-dimensional model of atomic beryllium interacting with a strong laser pulse, the TD-RASSCF method is reasonably accurate while largely reducing the computational complexity. The TD-RASSCF method has the potential to treat large atoms and molecules beyond the capability...

  12. Design and analysis of a field modulated magnetic screw for artificial heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijian Ling

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new electromechanical energy conversion system, called Field Modulated Magnetic Screw (FMMS as a high force density linear actuator for artificial heart. This device is based on the concept of magnetic screw and linear magnetic gear. The proposed FMMS consists of three parts with the outer and inner carrying the radially magnetized helically permanent-magnet (PM, and the intermediate having a set of helically ferromagnetic pole pieces, which modulate the magnetic fields produced by the PMs. The configuration of the newly designed FMMS is presented and its electromagnetic performances are analyzed by using the finite-element analysis, verifying the advantages of the proposed structure.

  13. Average acceleration and deceleration capacity of fetal heart rate in normal pregnancy and in pregnancies complicated by fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graatsma, E M; Mulder, E J H; Vasak, B; Lobmaier, S M; Pildner von Steinburg, S; Schneider, K T M; Schmidt, G; Visser, G H A

    2012-12-01

    To study fetal heart rate (FHR), its short term variability (STV), average acceleration capacity (AAC), and average deceleration capacity (ADC) throughout uncomplicated gestation, and to perform a preliminary comparison of these FHR parameters between small-for dates (SFD) and control fetuses. Prospective observational study of 7 h FHR-recordings obtained with a fetal-ECG monitor in the second half of uncomplicated pregnancies (n = 90) and pregnancies complicated by fetal SFD (n = 30). FHR and STV were calculated according to established analysis. True beat-to-beat FHR, recorded at 1 ms accuracy, was used to calculate AAC and ADC using Phase Rectified Signal Averaging (PRSA). Mean values of FHR, STV, AAC, and ADC derived from recordings in SFD fetuses were compared with the reference curves. Compared with the control group the mean z-scores for STV, AAC, and ADC in SFD fetuses were lower by 1.0 SD, 1.5 SD, and 1.7 SD, respectively (p < 0.0001 for all comparisons). In SFD fetuses, both the AAC and ADC z-scores were lower than the STV z-scores (p < 0.02 and p < 0.002, respectively). Analysis of the AAC and ADC as recorded with a high resolution fECG recorder may differentiate better between normal and SFD fetuses than STV.

  14. Endothelium in the pharyngeal arches 3, 4 and 6 is derived from the second heart field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Chen, Dongying; Chen, Kelley; Jubran, Ali; Ramirez, AnnJosette; Astrof, Sophie

    2017-01-15

    Oxygenated blood from the heart is directed into the systemic circulation through the aortic arch arteries (AAAs). The AAAs arise by remodeling of three symmetrical pairs of pharyngeal arch arteries (PAAs), which connect the heart with the paired dorsal aortae at mid-gestation. Aberrant PAA formation results in defects frequently observed in patients with lethal congenital heart disease. How the PAAs form in mammals is not understood. The work presented in this manuscript shows that the second heart field (SHF) is the major source of progenitors giving rise to the endothelium of the pharyngeal arches 3 - 6, while the endothelium in the pharyngeal arches 1 and 2 is derived from a different source. During the formation of the PAAs 3 - 6, endothelial progenitors in the SHF extend cellular processes toward the pharyngeal endoderm, migrate from the SHF and assemble into a uniform vascular plexus. This plexus then undergoes remodeling, whereby plexus endothelial cells coalesce into a large PAA in each pharyngeal arch. Taken together, our studies establish a platform for investigating cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating PAA formation and alterations that lead to disease.

  15. The role of the second heart field in pulmonary vein development : new insights in the origin of clinical abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, Yvonne Louise

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we describe normal and abnormal pulmonary vein development in human and mouse hearts, and focus on the histo(patho)logy of the pulmonary venous and left atrial dorsal wall, in order to elucidate the role of the posterior heart field in the formation and differentiation of the pulmonar

  16. Characterization of field strains of infectious laryngotracheitis virus in China by restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhuanqiang; Li, Shengpeng; Xie, Qingmei; Chen, Feng; Bi, Yingzuo

    2016-01-01

    Nineteen strains of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV; Gallid herpesvirus 1) were isolated from dead or diseased birds in chicken flocks from different areas of China between 2010 and 2014 and used to investigate ILTV epidemiology. These strains were characterized using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) patterns and sequence analysis of the thymidine kinase (TK) gene. PCR-RFLP analysis showed that the TK gene generated 2 patterns when digested with restriction endonuclease enzymes. Pattern A corresponded to 2 virulent field strains, while pattern B was characteristic of 2 virulent field strains, 15 low pathogenicity field strains, and all vaccine strains. Sequence analysis of the TK gene indicated that the messenger RNA polyadenylation signals could be identified in some isolates where amino acid 252 was threonine, and in those with methionine at that position. The present study has demonstrated that most of the outbreaks of ILT in China were caused either by low virulence strains or by vaccine-related strains, and also emphasizes the importance of reinforcing ILTV surveillance in both vaccinated and nonvaccinated flocks.

  17. Zebrafish Mef2ca and Mef2cb are essential for both first and second heart field cardiomyocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinits, Yaniv; Pan, Luyuan; Walker, Charline; Dowd, John; Moens, Cecilia B; Hughes, Simon M

    2012-09-15

    Mef2 transcription factors have been strongly linked with early heart development. D-mef2 is required for heart formation in Drosophila, but whether Mef2 is essential for vertebrate cardiomyocyte (CM) differentiation is unclear. In mice, although Mef2c is expressed in all CMs, targeted deletion of Mef2c causes lethal loss of second heart field (SHF) derivatives and failure of cardiac looping, but first heart field CMs can differentiate. Here we examine Mef2 function in early heart development in zebrafish. Two Mef2c genes exist in zebrafish, mef2ca and mef2cb. Both are expressed similarly in the bilateral heart fields but mef2cb is strongly expressed in the heart poles at the primitive heart tube stage. By using fish mutants for mef2ca and mef2cb and antisense morpholinos to knock down either or both Mef2cs, we show that Mef2ca and Mef2cb have essential but redundant roles in myocardial differentiation. Loss of both Mef2ca and Mef2cb function does not interfere with early cardiogenic markers such as nkx2.5, gata4 and hand2 but results in a dramatic loss of expression of sarcomeric genes and myocardial markers such as bmp4, nppa, smyd1b and late nkx2.5 mRNA. Rare residual CMs observed in mef2ca;mef2cb double mutants are ablated by a morpholino capable of knocking down other Mef2s. Mef2cb over-expression activates bmp4 within the cardiogenic region, but no ectopic CMs are formed. Surprisingly, anterior mesoderm and other tissues become skeletal muscle. Mef2ca single mutants have delayed heart development, but form an apparently normal heart. Mef2cb single mutants have a functional heart and are viable adults. Our results show that the key role of Mef2c in myocardial differentiation is conserved throughout the vertebrate heart.

  18. Restrictions on negative energy density for the Dirac field in flat spacetime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Wei-Xing; Yu Hong-Wei; Li Fei; Wu Pu-Xun; Ren Zhong-Zhou

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the quantum Dirac field in n + 1-dimensional flat spacetime and derives a lower bound in the form of quantum inequality on the energy density averaged against spacetime sampling functions. The stateindependent quantum inequality derived in the present paper is similar to the temporal quantum energy inequality and it is stronger for massive field than for massless one. It also presents the concrete results of the quantum inequality in 2 and 4-dimensional spacetimes.

  19. Cyp26 Enzymes Facilitate Second Heart Field Progenitor Addition and Maintenance of Ventricular Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydeen, Ariel B; Waxman, Joshua S

    2016-11-01

    Although retinoic acid (RA) teratogenicity has been investigated for decades, the mechanisms underlying RA-induced outflow tract (OFT) malformations are not understood. Here, we show zebrafish embryos deficient for Cyp26a1 and Cyp26c1 enzymes, which promote RA degradation, have OFT defects resulting from two mechanisms: first, a failure of second heart field (SHF) progenitors to join the OFT, instead contributing to the pharyngeal arch arteries (PAAs), and second, a loss of first heart field (FHF) ventricular cardiomyocytes due to disrupted cell polarity and extrusion from the heart tube. Molecularly, excess RA signaling negatively regulates fibroblast growth factor 8a (fgf8a) expression and positively regulates matrix metalloproteinase 9 (mmp9) expression. Although restoring Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling can partially rescue SHF addition in Cyp26 deficient embryos, attenuating matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) function can rescue both ventricular SHF addition and FHF integrity. These novel findings indicate a primary effect of RA-induced OFT defects is disruption of the extracellular environment, which compromises both SHF recruitment and FHF ventricular integrity.

  20. Cardiac tissue structure. Electric field interactions in polarizing the heart: 3D computer models and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entcheva, Emilia

    1998-11-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the interactions between the cardiac tissue structure and applied electric fields in producing complex polarization patterns. It is hypothesized that the response of the heart in the conditions of strong electric shocks, as those applied in defibrillation, is dominated by mechanisms involving the cardiac muscle structure perceived as a continuum. Analysis is carried out in three-dimensional models of the heart with detailed fiber architecture. Shock-induced transmembrane potentials are calculated using the bidomain model in its finite element implementation. The major new findings of this study can be summarized as follows: (1) The mechanisms of polarization due to cardiac fiber curvature and fiber rotation are elucidated in three-dimensional ellipsoidal hearts of variable geometry; (2) Results are presented showing that the axis of stimulation and the polarization axis on a whole heart level might differ significantly due to geometric and anisotropic factors; (3) Virtual electrode patterns are demonstrated numerically inside the ventricular wall in internal defibrillation conditions. The role of the tissue-bath interface in shaping the shock-induced polarization is revealed; (4) The generation of 3D phase singularity scrolls by shock-induced intramural virtual electrode patterns is proposed as evidence for a possible new mechanism for the failure to defibrillate. The results of this study emphasize the role of unequal anisotropy in the intra- and extracellular domains, as well as the salient fiber architecture characteristics, such as curvature and transmural rotation, in polarizing the myocardium. Experimental support of the above findings was actively sought and found in recent optical mapping studies using voltage-sensitive dyes. If validated in vivo, these findings would significantly enrich the prevailing concepts about the mechanisms of stimulation and defibrillation of the heart.

  1. Geft is dispensable for the development of the second heart field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiongwei Fan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Geft is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, which can specificallyactivate Rho family of small GTPase by catalyzing theexchange of bound GDP for GTP. Geft is highly expressed inthe excitable tissue as heart and skeletal muscle and plays importantroles in many cellular processes, such as cell proliferation,migration, and cell fate decision. However, the invivo role of Geft remains unknown. Here, we generated a Geftconditional knockout mouse by flanking exons 5-17 of Geftwith loxP sites. Cre-mediated deletion of the Geft gene in heartusing Mef2c-Cre transgenic mice resulted in a dramatic decreaseof Geft expression. Geft knockout mice develop normallyand exhibit no discernable phenotype, suggesting Geft isdispensable for the development of the second heart field inmouse. The Geft conditional knockout mouse will be a valuablegenetic tool for uncovering the in vivo roles of Geft duringdevelopment and in adult homeostasis. (BMB reports2012; 45(3: 153-158

  2. Field test of a paradigm: hysteresis of heart rate in thermoregulation by a free-ranging lizard (Pogona barbata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, G C; Seebacher, F

    1999-06-22

    The discovery that changes in heart rate and blood flow allow some reptiles to heat faster than they cool has become a central paradigm in our understanding of reptilian thermoregulation. However, this hysteresis in heart rate has been demonstrated only in simplistic laboratory heating and cooling trials, leaving its functional significance in free-ranging animals unproven. To test the validity of this paradigm, we measured heart rate and body temperature (Tb) in undisturbed, free-ranging bearded dragons (Pogona barbata), the species in which this phenomenon was first described. Our field data confirmed the paradigm and we found that heart rate during heating usually exceeded heart rate during cooling at any Tb. Importantly, however, we discovered that heart rate was proportionally faster in cool lizards whose Tb was still well below the 'preferred Tb range' compared to lizards whose Tb was already close to it. Similarly, heart rate during cooling was proportionally slower the warmer the lizard and the greater its cooling potential compared to lizards whose Tb was already near minimum operative temperature. Further, we predicted that, if heart rate hysteresis has functional significance, a 'reverse hysteresis' pattern should be observable when lizards risked overheating. This was indeed the case and, during heating on those occasions when Tb reached very high levels (> 40 degrees C), heart rate was significantly lower than heart rate during the immediately following cooling phase. These results demonstrate that physiological control of thermoregulation in reptiles is more complex than has been previously recognized.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: familial restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions familial restrictive cardiomyopathy familial restrictive cardiomyopathy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Familial restrictive cardiomyopathy is a genetic form of heart disease. For ...

  4. Magnetic fields threading black holes: restrictions from general relativity and implications for astrophysical black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, David

    2017-07-01

    The idea that black hole spin is instrumental in the generation of powerful jets in active galactic nuclei and X-ray binaries is arguably the most contentious claim in black hole astrophysics. Because jets are thought to originate in the context of electromagnetism, and the modeling of Maxwell fields in curved spacetime around black holes is challenging, various approximations are made in numerical simulations that fall under the guise of `ideal magnetohydrodynamics'. But the simplifications of this framework may struggle to capture relevant details of real astrophysical environments near black holes. In this work, we highlight tension between analytic and numerical results, specifically between the analytically derived conserved Noether currents for rotating black hole spacetimes and the results of general relativistic numerical simulations (GRMHD). While we cannot definitively attribute the issue to any specific approximation used in the numerical schemes, there seem to be natural candidates, which we explore. GRMHD notwithstanding, if electromagnetic fields around rotating black holes are brought to the hole by accretion, we show from first principles that prograde accreting disks likely experience weaker large-scale black hole-threading fields, implying weaker jets than in retrograde configurations.

  5. Identification of downstream genetic pathways of Tbx1 in the second heart field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jun; Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Nowotschin, Sonja; Bondarev, Alexei; Lipner, Shari; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2008-01-01

    Tbx1, a T-box transcription factor, and an important gene for velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS) in humans, causes outflow tract (OFT) heart defects when inactivated in the mouse. Tbx1 is expressed in the second heart field (SHF) and is required in this tissue for OFT development. To identify Tbx1 regulated genetic pathways in the SHF, we performed gene expression profiling of the caudal pharyngeal region in Tbx1-/- and wild type embryos. Isl1, a key marker for the SHF, as well as Hod and Nkx2-6, were downregulated in Tbx1-/- mutants, while genes required for cardiac morphogenesis, such as Raldh2, Gata4, and Tbx5, as well as a subset of muscle contractile genes, signifying myocardial differentiation, were ectopically expressed. Pan-mesodermal ablation of Tbx1 resulted in similar gene expression changes, suggesting cell-autonomous roles of Tbx1 in regulating these genes. Opposite expression changes concomitant with SHF-derived cardiac defects occurred in TBX1 gain-of-function mutants, indicating that appropriate levels of Tbx1 are required for heart development. When taken together, our studies show that Tbx1 acts upstream in a genetic network that positively regulates SHF cell proliferation and negatively regulates differentiation, cell-autonomously in the caudal pharyngeal region. PMID:18328475

  6. Evolutionary conservation of Nkx2.5 autoregulation in the second heart field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christopher D; Zhang, Boding; Lee, Benjamin; Evans, Samuel I; Lassar, Andrew B; Lee, Kyu-Ho

    2013-02-01

    The cardiac homeobox gene Nkx2.5 plays a key and dosage-sensitive role in the differentiation of outflow tract and right ventricle from progenitors of the second heart field (SHF) and Nkx2.5 mutation is strongly associated with human outflow tract congenital heart disease (OFT CHD). Therefore defining the regulatory mechanisms controlling Nkx2.5 expression in SHF populations serves an important function in understanding the etiology of complex CHD. Through a comparative analysis of regulatory elements controlling SHF expression of Nkx2.5 in the chicken and mouse, we have found evidence that Nkx2.5 autoregulation is important for maintaining Nkx2.5 expression during SHF differentiation in both species. However the mechanism of Nkx2.5 maintenance differs between placental mammals and non-mammalian vertebrates: in chick Nkx2.5 binds directly to a genomic enhancer element that is required to maintain Nkx2.5 expression in the SHF. In addition, it is likely that this is true in other non-mammalian vertebrates given that they possess a similar genomic organization. By contrast, in placental mammals, Nkx2.5 autoregulation in the SHF functions indirectly through Mef2c. These data underscore a tight relationship in mammals between Nkx2.5 and Mef2c in SHF transcriptional regulation, and highlight the potential for evolutionary cis-regulatory analysis to identify core, conserved components of the gene networks controlling heart development.

  7. Effects of short-term exposure to powerline-frequency electromagnetic field on the electrical activity of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmas, Onur; Comlekci, Selcuk; Koylu, Halis

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The heart is a contractile organ that can generate its own rhythm. The contraction, or the rhythm, of the heart may be influenced by electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure, because of the heart's excitability characteristic. In previous studies, different methods have been used to study the possible effects of an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) on the heart. But the studies' designs were not similar, and the results were also different. Recent studies have shown some evidence that short-term EMF exposure can influence the heart more than long-term exposure. This study investigated how the heart is affected in the first EMF exposure. In a simulation of the daily exposure of humans to a power frequency, Wistar albino rats were used. By utilizing the Helmholtz-coil set, we obtained a 50-Hz, 1-μT EMF and examined rat heart activity during short-term EMF exposure. No effect was observed under this exposure condition. The results obtained do not confirm a possible mechanism in the electrical activity of the rat heart model.

  8. Coherence of heart rate variability and local physical fields in monitoring studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzhilkin, D. A.; Borodin, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Technological advances have led to a substantial modification of the physical fields of the environment, which could affect the status of living organisms under their constant exposure. In this study, the activity of human cardiovascular system under the influence of a complex natural physical environmental factors investigated. The study was conducted on a representative homogeneous sample (44 persons aged 19 to 22 years) by simultaneous monitoring of electrocardiograms and natural physical fields in Tomsk (geomagnetic field, meteorological parameters - temperature, pressure and humidity, surface wind speed, the parameters of the Schumann resonance - amplitude, frequency and quality factor of the first four modes in the range of 6 to 32 Hz, the power spectral density infrasonic background in the range of from 0,5 to 32 Hz). It was shown that among the set of parameters of physical fields present field that can resonate in the functioning of the human organism. The greatest coherence with heart rate variability detect variations eastern component of the geomagnetic field.

  9. The effect of extremely low frequency magnetic field on heart tissue iron density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Nergiz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this histological study was to investigate the effects of extremely low frequency, low intensity magnetic field on the heart muscle ıron density.Materials and methods: In this study, 45 male Spraque Dawley rats were introduced and were divided into three groups as sham, control and experiment group. The experimental group was exposed to a 0.25 mT to Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Field (ELF-MF for 14 days, 3h a day in metacrylate boxes. The sham group was treated like the experimental group, except for ELF-MF exposure. For control, nothing applied to rats in this group and they completed their life cycle in the cage during the study period. After exposure period, the rats were sacrificed under ketalar anesthesia (50 mg / kg, intramuscularly. Heart tissues were immediately fixed in 10% neutral formaldehyde and embedded in paraffin blocks. Histological sections from cardiac tissue stained by hematoxylin-eosin, Perls’ Prussian blue for iron pigments. Histological slides were photographed under a Nikon DS-2MV photomicroscope.Results: The architecture and histology of the control, sham and experimental group were observed as normal. No differences were observed between the control, sham and experimental rat groups in the iron stain of heart tissues.Conclusion: As a result of our study, we did not observe differences between the control and ELF-MF (experimental group. In this investigation we demonstrated that the exposure of cardiac tissue of rats to the ELF-MF did not change in the iron stain study. J Clin Exp Invest 2011;2(2:144-8

  10. Extra-Low-Frequency Magnetic Fields alter Cancer Cells through Metabolic Restriction

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Background: Biological effects of extra-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MF) have lacked a credible mechanism of interaction between MFs and living material. Objectives: Examine the effect of ELF-MFs on cancer cells. Methods: Five cancer cell lines were exposed to ELF-MFs within the range of 0.025 to 5 microT, and the cells were examined for karyotype changes after 6 days. Results: All cancer cells lines lost chromosomes from MF exposure, with a mostly flat dose-response. Constant MF exposures for three weeks allow a rising return to the baseline, unperturbed karyotypes. From this point, small MF increases or decreases are again capable of inducing karyotype contractions. Our data suggests that the karyotype contractions are caused by MF interference with mitochondria's ATP synthase (ATPS), compensated by the action of AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK). The effects of MFs are similar to those of the ATPS inhibitor oligomycin. They are amplified by metformin, an AMPK stimulator, and attenuated by resisti...

  11. Restricted maximum likelihood estimation of variance components from field data for number of pigs born alive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, M T; Mabry, J W; Bertrand, J K

    1993-11-01

    Variance components for number of pigs born alive (NBA) were estimated from sow productivity field records collected by purebred breed associations. Data sets analyzed were as follows: Hampshire (n = 13,537), Landrace (n = 10,822), and Spotted (n = 3,949). Variance components for service sire, sire of sow, dam of sow, and residual effects on NBA (adjusted for parity) were estimated. The single-trait model included relationships between service sires, sires of sows, and dams of sows. The model was implemented using an expectation maximization (EM) REML algorithm. A sparse-matrix solver was also used. Heritability estimates for NBA were .13, .13, and .12 for Hampshire, Spotted, and Landrace, respectively. Estimates of maternal genetic (co)variances (m2) expressed as a proportion of the phenotypic variance were .05, .01, and .03 for Hampshire, Spotted, and Landrace, respectively. Results indicated that service sires account for 1 to 2% of the total variation for NBA. Genetic effects influencing NBA seem to be small in these data sets, but selection for increased NBA should be effective.

  12. Drosophila Dachsous and Fat polarize actin-based protrusions over a restricted domain of the embryonic denticle field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Kynan T; Ly, Daniel C; DiNardo, Stephen

    2013-11-15

    Atypical cadherins Dachsous (Ds) and Fat coordinate the establishment of planar polarity, essential for the patterning of complex tissues and organs. The precise mechanisms by which this system acts, particularly in cases where Ds and Fat act independently of the 'core' frizzled system, are still the subject of investigation. Examining the deployment of the Ds-Fat system in different tissues of the model organism Drosophila, has provided insights into the general mechanisms by which polarity is established and propagated to coordinate outcomes across a field of cells. The Drosophila embryonic epidermis provides a simple model epithelia where the establishment of polarity can be observed from start to finish, and in the absence of proliferation, over a fixed number of cells. Using the asymmetric placement of f-actin during denticle assembly as a read-out of polarity, we examine the requirement for Ds and Fat in establishing polarity across the denticle field. Comparing detailed phenotypic analysis with steady state protein enrichment revealed a spatially restricted requirement for the Ds-Fat system within the posterior denticle field. Ectopic Ds signaling provides evidence for a model whereby Ds acts to asymmetrically enrich Fat in a neighboring cell, in turn polarizing the cell to specify the position of the actin-based protrusions at the cell cortex.

  13. Posterior heart field and epicardium in cardiac development : PDGFRα and EMT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bax, Noortje Anna Maria

    2011-01-01

    The processes of heart development, in which a primitive heart tube transforms into a specialized organ with two atria and ventricles divided by septa, are not only important for the understanding of congenital heart defects. These processes also give more insight for the development of heart

  14. Posterior heart field and epicardium in cardiac development : PDGFRα and EMT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bax, Noortje Anna Maria

    2011-01-01

    The processes of heart development, in which a primitive heart tube transforms into a specialized organ with two atria and ventricles divided by septa, are not only important for the understanding of congenital heart defects. These processes also give more insight for the development of heart regene

  15. The AP-1 transcription factor component Fosl2 potentiates the rate of myocardial differentiation from the zebrafish second heart field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Leila; Sharpe, Michka; Novikov, Natasha; González-Rosa, Juan Manuel; Borikova, Asya; Nevis, Kathleen; Paffett-Lugassy, Noelle; Zhao, Long; Adams, Meghan; Guner-Ataman, Burcu; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate heart forms through successive phases of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Initially, cardiomyocytes derived from first heart field (FHF) progenitors assemble the linear heart tube. Thereafter, second heart field (SHF) progenitors differentiate into cardiomyocytes that are accreted to the poles of the heart tube over a well-defined developmental window. Although heart tube elongation deficiencies lead to life-threatening congenital heart defects, the variables controlling the initiation, rate and duration of myocardial accretion remain obscure. Here, we demonstrate that the AP-1 transcription factor, Fos-like antigen 2 (Fosl2), potentiates the rate of myocardial accretion from the zebrafish SHF. fosl2 mutants initiate accretion appropriately, but cardiomyocyte production is sluggish, resulting in a ventricular deficit coupled with an accumulation of SHF progenitors. Surprisingly, mutant embryos eventually correct the myocardial deficit by extending the accretion window. Overexpression of Fosl2 also compromises production of SHF-derived ventricular cardiomyocytes, a phenotype that is consistent with precocious depletion of the progenitor pool. Our data implicate Fosl2 in promoting the progenitor to cardiomyocyte transition and uncover the existence of regulatory mechanisms to ensure appropriate SHF-mediated cardiomyocyte contribution irrespective of embryonic stage.

  16. Generation of iPSC from cardiac and tail-tip fibroblasts derived from a second heart field reporter mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Javier; Arellano-Viera, Estibaliz; Iglesias-García, Olalla; Ferreira, Carmen; Iglesias, Elena; Abizanda, Gloria; Prósper, Felipe; Carvajal-Vergara, Xonia

    2016-05-01

    Mef2c Anterior Heart Field (AHF) enhancer is activated during embryonic heart development and it is expressed in multipotent cardiovascular progenitors (CVP) giving rise to endothelial and myocardial components of the outflow tract, right ventricle and ventricular septum. Here we have generated iPSC from transgenic Mef2c-AHF-Cre x Ai6(RCLZsGreen) mice. These iPSC will provide a novel tool to investigate the AHF-CVP and their cell progeny.

  17. Generation of iPSC from cardiac and tail-tip fibroblasts derived from a second heart field reporter mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Linares

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mef2c Anterior Heart Field (AHF enhancer is activated during embryonic heart development and it is expressed in multipotent cardiovascular progenitors (CVP giving rise to endothelial and myocardial components of the outflow tract, right ventricle and ventricular septum. Here we have generated iPSC from transgenic Mef2c-AHF-Cre x Ai6(RCLZsGreen mice. These iPSC will provide a novel tool to investigate the AHF-CVP and their cell progeny.

  18. Zebrafish Mef2ca and Mef2cb are essential for both first and second heart field cardiomyocyte differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinits, Yaniv; Pan, Luyuan; Walker, Charline; Dowd, John; Moens, Cecilia B.; Hughes, Simon M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mef2 transcription factors have been strongly linked with early heart development. D-mef2 is required for heart formation in Drosophila, but whether Mef2 is essential for vertebrate cardiomyocyte (CM) differentiation is unclear. In mice, although Mef2c is expressed in all CMs, targeted deletion of Mef2c causes lethal loss of second heart field (SHF) derivatives and failure of cardiac looping, but first heart field CMs can differentiate. Here we examine Mef2 function in early heart development in zebrafish. Two Mef2c genes exist in zebrafish, mef2ca and mef2cb. Both are expressed similarly in the bilateral heart fields but mef2cb is strongly expressed in the heart poles at the primitive heart tube stage. By using fish mutants for mef2ca and mef2cb and antisense morpholinos to knock down either or both Mef2cs, we show that Mef2ca and Mef2cb have essential but redundant roles in myocardial differentiation. Loss of both Mef2ca and Mef2cb function does not interfere with early cardiogenic markers such as nkx2.5, gata4 and hand2 but results in a dramatic loss of expression of sarcomeric genes and myocardial markers such as bmp4, nppa, smyd1b and late nkx2.5 mRNA. Rare residual CMs observed in mef2ca;mef2cb double mutants are ablated by a morpholino capable of knocking down other Mef2s. Mef2cb over-expression activates bmp4 within the cardiogenic region, but no ectopic CMs are formed. Surprisingly, anterior mesoderm and other tissues become skeletal muscle. Mef2ca single mutants have delayed heart development, but form an apparently normal heart. Mef2cb single mutants have a functional heart and are viable adults. Our results show that the key role of Mef2c in myocardial differentiation is conserved throughout the vertebrate heart. PMID:22750409

  19. Foxf genes integrate tbx5 and hedgehog pathways in the second heart field for cardiac septation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Hoffmann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Second Heart Field (SHF has been implicated in several forms of congenital heart disease (CHD, including atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs. Identifying the SHF gene regulatory networks required for atrioventricular septation is therefore an essential goal for understanding the molecular basis of AVSDs. We defined a SHF Hedgehog-dependent gene regulatory network using whole genome transcriptional profiling and GLI-chromatin interaction studies. The Forkhead box transcription factors Foxf1a and Foxf2 were identified as SHF Hedgehog targets. Compound haploinsufficiency for Foxf1a and Foxf2 caused atrioventricular septal defects, demonstrating the biological relevance of this regulatory network. We identified a Foxf1a cis-regulatory element that bound the Hedgehog transcriptional regulators GLI1 and GLI3 and the T-box transcription factor TBX5 in vivo. GLI1 and TBX5 synergistically activated transcription from this cis-regulatory element in vitro. This enhancer drove reproducible expression in vivo in the posterior SHF, the only region where Gli1 and Tbx5 expression overlaps. Our findings implicate Foxf genes in atrioventricular septation, describe the molecular underpinnings of the genetic interaction between Hedgehog signaling and Tbx5, and establish a molecular model for the selection of the SHF gene regulatory network for cardiac septation.

  20. Tbx5-hedgehog molecular networks are essential in the second heart field for atrial septation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Linglin; Hoffmann, Andrew D; Burnicka-Turek, Ozanna; Friedland-Little, Joshua M; Zhang, Ke; Moskowitz, Ivan P

    2012-08-14

    The developmental mechanisms underlying human congenital heart disease (CHD) are poorly understood. Atrial septal defects (ASDs) can result from haploinsufficiency of cardiogenic transcription factors including TBX5. We demonstrated that Tbx5 is required in the second heart field (SHF) for atrial septation in mice. Conditional Tbx5 haploinsufficiency in the SHF but not the myocardium or endocardium caused ASDs. Tbx5 SHF knockout embryos lacked atrial septum progenitors. We found that Tbx5 mutant SHF progenitors demonstrated cell-cycle progression defects and that Tbx5 regulated cell-cycle progression genes including Cdk6. Activated hedgehog (Hh) signaling rescued ASDs in Tbx5 mutant embryos, placing Tbx5 upstream or parallel to Hh in cardiac progenitors. Tbx5 regulated SHF Gas1 and Osr1 expression, supporting both pathways. These results describe a SHF Tbx5-Hh network required for atrial septation. A paradigm defining molecular requirements in SHF cardiac progenitors for cardiac septum morphogenesis has implications for the ontogeny of CHD.

  1. Gata4 potentiates second heart field proliferation and Hedgehog signaling for cardiac septation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lun; Liu, Jielin; Xiang, Menglan; Olson, Patrick; Guzzetta, Alexander; Zhang, Ke; Moskowitz, Ivan P; Xie, Linglin

    2017-02-21

    GATA4, an essential cardiogenic transcription factor, provides a model for dominant transcription factor mutations in human disease. Dominant GATA4 mutations cause congenital heart disease (CHD), specifically atrial and atrioventricular septal defects (ASDs and AVSDs). We found that second heart field (SHF)-specific Gata4 heterozygote embryos recapitulated the AVSDs observed in germline Gata4 heterozygote embryos. A proliferation defect of SHF atrial septum progenitors and hypoplasia of the dorsal mesenchymal protrusion, rather than anlage of the atrioventricular septum, were observed in this model. Knockdown of the cell-cycle repressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) restored cell-cycle progression and rescued the AVSDs. Gata4 mutants also demonstrated Hedgehog (Hh) signaling defects. Gata4 acts directly upstream of Hh components: Gata4 activated a cis-regulatory element at Gli1 in vitro and occupied the element in vivo. Remarkably, SHF-specific constitutive Hh signaling activation rescued AVSDs in Gata4 SHF-specific heterozygous knockout embryos. Pten expression was unchanged in Smoothened mutants, and Hh pathway genes were unchanged in Pten mutants, suggesting pathway independence. Thus, both the cell-cycle and Hh-signaling defects caused by dominant Gata4 mutations were required for CHD pathogenesis, suggesting a combinatorial model of disease causation by transcription factor haploinsufficiency.

  2. Foxf genes integrate tbx5 and hedgehog pathways in the second heart field for cardiac septation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Andrew D; Yang, Xinan Holly; Burnicka-Turek, Ozanna; Bosman, Joshua D; Ren, Xiaomeng; Steimle, Jeffrey D; Vokes, Steven A; McMahon, Andrew P; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V; Moskowitz, Ivan P

    2014-10-01

    The Second Heart Field (SHF) has been implicated in several forms of congenital heart disease (CHD), including atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs). Identifying the SHF gene regulatory networks required for atrioventricular septation is therefore an essential goal for understanding the molecular basis of AVSDs. We defined a SHF Hedgehog-dependent gene regulatory network using whole genome transcriptional profiling and GLI-chromatin interaction studies. The Forkhead box transcription factors Foxf1a and Foxf2 were identified as SHF Hedgehog targets. Compound haploinsufficiency for Foxf1a and Foxf2 caused atrioventricular septal defects, demonstrating the biological relevance of this regulatory network. We identified a Foxf1a cis-regulatory element that bound the Hedgehog transcriptional regulators GLI1 and GLI3 and the T-box transcription factor TBX5 in vivo. GLI1 and TBX5 synergistically activated transcription from this cis-regulatory element in vitro. This enhancer drove reproducible expression in vivo in the posterior SHF, the only region where Gli1 and Tbx5 expression overlaps. Our findings implicate Foxf genes in atrioventricular septation, describe the molecular underpinnings of the genetic interaction between Hedgehog signaling and Tbx5, and establish a molecular model for the selection of the SHF gene regulatory network for cardiac septation.

  3. Tbx5-Hedgehog Molecular Networks Are Essential in the Second Heart Field for Atrial Septation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Linglin; Hoffmann, Andrew D.; Burnicka-Turek, Ozanna; Friedland-Little, Joshua M.; Zhang, Ke; Moskowitz, Ivan P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The developmental mechanisms underlying human congenital heart disease (CHD) are poorly understood. Atrial septal defects (ASDs) can result from haploinsufficiency of cardiogenic transcription factors including TBX5. We demonstrated that Tbx5 is required in the second heart field (SHF) for atrial septation in mice. Conditional Tbx5 haploinsufficiency in the SHF but not the myocardium or endocardium caused ASDs. Tbx5 SHF knockout embryos lacked atrial septum progenitors. We found that Tbx5 mutant SHF progenitors demonstrated cell-cycle progression defects and that Tbx5 regulated cell-cycle progression genes including Cdk6. Activated hedgehog (Hh) signaling rescued ASDs in Tbx5 mutant embryos, placing Tbx5 upstream or parallel to Hh in cardiac progenitors. Tbx5 regulated SHF Gas1 and Osr1 expression, supporting both pathways. These results describe a SHF Tbx5-Hh network required for atrial septation. A paradigm defining molecular requirements in SHF cardiac progenitors for cardiac septum morphogenesis has implications for the ontogeny of CHD. PMID:22898775

  4. Terminating Ventricular Fibrillation Using Pulsed Far-Field Stimulation in Whole Rabbit Hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Amgad; Hornung, Daniel; Bittihn, Philip; Xia Wu, Dong; Krinsky, Valentin; Zabel, Markus; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Luther, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    During life-threatening cardiac fibrillation, chaotic spatio-temporal dynamics is mediated by vortex-like rotating waves. Current defibrillation strategies rely on global control through high-energy shocks, which may have severe side-effects including traumatic pain and tissue damage. Far-field antifibrillation pacing terminates fibrillation using a train of low-energy electric pulses [1,2]. Using optical mapping in isolated rabbit heart preparations, we evaluate the efficiency and robustness of this approach. We found that a series of pulses at low energies (ventricular fibrillation with a success rate of 95%. We will discuss the physical mechanisms involved.[4pt] [1] F.H. Fenton et al, Circulation 120 467-476 (2009).[0pt] [2] A. Pumir et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 208101 (2007).

  5. The forward and inverse problem of cardiac magnetic fields based on concentric ellipsoid torso-heart model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Hua, Ning; Tang, Xue-Zheng; Lu, Hong; Ma, Ping; Tang, Fa-Kuan

    2010-08-01

    This paper constructs a concentric ellipsoid torso-heart model by boundary element method and investigates the impacts of model structures on the cardiac magnetic fields generated by both equivalent primary source-a current dipole and volume currents. Then by using the simulated magnetic fields based on the torso-heart model as input, the cardiac current sources-an array of current dipoles by optimal constrained linear inverse method are constructed. Next, the current dipole array reconstruction considering boundaries are compared with that in an unbounded homogeneous medium. Furthermore, the influence of random noise on reconstruction is also considered and the reconstructing effect is judged by several reconstructing parameters.

  6. Influence of low-intensity electromagnetic fields on endothelial function in patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bokeria O.L.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the influence of low-intensity electromagnetic fields on endogenous bioresonance therapy on the level of asymmetric dimethylarginine in blood, as well as on the parameters of microcirculation in the assessment of endothelial function in patients with chronic heart failure. Material and Methods. The basic group included 40 patients with chronic heart failure (NYHA II: 17 female and 23 male patients. The average age of the patients was 56,4±10 years. The control group consisted of healthy volunteers (20 patients, including 10 women, 10 men aged 31 ±5 years. Assessment of vasomotor state of the endothelium microcirculation was carried out with the help of laser Dopplerflow-metry on the apparatus LAKK-TEST (T («Lazma», Russia. After the procedure endogenous bioresonance therapy was held. The intervention by low-intensity electromagnetic fields was carried out with the help of a hardware-software complex IMEDIS-EXPERT mode of endogenous bioresonance therapy for 15 minutes. Vasomotor endothelial function of microcirculation was evaluated. The concentration of an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthases, asymmetric dimethylar-ginine in blood before and after the exposure to the intervention by low-intensity electromagnetic fields was studied. Results. After the endogenous bioresonance therapy the microcirculation M parameter in the main group, on the background of iontophoresis with acetylcholine counted in average6,13±4,7 PF units. After iontophoresis with nitroprusside it was 5,9±3,8 PF units. In the control group the rate of myogenic oscillation amplitude (Am amounted in average 0,75±0,13 Hz, in the main group it was 0,68±0,26 Hz. Reduction of myogenic tone in the control group was statistically significant (p<0,05. Conclusions. The results obtained have proved the positive influence of electromagnetic fields on endothelial function. The normalization of endothelium-dependentvasodilation marked the possibility of their

  7. Enhanced Glutamatergic Synaptic Plasticity in the Hippocampal CA1 Field of Food-Restricted Rats: Involvement of CB1 Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talani, Giuseppe; Licheri, Valentina; Biggio, Francesca; Locci, Valentina; Mostallino, Maria Cristina; Secci, Pietro Paolo; Melis, Valentina; Dazzi, Laura; Carta, Gianfranca; Banni, Sebastiano; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    The endogenous endocannabinoid system has a crucial role in regulating appetite and feeding behavior in mammals, as well as working memory and reward mechanisms. In order to elucidate the possible role of cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1Rs) in the regulation of hippocampal plasticity in animals exposed to food restriction (FR), we limited the availability of food to a 2-h daily period for 3 weeks in Sprague-Dawley rats. FR rats showed a higher long-term potentiation at hippocampal CA1 excitatory synapses with a parallel increase in glutamate release when compared with animals fed ad libitum. FR rats showed a significant increase in the long-term spatial memory determined by Barnes maze. FR was also associated with a decreased inhibitory effect of the CB1R agonist win55,212-2 on glutamatergic field excitatory postsynaptic potentials, together with a decrease in hippocampal CB1R protein expression. In addition, hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein levels and mushroom dendritic spine density were significantly enhanced in FR rats. Altogether, our data suggest that alterations of hippocampal CB1R expression and function in FR rats are associated with dendritic spine remodeling and functional potentiation of CA1 excitatory synapses, and these findings are consistent with increasing evidence supporting the idea that FR may improve cognitive functions.

  8. Differential magnetic field effects on heart rate and nociception in anosmic pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Seppia, Cristina; Mencacci, Resi; Luschi, Paolo; Varanini, Maurizio; Ghione, Sergio

    2012-05-01

    Several studies have shown that exposure to altered magnetic fields affects nociception by suppressing stress-induced hypoalgesia, and that this effect is reduced or abolished if the treatment is performed in the absence of light. This raises the question as to whether other sources of sensory stimuli may also modulate these magnetic effects. We investigated the possible role of olfaction in the magnetically induced effects on sensitivity to nociceptive stimuli and heart rate (HR) in restraint-stressed homing pigeons exposed to an Earth-strength, irregularly varying (<1 Hz) magnetic field. The magnetic treatment decreased the nociceptive threshold in normally smelling birds and an opposite effect was observed in birds made anosmic by nostril plugging. Conversely, no differential effect of olfactory deprivation was observed on HR, which was reduced by the magnetic treatment both in smelling and anosmic pigeons. The findings highlight an important role of olfactory environmental information in the mediation of magnetic effects on nociception, although the data cannot be interpreted unambiguously because of the lack of an additional control group of olfactory-deprived, non-magnetically exposed pigeons. The differential effects on a pigeon's sensitivity to nociceptive stimulus and HR additionally indicate that the magnetic stimuli affect nociception and the cardiovascular system in different ways.

  9. Heart rate variability during high-intensity field exercise in female distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, K; Suzuki, S; Matsubara, M; Ando, Y; Kobayashi, F

    2006-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to demonstrate the transition of heart rate variability (HRV) during trials in the field and to examine the relationship between peak frequency of high-frequency band (HF) and stride frequency. Ten healthy long-distance college female runners (age 19-21 years) performed a 3000 m realistic time trial. The time-series power spectrum analysis by maximum entropy method was used to evaluate cardiac autonomic nervous activity during the race. Cross-correlation coefficients were calculated to estimate the degree of linear co-ordination between the central peak frequency of HF and stride frequency. Just after starting, the decrease in HF (0.15-1.00 Hz) and a transient increase of low-frequency band (LF)/HF were found. After that, the HF remained at a low level and LF/HF decreased sharply. These findings suggested that the parasympathetic activity was suppressed and sympathetic activity increased just after starting, and the sympathetic activity reached the saturated level according to continuation of high-intensity exercise. In spite of the significant decrease of HRV during trials, peak frequency of HF could be differentiated clearly. The cross-correlation coefficient of peak frequency of HF and stride frequency was from 0.703 to 0.868. This finding indicated that exercise rhythm reflected HRV during high-intensity running in the field.

  10. NK4 antagonizes Tbx1/10 to promote cardiac versus pharyngeal muscle fate in the ascidian second heart field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Razy-Krajka, Florian; Siu, Eric; Ketcham, Alexandra; Christiaen, Lionel

    2013-12-01

    The heart and head muscles share common developmental origins and genetic underpinnings in vertebrates, including humans. Parts of the heart and cranio-facial musculature derive from common mesodermal progenitors that express NKX2-5, ISL1, and TBX1. This ontogenetic kinship is dramatically reflected in the DiGeorge/Cardio-Velo-Facial syndrome (DGS/CVFS), where mutations of TBX1 cause malformations in the pharyngeal apparatus and cardiac outflow tract. Cardiac progenitors of the first heart field (FHF) do not require TBX1 and segregate precociously from common progenitors of the second heart field (SHF) and pharyngeal muscles. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern heart versus pharyngeal muscle specification within this lineage remain elusive. Here, we harness the simplicity of the ascidian larva to show that, following asymmetric cell division of common progenitors, NK4/NKX2-5 promotes GATAa/GATA4/5/6 expression and cardiac specification in the second heart precursors by antagonizing Tbx1/10-mediated inhibition of GATAa and activation of Collier/Olf/EBF (COE), the determinant of atrial siphon muscle (ASM) specification. Our results uncover essential regulatory connections between the conserved cardio-pharyngeal factor Tbx1/10 and muscle determinant COE, as well as a mutual antagonism between NK4 and Tbx1/10 activities upstream of GATAa and COE. The latter cross-antagonism underlies a fundamental heart versus pharyngeal muscle fate choice that occurs in a conserved lineage of cardio-pharyngeal progenitors. We propose that this basic ontogenetic motif underlies cardiac and pharyngeal muscle development and evolution in chordates.

  11. NK4 antagonizes Tbx1/10 to promote cardiac versus pharyngeal muscle fate in the ascidian second heart field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The heart and head muscles share common developmental origins and genetic underpinnings in vertebrates, including humans. Parts of the heart and cranio-facial musculature derive from common mesodermal progenitors that express NKX2-5, ISL1, and TBX1. This ontogenetic kinship is dramatically reflected in the DiGeorge/Cardio-Velo-Facial syndrome (DGS/CVFS, where mutations of TBX1 cause malformations in the pharyngeal apparatus and cardiac outflow tract. Cardiac progenitors of the first heart field (FHF do not require TBX1 and segregate precociously from common progenitors of the second heart field (SHF and pharyngeal muscles. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern heart versus pharyngeal muscle specification within this lineage remain elusive. Here, we harness the simplicity of the ascidian larva to show that, following asymmetric cell division of common progenitors, NK4/NKX2-5 promotes GATAa/GATA4/5/6 expression and cardiac specification in the second heart precursors by antagonizing Tbx1/10-mediated inhibition of GATAa and activation of Collier/Olf/EBF (COE, the determinant of atrial siphon muscle (ASM specification. Our results uncover essential regulatory connections between the conserved cardio-pharyngeal factor Tbx1/10 and muscle determinant COE, as well as a mutual antagonism between NK4 and Tbx1/10 activities upstream of GATAa and COE. The latter cross-antagonism underlies a fundamental heart versus pharyngeal muscle fate choice that occurs in a conserved lineage of cardio-pharyngeal progenitors. We propose that this basic ontogenetic motif underlies cardiac and pharyngeal muscle development and evolution in chordates.

  12. 心力衰竭患者限水治疗及疗效的研究进展%Research progress of fluid restriction treatment and effects on patients with heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙路路; 梁涛

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarized the concept, development of guidelines, practice, compliance and influencing factors of fluid restriction in patients with heart failure, and put forward corresponding suggestions in combination with negative impacts of fluid restriction treatment on heart failure patients. It was necessary to develop a measurable and individualized fluid restriction program based on comprehensive consideration of various factors for patients.%文章从心力衰竭患者限水的概念、认识演变、执行情况、依从性及影响因素方面进行了归纳总结,并在结合限水治疗对心力衰竭患者造成的负面影响基础上提出相应建议,认为常规对症处理外,应综合考虑多方面因素对心力衰竭患者的限水治疗制订一个可测量的个体化方案是非常必要的.

  13. 77 FR 61723 - Felgates Creek and Indian Field Creek Along the York River in Yorktown, VA; Restricted Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... areas historically noted on nautical charts as closed to the public and traditionally enforced by... amend an existing restricted area to include areas historically noted on nautical charts as closed...

  14. Magnetic-Field Immunity Examination and Evaluation of Transcutaneous Energy-Transmission System for a Totally Implantable Artificial Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Yamamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous energy transmission (TET is the most promising noninvasive method for supplying driving energy to a totally implantable artificial heart. Induction-heating (IH cookers generate a magnetic flux, and if a cooker is operated near a transcutaneous transformer, the magnetic flux generated will link with its external and internal coils. This will affect the performance of the TET and the artificial heart system. In this paper, we present the design and development of a coil to be used for a magnetic immunity test, and we detail the investigation of the magnetic immunity of a transcutaneous transformer. The experimental coil, with five turns like a solenoid, was able to generate a uniform magnetic field in the necessary bandwidth. A magnetic-field immunity examination of the TET system was performed using this coil, and the system was confirmed to have sufficient immunity to the magnetic field generated as a result of the conventional operation of induction-heating cooker.

  15. Detection of heart failure-related biomarker in whole blood with graphene field effect transistor biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yong-Min; Xiao, Meng-Meng; Li, Yu-Tao; Xu, Li; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2017-05-15

    Since brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) has become internationally recognized biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis of heart failure (HF), it is highly desirable to search for a novel sensing tool for detecting the patient's BNP level at the early stage. Here we report a platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs)-decorated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) field effect transistor (FET) biosensor coupled with a microfilter system for label-free and highly sensitive detection of BNP in whole blood. The PtNPs-decorated rGO FET sensor was obtained by drop-casting rGO onto the pre-fabricated FET chip and subsequently assembling PtNPs on the graphene surface. After anti-BNP was bound to the PtNPs surface, BNP was successfully detected by the anti-BNP immobilized FET biosensor. It was found that the developed FET biosensor was able to achieve a low detection limitation of 100fM. Moreover, BNP was successfully detected in human whole blood sample treated by a custom-made microfilter, suggesting the sensor's capability of working in a complex sample matrix. The developed FET biosensor provides a new sensing platform for protein detection, showing its potential applications in clinic sample.

  16. Genetic Fate Mapping Identifies Second Heart Field Progenitor Cells As a Source of Adipocytes in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Raffaella; Dong, Jinjiang; Rodriguez, Gabriela; Bell, Achim; Leung, Tack Ki; Schwartz, Robert J.; Willerson, James T.; Brugada, Ramon; Marian, Ali J.

    2009-01-01

    The phenotypic hallmark of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, a genetic disease of desmosomal proteins, is fibroadipocytic replacement of the right ventricle. Cellular origin of excess adipocytes, the responsible mechanism(s) and the basis for predominant involvement of the right ventricle are unknown. We generated 3 sets of lineage tracer mice regulated by cardiac lineage promoters α-myosin heavy chain (αMyHC), Nkx2.5, or Mef2C. We conditionally expressed the reporter enhanced yellow fluorescent protein while concomitantly deleting the desmosomal protein desmoplakin in cardiac myocyte lineages using the Cre-LoxP technique. Lineage tracer mice showed excess fibroadiposis and increased numbers of adipocytes in the hearts. Few adipocytes in the hearts of αMyHC-regulated lineage tracer mice, but the majority of adipocytes in the hearts of Nkx2.5- and Mef2C-regulated lineage tracer mice, expressed enhanced yellow fluorescent protein. In addition, rare cells coexpressed adipogenic transcription factors and the second heart field markers Isl1 and Mef2C in the lineage tracer mouse hearts and in human myocardium from patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. To delineate the responsible mechanism, we generated transgenic mice expressing desmosomal protein plakoglobin in myocyte lineages. Transgene plakoglobin translocated to nucleus, detected by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence staining and coimmunoprecipitated with Tcf7l2, a canonical Wnt signaling transcription factor. Expression levels of canonical Wnt/Tcf7l2 targets bone morphogenetic protein 7 and Wnt5b, which promote adipogenesis, were increased and expression level of connective tissue growth factor, an inhibitor of adipogenesis, was decreased. We conclude adipocytes in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy originate from the second heart field cardiac progenitors, which switch to an adipogenic fate because of suppressed canonical Wnt signaling by nuclear

  17. The effects of prenatal exposure to a 900-MHz electromagnetic field on the 21-day-old male rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türedi, Sibel; Hancı, Hatice; Topal, Zehra; Ünal, Deniz; Mercantepe, Tolga; Bozkurt, İlyas; Kaya, Haydar; Odacı, Ersan

    2015-01-01

    The growing spread of mobile phone use is raising concerns about the effect on human health of the electromagnetic field (EMF) these devices emit. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects on rat pup heart tissue of prenatal exposure to a 900 megahertz (MHz) EMF. For this purpose, pregnant rats were divided into experimental and control groups. Experimental group rats were exposed to a 900 MHz EMF (1 h/d) on days 13-21 of pregnancy. Measurements were performed with rats inside the exposure box in order to determine the distribution of EMF intensity. Our measurements showed that pregnant experimental group rats were exposed to a mean electrical field intensity of 13.77 V/m inside the box (0.50 W/m(2)). This study continued with male rat pups obtained from both groups. Pups were sacrificed on postnatal day 21, and the heart tissues were extracted. Malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase and catalase values were significantly higher in the experimental group rats, while glutathione values were lower. Light microscopy revealed irregularities in heart muscle fibers and apoptotic changes in the experimental group. Electron microscopy revealed crista loss and swelling in the mitochondria, degeneration in myofibrils and structural impairments in Z bands. Our study results suggest that exposure to EMF in the prenatal period causes oxidative stress and histopathological changes in male rat pup heart tissue.

  18. Restricted Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette; Lassen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    communities and shopping centres through mobility lenses. The article shows how different mobility systems enable and restrict the public access to private-public spaces, and it points out that proprietary communities create an unequal potential for human movement and access in the city. The main argument......Privatisation of public spaces in the contemporary city has increased during the last decades but only few studies have approached this field from a mobility perspective. Therefore the article seeks to rectify this by exploring two Australian examples of private spaces in the city; gated...... in the article is that the many mobility systems enable specialization of places that are targeted at a special section of the population. This means that various forms of motilities not only create new opportunities for urban life but it is also one of the most critical components of production of new exclusion...

  19. Heart Transplantation in a 14-Year-Old Boy in the Presence of Severe Out-of-Proportion Pulmonary Hypertension due to Restrictive Left Heart Disease: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Schwienbacher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old boy after balloon valvuloplasty of severe aortic valve stenosis in the neonatal period was referred for heart-lung transplantation because of high grade pulmonary hypertension and left heart dysfunction due to endocardial fibroelastosis with severe mitral insufficiency. After heart catheterization, hemodynamic parameters were invasively monitored: a course of levosimendan and initiation of diuretics led to a decrease of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (from maximum 35 to 24 mmHg. Instead of an expected decrease, mean pulmonary artery pressures (mPAP increased up to 80 mmHg with increasing transpulmonary pressure gradient (TPG up to 55 mmHg. Oral bosentan and intravenous epoprostenol then led to a ~50% decrease of mPAP (TPG between 16 and 22 mmHg. The boy was listed solely for heart transplantation which was successfully accomplished 1 month later.

  20. Evaluation of an exercise field test using heart rate monitors to assess cardiorespiratory fitness and heart rate recovery in an asymptomatic population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal L Coolbaugh

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Measures of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF and heart rate recovery (HRR can improve risk stratification for cardiovascular disease, but these measurements are rarely made in asymptomatic individuals due to cost. An exercise field test (EFT to assess CRF and HRR would be an inexpensive method for cardiovascular disease risk assessment in large populations. This study assessed 1 the predictive accuracy of a 12-minute run/walk EFT for estimating CRF ([Formula: see text] and 2 the accuracy of HRR measured after an EFT using a heart rate monitor (HRM in an asymptomatic population. METHODS: Fifty subjects (48% women ages 18-45 years completed a symptom-limited exercise tolerance test (ETT (Bruce protocol and an EFT on separate days. During the ETT, [Formula: see text] was measured by a metabolic cart, and heart rate was measured continuously by a HRM and a metabolic cart. RESULTS: EFT distance and sex independently predicted[Formula: see text]. The average absolute difference between observed and predicted [Formula: see text] was 0.26 ± 3.27 ml·kg-1·min-1 for our model compared to 7.55 ± 3.64 ml·kg-1·min-1 for the Cooper model. HRM HRR data were equivalent to respective metabolic cart values during the ETT. HRR at 1 minute post-exercise during ETT compared to the EFT had a moderate correlation (r=0.75, p<0.001. CONCLUSION: A more accurate model to estimate CRF from a 12-minute run/walk EFT was developed, and HRR can be measured using a HRM in an asymptomatic population outside of clinical settings.

  1. The effect of competition on heart rate during kart driving: A field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamakoshi Takehiro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both the act of competing, which can create a kind of mental stress, and participation in motor sports, which induces physical stress from intense g-forces, are known to increase heart rate dramatically. However, little is known about the specific effect of competition on heart rate during motor sports, particularly during four-wheel car driving. The goal of this preliminary study, therefore, was to investigate whether competition increases heart rate under such situations. Findings The participants drove an entry-level formula kart during two competitive races and during solo driving against the clock while heart rate and g-forces were measured. Analyses showed that heart rate values during the races (168.8 beats/min were significantly higher than those during solo driving (140.9 beats/min and rest (75.1 beats/min. Conclusions The results of this preliminary study indicate that competition heightens heart rate during four-wheel car driving. Kart drivers should be concerned about maintaining good health and developing physical strength.

  2. Isl1 is a direct transcriptional target of Forkhead transcription factors in second heart field-derived mesoderm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jione; Nathan, Elisha; Xu, Shan-Mei; Tzahor, Eldad; Black, Brian L.

    2009-01-01

    The cells of the second heart field (SHF) contribute to the outflow tract and right ventricle, as well as to parts of the left ventricle and atria. Isl1, a member of the LIM-homeodomain transcription factor family, is expressed early in this cardiac progenitor population and functions near the top of a transcriptional pathway essential for heart development. Isl1 is required for the survival and migration of SHF-derived cells into the early developing heart at the inflow and outflow poles. Despite this important role for Isl1 in early heart formation, the transcriptional regulation of Isl1 has remained largely undefined. Therefore, to identify transcription factors that regulate Isl1 expression in vivo, we screened the conserved noncoding sequences from the mouse Isl1 locus for enhancer activity in transgenic mouse embryos. Here, we report the identification of an enhancer from the mouse Isl1 gene that is sufficient to direct expression to the SHF and its derivatives. The Isl1 SHF enhancer contains three consensus Forkhead transcription factor binding sites that are efficiently and specifically bound by Forkhead transcription factors. Importantly, the activity of the enhancer is dependent on these three Forkhead binding sites in transgenic mouse embryos. Thus, these studies demonstrate that Isl1 is a direct transcriptional target of Forkhead transcription factors in the SHF and establish a transcriptional pathway upstream of Isl1 in the SHF. PMID:19580802

  3. Changes of the electrical heart field and hemodynamic parameters in the 34th to 40th weeks of pregnancy and after delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechmanová, M; Parízek, A; Halaska, M; Slavícek, J; Kittnar, O

    2002-07-01

    We have studied changes of the electrical heart field resulting from the changed spatial position of the heart during the last period of pregnancy in healthy women. This was suggested to be a good model of electrocardiographic changes that could be found on patients suffering from obesity. The measured parameters of the electrical heart field were compared with hemodynamic parameters before and after delivery in the group of non-obese women with physiological pregnancy and in a group of healthy non-obese and non-pregnant women. Several significant changes of the electrical heart field were detected in the late pregnancy: increased heart rate, shortening of A-V conductance, prolongation of QT interval normalised for the heart rate and changes in the ventricular depolarisation and repolarisation patterns. Some of these changes are not fully restored in 4 days after delivery. Moreover, we have found an increased pump function of the left ventricle accompanied by decreased peripheral resistance in the group of pregnant women. Increased pump function was partially restored after delivery, peripheral resistance was not only restored, but it overshot to increased values. Persisting elevated heart rate with increased peripheral resistance suggested increased sympathetic activity after birth. Only some changes of electrical heart field could be explained by changed spatial arrangement of the chest organs during pregnancy and they must be considered in a complex consequence with changes in regulatory mechanisms.

  4. Field observation of advance warning/advisory signage for passive railway crossings with restricted lateral sightline visibility: an experimental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, N J; Wilde, G J

    1995-04-01

    This study evaluated a newly proposed series of signs intended for passive crossings with restrictions to lateral sightline visibility. These signs provide advance warning of a crossing and the restriction to lateral visibility. In addition, the signs advise motorists to come to a complete stop before crossing. Motorist behaviour was examined before and after installation of these signs at a rural passive crossing. A second site was observed in parallel to control partially for any confounding effects. Results indicated that motorists reduced speed and searched approach quadrants longer at points in the approachway after installation of the signs. However, there was no reliable increase in the number of motorists coming to complete stop, engaging in search behaviours, or classified as safe. The results are discussed in terms of reasons for the lack of compliance with the sign advisory.

  5. Myoblast transplantation for heart repair: A review of the state of the field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Howard J. Leonhardt; Michael Brown

    2006-01-01

    Over 200 humans have been treated with myoblast transplantation for heart muscle repair since June 2000. Bioheart sponsored percutaneous delivery studies began in May 2001 in Europe. Approximately one third of the patients have exhibited substantial improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of over 30% and two heart failure class improvements. Over 80% of the patients have exhibited one heart failure class improvement with moderate improvement of LVEF. Clinical trials seem to demonstrate a marked reduction in emergency hospitalizations in myoblast treated patients. Many years of careful studies have lead to randomized controlled studies that are enrolling patients now at numerous centers worldwide. A firm conclusion on the safety and efficacy of myoblast transplantation cannot be determined until these randomized studies are completed. Final results from randomized controlled studies should be available soon. (J Geriatr Cardiol 2006;3:165-7.)

  6. Improvement in magnetic field immunity of externally-coupled transcutaneous energy transmission system for a totally implantable artificial heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takahiko; Koshiji, Kohji; Homma, Akihiko; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    Transcutaneous energy transmission (TET) that uses electromagnetic induction between the external and internal coils of a transformer is the most promising method to supply driving energy to a totally implantable artificial heart without invasion. Induction-heating (IH) cookers generate magnetic flux, and if a cooker is operated near a transcutaneous transformer, the magnetic flux generated will link with the external and internal coils of the transcutaneous transformer. This will affect the performance of the TET and the artificial heart system. Hence, it is necessary to improve the magnetic field immunity of the TET system. During operation of the system, if the transcutaneous transformer is in close proximity to an IH cooker, the electric power generated by the cooker and coupled to the transformer can drive the artificial heart system. To prevent this coupling, the external coil was shielded with a conductive shield that had a slit in it. This reduces the coupling between the transformer and the magnetic field generated by the induction cooker. However, the temperature of the shield increased due to heating by eddy currents. The temperature of the shield can be reduced by separating the IH cooker and the shield.

  7. Heart Rate Variability in Nonlinear Rats with Different Orientation and Exploratory Activity in the Open Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kur'yanova, E V; Teplyi, D L; Zhukova, Yu D; Zhukovina, N V

    2015-12-01

    The basic behavioral activity of nonlinear rats was evaluated from the sum of crossed peripheral and central squares and peripheral and central rearing postures in the open fi eld test. This index was low (30 episodes). Male rats with high score of orientation and exploratory activity were characterized by higher indexes of total heart rate variability than rats with low or intermediate activity. Specimens with a greater contribution of VLF waves into the total power spectrum of heart rate variability were shown to dominate among the rats with high behavioral activity. Our results are consistent with the notions of a suprasegmental nature of VLF waves.

  8. A dosimetric analysis of volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy with jaw width restriction vs 7 field intensity-modulated radiotherapy for definitive treatment of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B; Fang, Z; Huang, Y; Lin, P; Chen, Z

    2014-07-01

    Radiation therapy treatment planning was performed to compare the dosimetric difference between volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (RapidArc™ v. 10; Varian® Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and 7-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7f-IMRT) in the definitive treatment of cervical cancer. 13 patients with cervical cancer were enrolled in this study. Planning target volume (PTV) 50 and PTV60 were prescribed at a dose of 50 and 60 Gy in 28 fractions, respectively. The dose to the PTV60 was delivered as a simultaneous integrated boost to the pelvic lymph nodes. Owing to the mechanical limitation of the multileaf collimator in which the maximum displacement was limited to 15 cm, two types of RapidArc with different jaw width restrictions (15 and 20-23 cm) were investigated to evaluate their dosimetric differences. The RapidArc plan type with dosimetric superiority was then compared against the 7f-IMRT on the target coverage, sparing of the organs at risk (OARs), monitor units, treatment time and delivery accuracy to determine whether RapidArc is beneficial for the treatment of cervical cancer. The 15-cm jaw width restriction had better performance compared with the restrictions that were longer than 15 cm in the sparing of the OARs. The 15-cm RapidArc spared the OARs, that is, the bladder, rectum, small intestine, femoral heads and bones, and improved treatment efficiency compared with 7f-IMRT. Both techniques delivered a high quality-assurance passing rate (>90%) according to the Γ3mm,3% criterion. RapidArc with a 15-cm jaw width restriction spares the OARs and improves treatment efficiency in cervical cancer compared with 7f-IMRT. This study describes the dosimetric superiority of RapidArc with a 15-cm jaw width restriction and explores the feasibility of using RapidArc for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer.

  9. Comparison of heart rate deflection and ventilatory threshold during a field cross-country roller-skiing test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Nicolas; Passelergue, Philippe; Bouvard, Marc; Perrey, Stéphane

    2008-11-01

    This study was to assess whether the point of deflection from linearity of heart rate (HRd) could be an accurate predictor of ventilatory threshold (VT2) during a specific cross-country roller-skiing (RS) test. Ten well-trained cross-country skiers performed a maximal and incremental RS test in the field and a standardized maximal and incremental treadmill running (TR) test in the laboratory. Values of oxygen uptake (VO2) and heart rate (HR) were continuously recorded during all exercises by a portable breath-by-breath gas exchange measurement system and a wireless Polar monitoring system, respectively. The VT2 and HRd points were individually determined by visual analysis during RS. Maximal VO2 (VO2 max) and HR were higher (p cross-country coaches and skiers to evaluate and control specific aerobic training loads.

  10. High-field MR imaging in pediatric congenital heart disease: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Kim-Lien [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Cardiology, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Khan, Sarah N.; Moriarty, John M.; Mohajer, Kiyarash; Renella, Pierangelo; Boechat, M.I.; Finn, J.P. [University of California at Los Angeles, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Satou, Gary [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ayad, Ihab; Patel, Swati [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Anesthesia, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-08-03

    Comprehensive assessment of pediatric congenital heart disease (CHD) at any field strength mandates evaluation of both vascular and dynamic cardiac anatomy for which diagnostic quality contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) and cardiac cine are crucial. To determine whether high-resolution (HR) CEMRA and steady-state free precession (SSFP) cine can be performed reliably at 3.0 T in children with CHD and to compare the image quality to similar techniques performed at 1.5 T. Twenty-eight patients with a median age of 5 months and average weight 9.0 ± 7.8 kg with suspected or known CHD were evaluated at 3.0 T. SSFP cine (n = 86 series) and HR-CEMRA (n = 414 named vascular segments) were performed and images were scored for image quality and artifacts. The findings were compared to those of 28 patients with CHD of similar weight who were evaluated at 1.5 T. Overall image quality on HR-CEMRA was rated as excellent or good in 96% (397/414) of vascular segments at 3.0 T (k = 0.49) and in 94% (349/371) of vascular segments at 1.5 T (k = 0.36). Overall image quality of SSFP was rated excellent or good in 91% (78/86) of cine series at 3.0 T (k = 0.55) and in 81% (87/108) at 1.5 T (k = 0.47). Off-resonance artifact was common at both field strengths, varied over the cardiac cycle and was more prevalent at 3.0 T. At 3.0 T, off-resonance dark band artifact on SSFP cine was absent in 3% (3/86), mild in 69% (59/86), moderate in 27% (23/86) and severe in 1% (1/86) of images; at 1.5 T, dark band artifact was absent in 16% (17/108), mild in 69% (75/108), moderate in 12% (13/108) and severe in 3% (3/108) of cine images. The signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio of both SSFP cine and HR-CEMRA images were significantly higher at 3.0 T than at 1.5 T (P < 0.001). Signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio of high-resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and SSFP cine were higher at 3.0 T than at 1.5 T. Artifacts on SSFP cine were

  11. Histone Deacetylase 3 Coordinates Deacetylase-independent Epigenetic Silencing of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 (TGF-β1) to Orchestrate Second Heart Field Development*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Sara L.; Janardhan, Harish P.; Trivedi, Chinmay M.

    2015-01-01

    About two-thirds of human congenital heart disease involves second heart field-derived structures. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone deacetylases (HDACs), regulate the epigenome; however, their functions within the second heart field remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) orchestrates epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1, a causative factor in congenital heart disease pathogenesis, in a deacetylase-independent manner to regulate development of second heart field-derived structures. In murine embryos lacking HDAC3 in the second heart field, increased TGF-β1 bioavailability is associated with ascending aortic dilatation, outflow tract malrotation, overriding aorta, double outlet right ventricle, aberrant semilunar valve development, bicuspid aortic valve, ventricular septal defects, and embryonic lethality. Activation of TGF-β signaling causes aberrant endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and altered extracellular matrix homeostasis in HDAC3-null outflow tracts and semilunar valves, and pharmacological inhibition of TGF-β rescues these defects. HDAC3 recruits components of the PRC2 complex, methyltransferase EZH2, EED, and SUZ12, to the NCOR complex to enrich trimethylation of Lys-27 on histone H3 at the Tgf-β1 regulatory region and thereby maintains epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1 specifically within the second heart field-derived mesenchyme. Wild-type HDAC3 or catalytically inactive HDAC3 expression rescues aberrant endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1 in HDAC3-null outflow tracts and semilunar valves. These findings reveal that epigenetic dysregulation within the second heart field is a predisposing factor for congenital heart disease. PMID:26420484

  12. Histone Deacetylase 3 Coordinates Deacetylase-independent Epigenetic Silencing of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 (TGF-β1) to Orchestrate Second Heart Field Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Sara L; Janardhan, Harish P; Trivedi, Chinmay M

    2015-11-06

    About two-thirds of human congenital heart disease involves second heart field-derived structures. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone deacetylases (HDACs), regulate the epigenome; however, their functions within the second heart field remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) orchestrates epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1, a causative factor in congenital heart disease pathogenesis, in a deacetylase-independent manner to regulate development of second heart field-derived structures. In murine embryos lacking HDAC3 in the second heart field, increased TGF-β1 bioavailability is associated with ascending aortic dilatation, outflow tract malrotation, overriding aorta, double outlet right ventricle, aberrant semilunar valve development, bicuspid aortic valve, ventricular septal defects, and embryonic lethality. Activation of TGF-β signaling causes aberrant endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and altered extracellular matrix homeostasis in HDAC3-null outflow tracts and semilunar valves, and pharmacological inhibition of TGF-β rescues these defects. HDAC3 recruits components of the PRC2 complex, methyltransferase EZH2, EED, and SUZ12, to the NCOR complex to enrich trimethylation of Lys-27 on histone H3 at the Tgf-β1 regulatory region and thereby maintains epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1 specifically within the second heart field-derived mesenchyme. Wild-type HDAC3 or catalytically inactive HDAC3 expression rescues aberrant endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1 in HDAC3-null outflow tracts and semilunar valves. These findings reveal that epigenetic dysregulation within the second heart field is a predisposing factor for congenital heart disease.

  13. Suitability of PCR fingerprinting, infrequent-restriction-site PCR, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, combined with computerized gel analysis, in library typing of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garaizar, J.; Lopez-Molina, N.; Laconcha, I.

    2000-01-01

    Strains of Salmonella enterica (n = 212) of different serovars and phage types were used to establish a library typing computerized system for serovar Enteritidis on the basis of PCR fingerprinting, infrequent-restriction-site PCR (IRS-PCR), or pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The rate...... showed an intercenter reproducibility value of 93.3%. The high reproducibility of PFGE combined with the previously determined high discrimination directed its use for library typing. The use of PFGE with enzymes XbaI, BlnI, and SpeI for library typing of serovar Enteritidis was assessed with GelCompar 4...

  14. Akt1 signaling coordinates BMP signaling and β-catenin activity to regulate second heart field progenitor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wen; Zhao, Xia; Jin, Hengwei; Tao, Lichan; Zhu, Jingai; Wang, Huijuan; Hemmings, Brian A; Yang, Zhongzhou

    2015-02-15

    Second heart field (SHF) progenitors exhibit continued proliferation and delayed differentiation, which are modulated by FGF4/8/10, BMP and canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PTEN-Akt signaling regulates the stem cell/progenitor cell homeostasis in several systems, such as hematopoietic stem cells, intestinal stem cells and neural progenitor cells. To address whether PTEN-Akt signaling is involved in regulating cardiac progenitors, we deleted Pten in SHF progenitors. Deletion of Pten caused SHF expansion and increased the size of the SHF derivatives, the right ventricle and the outflow tract. Cell proliferation of cardiac progenitors was enhanced, whereas cardiac differentiation was unaffected by Pten deletion. Removal of Akt1 rescued the phenotype and early lethality of Pten deletion mice, suggesting that Akt1 was the key downstream target that was negatively regulated by PTEN in cardiac progenitors. Furthermore, we found that inhibition of FOXO by Akt1 suppressed the expression of the gene encoding the BMP ligand (BMP7), leading to dampened BMP signaling in the hearts of Pten deletion mice. Cardiac activation of Akt also increased the Ser552 phosphorylation of β-catenin, thus enhancing its activity. Reducing β-catenin levels could partially rescue heart defects of Pten deletion mice. We conclude that Akt signaling regulates the cell proliferation of SHF progenitors through coordination of BMP signaling and β-catenin activity.

  15. A Biobank for Long-term and Sustainable Research in the Field of Congenital Heart Disease in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Pickardt

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most frequent birth defect (0.8%–1% of all live births. Due to the advance in prenatal and postnatal early diagnosis and treatment, more than 90% of these patients survive into adulthood today. However, several mid- and long-term morbidities are dominating the follow-up of these patients. Due to the rarity and heterogeneity of the phenotypes of CHD, multicenter registry-based studies are required. The CHD-Biobank was established in 2009 with the aim to collect DNA from patients and their parents (trios or from affected families, as well as cardiovascular tissues from patients undergoing corrective heart surgery for cardiovascular malformations. Clinical/phenotype data are matched to the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10. The DNA collection currently comprises samples from approximately 4200 participants with a wide range of CHD phenotypes. The collection covers about 430 trios and 120 families with more than one affected member. The cardiac tissue collection comprises 1143 tissue samples from 556 patients after open heart surgery. The CHD-Biobank provides a comprehensive basis for research in the field of CHD with high standards of data privacy, IT management, and sample logistics.

  16. Murine Jagged1/Notch signaling in the second heart field orchestrates Fgf8 expression and tissue-tissue interactions during outflow tract development

    Science.gov (United States)

    High, Frances A.; Jain, Rajan; Stoller, Jason Z.; Antonucci, Nicole B.; Lu, Min Min; Loomes, Kathleen M.; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Pear, Warren S.; Epstein, Jonathan A.

    2009-01-01

    Notch signaling is vital for proper cardiovascular development and function in both humans and animal models. Indeed, mutations in either JAGGED or NOTCH cause congenital heart disease in humans and NOTCH mutations are associated with adult valvular disease. Notch typically functions to mediate developmental interactions between adjacent tissues. Here we show that either absence of the Notch ligand Jagged1 or inhibition of Notch signaling in second heart field tissues results in murine aortic arch artery and cardiac anomalies. In mid-gestation, these mutants displayed decreased Fgf8 and Bmp4 expression. Notch inhibition within the second heart field affected the development of neighboring tissues. For example, faulty migration of cardiac neural crest cells and defective endothelial-mesenchymal transition within the outflow tract endocardial cushions were observed. Furthermore, exogenous Fgf8 was sufficient to rescue the defect in endothelial-mesenchymal transition in explant assays of endocardial cushions following Notch inhibition within second heart field derivatives. These data support a model that relates second heart field, neural crest, and endocardial cushion development and suggests that perturbed Notch-Jagged signaling within second heart field progenitors accounts for some forms of congenital and adult cardiac disease. PMID:19509466

  17. Effects of broad band electromagnetic fields on HSP70 expression and ischemia-reperfusion in rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchi, Raffaella; Marano, Lidia; Braidotti, Paola; Bianciardi, Paola; Calamia, Mario; Fiorentini, Cesare; Samaja, Michele

    2004-09-03

    Although exposure to broad band (0.2-20 MHz) electromagnetic fields (EMF) is part of the treatment of several diseases, little is known as to their effects on myocardial protein expression and resistance to ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). We exposed Sprague-Dawley rats to either high (H, 10 min/day at 200 V/m, 36.1 microT) or low (L, 2 min/day at 30 V/m, 11.4 microT) intensity broad band EMF for 15 days. At the end of the treatment, myocardial HSP70 was 32 +/- 8% (mean +/- SEM) higher in L (P = 0.01) than in control (C), whereas in H it remained the same as in C. Electron microscopy revealed sporadic ruptures of mitochondrial cristae in H hearts, with no differences in other parameters. Malondialdehyde was increased in treated hearts (P < 0.05), but especially in H (P = 0.008). To assess the protective role of HSP70 during I/R, hearts were Langendorff-perfused with Krebs-Henseleit. After I/R, C hearts displayed depressed rate. pressure (-13 +/- 7%) and increased end-diastolic (+9.2 +/- 2.8 mmHg) and perfusion pressures (+30 +/- 10 mmHg). In H and L, rate. pressure recovery was similar to C (-2 +/- 21% and -12 +/- 16%, respectively, P = NS). In contrast, both end-diastolic and perfusion pressures were higher in L than in H (30.8 +/- 5.4 vs 18.2 +/- 3.5, P = 0.01, and 54 +/- 8 vs 21 +/- 8 mmHg, P = 0.01, respectively) indicating diastolic derangement in L. In conclusion, the effects of broad band EMF on HSP70 appear to be biphasic, and HSP70 overexpression might not be directly related to improved protection against I/R.

  18. Effect of static magnetic field and/or cadmium in the antioxidant enzymes activity in rat heart and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Salem; Garrel, Catherine; Favier, Alain; Ben Rhouma, Khémais; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2009-12-01

    Currently, environmental and industrial pollution along with increase and causes multiple stress conditions, the combined exposure to magnetic field and other toxic agents is recognised as an important research area, with a view to better protecting human health against their probable unfavourable effects. In the present study, we investigated the effect of co-exposure to static magnetic field (SMF) and cadmium (Cd) on the antioxidant enzymes activity and the malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration in rat skeletal and cardiac muscles. The exposure of rats to SMF (128 mT, 1 h/day during 30 consecutive days) decreased the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and the superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) in heart muscle. Sub-chronic exposure to SMF increased the MDA concentration in rat cardiac muscle. Cd treatment (CdCl2, 40 mg/l, per os) during 4 weeks decreased the activities of catalase (CAT) in skeletal muscle and the CuZn-SOD in the heart. Moreover, Cd administration increased MDA concentration in the both structures. The combined effect of SMF (128 mT, 1 h/day during 30 consecutive days) and Cd (40 mg/l, per os) disrupt the antioxidant enzymes activity in rat skeletal and cardiac muscles. Moreover, we noted a huge increase in MDA concentration in the heart and skeletal muscle compared to control group. Thus it is possible that the SMF- and/or Cd-induced depletion of antioxidant enzymes activity in muscle tissues might, like the enhanced lipid peroxidation, importantly contribute to oxidative damage. The combined effect of SMF and Cd altered significantly the antioxidant enzymatic capacity and induced lipid peroxidation in both skeletal and cardiac muscle.

  19. Restricted Airspace

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Redstone Technical Test Center has restricted airspace up to 30,000 feet ASL. Airspace encompasses R-2104 (Redstone). Airspace is used extensively for airborne/UAV...

  20. Brain–heart interactions: challenges and opportunities with functional magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Erika P.; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra-high field (UHF) strengths (7 T and above) offers unique opportunities for studying the human brain with increased spatial resolution, contrast and sensitivity. However, its reliability can be compromised by factors such as head motion, image distortion and non-neural fluctuations of the functional MRI signal. The objective of this review is to provide a critical discussion of the advantages and trade-offs associated with UHF imaging, focusing on the application to studying brain–heart interactions. We describe how UHF MRI may provide contrast and resolution benefits for measuring neural activity of regions involved in the control and mediation of autonomic processes, and in delineating such regions based on anatomical MRI contrast. Limitations arising from confounding signals are discussed, including challenges with distinguishing non-neural physiological effects from the neural signals of interest that reflect cardiorespiratory function. We also consider how recently developed data analysis techniques may be applied to high-field imaging data to uncover novel information about brain–heart interactions. PMID:27044994

  1. Brain-heart interactions: challenges and opportunities with functional magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Catie; Raven, Erika P; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-05-13

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra-high field (UHF) strengths (7 T and above) offers unique opportunities for studying the human brain with increased spatial resolution, contrast and sensitivity. However, its reliability can be compromised by factors such as head motion, image distortion and non-neural fluctuations of the functional MRI signal. The objective of this review is to provide a critical discussion of the advantages and trade-offs associated with UHF imaging, focusing on the application to studying brain-heart interactions. We describe how UHF MRI may provide contrast and resolution benefits for measuring neural activity of regions involved in the control and mediation of autonomic processes, and in delineating such regions based on anatomical MRI contrast. Limitations arising from confounding signals are discussed, including challenges with distinguishing non-neural physiological effects from the neural signals of interest that reflect cardiorespiratory function. We also consider how recently developed data analysis techniques may be applied to high-field imaging data to uncover novel information about brain-heart interactions.

  2. The Association between Work-Related Rumination and Heart Rate Variability: A Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropley, Mark; Plans, David; Morelli, Davide; Sütterlin, Stefan; Inceoglu, Ilke; Thomas, Geoff; Chu, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association between perseverative cognition in the form of work-related rumination, and heart rate variability (HRV). We tested the hypothesis that high ruminators would show lower vagally mediated HRV relative to low ruminators during their leisure time. Individuals were classified as being low (n = 17) or high ruminators (n = 19), using the affective scale on the work-related rumination measure. HRV was assessed using a wrist sensor band (Microsoft Band 2). HRV was sampled between 8 pm and 10 pm over three workday evenings (Monday to Wednesday) while individuals carried out their normal evening routines. Compared to the low ruminators, high affective ruminators demonstrated lower HRV in the form of root mean square successive differences (RMSSDs), relative to the low ruminators, indicating lower parasympathetic activity. There was no significant difference in heart rate, or activity levels between the two groups during the recording periods. The current findings of this study may have implications for the design and delivery of interventions to help individuals unwind post work and to manage stress more effectively. Limitations and implications for future research are discussed. PMID:28197087

  3. Nonlinear heart rate variability measures under electromagnetic fields produced by GSM cellular phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazzini, Marta; Ravazzani, Paolo; Thuroczy, György; Molnar, Ferenc B; Ardesi, Gianluca; Sacchettini, Alessio; Mainardi, Luca Tommaso

    2013-06-01

    This study was designed to assess the nonlinear dynamics of heart rate variability (HRV) during exposure to low-intensity EMFs. Twenty-six healthy young volunteers were subjected to a rest-to-stand protocol to evaluate autonomic nervous system in quiet condition (rest, vagal prevalence) and after a sympathetic activation (stand). The procedure was conducted twice in a double-blind design: once with a genuine EMFs exposure (GSM cellular phone at 900 MHz, 2 W) and once with a sham exposure (at least 24 h apart). During each session, three-lead electrocardiograms were recorded and RR series extracted off-line. The RR series were analyzed by nonlinear deterministic techniques in every phase of the protocol and during the different exposures. The analysis of the data shows there was no statistically significant effect due to GSM exposure on the nonlinear dynamics of HRV.

  4. Vangl2-regulated polarisation of second heart field-derived cells is required for outflow tract lengthening during cardiac development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon A Ramsbottom

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Planar cell polarity (PCP is the mechanism by which cells orient themselves in the plane of an epithelium or during directed cell migration, and is regulated by a highly conserved signalling pathway. Mutations in the PCP gene Vangl2, as well as in other key components of the pathway, cause a spectrum of cardiac outflow tract defects. However, it is unclear why cells within the mesodermal heart tissue require PCP signalling. Using a new conditionally floxed allele we show that Vangl2 is required solely within the second heart field (SHF to direct normal outflow tract lengthening, a process that is required for septation and normal alignment of the aorta and pulmonary trunk with the ventricular chambers. Analysis of a range of markers of polarised epithelial tissues showed that in the normal heart, undifferentiated SHF cells move from the dorsal pericardial wall into the distal outflow tract where they acquire an epithelial phenotype, before moving proximally where they differentiate into cardiomyocytes. Thus there is a transition zone in the distal outflow tract where SHF cells become more polarised, turn off progenitor markers and start to differentiate to cardiomyocytes. Membrane-bound Vangl2 marks the proximal extent of this transition zone and in the absence of Vangl2, the SHF-derived cells are abnormally polarised and disorganised. The consequent thickening, rather than lengthening, of the outflow wall leads to a shortened outflow tract. Premature down regulation of the SHF-progenitor marker Isl1 in the mutants, and accompanied premature differentiation to cardiomyocytes, suggests that the organisation of the cells within the transition zone is important for maintaining the undifferentiated phenotype. Thus, Vangl2-regulated polarisation and subsequent acquisition of an epithelial phenotype is essential to lengthen the tubular outflow vessel, a process that is essential for on-going cardiac morphogenesis.

  5. Vangl2-regulated polarisation of second heart field-derived cells is required for outflow tract lengthening during cardiac development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsbottom, Simon A; Sharma, Vipul; Rhee, Hong Jun; Eley, Lorraine; Phillips, Helen M; Rigby, Hannah F; Dean, Charlotte; Chaudhry, Bill; Henderson, Deborah J

    2014-12-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is the mechanism by which cells orient themselves in the plane of an epithelium or during directed cell migration, and is regulated by a highly conserved signalling pathway. Mutations in the PCP gene Vangl2, as well as in other key components of the pathway, cause a spectrum of cardiac outflow tract defects. However, it is unclear why cells within the mesodermal heart tissue require PCP signalling. Using a new conditionally floxed allele we show that Vangl2 is required solely within the second heart field (SHF) to direct normal outflow tract lengthening, a process that is required for septation and normal alignment of the aorta and pulmonary trunk with the ventricular chambers. Analysis of a range of markers of polarised epithelial tissues showed that in the normal heart, undifferentiated SHF cells move from the dorsal pericardial wall into the distal outflow tract where they acquire an epithelial phenotype, before moving proximally where they differentiate into cardiomyocytes. Thus there is a transition zone in the distal outflow tract where SHF cells become more polarised, turn off progenitor markers and start to differentiate to cardiomyocytes. Membrane-bound Vangl2 marks the proximal extent of this transition zone and in the absence of Vangl2, the SHF-derived cells are abnormally polarised and disorganised. The consequent thickening, rather than lengthening, of the outflow wall leads to a shortened outflow tract. Premature down regulation of the SHF-progenitor marker Isl1 in the mutants, and accompanied premature differentiation to cardiomyocytes, suggests that the organisation of the cells within the transition zone is important for maintaining the undifferentiated phenotype. Thus, Vangl2-regulated polarisation and subsequent acquisition of an epithelial phenotype is essential to lengthen the tubular outflow vessel, a process that is essential for on-going cardiac morphogenesis.

  6. Guidance as to restrictions on exposures to time varying electromagnetic fields and the 1988 recommendations of the International Non-Ionizing Radiation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, J A

    1989-01-01

    Under a direction from the Health Ministers, NRPB is required to advise on the acceptability to the United Kingdom of standards recommended or proposed by certain international bodies relating to protection from both ionising radiations and non-ionising electromagnetic radiations. This document contains the Board's advice in response to guidelines recommended by the International Non-Ionizing Radiation Committee (INIRC) on limiting exposures to electromagnetic fields in the frequency range 100 kHz to 300 GHz (Health Physics, 54, 115 (1988)). The Board's advice, however, extends over all frequencies up to 300 GHz. It has been prepared after considering advice from the Medical Research Council and responses to consultative documents published by the Board in 1982 and 1986. The Board's advice is intended to protect against the thermal effects of the absorption of electromagnetic energy and against the possibilities of electric shock and burn. It consists of a set of basic restrictions both on the average rate of...

  7. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  8. Effect of Caloric Restriction or Aerobic Exercise Training on Peak Oxygen Consumption and Quality of Life in Obese Older Patients with Heart Failure and Preserved Ejection Fraction A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzman, Dalane W.; Brubaker, Peter; Morgan, Timothy; Haykowsky, Mark; Hundley, Gregory; Kraus, William E.; Eggebeen, Joel; Nicklas, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    Importance More than 80% of patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), the most common form of HF among older persons, are overweight/obese. Exercise intolerance is the primary symptom of chronic HFPEF and a major determinant of reduced quality-of-life (QOL). Objective To determine whether caloric restriction (Diet), or aerobic exercise training (Exercise), improves exercise capacity and QOL in obese older HFPEF patients. Design Randomized, attention-controlled, 2x2 factorial trial conducted from February 2009 November 2014. Setting Urban academic medical center. Participants 100 older (67±5 years) obese (BMI=39.3±5.6kg/m2) women (n=81) and men (n=19) with chronic, stable HFPEF enrolled from 577 patients initially screened (366 excluded by inclusion / exclusion criteria, 31 for other reasons, 80 declined participation). Twenty-six participants were randomized to Exercise alone, 24 to Diet alone, 25 to Diet+Exercise, and 25 to Control; 92 completed the trial. Interventions 20 weeks of Diet and/or Exercise; Attention Control consisted of telephone calls every 2 weeks. Main Outcomes and Measures Exercise capacity measured as peak oxygen consumption (VO2, ml/kg/min; primary outcome) and QOL measured by the Minnesota Living with HF Questionnaire (MLHF) total score (co-primary outcome; score range: 0–105, higher scores indicate worse HF-related QOL). Results By main effects analysis, peak VO2 was increased significantly by both interventions: Exercise main effect 1.2 ml/kg/min (95%CI: 0.7,1.7; pExercise+Diet was additive (complementary) for peak VO2 (joint effect 2.5 ml/kg/min). The change in MLHF total score was non-significant with Exercise (main effect −1 unit; 95%CI: −8,5; p=0.70) and with Diet (main effect −6 units; 95%CI: −12,1; p=0.078). The change in peak VO2 was positively correlated with the change in percent lean body mass (r=0.32; p=0.003) and the change in thigh muscle/intermuscular fat ratio (r=0.27; p=0.02). There

  9. Standing Excitation Waves in the Heart Induced by Strong Alternating Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Richard A.; Mornev, Oleg A.; Jalife, José; Aslanidi, Oleg V.; Pertsov, Arkady M.

    2001-10-01

    We studied the effect of sinusoidal electric fields on cardiac tissue both experimentally and numerically. We found that periodic forcing at 5-20 Hz using voltage applied in the bathing solution could stop the propagation of excitation waves by producing standing waves of membrane depolarization. These patterns were independent of the driving frequency in contrast to classical standing waves. The stimulus strength required for pattern formation was large compared to the excitation threshold. A novel tridomain representation of cardiac tissue was required to reproduce this behavior numerically.

  10. Effects of long-term exposure to 900 megahertz electromagnetic field on heart morphology and biochemistry of male adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimoğlu, G; Mercantepe, T; Erol, H S; Turgut, A; Kaya, H; Çolakoğlu, S; Odacı, E

    2016-08-11

    The pathological effects of exposure to an electromagnetic field (EMF) during adolescence may be greater than those in adulthood. We investigated the effects of exposure to 900 MHz EMF during adolescence on male adult rats. Twenty-four 21-day-old male rats were divided into three equal groups: control (Cont-Gr), sham (Shm-Gr) and EMF-exposed (EMF-Gr). EMF-Gr rats were placed in an EMF exposure cage (Plexiglas cage) for 1 h/day between postnatal days 21 and 59 and exposed to 900 MHz EMF. Shm-Gr rats were placed inside the Plexiglas cage under the same conditions and for the same duration, but were not exposed to EMF. All animals were sacrificed on postnatal day 60 and the hearts were extracted for microscopic and biochemical analyses. Biochemical analysis showed increased levels of malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase, and reduced glutathione and catalase levels in EMF-Gr compared to Cont-Gr animals. Hematoxylin and eosin stained sections from EMF-Gr animals exhibited structural changes and capillary congestion in the myocardium. The percentage of apoptotic myocardial cells in EMF-Gr was higher than in either Shm-Gr or Cont-Gr animals. Transmission electron microscopy of myocardial cells of EMF-Gr animals showed altered structure of Z bands, decreased myofilaments and pronounced vacuolization. We found that exposure of male rats to 900 MHz EMF for 1 h/day during adolescence caused oxidative stress, which caused structural alteration of male adolescent rat heart tissue.

  11. Zebrafish second heart field development relies on progenitor specification in anterior lateral plate mesoderm and nkx2.5 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guner-Ataman, Burcu; Paffett-Lugassy, Noelle; Adams, Meghan S; Nevis, Kathleen R; Jahangiri, Leila; Obregon, Pablo; Kikuchi, Kazu; Poss, Kenneth D; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey

    2013-03-01

    Second heart field (SHF) progenitors perform essential functions during mammalian cardiogenesis. We recently identified a population of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) in zebrafish expressing latent TGFβ-binding protein 3 (ltbp3) that exhibits several defining characteristics of the anterior SHF in mammals. However, ltbp3 transcripts are conspicuously absent in anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM), where SHF progenitors are specified in higher vertebrates. Instead, ltbp3 expression initiates at the arterial pole of the developing heart tube. Because the mechanisms of cardiac development are conserved evolutionarily, we hypothesized that zebrafish SHF specification also occurs in the ALPM. To test this hypothesis, we Cre/loxP lineage traced gata4(+) and nkx2.5(+) ALPM populations predicted to contain SHF progenitors, based on evolutionary conservation of ALPM patterning. Traced cells were identified in SHF-derived distal ventricular myocardium and in three lineages in the outflow tract (OFT). We confirmed the extent of contributions made by ALPM nkx2.5(+) cells using Kaede photoconversion. Taken together, these data demonstrate that, as in higher vertebrates, zebrafish SHF progenitors are specified within the ALPM and express nkx2.5. Furthermore, we tested the hypothesis that Nkx2.5 plays a conserved and essential role during zebrafish SHF development. Embryos injected with an nkx2.5 morpholino exhibited SHF phenotypes caused by compromised progenitor cell proliferation. Co-injecting low doses of nkx2.5 and ltbp3 morpholinos revealed a genetic interaction between these factors. Taken together, our data highlight two conserved features of zebrafish SHF development, reveal a novel genetic relationship between nkx2.5 and ltbp3, and underscore the utility of this model organism for deciphering SHF biology.

  12. Locomotor, Heart-Rate, and Metabolic Power Characteristics of Youth Women's Field Hockey: Female Athletes in Motion (FAiM) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vescovi, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the locomotor, heart-rate, and metabolic power characteristics of high-level youth female field hockey matches. Method: Players from the U21 and U17 Canadian women's national teams were monitored during a 4-match test series using Global Positioning System technology. Position (forward,…

  13. Nanosecond pulse electric field activation of platelet-rich plasma reduces myocardial infarct size and improves left ventricular mechanical function in the rabbit heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, Barbara; Li, Francis

    2012-12-01

    In the current study, we used the novel, nonchemical method of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) to investigate the efficiency of a protocol involving the in vivo treatment of the ischemic and reperfused heart and heart cells in culture with platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Associated with the restoration of blood flow to the ischemic tissue is a phenomenon referred to as "ischemic reperfusion injury." Clinically a type of reperfusion injury occurs during coronary bypass surgery once blood perfusion to the heart is restarted. Although the restoration of oxygen to ischemic myocardial cells is critical for tissue survival, reperfusion causes myocardial oxidative stress, attributable in part to the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Enhanced ROS production is associated with mitochondrial damage. Adult female New Zealand white rabbits were anesthetized and a left thoracotomy performed to expose the heart. The distal segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded for 15 minutes and then released so reperfusion of the tissue could occur. PRP (.21 mg/heart) or saline was injected into the ischemic area of the myocardium. Mechanical function of the left ventricle was analyzed using a Millar catheter attached to a Micro-Med Analysis System. H9c2 cells in culture were treated with 1 mL of nsPEF activated PRP (1.05 mg/flask) for 24 hours before analysis for ROS production or mitochondrial depolarization damage). The left ventricle contracted and relaxed faster and infarct size was reduced in hearts treated with PRP compared with saline. ROS production and mitochondrial depolarization were reduced in H9c2 cells treated with PRP and stimulated with hydrogen peroxide. These results provide evidence that nsPEFs can successfully be used to prepare PRP and that the PRP is functional in heart protection possibly by reducing ROS generation and stabilizing the mitochondria of the ischemic/reperfused heart.

  14. Field test of a paradigm: hysteresis of heart rate in thermoregulation by a free-ranging lizard (Pogona barbata).

    OpenAIRE

    Grigg, G C; Seebacher, F.

    1999-01-01

    The discovery that changes in heart rate and blood flow allow some reptiles to heat faster than they cool has become a central paradigm in our understanding of reptilian thermoregulation. However, this hysteresis in heart rate has been demonstrated only in simplistic laboratory heating and cooling trials, leaving its functional significance in free-ranging animals unproven. To test the validity of this paradigm, we measured heart rate and body temperature (Tb) in undisturbed, free-ranging bea...

  15. Development of the sinus venosus myocardium from the posterior second heart field : implications for sinoatrial and atrioventricular mode development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vicente Steijn, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    While the embryonic heart is developing and maturing towards its four-chambered form, the cardiac conduction system (CCS) is developing as well. The CCS will provide the heart with the required wiring system to ensure the properly orchestrated contraction of the myocardial chambers. In both the youn

  16. Development of the sinus venosus myocardium from the posterior second heart field : implications for sinoatrial and atrioventricular mode development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vicente Steijn, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    While the embryonic heart is developing and maturing towards its four-chambered form, the cardiac conduction system (CCS) is developing as well. The CCS will provide the heart with the required wiring system to ensure the properly orchestrated contraction of the myocardial chambers. In both the

  17. AcvR1-mediated BMP signaling in second heart field is required for arterial pole development: implications for myocardial differentiation and regional identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Penny S; Rajderkar, Sudha; Lane, Jamie; Mishina, Yuji; Kaartinen, Vesa

    2014-06-15

    BMP signaling plays an essential role in second heart field-derived heart and arterial trunk development, including myocardial differentiation, right ventricular growth, and interventricular, outflow tract and aortico-pulmonary septation. It is mediated by a number of different BMP ligands, and receptors, many of which are present simultaneously. The mechanisms by which they regulate morphogenetic events and degree of redundancy amongst them have still to be elucidated. We therefore assessed the role of BMP Type I receptor AcvR1 in anterior second heart field-derived cell development, and compared it with that of BmpR1a. By removing Acvr1 using the driver Mef2c[AHF]-Cre, we show that AcvR1 plays an essential role in arterial pole morphogenesis, identifying defects in outflow tract wall and cushion morphology that preceded a spectrum of septation defects from double outlet right ventricle to common arterial trunk in mutants. Its absence caused dysregulation in gene expression important for myocardial differentiation (Isl1, Fgf8) and regional identity (Tbx2, Tbx3, Tbx20, Tgfb2). Although these defects resemble to some degree those in the equivalent Bmpr1a mutant, a novel gene knock-in model in which Bmpr1a was expressed in the Acvr1 locus only partially restored septation in Acvr1 mutants. These data show that both BmpR1a and AcvR1 are needed for normal heart development, in which they play some non-redundant roles, and refine our understanding of the genetic and morphogenetic processes underlying Bmp-mediated heart development important in human congenital heart disease.

  18. An Early Requirement for nkx2.5 Ensures First and Second Heart Field Ventricular Identity and Cardiac Function into Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Vanessa; Colombo, Sophie; Targoff, Kimara L.

    2015-01-01

    Temporally controlled mechanisms that define the unique features of ventricular and atrial cardiomyocyte identity are essential for the construction of a coordinated, morphologically intact heart. We have previously demonstrated an important role for nkx genes in maintaining ventricular identity, however, the specific timing of nkx2.5 function in distinct cardiomyocyte populations has yet to be elucidated. Here, we show that heat-shock induction of a novel transgenic line, Tg(hsp70l:nkx2.5-EGFP), during the initial stages of cardiomyocyte differentiation leads to rescue of chamber shape and identity in nkx2.5−/− embryos as chambers emerge. Intriguingly, our findings link an early role of this essential cardiac transcription factor with a later function. Moreover, these data reveal that nkx2.5 is also required in the second heart field as the heart tube forms, reflecting the temporal delay in differentiation of this population. Thus, our results support a model in which nkx genes induce downstream targets that are necessary to maintain chamber-specific identity in both early- and late-differentiating cardiomyocytes at discrete stages in cardiac morphogenesis. Furthermore, we show that overexpression of nkx2.5 during first and second heart field development not only rescues the mutant phenotype, but also is sufficient for proper function of the adult heart. Taken together, these results shed new light on the stage-dependent mechanisms that sculpt chamber-specific cardiomyocytes and, therefore, have the potential to improve in vitro generation of ventricular cells to treat myocardial infarction and congenital heart disease. PMID:25536398

  19. Molecular Epidemiology of Nosocomial Infection: Analysis of chro­mosomal Restriction Fragment Patterns by Pulsed-Field Gel Electro­phoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afaf I Shehata

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is a species of non-fermentative gram-negative coccobacilli commonly found in soil, water and other environmental samples. This bacterium is defined as being strict aerobes, nonmotile, catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. This organism was susceptible to most antibiotics in the 1970s. A. baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen that may be an important threat due to its increasing multidrug resistance and is involved in nosocomial infections that are often severe. The objective of this study was undertaken to elucidate the molecular epidemiology of A. baumannii using the most widely applicable DNA – based typing methods namely Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE. These strains comprised isolates from environmental samples, blood, wound, urine, cerebrospinal fluid and tracheal aspirates. PFGE analysis of 81 clinical isolates has been carried out by using CHEF–DR III systems from Bio – Rad and following the protocol of Gautom with some modifications. A 2.00% band tolerance and an optimization of 4.00% were selected for use during comparisons of generated fingerprints or pulsotypes after digestion with Apa I restriction enzyme. Similarity values have been generated using BioNumerics software, cluster analysis was performed by the unweighted pair – group method using arithmetic averages and DNA relatedness was calculated based on Dice coefficient. An interlinkage homology level of 80% between patterns was assumed as the cutoff for defining a close genetic relationship between strains and was used to define the cluster. As per the generated dendogram, isolates were categorized into 18 major groups designated as Strain I to Strain xvIII. Overall, PFGE was able to discriminate the 81 different Acinetobacter baumannii isolates with similarity levels of 63.63%.

  20. Quasi-Restricted Orbital Treatment for the Density Functional Theory Calculations of the Spin-Orbit Term of Zero-Field Splitting Tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugisaki, Kenji; Toyota, Kazuo; Sato, Kazunobu; Shiomi, Daisuke; Takui, Takeji

    2016-12-15

    A quasi-restricted orbital (QRO) approach for the calculation of the spin-orbit term of zero-field splitting tensors (D(SO) tensors) by means of density functional theory (DFT) importantly features in the fact that it is free from spin contamination problems because it uses spin eigenfunctions for the zeroth order wave functions. In 2011, however, Schmitt and co-workers pointed out that in the originally proposed QRO working equation some possible excitations were not included in their sum-over-states procedure, which causes spurious D(SO) contributions from closed-shell subsystems located far from the magnetic molecule under study. We have revisited the derivation of the QRO working equation and modified it, making it include all possible types of excitations in the sum-over-states procedure. We have found that the spurious D(SO) contribution can be eliminated by taking into account contributions from all possible types of singly excited configuration state functions. We have also found that only the SOMO(α) → SOMO(β) excited configurations have nonzero contributions to the D(SO) tensors as long as α and β spin orbitals have the same spatial distributions and orbital energies. For the D(SO) tensor calculations, by using a ground state wave function free from spin contamination, we propose a natural orbital-based Pederson-Khanna (NOB-PK) method, which utilizes the single determinant wave function consisting of natural orbitals in conjunction with the Pederson-Khanna (PK) type perturbation treatment. Some relevant calculations revealed that the NOB-PK method can afford more accurate D(SO) tensors than the conventional PK method as well as the QRO approach in Mn(II) complexes and Re(IV)-based single molecule magnets.

  1. Genes with Restricted Introgression in a Field Cricket (Gryllus firmus/Gryllus pennsylvanicus) Hybrid Zone Are Concentrated on the X Chromosome and a Single Autosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroja, Luana S; Larson, Erica L; Bogdanowicz, Steven M; Harrison, Richard G

    2015-08-26

    Characterizing the extent of genomic differentiation between recently diverged lineages provides an important context for understanding the early stages of speciation. When such lineages form discrete hybrid zones, patterns of differential introgression allow direct estimates of which genome regions are likely involved in speciation and local adaptation. Here we use a backcross experimental design to construct a genetic linkage map for the field crickets Gryllus firmus and Gryllus pennsylvanicus, which interact in a well-characterized hybrid zone in eastern North America. We demonstrate that loci with major allele frequency differences between allopatric populations are not randomly distributed across the genome. Instead, most are either X-linked or map to a few small autosomal regions. Furthermore, the subset of those highly differentiated markers that exhibit restricted introgression across the cricket hybrid zone are also concentrated on the X chromosome (39 of 50 loci) and in a single 7-cM region of one autosome. Although the accumulation on the sex chromosome of genes responsible for postzygotic barriers is a well-known phenomenon, less attention has been given to the genomic distribution of genes responsible for prezygotic barriers. We discuss the implications of our results for speciation, both in the context of the role of sex chromosomes and also with respect to the likely causes of heterogeneous genomic divergence. Although we do not yet have direct evidence for the accumulation of ecological, behavioral, or fertilization prezygotic barrier genes on the X chromosome, faster-X evolution could make these barriers more likely to be X-linked.

  2. Disheveled mediated planar cell polarity signaling is required in the second heart field lineage for outflow tract morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Tanvi; Wang, Bing; Evans, Sylvia; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Wang, Jianbo

    2012-10-01

    Disheveled (Dvl) is a key regulator of both the canonical Wnt and the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. Previous genetic studies in mice indicated that outflow tract (OFT) formation requires Dvl1 and 2, but it was unclear which pathway was involved and whether Dvl1/2-mediated signaling was required in the second heart field (SHF) or the cardiac neural crest (CNC) lineage, both of which are critical for OFT development. In this study, we used Dvl1/2 null mice and a set of Dvl2 BAC transgenes that function in a pathway-specific fashion to demonstrate that Dvl1/2-mediated PCP signaling is essential for OFT formation. Lineage-specific gene-ablation further indicated that Dvl1/2 function is dispensable in the CNC, but required in the SHF for OFT lengthening to promote cardiac looping. Mutating the core PCP gene Vangl2 and non-canonical Wnt gene Wnt5a recapitulated the OFT morphogenesis defects observed in Dvl1/2 mutants. Consistent with genetic interaction studies suggesting that Wnt5a signals through the PCP pathway, Dvl1/2 and Wnt5a mutants display aberrant cell packing and defective actin polymerization and filopodia formation specifically in SHF cells in the caudal splanchnic mesoderm (SpM), where Wnt5a and Dvl2 are co-expressed specifically. Our results reveal a critical role of PCP signaling in the SHF during early OFT lengthening and cardiac looping and suggest that a Wnt5a→ Dvl PCP signaling cascade may regulate actin polymerization and protrusive cell behavior in the caudal SpM to promote SHF deployment, OFT lengthening and cardiac looping.

  3. An investigation into a contactless photoplethysmographic mobile application to record heart rate post-exercise: Implications for field testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peart Daniel J.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: the aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of a contactless photoplethysmographic mobile application (CPA to record post-exercise heart rate and estimate maximal aerobic capacity after the Queen’s College Step Test. It was hypothesised that the CPA may present a cost effective heart rate measurement tool for educators and practitioners with limited access to specialised laboratory equipment.

  4. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of heart disease you have. Symptoms of heart disease in your blood vessels (atherosclerotic disease) Cardiovascular disease ... can sometimes be found early with regular evaluations. Heart disease symptoms caused by abnormal heartbeats (heart arrhythmias) A ...

  5. Challenges to success in heart failure: Cardiac cell therapies in patients with heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hidemasa; Ito, Hiroshi; Sano, Shunji

    2016-11-01

    Heart failure remains the leading cause of death worldwide, and is a burgeoning problem in public health due to the limited capacity of postnatal hearts to self-renew. The pathophysiological changes in injured hearts can sometimes be manifested as scar formation or myocardial degradation, rather than supplemental muscle regeneration to replenish lost tissue during the healing processes. Stem cell therapies have been investigated as a possible treatment approach for children and adults with potentially fatal cardiovascular disease that does not respond to current medical therapies. Although the heart is one of the least regenerative organs in mammals, discoveries made during the past few decades have improved our understanding of cardiac development and resident stem/progenitor pools, which may be lineage-restricted subpopulations during the post-neonatal stage of cardiac morphogenesis. Recently, investigation has specifically focused on factors that activate either endogenous progenitor cells or preexisting cardiomyocytes, to regenerate cardiovascular cells and replace the damaged heart tissues. The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells has advanced our technological capability to direct cardiac reprogramming by essential factors that are crucial for heart field completion in each stage. Cardiac tissue engineering technology has recently shown progress in generating myocardial tissue on human native cardiac extracellular matrix scaffolds. This review summarizes recent advances in the field of cardiac cell therapies with an emphasis on cellular mechanisms, such as bone marrow stem cells and cardiac progenitor cells, which show the high potential for success in preclinical and clinical meta-analysis studies. Expanding our current understanding of mechanisms of self-renewal in the neonatal mammalian heart may lead to the development of novel cardiovascular regenerative medicines for pediatric heart diseases. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology

  6. Cardiac malformations in Pdgfrα mutant embryos are associated with increased expression of WT1 and Nkx2.5 in the second heart field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bax, Noortje A.M.; Bleyl, Steven B.; Gallini, Radiosa; Wisse, Lambertus J.; Hunter, Jennifer; van Oorschot, Angelique A.M.; Mahtab, Edris A.F.; Lie-Venema, Heleen; Goumans, Marie-Jose; Betsholtz, Christer; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C.

    2010-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (Pdgfrα) identifies cardiac progenitor cells in the posterior part of the second heart field. We aim to elucidate the role of Pdgfrα in this region. Hearts of Pdgfrα deficient mouse embryos (E9.5–E14.5) showed cardiac malformations consisting of atrial and sinus venosus myocardium hypoplasia, including venous valves and sinoatrial node. In vivo staining for Nkx2.5, showed increased myocardial expression in Pdgfrα mutants, confirmed by Western blot analysis. Due to hypoplasia of the primary atrial septum, mesenchymal cap and dorsal mesenchymal protrusion, the atrioventricular septal complex failed to fuse. Impaired epicardial development and severe blebbing coincided with diminished migration of epicardium-derived cells and myocardial thinning, which could be linked to increased WT1 and altered α4-integrin expression. Our data provide novel insight in a possible role for Pdgfrα in transduction pathways that lead to repression of Nkx2.5 and WT1 during development of posterior heart field derived cardiac structures. PMID:20658695

  7. Effects of various extremely low frequency magnetic fields on the free radical processes, natural antioxidant system and respiratory burst system activities in the heart and liver tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canseven, Ayse Gulnihal; Coskun, Sule; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2008-10-01

    Magnetic fields (MFs) can affect biological systems by increasing the release of free radicals that are able to alter cell defense systems and breakdown tissue homeostasis. In the present study, the effects of extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) were investigated on free radical levels, natural antioxidant systems and respiratory burst system activities in heart and liver tissues of guinea pigs exposed to 50 Hz MFs of 1, 2 and 3 mT for 4 h/day and 8 h/day for 5 days by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), glutathione (GSH) levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. A total of sixty-two male guinea pigs, 10-12 weeks old were studied in seven groups as control and exposure groups: Group I (control), II (1 mT, 4 h/day), III (1 mT, 8 h/day), IV (2 mT, 4 h/day), V (2 mT, 8 h/day), VI (3 mT, 4 h/day), and VII (3 mT, 8 h/day). Controls were kept under the same conditions without any exposure to MF. MDA levels increased in liver in groups II and IV, but decreased in group VII for both liver and heart tissues. NOx levels declined in heart in groups II and III and in liver in groups III, V, and VI, but increased in liver in group VII. GSH levels increased in heart in groups II, IV, V, and in liver in groups V and VI and VI, but decreased in groups II and IV in liver. MPO activity decreased in liver in groups III, IV, VI and VII with respect to controls and in heart tissues in groups II, III and IV; however, there was a significant increase MPO activity in heart in group VII. From the results, it can be concluded that the intensity and exposure duration of MFs are among the effective conditions on the formation of free radicals and behaviour of antioxidant enzymes.

  8. [Effects of disturbances of natural magnetic field of the Earth on melatonin production in patients with coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, S I; Malinovskaia, N K; Oraevskií, V N; Komarov, F I; Nosovskií, A M; Vetterberg, L

    1997-01-01

    The obtained results clearly evidence for the influence of magnetic disturbances and storms on melatonin production in patients with ischemic heart disease. Improvement of 24-hour rhythm of melatonin secretion during the period of magnetic disturbances says in favour of this influence while an overall fall of melatonin production during magnetic disturbances and storms is an apparent negative factor.

  9. Progress in the field of heart failure in 2011%2011年心力衰竭新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢永昕; 苏冠华

    2012-01-01

    本文综述了2011年心力衰竭领域的最新临床试验及其进展,包括SHIFT、CARVIVA-HF、EMPHASIS-HF、CUPID、TARGET、SMART-AV、EVERESTⅡ、CADUCEUS、Late-TIMI、CELLWAVE、REPAIR-AMI和CHAMPION等研究.在药物治疗领域,伊伐布雷定可能有助于逆转慢性心力衰竭患者的左室重构、改善其生活质量;依普利酮能够减少新发心房颤动或心房扑动;新型正性肌力药Omecamtiv mecarbil、Mydicar显示出初步的有效性和安全性.在器械治疗领域,通过超声心动图斑点示踪技术和QLV测量电学不同步指导左室电极植入有助于提高心脏再同步化治疗(CRT)的应答率,经皮导管MitraClip系统疗法正逐步成为不能耐受手术或对CRT治疗无效的严重二尖瓣反流患者的一种替代治疗手段.在细胞治疗领域,缺血性心力衰竭患者干细胞治疗的疗效结果不一,尚无定论.慢性心力衰竭患者的远程监测系统尚处于早期探索阶段.%This article reviewed the progress and key trials relevant to the treatment of heart failure ( HF) presented in 2011, including SHIFT, CARVIVA-HF, EMPHASIS-HF, CUPID, TARGET, SMART-AV, EVEREST Ⅱ , CADUCEUS, Late-TIMI, CELLWAVE, REPAIR-AMI and CHAMPION studies. In the field of medication therapy, studies showed that ivabradine may cause favourable left ventricular remodelling and improve quality of life in patients with chronic HF. Eplerenone reduced the incidence of new onset atrial fibrillation or flutter in patients with mild HF. Novel inotropes such as Omecamtiv mecarbil and Mydicar offered the promise of a safe and effective treatment for HF. Improvement of left ventricular lead placement of a cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device by speckle tracking echocardiography and QLV measurement was associated with an enhanced response, and catheter-based treatment with the MitraClip system has been proposed as an additional therapeutic option in patients with severe mitral regurgitation who was

  10. Translation and field testing of the family functioning, family health and social support questionnaire in Danish outpatients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Birte; Pedersen, Karen Steenvinkel; Lauridsen, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Valid and reliable instruments to assess family functioning, health and social support in families with heart failure constitute a cornerstone in the detection of the families' needs, in improving their functioning and in evaluating the effects of nursing interventions. AIM: To transl......BACKGROUND: Valid and reliable instruments to assess family functioning, health and social support in families with heart failure constitute a cornerstone in the detection of the families' needs, in improving their functioning and in evaluating the effects of nursing interventions. AIM....... The test-retest showed interclass correlation coefficients ranging between 0.69 and 0.86, indicating acceptable test-retest reliability. CONCLUSION: The Danish version of the FAFHES is an instrument that can be used to measure family functioning, family health and social support from the perspective...

  11. A Biobank for Long-term and Sustainable Research in the Field of Congenital Heart Disease in Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas Pickardt; Eva Niggemeyer; Ulrike MM Bauer; Hashim Abdul-Khaliq

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most frequent birth defect (0.8%–1% of all live births). Due to the advance in prenatal and postnatal early diagnosis and treatment, more than 90%of these patients survive into adulthood today. However, several mid-and long-term morbidi-ties are dominating the follow-up of these patients. Due to the rarity and heterogeneity of the phe-notypes of CHD, multicenter registry-based studies are required. The CHD-Biobank was established in 2009 with the aim to collect DNA from patients and their parents (trios) or from affected families, as well as cardiovascular tissues from patients undergoing corrective heart surgery for cardiovascular malformations. Clinical/phenotype data are matched to the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC) and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10). The DNA collection currently comprises samples from approximately 4200 participants with a wide range of CHD phenotypes. The collection covers about 430 trios and 120 families with more than one affected member. The cardiac tissue collection comprises 1143 tissue samples from 556 patients after open heart surgery.

  12. Guidelines for heart transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    de Jonge, N; Kirkels, J.H.; Klöpping, C.; Lahpor, J.R.; Caliskan, K.; Maat, A.P.W.M.; Brügemann, J; Erasmus, M.E.; Klautz, R. J. M.; Verwey, H.F; Oomen, A.; Peels, C.H.; Golüke, A.E.J.; Nicastia, D.; Koole, M.A.C.

    2008-01-01

    Based on the changes in the field of heart transplantation and the treatment and prognosis of patients with heart failure, these updated guidelines were composed by a committee under the supervision of both the Netherlands Society of Cardiology and the Netherlands Association for Cardiothoracic surgery (NVVC and NVT).

  13. Guidelines for heart transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirkels, J. H.; Klopping, C.; Lahpor, J. R.; Caliskan, K.; Maat, A. P. W. M.; Brugemann, J.; Erasmus, M. E.; Klautz, R. J. M.; Verwey, H. F.; Oomen, A.; Peels, C. H.; Goluke, A. E. J.; Nicastia, D. M.; Koole, M. A. C.; Balk, A. H. M. M.; de Jonge, N.

    Based on the changes in the field of heart transplantation and the treatment and prognosis of patients with heart failure, these updated guidelines were composed by a committee under the supervision of both the Netherlands Society of Cardiology and the Netherlands Association for Cardiothoracic

  14. Gene network and familial analyses uncover a gene network involving Tbx5/Osr1/Pcsk6 interaction in the second heart field for atrial septation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke K; Xiang, Menglan; Zhou, Lun; Liu, Jielin; Curry, Nathan; Heine Suñer, Damian; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo; Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Qin; Xie, Linglin

    2016-03-15

    Atrial septal defects (ASDs) are a common human congenital heart disease (CHD) that can be induced by genetic abnormalities. Our previous studies have demonstrated a genetic interaction between Tbx5 and Osr1 in the second heart field (SHF) for atrial septation. We hypothesized that Osr1 and Tbx5 share a common signaling networking and downstream targets for atrial septation. To identify this molecular networks, we acquired the RNA-Seq transcriptome data from the posterior SHF of wild-type, Tbx5(+/) (-), Osr1(+/-), Osr1(-/-) and Tbx5(+/-)/Osr1(+/-) mutant embryos. Gene set analysis was used to identify the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways that were affected by the doses of Tbx5 and Osr1. A gene network module involving Tbx5 and Osr1 was identified using a non-parametric distance metric, distance correlation. A subset of 10 core genes and gene-gene interactions in the network module were validated by gene expression alterations in posterior second heart field (pSHF) of Tbx5 and Osr1 transgenic mouse embryos, a time-course gene expression change during P19CL6 cell differentiation. Pcsk6 was one of the network module genes that were linked to Tbx5. We validated the direct regulation of Tbx5 on Pcsk6 using immunohistochemical staining of pSHF, ChIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and luciferase reporter assay. Importantly, we identified Pcsk6 as a novel gene associated with ASD via a human genotyping study of an ASD family. In summary, our study implicated a gene network involving Tbx5, Osr1 and Pcsk6 interaction in SHF for atrial septation, providing a molecular framework for understanding the role of Tbx5 in CHD ontogeny.

  15. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... daily aspirin to prevent heart attack? Does taking birth control pills increase my risk for heart disease? Does using ... tells you to. Return to top Does taking birth control pills increase my risk for heart disease? Taking birth ...

  16. Spectral properties of correlation functions of fields with arbitrary position dependence in restricted geometries from the ballistic to the diffusive regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Swank, C M; Golub, R

    2011-01-01

    The transition between ballistic and diffusive motion poses difficult problems in several fields of physics. In this work we show how to calculate the spectra of the correlation functions between fields of arbitrary spatial dependence as seen by particles moving through the fields in regions bounded by specularly reflecting walls valid for diffusive and ballistic motion as well as the transition region in between for motion in 2 and 3 dimensions. Applications to relaxation in nmr are discussed.

  17. Wnt/β-catenin signaling directs the regional expansion of first and second heart field-derived ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buikema, Jan Willem; Mady, Ahmed S; Mittal, Nikhil V; Atmanli, Ayhan; Caron, Leslie; Doevendans, Pieter A; Sluijter, Joost P G; Domian, Ibrahim J

    2013-10-01

    In mammals, cardiac development proceeds from the formation of the linear heart tube, through complex looping and septation, all the while increasing in mass to provide the oxygen delivery demands of embryonic growth. The developing heart must orchestrate regional differences in cardiomyocyte proliferation to control cardiac morphogenesis. During ventricular wall formation, the compact myocardium proliferates more vigorously than the trabecular myocardium, but the mechanisms controlling such regional differences among cardiomyocyte populations are not understood. Control of definitive cardiomyocyte proliferation is of great importance for application to regenerative cell-based therapies. We have used murine and human pluripotent stem cell systems to demonstrate that, during in vitro cellular differentiation, early ventricular cardiac myocytes display a robust proliferative response to β-catenin-mediated signaling and conversely accelerate differentiation in response to inhibition of this pathway. Using gain- and loss-of-function murine genetic models, we show that β-catenin controls ventricular myocyte proliferation during development and the perinatal period. We further demonstrate that the differential activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway accounts for the observed differences in the proliferation rates of the compact versus the trabecular myocardium during normal cardiac development. Collectively, these results provide a mechanistic explanation for the differences in localized proliferation rates of cardiac myocytes and point to a practical method for the generation of the large numbers of stem cell-derived cardiac myocytes necessary for clinical applications.

  18. A Field Study of the Effects of Traffic Noise on Heart Rate and Cardiac Arrhythmia During Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, N. L.; Ingham, P.; Tran, K.; Hunyor, S. N.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that traffic noise could increase heart rate, and the frequency or severity of cardiac arrhythmias in susceptible people while asleep. Physiological indicators of sleep, electrocardiograph, and respiration and blood oxygen saturation were monitored continuously overnight in seven elderly men living on a busy road. Continuous recordings of the noise outdoors, at the facade, and indoors in the bedrooms, and video recordings of the traffic were made, simultaneously with the physiological measurements. LAeq, LAmax, LApk , LA90, LA10 and LA1 were measured in each 20 s interval, and noise events exceeding 70 dB(A) outdoors and 50 dB(A) indoors for 2 s or longer were logged. Between 03:00 and 05:00 hours, 65% of the traffic consisted of heavy vehicles. With windows open slightly, indoor and outdoor noise exceeded all local, and internationally recommended criteria for adequate sleep by a wide margin. Cardiac arrhythmia occurred during sleep in four of the men. Heart rate and frequency of cardiac arrhythmia were not correlated with indoor LAeq , LApk or LA1, in stage 2, stage 4 and REM sleep. Two of the four subjects with cardiac arrhythmia showed a significant association ( p sleep, between single indoor noise events and the frequency of cardiac ectopic beats 20-40 s later.

  19. Autonomic and Renal Alterations in the Offspring of Sleep-Restricted Mothers During Late Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce R.S. Raimundo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Considering that changes in the maternal environment may result in changes in progeny, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sleep restriction during the last week of pregnancy on renal function and autonomic responses in male descendants at an adult age. METHODS: After confirmation of pregnancy, female Wistar rats were randomly assigned to either a control or a sleep restriction group. The sleep-restricted rats were subjected to sleep restriction using the multiple platforms method for over 20 hours per day between the 14th and 20th day of pregnancy. After delivery, the litters were limited to 6 offspring that were designated as offspring from control and offspring from sleep-restricted mothers. Indirect measurements of systolic blood pressure (BPi, renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate, glomerular area and number of glomeruli per field were evaluated at three months of age. Direct measurements of cardiovascular function (heart rate and mean arterial pressure, cardiac sympathetic tone, cardiac parasympathetic tone, and baroreflex sensitivity were evaluated at four months of age. RESULTS: The sleep-restricted offspring presented increases in BPi, glomerular filtration rate and glomerular area compared with the control offspring. The sleep-restricted offspring also showed higher basal heart rate, increased mean arterial pressure, increased sympathetic cardiac tone, decreased parasympathetic cardiac tone and reduced baroreflex sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that reductions in sleep during the last week of pregnancy lead to alterations in cardiovascular autonomic regulation and renal morpho-functional changes in offspring, triggering increases in blood pressure.

  20. Lungs in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Apostolo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung function abnormalities both at rest and during exercise are frequently observed in patients with chronic heart failure, also in the absence of respiratory disease. Alterations of respiratory mechanics and of gas exchange capacity are strictly related to heart failure. Severe heart failure patients often show a restrictive respiratory pattern, secondary to heart enlargement and increased lung fluids, and impairment of alveolar-capillary gas diffusion, mainly due to an increased resistance to molecular diffusion across the alveolar capillary membrane. Reduced gas diffusion contributes to exercise intolerance and to a worse prognosis. Cardiopulmonary exercise test is considered the “gold standard” when studying the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic adaptations to exercise in cardiac patients. During exercise, hyperventilation and consequent reduction of ventilation efficiency are often observed in heart failure patients, resulting in an increased slope of ventilation/carbon dioxide (VE/VCO2 relationship. Ventilatory efficiency is as strong prognostic and an important stratification marker. This paper describes the pulmonary abnormalities at rest and during exercise in the patients with heart failure, highlighting the principal diagnostic tools for evaluation of lungs function, the possible pharmacological interventions, and the parameters that could be useful in prognostic assessment of heart failure patients.

  1. Continuous In-The-Field Measurement of Heart Rate: Correlates of Drug Use, Craving, Stress, and Mood in Polydrug Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ashley P.; Epstein, David H.; Jobes, Michelle L.; Agage, Daniel; Tyburski, Matthew; Phillips, Karran A.; Ali, Amin Ahsan; Bari, Rummana; Hossain, Syed Monowar; Hovsepian, Karen; Rahman, Md. Mahbubur; Ertin, Emre; Kumar, Santosh; Preston, Kenzie L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ambulatory physiological monitoring could clarify antecedents and consequences of drug use and could contribute to a sensor-triggered mobile intervention that automatically detects behaviorally risky situations. Our goal was to show that such monitoring is feasible and can produce meaningful data. Methods We assessed heart rate (HR) with AutoSense, a suite of biosensors that wirelessly transmits data to a smartphone, for up to four weeks in 40 polydrug users in opioid-agonist maintenance as they went about their daily lives. Participants also self-reported drug use, mood, and activities on electronic diaries. We compared HR with self-report using multilevel modeling (SAS Proc Mixed). Results Compliance with AutoSense was good; the data yield from the wireless electrocardiographs was 85.7%. HR was higher when participants reported cocaine use than when they reported heroin use (F(2,9) = 250.3, p<.0001) and was also higher as a function of the dose of cocaine reported (F(1,8) = 207.7, p<.0001). HR was higher when participants reported craving heroin (F(1,16)=230.9, p<.0001) or cocaine (F(1,14)=157.2, p<.0001) than when they reported of not craving. HR was lower (p<.05) in randomly prompted entries in which participants reported feeling relaxed, feeling happy, or watching TV, and was higher when they reported feeling stressed, being hassled, or walking. Conclusions High-yield, high-quality heart-rate data can be obtained from drug users in their natural environment as they go about their daily lives, and the resultant data robustly reflect episodes of cocaine and heroin use and other mental and behavioral events of interest. PMID:25920802

  2. Heart Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  3. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  4. Maternal Nutrient Restriction Predisposes Ventricular Remodeling in Adult Sheep Offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Wei; Hu, Nan; George, Lindsey A; Ford, Stephen P.; Peter W Nathanielsz; Wang, Xiaoming; Ren, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Maternal nutrient restriction during pregnancy is associated with the development of a “thrifty phenotype” in offspring, conferring increased prevalence of metabolic diseases in adulthood. To explore the possible mechanisms behind heart diseases in adulthood following maternal nutrient restriction, dams were fed a nutrient restricted (NR: 50%) or control (100%) diet from 28 to 78 d of gestation. Both groups were then fed 100% of requirements to lambing. At 6 yrs of age, female offspring of NR...

  5. Restrictive cardiomyopathy. Report of seven cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca Sánchez Luis Alfonso

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Restrictive cardiomyopathy is a disease characterized by ventricular diastolic failure with elevation of end-dyastolic pressure and preserved systolic function. Materials and methods: retrospective study of patients with a diagnosis of restrictive cardiomyopathy. We carry out an analysis of demographic data, clinical presentation, and studies of patients diagnosed in the last 15 years at Instituto Nacional de Pediatría. Results: all included patients had clinical data of heart failure manifested mainly by medium-sized efforts dyspnea on schoolchildren and dyspnea by feeding in infants, as well as polypnea and diaphoresis. The most important signs were hepatomegaly, ascites, and gallop rhythm. Cardiomegaly by right atrial dilatation was the most frequent radiological data. The most frequent electrocardiographic data were dilatation of both atria, ST-segment depression and negative T waves. Echocardiogram showed in all cases binaural dilation and restrictive pattern. Conclusions: our patients were similar to those described in the specialized literature. Echocardiogram is still the best study for the diagnosis and the use of functional measurements as Doppler imaging can help to reveal early diastolic failure. In our country the heart transplant is just feasible; mortality remains 100%. Keywords: Restrictive cardiomyopathy, Heart failure, Cardiomyopathy.

  6. Fibroblast growth factor 10 gene regulation in the second heart field by Tbx1, Nkx2-5, and Islet1 reveals a genetic switch for down-regulation in the myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yusuke; Zaffran, Stéphane; Kuroiwa, Atsushi; Higuchi, Hiroaki; Ogura, Toshihiko; Harvey, Richard P; Kelly, Robert G; Buckingham, Margaret

    2012-11-06

    During cardiogenesis, Fibroblast Growth Factor (Fgf10) is expressed in the anterior second heart field. Together with Fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8), Fgf10 promotes the proliferation of these cardiac progenitor cells that form the arterial pole of the heart. We have identified a 1.7-kb region in the first intron of Fgf10 that is necessary and sufficient to direct transgene expression in this cardiac context. The 1.7-kb sequence is directly controlled by T-box transcription factor 1 (Tbx1) in anterior second heart field cells that contribute to the outflow tract. It also responds to both NK2 transcription factor related, locus 5 (Nkx2-5) and ISL1 transcription factor, LIM/homeodomain (Islet1), acting through overlapping sites. Mutation of these sites reduces transgene expression in the anterior second heart field where the Fgf10 regulatory element is activated by Islet1 via direct binding in vivo. Analysis of the response to Nkx2-5 loss- and Isl1 gain-of-function genetic backgrounds indicates that the observed up-regulation of its activity in Nkx2-5 mutant hearts, reflecting that of Fgf10, is due to the absence of Nkx2-5 repression and to up-regulation of Isl1, normally repressed in the myocardium by Nkx2-5. ChIP experiments show strong binding of Nkx2-5 in differentiated myocardium. Molecular and genetic analysis of the Fgf10 cardiac element therefore reveals how key cardiac transcription factors orchestrate gene expression in the anterior second heart field and how genes, such as Fgf10, normally expressed in the progenitor cell population, are repressed when these cells enter the heart and differentiate into myocardium. Our findings provide a paradigm for transcriptional mechanisms that underlie the changes in regulatory networks during the transition from progenitor state to that of the differentiated tissue.

  7. Validity of the Elite HRV Smart Phone Application for Examining Heart Rate Variability in a Field Based Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, A S; Jeklin, A; Hives, B A; Meanwell, L E; Warburton, D E R

    2017-02-08

    The introduction of smart phone applications has allowed athletes and practitioners to record and store R-R intervals on smart phones for immediate heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. This user-friendly option should be validated in the effort to provide practitioners confidence when monitoring their athletes before implementing such equipment.The objective of this investigation was to examine the relationship between a vagal related HRV index, rMSSD when derived from a smart phone application accessible with most smart phone operating systems against Kubios HRV 2.2R-R intervals were recorded immediately upon awakening over 14 consecutive days using the Elite HRV smartphone application. R-R recordings were then exported into Kubios HRV 2.2 for analysis. The relationship between rMSSDln derived from Elite HRV and Kubios HRV 2.2 was examined using a Pearson Product Moment Correlation and a Bland-Altman Plot.An extremely large relationship was identified (r = 0.92; p smart phone application for examining rMSDDLn when compared to Kubios HRV 2.2. We propose further research is warranted to confirm our observations and to identify if this smart phone application may be reliable rather than valid when assessing parasympathetic modulation.

  8. Research on the coupling heart electric field using passive human body detection system%被动式人体探测系统的双人体耦合心电场分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张燕; 徐立新

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of the coupling heart electric field is a pivotal step in the human body detection system which target is the heart coupling electric field between the operator and the detected living human. In this paper, the double-human heart coupling electric field is discussed and the Three-dimensional finite element method is used to analytically solve that problem. Firstly,we described the principle of the single human heart electric field based on the cardiact electric dipoles. Then,the double-human coupling heart electric field is analysised. Finally,the Three-dimensional finite element method is used to simulat and calculate the coupling heart electric field. The three different typical coupling heart electric field is shown in the result. Through comparing with the single human heart electric field,it has obvious advantages. The conclusion of this paper is the most significant studies of the passive electrostatic human body detection technique.%在利用以被探测者与探测者双人体心脏耦合电场为探测目标的人体探测系统中,对目标电场的分析是整个研究过程的关键环节.重点讨论了双人体心电偶极子所产生的耦合电场问题,并利用有限元方法对其进行分析.文中首先阐述了以心电偶极子为电场源的人体心电场产生原理;其次,分析了双人体心脏耦合电场模型及特性;最后,利用三维有限元方法对耦合电场进行建模与仿真,并且将其与单人体心电场进行比较.据此进行的仿真结果清晰展示了双人体耦合心电场的特性与优点,且与理论分析相一致.研究的结论为以人体心电场为探测目标的静电探测系统建立了有效的电场模型,对人体探测技术的进一步研究具有重要意义.

  9. A general framework to quantify the effect of restricted diffusion on the NMR signal with applications to double pulsed field gradient NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozarslan, Evren; Shemesh, Noam; Basser, Peter J

    2009-03-14

    Based on a description introduced by Robertson, Grebenkov recently introduced a powerful formalism to represent the diffusion-attenuated NMR signal for simple pore geometries such as slabs, cylinders, and spheres analytically. In this work, we extend this multiple correlation function formalism by allowing for possible variations in the direction of the magnetic field gradient waveform. This extension is necessary, for example, to incorporate the effects of imaging gradients in diffusion-weighted NMR imaging scans and in characterizing anisotropy at different length scales via double pulsed field gradient (PFG) experiments. In cylindrical and spherical pores, respectively, two- and three-dimensional vector operators are employed whose form is deduced from Grebenkov's results via elementary operator algebra for the case of cylinders and the Wigner-Eckart theorem for the case of spheres. The theory was validated by comparison with known findings and with experimental double-PFG data obtained from water-filled microcapillaries.

  10. Change in fibrinolytic activity under the influence of a constant magnetic field. [blood coagulation normilization in heart patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepishina, S. G.

    1974-01-01

    The fibrinolytic activity of plasma changes under the influence of a constant magnetic field (CMF) with a strength of 250 or 2500 oersteds. CMF shows a tendency toward normalization of fibrinolytic processes in the presence of pathological disturbances in fibrinolysis activation.

  11. Theory of heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, L. (ed.) (McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada). Dept. of Physiology); Hunter, P. (ed.) (Auckland Univ., Auckland (New Zealand). Dept. of Engineering Science); McCulloch, A. (ed.) (California Univ., San Diego (United States))

    1991-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growth in interest in studying the heart from the perspective of the physical sciences: mechanics, fluid flow, electromechanics. This volume is the result of a workshop held in July 1989 at the Institute for Nonlinear Sciences at the University of California at San Diego that brought together scientists and clinicians with graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who share an interest in the heart. The chapters were prepared by the invited speakers as didactic reviews of their subjects but also include up-to-date results in their fields. Topics covered include the structure, mechanical properties, and function of the heart and the myocardium, electrical activity of the heart and myocardium, and mathematical models of heart function. Individual chapters are abstracted separately.

  12. A vector-free ECG interpretation with P, QRS & T waves as unbalanced transitions between stable configurations of the heart electric field during P-R, S-T & T-P segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Since cell membranes are weak sources of electrostatic fields, this ECG interpretation relies on the analogy between cells and electrets. It is here assumed that cell-bound electric fields unite, reach the body surface and the surrounding space and form the thoracic electric field that consists from two concentric structures: the thoracic wall and the heart. If ECG leads measure differences in electric potentials between skin electrodes, they give scalar values that define position of the electric field center along each lead. Repolarised heart muscle acts as a stable positive electric source, while depolarized heart muscle produces much weaker negative electric field. During T-P, P-R and S-T segments electric field is stable, only subtle changes are detectable by skin electrodes. Diastolic electric field forms after ventricular depolarization (T-P segments in the ECG recording). Telediastolic electric field forms after the atria have been depolarized (P-Q segments in the ECG recording). Systolic electric field forms after the ventricular depolarization (S-T segments in the ECG recording). The three ECG waves (P, QRS and T) can then be described as unbalanced transitions of the heart electric field from one stable configuration to the next and in that process the electric field center is temporarily displaced. In the initial phase of QRS, the rapidly diminishing septal electric field makes measured potentials dependent only on positive charges of the corresponding parts of the left and the right heart that lie within the lead axes. If more positive charges are near the "DOWN" electrode than near the "UP" electrode, a Q wave will be seen, otherwise an R wave is expected. Repolarization of the ventricular muscle is dampened by the early septal muscle repolarization that reduces deflection of T waves. Since the "UP" electrode of most leads is near the usually larger left ventricle muscle, T waves are in these leads positive, although of smaller amplitude and longer

  13. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart failure due to systolic dysfunction. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014. Colucci WS. ... patient with heart failure or cardiomyopathy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014. Colucci WS. ...

  14. Heart palpitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ... Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of ...

  15. Heart pacemaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ... Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of ...

  16. Triple rule-out CT angiography protocol with restricting field of view for detection of pulmonary thromboembolism and aortic dissection in emergency department patients: simulation of modified CT protocol for reducing radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Su; Kim, Sung Mok; Cha, Min Jae; Kim, Yoo Na; Kim, Hae Jin; Choi, Jin-Ho; Choe, Yeon Hyeon

    2017-05-01

    Background Triple rule-out computed tomography (TRO CT) is a CT protocol designed to simultaneously evaluate the coronary, aorta, and pulmonary arteries. Purpose To evaluate potential diagnostic performance of TRO CT with restricted volume coverage for detection of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) and aortic dissection (AD). Material and Methods This study included 1224 consecutive patients with acute chest pain who visited the emergency department and underwent TRO CT using a 128-slice dual-source CT. Image data were reconstructed according to the display field of view (DFOV) of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) and TRO CT protocols in each patient. The presence of PTE and AD was evaluated by independent observers in each DFOV. The radiation dose was calculated to evaluate the potential benefits by restricting z-axis coverage to cardiac scan range instead of the whole thorax. Results Among all patients, 22 cases with PTE (1.9%) and nine cases with AD (0.8%) were found. Except for one PTE case, all cases were detected on both DFOV of TRO CT and CCTA. Mean effective dose for evaluation of entire thorax and cardiac scan coverage were 5.9 ± 1.1 mSv and 3.5 ± 0.7 mSv, respectively. Conclusion Isolated PTE and AD outside the CCTA DFOV rarely occur. Therefore, modified TRO CT protocol using cardiac scan coverage can be adopted to detect PTE and AD with reduced radiation dose.

  17. Loss of Wnt5a disrupts second heart field cell deployment and may contribute to OFT malformations in DiGeorge syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Tanvi; Li, Ding; Théveniau-Ruissy, Magali; Hutson, Mary R; Kelly, Robert G; Wang, Jianbo

    2015-03-15

    Outflow tract (OFT) malformation accounts for ∼30% of human congenital heart defects and manifests frequently in TBX1 haplo-insufficiency associated DiGeorge (22q11.2 deletion) syndrome. OFT myocardium originates from second heart field (SHF) progenitors in the pharyngeal and splanchnic mesoderm (SpM), but how these progenitors are deployed to the OFT is unclear. We find that SHF progenitors in the SpM gradually gain epithelial character and are deployed to the OFT as a cohesive sheet. Wnt5a, a non-canonical Wnt, is expressed specifically in the caudal SpM and may regulate oriented cell intercalation to incorporate SHF progenitors into an epithelial-like sheet, thereby generating the pushing force to deploy SHF cells rostrally into the OFT. Using enhancer trap and Cre transgenes, our lineage tracing experiments show that in Wnt5a null mice, SHF progenitors are trapped in the SpM and fail to be deployed to the OFT efficiently, resulting in a reduction in the inferior OFT myocardial wall and its derivative, subpulmonary myocardium. Concomitantly, the superior OFT and subaortic myocardium are expanded. Finally, in chick embryos, blocking the Wnt5a function in the caudal SpM perturbs polarized elongation of SHF progenitors, and compromises their deployment to the OFT. Collectively, our results highlight a critical role for Wnt5a in deploying SHF progenitors from the SpM to the OFT. Given that Wnt5a is a putative transcriptional target of Tbx1, and the similar reduction of subpulmonary myocardium in Tbx1 mutant mice, our results suggest that perturbing Wnt5a-mediated SHF deployment may be an important pathogenic mechanism contributing to OFT malformations in DiGeorge syndrome.

  18. Prdm1 functions in the mesoderm of the second heart field, where it interacts genetically with Tbx1, during outflow tract morphogenesis in the mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Stéphane D; Mayeuf-Louchart, Alicia; Watanabe, Yusuke; Brzezinski, Joseph A; Miyagawa-Tomita, Sachiko; Kelly, Robert G; Buckingham, Margaret

    2014-10-01

    Congenital heart defects affect at least 0.8% of newborn children and are a major cause of lethality prior to birth. Malformations of the arterial pole are particularly frequent. The myocardium at the base of the pulmonary trunk and aorta and the arterial tree associated with these great arteries are derived from splanchnic mesoderm of the second heart field (SHF), an important source of cardiac progenitor cells. These cells are controlled by a gene regulatory network that includes Fgf8, Fgf10 and Tbx1. Prdm1 encodes a transcriptional repressor that we show is also expressed in the SHF. In mouse embryos, mutation of Prdm1 affects branchial arch development and leads to persistent truncus arteriosus (PTA), indicative of neural crest dysfunction. Using conditional mutants, we show that this is not due to a direct function of Prdm1 in neural crest cells. Mutation of Prdm1 in the SHF does not result in PTA, but leads to arterial pole defects, characterized by mis-alignment or reduction of the aorta and pulmonary trunk, and abnormalities in the arterial tree, defects that are preceded by a reduction in outflow tract size and loss of caudal pharyngeal arch arteries. These defects are associated with a reduction in proliferation of progenitor cells in the SHF. We have investigated genetic interactions with Fgf8 and Tbx1, and show that on a Tbx1 heterozygote background, conditional Prdm1 mutants have more pronounced arterial pole defects, now including PTA. Our results identify PRDM1 as a potential modifier of phenotypic severity in TBX1 haploinsufficient DiGeorge syndrome patients.

  19. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a million people in the U.S. have a heart attack. About half of them die. Many people have permanent heart damage or die because they don't get ... It's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if someone ...

  20. High-resolution genotyping of Listeria monocytogenes by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis compared to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, ribotyping, and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Fussing, V.; Ojeniyi, B.

    2004-01-01

    of different origin. The AFLP technique was compared with three other molecular typing methods - ribotyping, random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) - in terms of discriminatory ability. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism was included......The purpose of this study was to evaluate fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis for the inter- and intraspecies differentiation of a collection of 96 strains of Listeria monocytogenes and 10 non- L. monocytogenes strains representing six other Listeria species...... for virulence gene allele characterization. The 96 L. monocytogenes strains were divided into two major clusters by AFLP fingerprinting at a similarity level of 82% in concordance with the results of PFGE, RAPD, and ribotyping. One main cluster consisted of all of the 24 L. monocytogenes hly allele 1 strains...

  1. Restrictions and Proportionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2009-01-01

    The article discusses three central aspects of the freedoms under European Community law, namely 1) the prohibition against restrictions as an important extension of the prohibition against discrimination, 2) a prohibition against exit restrictions which is just as important as the prohibition...

  2. SWI/SNF protein component BAF250a regulates cardiac progenitor cell differentiation by modulating chromatin accessibility during second heart field development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ienglam; Gao, Xiaolin; Sham, Mai Har; Wang, Zhong

    2012-07-13

    ATP-dependent SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes alter the structure of chromatin at specific loci and facilitate tissue-specific gene regulation during development. Several SWI/SNF subunits are required for cardiogenesis. However, the function and mechanisms of SWI/SNF in mediating cardiac progenitor cell (CPC) differentiation during cardiogenesis are not well understood. Our studies of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex identified that BAF250a, a regulatory subunit of the SWI/SNF, plays a key role in CPC differentiation. BAF250a ablation in mouse second heart field (SHF) led to trabeculation defects in the right ventricle, ventricular septal defect, persistent truncus arteriosus, reduced myocardial proliferation, and embryonic lethality around E13. Using an embryonic stem cell culture system that models the formation and differentiation of SHF CPCs in vivo, we have shown that BAF250a ablation in CPCs specifically inhibits cardiomyocyte formation. Moreover, BAF250a selectively regulates the expression of key cardiac factors Mef2c, Nkx2.5, and Bmp10 in SHF CPCs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNase I digestion assays indicate that BAF250a regulates gene expression by binding selectively to its target gene promoters and recruiting Brg1, the catalytic subunit of SWI/SNF, to modulate chromatin accessibility. Our results thus identify BAF250a-mediated chromatin remodeling as an essential epigenetic mechanism mediating CPC differentiation.

  3. SWI/SNF Protein Component BAF250a Regulates Cardiac Progenitor Cell Differentiation by Modulating Chromatin Accessibility during Second Heart Field Development*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ienglam; Gao, Xiaolin; Sham, Mai Har; Wang, Zhong

    2012-01-01

    ATP-dependent SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes alter the structure of chromatin at specific loci and facilitate tissue-specific gene regulation during development. Several SWI/SNF subunits are required for cardiogenesis. However, the function and mechanisms of SWI/SNF in mediating cardiac progenitor cell (CPC) differentiation during cardiogenesis are not well understood. Our studies of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex identified that BAF250a, a regulatory subunit of the SWI/SNF, plays a key role in CPC differentiation. BAF250a ablation in mouse second heart field (SHF) led to trabeculation defects in the right ventricle, ventricular septal defect, persistent truncus arteriosus, reduced myocardial proliferation, and embryonic lethality around E13. Using an embryonic stem cell culture system that models the formation and differentiation of SHF CPCs in vivo, we have shown that BAF250a ablation in CPCs specifically inhibits cardiomyocyte formation. Moreover, BAF250a selectively regulates the expression of key cardiac factors Mef2c, Nkx2.5, and Bmp10 in SHF CPCs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNase I digestion assays indicate that BAF250a regulates gene expression by binding selectively to its target gene promoters and recruiting Brg1, the catalytic subunit of SWI/SNF, to modulate chromatin accessibility. Our results thus identify BAF250a-mediated chromatin remodeling as an essential epigenetic mechanism mediating CPC differentiation. PMID:22621927

  4. Monitoring oral temperature, heart rate, and respiration rate of West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) during capture and handling in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Arthur W.; Bonde, Robert K.; Siegal-Willott, Jessica; Stamper, M. Andrew; Colee, James; Powell, James A.; Reid, James P.; Deutsch, Charles J.; Harr, Kendal E.

    2012-01-01

    West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) are captured, handled, and transported to facilitate conservation, research, and rehabilitation efforts. Monitoring manatee oral temperature (OT), heart rate (HR), and respiration rate (RR) during out-of-water handling can assist efforts to maintain animal well-being and improve medical response to evidence of declining health. To determine effects of capture on manatee vital signs, we monitored OT, HR, and RR continuously for a 50-min period in 38 healthy, awake, juvenile and adult Florida manatees (T. m. latirostris) and 48 similar Antillean manatees (T. m. manatus). We examined creatine kinase (CK), potassium (K+), serum amyloid A (SAA), and lactate values for each animal to assess possible systemic inflammation and muscular trauma. OT range was 29.5 to 36.2° C, HR range was 32 to 88 beats/min, and RR range was 0 to 17 breaths/5 min. Antillean manatees had higher initial OT, HR, and RR than Florida manatees (p manatees had higher overall lactate values ([mean ± SD] 20.6 ± 7.8 mmol/L) than Florida manatees (13.7 ± 6.7 mmol/L; p manatee OT, HR, and RR during capture and handling in the field or in a captive care setting.

  5. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    HLHS; Congenital heart - hypoplastic left heart; Cyanotic heart disease - hypoplastic left heart ... Hypoplastic left heart is a rare type of congenital heart disease. It is more common in males than in ...

  6. Depression and Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    There are exciting findings in the field of depression and coronary heart disease. Whether diagnosed or simply self-reported, depression continues to mark very high risk for a recurrent acute coronary syndrome or for death in patients with coronary heart disease. Many intriguing mechanisms have been posited to be implicated in the association between depression and heart disease, and randomized controlled trials of depression treatment are beginning to delineate the types of depression manage...

  7. Heart transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Allen; Slaughter, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure remains a major global problem with approximately 6 million individuals suffering from heart failure in the United States alone. The surgical technique of heart transplantation, popularized by Dr. Norman Shumway, has led to its success and currently remains the best treatment options for patients with end-stage. However, with the continued limitation of donor organs and the rapid development of ventricular assist device technology, the number of patients bridged to transplant wi...

  8. Heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2014:chap 51. Read More Arrhythmias Cardiogenic shock Diabetes Hardening of the arteries Heart failure - overview High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Lipoprotein- ...

  9. Electromagnetic fields and health effects-epidemiologic studies of cancer, diseases of the central nervous system and arrhythmia-related heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, C.

    2004-07-01

    This epidemiologic investigation comprised separate studies of the risk of cancer, cause-specific mortality rates, risks for neurodegenerative diseases, and the risk of arrhythmia-related heart disease among employees exposed to extremely low- frequency (50-Hz) electromagnetic fields (EMF) in the Danish utility industry. All the employees in this industry were followed-up in several registers. The risk of disease was analyzed in relation to occupational exposure to EMF, latency, and duration of employment. A specific job-exposure matrix was developed and validated by comparison with direct measurements of EMF during a workday. Linkage with the Danish Cancer Register did not identify increased risks for the cancers suggested a priori to be associated with exposure to EMF, including leukemia, brain tumors, and breast cancer. Significantly increased risks for lung cancer and mesothelioma were identified for workers highly exposed to asbestos. Linkage with the National Mortality Register revealed a significantly increased overall mortality rate from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), with an increasing trend with duration of employment and EMF exposure. In addition, a significantly increased mortality rate from electric accidents was observed. It was hypothesized that the observation of increased mortality from ALS was associated with exposure to EMF or electric shocks. No increased mortality rate from cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease was observed. Linkage with the National Hospital Register also revealed an increased risk of ALS and, thereby confirmed the finding of an increased mortality rate for this disease in the previous study. Linkage of the cohort with the Multiple Sclerosis Register revealed an increased risk of multiple sclerosis, which was not, however, significant Linkage with the Pacemaker Register showed no increased risk of severe arrhythmia-related heart disease. The second part of the study included the establishment of a large, nationwide

  10. Ruminant models of prenatal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, R V; Scheaffer, A N; Wright, C D; Regnault, T R H

    2003-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a significant health issue that not only affects infant mortality and morbidity, but may also predispose individuals to coronary heart disease, diabetes, hypertension and stroke as adults. The majority of IUGR pregnancies in humans are characterized by asymmetric fetal growth, resulting from inadequate nutrient transfer to the fetus. Furthermore, most of these pregnancies involve functional placental insufficiency, and may also show altered umbilical velocimetry. As the severity of IUGR increases, the fetus becomes increasingly hypoxic, hypoglycaemic and acidotic. In addition, placental transfer or utilization of some amino acids is known to be altered in IUGR pregnancies. Although a great deal has been learned from clinical studies of human IUGR, appropriate animal models are required to define completely the mechanisms involved in the development of IUGR. The pregnant sheep is a long-standing model for placental-fetal interactions, and fetal growth restriction can be induced in pregnant sheep by maternal nutrient restriction, maternal nutrient excess, administration of glucocorticoid, utero-placental embolization, carunclectomy and maternal hyperthermia. Although all of these sheep models are capable of inducing fetal growth restriction, the degree of restriction is variable. This review compares these sheep models of IUGR with the characteristics of human IUGR.

  11. Matching the Market for Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsich, Eileen M

    2016-04-01

    Heart transplantation is the most effective therapy for patients with Stage D heart failure with a median life expectancy of ≈10 to 15 years. Unfortunately, many patients die on the waiting list hoping for a chance of survival. The life boat cannot rescue everyone. Over a decade, the donor pool has remained relatively stable, whereas the number of heart transplant candidates has risen. Potential recipients often have many comorbidities and are older because the criteria for heart transplantation has few absolute contraindications. Women, Hispanics, and patients with restrictive heart disease and congenital heart disease are more likely to die while awaiting heart transplantation than men, white patients, and those with either ischemic or dilated cardiomyopathy. To better match the market, we need to (1) increase the donor pool, (2) reduce the waitlist, and (3) improve the allocation system. This review article addresses all 3 options and compares strategies in the United States to those in other countries.

  12. Heart transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors include the type and severity of your heart disease, and how sick you are at the time you are listed. The amount of time you spend on a waiting list is usually NOT a factor for how soon you get a heart, except in the case of children. Most, but ...

  13. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970284 Effects of enalapril on heart rate variabilityin patients with congestive heart failure. ZHANGYouhua(章友华), et a1. Dept Cardiol, Cardiovasc Instit& Fuwai Hosp, CAMS & PUMC, Beijing, 100037. ChinCir J 1996; 11(2): 729-732.

  14. Heart Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the left ventricle into the aorta, your body's largest artery. See also on this site: The Heartbeat The Conduction System (illustration) Electrical impulses from your heart muscle (the myocardium) cause your heart to contract. This electrical signal begins in the sinoatrial (SA) node, located at ...

  15. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart ...

  16. Two-component multi-configurational second-order perturbation theory with Kramers restricted complete active space self-consistent field reference function and spin-orbit relativistic effective core potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Inkoo; Lee, Yoon Sup, E-mail: yslee@kaist.edu [Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-28

    We report the formulation and implementation of KRCASPT2, a two-component multi-configurational second-order perturbation theory based on Kramers restricted complete active space self-consistent field (KRCASSCF) reference function, in the framework of the spin-orbit relativistic effective core potential. The zeroth-order Hamiltonian is defined as the sum of nondiagonal one-electron operators with generalized two-component Fock matrix elements as scalar factors. The Kramers symmetry within the zeroth-order Hamiltonian is maintained via the use of a state-averaged density, allowing a consistent treatment of degenerate states. The explicit expressions are derived for the matrix elements of the zeroth-order Hamiltonian as well as for the perturbation vector. The use of a fully variational reference function and nondiagonal operators in relativistic multi-configurational perturbation theory is reported for the first time. A series of initial calculations are performed on the ionization potential and excitation energies of the atoms of the 6p-block; the results display a significant improvement over those from KRCASSCF, showing a closer agreement with experimental results. Accurate atomic properties of the superheavy elements of the 7p-block are also presented, and the electronic structures of the low-lying excited states are compared with those of their lighter homologues.

  17. Two-component multi-configurational second-order perturbation theory with Kramers restricted complete active space self-consistent field reference function and spin-orbit relativistic effective core potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Inkoo; Lee, Yoon Sup

    2014-10-28

    We report the formulation and implementation of KRCASPT2, a two-component multi-configurational second-order perturbation theory based on Kramers restricted complete active space self-consistent field (KRCASSCF) reference function, in the framework of the spin-orbit relativistic effective core potential. The zeroth-order Hamiltonian is defined as the sum of nondiagonal one-electron operators with generalized two-component Fock matrix elements as scalar factors. The Kramers symmetry within the zeroth-order Hamiltonian is maintained via the use of a state-averaged density, allowing a consistent treatment of degenerate states. The explicit expressions are derived for the matrix elements of the zeroth-order Hamiltonian as well as for the perturbation vector. The use of a fully variational reference function and nondiagonal operators in relativistic multi-configurational perturbation theory is reported for the first time. A series of initial calculations are performed on the ionization potential and excitation energies of the atoms of the 6p-block; the results display a significant improvement over those from KRCASSCF, showing a closer agreement with experimental results. Accurate atomic properties of the superheavy elements of the 7p-block are also presented, and the electronic structures of the low-lying excited states are compared with those of their lighter homologues.

  18. PREVALENCE OF HEART DISEASE IN PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumathi Natarajan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Previously, the high maternal mortality in cardiac patients who became pregnant prompted the assertion: Women with an abnormal heart should not become pregnant. This long-standing notion needs to be revised today. AIM To study the prevalence of heart disease in antenatal admissions at Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai. METHODOLOGY An observational study of 3669 antenatal patients being admitted in GRH, Madurai, from March 2016 to April 2016. Both primigravida and multi-gravida with no age restrictions were included in the study. Screening ECHOs were done. Among 3669 admissions, 46 patients were diagnosed to have heart disease. The cardiac diseases include multivalvular heart disease, congenital heart disease, peripartum cardiomyopathy, coronary heart disease, hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. RESULTS The study showed that the prevalence of heart disease in Government Rajaji Hospital is 1.25% and it is more common in 20-30 years of age (p value <0.001, which is significant. DISCUSSION Pregnancy and puerperium are important risk factors for heart disease. Heart disease also significantly affects the course of pregnancy. So it is important to diagnose heart disease early in pregnancy. This study emphasizes that heart disease complicating pregnancy forms an important proportion of antenatal mother and needs early diagnosis and management. CONCLUSION Though considered rare previously, heart disease contributes to a significant proportion of antenatal mothers (1.25% and early referral to proper tertiary care centre helps in reducing the mortality and morbidity

  19. Combined sciatic femoral nerve block in a case of restrictive cardiomyopathy for arthroscopy and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurab Maitra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Restrictive cardiomyopathy is a rare heart muscle disease resulting in impaired ventricular filling, low cardiac output and a propensity for development of heart failure with minimal fluid overload. Here, we present the management of a case of restrictive cardiomyopathy undergoing arthroscopy and anterior cruciate liga-ment (ACL reconstruction.

  20. Late gestational nutrient restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tygesen, Malin Plumhoff; Nielsen, Mette Olaf; Nørgaard, Peder;

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of 50% nutrient restriction during the last 6 weeks of gestation on twin-pregnant ewes' plasma glucose, non-esterified fatty acid, ß-hydroxybutyrate, insulin, IGF-1 and leptin concentrations and the effects on lamb birth weight and ewes' lactation performance. Plasma...... metabolite and hormone concentrations in restricted ewes suggest that maternal tissues were being mobilised. Despite the ewes' adaptations their lambs weighed significantly less at birth. Furthermore, colostrum and milk yields were markedly reduced up until the latest measurement at 3 weeks post partum...

  1. Wine and heart health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health and wine; Wine and heart disease; Preventing heart disease - wine; Preventing heart disease - alcohol ... more often just to lower your risk of heart disease. Heavier drinking can harm the heart and ...

  2. How the Heart Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Works Explore How the Heart Works What Is... Anatomy Contraction Circulation Electrical System Heart Disease Related Topics Arrhythmia Congenital Heart Defects Coronary Heart Disease Heart Valve Disease How the Lungs Work Send a link to NHLBI to someone ...

  3. Heart Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Heart Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Heart Disease Print A A ... chest pain, heart attacks, and strokes . What Is Heart Disease? The heart is the center of the cardiovascular ...

  4. Men and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Men and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Source: Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Heart Disease Facts in Men Heart disease is the leading ...

  5. About Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... talk about your health and the medicines About Heart Failure Heart failure is a disease where the heart cannot do ... very important for your health. common causes of heart failure are diseases or conditions that damage the heart. ...

  6. What Is Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  7. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Atherosclerosis is also the most common cause of cardiovascular disease. It can be caused by correctable problems, such as an unhealthy diet, lack of exercise, being overweight and smoking. Causes of heart arrhythmia ...

  8. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tear in the heart artery (spontaneous coronary artery dissection). Certain factors contribute to the unwanted buildup of ... logo are trademarks of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. © 1998-2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical ...

  9. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Singh Gulati, G., E-mail: gulatigurpreet@rediffmail.com [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Seth, S. [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Sharma, S. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India)

    2012-02-15

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  10. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008275 Relationship of calcineure in mRNA level in peripheral blood and cardiac muscle of patients with heart failure.WANG Mengmeng(王萌萌),et al.Dept Cardiol,Shandong Prov Hosp,Shandong Univ,Jinan 250021.Chin Cir J 2008;23(2):113-116.Objective To study the relationship of calcineurin mRNA level between peripheral lymphocytes and cardiac muscles of patients with chronic heart failure.Methods

  11. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008037 Factors associated with efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy for patients with congestive heart failure. SHI Haoying(史浩颖), et al. Dept Cardiol, Zhongshan Hosp Fudan Univ, Shanghai 200032. Chin J Cardiol 2007;35(12):1099-1163. Objective The efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with congestive heart failure and the potential factors associated with responder or nonresponder were investigated. Methods Fifty

  12. Training Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Asja

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) are probabilistic graphical models that can also be interpreted as stochastic neural networks. Training RBMs is known to be challenging. Computing the likelihood of the model parameters or its gradient is in general computationally intensive. Thus, training...

  13. Calorie restriction and stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzanero Silvia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stroke, a major cause of disability and mortality in the elderly, occurs when a cerebral blood vessel is occluded or ruptured, resulting in ischemic damage and death of brain cells. The injury mechanism involves metabolic and oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, apoptosis and inflammatory processes, including activation of glial cells and infiltration of leukocytes. In animal models, dietary energy restriction, by daily calorie reduction (CR or intermittent fasting (IF, extends lifespan and decreases the development of age-related diseases. Dietary energy restriction may also benefit neurons, as suggested by experimental evidence showing that CR and IF protect neurons against degeneration in animal models. Recent findings by our group and others suggest the possibility that dietary energy restriction may protect against stroke induced brain injury, in part by inducing the expression of neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF; protein chaperones, including heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 and glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78; antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases (SOD and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1, uncoupling proteins and anti-inflammatory cytokines. This article discusses the protective mechanisms activated by dietary energy restriction in ischemic stroke.

  14. Bilinear Fourier restriction theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Demeter, Ciprian

    2012-01-01

    We provide a general scheme for proving $L^p$ estimates for certain bilinear Fourier restrictions outside the locally $L^2$ setting. As an application, we show how such estimates follow for the lacunary polygon. In contrast with prior approaches, our argument avoids any use of the Rubio de Francia Littlewood--Paley inequality.

  15. Longitudinal study of computerized cardiotocography in early fetal growth restriction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, H.; Arabin, B.; Lees, C. C.; Oepkes, D.; Prefumo, F.; Thilaganathan, B.; Todros, T.; Visser, G. H. A.; Bilardo, C. M.; Derks, J. B.; Diemert, A.; Duvekot, J. J.; Ferrazzi, E.; Frusca, T.; Hecher, K.; Marlow, N.; Martinelli, P.; Ostermayer, E.; Papageorghiou, A. T.; Scheepers, H. C. J.; Schlembach, D.; Schneider, K. T. M.; Valcamonico, A.; Van Wassenaer-Leemhuis, A.; Ganzevoort, W.

    Objectives: To explore whether, in early fetal growth restriction (FGR), the longitudinal pattern of fetal heart rate (FHR) short-term variation (STV) can be used to identify imminent fetal distress and whether abnormalities of FHR recordings are associated with 2-year infant outcome. Methods: The

  16. Development of pediatric and congenital heart surgery in latin america: accomplishments and remaining challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzer, Christian; Capelli, Horacio; Sandoval, Nestor; Jatene, Marcelo; Kreutzer, Guillermo

    2011-04-01

    In the last 70 years, congenital heart surgery has dramatically evolved, and Latin America has completed this journey with unique regional features. Since the first ligation of a patent arterial duct by Enrique Finochietto in 1941 in Buenos Aires, the development of congenital heart surgery was deeply influenced by funding restrictions and scarcity of technology. However, the determined work of cardiovascular surgery pioneers as Hugo Filipozzi, Euriclides Zerbini, and Adib Jatene in Brazil; Helmut Jaeger in Chile; Hugo Baz and Clemente Robles in Mexico; Alberto Bejarano in Colombia; and Mario Brea and Fernando Tricerri in Argentina made cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass available by the late 1950s. In the following five decades new generations of cardiovascular surgeons received the legacy of these outstanding leaders and made several important contributions to the field in tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, tricuspid atresia, single ventricle, truncus arteriosus, heart transplantation, and many others. Many centers in Latin America routinely perform congenital heart disease surgery with excellent results, covering the entire spectrum from the newborn to the adult congenital heart patient. The most important challenge that remains is to provide access to care to all children with congenital heart disease in Latin America, since currently only 42% of them receive surgical treatment.

  17. Heart and heart-liver transplantation in patients with hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Monique R; Al-Kindi, Sadeer G; Oliveira, Guilherme H

    2017-10-01

    Hemochromatosis predisposes to dilated or restrictive cardiomyopathy which can progress to end-stage heart failure, requiring the use of advanced heart therapies including heart (HT) and heart liver (HLT) transplantation. Little is known about the characteristics and outcomes of these patients. We queried the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) registry for all patients listed for HT or HLT for a diagnosis of 'hemochromatosis' between 1987 and 2014. Waitlist and post-transplantation outcomes were compared between patients with hemochromatosis (HT vs HLT) and other etiologies. Of the 81,356 adults listed for heart transplantation, 23 patients with hemochromatosis were identified (16 listed for HLT; and 7 listed for HT). Compared with other etiologies, HC patients were younger (39 vs 51years, p<0.0001), and more likely to need inotropes (56.5% vs 25.6%, p=0.003) and mechanical ventilation (13% vs 3.4%, p=0.041). Cumulative hazards of waitlist mortality or delisting were higher in hemochromatosis patients than for other etiologies of heart failure (p<0.001). There were 4 HT and 4 HLT during the study period. Post-transplantation, patients with HC had a 1- and 2-year cumulative survival of 88% and 75%, respectively. Both HT and HLT are viable options for patients with hemochromatosis. Patients with hemochromatosis are younger with increased wait-list mortality compared with other etiologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Coeur en santé St-Henri--a heart health promotion programme in a low income, low education neighbourhood in Montreal, Canada: theoretical model and early field experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, G; O'Loughlin, J; Elliott, M; Masson, P; Renaud, L; Sacks-Silver, G; Lampron, G

    1995-10-01

    Coeur en santé St-Henri is a five year, community based, multifactorial, heart health promotion programme in a low income, low education neighbourhood in Montreal, Canada. The objectives of this programme are to improve heart-healthy behaviours among adults of St-Henri. This paper describes the theoretical model underlying programme development as well as our early field experience implementing interventions. The design of the intervention programme is based on a behaviour change model adapted from social learning theory, the reasoned action model, and the precede-proceed model. The Ottawa charter for health promotion provided the framework for the development of specific interventions. Each intervention is submitted to formative, implementation, and impact evaluations using simple and inexpensive methods. The target population consists of adults living in St-Henri, a neighbourhood of 23,360 residents. Because of costs constraints, the intervention strategy targets women more specifically. The community is one of the poorest in Canada with 46% of the population living below the poverty line and 20% being very poor. The age-sex adjusted ischaemic heart disease mortality in 1985-87 was 317 per 100,000 compared with 126 per 100,000 in an affluent adjacent neighbourhood. Thirty nine distinct interventions have been developed and tested in the community, eight related to tobacco, 10 to diet, seven to physical activity, and 14 which are multifactorial. The interventions include smoking cessation and healthy recipes contests, a menu labelling and healthy food discount programme in restaurants, a point of choice nutrition education campaign, healthy eating and smoking cessation workshops, a walking club, educational material, print and electronic media campaigns, heart health fairs, and community events. An integrated heart health promotion programme is feasible in low income urban neighbourhoods but not all interventions are successful. Such a programme requires

  19. Should sodium intake be restricted in chronic heart failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Castro-Gutiérrez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen La restricción de sodio en insuficiencia cardiaca crónica ha sido recomendada desde hace décadas. Sin embargo, la evidencia sobre sus beneficios no es tan clara, e incluso podría asociarse a riesgos. Utilizando la base de datos Epistemonikos, la cual es mantenida mediante búsquedas en múltiples bases de datos, identificamos tres revisiones sistemáticas que en conjunto incorporan 13 estudios en total que responden la pregunta de interés, incluyendo 10 estudios aleatorizados. Extrajimos la información, realizamos un metanálisis y confeccionamos una tabla de resumen de los resultados utilizando el método GRADE. Concluimos que la restricción de sodio en pacientes con insuficiencia cardíaca crónica podría aumentar la mortalidad y la readmisión hospitalaria, pero la certeza de la evidencia es baja.

  20. Restricted and quasi-toral restricted Lie-Rinehart algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Bing

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce the definition of restrictable Lie-Rinehart algebras, the concept of restrictability is by far more tractable than that of a restricted Lie-Rinehart algebra. Moreover, we obtain some properties of p-mappings and restrictable Lie-Rinehart algebras. Finally, we give some sufficient conditions for the commutativity of quasi-toral restricted Lie-Rinehart algebras and study how a quasi-toral restricted Lie-Rinehart algebra with zero center and of minimal dimension should be.

  1. Restriction of Helmholtz Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Polunin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of the experimental studies of physical mechanisms of energy dissipation in the oscillating system in which air cavity held by the forces of magnetic levitation is used as the elastic element, and magnetic fluid prepared on the basis of dispersing media with different viscosity level is used as the inertial element are considered in the article. Based on the obtained results the conclusion on the restriction of the applicability of Helmholtz equation, caused by boundary effects is made.

  2. License restrictions at Barnwell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autry, V.R. [S.C. Dept. of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia, SC (United States). Bureau of Radiological Health

    1991-12-31

    The State of South Carolina was delegated the authority by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to regulate the receipt, possession, use and disposal of radioactive material as an Agreement State. Since 1970, the state has been the principal regulatory authority for the Barnwell Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility operated by Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. The radioactive material license issued authorizing the receipt and disposal of low-level waste contains numerous restrictions to ensure environmental protection and compliance with shallow land disposal performance criteria. Low-level waste has evolved from minimally contaminated items to complex waste streams containing high concentrations of radionuclides and processing chemicals which necessitated these restrictions. Additionally, some waste with their specific radionuclides and concentration levels, many classified as low-level radioactive waste, are not appropriate for shallow land disposal unless additional precautions are taken. This paper will represent a number of these restrictions, the rationale for them, and how they are being dealt with at the Barnwell disposal facility.

  3. [Radiotelemetric studies on heart rates of 10 year old boys and girls during a 3000 m-run on the sports field and on the treadmill (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasmund, U; Nowacki, P E; Ditter, H; Klimt, F

    1978-04-01

    The behaviour of heart rates of 25 untrained boys and 25 untrained girls between 9.5 and 10.5 years of age was registered telemetrically before, during and after a 3000m-run with a finish on the sportsfield and during a run over the same distance with the equivalent but constant speed on a treadmill. Additionally an exhausting spiroergometric test on a bicycle in a sitting position (method: W/kg body weight) was carried out. With a self-determined intensity the boys passed the 3000 m-distance in a shorter time than the girls. During the run the girls' heart rates remained relatively constant between 190 and 204 per min, whereas the boys' heart rates were significantly lower (about 10/min). Children with a higher relative oxygen capacity (56 ml O2/kg) run faster and revealed lower heart rates than children with less relative oxygen capacity (39.8 ml O2/kg). The same results were obtained when children with lower body weight were compared to heavier children of the same size.

  4. Querying Schemas With Access Restrictions

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael; Ley, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    We study verification of systems whose transitions consist of accesses to a Web-based data-source. An access is a lookup on a relation within a relational database, fixing values for a set of positions in the relation. For example, a transition can represent access to a Web form, where the user is restricted to filling in values for a particular set of fields. We look at verifying properties of a schema describing the possible accesses of such a system. We present a language where one can describe the properties of an access path, and also specify additional restrictions on accesses that are enforced by the schema. Our main property language, AccLTL, is based on a first-order extension of linear-time temporal logic, interpreting access paths as sequences of relational structures. We also present a lower-level automaton model, Aautomata, which AccLTL specifications can compile into. We show that AccLTL and A-automata can express static analysis problems related to "querying with limited access patterns" that h...

  5. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... the best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic versus diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure ...

  6. Problem: Heart Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  7. Healthy Heart Quizzes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  8. Problem: Heart Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  9. Travel and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  10. Exercise echocardiography for structural heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumo, Masaki; Akashi, Yoshihiro J

    2016-03-01

    Since the introduction of transcatheter structural heart intervention, the term "structural heart disease" has been widely used in the field of cardiology. Structural heart disease refers to congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, and cardiomyopathy. In structural heart disease, valvular heart disease is frequently identified in the elderly. Of note, the number of patients who suffer from aortic stenosis (AS) and mitral regurgitation (MR) is increasing in developed countries because of the aging of the populations. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement and percutaneous mitral valve repair has been widely used for AS and MR, individually. Echocardiography is the gold standard modality for initial diagnosis and subsequent evaluation of AS and MR, although the difficulties in assessing patients with these diseases still remain. Here, we review the clinical usefulness and prognostic impact of exercise echocardiography on structural heart disease, particularly on AS and MR.

  11. Pediatric heart transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Schweiger, Martin; Stiasny, Brian; Dave, Hitendu; Cavigelli-Brunner, Anna; Balmer, Christian; Kretschmar, Oliver; Bürki, Christoph; Klauwer, Dietrich; Hübler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric heart transplantation (pHTx) represents a small (14%) but very important and particular part in the field of cardiac transplantation. This treatment has lifelong impact on children. To achieve the best short and especially long-term survival with adequate quality of life, which is of crucial importance for this young patient population, one has to realize and understand the differences with adult HTx. Indication for transplantation, waitlist management including ABO incompatible (AB...

  12. Heart Health: The Heart Truth Campaign 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health The Heart Truth Campaign 2009 Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of ... of the celebrities supporting this year's The Heart Truth campaign. Both R&B singer Ashanti (center) and ...

  13. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... NHLBI has uncovered some of the causes of heart diseases and conditions, as well as ways to prevent ...

  14. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk factors. ...

  15. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009170 Curcumin attenuates left ventricular dysfunction and remodeling in rabbits with chronic heart failure. TANG Yanhong(唐艳红),et al.Dept Cardiol,Renmin Hosp,Wuhan Univ,Wuhan 430060.Chin J Cardiol,2009;37(3):262-267.

  16. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008411 Expression of S100B during heart failure in rats. JIANG Zhenni(蒋珍妮), et al. Dept Cardiol, 2nd Affili Hosp, Zhejiang Univ, Coll Med Hangzhou 310009. Chin J Emerg Med 2008;17(5):475-478. Objective To evaluate the value of S100B gene on cardiovascular remodeling in rats with abdominal aorta coarctation.

  17. Heart attack first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that carries oxygen to the heart is blocked. The heart muscle ...

  18. Pediatric heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... the type of defect, and the type of surgery that was done. Many children recover completely and lead normal, active lives.

  19. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra ...

  20. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... slow down or stop. A risk factor for heart disease is something that increases your chance of getting ...

  1. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Back to Patient Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Millions of people experience irregular heartbeats, called ... harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious ...

  2. Overview of Heart Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develop in the sac that surrounds the heart (pericardium). Tumors in the pericardium may squeeze (constrict) the heart, preventing it from ... Heart wall Fibroma Hemangioma Rhabdomyoma Outside surface Lipoma Pericardium (outer sac covering heart) Pericardial cyst Base of ...

  3. Classes of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Classes of Heart Failure Updated:Sep 28,2016 Doctors usually classify patients' ... Blood Pressure Tracker Find additional helpful resources here Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure Introduction Types of Heart ...

  4. Heart valve surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tricuspid valve stenosis Risks The risks of having cardiac surgery include: Death Heart attack Heart failure Bleeding requiring ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Heart Surgery Read more Heart Valve Diseases Read more Latest ...

  5. Fasting Diet: Can It Improve My Heart Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but it seems that regularly fasting — severely restricting food and drink for one to two days a week — can potentially improve your heart health. It's difficult to tell what effect fasting has on your heart health because many people who routinely fast often do so for religious reasons. These people ...

  6. Intracellular diffusion restrictions in isolated cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkedal Rikke

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restriction of intracellular diffusion of adenine nucleotides has been studied intensively on adult rat cardiomyocytes. However, their cause and role in vivo is still uncertain. Intracellular membrane structures have been suggested to play a role. We therefore chose to study cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, which are thinner and have fewer intracellular membrane structures than adult rat cardiomyocytes. Previous studies suggest that trout permeabilized cardiac fibers also have diffusion restrictions. However, results from fibers may be affected by incomplete separation of the cells. This is avoided when studying permeabilized, isolated cardiomyocytes. The aim of this study was to verify the existence of diffusion restrictions in trout cardiomyocytes by comparing ADP-kinetics of mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibers, permeabilized cardiomyocytes and isolated mitochondria from rainbow trout heart. Experiments were performed at 10, 15 and 20°C in the absence and presence of creatine. Results Trout cardiomyocytes hypercontracted in the solutions used for mammalian cardiomyocytes. We developed a new solution in which they retained their shape and showed stable steady state respiration rates throughout an experiment. The apparent ADP-affinity of permeabilized cardiomyocytes was different from that of fibers. It was higher, independent of temperature and not increased by creatine. However, it was still about ten times lower than in isolated mitochondria. Conclusions The differences between fibers and cardiomyocytes suggest that results from trout heart fibers were affected by incomplete separation of the cells. However, the lower ADP-affinity of cardiomyocytes compared to isolated mitochondria indicate that intracellular diffusion restrictions are still present in trout cardiomyocytes despite their lower density of intracellular membrane structures. The lack of a creatine effect indicates that

  7. Newer antidiabetic drugs and calorie restriction mimicry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available De-acceleration of aging and delayed development of age-related morbidity accompanies the restriction of calories (without malnutrition in laboratory mice, nematodes, yeast, fish, and dogs. Recent results from long-term longitudinal studies conducted on primates have suggested longevity benefits of a 30% restriction of calories in rhesus monkeys as well. Among calorie restricted rhesus monkeys one of the mechanisms for the improvement in lifespan was the reduction in the development of glucose intolerance and cardiovascular disease. Although there are no comparable human studies, it is likely that metabolic and longevity benefits will accompany a reduction in calories in humans as well. However, considering the difficulties in getting healthy adults to limit food intake science has focused on understanding the biochemical processes that accompany calorie restriction (CR to formulate drugs that would mimic the effects of CR without the need to actually restrict calories. Drugs in this emerging therapeutic field are called CR mimetics. Some of the currently used anti-diabetic agents may have some CR mimetic like effects. This review focuses on the CR mimetic properties of the currently available anti-diabetic agents.

  8. Newer antidiabetic drugs and calorie restriction mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay; Jacob, Jubbin Jagan; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2016-01-01

    De-acceleration of aging and delayed development of age-related morbidity accompanies the restriction of calories (without malnutrition) in laboratory mice, nematodes, yeast, fish, and dogs. Recent results from long-term longitudinal studies conducted on primates have suggested longevity benefits of a 30% restriction of calories in rhesus monkeys as well. Among calorie restricted rhesus monkeys one of the mechanisms for the improvement in lifespan was the reduction in the development of glucose intolerance and cardiovascular disease. Although there are no comparable human studies, it is likely that metabolic and longevity benefits will accompany a reduction in calories in humans as well. However, considering the difficulties in getting healthy adults to limit food intake science has focused on understanding the biochemical processes that accompany calorie restriction (CR) to formulate drugs that would mimic the effects of CR without the need to actually restrict calories. Drugs in this emerging therapeutic field are called CR mimetics. Some of the currently used anti-diabetic agents may have some CR mimetic like effects. This review focuses on the CR mimetic properties of the currently available anti-diabetic agents.

  9. Training Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Asja

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) are probabilistic graphical models that can also be interpreted as stochastic neural networks. Training RBMs is known to be challenging. Computing the likelihood of the model parameters or its gradient is in general computationally intensive. Thus, training...... relies on sampling based approximations of the log-likelihood gradient. I will present an empirical and theoretical analysis of the bias of these approximations and show that the approximation error can lead to a distortion of the learning process. The bias decreases with increasing mixing rate...... of the applied sampling procedure and I will introduce a transition operator that leads to faster mixing. Finally, a different parametrisation of RBMs will be discussed that leads to better learning results and more robustness against changes in the data representation....

  10. Very strict selectional restrictions

    CERN Document Server

    Laporte, Eric; Dias, Maria Carmelita P

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the characteristics and behaviour of two parallel classes of verbs in two Romance languages, French and Portuguese. Examples of these verbs are Port. abater [gado] and Fr. abattre [b\\'etail], both meaning "slaughter [cattle]". In both languages, the definition of the class of verbs includes several features: - They have only one essential complement, which is a direct object. - The nominal distribution of the complement is very limited, i.e., few nouns can be selected as head nouns of the complement. However, this selection is not restricted to a single noun, as would be the case for verbal idioms such as Fr. monter la garde "mount guard". - We excluded from the class constructions which are reductions of more complex constructions, e.g. Port. afinar [instrumento] com "tune [instrument] with".

  11. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005186 The diagnostic application of bedside measurement of plasma brain natriuretic in patients with heart failure. SHAO Le-wen (邵乐文) , Advanced Ward Dept, 1st Hosp, Med Sch, Zhejiang Univ, Hangzhou 310003. Chin J Intern Med, 2005;44(2): 99-101. Objective: To investigate differential diagnosis value of ultra-rapid bedside measurement of brain na-triuretic peptide (BNP) in patients with dyspnea.

  12. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010316 Tissue doppler imaging observation on effect of long-term use of gingko biloba tabtet on left ventricular function in patients with chronic heart failure. ZHANG Hui(张辉),et al. Dept Cardiovasc Med, 2nd Hosp, Hebei Med Univ,Shijiazhuang 050000. Chin J Integr Tradit & West Med 2010;30(5):478-481. Objective To quantitatively observe the effect of long-term

  13. [Genetics of congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Damien

    2017-06-01

    Developmental genetics of congenital heart diseases has evolved from analysis of serial slices in embryos towards molecular genetics of cardiac morphogenesis with a dynamic view of cardiac development. Genetics of congenital heart diseases has also changed from formal genetic analysis of familial recurrences or population-based analysis to screening for mutations in candidates genes identified in animal models. Close cooperation between molecular embryologists, pathologists involved in heart development and pediatric cardiologists is crucial for further increase of knowledge in the field of cardiac morphogenesis and genetics of cardiac defects. The genetic model for congenital heart disease has to be revised to favor a polygenic origin rather than a monogenic one. The main mechanism is altered genic dosage that can account for heart diseases in chromosomal anomalies as well as in point mutations in syndromic and isolated congenital heart diseases. The use of big data grouping information from cardiac development, interactions between genes and proteins, epigenetic factors such as chromatin remodeling or DNA methylation is the current source for improving our knowledge in the field and to give clues for future therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Property Rights, Restrictions and Responsibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    Land Administration Systems are the basis for conceptualizing rights, restrictions and responsibilities related to people, policies and places. Property rights are normally concerned with ownership and tenure whereas restrictions usually control use and activities on land. Responsibilities relate...... more to a social, ethical commitment or attitude to environmental sustainability and good husbandry. This paper provides an overall understanding of the concept of land administration systems for dealing with rights, restrictions and responsibilities in future spatially enabled government. Finally...

  15. Constrictive Pericarditis Versus Restrictive Cardiomyopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mario J

    2016-05-01

    About one-half of the patients with congestive heart failure have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). Although the etiology of HFpEF is most commonly related to long-standing hypertension and atherosclerosis, a significant number of suspected HFpEF patients have a restrictive cardiomyopathy or chronic pericardial disease. Recognizing these syndromes is important because early diagnosis may lead to instituting specific therapy that may prolong survival, improve quality of life, and/or recognize and treat an underlying systemic disorder. Advances in diagnostic imaging, biomarkers, and genetic testing today allow identification of the specific etiology in most cases. Novel pharmacological, immunologic, and surgical therapies are leading to improved quality of life and survival.

  16. Troponin Ⅰ,cardiac diastolic dysfunction and restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-pei HUANG; Jian-feng DU

    2004-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diseases of heart muscle that are associated with cardiac dysfunction. Molecular genetic studies performed to date have demonstrated that the damage or mutations in several sarcomeric contractile protein genes are associated with the development of the diseases. In this review, cardiac troponin Ⅰ, one of the sarcomeric thin filament protein, will be discussed regarding its role in cardiac function, its deficiency-related diastolic dysfunction, and the mutation of this protein-mediated restrictive cardiomyopathy.

  17. Types of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Types of Heart Failure Updated:Feb 9,2017 Left-sided heart failure ... making. This content was last reviewed April 2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure Introduction Types of Heart ...

  18. Left heart catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye will be injected into your ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  19. Heart-Healthy Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Heart-Healthy Exercise Lauren Healey Mellett , Gisele Bousquet Download PDF https:// ... if you already have heart disease. How Can Exercise Help? There are many modifiable risk factors for ...

  20. Heart pacemaker - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pacemaker can be used for patients with heart failure. It has three leads to help the heart beat in a more coordinated manner. Some pacemakers also can deliver electric shocks to the heart that can stop life-threatening ...

  1. Honolulu Heart Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-13

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Heart Failure, Congestive; Myocardial Infarction; Asthma; Emphysema; Lung Diseases, Obstructive; Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal; Bronchitis; Dementia; Hypertension; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Heart Failure

  2. Heart Health Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is easier to treat. Blood tests and heart health tests can help find heart diseases or identify ... diseases. There are several different types of heart health tests. Your doctor will decide which test or ...

  3. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 434. ...

  4. Heart and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Conditions » The Heart & Down Syndrome The Heart & Down Syndrome Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are common in ... the Most Common Heart Defects in Children With Down Syndrome? The most common defects are Atrioventricular Septal Defect ( ...

  5. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001114.htm Congenital heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure ...

  6. Cyanotic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001104.htm Cyanotic heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cyanotic heart disease refers to a group of many different heart ...

  7. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Other Chronic Disease Topics Diabetes Nutrition Obesity Physical Activity Stroke Heart Disease Risk Factors Recommend ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Other Chronic Disease Topics Diabetes Nutrition Obesity Physical Activity Stroke File Formats Help: How do ...

  8. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  9. Living with Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Failure Currently, heart failure has no cure. You'll ... avoid harmful side effects. Take Steps To Prevent Heart Failure From Getting Worse Certain actions can worsen your ...

  10. Who Needs Heart Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Needs Heart Surgery? Heart surgery is used to treat ... will work with you to decide whether you need heart surgery. A cardiologist specializes in diagnosing and ...

  11. Revealing Hearts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saghaug, Kristin Falck; Pattison, George; Lindgren, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Some small business owners want to balance personal values as well as economic values. “I have to follow my heart” or “it must be meaningful” some of them say. But how might they be able to know what gives meaning to the heart? The philosophical theologian Paul Tillich finds that the problem...... with reference to Tillich’s account of the meaning of revelation through culture and art, summed up in the statement that “(...) revelation is the manifestation of the ground of being for human knowledge” (Tillich, 1951, p.94), which, we argue, can be extended to everyday experiences, for example, in business...... life. In Tillich’s own terms, even preliminary concerns may point at an ultimate concern (Tillich, 1964), which can also be understood as ‘knowledge of the heart’. Our account is also connected to wider discussions concerning the nature of intuition....

  12. Understanding chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Fenton, Matthew; Burch, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The key principles of chronic heart failure and the development of clinical management strategies are described. The physiological changes in chronic heart failure and the clinical management of children with heart failure are considered, but the treatment of heart failure related to congenital heart disease or the intensive care management of heart failure are not mentioned as both topics require consideration in their own right. A greater understanding of the maladaptive responses to chroni...

  13. Groningen's gas field. 50th anniversary. Beating heart of the Dutch natural gas industry; Groningen-gasveld. Vijftig jaar. Kloppend hart van de Nederlandse gasvoorziening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenk, J.; Timmer, P.

    2009-07-01

    Ever since the natural gas field of Slochteren was discovered, natural gas has become crucial to the Dutch energy system and to the economy. This booklet on the 50th anniversary of the Groningen gas field offers the history of half a century of natural gas extraction and its consequences. [Dutch] Aardgas is sinds de vondst van het aardgasveld bij Slochteren cruciaal voor de Nederlandse energievoorziening en voor de economie. Groningen-gasveld vijftig jaar is de geschiedenis van een halve eeuw aardgaswinning en de consequenties daarvan.

  14. Heart failure - home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... failure - discharge Heart failure - fluids and diuretics Heart failure - what to ask ... Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, ...

  15. Leaky valves: new operation improves the heart's pumping action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kasteren, J.

    2003-01-01

    The action of any pump will start to decline when the valves no longer close properly. The same goes for the heart, the pump that maintains the circulation in our vascular system. Consequently, a major field of focus of open heart surgery is the repair or replacement of heart valves. Petr Havl a Ph.

  16. Take heart!

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    Recently, ten new semi-automatic defibrillators were installed at various locations around CERN. This is a preventive measure intended to provide cardiac arrest victims with the best possible response. The first responder could be you!   The Director-General has welcomed the initiative of the Medical Service and Fire Brigade for the installation of ten new semi-automatic defibrillators. You have probably seen them on your way to the restaurant, for example:  brand new semi-automatic defibrillators, ready for an emergency. Housed in a white wall-mounted case, the bright red defibrillators are marked with a white heart symbol crossed by a lightning bolt (see photo). The defibrillator is designed so that anyone can use it. “Anyone can use it, you don’t need to be a health professional,” says Dr Reymond from CERN's Medical Service. Together with the CERN Fire Brigade, he is behind the initiative to have these units put in place. And with good reason, as the unit...

  17. Restricted Quantum Affine Symmetry of Perturbed Minimal Models

    CERN Document Server

    Felder, G

    1992-01-01

    We study the structure of superselection sectors of an arbitrary perturbation of a conformal field theory. We describe how a restriction of the q-deformed $\\hat{sl(2)}$ affine Lie algebra symmetry of the sine-Gordon theory can be used to derive the S-matrices of the $\\Phi^{(1,3)}$ perturbations of the minimal unitary series. This analysis provides an identification of fields which create the massive kink spectrum. We investigate the ultraviolet limit of the restricted sine-Gordon model, and explain the relation between the restriction and the Fock space cohomology of minimal models. We also comment on the structure of degenerate vacuum states. Deformed Serre relations are proven for arbitrary affine Toda theories, and it is shown in certain cases how relations of the Serre type become fractional spin supersymmetry relations upon restriction.

  18. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome is a congenital heart condition that occurs during the development of the heart in the ... womb. During the heart's development, parts of the left side of the heart (mitral valve, left ventricle ...

  19. Remarks on restricted Nevanlinna transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Jankowski, Lech

    2010-01-01

    The Nevanlinna transform K(z), of a measure and a real constant, plays an important role in the complex analysis and more recently in the free probability theory (boolean convolution). It is shown that its restriction k(it) (the restricted Nevanlinna transform) to the imaginary axis can be expressed as the Laplace transform of the Fourier transform (characteristic function) of the corresponding measure. Finally, a relation between the Voiculescu and the boolean convolution is indicated.

  20. What Causes Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Heart Disease? Research suggests that coronary heart disease (CHD) begins with damage to the lining and ... causing coronary microvascular disease (MVD). Coronary MVD is heart disease that affects the heart's tiny arteries. The cause ...

  1. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... It's the major reason people have heart attacks. Heart diseases that affect women more than men include Coronary ...

  2. Healing Hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses regeneration which is actually the dream of a scattering of biologists working in a relatively unheralded field called regenerative medicine. They hope to learn how other animals make whole their damaged parts, recreating complete working organs and appendages just as they did as embryos, but swiftly, and on a scale that…

  3. Heart rate variability in isolated rabbit hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, B; Heger, G; Mayer, C; Kiegler, B; Stöhr, H; Steurer, G

    1996-11-01

    The presence of heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with cardiac denervation after heart transplantation raised our interest in HRV of isolated, denervated hearts. Hearts from seven adult white ELCO rabbits were transferred to a perfusion apparatus. All hearts were perfused in the working mode and in the Langendorff mode for 20 minutes each. HRV was analyzed in the frequency domain. A computer simulated test ECG at a constant rate of 2 Hz was used for error estimation of the system. In the isolated, denervated heart, HRV was of random, broadband fluctuations, different from the well-characterized oscillations at specific frequencies in intact animals. Mean NN was 423 +/- 51 ms in the Langendorff mode, 406 +/- 33 ms in the working heart mode, and 500 ms in the test ECG. Total power was 663 +/- 207 ms2, 817 +/- 318 ms2, and 3.7 ms2, respectively. There was no significant difference in any measure of HRV between Langendorff and working heart modes. The data provide evidence for the presence of HRV in isolated, denervated rabbit hearts. Left atrial and ventricular filling, i.e., the working heart mode, did not alter HRV, indicating that left atrial or ventricular stretch did not influence the sinus nodal discharge rate.

  4. Does calorie restriction induce mitochondrial biogenesis? A reevaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Chad R.; Han, Dong-Ho; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Kim, Sang Hyun; Holloszy, John O.

    2011-01-01

    It has been reported that 30% calorie restriction (CR) for 3 mo results in large increases in mitochondrial biogenesis in heart, brain, liver, and adipose tissue, with concomitant increases in respiration and ATP synthesis. We found these results surprising, and performed this study to determine whether 30% CR does induce an increase in mitochondria in heart, brain, liver, adipose tissue, and/or skeletal muscle. To this end, we measured the levels of a range of mitochondrial proteins, and mRNAs. With the exception of long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase protein level, which was increased ∼60% in adipose tissue, none of the mitochondrial proteins or mRNAs that we measured were increased in rats subjected to 30% CR for 14 wk. There was also no increase in citrate synthase activity. Because it is not possible to have an increase in mitochondria without any increase in key mitochondrial proteins, we conclude that 30% CR does not induce an increase in mitochondria in heart, brain, liver, adipose tissue, or skeletal muscle in laboratory rodents.—Hancock, C. R., Han, D.-H., Higashida, K., Kim, S. H., Holloszy, J. O. Does calorie restriction induce mitochondrial biogenesis? A reevaluation. PMID:21048043

  5. Beyond Intergovernmentalism: The Europeanization of Restrictive Measures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Giumelli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The functioning of the European Union (EU has been explored extensively in recent years. The dominant prism through which to look at the EU is still one of locus: i.e. whether decisions are made in the capitals of its member states or in Brussels. This debate is contained in the dualism between intergovernmentalism and supranationalism, but drawing the boundaries between the two concepts is still undone. This article attempts to contribute to solving this problem by investigating the restrictive measures policy of the EU in order to identify three conditions under which intergovernmentalism should be used. First, when EU institutions are dependent on EU member states for information and expertise; second, when decision-making powers rest mainly in EU capitals; and three, when there are no exclusive fora for decision-making in Brussels. The study of the restrictive measures of the European Union does not meet any of these three conditions; therefore the article argues that the concept of supranational intergovernmentalism offers useful insights to understand the EU security governance of CFSP sanctions. The article is divided into four parts. The first introduces the debate on security governance and justifies the selection of this specific approach to the study of sanctions. The second part presents the restrictive measures policy of the European Union and justifies its pertinence to the field of security. The third part of the article investigates the emerging patterns in security governance by testing the three conditions on the decision-making process for EU restrictive measures. Finally, the conclusion summarises the main argument and indicates ways forward in the study of EU sanctions from a governance perspective.

  6. Molecular motion in restricted geometries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Siddharth Gautam; S Mitra; R Mukhopadhyay

    2008-10-01

    Molecular dynamics in restricted geometries is known to exhibit anomalous behaviour. Diffusion, translational or rotational, of molecules is altered significantly on confinement in restricted geometries. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) offers a unique possibility of studying molecular motion in such systems. Both time scales involved in the motion and the geometry of motion can be studied using QENS. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation not only provides insight into the details of the different types of motion possible but also does not suffer limitations of the experimental set-up. Here we report the effect of confinement on molecular dynamics in various restricted geometries as studied by QENS and MD simulations: An example where the QENS technique provided direct evidence of phase transition associated with change in the dynamical behaviour of the molecules is also discussed.

  7. Effects of vield-of-view restrictions on speed and accuracy of manoeuvring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Jansen, S.E.M.; Delleman, N.J.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of field-of-view restrictions on the speed and accuracy of participants performing a real-world manoeuvring task through an obstacled environment were investigated. Although field-of-view restrictions are known to affect human behaviour and to degrade performance for a range of different tas

  8. All about Heart Rate (Pulse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  9. On the Morphology of the Drosophila Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Rotstein

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The circulatory system of Drosophila melanogaster represents an easily amenable genetic model whose analysis at different levels, i.e., from single molecules up to functional anatomy, has provided new insights into general aspects of cardiogenesis, heart physiology and cardiac aging, to name a few examples. In recent years, the Drosophila heart has also attracted the attention of researchers in the field of biomedicine. This development is mainly due to the fact that several genes causing human heart disease are also present in Drosophila, where they play the same or similar roles in heart development, maintenance or physiology as their respective counterparts in humans. This review will attempt to briefly introduce the anatomy of the Drosophila circulatory system and then focus on the different cell types and non-cellular tissue that constitute the heart.

  10. Smoking Thickens Heart Wall, Leading to Heart Failure: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160932.html Smoking Thickens Heart Wall, Leading to Heart Failure: Study ... 13, 2016 TUESDAY, Sept. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking leads to heart failure by causing thickened heart ...

  11. Heart Disease Affects Far More Than the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163584.html Heart Disease Affects Far More Than the Heart Blocked arteries ... 14, 2017 TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease affects more than just the heart. It also ...

  12. Restrictive dermopathy and fetal behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, EJH; Beemer, FA; Stoutenbeek, P

    2001-01-01

    We report three siblings from consecutive pregnancies affected with restrictive dermopathy (RD). During the second pregnancy, fetal behavioural development and growth were studied extensively using ultrasound at 1-4 week intervals. Dramatic and sudden changes occurred in fetal body movements and gro

  13. Legal restrictions and Investment Growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensink, B.W.; Scholtens, B.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the impact of legal restrictions on investment growth at the firm level. With the help of a unique firm-level survey database, we analyze whether firm investments are related to the efficiency and quality of the judiciary. Furthermore, we analyze whether the investment behavior of large a

  14. Legal restrictions and investment growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensink, B.W.; Scholtens, B.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the impact of legal restrictions on investment growth at the firm level. With the help of a unique firm-level survey database, we analyze whether firm investments are related to the efficiency and quality of the judiciary, Furthermore, we analyze whether the investment behavior of large a

  15. Restricted Morgan’s problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈树中; 曹立

    1996-01-01

    A new list of regular feedback invariant integers called right independent orders is introduced.That the restricted Morgan’s problem is equivalent to a kind of nonlinear algebraic equations is proved and the condition that the nonlinear algebraic equations degenerate into linear algebraic equations is given.

  16. Insights into restrictive cardiomyopathy from clinical and animal studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pierre-Yves Jean-Charles; Yue-Jin Li; Chang-Long Nan; Xu-Pei Huang

    2011-01-01

    Catdiomyopathies are diseases that primarily affect the myocardium,leading to serious cardiac dysfimction and heart failure.Out of the three major categories of candiomyopathies(hypertrophic,dilated and restrictive),restrictive cardiomyopathy(RCM)is less common and also the least studied However,the prognosis for RCM is poor as some patients dying in their childhood The molecular mechanisms behind the disease development and progression are not very clear and the treatment of RCM is very difficult and often ineffective.In this article,we reviewed the recent progress in RCM research from the clinical studies and the translational studies done on diseased transgenic animal models.This will help for a better understanding of tare mechanisms underlying the etiology and development of RCM and for the design of better treatments for the disease.

  17. Texas Heart Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine today with a keynote from Texas State Senator Paul Bettencourt Dr. Taylor received the ... in cardiovascular discovery is happening here at the Texas Heart Institute. Visit www.thenextfirst.org . Your Heart ...

  18. Heart Diseases--Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you have a close family member who had heart disease at an early age. Fortunately, there are many things you can do reduce your chances of getting heart disease. You should Know your blood pressure and keep ...

  19. Heart failure - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ... Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of ...

  20. Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More The Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia Click a letter below to get a ... dozens of cardiovascular terms from our Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia and get links to in-depth information. ...

  1. Open heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - open ... lung machine is used in most cases during open heart surgery. While the surgeon works on the ... with these procedures, the surgeon may have to open the chest to do the surgery.

  2. Valvular heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gelson, E; Gatzoulis, M; Johnson, M.

    2007-01-01

    Valvular disease may be unmasked in pregnancy when physiological changes increase demands on the heart. Women with valvular heart disease require close follow-up during pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum

  3. Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Balance › Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease January 2014 Download PDFs English ... nervous system, body temperature, and weight. What is hypothyroidism and what are its symptoms? Hypothyroidism, also called ...

  4. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  5. Anatomy of the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Anatomy of the Heart Your heart is located under your ribcage in the center of your chest between your right and left lungs. Its muscular walls beat, or contract, pumping blood ...

  6. Heart Health for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it Email Print En Español In Chinese - In Korean - In Vietnamese - In French Creole You may think ... Download and Share: Social Media Toolkit (PDF 481KB) Learn More About Heart Disease: The Heart Truth Campaign ...

  7. Heart Attack Payment - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – provider data. This data set includes provider data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  8. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Oct 12,2016 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  9. Meditation and Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Check Meal Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering the Menu Ordering Your Meal Eating Fast ...

  10. Alcohol and Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Check Meal Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering the Menu Ordering Your Meal Eating Fast ...

  11. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007188.htm Heart disease and women To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. People often DO NOT consider heart disease a woman's disease. Yet cardiovascular disease is the ...

  12. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000092.htm Aspirin and heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... healthy people who are at low risk for heart disease. You provider will consider your overall medical condition ...

  13. [Understanding heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, José Fernando Guadalajara

    2006-01-01

    Heart failure is a disease with several definitions. The term "heart failure" is used by has brougth about confusion in the terminology. For this reason, the value of the ejection fraction (< 0.40 or < 0.35) is used in most meganalyses on the treatment of heart failure, avoiding the term "heart failure" that is a confounding concept. In this paper we carefully analyze the meaning of contractility, ventricular function or performance, preload, afterload, heart failure, compensation mechanisms in heart failure, myocardial oxygen consumption, inadequate, adequate and inappropriate hypertrophy, systole, diastole, compliance, problems of relaxation, and diastolic dysfunction. Their definitions are supported by the original scientific descriptions in an attempt to clarify the concepts about ventricular function and heart failure and, in this way, use the same scientific language about the meaning of ventricular function, heart failure, and diastolic dysfunction.

  14. Pericarditis - after heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and swelling of the covering of the heart (pericardium). It can occur in the days or weeks ... Symptoms include: Anxiety Chest pain from the swollen pericardium rubbing on the heart. The pain may be ...

  15. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are working and to measure your potassium levels. Beta Blockers Beta blockers slow your heart rate and decrease the strength ... muscle contracts in the short term. Long term beta blockers help keep your heart failure from becoming worse. ...

  16. Know Your Heart's Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of body fat based on height and weight), waist circumference, blood sugar and weight. The telephone survey of ... for heart health. Just 36 percent knew that waist circumference is important measure of heart disease risk. The ...

  17. Heart Attack Payment - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – state data. This data set includes state-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  18. Heart Attack Payment - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – national data. This data set includes national-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  19. DenHeart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Rasmussen, Trine Bernholdt; Thrysøe, Lars

    2017-01-01

    differences were found in all patient reported outcomes across diagnostic groups. Listed from worst to best outcomes were heart failure, heart valve disease, ischemic heart disease, infectious heart disease, arrhythmia, congenital heart disease and heart transplant. Also “observation for cardiac disease...... reported outcomes. Methods A national cross-sectional survey combined with national register data. From April 2013 to April 2014 all patients (n = 34,564) discharged or transferred from one of five Danish Heart Centres were invited to participate. 16,712 patients (51%) responded; 67% male and mean age 64...... years. All diagnostic groups were represented similar to real life proportions. Patient reported outcome measures included: SF-12, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, EQ-5D, Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, HeartQoL and Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale. Results Statistically significant...

  20. Right heart ventriculography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiography - right heart ... The catheter will be moved forward into the right side of the heart. As the catheter is advanced, the doctor can record pressures from the right atrium and right ventricle. Contrast material ("dye") is ...

  1. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  2. Heart-lung transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Griffith, Bartley P.; Magliato, Kathy E.

    2014-01-01

    Heart-lung transplantation itself is not a particularly difficult operation technically. It is the setting in which this procedure is performed which is difficult. The three issues of importance in a successful outcome are appropriate harvest of the heart-lung bloc from the donor, careful explant of the heart and lungs of the recipient, and finally the implant of the heart-lung bloc into the recipient. None of this requires extraordinary technical skill, but does require careful coordination ...

  3. 30 CFR 56.11008 - Restricted clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Restricted clearance. 56.11008 Section 56.11008 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Restricted clearance. Where restricted clearance creates a hazard to persons, the restricted clearance...

  4. 30 CFR 57.11008 - Restricted clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Restricted clearance. 57.11008 Section 57.11008... Escapeways Travelways-Surface and Underground § 57.11008 Restricted clearance. Where restricted clearance creates a hazard to persons, the restricted clearance shall be conspicuously marked....

  5. The evolution of heart gene delivery vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wasala, Nalinda B.; Shin, Jin-Hong; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise for treating numerous heart diseases. A key premise for the success of cardiac gene therapy is the development of powerful gene transfer vehicles that can achieve highly efficient and persistent gene transfer specifically in the heart. Other features of an ideal vector include negligible toxicity, minimal immunogenicity and easy manufacturing. Rapid progress in the fields of molecular biology and virology has offered great opportunities to engineer various genetic m...

  6. Heart Valve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  7. Heart failure overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms) You feel a severe crushing chest pain Prevention Most cases of heart failure can be prevented by living a healthy lifestyle and taking steps aimed at reducing your risk for heart disease . . Alternative Names CHF; Congestive heart failure; Left-sided ...

  8. The Danish Heart Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özcan, Cengiz; Juel, Knud; Lassen, Jens Flensted

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Danish Heart Registry (DHR) seeks to monitor nationwide activity and quality of invasive diagnostic and treatment strategies in patients with ischemic heart disease as well as valvular heart disease and to provide data for research. STUDY POPULATION: All adult (≥15 years) patients...

  9. Heart valve surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: executive summary: a report of the American College ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Surgery Heart Valve Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  10. The Heart of Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  11. Heart Truth for Latinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... That’s a man’s disease.” But here’s The Heart Truth : Heart disease is the #1 killer of Latinas ... TAKING ACTION Now that you know The Heart Truth , what should you do? First, find out your ...

  12. The Heart of Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  13. Living with Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Disease If you have coronary heart disease (CHD), you can take steps to control its ... the section of this article titled "How Is Heart Disease Treated?" You also can visit the Health Topics ...

  14. Women and Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹国如

    2005-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading killer of Americans. But it kills more women than men. The American Heart Association says heart disease and other cardiovascular (心血管的) disorders kill about five hundred thousand women a year. That is more than the next seven causes of death combined.

  15. Implantable Heart Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  16. Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SA) node --- the heart's natural pacemaker - sends out electrical signals faster than usual. The heart rate is fast, but the heart beats properly. Causes of sinus tachycardia A rapid heartbeat may be your body's response to common conditions such as: Fever Anxiety ...

  17. Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and genetics may play a role. Why congenital heart disease resurfaces in adulthood Some adults may find that ... in following adults with congenital heart disease. Congenital heart disease and pregnancy Women with congenital heart disease who ...

  18. Managing Feelings about Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Heart Failure Module 6: Managing Feelings About Heart Failure Download Module Order Hardcopy Heart failure can cause ... professional help for emotional problems. Common Feelings About Heart Failure It is common for people to feel depressed ...

  19. Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease Updated:May 17,2017 Most illegal drugs can ... www.dea.gov/druginfo/factsheets.shtml Alcohol and Heart Disease Caffeine and Heart Disease Tobacco and Heart Disease ...

  20. What Are Congenital Heart Defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Congenital Heart Defects? Congenital (kon-JEN-ih-tal) heart defects are problems ... carry blood to the heart or the body Congenital heart defects change the normal flow of blood through the ...

  1. Comparison of a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine the effect of repeated subculture and prolonged storage on RFLP patterns of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Kensuke; Wu, Yuluo; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Asakura, Masahiro; Nishimura, Kazuhiko; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we compared a recently developed PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using three different Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains to understand whether repeated subculture in vitro and prolonged storage at room temperature affect the RFLP patterns of STEC. The PFGE profiles of the STEC strains changed by 1 to 8 fragments after repeated subculture and prolonged storage; one strain was no longer clonal after repeated subculture compared to the original isolate according to the Tenover criteria. In contrast, RFLP patterns obtained by PCR-RFLP were identical after repeated subculture and prolonged storage. These data clearly indicate that the PCR-RFLP assay which is based on the diversity of region V, a regulatory region of Stx-phage, was not affected by repeated subculture and prolonged storage and is a more practical and reliable method for molecular typing of STEC strains.

  2. [Embryology of the heart walls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, M-M; Galvaing, G; Sakka, L; Garcier, J-M; Chazal, J; Filaire, M

    2013-03-01

    Although anatomically simple structures, the atrial septum and the ventricular septum have complex embryological origins. Recent findings in molecular biology allowed better comprehension of their formation. As soon as the heart tube is formed, cells migrate from several cardiogenic fields to take part in the septation. Elongation, ballooning, and later inflexion of the heart tube create chamber separating grooves, facing the future septa. The systemic venous tributaries conflate at the venous pole of the heart; it will partially involute while contributing to the atrial septum. The primary atrial septum grows from the atrial roof towards the atrioventricular canal. It fuses there with the atrioventricular cushions, while its upper margin breaks down to form the ostium secundum. Then a deep fold develops from the atrial roof and partly covers the ostium secundum, leaving a flap-like interatrial communication through the oval foramen. It will close at birth. The interventricular septum has three embryological origins. The ventricular septum primum, created during the ballooning process, origins from the primary heart tube. It will form the trabecular septum and the inlet septum. The interventricular ring, surrounding the interventricular foramen, will participate in the inlet septum and also form the atrioventricular conduction axis. The outflow cushions will separate the outflow tract in the aorta and pulmonary artery, and grow to create the outlet septum. After merging with the atrioventricular cushions, they will also be part of the membranous septum.

  3. The Danish Heart Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özcan, Cengiz; Juel, Knud; Flensted Lassen, Jens;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Danish Heart Registry (DHR) seeks to monitor nationwide activity and quality of invasive diagnostic and treatment strategies in patients with ischemic heart disease as well as valvular heart disease and to provide data for research. STUDY POPULATION: All adult (≥15 years) patients...... undergoing coronary angiography (CAG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting, and heart valve surgery performed across all Danish hospitals were included. MAIN VARIABLES: The DHR contains a subset of the data stored in the Eastern and Western Denmark Heart Registries (EDHR...

  4. Heart Age PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-09-01

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Your heart age is the age of your heart and blood vessels as a result of your risk factors for heart attack and stroke. If you smoke or have high blood pressure, your heart age will be much higher than your actual age. Learn what you can do to lower your heart age and keep it low.  Created: 9/1/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/1/2015.

  5. Temperature based Restricted Boltzmann Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqi; Deng, Lei; Xu, Yi; Wen, Changyun; Wang, Wei; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping

    2016-01-13

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs), which apply graphical models to learning probability distribution over a set of inputs, have attracted much attention recently since being proposed as building blocks of multi-layer learning systems called deep belief networks (DBNs). Note that temperature is a key factor of the Boltzmann distribution that RBMs originate from. However, none of existing schemes have considered the impact of temperature in the graphical model of DBNs. In this work, we propose temperature based restricted Boltzmann machines (TRBMs) which reveals that temperature is an essential parameter controlling the selectivity of the firing neurons in the hidden layers. We theoretically prove that the effect of temperature can be adjusted by setting the parameter of the sharpness of the logistic function in the proposed TRBMs. The performance of RBMs can be improved by adjusting the temperature parameter of TRBMs. This work provides a comprehensive insights into the deep belief networks and deep learning architectures from a physical point of view.

  6. Postoperative activity restrictions: any evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Larissa F; Nygaard, Ingrid E; Wilken, Jason; Brandt, Debra; Janz, Kathleen F

    2006-02-01

    Because of a widespread but untested belief that increased intra-abdominal pressure contributes to pelvic floor disorders, physicians commonly restrict various activities postoperatively. Our aim was to describe intra-abdominal pressures during common physical activities. Thirty women of wide age and weight ranges who were not undergoing treatment for pelvic floor disorders performed 3 repetitions of various activities while intra-abdominal pressures (baseline and maximal) were approximated via microtip rectal catheters. We calculated median peak and net pressures (centimeters of H(2)O). We assessed correlations between abdominal pressures and body mass index, abdominal circumference, and grip strength (a proxy for overall strength). P climbing stairs, walking briskly, or doing abdominal crunches. Body mass index and abdominal circumference each correlated positively with peak, but not net, pressures. Age and grip strength were not associated with abdominal pressure. Some activities commonly restricted postoperatively have no greater effect on intra-abdominal pressures than unavoidable activities like rising from a chair. How lifting is done impacts intra-abdominal pressure. Many current postoperative guidelines are needlessly restrictive. Further research is needed to determine whether increased intra-abdominal pressure truly promotes pelvic floor disorders. III.

  7. The Body of Knowledge on Compliance in Heart Failure Patients We Are Not There Yet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, Maurice M. W.; van der Wal, Martje H. L.; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2011-01-01

    Background: Noncompliance with diet and fluid restriction is a problem in patients with heart failure (HF). In recent studies, a relationship between compliance with sodium and fluid restriction and knowledge and beliefs regarding compliance was found. In these studies, however, compliance was prima

  8. The Body of Knowledge on Compliance in Heart Failure Patients We Are Not There Yet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, Maurice M. W.; van der Wal, Martje H. L.; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2011-01-01

    Background: Noncompliance with diet and fluid restriction is a problem in patients with heart failure (HF). In recent studies, a relationship between compliance with sodium and fluid restriction and knowledge and beliefs regarding compliance was found. In these studies, however, compliance was prima

  9. Development, Validation, and Field-Testing of an Instrument for Clinical Assessment of HIV-Associated Neuropathy and Neuropathic Pain in Resource-Restricted and Large Population Study Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerman, Peter R.; Veliotes, Demetri G. A.; Phillips, Tudor J.; Asboe, David; Boffito, Marta; Rice, Andrew S. C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-associated sensory peripheral neuropathy (HIV-SN) afflicts approximately 50% of patients on antiretroviral therapy, and is associated with significant neuropathic pain. Simple accurate diagnostic instruments are required for clinical research and daily practice in both high- and low-resource setting. A 4-item clinical tool (CHANT: Clinical HIV-associated Neuropathy Tool) assessing symptoms (pain and numbness) and signs (ankle reflexes and vibration sense) was developed by selecting and combining the most accurate measurands from a deep phenotyping study of HIV positive people (Pain In Neuropathy Study–HIV-PINS). CHANT was alpha-tested in silico against the HIV-PINS dataset and then clinically validated and field-tested in HIV-positive cohorts in London, UK and Johannesburg, South Africa. The Utah Early Neuropathy Score (UENS) was used as the reference standard in both settings. In a second step, neuropathic pain in the presence of HIV-SN was assessed using the Douleur Neuropathique en 4 Questions (DN4)-interview and a body map. CHANT achieved high accuracy on alpha-testing with sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 90%, respectively. In 30 patients in London, CHANT diagnosed 43.3% (13/30) HIV-SN (66.7% with neuropathic pain); sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 85%, and likelihood ratio = 6.7 versus UENS, internal consistency = 0.88 (Cronbach alpha), average item-total correlation = 0.73 (Spearman’s Rho), and inter-tester concordance > 0.93 (Spearman’s Rho). In 50 patients in Johannesburg, CHANT diagnosed 66% (33/50) HIV-SN (78.8% neuropathic pain); sensitivity = 74.4%, specificity = 85.7%, and likelihood ratio = 5.29 versus UENS. A positive CHANT score markedly increased of pre- to post-test clinical certainty of HIV-SN from 43% to 83% in London, and from 66% to 92% in Johannesburg. In conclusion, a combination of four easily and quickly assessed clinical items can be used to accurately diagnose HIV-SN. DN4-interview used in the context of bilateral feet

  10. Assisted reproductive technologies: professional and legal restrictions in Australian clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Kerry; Baker, H W G; Pitts, Marian; Thorpe, Rachel

    2005-02-01

    The professional and legal regulation of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) in Australia is a vast maze of intersecting laws and guidelines which place restrictions on the provision of services such as infertility treatment, surrogacy, sex selection for social reasons, donor insemination, pre-implantation diagnosis and human embryo research. This study investigated the application of these restrictions on clinical practice in New South Wales, a relatively unregulated State, and Victoria, a relatively highly regulated State. The results of the survey indicate that the range of ART services in Victorian clinics was far more limited than in New South Wales clinics. The Victorian clinics uniformly restricted access of single and lesbian women and did not offer social sex selection procedures. The New South Wales clinics adopted different polices regarding these services. It was found that restrictive laws governing "social" issues have a significant impact on the availability of ART services and some respondents seemed unclear about the nature of restrictions and laws relevant to their work. It was also found that "reproductive tourism" is prevalent and restrictions were circumnavigated by patients with assistance from clinics. It was concluded that more evidence is required to evaluate regulation in this field of medicine.

  11. Muscle metaboreflex and autonomic regulation of heart rate in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, James P; Adlan, Ahmed M; Shantsila, Alena

    2013-01-01

    We elucidated the autonomic mechanisms whereby heart rate (HR) is regulated by the muscle metaboreflex. Eight male participants (22 ± 3 years) performed three exercise protocols: (1) enhanced metaboreflex activation with partial flow restriction (bi-lateral thigh cuff inflation) during leg cycling...

  12. Heart transplantation in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchill, Luke J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) is vastly different to that observed in acquired heart disease. Unlike acquired HF in which pharmacological strategies are the cornerstone for protecting and improving ventricular function, ACHD-related HF relies heavily upon structural and other interventions to achieve these aims. patients with ACHD constitute a small percentage of the total adult heart transplant population (∼3%), although the number of ACHD heart transplant recipients is growing rapidly with a 40% increase over the last two decades. The worldwide experience to date has confirmed heart transplantation as an effective life-extending treatment option in carefully selected patients with ACHD with end-stage cardiac disease. Opportunities for improving outcomes in patients with ACHD-related HF include (i) earlier recognition and referral to centres with combined expertise in ACHD and HF, (ii) increased awareness of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death risk in this population, (iii) greater collaboration between HF and ACHD specialists at the time of heart transplant assessment, (iv) expert surgical planning to reduce ischaemic time and bleeding risk at the time of transplant, (v) tailored immunosuppression in the post-transplant period and (vi) development and validation of ACHD-specific risk scores to predict mortality and guide patient selection. The purpose of this article is to review current approaches to diagnosing and treating advanced HF in patients with ACHD including indications, contraindications and clinical outcomes after heart transplantation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Sleep restriction during simulated wildfire suppression: effect on physical task performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Vincent

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of sleep restriction on firefighters' physical task performance during simulated wildfire suppression. METHODS: Thirty-five firefighters were matched and randomly allocated to either a control condition (8-hour sleep opportunity, n = 18 or a sleep restricted condition (4-hour sleep opportunity, n = 17. Performance on physical work tasks was evaluated across three days. In addition, heart rate, core temperature, and worker activity were measured continuously. Rate of perceived and exertion and effort sensation were evaluated during the physical work periods. RESULTS: There were no differences between the sleep-restricted and control groups in firefighters' task performance, heart rate, core temperature, or perceptual responses during self-paced simulated firefighting work tasks. However, the sleep-restricted group were less active during periods of non-physical work compared to the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Under self-paced work conditions, 4 h of sleep restriction did not adversely affect firefighters' performance on physical work tasks. However, the sleep-restricted group were less physically active throughout the simulation. This may indicate that sleep-restricted participants adapted their behaviour to conserve effort during rest periods, to subsequently ensure they were able to maintain performance during the firefighter work tasks. This work contributes new knowledge to inform fire agencies of firefighters' operational capabilities when their sleep is restricted during multi-day wildfire events. The work also highlights the need for further research to explore how sleep restriction affects physical performance during tasks of varying duration, intensity, and complexity.

  14. Overlapping Cardiac Programs in Heart Development and Regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Song Zhen; Qing Wu; Cheng-Lu Xiao; Nan-Nan Chang; Xu Wang; Lei Lei; Xiaojun Zhu; Jing-Wei Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Gaining cellular and molecular insights into heart development and regeneration will likely provide new therapeutic targets and opportunities for cardiac regenerative medicine,one of the most urgent clinical needs for heart failure.Here we present a review on zebrafish heart development and regeneration,with a particular focus on early cardiac progenitor development and their contribution to building embryonic heart,as well as cellular and molecular programs in adult zebrafish heart regeneration.We attempt to emphasize that the signaling pathways shaping cardiac progenitors in heart development may also be redeployed during the progress of adult heart regeneration.A brief perspective highlights several important and promising research areas in this exciting field.

  15. Peak heart rates at extreme altitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Van Hall, Gerrit

    2001-01-01

    We have measured maximal heart rate during a graded maximal bicycle exercise test to exhaustion in five healthy climbers before and during an expedition to Mt. Everest. Maximal heart rates at sea level were 186 (177-204) beats/min(-1) at sea level and 170 (169-182) beats/min(-1) with acute hypoxia....... After 1, 4 and 6 weeks of acclimatization to 5400 m, maximal heart rates were 155 (135-182), 158 (144-182), and 155 (140-183) beats/min(-1), respectively. Heart rates of two of the climbers were measured during their attempt to reach the summit of Mt. Everest without the use of supplemental oxygen....... The peak heart rates at 8,750 m for the two climbers were 142 and 144 beats/min(-1), which were similar to their maximal heart rates during exhaustive bicycle exercise at 5,400 m, the values being 144 and 148 beats/min(-1), respectively. The peak heart rates at 8,750 m are in agreement with other field...

  16. FPGA Implementation of Heart Rate Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahy, D; Rakshit, M; Sahu, P K

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a field programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation of a system that calculates the heart rate from Electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. After heart rate calculation, tachycardia, bradycardia or normal heart rate can easily be detected. ECG is a diagnosis tool routinely used to access the electrical activities and muscular function of the heart. Heart rate is calculated by detecting the R peaks from the ECG signal. To provide a portable and the continuous heart rate monitoring system for patients using ECG, needs a dedicated hardware. FPGA provides easy testability, allows faster implementation and verification option for implementing a new design. We have proposed a five-stage based methodology by using basic VHDL blocks like addition, multiplication and data conversion (real to the fixed point and vice-versa). Our proposed heart rate calculation (R-peak detection) method has been validated, using 48 first channel ECG records of the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. It shows an accuracy of 99.84%, the sensitivity of 99.94% and the positive predictive value of 99.89%. Our proposed method outperforms other well-known methods in case of pathological ECG signals and successfully implemented in FPGA.

  17. Denoising method of heart sound signals based on self-construct heart sound wavelet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiefeng; Zhang, Zheng

    2014-08-01

    In the field of heart sound signal denoising, the wavelet transform has become one of the most effective measures. The selective wavelet basis is based on the well-known orthogonal db series or biorthogonal bior series wavelet. In this paper we present a self-construct wavelet basis which is suitable for the heart sound denoising and analyze its constructor method and features in detail according to the characteristics of heart sound and evaluation criterion of signal denoising. The experimental results show that the heart sound wavelet can effectively filter out the noise of the heart sound signals, reserve the main characteristics of the signal. Compared with the traditional wavelets, it has a higher signal-to-noise ratio, lower mean square error and better denoising effect.

  18. Denoising method of heart sound signals based on self-construct heart sound wavelet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiefeng Cheng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the field of heart sound signal denoising, the wavelet transform has become one of the most effective measures. The selective wavelet basis is based on the well-known orthogonal db series or biorthogonal bior series wavelet. In this paper we present a self-construct wavelet basis which is suitable for the heart sound denoising and analyze its constructor method and features in detail according to the characteristics of heart sound and evaluation criterion of signal denoising. The experimental results show that the heart sound wavelet can effectively filter out the noise of the heart sound signals, reserve the main characteristics of the signal. Compared with the traditional wavelets, it has a higher signal-to-noise ratio, lower mean square error and better denoising effect.

  19. Restriction Theorem for Principal bundles in Arbitrary Characteristic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurjar, Sudarshan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to prove two basic restriction theorem for principal bundles on smooth projective varieties in arbitrary characteristic generalizing the analogues theorems of Mehta-Ramanathan for vector bundles. More precisely, let G be a reductive algebraic group over an algebraically...... closed field k and let X be a smooth, projective variety over k together with a very ample line bundle O(1). The main result of the paper is that if E is a semistable (resp. stable) principal G-bundle on X w.r.t O(1), then the restriction of E to a general, high multi-degree, complete-intersection curve...

  20. Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma-Kuinkel, Batu K; Rude, Thomas H; Fowler, Vance G

    2016-01-01

    Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) is a powerful genotyping technique used for the separation of large DNA molecules (entire genomic DNA) after digesting it with unique restriction enzymes and applying to a gel matrix under the electric field that periodically changes direction. PFGE is a variation of agarose gel electrophoresis that permits analysis of bacterial DNA fragments over an order of magnitude larger than that with conventional restriction enzyme analysis. It provides a good representation of the entire bacterial chromosome in a single gel with a highly reproducible restriction profile, providing clearly distinct and well-resolved DNA fragments.

  1. Rurality study of restricted areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rivaroli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Two main perspectives of investigation emerge from the study of a territory’s rurality: a geographical approach and a sociological approach. The research examines the sub-regional study case of ‘Nuovo circondario imolese’. The analysis shows that the combination of traditional institutional criteria with detailed informations about the territory, generates more accurate results which determine a better comprehension of the characteristics of restricted areas’ rurality. Over the period 1991-2001, the study highlights an increase in rural areas. This result could be interpreted as an effect of urban sprawl’s intensification, that increases the competition between non-farm residences and agricultural activities.

  2. Parental factors associated with intrauterine growth restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hăşmăşanu Monica G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Linear growth failure is caused by multiple factors including parental factors. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate parental risk factors for intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR on a population of Romanian newborn infants in a tertiary level maternity facility for a period of 2.5 years. Methods. A retrospective matched case-control study was conducted in the Emergency County Hospital of Cluj-Napoca, a university hospital in North-Western Romania. The sample was selected from 4,790 infants admitted to the Neonatal Ward at 1st Gynecology Clinic between January 2012 and June 2014. Results. The age of mothers was significantly lower in the IUGR group compared to controls (p=0.041. A significantly higher percentage of mothers had hypertension in the IUGR group compared to those in the control group (p0.13. The age of fathers of infants with IUGR proved significantly lower compared to controls (p=0.0278. The analysis of infants’ comorbidities revealed no significant difference between groups for respiratory distress, hyperbilirubinemia, hypocalcaemia, and heart failure (p>0.27. Intracranial hemorrhage, necrotizing enterocolitis and hypoglycemia were significantly higher in the IUGR group compared to controls. The logistic regression identified hypertension as a significant risk factor for IUGR (OR=2.4, 95% CI [1.3-4.5]. Conclusion. Although the age of the mothers and fathers proved significantly lower in the IUGR group compared to controls, only hypertension in the mothers proved significant risk factors for IUGR.

  3. Medicinal Chemistry Approaches to Heart Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, Dennis; Plowright, Alleyn T

    2015-12-24

    Because of the minimal and clearly insufficient ability of the adult heart to regenerate after ischemic injury, there is a great opportunity to identify biological mechanisms, substances, and factors that enhance this process. Hence, innovative therapeutic management of heart failure following infarction requires a paradigm shift in pharmacotherapy. Spurred by tremendous progress in the field of stem cell and cardiac biology, several attractive approaches for regeneration of lost cardiomyocytes and supporting vasculature have emerged. Research in this area focuses on restoring the hearts' original function via proliferation and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells, proliferation of pre-existing cardiomyocytes, and reprogramming of cardiac fibroblasts. In this review, we outline these principal strategies, putative biological targets or signaling pathways and chemical agents, with a focus on small molecules, to achieve therapeutic heart regeneration. We also point out the many remaining questions and challenges, particularly for translating in vitro discoveries to in vivo application.

  4. Drug Therapy for Acute Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Somma, Salvatore; Magrini, Laura

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is globally one of most frequent reasons for hospitalization and still represents a challenge for the choice of the best treatment to improve patient outcome. According to current international guidelines, as soon as patients with acute heart failure arrive at the emergency department, the common therapeutic approach aims to improve their signs and symptoms, correct volume overload, and ameliorate cardiac hemodynamics by increasing vital organ perfusion. Recommended treatment for the early management of acute heart failure is characterized by the use of intravenous diuretics, oxygen, and vasodilators. Although these measures ameliorate the patient's symptoms, they do not favorably impact on short- and long-term mortality. Consequently, there is a pressing need for novel agents in acute heart failure treatment with the result that research in this field is increasing worldwide. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Heart rate index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, C; Pedersen, F H; Svendsen, J H

    1992-01-01

    The present study compares the variables assessed by standard exercise test with the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) measured by multigated radionuclide angiocardiography (MUGA) in 77 patients early after myocardial infarction. The exercise test and MUGA were performed within two weeks...... after the myocardial infarction. A significant correlation (Spearman's correlation coefficient rs, p less than 0.05) was found between LVEF at rest and the following variables assessed at exercise test: 1) the heart rate at rest, 2) rise in heart rate, 3) ratio between maximal heart rate and heart rate...... at rest, 4) rise in systolic blood pressure, 5) rate pressure product at rest, 6) rise in rate pressure product, 7) ratio (rHR) between maximal rate pressure product and rate pressure product at rest, 8) total exercise time. The heart rate was corrected for effects caused by age (heart index (HR...

  6. Parenting and restrictions in childhood epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, R.; Meijer, A.M.; Scherphof, C.; Carpay, J.A.; Augustijn, P.; Aldenkamp, A.P.; Deković, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: From the overprotection literature, the predictive and interactional (moderation) effects of controlling and indulgent parenting on restrictions in children with epilepsy were examined. Methods: Parents of 73 children with epilepsy completed questionnaires on parenting, restrictions, and

  7. Patterns of Heart Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Hypertension (high blood pressure), smoking, family history of heart disease, and diabetes mellitus (both types 1 and 2) are also factors that increase the risk...breath 16% 19% Hyperlipidemia 2% Asthma 23% Coronary Artery Disease 15% Chest Pain 4% Pneumonia 24% 38% Diabetes 7% Congestive Heart Failure 9% 6...Pain Diabetes Congestive Heart Failure Hypertension Asthma Table 5.7: Diagnoses that distinguish cluster 8 from the cost bucket 2 population average. The

  8. Music and the heart

    OpenAIRE

    Koelsch, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    Music can powerfully evoke and modulate emotions and moods, along with changes in heart activity, blood pressure (BP), and breathing. Although there is great heterogeneity in methods and quality among previous studies on effects of music on the heart, the following findings emerge from the literature: Heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) are higher in response to exciting music compared with tranquilizing music. During musical frissons (involving shivers and piloerection), both HR and RR...

  9. PIV Measurements of flow downstream of polyurethane heart valve prosthesis for artificial heart: steady flow experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.K.; Sung, J.Y. [Seoul National University Graduate School, Seoul (Korea); Chang, J.K.; Yoo, J.Y.; Min, B.G. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    Hemodynamic performance of a polyurethane heart valve prosthesis was evaluated in comparison with that of Bjork-Shiley Monostrut mechanical valve in steady flow representing the systolic peak flow phase. Pressure losses through the valves were obtained from the streamwise pressure distributions downstream of the valves. Unsteady and turbulent flow field distal to the heart valve prostheses were investigated using PIV(Particle Image Velocimetry) which can measure the full-field velocity instantaneously and noninvasively. By examining the velocity and Reynolds shear stress fields downstream of the polyurethane heart valve, it is known that there is a large recirculation region near the valve and high shear stress regions exist at the interface between strong axial jet flows along the wall and vortical flows in the central area. The possibilities of vascular complications, such as the thrombus formation and red blood cell damage, could be predicted from the overall view of the velocity and stress fields. (author). 22 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Heart Rate Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Under a NASA grant, Dr. Robert M. Davis and Dr. William M. Portnoy came up with a new type of electrocardiographic electrode that would enable long term use on astronauts. Their invention was an insulated capacitive electrode constructed of a thin dielectric film. NASA subsequently licensed the electrode technology to Richard Charnitski, inventor of the VersaClimber, who founded Heart Rate, Inc., to further develop and manufacture personal heart monitors and to produce exercise machines using the technology for the physical fitness, medical and home markets. Same technology is on both the Home and Institutional Model VersaClimbers. On the Home Model an infrared heart beat transmitter is worn under exercise clothing. Transmitted heart rate is used to control the work intensity on the VersaClimber using the heart rate as the speedometer of the exercise. This offers advantages to a full range of users from the cardiac rehab patient to the high level physical conditioning of elite athletes. The company manufactures and markets five models of the 1*2*3 HEART RATE monitors that are used wherever people exercise to accurately monitor their heart rate. Company is developing a talking heart rate monitor that works with portable headset radios. A version of the heart beat transmitter will be available to the manufacturers of other aerobic exercise machines.

  11. Anesthesia for Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsingh, Davinder; Harvey, Reed; Runyon, Alec; Benggon, Michael

    2017-09-01

    This article seeks to evaluate current practices in heart transplantation. The goals of this article were to review current practices for heart transplantation and its anesthesia management. The article reviews current demographics and discusses the current criteria for candidacy for heart transplantation. The process for donor and receipt selection is reviewed. This is followed by a review of mechanical circulatory support devices as they pertain to heart transplantation. The preanesthesia and intraoperative considerations are also discussed. Finally, management after transplantation is also reviewed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Heart transplantation and infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozábalová, Eva; Krejčí, Jan; Hude, Petr; Godava, Julius; Honek, Tomáš; Špinarová, Lenka; Pavlík, Petr; Bedáňová, Helena; Němec, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Heart transplantation (HTx) is a method of treatment for patients with end-stage heart failure with severe symptoms despite complex therapy. Post-transplant difficulties include acute rejection and infectious complications, which are the most common reason of morbidity and mortality in the first year after heart transplant. It requires the patient to remain on immunosuppressive medication to avoid the possibility of graft rejection. Therefore the range of infection is much larger. The diagnosis and treatment of viral, bacterial and fungal infections is often difficult.Key words: heart transplantation - immunosuppression - infection.

  13. 7 CFR 982.14 - Restricted hazelnuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restricted hazelnuts. 982.14 Section 982.14... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 982.14 Restricted hazelnuts. Restricted hazelnuts...

  14. 29 CFR 18.56 - Restricted access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Restricted access. 18.56 Section 18.56 Labor Office of the... ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES General § 18.56 Restricted access. On his or her own motion, or on the motion of any party, the administrative law judge may direct that there be a restricted access portion of the...

  15. 28 CFR 68.51 - Restricted access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Restricted access. 68.51 Section 68.51... ALIENS, UNFAIR IMMIGRATION-RELATED EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES, AND DOCUMENT FRAUD § 68.51 Restricted access. On... be a restricted access portion of the record to contain any material in the record to which...

  16. Problem-Solving Test: Restriction Endonuclease Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    The term "restriction endonuclease mapping" covers a number of related techniques used to identify specific restriction enzyme recognition sites on small DNA molecules. A method for restriction endonuclease mapping of a 1,000-basepair (bp)-long DNA molecule is described in the fictitious experiment of this test. The most important fact needed to…

  17. Restriction Enzyme Mapping: A Simple Student Practical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Stephen J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    An experiment that uses the recombinant plasmid pX1108 to illustrate restriction mapping is described. The experiment involves three restriction enzymes and employs single and double restriction enzyme digestions. A list of needed materials, procedures, safety precautions, results, and discussion are included. (KR)

  18. Restrictive Imputation of Incomplete Survey Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, G.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on finding plausible imputations when there is some restriction posed on the imputation model. In these restrictive situations, current imputation methodology does not lead to satisfactory imputations. The restrictions, and the resulting missing data problems are real-life

  19. 47 CFR 1.1208 - Restricted proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restricted proceedings. 1.1208 Section 1.1208... Restricted Proceedings § 1.1208 Restricted proceedings. Unless otherwise provided by the Commission or its... in all proceedings not listed as exempt in § 1.1204(b) or permit-but-disclose in § 1.1206(a) of...

  20. Acquired heart conditions in adults with congenital heart disease: a growing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutarel, Oktay

    2014-09-01

    The number of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing due to the great achievements in the field of paediatric cardiology, congenital heart surgery and intensive care medicine over the last decades. Mortality has shifted away from the infant and childhood period towards adulthood. As congenital heart disease patients get older, a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors is encountered similar to the general population. Consequently, the contribution of acquired morbidities, especially acquired heart conditions to patient outcome, is becoming increasingly important. Therefore, to continue the success story of the last decades in the treatment of congenital heart disease and to further improve the outcome of these patients, more attention has to be given to the prevention, detection and adequate therapy of acquired heart conditions. The aim of this review is to give an overview about acquired heart conditions that may be encountered in adults with congenital heart disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. All about Heart Rate (Pulse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get a picture of your health. Learn more: Blood Pressure Vs. Heart Rate Target Heart Rate Arrhythmias (abnormal heart rhythms) This ... Healthy 6 What are the Symptoms of High Blood Pressure? 7 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 8 Warning Signs of a Heart Attack ...

  2. Dimensional analysis of heart rate variability in heart transplant recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbilut, J.P.; Mayer-Kress, G.; Geist, K.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss periodicities in the heart rate in normal and transplanted hearts. We then consider the possibility of dimensional analysis of these periodicities in transplanted hearts and problems associated with the record.

  3. Women's Heart Disease: Join the Heart Truth Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Join The Heart Truth Community Past Issues / Winter ... introduced as the national symbol for women and heart disease awareness in 2002 by the NHLBI. The Red ...

  4. Women and Heart Disease: Sharing Advice from the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women and Heart Disease Sharing Advice From The Heart Past Issues / Spring ... gowns in an effort to raise awareness that heart disease is the leading cause of death among women. ...

  5. Gentile statistics and restricted partitions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C S Srivatsan; M V N Murthy; R K Bhaduri

    2006-03-01

    In a recent paper (Tran et al, Ann. Phys. 311, 204 (2004)), some asymptotic number theoretical results on the partitioning of an integer were derived exploiting its connection to the quantum density of states of a many-particle system. We generalise these results to obtain an asymptotic formula for the restricted or coloured partitions $p_{k}^{s} (n)$, which is the number of partitions of an integer into the summand of th powers of integers such that each power of a given integer may occur utmost times. While the method is not rigorous, it reproduces the well-known asymptotic results for = 1 apart from yielding more general results for arbitrary values of .

  6. Stillbirth and fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Radek

    2010-09-01

    The association between stillbirth and fetal growth restriction is strong and supported by a large body of evidence and clinically employed for the stillbirth prediction. However, although assessment of fetal growth is a basis of clinical practice, it is not trivial. Essentially, fetal growth is a result of the genetic growth potential of the fetus and placental function. The growth potential is the driving force of fetal growth, whereas the placenta as the sole source of nutrients and oxygen might become the rate limiting element of fetal growth if its function is impaired. Thus, placental dysfunction may prevent the fetus from reaching its full genetically determined growth potential. In this sense fetal growth and its aberration provides an insight into placental function. Fetal growth is a proxy for the test of the effectiveness of placenta, whose function is otherwise obscured during pregnancy.

  7. An Infinite Restricted Boltzmann Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Marc-Alexandre; Larochelle, Hugo

    2016-07-01

    We present a mathematical construction for the restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM) that does not require specifying the number of hidden units. In fact, the hidden layer size is adaptive and can grow during training. This is obtained by first extending the RBM to be sensitive to the ordering of its hidden units. Then, with a carefully chosen definition of the energy function, we show that the limit of infinitely many hidden units is well defined. As with RBM, approximate maximum likelihood training can be performed, resulting in an algorithm that naturally and adaptively adds trained hidden units during learning. We empirically study the behavior of this infinite RBM, showing that its performance is competitive to that of the RBM, while not requiring the tuning of a hidden layer size.

  8. INTERPOLATION WITH RESTRICTED ARC LENGTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petar Petrov

    2003-01-01

    For given data (ti,yi), I= 0,1,…,n,0 = t0 <t1 <…<tn = 1we study constrained interpolation problem of Favard type inf{‖f"‖∞|f∈W2∞[0,1],f(ti)=yi,i=0,…,n,l(f;[0,1])≤l0}, wherel(f";[0,1])=∫1 0 / 1+f'2(x)dx is the arc length off in [0,1]. We prove the existence of a solution f* of the above problem, that is a quadratic spline with a second derivative f"* , which coincides with one of the constants - ‖f"*‖∞,0,‖f"*‖∞ between every two consecutive knots. Thus, we extend a result ofKarlin concerning Favard problem, to the case of restricted length interpolation.

  9. Neurodevelopment after fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baschat, Ahmet A

    2014-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) can emerge as a complication of placental dysfunction and increases the risk for neurodevelopmental delay. Marked elevations of umbilical artery (UA) Doppler resistance that set the stage for cardiovascular and biophysical deterioration with subsequent preterm birth characterize early-onset FGR. Minimal, or absent UA Doppler abnormalities and isolated cerebral Doppler changes with subtle deterioration and a high risk for unanticipated term stillbirth are characteristic for late-onset FGR. Nutritional deficiency manifested in lagging head growth is the most powerful predictor of developmental delay in all forms of FGR. Extremes of blood flow resistance and cardiovascular deterioration, prematurity and intracranial hemorrhage increase the risks for psychomotor delay and cerebral palsy. In late-onset FGR, regional cerebral vascular redistribution correlates with abnormal behavioral domains. Irrespective of the phenotype of FGR, prenatal tests that provide precise and independent stratification of risks for adverse neurodevelopment have yet to be determined.

  10. Mapping the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Grace

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made ceramic heart maps. The impetus for this project came from reading "My Map Book" by Sara Fanelli. This book is a collection of quirky, hand-drawn and collaged maps that diagram a child's world. There are maps of her stomach, her day, her family, and her heart, among others. The…

  11. Chronic heart failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    population, and up to 10% in people aged 75 years and older. It is also estimated that ... The first step in the development of heart failure is an injury to the myocardium ... treatment of heart failure by blocking the compensatory mechanisms with ... pulmonary disease, cognitive dysfunction, depression, chronic kidney disease ...

  12. Heart Surgery Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CABG) The surgical procedure to treat narrowing or " stenosis " of the coronary arteries is called coronary artery bypass, or CABG ( ... blood flow to the heart. Coronary artery disease Coronary artery disease is characterized by a narrowing or " stenosis " of the blood vessels to the heart resulting ...

  13. The total artificial heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jason A; Shah, Keyur B; Quader, Mohammed A; Cooke, Richard H; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Rao, Kris K; Smallfield, Melissa C; Tchoukina, Inna; Tang, Daniel G

    2015-12-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a form of mechanical circulatory support in which the patient's native ventricles and valves are explanted and replaced by a pneumatically powered artificial heart. Currently, the TAH is approved for use in end-stage biventricular heart failure as a bridge to heart transplantation. However, with an increasing global burden of cardiovascular disease and congestive heart failure, the number of patients with end-stage heart failure awaiting heart transplantation now far exceeds the number of available hearts. As a result, the use of mechanical circulatory support, including the TAH and left ventricular assist device (LVAD), is growing exponentially. The LVAD is already widely used as destination therapy, and destination therapy for the TAH is under investigation. While most patients requiring mechanical circulatory support are effectively treated with LVADs, there is a subset of patients with concurrent right ventricular failure or major structural barriers to LVAD placement in whom TAH may be more appropriate. The history, indications, surgical implantation, post device management, outcomes, complications, and future direction of the TAH are discussed in this review.

  14. Heart failure in COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Frans Hendrik

    2005-01-01

    The main aim of the thesis was to assess the prevalence of heart failure in patients with a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Furthermore, to explore diagnostic strategies (including natriuretic peptides and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR)) to identify heart

  15. Mapping the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Grace

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made ceramic heart maps. The impetus for this project came from reading "My Map Book" by Sara Fanelli. This book is a collection of quirky, hand-drawn and collaged maps that diagram a child's world. There are maps of her stomach, her day, her family, and her heart, among others. The…

  16. Music and the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2015-11-21

    Music can powerfully evoke and modulate emotions and moods, along with changes in heart activity, blood pressure (BP), and breathing. Although there is great heterogeneity in methods and quality among previous studies on effects of music on the heart, the following findings emerge from the literature: Heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) are higher in response to exciting music compared with tranquilizing music. During musical frissons (involving shivers and piloerection), both HR and RR increase. Moreover, HR and RR tend to increase in response to music compared with silence, and HR appears to decrease in response to unpleasant music compared with pleasant music. We found no studies that would provide evidence for entrainment of HR to musical beats. Corresponding to the increase in HR, listening to exciting music (compared with tranquilizing music) is associated with a reduction of heart rate variability (HRV), including reductions of both low-frequency and high-frequency power of the HRV. Recent findings also suggest effects of music-evoked emotions on regional activity of the heart, as reflected in electrocardiogram amplitude patterns. In patients with heart disease (similar to other patient groups), music can reduce pain and anxiety, associated with lower HR and lower BP. In general, effects of music on the heart are small, and there is great inhomogeneity among studies with regard to methods, findings, and quality. Therefore, there is urgent need for systematic high-quality research on the effects of music on the heart, and on the beneficial effects of music in clinical settings.

  17. Heart imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, H. Dale; Gribble, R. Parks; Busse, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for providing an image of the human heart's electrical system derives time-of-flight data from an array of EKG electrodes and this data is transformed into phase information. The phase information, treated as a hologram, is reconstructed to provide an image in one or two dimensions of the electrical system of the functioning heart.

  18. World Heart Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-01

    For World Heart Day, learn more about what heart-healthy steps you can take in the workplace.  Created: 9/1/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/9/2009.

  19. A Traffic Restriction Scheme for Enhancing Carpooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Ding

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of alleviating traffic congestion, this paper proposes a scheme to encourage travelers to carpool by traffic restriction. By a variational inequity we describe travelers’ mode (solo driving and carpooling and route choice under user equilibrium principle in the context of fixed demand and detect the performance of a simple network with various restriction links, restriction proportions, and carpooling costs. Then the optimal traffic restriction scheme aiming at minimal total travel cost is designed through a bilevel program and applied to a Sioux Fall network example with genetic algorithm. According to various requirements, optimal restriction regions and proportions for restricted automobiles are captured. From the results it is found that traffic restriction scheme is possible to enhance carpooling and alleviate congestion. However, higher carpooling demand is not always helpful to the whole network. The topology of network, OD demand, and carpooling cost are included in the factors influencing the performance of the traffic system.

  20. 10 CFR 1045.16 - Criteria for evaluation of restricted data and formerly restricted data information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... § 1045.16 Criteria for evaluation of restricted data and formerly restricted data information. (a) The... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criteria for evaluation of restricted data and formerly restricted data information. 1045.16 Section 1045.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS)...

  1. "The Heart Game"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dithmer, Marcus; Rasmussen, Jack Ord; Grönvall, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this article is to describe the development and testing of a prototype application (“The Heart Game”) using gamification principles to assist heart patients in their telerehabilitation process in the Teledialog project. Materials and Methods: A prototype game was developed via...... tool as a part of their telerehabilitation process in everyday life. Gamification and gameful design principles such as leaderboards, relationships, and achievements engaged the patients and relatives. The inclusion of a close relative in the game motivated the patients to perform rehabilitation...... activities. Conclusions: “The Heart Game” concept presents a new way to motivate heart patients by using technology as a social and active approach to telerehabilitation. The findings show the potential of using gamification for heart patients as part of a telerehabilitation program. The evaluation indicated...

  2. Types of Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart develops. Examples of Simple Congenital Heart Defects Holes in the Heart (Septal Defects) The septum is ... Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG CONTACT US National Institutes of Health ...

  3. Can Pregnancy Harm Your Heart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and women's heart health, said Dr. Mary Ann Bauman, a spokeswoman for the American Heart Association. "We ... of the mechanisms of women and heart disease," Bauman said. "Women aren't just men with ovaries. ...

  4. Heart Disease and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Heart Disease Heart Disease and African Americans Although African American adults are ... were 30 percent more likely to die from heart disease than non-Hispanic whites. African American women are ...

  5. Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Health and Stroke Heart disease and stroke prevention Related information Learn more about healthy eating and ... top More information on Heart disease and stroke prevention Read more from womenshealth.gov A Lifetime of ...

  6. Living with Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Coronary Heart Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) can cause serious complications. However, if you ... changes and medicines, go to "How Is Coronary Heart Disease Treated?" Work closely with your doctor to control ...

  7. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic heart disease (DHD) increases the likelihood of earlier and more ... also tend to have less success from certain heart disease treatments, such as coronary artery bypass grafting and ...

  8. About the Operation: Heart Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... There are two very different surgical approaches to heart transplantation: the orthotopic and the heterotopic approach. Because the ... begins. Heterotopic Approach. Heterotopic transplantation, also called ... by leaving the recipient's heart in place and connecting the donor heart to ...

  9. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Media for Heart.org Heart and Stroke Association Statistics Banner 1 - Stats white banner Each year, the ... health and disease in the population. Heart & Stroke Statistics FAQs What is Prevalence? Prevalence is an estimate ...

  10. What Causes Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a heart attack or injury to the heart. Rheumatic Fever Untreated strep throat or other infections with strep bacteria that progress to rheumatic fever can cause heart valve disease. When the body ...

  11. Restricted Interval Valued Neutrosophic Sets and Restricted Interval Valued Neutrosophic Topological Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjan Mukherjee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce the concept of restricted interval valued neutrosophic sets (RIVNS in short. Some basic operations and properties of RIVNS are discussed. The concept of restricted interval valued neutrosophic topology is also introduced together with restricted interval valued neutrosophic finer and restricted interval valued neutrosophic coarser topology. We also define restricted interval valued neutrosophic interior and closer of a restricted interval valued neutrosophic set. Some theorems and examples are cites. Restricted interval valued neutrosophic subspace topology is also studied.

  12. Remnant cholesterol and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review recent advances in the field of remnant cholesterol as a contributor to the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD). RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiologic, mechanistic, and genetic studies all support a role for elevated remnant cholesterol (=cholesterol in triglyceride...

  13. Mending broken hearts : Cardiac regeneration in zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruse, F.K.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading global cause of death, accounting for more than 30% of all deaths. It claims more lives than all forms of cancer combined. Bearing these facts in mind, research in this field is direly needed. A heart attack, also known as myocardial infarction (MI), happens whe

  14. The heart's content-renewable resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucherre, Adèle; Jopling, Chris

    2013-08-20

    Heart regeneration is a huge, complex area involving numerous lines of research ranging from the stem cell therapy to xenografts and bioengineering. This review will focus on two avenues of regenerative research, cardiac progenitor cells and adult cardiomyocyte proliferation, both of which offer great promise for the field of heart regeneration. However, the principles behind how this could be achieved by either technique are very different. Cardiac progenitor cells represent a population of somatic stem cells which reside within the adult heart. These cells appear to have the capacity to proliferate and differentiate into the different cell types found within the adult heart and thus have the potential, if the correct stimuli can be found, to effectively regenerate a heart damaged by ischemia/infarction. Inducing adult cardiomyocytes to proliferate offers a different approach to achieving the same goal. In this case, the cardiomyocytes that remain after the damage has occurred would need to be stimulated into effecting a regenerative response. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of how heart regeneration could be achieved by either of these very different approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Advances in gene therapy for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Kenneth M; Ishikawa, Kiyotake

    2015-04-01

    Chronic heart failure is expected to increase its social and economic burden as a consequence of improved survival in patients with acute cardiac events. Cardiac gene therapy holds significant promise in heart failure treatment for patients with currently very limited or no treatment options. The introduction of adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene vector changed the paradigm of cardiac gene therapy, and now it is the primary vector of choice for chronic heart failure gene therapy in clinical and preclinical studies. Recently, there has been significant progress towards clinical translation in this field spearheaded by AAV-1 mediated sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA2a) gene therapy targeting chronic advanced heart failure patients. Meanwhile, several independent laboratories are reporting successful gene therapy approaches in clinically relevant large animal models of heart failure and some of these approaches are expected to enter clinical trials in the near future. This review will focus on gene therapy approaches targeting heart failure that is in clinical trials and those close to its initial clinical trial application.

  16. Legitimate vs. illegitimate restrictions - a motivational and physiological approach investigating reactance processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittenthaler, Sandra; Steindl, Christina; Jonas, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Threats to our freedom are part of our daily social interactions. They are accompanied by an aversive state of motivational arousal, called reactance, which leads people to strive to reestablish their threatened freedom. This is especially the case if the threat seems to be illegitimate in nature. However, reactance theory suggests that reactance should also be aroused when people are exposed to legitimate freedom threats. In this article we first aim to show that both illegitimate and legitimate freedom threats evoke reactance. Second, we aim to extend past work on reactance by exploring the underlying process of experiencing a legitimate vs. an illegitimate restriction. In the current study (N= 57) participants were restricted in an illegitimate (unexpected and inappropriate) or legitimate (unexpected but appropriate) way, or were not restricted at all. We assessed participants' experience of reactance, their behavioral intentions to restore their freedom, their approach motivational states, as well as their physiological arousal (heart rate). Results indicated that when restricted in an illegitimate or a legitimate way, participants indicated the same amount of reactance as well as anger. However, when looking at people's physiological reactions, important differences between illegitimate and legitimate restrictions become apparent. Illegitimate restrictions led to an immediate arousal, whereas legitimate restrictions led to a time delayed arousal. This suggests that illegitimate restrictions lead to a sudden increase in aversive arousal. Legitimate restrictions, however, seem to be associated with a more cognitive process in which people first need to structure their thoughts and reflect upon the situation before getting into the feeling of reactance in a physiologically arousing sense. Moreover a mediation analysis could show that behavioral intentions to regain one's freedom result in positive and negative approach motivation. In sum we propose a combined

  17. Angioplasty and stent placement - heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... angioplasty; Coronary artery angioplasty; Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty; Heart artery dilatation ... to carefully guide the catheter up into your heart and arteries. Dye will be injected into your ...

  18. Dietary cholesterol, heart disease risk and cognitive dissonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Donald J

    2014-05-01

    In the 1960s, the thesis that dietary cholesterol contributes to blood cholesterol and heart disease risk was a rational conclusion based on the available science at that time. Fifty years later the research evidence no longer supports this hypothesis yet changing the dietary recommendation to limit dietary cholesterol has been a slow and at times contentious process. The preponderance of the clinical and epidemiological data accumulated since the original dietary cholesterol restrictions were formulated indicate that: (1) dietary cholesterol has a small effect on the plasma cholesterol levels with an increase in the cholesterol content of the LDL particle and an increase in HDL cholesterol, with little effect on the LDL:HDL ratio, a significant indicator of heart disease risk, and (2) the lack of a significant relationship between cholesterol intake and heart disease incidence reported from numerous epidemiological surveys. Over the last decade, many countries and health promotion groups have modified their dietary recommendations to reflect the current evidence and to address a now recognised negative consequence of ineffective dietary cholesterol restrictions (such as inadequate choline intake). In contrast, health promotion groups in some countries appear to suffer from cognitive dissonance and continue to promote an outdated and potentially hazardous dietary recommendation based on an invalidated hypothesis. This review evaluates the evidence for and against dietary cholesterol restrictions and the potential consequences of such restrictions.

  19. Heart rate turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death. © 2013.

  20. The coronary heart team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Bobby; Puskas, John D; Bhatt, Deepak L; Verma, Subodh

    2017-09-01

    The concept of a Coronary Heart Team has generated increased interest, including support from major practice guidelines. Here, we review the rationale and the published experience of Coronary Heart Teams. A Coronary Heart Team should be led by both cardiology and cardiac surgery with a shared decision-making approach. The team should incorporate data from anatomic and clinical risk prediction models to offer individualized care. Most teams focus on management of complex patients and those with indications for both coronary artery bypass graft and percutaneous coronary intervention. The potential benefits of a Coronary Heart Team include balanced decision-making, greater adherence to evidence-based practice guidelines, as well as promoting greater collegiality and exchange of knowledge between specialties. Single-center series have demonstrated consistency in decision-making by Coronary Heart Teams but prospective data demonstrating improved patient outcomes and/or cost effectiveness are necessary. The concept of a Coronary Heart Team is gaining traction for patients with complex coronary artery disease. There is a growing literature in support of Coronary Heart Teams but comparative and prospective data demonstrating improved patient outcomes are needed.

  1. Endurance training in early life results in long-term programming of heart mass in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadley, Glenn D; Laker, Rhianna C; McConell, Glenn K; Wlodek, Mary E

    2016-02-01

    Being born small for gestational age increases the risk of developing adult cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. This study aimed to examine if early-life exercise could increase heart mass in the adult hearts from growth restricted rats. Bilateral uterine vessel ligation to induce uteroplacental insufficiency and fetal growth restriction in the offspring (Restricted) or sham surgery (Control) was performed on day 18 of gestation in WKY rats. A separate group of sham litters had litter size reduced to five pups at birth (Reduced litter), which restricted postnatal growth. Male offspring remained sedentary or underwent treadmill running from 5 to 9 weeks (early exercise) or 20 to 24 weeks of age (later exercise). Remarkably, in Control, Restricted, and Reduced litter groups, early exercise increased (P heart mass in adulthood. This was despite the animals being sedentary for ~4 months after exercise. Later exercise also increased adult absolute and relative heart mass (P early or later exercise. Phosphorylation of Akt Ser(473) in adulthood was increased in the early exercise groups but not the later exercise groups. Microarray gene analysis and validation by real-time PCR did not reveal any long-term effects of early exercise on the expression of any individual genes. In summary, early exercise programs the heart for increased mass into adulthood, perhaps by an upregulation of protein synthesis based on greater phosphorylation of Akt Ser(473).

  2. Freedom to contract and its restriction in business obligations

    OpenAIRE

    Prieložný, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Freedom to contract and its restriction in business obligations (Summary) This thesis deals with freedom to contract and its limitations in the field of business obligations. It introduces the possibilities that parties have when entering into contracts as well as it outlines the boundaries which they cannot cross. It aspires to clarify the topic by referring to a wide scope of related judicial decisions which have evolved throughout the years. The first chapter briefly describes and classifi...

  3. Relationship between TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X F; Zhang, Y F; Zhao, C F; Liu, M M; Si, J P; Fang, Y F; Xing, W W; Wang, F L

    2016-06-02

    Congenital heart disease in children is a type of birth defect. Previous studies have suggested that the transcription factor, TBX20, is involved in the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease in children; however, the specific regulatory mechanisms are yet to be evaluated. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the TBX20 polymorphism and the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease. The TBX20 gene sequence was obtained from the NCBI database and the polymorphic locus candidate was predicted. Thereafter, the specific gene primers were designed for the restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) of DNA extracted from the blood of 80 patients with congenital heart disease and 80 controls. The results of the PCR were subjected to correlation analysis to identify the differences between the amplicons and to determine the relationship between the TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease. One of the single nucleotide polymorphic locus was found to be rs3999950: c.774T>C (Ala265Ala). The TC genotype frequency in the patients was higher than that in the controls, similar to that for the C locus. The odds ratio of the TC genotypes was above 1, indicating that the presence of the TC genotype increases the incidence of congenital heart diseases. Thus, rs3999950 may be associated with congenital heart disease, and TBX20 may predispose children to the defect.

  4. [Ischemic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamuro, Megumi; Ogawa, Hisao

    2009-04-01

    It has been reported that antihypertensive therapy reduces the risk of ischemic heart disease. Except for the antihypertensive effects, the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are proved to be very effective in primary and secondary event onset prophylaxis by many clinical trials. The angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) used briskly in recent years inhibits angiotensin II type 1 receptor alternatively. Although ARBs protect organs, especially blood vessel, heart, brain and kidney in sites of pharmacology, ARBs are still not much as effective results as ACE inhibitors for the patients with ischemic heart disease, by many clinical trials.

  5. Thyroid and the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Karas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular signs and symptoms of thyroid disease are some of the most clinically relevant findings that accompany both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. On the basis of the understanding of the mechanisms of thyroid hormone action on the heart and cardiovascular system, it is possible to explain the changes in cardiac output, cardiac contractility, blood pressure and rhythm disturbances that result from thyroid dysfunction. In the present review will integrate what is known about the mechanisms of thyroid hormone action on the heart and the alterations in thyroid hormone metabolism that accompany chronic congestive heart failure.

  6. Women and heart transplantation: an issue of gender equity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lynne; Little, Maureen

    2004-05-01

    Heart transplantation (HT) is increasingly commonplace in countries with advanced health care systems. A review of the family and HT literature points to a gender inequity in the field: Men are more likely to be heart transplant recipients; women are more likely to contribute as their caregivers. In this critique, we argue that there are not only physiological but also social and economic issues that contribute to inequitable access to HT for women. Further, we point out that another invisible inequity in the heart transplant field is the lack of acknowledgment of, and support for, women whose contributions as family caregivers to the heart transplant process often ensure the success of heart transplant procedures. The authors call for recognition of these inequities and the development of policies that have the potential to ensure that women have equitable access to cardiovascular care in general and HT in particular, and that woman are recognized for, and supported in, their role as caregivers.

  7. Assessing restrictiveness of national alcohol marketing policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Marissa B; Jernigan, David H

    2014-01-01

    To develop an approach for monitoring national alcohol marketing policies globally, an area of the World Health Organization's (WHO) Global Alcohol Strategy. Data on restrictiveness of alcohol marketing policies came from the 2002 and 2008 WHO Global Surveys on Alcohol and Health. We included four scales in a sensitivity analysis to determine optimal weights to score countries on their marketing policies and applied the selected scale to assess national marketing policy restrictiveness. Nearly, 36% of countries had no marketing restrictions. The overall restrictiveness levels were not significantly different between 2002 and 2008. The number of countries with strict marketing regulations did not differ across years. This method of monitoring alcohol marketing restrictiveness helps track progress towards implementing WHO'S Global Alcohol Strategy. Findings indicate a consistent lack of restrictive policies over time, making this a priority area for national and global action. © The Author 2014. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  8. Heart to Heart Art: Empowering Homeless Children and Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Jerri; Booth, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    This article describes Heart to Heart Art, an after-school program developed for homeless children and youth at the YWCA in Spokane, Washington. Pre-service teacher candidates from a local university create meaningful activities that engage homeless students in visual art, music, drama, cooking, and community service. Heart to Heart Art was…

  9. Measuring Regulatory Restrictions in Logistics Services

    OpenAIRE

    Claire HOLLWEG; Marn-Heong WONG

    2009-01-01

    This study measures the extent of restrictions on trade in logistics services in the ASEAN+6 economies by constructing a logistics regulatory restrictiveness index for each economy that quantifies the extent of government regulations faced by logistics service providers. This is the first study of its kind to construct a regulatory index of the entire logistics sector, which includes the main modes of international transport and customs restrictions. The indices show that large differences ex...

  10. Genetic research in coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, A G

    1984-01-01

    Coronary heart disease research along genetic lines is difficult. Studies in molecular genetics of apolipoprotein and receptor variability appear most promising in the near future. However, unexpected discoveries and methodology may turn up that may completely change the field. Exclusive concentration on lipid research therefore should be avoided. It is likely that most advances will come from carefully designed studies that ask specific questions. Such research design is appropriate not only for laboratory studies but also for clinical and epidemiological investigations. The collaboration of clinicians, biochemists, geneticists, epidemiologists, and statisticians is likely to lead to better understanding of coronary heart disease.

  11. Data and Statistics: Women and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Women and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Atlas of Heart Disease Facts on Women and Heart Disease Heart disease is the leading cause of death ...

  12. Congestive Heart Failure: A Case of Protein Misfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Chung-Eun; Bhagavan, Nadhipuram V; Loscalzo, Miki; Chan, Stephen K; Nguyen, Huy V; Rios, Carlos N

    2014-01-01

    This article describes an interesting case of a patient presenting with congestive heart failure found to have restrictive cardiomyopathy with initial laboratory evaluation showing hypogammaglobuminemia without a monoclonal band on serum and urine electrophoresis. This case highlights the clinically significant cardiac manifestation caused by protein misfolding, a defect in protein homeostasis. In addition, the utility of a relatively newer laboratory test, serum free light chains as well as the importance of clinical and pathophysiologic correlation is also discussed. We present a relatively uncommon cause of heart disease, cardiac amyloidosis in a patient with a systemic plasma cell dyscrasia, and multiple myeloma. PMID:24959390

  13. Long-term adaptation capacity of ponies: effect of season and feed restriction on blood and physiological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, L; Riek, A; Gerken, M

    2017-07-10

    Domesticated horses are increasingly kept under semi-natural housing conditions, whereas their adaptation capacity is not fully investigated. In all, 10 Shetland pony mares were held under semi-extensive conditions for 1 year. In winter animals were allocated into two feeding groups (60% and 100% of maintenance energy requirement, respectively). Triiodothyronine, thyroxine, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), total bilirubin, total protein, triglyceride, glucose, insulin and hair length were measured at monthly intervals, whereas BW, body condition score, cresty neck score and resting heart rate were recorded every 2 weeks. From summer to winter all Ponies showed a reduction in resting heart rate (P0.05). Refeeding of restrictively fed ponies resulted in a rapid increase in resting heart rate and BW and a return of blood parameters to reference values. Adequately supplied animals adapted without difficulty to varying environmental conditions, whereas feed restriction in ponies during winter resulted in reduced resting heart rates suggesting a reduced basal metabolic rate. The energy restriction was compensated by mobilizing body fat reserves which led to changes in blood parameters. Refeeding in feed restricted animals revealed a remarkably quick recovery of physiological and blood parameters to reference values. We therefore suggest that year round-outdoor housing can be a suitable housing system for robust horse breeds provided that an adequate food supply is available.

  14. Caffeine and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dehydration. Caffeine is in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate and some nuts. Whether high caffeine intake increases ... and Heart Disease Healthy Eating • Healthy Eating Home • Nutrition AHA Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations Making Healthy Choices ...

  15. Heart disease. Third edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunwald, E.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 62 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiological and Angiographic Examination of the Heart; Newer Cardiac Imaging Techniques: Digital Subtraction Angiography, Computerized Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Nuclear Cardiology; and Genetics and Cardiovascular Disease.

  16. Heart attack - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/pubmed/23166211 . Giugliano RP, Cannon CP, Braunwald E. Non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of ...

  17. Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patients and their doctors, making good decisions requires teamwork. Through shared decision making, doctors and patients consider ... Heart Failure and Knowing Your Options Planning Ahead Communicating With Your Healthcare Provider Overcoming Barriers to Shared ...

  18. Heart and vascular services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CT angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) Echocardiogram PET scan of the heart Stress tests (many ... most cases, such procedures do not need general anesthesia . Patients often do not need to stay in ...

  19. Heart disease and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liver, and prepared meats such as sausage, hot dogs, and high-fat lunch meats. Adults should eat ... risk: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. ...

  20. Hyperkalemia in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Chaudhry M S; Papadimitriou, Lampros; Pitt, Bertram; Piña, Ileana; Zannad, Faiez; Anker, Stefan D; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Butler, Javed

    2016-10-01

    Disorders of potassium homeostasis can potentiate the already elevated risk of arrhythmia in heart failure. Heart failure patients have a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease, which further heightens the risk of hyperkalemia, especially when renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors are used. Acute treatment for hyperkalemia may not be tolerated in the long term. Recent data for patiromer and sodium zirconium cyclosilicate, used to treat and prevent high serum potassium levels on a more chronic basis, have sparked interest in the treatment of hyperkalemia, as well as the potential use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors in patients who were previously unable to take these drugs or tolerated only low doses. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and outcomes of hyperkalemia in heart failure; provides an overview of traditional and novel ways to approach management of hyperkalemia; and discusses the need for further research to optimally treat heart failure.

  1. Picturing the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links for Students Glossary Picturing the Heart SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource Links for Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Government Resources Kids.gov – Science Information and services on the web ...

  2. A heart for interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Roepstorff, Andreas; Tylén, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Interpersonally shared physiological dynamics are increasingly argued to underlie rapport, empathy, and even team performance. Inspired by the model of interpersonal synergy, we critically investigate the presence, temporal development, possible mechanisms and impact of shared interpersonal heart...

  3. Heart CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stored, viewed on a monitor, or printed on film. 3D or three-dimensional models of the heart ... Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, ...

  4. Protein and Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It Works Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Protein and Heart Health Updated:May 5,2015 Protein ... said. What’s the harm in getting too much protein? The main problem is that often the extra ...

  5. Stress and your heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Newly Reported Coronary Heart Disease Among US Active Duty and Reserve Forces. Circulation . 2014;129(18):1813- ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  6. Types of Heart Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Heart Surgery Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Coronary artery bypass grafting ( ... TAHs) might be used to treat these patients. Surgery To Place Ventricular Assist Devices or Total Artificial ...

  7. Acute heart failure syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tandfonline.com/ ... When heart failure develops gradually, there is time for the compensatory ... of this can be seen in acute brain injury, some forms of takotsubo syndrome or .... reduce blood pressure in cases presenting with elevated blood pressure.

  8. Heart Healthy Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of heart disease and stroke? You should limit: Saturated fats. Saturated fat is usually in pizza, ice cream, fried chicken, ... and hamburgers. Check the Nutrition Facts label for saturated fat. Less than 10% of your daily calories should ...

  9. Heart PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  10. Target Heart Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... morning after you’ve had a good night’s sleep and before you get out of bed. According to the National Institute of Health, the average resting heart rate: for children 10 years and older, and adults ( ...

  11. Pathophysiology of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiariello, M; Perrone-Filardi, P

    1999-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in Western countries. Common etiology is mostly represented by ischemic and hypertensive heart disease. Clinically, heart failure can be defined as an impaired cardiac performance, unable to meet the energy requirements of the periphery. Pathophysiologically, the clinical onset of heart failure symptoms already represents an advanced stage of disease when compensatory mechanisms triggered by the underlying decrease in contractility are no longer capable of maintaining adequate cardiac performance during exercise and, subsequently, under resting conditions. Independent of its underlying etiology, cardiac failure is always characterized by an impairment in the intrinsic contractility of myocytes. As a consequence of reduced contractility, a number of central and peripheral compensatory mechanisms take place that are capable of effectively counteracting reduced intravascular intrinsic performance for a long period of time. Among them, recruitment of preload reserve, enhanced neurohormonal stimulation and cardiac hypertrophy are the most important. All of them, however, also carry unfavorable effects that contribute to further deterioration of cardiac function. In fact, increased end-diastolic volume determines increased wall stress that further reduces systolic performance; sympathetic and angiotensin stimulation increases peripheral resistance and contributes to increase volume expansion; hypertrophic myocytes demonstrate impaired intrinsic contractility and relaxation, and hypertrophy causes a clinically relevant deterioration of ventricular relaxation and compliance that substantially participates in increased end-diastolic pressure, and, therefore, to limited exercise performance. Diastolic dysfunction usually accompanies systolic dysfunction, although in some cases it may represent the prevalent mechanism of congestive heart failure in patients in whom systolic performance is preserved. Biological causes

  12. Life After a Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms of a heart attack. It presents one woman's real-life experience with heart attack symptoms, which started during her pregnancy. The video also explains how a heart attack occurs and encourages women to seek care right away for heart attack symptoms. For more information, ...

  13. What Is a Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms of a heart attack. It presents one woman's real-life experience with heart attack symptoms, which started during her pregnancy. The video also explains how a heart attack occurs and encourages women to seek care right away for heart attack symptoms. For more information, ...

  14. What Causes a Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms of a heart attack. It presents one woman's real-life experience with heart attack symptoms, which started during her pregnancy. The video also explains how a heart attack occurs and encourages women to seek care right away for heart attack symptoms. For more information, ...

  15. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes happen every year in the United States. You ... some of your risks for heart disease and stroke, but you can manage many of your risks ...

  16. How Is Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart tests are done. If you can't exercise, you may be given medicines to increase your heart rate. When your heart is working hard and beating fast, it needs more blood and oxygen. Plaque-narrowed coronary (heart) arteries can' ...

  17. Novel therapies in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Licette Cécile Yang

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical condition that is characterized by the inability of the heart to meet the oxygen requirements of peripheral tissues and organs, despite normal filling pressures. Despite recent developments in the treatment of heart failure, the prognosis of heart failure patients remains

  18. Predicting Outcome of Heart Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjang, Y.S.

    2008-01-01

    Heart transplantation has become the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage heart diseases. Originally, strict recipient and donor selection criteria were developed to minimize morbidity and mortality after heart transplantation. However, the increasing demand for heart transplantation has

  19. Congenital Heart Defects (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Congenital Heart Defects KidsHealth > For Parents > Congenital Heart Defects A A A What's in this article? How ... a Problem en español Anomalías cardíacas congénitas A congenital heart defect is a problem in the heart's structure that ...

  20. Novel therapies in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Licette Cécile Yang

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical condition that is characterized by the inability of the heart to meet the oxygen requirements of peripheral tissues and organs, despite normal filling pressures. Despite recent developments in the treatment of heart failure, the prognosis of heart failure patients remains