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Sample records for restorative materials bonding

  1. Shear Bond Strength of Three Orthodontic Bonding Systems on Enamel and Restorative Materials.

    Hellak, Andreas; Ebeling, Jennifer; Schauseil, Michael; Stein, Steffen; Roggendorf, Matthias; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (iBond ™ and Scotchbond ™ ) on different prosthetic surfaces and enamel, in comparison with the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT ™ . Materials and Methods . A total of 270 surfaces (1 enamel and 8 restorative surfaces, n = 30) were randomly divided into three adhesive groups. In group 1 (control) brackets were bonded with Transbond XT primer. In the experimental groups iBond adhesive (group 2) and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (group 3) were used. The SBS was measured using a Zwicki 1120 ™ testing machine. The ARI and SBS were compared statistically using the Kruskal-Wallis test ( P ≤ 0.05). Results . Significant differences in SBS and ARI were found between the control group and experimental groups. Conclusions . Transbond XT showed the highest SBS on human enamel. Scotchbond Universal on average provides the best bonding on all other types of surface (metal, composite, and porcelain), with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures on restorative materials in patients. If metal brackets have to be bonded to a metal surface, the use of a dual-curing resin is recommended.

  2. Shear Bond Strength of Three Orthodontic Bonding Systems on Enamel and Restorative Materials

    Andreas Hellak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS and adhesive remnant index (ARI score of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (iBond™ and Scotchbond™ on different prosthetic surfaces and enamel, in comparison with the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT™. Materials and Methods. A total of 270 surfaces (1 enamel and 8 restorative surfaces, n=30 were randomly divided into three adhesive groups. In group 1 (control brackets were bonded with Transbond XT primer. In the experimental groups iBond adhesive (group 2 and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (group 3 were used. The SBS was measured using a Zwicki 1120™ testing machine. The ARI and SBS were compared statistically using the Kruskal–Wallis test (P≤0.05. Results. Significant differences in SBS and ARI were found between the control group and experimental groups. Conclusions. Transbond XT showed the highest SBS on human enamel. Scotchbond Universal on average provides the best bonding on all other types of surface (metal, composite, and porcelain, with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures on restorative materials in patients. If metal brackets have to be bonded to a metal surface, the use of a dual-curing resin is recommended.

  3. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials

    Janaina Barros Cruz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days. Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250. Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×. Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05. Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001. For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  4. Evaluation of a new nano-filled restorative material for bonding orthodontic brackets.

    Bishara, Samir E; Ajlouni, Raed; Soliman, Manal M; Oonsombat, Charuphan; Laffoon, John F; Warren, John

    2007-01-01

    To compare the shear bond strength of a nano-hybrid restorative material, Grandio (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany), to that of a traditional adhesive material (Transbond XT; 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA) when bonding orthodontic brackets. Forty teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups: 20 teeth were bonded with the Transbond adhesive system and the other 20 teeth with the Grandio restorative system, following manufacturer's instructions. Student t test was used to compare the shear bond strength of the 2 systems. Significance was predetermined at P 5 .05. The t test comparisons (t = 0.55) of the shear bond strength between the 2 adhesives indicated the absence of a significant (P = .585) difference. The mean shear bond strength for Grandio was 4.1 +/- 2.6 MPa and that for Transbond XT was 4.6 +/- 3.2 MPa. During debonding, 3 of 20 brackets (15%) bonded with Grandio failed without registering any force on the Zwick recording. None of the brackets bonded with Transbond XT had a similar failure mode. The newly introduced nano-filled composite materials can potentially be used to bond orthodontic brackets to teeth if its consistency can be more flowable to readily adhere to the bracket base.

  5. Effect of whitening toothpastes on bonding of restorative materials to ...

    2015-03-26

    Mar 26, 2015 ... Materials and Methods: Eighty labial enamel surfaces of primary ... Introduction ... recommended further research of dental whitening agents ... and/or enamel); or mixed failure (partial cohesive failure ..... A concise review.

  6. Information resources and material selection in bonded restorations among Korean dentists.

    Chang, Juhea; Kim, Hae-Young; Cho, Byeong Hoon; Lee, In Bog; Son, Ho Hyun

    2009-12-01

    To elucidate how dentists access knowledge sources when choosing adhesive agents for bonded restoration and whether these resources influenced the selection of materials. A national survey was carried out involving dentists in South Korea. The questionnaire included the status of the operator, clinical techniques, and materials. A total of 12,193 e-mails were distributed, 2632 were opened by recipients, and 840 responses were collected. For primary information resources in material selection, 55.8% (n = 469) of the responders mentioned continuing education. This selection criteria varied according to the working status of the clinician (p choice of bonding system was influenced by of the length of the career (p < 0.0001), and the preferred bonding systems differed according to the source of the information (p = 0.035). The popular bonding systems were not ranked according to the bonding strategy, but a preference was found for specific brands or manufacturers. To decrease the confusion of clinicians related to the selection of bonding materials, evidence-based guidelines need to be comprehensibly organized and efficiently approached in clinics.

  7. In vitro shear bond strength of cementing agents to fixed prosthodontic restorative materials.

    Piwowarczyk, Andree; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Sorensen, John A

    2004-09-01

    Durable bonding to fixed prosthodontic restorations is desirable; however, little information is available on the strength of the bond between different cements and fixed prosthodontic restorative materials. This study determined the shear-bond strength of cementing agents to high-gold-content alloy castings and different dental ceramics: high-strength aluminum oxide (Procera AllCeram), leucite-reinforced (IPS Empress), and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS Empress 2). Prepolymerized resin composite cylinders (5.5 mm internal diameter, n=20) were bonded to the pretreated surfaces of prosthodontic materials. High-gold-content alloy and high-strength aluminum oxide surfaces were airborne-particle-abraded, and pressable ceramics were hydrofluoric acid-etched and silanized prior to cementing. The cementing agents tested were a zinc-phosphate cement (Fleck's zinc cement), glass ionomer cements (Fuji I, Ketac-Cem), resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji Plus, Fuji Cem, RelyX Luting), resin cements (RelyX ARC, Panavia F, Variolink II, Compolute), and a self-adhesive universal resin cement (RelyX Unicem). Half the specimens (n=10) were tested after 30 minutes; the other half (n=10) were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 14 days and then thermal cycled 1000 times between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C prior to testing. Shear-bond strength tests were performed using a universal testing machine at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical analysis was performed by multifactorial analysis of variance taking interactions between effects into account. For multiple paired comparisons, the Tukey method was used (alpha=.05). In a 3-way ANOVA model, the main factors substrate, cement, time, and all corresponding interactions were statistically significant (all P <.0001). In subsequent separate 1-way or 2-way ANOVA models for each substrate type, significant differences between cement types and polymerizing modes were found (all P <.001). None of the

  8. Shear bond strength of bulk-fill and nano-restorative materials to dentin.

    Colak, Hakan; Ercan, Ertugrul; Hamidi, Mehmet Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Bulk-fill composite materials are being developed for preparation depths of up to 4 mm in an effort to simplify and improve the placement of direct composite posterior restorations. The aim of our study was to compare shear-bond strength of bulk-fill and conventional posterior composite resins. In this study, 60 caries free extracted human molars were used and sectioned parallel to occlusal surface to expose midcoronal dentin. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups. Total-etch dentine bonding system (Adper Scotchbond 1XT, 3M ESPE) was applied to dentin surface in all the groups to reduce variability in results. Then, dentine surfaces covered by following materials. Group I: SonicFill Bulk-Fill, Group II: Tetric EvoCeram (TBF), Group III: Herculite XRV Ultra, and Group IV: TBF Bulk-Fill, 2 mm × 3 mm cylindrical restorations were prepared by using application apparatus. Shear bond testing was measured by using a universal testing machine. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests were performed to evaluate the data. The highest value was observed in Group III (14.42 ± 4.34) and the lowest value was observed in Group IV (11.16 ± 2.76) and there is a statistically significant difference between these groups (P = 0.046). However, there is no statistically significant difference between the values of other groups. In this study, Group III was showed higher strength values. There is a need for future studies about long-term bond strength and clinical success of these adhesive and bulk-fill systems.

  9. Shear bond strength of brackets on restorative materials: Comparison on various dental restorative materials using the universal primer Monobond® Plus.

    Ebert, Thomas; Elsner, Laura; Hirschfelder, Ursula; Hanke, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to analyze surfaces consisting of different restorative materials for shear bond strength (SBS) and failure patterns of metal and ceramic brackets. Bonding involved the use of a universal primer (Monobond® Plus, Ivoclar Vivadent). Six restorative materials were tested, including one composite resin (Clearfil Majesty™ Posterior, Kuraray Noritake Dental), one glass-ceramic material (IPS Empress® Esthetic, Ivoclar Vivadent), one oxide-ceramic material (CORiTEC Zr transpa Disc, imes-icore), two base-metal alloys (remanium® star, Dentaurum; Colado® CC, Ivoclar Vivadent), and one palladium-based alloy (Callisto® 75 Pd, Ivoclar Vivadent). Bovine incisors served as controls. Both metal and ceramic brackets (discovery®/discovery® pearl; Dentaurum) were bonded to the restorative surfaces after sandblasting and pretreatment with Monobond® Plus. A setup modified from DIN 13990-2 was used for SBS testing and adhesive remnant index (ARI)-based analysis of failure patterns. The metal brackets showed the highest mean SBS values on the glass-ceramic material (68.61 N/mm(2)) and the composite resin (67.58 N/mm(2)) and the lowest mean SBS on one of the base-metal alloys (Colado® CC; 14.01 N/mm(2)). The ceramic brackets showed the highest mean SBS on the glass-ceramic material (63.36 N/mm(2)) and the lowest mean SBS on the palladium-based alloy (38.48 N/mm(2)). Significant differences between the metal and ceramic brackets were observed in terms of both SBS values and ARI scores (p bracket types, fractures of the composite-resin and the glass-ceramic samples were observed upon debonding. Opaque restorative materials under metal brackets were found to involve undercuring of the adhesive. Monobond® Plus succeeded in generating high bond strengths of both bracket types on all restorative surfaces. Given our observations of cohesive fracture (including cases of surface avulsion) of the composite-resin and the glass-ceramic samples, we recommend

  10. The Effect of Gamma Radiation on the Bond Strength and Micro leakage of Two Aesthetic Restorative Materials

    Seif, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on bond strength and micro leakage of nano-composite and nano-glassionomer, and to detect any alterations in their molecular structure due to gamma radiation. Materials and Methods: 80 specimens were used as follow; 40 specimens for shear bond strength evaluation, 20 specimens for micro leakage assessment, while the remaining 20 specimens for deducing the chemical structure. For shear bond strength (SBS) test 2 mm thick wafers of dentine were sectioned and 3 mm diameter holes were drilled through the wafers. 20 specimens were restored with nano-composite and nano-glassionomer without irradiation (Group A1, B1). The remaining 20 specimens were restored with nano-composite and nano-glassionomer (Group A2, B2), then they were irradiated with therapeutic dose of 60 gray for 1 week (3 days/week). For micro leakage, 10 natural teeth with two prepared class V cavities were used. One of the cavities was restored with nano-composite while the other one with nano-glassionomer to be examined before and after gamma radiation. Spectrophotometric analysis was performed for all tested materials before and after radiation to trace any structural changes. Results: Significant increase in SBS of nano-composite after irradiation while nano-glassionomer was insignificantly increased. For micro leakage no significant difference existed between the irradiated and non-irradiated groups of both materials. Conclusion: Therapeutic dose of head and neck gamma radiation had improved dentin shear bond strength of nano-composite. On the other hand, it had not an effect on shear bond strength of nano-glassionomer and the micro leakage of both tested materials. Gamma radiation did not alter the chemical structure of the tested material.

  11. Influence of different surface treatments on bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement.

    Kömürcüoğlu, Meltem Bektaş; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Tulga, Ayça

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement by four point bending test. The CAD/CAM materials under investigation were e.max CAD, Mark II, Lava Ultimate, and Enamic. A total of 400 bar specimens (4×1.2×12 mm) (n=10) milled from the CAD/CAM blocks underwent various pretreatments (no pretreatment (C), hydrofluoric acid (A), hydrofluoric acid + universal adhesive (Scotchbond) (AS), sandblasting (Sb), and sandblasting + universal adhesive (SbS)). The bars were luted end-to-end on the prepared surfaces with a dual curing adhesive resin cement (Variolink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) on the custom-made stainless steel mold. Ten test specimens for each treatment and material combination were performed with four point bending test method. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The surface treatment and type of CAD/CAM restorative material showed a significant effect on the four point bending strength (FPBS) ( P CAD/CAM restorative materials was modified after treatments. The surface treatment of sandblasting or HF acid etching in combination with a universal adhesive containing MDP can be suggested for the adhesive cementation of the novel CAD/CAM restorative materials.

  12. Influence of different surface treatments on bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement

    Kömürcüoğlu, Meltem Bektaş; Sağırkaya, Elçin

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement by four point bending test. MATERIALS AND METHODS The CAD/CAM materials under investigation were e.max CAD, Mark II, Lava Ultimate, and Enamic. A total of 400 bar specimens (4×1.2×12 mm) (n=10) milled from the CAD/CAM blocks underwent various pretreatments (no pretreatment (C), hydrofluoric acid (A), hydrofluoric acid + universal adhesive (Scotchbond) (AS), sandblasting (Sb), and sandblasting + universal adhesive (SbS)). The bars were luted end-to-end on the prepared surfaces with a dual curing adhesive resin cement (Variolink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) on the custom-made stainless steel mold. Ten test specimens for each treatment and material combination were performed with four point bending test method. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. RESULTS The surface treatment and type of CAD/CAM restorative material showed a significant effect on the four point bending strength (FPBS) (Pcementation of the novel CAD/CAM restorative materials. PMID:29279763

  13. [Posterior ceramic bonded partial restorations].

    Mainjot, Amélie; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    Posterior ceramic bonded partial restorations are conservative and esthetic approaches for compromised teeth. Overlays constitute a less invasive alternative for tooth tissues than crown preparations. With inlays and onlays they are also indicated in case of full arch or quadrant rehabilitations including several teeth. This article screens indications and realization of this type of restorations.

  14. Evaluating the effect of antioxidant agents on shear bond strength of tooth-colored restorative materials after bleaching: A systematic review.

    Feiz, Atiyeh; Mosleh, Hamid; Nazeri, Rahman

    2017-07-01

    The main objective of the present study was to make a systematic review of how antioxidant agents affect shear bond strength of tooth-colored restorative materials after bleaching. Electronic search was used to extract the related articles on the targeted key words such as "antioxidant", "dental bleaching" and "shear bond strength" (SBS) from MeSH, PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane electronic data bases. These articles were all published before 2016. Inclusion criteria were restricted to English journal articles concerning humans, clinical trials, cohorts and case-control studies. Therefore, systematic reviews, case reports, letters to editors, editorials and congress abstracts were excluded from the analysis. Most studies conducted on the issue have produced experimental data which are rather controversial, and there is no general agreement about the reported outcomes. As an illustration, most studies have not considered the relationship between the type of antioxidant materials and the shear bond strength. In point of fact, some researchers (e.g Kimyai et al.) have concluded that antioxidants like gel and solution leave similar effects on SBS. Alternatively, certain studies (e.g., Kunt et al.) have produced inconclusive data regarding the impact of one week postponement of the restorative process on SBS after the bleaching process. The results of the studies evaluating the role of various adhesive systems used after bleaching have demonstrated that regardless of the type of adhesive system used, applying antioxidants before restorative procedures can adversely affect the bleaching agents utilized for SBS. It has also been suggested that the type of the adhesive system used might be correlated with the magnitude of SBS. The results obtained from the systematic review of the articles under investigation reflected that the use of antioxidant agents, regardless of their type, form, concentration and duration of application, can improve SBS after bleaching. Copyright

  15. Hydrogen bonded supramolecular materials

    Li, Zhan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date text covering topics in utilizing hydrogen bonding for constructing functional architectures and supramolecular materials. The first chapter addresses the control of photo-induced electron and energy transfer. The second chapter summarizes the formation of nano-porous materials. The following two chapters introduce self-assembled gels, many of which exhibit unique functions. Other chapters cover the advances in supramolecular liquid crystals and the versatility of hydrogen bonding in tuning/improving the properties and performance of materials. This book is designed

  16. Factors influencing bonding fixed restorations

    Medić Vesna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Crown displacement often occurs because the features of tooth preparations do not counteract the forces directed against restorations. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of preparation designs on retention and resistance of fixed restorations. METHOD The study was performed on 64 differently sized stainless steel dies. Also, caps which were used for evaluated retention were made of stainless steel for each die. After cementing the caps on experimental dies, measuring of necessary tensile forces to separate cemented caps from dies was done. Caps, which were made of a silver-palladium alloy with a slope of 60° to the longitudinal axis formed on the occlusal surface, were used for evaluating resistance. A sudden drop in load pressure recorded by the test machine indicated failure for that cap. RESULTS A significant difference was found between the tensile force required to remove the caps from the dies with different length (p<0.05 and different taper (p<0.01. The greatest retentive strengths (2579.2 N and 2989.8 N were noticed in experimental dies with the greatest length and smallest taper. No statistically significant (p>0.05 differences were found between tensile loads for caps cemented on dies with different diameter. Although there was an apparent slight increase in resistance values for caps on dies with smaller tapers, the increase in resistance for those preparation designs was not statistically significant. There was a significant difference among the resistance values for caps on dies with different length (p<0.01 and diameter (p<0.05. CONCLUSION In the light of the results obtained, it could be reasonably concluded that retention and resistance of the restoration is in inverse proportion to convergence angle of the prepared teeth. But, at a constant convergence angle, retention and resistance increase with rising length and diameter.

  17. Various Effects of Sandblasting of Dental Restorative Materials.

    Goro Nishigawa

    Full Text Available Sandblasting particles which remain on the surfaces of dental restorations are removed prior to cementation. It is probable that adhesive strength between luting material and sandblasting particle remnants might exceed that with restorative material. If that being the case, blasting particles adhere to sandblasted material surface could be instrumental to increasing adhesive strength like underlying bonding mechanism between luting material and silanized particles of tribochemical silica coating-treated surface. We hypothesize that ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces, which were pretreated with sandblasting, may affect adhesive strength of a resin luting material to dental restorative materials.We therefore observed adhesive strength of resin luting material to aluminum oxide was greater than those to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy beforehand. To measure the shear bond strengths of resin luting material to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, forty specimens of each restorative material were prepared. Bonding surfaces were polished with silicon abrasive paper and then treated with sandblasting. For each restorative material, 40 sandblasted specimens were equally divided into two groups: ultrasonic cleaning (USC group and non-ultrasonic cleaning (NUSC group. After resin luting material was polymerized on bonding surface, shear test was performed to evaluate effect of ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces pretreated with sandblasting on bond strength.For both zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, NUSC group showed significantly higher shear bond strength than USC group.Ultrasonic cleaning of dental restorations after sandblasting should be avoided to retain improved bonding between these materials.

  18. Microtensile bond strength of bulk-fill restorative composites to dentin.

    Mandava, Jyothi; Vegesna, Divya-Prasanna; Ravi, Ravichandra; Boddeda, Mohan-Rao; Uppalapati, Lakshman-Varma; Ghazanfaruddin, M D

    2017-08-01

    To facilitate the easier placement of direct resin composite in deeper cavities, bulk fill composites have been introduced. The Mechanical stability of fillings in stress bearing areas restored with bulk-fill resin composites is still open to question, since long term clinical studies are not available so far. Thus, the objective of the study was to evaluate and compare the microtensile bond strength of three bulk-fill restorative composites with a nanohybrid composite. Class I cavities were prepared on sixty extracted mandibular molars. Teeth were divided into 4 groups (n= 15 each) and in group I, the prepared cavities were restored with nanohybrid (Filtek Z250 XT) restorative composite in an incremental manner. In group II, III and IV, the bulk-fill composites (Filtek, Tetric EvoCeram, X-tra fil bulk-fill restoratives) were placed as a 4 mm single increment and light cured. The restored teeth were subjected to thermocycling and bond strength testing was done using instron testing machine. The mode of failure was assessed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The bond strength values obtained in megapascals (MPa) were subjected to statistical analysis, using SPSS/PC version 20 software.One-way ANOVA was used for groupwise comparison of the bond strength. Tukey's Post Hoc test was used for pairwise comparisons among the groups. The highest mean bond strength was achieved with Filtek bulk-fill restorative showing statistically significant difference with Tetric EvoCeram bulk-fill ( p composites. Adhesive failures are mostly observed with X-tra fil bulk fill composites, whereas mixed failures are more common with other bulk fill composites. Bulk-fill composites exhibited adequate bond strength to dentin and can be considered as restorative material of choice in posterior stress bearing areas. Key words: Bond strength, Bulk-fill restoratives, Configuration factor, Polymerization shrinkage.

  19. Adhesive bonding of wood materials

    Charles B. Vick

    1999-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of wood components has played an essential role in the development and growth of the forest products industry and has been a key factor in the efficient utilization of our timber resource. The largest use of adhesives is in the construction industry. By far, the largest amounts of adhesives are used to manufacture building materials, such as plywood,...

  20. Resistance of Bonded Composite Restorations on Fractures of Endodontically Treated Teeth

    AR Daneshkazemi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was performed to evaluate the effect of dentine bonding agents and Glass Ionomer cement beneath composite restorations and its resistance on fractures of endodontically treated teeth. Material and Methods: Forty sound maxillary teeth were selected; ten of them for positive control, and on the rest, RCT and MOD cavity preparations were done with standard methods. Then, the teeth were divided to four groups: 1-Sound teeth for positive control. 2-Prepared without any restoration for negative control. 3-Prepared and restored with Vitrabond(3M, USA, Single bond(3M, USA and Z100(3M, USA resin composite. 4-Prepared and restored by Single bond and Z100 resin composite. Specimens were subjected to compressive load by Instron 8502 until fracture occurred. Results: Group 1 showed the highest resistance to compressive forces followed by group 4,3&2 respectively. ANOVA, t test and Chi-square tests indicated significant difference between all the groups. Conclusion: Use of dentine bonding agents and resin composite increases resistance of endodontically treated teeth to fractures more than teeth restored with sandwich of glass ionomer cements, dentine bonding agents and resin composite.

  1. Effect of Different Surface Treatments on the Bond Strength of Repaired Resin Restorations

    Engy Fahmy Ismaiel Fekry Abaza

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, growing demands by patients for mercury-free esthetic restorations had markedly increased the use of resin composites in restorative dentistry. However, despite the continuing development of resin composites with improved properties, several factors, such as discoloration, color mismatch, wear; chipping or bulk fracture might present clinical problems (Mjor and Gordan. 2002, Vichi et al. 2004 and Kolbeck et al. 2006). As a result, the clinician should decide whether to replace or simply repair these restorations. Total replacement of the restoration might be regarded as over-treatment since in most cases, large portions of the restorations might be clinically and radio graphically considered free of failure. Moreover, complete removal of the restoration inevitably resulted in weakening of the tooth, unnecessary removal of intact dental tissues, more money and time consuming. For these reasons, the repair of the restoration instead of its removal would be a favorable procedure (Lucena-Martin et al. 2001, Frankenberger et al. 2003 a and Oztas et al. 2003). The key element in the determination of successful repair procedures was the adequate bond strength between the existing resin composite and the new one. Various methods have been suggested to improve the bond strength of the repaired resin restorations (Tezvergil et al. 2003 and Bonstein et al. 2005). Mechanical and/or chemical treatments had been investigated for preparation of the aged resin restorations to be repaired (Tezvergil et al. 2003, Ozcan et al. 2005 and Hannig et al. 2006). These treatments were introduced to counteract the problems of aged resin restorations which were limited amount of residual free radicals available for reaction with the repair material, contaminated surface, and highly cross-linked resin matrix ( Dall Oca et al. 2006 and Papacchini et al. 2007 a) Previous studies emphasized that mechanical treatments are the most important factor in obtaining optimal repair

  2. Shear Bond Strength of Resin Buttons to Lithium Disilicate and Leucite Reinforced Feldspathic Restorations

    2016-05-01

    utilizing enamel bonding procedures. These fixed orthodontic appliances are the gold standard in orthodontic treatment and can be used to correct... enamel of teeth. When this same procedure needs to be done on a restorative material such as lithium disilicate, or leucite reinforced feldspathic...toughness from its crystal size and orientation which causes cracks to deflect instead of propagate. The second material being tested, IPS Empress

  3. Clinical Bonding of Resin Nano Ceramic Restorations to Zirconia Abutments : A Case Series within a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Schepke, Ulf; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Vermeulen, Karin M.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Cune, Marco S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: New dental materials are introduced and promoted in the field without extensive clinical testing. Using those materials in a clinical setting might result in unacceptable early failure rates. Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to analyze bonding of a new dental restorative material

  4. Adhesive Bonding to Computer-aided Design/ Computer-aided Manufacturing Esthetic Dental Materials: An Overview.

    Awad, Mohamed Moustafa; Alqahtani, H; Al-Mudahi, A; Murayshed, M S; Alrahlah, A; Bhandi, Shilpa H

    2017-07-01

    To review the adhesive bonding to different computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) esthetic restorative materials. The use of CAD/CAM esthetic restorative materials has gained popularity in recent years. Several CAD/ CAM esthetic restorative materials are commercially available. Adhesive bonding is a major determinant of success of CAD/ CAM restorations. Review result: An account of the currently available bonding strategies are discussed with their rationale in various CAD/ CAM materials. Different surface treatment methods as well as adhesion promoters can be used to achieve reliable bonding of CAD/CAM restorative materials. Selection of bonding strategy to such material is determined based on its composition. Further evidence is required to evaluate the effect of new surface treatment methods, such as nonthermal atmospheric plasma and self-etching ceramic primer on bonding to different dental ceramics. An understanding of the currently available bonding strategies to CA/CAM materials can help the clinician to select the most indicated system for each category of materials.

  5. Desensitizing bioactive agents improves bond strength of indirect resin-cemented restorations: preliminary results

    Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of indirect composite restorations cemented with a resin-based cement associated with etch-and-rinse and self-etching primer adhesive systems to dentin treated or not with a bioactive material. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Twenty bovine incisor crowns had the buccal enamel removed and the dentin ground flat. The teeth were assigned to 4 groups (n=5: Group I: acid etching + Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply; Group II: application of a bioactive glass (Biosilicato®+ acid etching + Prime & Bond NT; Group III: One-up Bond F (J Morita; Group IV: Biosilicato® + One-up Bond F. Indirect composite resin (Artglass, Kulzer cylinders (6x10mm were fabricated and cemented to the teeth with a dual-cure resin-based cement (Enforce, Dentsply. After cementation, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37ºC for 30 days and thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC with 50 kgf load cell at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure modes were assessed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (95% level of confidence. RESULTS: Groups I, II and III had statistically similar results (p>0.05. Group IV had statistically significant higher bond strength means (p<0.05 than the other groups. The analysis of the debonded surfaces showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode for Group III and mixed failure mode for the other groups. CONCLUSION: The use of desensitizing agent did not affect negatively the bonding of the indirect composite restorations to dentin, independently of the tested adhesive systems.

  6. Fluoride-releasing restorative materials and secondary caries.

    Hicks, John; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Donly, Kevin; Flaitz, Catherine

    2003-03-01

    Secondary caries is responsible for 60 percent of all replacement restorations in the typical dental practice. Risk factors for secondary caries are similar to those for primary caries development. Unfortunately, it is not possible to accurately predict which patients are at risk for restoration failure. During the past several decades, fluoride-releasing dental materials have become a part of the dentist's armamentarium. Considerable fluoride is released during the setting reaction and for periods up to eight years following restoration placement. This released fluoride is readily taken up by the cavosurface tooth structure, as well as the enamel and root surfaces adjacent to the restoration. Resistance against caries along the cavosurface and the adjacent smooth surface has been shown in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Fluoride-releasing dental materials provide for improved resistance against primary and secondary caries in coronal and root surfaces. Plaque and salivary fluoride levels are elevated to a level that facilitates remineralization. In addition, the fluoride released to dental plaque adversely affects the growth of lactobacilli and mutans streptococci by interference with bacterial enzyme systems. Fluoride recharging of these dental materials is readily achieved with fluoridated toothpastes, fluoride mouthrinses, and other sources of topical fluoride. This allows fluoride-releasing dental materials to act as intraoral fluoride reservoirs. The improvement in the properties of dental materials with the ability to release fluoride has improved dramatically in the past decade, and it is anticipated that in the near future the vast majority of restorative procedures will employ fluoride-releasing dental materials as bonding agents, cavity liners, luting agents, adhesives for orthodontic brackets, and definitive restoratives.

  7. Radiopacity of dental restorative materials and cements

    Kang, Byung Chul; Yang, Hong So; Chung, Hyun Ju; Oh, Won Mann

    1994-01-01

    The radiopacity of six composite resins, three resin luting cements and ten filling materials were studied. The purpose was to obtain an indication of radiopacity value of different brands within each of these groups of materials and to show differences in radiopacities of filling materials and natural tooth structures. On radiographs, the optimal densities of standardized samples were determined by computer imaging system and radiopacity values of the materials were expressed in millimeter equivalent aluminum. Within to groups of materials studied, there was considerable variation in radiopacity. The composite resins of P-50, Zl00 and prisma AP. H displayed much higher radiopacities than aluminum. Panavia resin cement was shown to be similarly radiopaque to aluminum. Generally, the radiopacity of base and filling materials appeared to combined applications for restorative treatment of teeth, lower radiopacity can interfere with the diagnosis and detection of gaps near the restoration.

  8. Current bonding systems for resin-bonded restorations and fixed partial dentures made of silver–palladium–copper–gold alloy

    Hideo Matsumura

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This review article describes about the bonding systems for noble metal alloys, bonding techniques of restorations and fixed partial dentures (FPDs made of Ag–Pd–Cu–Au alloys, and their clinical performance. Thione monomers, 6-(4-vinylbenzyl-n-propyl amino-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-dithione (VTD, 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl-2-thiouracil-5-carboxylate (MTU-6, and 10-methacryloxydecyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (MDDT, has been proved effective for bonding noble metal alloys. An acrylic adhesive consists of the tri-n-butylborane (TBB initiator, methyl methacrylate (MMA monomer liquid with 5% 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META, and poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA, is being used for bonding metallic restorations to abutment surfaces. Clinical performance of restorations and FPDs made of Ag–Pd–Cu–Au alloys is overall excellent when they are seated with the currently available noble metal bonding systems.

  9. The diffusion bonding of advanced material

    Khan, T.I.

    2001-01-01

    As a joining process diffusion bonding has been used since early periods, and artifacts have been found which date back to 3000 years. However, over the last 20 years this joining process has been rediscovered and research has been carried out to understand the mechanisms of the process, and the application of the technique to advanced materials. This paper will review some of the reasons to why diffusion bonding may be preferred over other more conventional welding processes to join advanced alloy systems. It also describes in brief the different types of bonding processes, namely, solid-state and liquid phase bonding techniques. The paper demonstrates the application of diffusion bonding processes to join a range of dissimilar materials for instance: oxide dispersion strengthened superalloys, titanium to duplex stainless steels and engineering ceramics such as Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ to metal alloys. The research work highlights the success and limitations of the diffusion bonding process and is based on the experience of the author and his colleagues. (author)

  10. Color stability evaluation of aesthetic restorative materials

    Adriana Postiglione Bührer Samra

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Color match is one of the most important characteristics of aesthetic restorative materials. Maintenance of color throughout the functional lifetime of restorations is important for the durability of treatment. This characteristic is not constant among dental materials. The purpose of this research was to assess the color stability of five aesthetic restorative materials when immersed in a coffee solution. Seventy-one 17 mm x 1 mm specimens, divided into five groups, were made using one direct composite resin (Tetric Ceram®, Ivoclar/Vivadent - G1, three indirect composite resins (Targis, Ivoclar/Vivadent - G2; Resilab Master, Wilcos - G3; belleGlassTM HP, Kerr - G4 and one porcelain (IPS Empress® 2, Ivoclar/Vivadent - G5. The specimens were immersed in a coffee staining media for 15 days and stored under a controlled temperature of 37°C ± 1°C in the dark. The evaluations were made after 1, 7 and 15 days by means of reflectance spectrophotometry. The data was submitted to two-way ANOVA (p < 0.005 and post hoc tests. Statistical difference was observed between G1 / G3 and the other groups; G2 / G4 and the other groups; and G5 and all the other groups. It was concluded that G1 and G3 showed significantly higher discoloration than the other groups. G2 and G4 showed intermediary pigmentation, while G5 showed the smallest changes.

  11. Comparative in vitro study of the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with restorative and orthodontic resins

    Hassan Isber

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with different restorative systems and compare it with that afforded by an established orthodontic bonding system. Seventy human bicuspids were used, divided into five different groups with 14 teeth each. Whereas a specific orthodontic bonding resin (TransbondTM XT was used in the control group, the restorative systems Charisma, Tetric Ceram, TPH Spectrum and Z100 were used in the other four groups. Seven days after bonding the brackets to the samples, shear forces were applied under pressure in a universal testing machine. The data collected was evaluated using the ANOVA test and, when a difference was identified, the Tukey test was applied. A 5% level of significance was adopted. The mean results of the shear bond strength tests were as follows: Group 1 (Charisma, 14.98 MPa; Group 2 (Tetric Ceram, 15.16 MPa; Group 3 (TPH, 17.70 MPa; Group 4 (Z100, 13.91 MPa; and Group 5 or control group (TransbondTM XT, 17.15 MPa. No statistically significant difference was found among the groups. It was concluded that all tested resins have sufficient bond strength to be recommended for bonding orthodontic brackets.

  12. Apparatus Tests Peeling Of Bonded Rubbery Material

    Crook, Russell A.; Graham, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Instrumented hydraulic constrained blister-peel apparatus obtains data on degree of bonding between specimen of rubbery material and rigid plate. Growth of blister tracked by video camera, digital clock, pressure transducer, and piston-displacement sensor. Cylinder pressure controlled by hydraulic actuator system. Linear variable-differential transformer (LVDT) and float provide second, independent measure of change in blister volume used as more precise volume feedback in low-growth-rate test.

  13. A pin-assisted retention technique for resin-bonded restorations.

    Miara, P; Touati, B

    1992-09-01

    The value of pins for auxiliary retention has been demonstrated many times. The use of pins with resin-bonded restorations allows for improved aesthetics and less tooth reduction while increasing resistance to dislodging forces. Clinical and technical procedures for resin-bonded bridges with pin-assisted retention are presented.

  14. Impairment of resin cement application on the bond strength of indirect composite restorations

    Jovito Adiel SKUPIEN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of immediate and delayed resin cement application on the microtensile bond strength of indirect composite resin restorations and, to evaluate adhesive strategies (for regular resin cement or humidity parameters for self-adhesive resin cement. Forty-five enamel/dentin discs (0.5 mm height and 10 mm of diameter obtained from bovine teeth were divided into nine groups (n = 5. For regular cement, the variation factors were cementation technique at three levels (immediate cementation, 5 or 30 min after adhesive system application; and type of adhesive system at two levels (three- or two-step. For self-adhesive cement, the dentin moisture was the source of variation at three levels (normal, dry, or wet cementation. The specimens were submitted to microtensile bond strength (μTBS testing using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey’s test, and linear regression. Regular cement and three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system showed the highest values of bond strength (25.21 MPa–30 min of delay. Only for this condition, three-step adhesive showed higher bond strength than the two-step adhesive. Nevertheless, the linear regression showed that irrespective of the strategy, the use of the two-step approach when compared with three-step adhesive system decreased μTBS (p < 0.001. The failure analysis showed predominant adhesive failures for all tested groups. All groups had comparable values of bond strength to bovine dentin when the same materials were used, even in suboptimal clinical conditions.

  15. Relevant optical properties for direct restorative materials.

    Pecho, Oscar E; Ghinea, Razvan; do Amaral, Erika A Navarro; Cardona, Juan C; Della Bona, Alvaro; Pérez, María M

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate relevant optical properties of esthetic direct restorative materials focusing on whitened and translucent shades. Enamel (E), body (B), dentin (D), translucent (T) and whitened (Wh) shades for E (WhE) and B (WhB) from a restorative system (Filtek Supreme XTE, 3M ESPE) were evaluated. Samples (1 mm thick) were prepared. Spectral reflectance (R%) and color coordinates (L*, a*, b*, C* and h°) were measured against black and white backgrounds, using a spectroradiometer, in a viewing booth, with CIE D65 illuminant and d/0° geometry. Scattering (S) and absorption (K) coefficients and transmittance (T%) were calculated using Kubelka-Munk's equations. Translucency (TP) and opalescence (OP) parameters and whiteness index (W*) were obtained from differences of CIELAB color coordinates. R%, S, K and T% curves from all shades were compared using VAF (Variance Accounting For) coefficient with Cauchy-Schwarz inequality. Color coordinates and optical parameters were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Tukey's test with Bonferroni correction (α=0.0007). Spectral behavior of R% and S were different for T shades. In addition, T shades showed the lowest R%, S and K values, as well as the highest T%, TP an OP values. In most cases, WhB shades showed different color and optical properties (including TP and W*) than their corresponding B shades. WhE shades showed similar mean W* values and higher mean T% and TP values than E shades. When using whitened or translucent composites, the final color is influenced not only by the intraoral background but also by the color and optical properties of multilayers used in the esthetic restoration. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. In vitro marginal adaptation of high-viscosity resin composite restorations bonded to dentin cavities.

    Rahiotis, Christos; Tzoutzas, John; Kakaboura, Afrodite

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation of high-viscosity resin composite restoratives bonded to dentin in a cylindrical cavity model. The buccal enamel of 64 human premolars was removed and cylindrical cavities 3 mm in diameter and 1.3 mm in depth were prepared on each dentin surface. The cavities were divided into 8 groups of 8 cavities each and restored according to the manufacturers' instructions with the following adhesive/composite systems: Bond 1/Alert, Stae/Glacier, OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable, One-Step/Pyramid, Solidbond/Solitaire, Prime&Bond NT/Surefil, One Coat Bond/Synergy, and Scotchbond 1/Z250. The composite surfaces were pressed against mylar strips, covered with cover slips, and photopolymerized in a single increment for 40 s. The restorations were polished with wet SiC papers of 320 to 1000 grit size to expose dentin margins. The marginal adaptation was evaluated immediately after photopolymerization and again after 1 week of storage in water at 37 +/- 1 degrees C. Evaluation was performed under a metallographic microscope at 200X magnification by recording the frequency of gap-free restorations (GF), the percentage length of the debonded margins relative to the cavity periphery (DM), the width of the maximum marginal gap (MG), and the marginal index (MI = MG x DM / 100). The results were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and the Mann-Whitney U-test at alpha = 0.05. No incidence of gaps was found in 62.5% of One Coat Bond/Synergy and 37.5% of OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable restorations. All the other restorative systems exhibited restorations with gaps. One Coat Bond/Synergy, Scotchbond 1/Z250, and OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable were the groups with the lowest DM values, while Stae/Glacier showed the highest DM values. One Coat Bond/Synergy and OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable revealed the lowest MI values and Stae/Glacier the highest. No statistically significant differences were recorded between

  17. Resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials: a review of the literature.

    Spitznagel, Frank A; Horvath, Sebastian D; Guess, Petra C; Blatz, Markus B

    2014-01-01

    Resin bonding is essential for clinical longevity of indirect restorations. Especially in light of the increasing popularity of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-fabricated indirect restorations, there is a need to assess optimal bonding protocols for new ceramic/polymer materials and indirect composites. The aim of this article was to review and assess the current scientific evidence on the resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials. An electronic PubMed database search was conducted from 1966 to September 2013 for in vitro studies pertaining the resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials. The search revealed 198 titles. Full-text screening was carried out for 43 studies, yielding 18 relevant articles that complied with inclusion criteria. No relevant studies could be identified regarding new ceramic/polymer materials. Most common surface treatments are aluminum-oxide air-abrasion, silane treatment, and hydrofluoric acid-etching for indirect composite restoration. Self-adhesive cements achieve lower bond strengths in comparison with etch-and-rinse systems. Thermocycling has a greater impact on bonding behavior than water storage. Air-particle abrasion and additional silane treatment should be applied to enhance the resin bond to laboratory-processed composites. However, there is an urgent need for in vitro studies that evaluate the bond strength to new ceramic/polymer materials. This article reviews the available dental literature on resin bond of laboratory composites and gives scientifically based guidance for their successful placement. Furthermore, this review demonstrated that future research for new ceramic/polymer materials is required. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Grinding damage assessment for CAD-CAM restorative materials.

    Curran, Philippe; Cattani-Lorente, Maria; Anselm Wiskott, H W; Durual, Stéphane; Scherrer, Susanne S

    2017-03-01

    To assess surface/subsurface damage after grinding with diamond discs on five CAD-CAM restorative materials and to estimate potential losses in strength based on crack size measurements of the generated damage. The materials tested were: Lithium disilicate (LIT) glass-ceramic (e.max CAD), leucite glass-ceramic (LEU) (Empress CAD), feldspar ceramic (VM2) (Vita Mark II), feldspar ceramic-resin infiltrated (EN) (Enamic) and a composite reinforced with nano ceramics (LU) (Lava Ultimate). Specimens were cut from CAD-CAM blocs and pair-wise mirror polished for the bonded interface technique. Top surfaces were ground with diamond discs of respectively 75, 54 and 18μm. Chip damage was measured on the bonded interface using SEM. Fracture mechanics relationships were used to estimate fracture stresses based on average and maximum chip depths assuming these to represent strength limiting flaws subjected to tension and to calculate potential losses in strength compared to manufacturer's data. Grinding with a 75μm diamond disc induced on a bonded interface critical chips averaging 100μm with a potential strength loss estimated between 33% and 54% for all three glass-ceramics (LIT, LEU, VM2). The softer materials EN and LU were little damage susceptible with chips averaging respectively 26μm and 17μm with no loss in strength. Grinding with 18μm diamond discs was still quite detrimental for LIT with average chip sizes of 43μm and a potential strength loss of 42%. It is essential to understand that when grinding glass-ceramics or feldspar ceramics with diamond discs surface and subsurface damage are induced which have the potential of lowering the strength of the ceramic. Careful polishing steps should be carried out after grinding especially when dealing with glass-ceramics. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of shear bond strengths of conventional orthodontic composite and nano-ceramic restorative composite: An in vitro study

    Namit Nagar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the shear bond strength of a nano-ceramic restorative composite Ceram-X MonoTM♦, a restorative resin with the traditional orthodontic composite Transbond XTTM† and to evaluate the site of bond failure using Adhesive Remnant Index. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human premolars were divided into two groups of 30 each. Stainless steel brackets were bonded using Transbond XTTM† (Group I and Ceram-X MonoTM♦ (Group II according to manufacturer′s protocol. Shear bond strength was measured on Universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. Adhesive Remnant Index scores were assigned to debonded brackets of each group. Data was analyzed using unpaired ′t′ test and Chi square test. Results: The mean shear bond strength of Group I (Transbond XTTM† was 12.89 MPa ± 2.19 and that of Group II (Ceram-X MonoTM was 7.29 MPa ± 1.76. Unpaired ′t′ test revealed statistically significant differences amongst the shear bond strength of the samples measured. Chi-square test revealed statistically insignificant differences amongst the ARI scores of the samples measured. Conclusions: Ceram-X MonoTM♦ had a lesser mean shear bond strength when compared to Transbond XTTM† which was statistically significant difference. However, the mean shear bond of Ceram X Mono was within the clinically acceptable range for bonding. Ceram-X MonoTM† and Transbond XTTM† showed cohesive fracture of adhesive in 72.6% and 66.6% of the specimens, respectively.

  20. Method to improve commercial bonded SOI material

    Maris, Humphrey John; Sadana, Devendra Kumar

    2000-07-11

    A method of improving the bonding characteristics of a previously bonded silicon on insulator (SOI) structure is provided. The improvement in the bonding characteristics is achieved in the present invention by, optionally, forming an oxide cap layer on the silicon surface of the bonded SOI structure and then annealing either the uncapped or oxide capped structure in a slightly oxidizing ambient at temperatures greater than 1200.degree. C. Also provided herein is a method for detecting the bonding characteristics of previously bonded SOI structures. According to this aspect of the present invention, a pico-second laser pulse technique is employed to determine the bonding imperfections of previously bonded SOI structures.

  1. Evaluation of bond strength of silorane and methacrylate based restorative systems to dentin using different cavity models

    Stephano Zerlottini Isaac

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS to dentin of two different restorative systems: silorane-based (P90, and methacrylate-based (P60, using two cavity models. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Occlusal enamel of 40 human third molars was removed to expose flat dentin surface. Class I cavities with 4 mm mesial-distal width, 3 mm buccal-lingual width and 3 mm depth (C-factor=4.5 were prepared in 20 teeth, which were divided into two groups (n=10 restored with P60 and P90, bulk-filled after dentin treatment according to manufacturer's instructions. Flat buccal dentin surfaces were prepared in the 20 remaining teeth (C-factor=0.2 and restored with resin blocks measuring 4x3x3 mm using the two restorative systems (n=10. The teeth were sectioned into samples with area between 0.85 and 1.25 mm2 that were submitted to µTBS testing, using a universal testing machine (EMIC at speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fractured specimens were analyzed under stereomicroscope and categorized according to fracture pattern. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey Kramer tests. RESULTS: For flat surfaces, P60 obtained higher bond strength values compared with P90. However, for Class I cavities, P60 showed significant reduction in bond strength (p0.05, or between Class I Cavity and Flat Surface group, considering P90 restorative system (p>0.05. Regarding fracture pattern, there was no statistical difference among groups (p=0.0713 and 56.3% of the fractures were adhesive. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that methacrylate-based composite µTBS was influenced by cavity models, and the use of silorane-based composite led to similar bond strength values compared to the methacrylate-based composite in cavities with high C-factor.

  2. Combination Effect of Hemostatic and Disinfecting Agents on Micro-leakage of Restorations Bonded with Different Bonding Systems

    Farhadpour H

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Hemostatic agents may affect the micro-leakage of different adhesive systems. Also, chlorhexidine has shown positive effects on micro-leakage. However, their interaction effect has not been reported yet. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of contamination with a hemostatic agent on micro- leakage of total- and self-etching adhesive systems and the effect of chlorhexidine application after the removal of the hemostatic agent. Materials and Methods: Standardized Class V cavity was prepared on each of the sixty caries free premolars at the cemento-enamel junction, with the occlusal margin located in enamel and the gingival margin in dentin. Then, the specimens were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 10 according to hemostatic agent (H contamination, chlorhexidine (CHX application, and the type of adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond and Clearfil SE Bond used. After filling the cavities with resin composite, the root apices were sealed with utility wax. Furthermore, all the surfaces, except for the restorations and 1mm from the margins, were covered with two layers of nail varnish. The teeth were immersed in a 0.5% basic fuschin dye for 24 hours, rinsed, blot-dried and sectioned longitudinally through the center of the restorations bucco- lingualy. The sections were examined using a stereomicroscope and the extension of dye penetration was analyzed according to a non-parametric scale from 0 to 3. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: While ASB group showed no micro-leakage in enamel, none of the groups showed complete elimination of micro-leakage from the dentin. Regarding micro- leakage at enamel, and dentin margins, there was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2, 1 and 3, and 2 and 3 (p > 0.05. A significantly lower micro-leakage at the enamel and dentin margins was observed in group 3, compared to group 6. No significant difference was observed between

  3. Evidence-based concepts and procedures for bonded inlays and onlays. Part II. Guidelines for cavity preparation and restoration fabrication.

    Rocca, Giovanni Tommaso; Rizcalla, Nicolas; Krejci, Ivo; Dietschi, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The second part of this article series presents an evidence-based update of clinical protocols and procedures for cavity preparation and restoration selection for bonded inlays and onlays. More than ever, tissue conservation dictates preparation concepts, even though some minimal dimensions still have to be considered for all restorative materials. In cases of severe bruxism or tooth fragilization, CAD/CAM composite resins or pressed CAD/CAM lithium disilicate glass ceramics are often recommended, although this choice relies mainly on scarce in vitro research as there is still a lack of medium- to long-term clinical evidence. The decision about whether or not to cover a cusp can only be made after a multifactorial analysis, which includes cavity dimensions and the resulting tooth biomechanical status, as well as occlusal and esthetic factors. The clinical impact of the modern treatment concepts that were outlined in the previous article - Dual Bonding (DB)/Immediate Dentin Sealing (IDS), Cavity Design Optimization (CDO), and Cervical Margins Relocation (CMR) - are described in detail in this article and discussed in light of existing clinical and scientific evidence for simpler, more predictable, and more durable results. Despite the wide choice of restorative materials (composite resin or ceramic) and techniques (classical or CAD/CAM), the cavity for an indirect restoration should meet five objective criteria before the impression.

  4. Curing mode affects bond strength of adhesively luted composite CAD/CAM restorations to dentin.

    Lührs, Anne-Katrin; Pongprueksa, Pong; De Munck, Jan; Geurtsen, Werner; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2014-03-01

    To determine the effect of curing mode and restoration-surface pre-treatment on the micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) to dentin. Sandblasted CAD/CAM composite blocks (LAVA Ultimate, 3M ESPE) were cemented to bur-cut dentin using either the etch & rinse composite cement Nexus 3 ('NX3', Kerr) with Optibond XTR ('XTR', Kerr), or the self-etch composite cement RelyX Ultimate ('RXU', 3M ESPE) with Scotchbond Universal ('SBU', 3M ESPE). All experimental groups included different 'curing modes' (light-curing of adhesive and cement ('LL'), light-curing of adhesive and auto-cure of cement ('LA'), co-cure of adhesive through light-curing of cement ('AL'), or complete auto-cure ('AA')) and different 'restoration-surface pre-treatments' of the composite block (NX3: either a silane primer (Kerr), or the XTR adhesive; RXU: either silane primer (RelyX Ceramic Primer, 3M ESPE) and SBU, or solely SBU). After water-storage (7 days, 37°C), the μTBS was measured. Additionally, the degree of conversion (DC) of both cements was measured after 10min and after 1 week, either auto-cured (21°C/37°C) or light-cured (directly/through 3-mm CAD/CAM composite). The linear mixed-effects model (α=0.05) revealed a significant influence of the factors 'curing mode' and 'composite cement', and a less significant effect of the factor 'restoration-surface pre-treatment'. Light-curing 'LL' revealed the highest μTBS, which decreased significantly for all other curing modes. For curing modes 'AA' and 'AL', the lowest μTBS and a high percentage of pre-testing failures were reported. Overall, DC increased with light-curing and incubation time. The curing mode is decisive for the bonding effectiveness of adhesively luted composite CAD/CAM restorations to dentin. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Implications of resin-based composite (RBC) restoration on cuspal deflection and microleakage score in molar teeth: Placement protocol and restorative material.

    McHugh, Lauren E J; Politi, Ioanna; Al-Fodeh, Rami S; Fleming, Garry J P

    2017-09-01

    To assess the cuspal deflection of standardised large mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities in third molar teeth restored using conventional resin-based composite (RBC) or their bulk fill restorative counterparts compared with the unbound condition using a twin channel deflection measuring gauge. Following thermocycling, the cervical microleakage of the restored teeth was assessed to determine marginal integrity. Standardised MOD cavities were prepared in forty-eight sound third molar teeth and randomly allocated to six groups. Restorations were placed in conjunction with (and without) a universal bonding system and resin restorative materials were irradiated with a light-emitting-diode light-curing-unit. The dependent variable was the restoration protocol, eight oblique increments for conventional RBCs or two horizontal increments for the bulk fill resin restoratives. The cumulative buccal and palatal cuspal deflections from a twin channel deflection measuring gauge were summed, the restored teeth thermally fatigued, immersed in 0.2% basic fuchsin dye for 24h, sectioned and examined for cervical microleakage score. The one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) identified third molar teeth restored using conventional RBC materials had significantly higher mean total cuspal deflection values compared with bulk fill resin restorative restoration (all pmaterial selection is vital in the absence of clinical data. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Microleakage of bonded amalgam restorations using different adhesive agents with dye under vacuum: An in vitro study

    Abhishek Parolia

    2011-01-01

    Clinical Significance: Bonded amalgam restorations prevent over-preparation and reduce the tooth flexure. GIC type I under amalgam provides chemical bonding in between amalgam and tooth structure and thus reduces the microleakage.

  7. Effect of a retention groove on the shear bond strength of dentin-bonded restorations

    de Kok, P.; de Jager, N.; Veerman, I.A.M.; Hafeez, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Roeters, J.F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Statement of problem. With the increasing use of minimally invasive restorations, effective adhesion becomes more important. Applying mechanical retention to a flat dentin surface might improve the adhesion of ceramic and composite resin restorations. Purpose. The purpose of this in vitro study was

  8. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of zirconia restorations cleansed various cleansing protocols bonded with two different resin cements: An In vitro study

    Sriram Sankar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Yttria partially stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline restorations have gained widespread use because of its enhanced strength and esthetics. During the try-in process, zirconia is likely to be contaminated with saliva. This contamination leads to a clear weakening of the bond between restorative material and cement. For this reason, zirconia surface should be cleaned before cementation. Hence, the purpose of this study is to compare the shear bond strength of zirconia restorations cleansed with various surface cleansing protocols bonded with two different resin cements. Materials and Methods: Eighty samples of zirconia discs were prepared in the dimensions 2.5 mm diameter and 4.5 mm thickness. They were divided into two groups of each forty samples based on luting cement used. Each group was further subdivided into four subgroups of each (n = 10: Group 1: uncontaminated zirconia blocks, Group 2: saliva-contaminated zirconia blocks and cleaned only with distilled water, Group 3: saliva-contaminated zirconia blocks treated with Ivoclean, and Group 4: saliva-contaminated zirconia blocks were air abraded. Eighty human maxillary premolars were then sectioned to expose dentin and were mounted on an acrylic block. A jig was fabricated to bond zirconia with the tooth using two self-adhesive resin cements. The samples were subjected to shear bond strength testing. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's honest significance difference test with a level of significance set at p < 0.05. Results: The mean shear bond strength values of Group 1 and 2 - subgroup B are 10.3 ± 0.4 and 9.80 ± 0.7 (saliva-contaminated zirconia, cleansed with distilled water only, respectively, were lowest among all test subgroups and were significantly less than mean values of subgroup C, Group 1 - 20.45 ± 0.6 and Group 2 - 20.75 ± 0.4 (Ivoclean group and subgroup D, Group 1 - 20.90 ± 0.3 and Group 2 - 20.60 ± 0.5 (air

  9. In Vitro Inhibition of Enamel Demineralisation by Fluoride-releasing Restorative Materials and Dental Adhesives.

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Helvatzoglou-Antoniades, Maria; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    To determine the ability of 5 contemporary fluoride-releasing restoratives and 3 fluoride-releasing adhesives to inhibit enamel demineralisation surrounding restorations, and the associations between inhibition and the levels of fluoride released from these materials. Five fluoride-releasing restoratives (Fuji IX GP, Ketac N100, Dyract Extra, Beautifil II and Wave) and 3 fluoride-releasing adhesives (Stae, Prime & Bond NT and Fluoro Bond II) were investigated. Eight disks of each material were prepared. Fluoride release was measured daily using a fluoride-ion-selective electrode for 15 days. Twenty-four cavities for each group were restored with a restorative and an adhesive. Specimens were subjected to thermal stress and stored for 30 days in saline solution. After a 15-day pH-cycling regimen, two 150-μm-thick sections were derived from each specimen. Enamel lesion depth was measured at 0, 100, and 200 μm from each restoration's margin via polarised light microscopy. Of the restoratives investigated, Fuji IX GP released the most fluoride. The fluoride-releasing restoratives tested exhibited shallower enamel lesions than did the control group at all distances tested (p < 0.05). Fuji IX GP yielded significantly lower enamel lesion depth than did the other experimental materials. The depths of enamel lesions did not differ significantly when comparing restoratives applied with a fluoride-releasing adhesive with those applied with a non-fluoride-releasing adhesive. The fluoride-releasing materials tested reduced enamel demineralisation but to different extents, depending on their levels of fluoride release. Fluoride-releasing adhesives did not influence enamel lesion formation.

  10. Influence of periodontal ligament simulation on bond strength and fracture resistance of roots restored with fiber posts

    Ana Maria Estivalete MARCHIONATTI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Considering that periodontal ligament simulation may influence the stress distribution over teeth restored with intraradicular retainers, this study aimed to assess the combined effect of mechanical cycling and periodontal ligament simulation on both the bond strength between fiber posts and root dentin and the fracture resistance of teeth restored using glass fiber posts. Material and Methods: Ninety roots were randomly distributed into 3 groups (n=10 (C-MC: control; P-MC: polyether; AS-MC: addition silicone to test bond strength and 6 groups (n=10 (C: control; P: polyether; AS: addition silicone, without mechanical cycling, and C-MC, P-MC and AS-MC with mechanical cycling to test fracture strength, according to the material used to simulate the periodontal ligament. For the bond strength test, fiber posts were cemented, cores were built, mechanical cycling was applied (2×106 cycles, 88 N, 2.2 Hz, and 45º incline, and the teeth cut into 3 slices (2 mm, which were then subjected to the push-out test at 1 mm/min. For the fracture strength test, fiber posts were cemented, cores were built, and half of the groups received mechanical cycling, followed by the compressive strength (45° to the long axis and 1 mm/min performed on all groups. Results: Periodontal ligament simulation did not affect the bond strength (p=0.244 between post and dentin. Simulation of periodontal ligament (p=0.153 and application of mechanical cycling (p=0.97 did not affect fracture resistance. Conclusions: The materials used to simulate the periodontal ligament did not affect fracture or bond strength, therefore periodontal ligament simulation using the tested materials could be considered optional in the conditions of the study.

  11. Fluoride release and recharge abilities of contemporary fluoride-containing restorative materials and dental adhesives.

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Helvatzoglou-Antoniades, Maria; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of five fluoride-releasing restorative materials and three dental adhesives, before and after NaF solution treatment. Five restorative materials (Fuji IX GP, GC Corp.; Ketac N100, 3M ESPE; Dyract Extra, Dentsply; Beautifil II, Shofu Inc.; Wave, SDI) and three dental adhesives (Stae, SDI; Fluorobond II - Shofu Inc.; Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply) were investigated before and after NaF solution treatment. A fluoride ion-selective electrode was to measure fluoride concentrations. During the 86-day period before NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP released the highest amount of fluoride among the restorative materials while Prime & Bond NT was the highest among the dental adhesives. After NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP again ranked the highest in fluoride release among the restorative materials while Fluorobond II ranked the highest among dental adhesives. It was concluded that the compositions and setting mechanisms of fluoride-containing dental materials influenced their fluoride release and recharge abilities.

  12. Unique Bond Breaking in Crystalline Phase Change Materials and the Quest for Metavalent Bonding.

    Zhu, Min; Cojocaru-Mirédin, Oana; Mio, Antonio M; Keutgen, Jens; Küpers, Michael; Yu, Yuan; Cho, Ju-Young; Dronskowski, Richard; Wuttig, Matthias

    2018-05-01

    Laser-assisted field evaporation is studied in a large number of compounds, including amorphous and crystalline phase change materials employing atom probe tomography. This study reveals significant differences in field evaporation between amorphous and crystalline phase change materials. High probabilities for multiple events with more than a single ion detected per laser pulse are only found for crystalline phase change materials. The specifics of this unusual field evaporation are unlike any other mechanism shown previously to lead to high probabilities of multiple events. On the contrary, amorphous phase change materials as well as other covalently bonded compounds and metals possess much lower probabilities for multiple events. Hence, laser-assisted field evaporation in amorphous and crystalline phase change materials reveals striking differences in bond rupture. This is indicative for pronounced differences in bonding. These findings imply that the bonding mechanism in crystalline phase change materials differs substantially from conventional bonding mechanisms such as metallic, ionic, and covalent bonding. Instead, the data reported here confirm a recently developed conjecture, namely that metavalent bonding is a novel bonding mechanism besides those mentioned previously. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Recent advances and developments in composite dental restorative materials.

    Cramer, N B; Stansbury, J W; Bowman, C N

    2011-04-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance.

  14. Survival of extensively damaged endodontically treated incisors restored with different types of posts-and-core foundation restoration material.

    Lazari, Priscilla Cardoso; de Carvalho, Marco Aurélio; Del Bel Cury, Altair A; Magne, Pascal

    2018-05-01

    Which post-and-core combination will best improve the performance of extensively damaged endodontically treated incisors without a ferrule is still unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the restoration of extensively damaged endodontically treated incisors without a ferrule using glass-ceramic crowns bonded to various composite resin foundation restorations and 2 types of posts. Sixty decoronated endodontically treated bovine incisors without a ferrule were divided into 4 groups and restored with various post-and-core foundation restorations. NfPfB=no-ferrule (Nf) with glass-fiber post (Pf) and bulk-fill resin foundation restoration (B); NfPfP=no-ferrule (Nf) with glass-fiber post (Pf) and dual-polymerized composite resin core foundation restoration (P); NfPt=no-ferrule (Nf) with titanium post (Pt) and resin core foundation restoration; and NfPtB=no-ferrule (Nf) with titanium post (Pt) and bulk-fill resin core foundation restoration (B). Two additional groups from previously published data from the same authors (FPf=2mm of ferrule (F) and glass-fiber post (Pf) and composite resin core foundation restoration; and NfPf=no-ferrule (Nf) with glass-fiber post (Pf) and composite resin core foundation restoration), which were tested concomitantly and using the same experimental arrangement, were included for comparison. All teeth were prepared to receive bonded glass-ceramic crowns luted with dual-polymerized resin cement and were subjected to accelerated fatigue testing under submerged conditions at room temperature. Cyclic isometric loading was applied to the incisal edge at an angle of 30 degrees with a frequency of 5 Hz, beginning with a load of 100 N (5000 cycles). A 100-N load increase was applied every 15000 cycles. The specimens were loaded until failure or to a maximum of 1000 N (140000 cycles). The 6 groups (4 groups from the present study and 2 groups from the previously published study) were compared using the Kaplan-Meier survival

  15. Effect of Enamel and Dentin Irradiation by Gamma Rays on the Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Restorations

    Zein, N.S.A.

    2014-01-01

    and neck cancer patients subjected to radiotherapy represents a challenge for restorative dentistry. This is due to the high rates of caries found and the reduction in restoration longevity by restorative material deterioration and failure events that tend to occur rapidly(7). The use of adhesive restorative materials is recommended for the treatment of radiation caries. It has been reported that these tooth-colored restorations survive longer when they are provided with a good seal and protection against secondary caries (8). Unfortunately, the influence of radiotherapy, alone or followed by application of a desensitizing agent, on the bond strengths of these restorations has not been extensively evaluated. Therefore, the current study has been conducted to investigate the effect of enamel and dentin irradiation by gamma rays on the bond strength of two adhesive restorations and to investigate the effect of application of an amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) desensitizing agent after irradiation and before restoration on the bond strength of the adhesive restorations

  16. Effect of Luting Cements On the Bond Strength to Turkom-Cera All-Ceramic Material

    Al–Makramani, Bandar M. A.; Razak, Abdul A. A.; Abu–Hassan, Mohamed I.; Al–Sanabani, Fuad A.; Albakri, Fahad M.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The selection of the appropriate luting cement is a key factor for achieving a strong bond between prepared teeth and dental restorations. AIM: To evaluate the shear bond strength of Zinc phosphate cement Elite, glass ionomer cement Fuji I, resin-modified glass ionomer cement Fuji Plus and resin luting cement Panavia-F to Turkom-Cera all-ceramic material. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Turkom-Cera was used to form discs 10mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness (n = 40). The ceramic discs were wet ground, air - particle abraded with 50 - μm aluminium oxide particles and randomly divided into four groups (n = 10). The luting cement was bonded to Turkom-Cera discs as per manufacturer instructions. The shear bond strengths were determined using the universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analysed using the tests One Way ANOVA, the nonparametric Kruskal - Wallis test and Mann - Whitney Post hoc test. RESULTS: The shear bond strength of the Elite, Fuji I, Fuji Plus and Panavia F groups were: 0.92 ± 0.42, 2.04 ± 0.78, 4.37 ± 1.18, and 16.42 ± 3.38 MPa, respectively. There was the statistically significant difference between the four luting cement tested (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: the phosphate-containing resin cement Panavia-F exhibited shear bond strength value significantly higher than all materials tested. PMID:29610618

  17. The bond of different post materials to a resin composite cement and a resin composite core material.

    Stewardson, D; Shortall, A; Marquis, P

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the bond of endodontic post materials, with and without grit blasting, to a resin composite cement and a core material using push-out bond strength tests. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts containing carbon (C) or glass (A) fiber and a steel (S) post were cemented into cylinders of polymerized restorative composite without surface treatment (as controls) and after grit blasting for 8, 16, and 32 seconds. Additional steel post samples were sputter-coated with gold before cementation to prevent chemical interaction with the cement. Cylindrical composite cores were bonded to other samples. After sectioning into discs, bond strengths were determined using push-out testing. Profilometry and electron microscopy were used to assess the effect of grit blasting on surface topography. Mean (standard deviation) bond strength values (MPa) for untreated posts to resin cement were 8.41 (2.80) for C, 9.61(1.88) for A, and 19.90 (3.61) for S. Prolonged grit blasting increased bond strength for FRC posts but produced only a minimal increase for S. After 32 seconds, mean values were 20.65 (4.91) for C, 20.41 (2.93) for A, and 22.97 (2.87) for S. Gold-coated steel samples produced the lowest bond strength value, 7.84 (1.40). Mean bond strengths for untreated posts bonded to composite cores were 6.19 (0.95) for C, 13.22 (1.61) for A, and 8.82 (1.18) for S, and after 32 seconds of grit blasting the values were 17.30 (2.02) for C, 26.47 (3.09) for A, and 20.61 (2.67) for S. FRC materials recorded higher roughness values before and after grit blasting than S. With prolonged grit blasting, roughness increased for A and C, but not for S. There was no evidence of significant bonding to untreated FRC posts, but significant bonding occurred between untreated steel posts and the resin cement. Increases in the roughness of FRC samples were material dependent and roughening significantly increased bond strength values (p<0.05). Surface roughening of the tested FRC posts is

  18. Resin-bonded restorations: a strategy for managing anterior tooth loss in adolescence.

    Zitzmann, Nicola U; Özcan, Mutlu; Scherrer, Susanne S; Bühler, Julia M; Weiger, Roland; Krastl, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    In children or adolescents with anterior tooth loss, space closure with the patient's own teeth should be considered as the first choice to avoid lifelong restorative needs. Thorough diagnostics and treatment planning are required when autotransplantation or orthodontic space closure is considered. If these options are not indicated and a single tooth implant restoration is considered, implant placement should be postponed until adulthood, particularly in young women and in patients with hyperdivergent skeletal growth pattern. A ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prosthesis with 1 retainer is an excellent treatment solution for the interim period; it may also serve as a long-term restoration, providing that sound enamel structure is present, sufficient framework dimensions have been provided, adhesive cementation techniques have been meticulously applied, and functional contacts of the cantilever pontic avoided. In contrast, a resin-bonded fixed dental prosthesis with a metal framework and retentive preparation is indicated if the palatal enamel structure is compromised, interocclusal clearance is limited, splinting (such as after orthodontic treatment) is required, or more than 1 tooth has to be replaced. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Color stability of esthetic restorative materials: a spectrophotometric analysis.

    Poggio, Claudio; Ceci, Matteo; Beltrami, Riccardo; Mirando, Maria; Wassim, Jaffal; Colombo, Marco

    2016-12-01

    Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the color stability of different restorative materials (one microfilled composite, one nanofilled composite, one nanohybrid composite and one Ormocer-based composite) after exposure to different staining solutions (coffee, coca-cola and red wine). Material and methods: All materials were polymerized into silicon rings (2 mm ×6 mm ×8 mm) to obtain specimens identical in size. Thirty cylindrical specimens of each material were prepared. They were immersed in staining solutions over a 28-day test period. A colorimetric evaluation according to the CIE L*a*b* system was performed by a blind trained operator at 7, 14, 21, 28 days of the staining process. The Shapiro-Wilk test and Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA were applied to assess significant differences among restorative materials. The paired t -test was applied to test which CIE L*a*b* parameters significantly changed after immersion in staining solutions. Results: All restorative materials showed clinically perceptible color differences after immersion in coffee. L* and b* values showed the highest variability. Coca cola and red wine did not influence the color stability for all restorative materials except for Filtek Supreme XTE. Conclusions: Coffee caused a significant color change in all types of tested composite resins. Filtek Supreme XTE demonstrated alone a staining susceptibility to red wine; no other significant differences among the materials were demonstrated. Long-term exposure to some food dyes (coffee in particular) can significantly affect the color stability of modern esthetic restorative materials regardless of materials' different composition.

  20. Environmental restoration waste materials co-disposal

    Phillips, S.J.; Alexander, R.G.; England, J.L.; Kirdendall, J.R.; Raney, E.A.; Stewart, W.E.; Dagan, E.B.; Holt, R.G.

    1993-09-01

    Co-disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste is a highly efficient and cost-saving technology. The technology used for final treatment of soil-washing size fractionization operations is being demonstrated on simulated waste. Treated material (wasterock) is used to stabilize and isolate retired underground waste disposal structures or is used to construct landfills or equivalent surface or subsurface structures. Prototype equipment is under development as well as undergoing standardized testing protocols to prequalify treated waste materials. Polymer and hydraulic cement solidification agents are currently used for geotechnical demonstration activities

  1. FEATURES OF RESTORATION OF DISPERSE POROUS MATERIALS

    S. L. Rovin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research recycling of dispersed materials in rotary furnaces. Has been received new data on the of heat and mass transfer processes and carry out intensive and continuous process of solid- liquid-phase reduction of oxides in a single unit.

  2. Influence of different bonding agents on marginal sealing quality of amalgam restorations

    Melih Irena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although advanced adhesive systems are in use, marginal microleakage is one of the greatest problems of contemporary restorative dentistry. Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different bonding agents on the marginal sealing quality of class II amalgam restorations. Methods. Forty freshly extracted human premolar and molar teeth were divided into four groups with 10 teeth in each one. Class II preparations were prepared and different adhesives were applied as follows: group I - Amalgam Liner® (Voco; group II - ONE-STEP® PLUS (Bisco; group III - PQ 1 (Ultradent. Group IV was used as a control, without any bonding agent. Amalgam (Cavex Non Gamma 2, Cavex was hand-condensed into each preparation. Specimens were thermocycled 200 times at the following temperatures: 5-7°C, 37°C and 57-59°C, and were then immersed into 1% solution of gentian violet for 72 hours. The teeth were sectioned longitudinally and microleakage was graded in the area of the gingival and occlusal quantity rim using a binocular magnifying glass with 25 times magnification. Results. The highest microleakage was recorded in the Amalgam Liner group; 1526.0 μm at the gingival wall and 694.5 μm at the occlusal cavity wall. The lowest dye penetration was observed in the PQ1 group; 589.5 μm at the gingival wall, and 599.9 μm at the occlusal wall of the restoration. ANOVA test showed that there was a statistically significant difference of dye penetration values at the gingival wall among all examination groups (p<0.01. No statistically significant differences were found comparing microleakage values at the occlusal wall. Conclusion. Results of this study showed that the best marginal sealing was accomplished by using the PQ1 bonding agent.

  3. Push-Out Bond Strength of Restorations with Bulk-Fill, Flow, and Conventional Resin Composites

    Rodrigo Vieira Caixeta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strengths of composite restorations made with different filler amounts and resin composites that were photoactivated using a light-emitting diode (LED. Thirty bovine incisors were selected, and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. All preparations were etched with Scotchbond Etching Gel, the Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus adhesive system was applied followed by photoactivation, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtek Z350 XT, Filtek Z350 XT Flow, or bulk-fill X-tra fil resin composite (n = 10 followed by photoactivation. A push-out test to determine bond strength was conducted using a universal testing machine. Data (MPa were submitted to Student’s t-test at a 5% significance level. After the test, the fractured specimens were examined using an optical microscope under magnification (10x. Although all three composites demonstrated a high prevalence of adhesive failures, the bond strength values of the different resin composites photoactivated by LED showed that the X-tra fil resin composite had a lower bond strength than the Filtek Z350 XT and Filtek Z350 XT Flow resin composites.

  4. Effect of deproteinization and tubular occlusion on microtensile bond strength and marginal microleakage of resin composite restorations

    Wagner Baseggio

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Dentin adhesion procedure presents limitations, especially regarding to lifetime stability of formed hybrid layer. Alternative procedures have been studied in order to improve adhesion to dentin. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of deproteinization or dentin tubular occlusion, as well as the combination of both techniques, on microtensile bond strength (µTBS and marginal microleakage of composite resin restorations. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Extracted erupted human third molars were randomly divided into 4 groups. Dentin surfaces were treated with one of the following procedures: (A 35% phosphoric acid gel (PA + adhesive system (AS; (B PA + 10% NaOCl + AS; (C PA + oxalate + AS and (D PA + oxalate + 10% NaOCl + AS. Bond strength data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. The microleakage scores were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney non-parametric tests. Significance level was set at 0.05 for all analyses. RESULTS: µTBS data presented statistically lower values for groups D and B, ranking data as A>C>B>D. The use of oxalic acid resulted in microleakage reduction along the tooth/restoration interface, being significant when used alone. On the other hand, the use of 10% NaOCl alone or in combination with oxalic acid, resulted in increased microleakage. CONCLUSIONS: Dentin deproteinization with 10% NaOCl or in combination with oxalate significantly compromised both the adhesive bond strength and the microleakage at interface. Tubular occlusion prior to adhesive system application seems to be a useful technique to reduce marginal microleakage.

  5. Supramolecular materials based on hydrogen-bonded polymers

    ten Brinke, Gerrit; Ruokolainen, Janne; Ikkala, Olli; Binder, W

    2007-01-01

    Combining supramolecular principles with block copolymer self-assembly offers unique possibilities to create materials with responsive and/or tunable properties. The present chapter focuses on supramolecular materials based on hydrogen bonding and (block co-) polymers. Several cases will be

  6. Role of dental restoration materials in oral mucosal lichenoid lesions

    Rajneesh Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental restorative materials containing silver-mercury compounds have been known to induce oral lichenoid lesions. Objectives: To determine the frequency of contact allergy to dental restoration materials in patients with oral lichenoid lesions and to study the effect of removal of the materials on the lesions. Results: Forty-five patients were recruited in three groups of 15 each: Group A (lesions in close contact with dental materials, Group B (lesions extending 1 cm beyond the area of contact and Group C (no topographic relationship. Thirty controls were recruited in two groups of 15 individuals each: Group D (oral lichenoid lesions but no dental material and Group E (dental material but no oral lichenoid lesions. Patch tests were positive in 20 (44.5% patients. Mercury was the most common allergen to elicit a positive reaction in eight patients, followed by nickel (7, palladium (5, potassium dichromate (3, balsam of Peru, gold sodium thiosulphate 2 and tinuvin (2 and eugenol (1, cobalt chloride (1 and carvone (1. Seven patients elicited positive response to more than one allergen. In 13 of 20 patients who consented to removal of the dental material, complete healing was observed in 6 (30%, marked improvement in 7 (35% and no improvement in 7 (35% patients. Relief of symptoms was usually observed 3 months after removal. Limitations: Limited number of study subjects and short follow up after removal/replacement of dental restoration materials are the main limitations of this study. Conclusion: Contact allergy to amalgam is an important etiologic factor in oral lichenoid lesions and removal of restorative material should be offered to patients who have lesions in close proximity to the dental material.

  7. The Effect of Various Types of Mechanical and Chemical Preconditioning on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets on Zirconia Restorations

    Jihun Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the combined effect of mechanical and chemical treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS of metal orthodontic brackets on zirconia restoration. The zirconia specimens were randomly divided into 12 groups (n=10 according to three factors: AL (Al2O3 and CO (CoJet™ by sandblasting material; SIL (silane, ZPP (Zirconia Prime Plus, and SBU (Single Bond Universal by primer; and N (not thermocycled and T (thermocycled. The specimens were evaluated for shear bond strength, and the fractured surfaces were observed using a stereomicroscope. Scanning electron microscopy images were also obtained. CO-SBU combination had the highest bond strength after thermocycling (26.2 MPa. CO-SIL showed significantly higher SBS than AL-SIL (p0.05. Modified Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI scoring and SEM figures were consistent with the results of the surface treatments. In conclusion, CO-SBU, which combines the effect of increased surface area and chemical bonding with both 10-MDP and silane, showed the highest SBS. Sandblasting with either material improved the mechanical bonding by increasing the surface area, and all primers showed clinically acceptable increase of shear bond strength for orthodontic treatment.

  8. Influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage restorations.

    Bakeman, E M; Rego, N; Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage ceramic restorations. Forty extracted molars were allocated into four groups (n=10) to test for two variables: 1) the thickness of ceramic (1 mm or 2 mm) and 2) the ceramic materials (a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max] or leucite-reinforced glass ceramic [IPS Empress]). All ceramic restorations were luted with resin cement (Variolink II) on the prepared teeth. These luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, in the compression mode, with a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey Honestly Significantly Different multiple comparison test (α =0.05). The fracture resistance revealed a significant effect for materials (pceramic was not significant (p=0.074), and the interaction between the thickness of ceramic and the materials was not significant (p=0.406). Mean (standard deviation) fracture resistance values were as follows: a 2-mm thickness of a lithium disilicate bonded to tooth structure (2505 [401] N) revealed a significantly higher fracture resistance than did a 1-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced (1569 [452] N) and a 2-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced ceramic bonded to tooth structure (1716 [436] N) (pceramic at 1-mm thickness (2105 [567] N) and at 2-mm thickness. Using a lithium disilicate glass ceramic for partial coverage restoration significantly improved fracture resistance compared to using a leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The thickness of ceramic had no significant effect on fracture resistance when the ceramics were bonded to the underlying tooth structure.

  9. An evaluation on microleakage and gap width of different dentin bonding agents in high copper amalgam restorations

    Ghavam-Nasiri M. Associate Professor

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: A lot of efforts have been made to create a complete adaptation between tooth"nand amalgam restorations."nPurpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate microleakage and interfacial micromorphology of"namalgam restorations lined with dentin adhesives, namely One Coat Bond, Syntac, Excite and Copalite,"nas liners."nMaterials and Methods: 144 intact human canine teeth were selected. Then class V cavities, with"nenamel and dentinal margins, were prepared on each of them. Cavities were lined with different dentin"nbonding systems (Syntac, One Coat Bond and Excite according to the manufacturer's instructions and"nrestored with Oralloy and Cinalloy, non gamma 2 spherical amalgams and Aristaloy a non gamma 2"nAdmixed alloy. Copalite was used in the group, served as controls. After thirty days storage in synthetic"nsaliva at 37°c, the specimens were thermocycled in saliva (4000 cycles. The degree of microleakage was"nassessed by means of basic fushin dye penetration and recorded. The gap width was evaluated with"nScanning Electron Microscope. Pearson and %2 tests were used to analyze the results."nResults: None of the systems, tested in this study, eliminated microleakage completely, Pearson's"ncorrelation coefficient showed a positive correlation between gap and microleakage (P<0/05.Statistical"nsignificant differences were revealed among the liners regarding gap and microleakage (P<0.05."nOne Coat Bond and Syntac appeared to leak less than other groups. The gap width by One Coat Bond"nand Syntac were respectively 0.35 and 0.3 urn in dentine, 0.2 and 0.1 in enamel. Excite and copalite gap"nwidth in dentine and enamel were 1,3-1.36 urn and 0.3-0.6, respectively. The type of amalgam did not"nhave any effect in the degree of microleakage and gap width (P>0/05."nConclusion: One Coat Bond and Syntac, comparing to Excite and Copalite, showed less microleakage"nand gap width.

  10. New materials for structural restoration: an old debate

    Federica Ottoni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of composites in architectural restoration is becoming more and more widespread, due to their technical advantages, in many cases. However, using these materials in the field of cultural heritage creates not only technical problems but also cultural issues. The paper deals with these issues, starting from some considerations on the use of “new” materials in the past, when – just to mention some examples – iron, steel and reinforced concrete were considered innovative. From Ruskin’s idea of  “crutch”, passing to the “hidden reinforcement” expressed in the Athens Charter, to some more recent examples, the past experiences offer once again the opportunity to evaluate new techniques and theoretical approaches. The authors underline the opportunity to identify a “correct methodology” rather than a “correct solution” in restoration.  Further knowledge and comprehension of a monument and – at the same time - a deep awareness of the limits and weaknesses of recent technologies and materials, may guide architects to a more efficient, respectful structural restoration project. Keywords: restoration, structure, materials, reinforcement, technique

  11. Shear bond strength of indirect composite material to monolithic zirconia.

    Sari, Fatih; Secilmis, Asli; Simsek, Irfan; Ozsevik, Semih

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of indirect composite material (Tescera Indirect Composite System) to monolithic zirconia (inCoris TZI). Partially stabilized monolithic zirconia blocks were cut into with 2.0 mm thickness. Sintered zirconia specimens were divided into different surface treatment groups: no treatment (control), sandblasting, glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application, and sandblasting + glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application. The indirect composite material was applied to the surface of the monolithic zirconia specimens. Shear bond strength value of each specimen was evaluated after thermocycling. The fractured surface of each specimen was examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope to assess the failure types. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey LSD tests (α=.05). Bond strength was significantly lower in untreated specimens than in sandblasted specimens (Pcomposite material and monolithic zirconia.

  12. Marginal microleakage of class V resin-based composite restorations bonded with six one-step self-etch systems

    Alfonso Sánchez-Ayala

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the microleakage of class V restorations bonded with various one-step self-etching adhesives. Seventy class V resin-based composite restorations were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 35 premolars, by using: Clearfil S 3 Bond, G-Bond, iBond, One Coat 7.0, OptiBond All-In-One, or Xeno IV. The Adper Single Bond etch-and-rinse two-step adhesive was employed as a control. Specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles in separate water baths at 5°C and 55°C and loaded under 40 to 70 N for 50,000 cycles. Marginal microleakage was measured based on the penetration of a tracer agent. Although the control showed no microleakage at the enamel margins, there were no differences between groups (p = 0.06. None of the adhesives avoided microleakage at the dentin margins, and they displayed similar performances (p = 0.76. When both margins were compared, iBond® presented higher microleakage (p < 0.05 at the enamel margins (median, 1.00; Q3–Q1, 1.25–0.00 compared to the dentin margins (median, 0.00; Q3–Q1, 0.25–0.00. The study adhesives showed similar abilities to seal the margins of class V restorations, except for iBond®, which presented lower performance at the enamel margin.

  13. [Research on the aging of all-ceramics restoration materials].

    Zhang, Dongjiao; Chen, Xinmin

    2011-10-01

    All-ceramic crowns and bridges have been widely used for dental restorations owing to their excellent functionality, aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, the premature clinical failure of all-ceramic crowns and bridges may easily occur when they are subjected to the complex environment of oral cavity. In the oral environment, all-ceramic materials are prone to aging. Aging can lead all-ceramic materials to change color, to lower bending strength, and to reduce anti-fracture toughness. There are many factors affecting the aging of the all-ceramic materials, for example, the grain size, the type of stabilizer, the residual stress and the water environment. In order to analyze the aging behavior, to optimize the design of all-ceramic crowns and bridges, and to evaluate the reliability and durability, we review in this paper recent research progress of aging behavior for all-ceramics restoration materials.

  14. Asymmetrical bonding in cold spraying of dissimilar materials

    Nikbakht, R.; Seyedein, S. H.; Kheirandish, S.; Assadi, H.; Jodoin, B.

    2018-06-01

    Characteristics of particle bonding, especially for dissimilar materials, remains a key question in cold spray deposition. There are limited reports in direct correlation to particle/substrate bonding and peripheral shear zones. Cold spraying experiments and numerical simulations are conducted to characterise and analyse the correlation between bonding and peripheral shear zones for asymmetric particle/substrate pairs of intermetallic-forming elements of nickel and titanium. The correlation between metallic bonding and highly strained areas is explored in view of the growth of the intermetallic phase at the particle/substrate interface during subsequent heat treatments. Characterisation of the as-sprayed samples reveal that for the Ni(particle)/Ti(substrate) pair, plastic deformation of the particle is dominating over substrate deformation. However, for the Ti(particle)/Ni(substrate) pair, it is observed that the substrate and particle deform to similar extents. Characterisation of the samples after a brief heat treatment at 700 °C indicate that intermetallic formation, and hence metallurgical bonding of the pairs is more likely to occur at the particle peripheries where the interface areas are highly strained, and rarely achieved at the particle base. Results also reveal that bonding extends from peripheries toward the central part of the interfaces with increasing the impact velocity. The kinetics of interfacial intermetallic formation at peripheral areas and its correlation to particle bonding is discussed in view of deformation-enhanced interdiffusion.

  15. Laboratory Performance of Universal Adhesive Systems for Luting CAD/CAM Restorative Materials.

    Siqueira, Fabiana; Cardenas, Andres Millan; Gutierrez, Mario Felipe; Malaquias, Pâmela; Hass, Viviane; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Perdigão, Jorge

    To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of several universal adhesive systems applied on five different indirect restorative materials. Five CAD/CAM materials were selected: 1) indirect resin composite (LAV); 2) feldspathic glass ceramic (VTR); 3) leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic (EMP); 4) lithium disilicate ceramic (EMX); 5) yttrium-stabilized zirconium dioxide (CZI). For each material, 15 blocks were cut into 4 rectangular sections (6 × 6 × 6 mm) (n = 60 per group), and processed as recommended by the respective manufacturer. For each indirect material, the following adhesive systems were applied according to the respective manufacturer's instructions: 1) AdheSE Universal [ADU]; 2) All-Bond Universal (ABU); 3) Ambar Universal (AMB); 4) Clearfil Universal (CFU); 5) Futurabond U (FBU); 6) One Coat 7 Universal (OCU); 7) Peak Universal Bond (PUB); 8) Prime&Bond Elect (PBE); 9) Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU); 10) Xeno Select (XEN, negative control). After the application of the adhesive system, cylinder-shaped transparent matrices were filled with a dual-curing resin cement (NX3) and light cured. Specimens were stored in water (37°C for 24 h) and tested in shear mode at 1.0 mm/min (mSBS). The failure pattern and μSBS were statistically evaluated (a = 0.05). LAV, VTR, and EMP showed a greater number of cohesive fractures than EMX and CZI (p materials. There was a wide variability in mean μSBS when different universal adhesives were applied to the several CAD/CAM indirect materials. Most universal adhesives bonded well to air-abraded zirconia.

  16. Materials and methods for autonomous restoration of electrical conductivity

    Blaiszik, Benjamin J; Odom, Susan A; Caruso, Mary M; Jackson, Aaron C; Baginska, Marta B; Ritchey, Joshua A; Finke, Aaron D; White, Scott R; Moore, Jeffrey S; Sottos, Nancy R; Braun, Paul V; Amine, Khalil

    2014-03-25

    An autonomic conductivity restoration system includes a solid conductor and a plurality of particles. The particles include a conductive fluid, a plurality of conductive microparticles, and/or a conductive material forming agent. The solid conductor has a first end, a second end, and a first conductivity between the first and second ends. When a crack forms between the first and second ends of the conductor, the contents of at least a portion of the particles are released into the crack. The cracked conductor and the released contents of the particles form a restored conductor having a second conductivity, which may be at least 90% of the first conductivity.

  17. Energetic materials: crystallization, characterization and insensitive plastic bonded explosives

    Heijden, Antoine E.D.M. van der; Creyghton, Yves L.M.; Marino, Emanuela; Bouma, Richard H.B.; Scholtes, Gert J.H.G.; Duvalois, Willem [TNO Defence, Security and Safety, P. O. Box 45, 2280 AA Rijswijk (Netherlands); Roelands, Marc C.P.M. [TNO Science and Industry, P. O. Box 342, 7300 AH Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    2008-02-15

    The product quality of energetic materials is predominantly determined by the crystallization process applied to produce these materials. It has been demonstrated in the past that the higher the product quality of the solid energetic ingredients, the less sensitive a plastic bonded explosive containing these energetic materials becomes. The application of submicron or nanometric energetic materials is generally considered to further decrease the sensitiveness of explosives. In order to assess the product quality of energetic materials, a range of analytical techniques is available. Recent attempts within the Reduced-sensitivity RDX Round Robin (R4) have provided the EM community a better insight into these analytical techniques and in some cases a correlation between product quality and shock initiation of plastic bonded explosives containing (RS-)RDX was identified, which would provide a possibility to discriminate between conventional and reduced sensitivity grades. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Evaluation of the anti-cariogenic potential and bond strength to enamel of different fluoridated materials used for bracket bonding

    SILVA, Sérgio Ricardo da; SILVA, Luciana Alves Herdy da; BASTING, Roberta Tarkany; LIMA-ARSATI, Ynara Bosco de Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the in vitro and in situ anti-cariogenic potential and bond strength to enamel of materials containing fluoride (F), used for bracket bonding: Transbond XT (GT, negative control), Transbond Plus Color Change (GTF), Transbond-Self-Etching Primer (GSAF) and Vitremer (GV, positive control). Material and method In the in vitro study, the specimens were premolars with bonded brackets (n=12/group). After pH cycling, the F release, bond strength, fracture mode and pr...

  19. Spectrophotometric assessment of tooth bleaching under orthodontic braquets bonded with different materials

    Camila Maria Lima de CASTRO

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction patients have been submitted to tooth bleaching during orthodontic treatment for aesthetic purposes or to anticipate the replacement of restorations after completion of the treatment. Objective to evaluate the effectiveness of tooth bleaching under orthodontic brackets bonded with different materials. Material and method a hundred bovine enamel blocks were divided into two groups, at-home and in-office tooth bleaching. In-office bleaching was subdivided into five groups (n = 10: HP (control - without brackets; SA(t - brackets bonded with Transbond XT, without bleaching; SA(fm - brackets bonded with Orthodontic Fill Magic, without bleaching; HP(t - brackets bonded with Transbond XT subjected to bleaching; and HP(fm - brackets bonded with Orthodontic Fill Magic subjected to bleaching. At-home bleaching followed the same treatments, only replacing the bleaching agent. Spectrophotometric assessment was used for tooth color determination at three moments: 1 before staining (baseline; 2 after staining; 3 after bonding the brackets and bleaching procedures. Data were submitted to ANOVA and analyzed by Tukey's test (p < 0.05. Result For both types of bleaching, the control group had an effective bleaching action. Groups using Transbond XT presented greater bleaching potential among the groups with orthodontic accessory, but the bleaching action differed from the positive control. Groups using Orthodontic Fill Magic presented no bleaching action, resembling the negative control groups (artificial saliva. Conclusion the orthodontic bracket impaired the effectiveness of the at-home and in-office bleaching treatment, regardless of the resin used for bonding.

  20. Adhesives with wood materials : bond formation and performance

    Charles R. Frihart; Christopher G. Hunt

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of wood plays an increasing role in the forest products industry and is a key factor for efficiently utilizing our timber resource. The main use of adhesives is in the manufacture of building materials, including plywood, oriented strandboard, particleboard, fiberboard, structural composite lumber, doors, windows and frames, and factory-laminated wood...

  1. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of bleaching on microhardness of esthetic restorative materials.

    Malkondu, Özlem; Yurdagüven, Haktan; Say, Esra Can; Kazazoğlu, Ender; Soyman, Mübin

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a high-concentration carbamide peroxide–containing home bleaching system (Opalescence PF) and a hydrogen peroxide–containing over-the-counter bleaching system (Treswhite Supreme) on the microhardness of two nanocomposites (Filtek Supreme XT and Premise) and leucite-reinforced glass ceramic (Empress Esthetic), glass ceramic (Empress 2 layering), and feldspathic porcelain (Matchmaker MC). A total of 100 specimens, 20 of each kind of the restorative materials, 2 mm in thickness and 10 mm in diameter, were fabricated. Then the specimens were polished with SiC paper and 1 μm alumina polishing paste. After polishing, porcelain specimens were glazed in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Each type of restorative material was then randomly divided into two groups (n=10), and the specimens were treated with either Opalescence PF or Treswhite Supreme. The microhardness of the specimens before bleaching (baseline) and after bleaching was determined using a digital microhardness tester. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test and the Wilcoxon test. Opalescence PF significantly influenced the hardness of all the restorative materials. Statistically significant decreases with respect to before bleaching were found for Premise (p=0.005), Empress Esthetic (p=0.003), Empress 2 layering (p=0.005), and Matchmaker-MC (p=0.003), whereas a statistically significant increase was observed in Filtek Supreme XT (p=0.028). The difference in the microhardness values between before and after bleaching using Treswhite Supreme was statistically significant only for Premise (p=0.022). High-concentration carbamide peroxide–containing home bleaching may affect the microhardness of restorative materials.

  3. Evaluation of color stability of different temporary restorative materials

    José Vitor Quinelli Mazaro

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroductionTemporary restorative materials are widely used, however, little is know about their color stability.Objectiveto evaluate the color stability of the following temporary restorative materials: acrylic and bis-acrylic resins after immersion in pigmenting solutions for different periods of storage.Material and methodFour materials were tested (Dêncor/Clássico, Protemp 4/3M ESPE; Structur 2 SC/Voco; Luxatemp AM Plus/DMG and 30 test specimens (15 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick per material were fabricated. They were divided according to the storage medium (artificial saliva, saliva + cola type soda, and saliva + coffee and storage time intervals (2, 5, 7 and 15 days. Color measurements were made before and after immersions, with use of a spectrophotometer, by means of the CIE L*a*b* system. The data were analyzed by the analysis of variance and the Tukey Test, at a level of significance of 5%.ResultAcrylic resin presented greater color stability in comparison with bis-acrylic resins (p<0.001. When bis-acrylic resins were compared no significant difference was observed between the resins Structur and Luxatemp (p=0.767. As regards solutions tested, coffee showed the highest color change values (p<0.001, and the longer the storage time interval, the greater was the color change in all the temporary restorative materials analyzed (p<0.001.ConclusionAcrylic resin presented greater color stability in comparison with bis-acrylic resins (p<0.001. Coffee caused the greatest color change, and immersion time was determinant in color stability of the temporary materials analyzed.

  4. In vitro color stability of provisional restorative materials.

    Jalali, Hamid; Dorriz, Hassan; Hoseinkhezri, Farzaneh; Emadian Razavi, S F

    2012-01-01

    Discoloration of provisional restorations can result in esthetic problems which are critically important in, for example, anterior areas and may compromise the acceptability of the restoration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of tea on provisional restorative materials. This study was designed to measure the degree of color change of three acrylic resin provisional materials, before and after immersion in artificial saliva and artificial saliva-tea solution for 2 and 4 weeks. Three types of acrylic provisional materials (duralay, tempron, acropars TRP), were studied. Twenty disks (20 ± 0.1 mm by 2 ± 0.05 mm) were fabricated from each material. Specimens were polished with acrylic bur using pumice and diamond polishing paste. Base line color was measured using a spectrophotometer. Ten disks were stored in artificial saliva and 10 were stored in a solution of artificial saliva and tea at room temperature. Color measurements were made after 2 and 4 weeks of immersion. Differences in color changes were compared by two way ANOVA, across the six groups, followed by a Turkey-Kramer's multiple comparison test. For specimens immersed in artificial saliva, the color change of methyl methacrylate materials; duralay (ΔE=4.94) and tempron (ΔE=6.54), was significantly more than butyl methacrylate material; acropars (ΔE=4.10). After immersion in an artificial saliva- tea solution, tempron exhibited less color change (ΔE=8.50) compared to duralay (ΔE=10.93) and acropars (ΔE=15.64). Color stability of methyl methacrylate is higher than butyl methacrylates so if provisional materials are used for extended periods of time; tempron is preferred.

  5. Phosphate bonded ceramics as candidate final-waste-form materials

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.; Cunnane, J.; Sutaria, M.; Kurokawa, S.; Mayberry, J.

    1994-04-01

    Room-temperature setting phosphate-bonded ceramics were studied as candidate materials for stabilization of DOE low-level problem mixed wastes which cannot be treated by other established stabilization techniques. Phosphates of Mg, Mg-Na, Al and Zr were studied to stabilize ash surrogate waste containing RCRA metals as nitrates and RCRA organics. We show that for a typical loading of 35 wt.% of the ash waste, the phosphate ceramics pass the TCLP test. The waste forms have high compression strength exceeding ASTM recommendations for final waste forms. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies and differential thermal analyses of the waste forms show evidence of chemical reaction of the waste with phosphoric acid and the host matrix. The SEM studies show evidence of physical bonding. The excellent performance in the leaching tests is attributed to a chemical solidification and physical as well as chemical bonding of ash wastes in these phosphate ceramics

  6. HIP bonding between niobium/copper/stainless steel materials

    Inoue, Hitoshi; Fujino, Takeo; Hitomi, Nobuteru; Saito, Kenji; Yamada, Masahiro; Shibuya, Junichi; Ota, Tomoko

    2000-01-01

    We have used niobium flanges for the niobium bulk superconducting RF cavities, however, they are expensive. Stainless steel flanges instead of the niobium flanges will be used in the future large scale production of sc cavities like the KEK/JAERI joint project. For a future R and D of the vacuum sealing related to the clean horizontal assembly method or development of cavities welded a helium vessel in the KEK/JAERI joint project, a converter section of niobium material to stainless steel is required. From these requirements we need to develop the converter. We have tried a HIP bonding method between niobium materials and stainless steel or copper material. It was made clear that the technology could offer an enough bonding strength even higher than niobium tensile strength in the joined surface between niobium and stainless steel or copper. (author)

  7. In Vitro Comparison of the Bond Strength between Ceramic Repair Systems and Ceramic Materials and Evaluation of the Wettability.

    Kocaağaoğlu, Hasan; Manav, Taha; Albayrak, Haydar

    2017-04-01

    When fracture of an all-ceramic restoration occurs, it can be necessary to repair without removing the restoration. Although there are many studies about the repair of metal-ceramic restorations, there are few about all-ceramic restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between ceramic repair systems and esthetic core materials and to evaluate the wettability of all-ceramic core materials. Disk-like specimens (N = 90) made of three dental ceramic infrastructure materials (zirconia ceramic, alumina ceramic, glass ceramic) were polished with silicon carbide paper, prepared for bonding (abrasion with 30 μm diamond rotary cutting instrument). Thirty specimens of each infrastructure were obtained. Each infrastructure group was divided into three subgroups; they were bonded using 3 repair systems: Bisco Intraoral Repair Kit, Cimara & Cimara Zircon Repair System, and Clearfil Repair System. After 1200 thermocycles, shear bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. In addition, the contact angle values of the infrastructures after surface treatments were examined for wettability. Data were analyzed by using ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests. Although there were no significant differences among the repair systems (p > 0.05) in the glass ceramic and zirconia groups, a significant difference was found among the repair systems in alumina infrastructure (p 0.05); however, a statistically significant difference was found among the repair systems (p < 0.05). No difference was found among the infrastructures and repair systems in terms of contact angle values. Cimara & Cimara Zircon Repair System had higher bond strength values than the other repair systems. Although no difference was found among the infrastructures and repair systems, contact wettability angle was decreased by surface treatments compared with polished surfaces. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. An improved interfacial bonding model for material interface modeling

    Lin, Liqiang; Wang, Xiaodu; Zeng, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    An improved interfacial bonding model was proposed from potential function point of view to investigate interfacial interactions in polycrystalline materials. It characterizes both attractive and repulsive interfacial interactions and can be applied to model different material interfaces. The path dependence of work-of-separation study indicates that the transformation of separation work is smooth in normal and tangential direction and the proposed model guarantees the consistency of the cohesive constitutive model. The improved interfacial bonding model was verified through a simple compression test in a standard hexagonal structure. The error between analytical solutions and numerical results from the proposed model is reasonable in linear elastic region. Ultimately, we investigated the mechanical behavior of extrafibrillar matrix in bone and the simulation results agreed well with experimental observations of bone fracture. PMID:28584343

  9. Dental Cements for Luting and Bonding Restorations: Self-Adhesive Resin Cements.

    Manso, Adriana P; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2017-10-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements combine easy application of conventional luting materials with improved mechanical properties and bonding capability of resin cements. The presence of functional acidic monomers, dual cure setting mechanism, and fillers capable of neutralizing the initial low pH of the cement are essential elements of the material and should be understood when selecting the ideal luting material for each clinical situation. This article addresses the most relevant aspects of self-adhesive resin cements and their potential impact on clinical performance. Although few clinical studies are available to establish solid clinical evidence, the information presented provides clinical guidance in the dynamic environment of material development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Difference in opalescence of restorative materials by the illuminant.

    Yu, Bin; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2009-08-01

    To determine the differences in the opalescence parameter (OP) of indirect and direct resin composites, veneer ceramics and bovine enamel relative to the CIE standard illuminants D65, A and F2. BelleGlass NG (indirect resin; 10 shades) and Estelite Sigma (direct resin; 12 shades), and 4 shades of veneer ceramics were investigated. Bovine enamel was used as a reference. Reflected and transmitted colors of specimens were measured relative to the illuminants D65, A and F2 with a reflection spectrophotometer. OP values relative to the three illuminants [OP(D65), OP(A) and OP(F2)], difference in OP (DeltaOP) and OP difference ratio relative to OP(D65) [DeltaOP/OP(D65)] by the change of illuminants were calculated. Within each restorative material, DeltaOP and DeltaOP/OP(D65) values were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), with the fixed factors of the shade designation and the combination of illuminants (alpha=0.05). DeltaOP and DeltaOP/OP(D65) values were influenced by the two factors within each restorative material based on two-way ANOVA. High opalescent materials showed higher DeltaOP values. OP(D65) was lower than OP(F2) and OP(A) values. Restorative materials showed lower DeltaOP/OP(D65) values than bovine enamel. Correlation coefficients between OP values relative to different illuminants were higher than 0.961 (Popalescence properties as compared with natural tooth enamel.

  11. Interpenetrating network ceramic-resin composite dental restorative materials.

    Swain, M V; Coldea, A; Bilkhair, A; Guess, P C

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the structure and some properties of resin infiltrated ceramic network structure materials suitable for CAD/CAM dental restorative applications. Initially the basis of interpenetrating network materials is defined along with placing them into a materials science perspective. This involves identifying potential advantages of such structures beyond that of the individual materials or simple mixing of the components. Observations from a number of recently published papers on this class of materials are summarized. These include the strength, fracture toughness, hardness and damage tolerance, namely to pointed and blunt (spherical) indentation as well as to burr adjustment. In addition a summary of recent results of crowns subjected to simulated clinical conditions using a chewing simulator are presented. These results are rationalized on the basis of existing theoretical considerations. The currently available ceramic-resin IPN material for clinical application is softer, exhibits comparable strength and fracture toughness but with substantial R-curve behavior, has lower E modulus and is more damage tolerant than existing glass-ceramic materials. Chewing simulation observations with crowns of this material indicate that it appears to be more resistant to sliding/impact induced cracking although its overall contact induced breakage load is modest. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Restoration of Strip Crown with a Resin-Bonded Composite Cement in Early Childhood Caries

    Mi-ae Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Early childhood caries is a widely prevalent disease throughout the world. It is necessary to treat this condition in early childhood; however, child behavior management may be particularly challenging during treatment. To overcome this challenge, we used Carigel to remove caries and RelyX Unicem resin cement for strip crown restoration. It not only has the desired aesthetic effect but is also more effective for primary teeth, which are used for a shorter period than permanent teeth are. Case Presentation. We report a case of three pediatric patients with early childhood caries, in whom caries was removed by using Carigel to avoid the risk of pulpal exposure associated with high-speed handpieces. Subsequently, aesthetic restoration was performed using strip crown with RelyX Unicem self-adhesive resin cement. Conclusion. RelyX Unicem has the following advantages: (1 not requiring have any special skills for the dentist for performing the procedure, (2 decreased occurrence of bubbles during injection of the cement, and (3 overall short duration of the procedure. Thus, it is appropriate for the treatment of pediatric patients whose behavior is difficult to manage. However, further studies are required in order to establish the use of RelyX Unicem as a stable restorative material in early childhood caries.

  13. Bonding in phase change materials: concepts and misconceptions

    Jones, R. O.

    2018-04-01

    Bonding concepts originating in chemistry are surveyed from a condensed matter perspective, beginning around 1850 with ‘valence’ and the word ‘bond’ itself. The analysis of chemical data in the 19th century resulted in astonishing progress in understanding the connectivity and stereochemistry of molecules, almost without input from physicists until the development of quantum mechanics in 1925 and afterwards. The valence bond method popularized by Pauling and the molecular orbital methods of Hund, Mulliken, Bloch, and Hückel play major roles in the subsequent development, as does the central part played by the kinetic energy in covalent bonding (Ruedenberg and others). ‘Metallic’ (free electron) and related approaches, including pseudopotential and density functional theories, have been remarkably successful in understanding structures and bonding in molecules and solids. We discuss these concepts in the context of phase change materials, which involve the rapid and reversible transition between amorphous and crystalline states, and note the confusion that some have caused, in particular ‘resonance’ and ‘resonant bonding’.

  14. Surface Reconstruction-Induced Coincidence Lattice Formation Between Two-Dimensionally Bonded Materials and a Three-Dimensionally Bonded Substrate

    Boschker, Jos E.; Momand, Jamo; Bragaglia, Valeria; Wang, Ruining; Perumal, Karthick; Giussani, Alessandro; Kooi, Bart J.; Riechert, Henning; Calarco, Raffaella

    Sb2Te3 films are used for studying the epitaxial registry between two-dimensionally bonded (2D) materials and three-dimensional bonded (3D) substrates. In contrast to the growth of 3D materials, it is found that the formation of coincidence lattices between Sb2Te3 and Si(111) depends on the geometry

  15. Dentin surface treatment using a non-thermal argon plasma brush for interfacial bonding improvement in composite restoration

    Ritts, Andy Charles; Li, Hao; Yu, Qingsong; Xu, Changqi; Yao, Xiaomei; Hong, Liang; Wang, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the treatment effects of non-thermal atmospheric gas plasmas on dentin surfaces for composite restoration. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. The dentin surfaces were treated by using a non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush for various durations. The molecular changes of the dentin surfaces were analyzed using FTIR/ATR and an increase in carbonyl groups on dentin surfaces was detected with plasma treated dentin. Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive and Filtek Z250 dental composite were applied as directed. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, the teeth thus prepared were sectioned into micro-bars as the specimens for tensile test. Student Newman Keuls tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s plasma treatment. However, the bonding strength to plasma treated inner dentin did not show any improvement. It was found that plasma treatment of peripheral dentin surface up to 100 s gave an increase in interfacial bonding strength, while a prolong plasma treatment of dentin surfaces, e.g., 5 min treatments, showed a decrease in interfacial bonding strength. PMID:20831586

  16. Comparison of shear bond strengths of conventional orthodontic composite and nano-ceramic restorative composite: an in vitro study.

    Nagar, Namit; Vaz, Anna C

    2013-01-01

    To compare the shear bond strength of a nano-ceramic restorative composite Ceram-X Mono(TM♦), a restorative resin with the traditional orthodontic composite Transbond XT(TM†) and to evaluate the site of bond failure using Adhesive Remnant Index. Sixty extracted human premolars were divided into two groups of 30 each. Stainless steel brackets were bonded using Transbond XT(TM†) (Group I) and Ceram-X Mono(TM♦) (Group II) according to manufacturer's protocol. Shear bond strength was measured on Universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. Adhesive Remnant Index scores were assigned to debonded brackets of each group. Data was analyzed using unpaired 't' test and Chi square test. The mean shear bond strength of Group I (Transbond XT(TM†)) was 12.89 MPa ± 2.19 and that of Group II (Ceram-X Mono(TM)) was 7.29 MPa ± 1.76. Unpaired 't' test revealed statistically significant differences amongst the shear bond strength of the samples measured. Chi-square test revealed statistically insignificant differences amongst the ARI scores of the samples measured. Ceram-X Mono(TM♦) had a lesser mean shear bond strength when compared to Transbond XT(TM†) which was statistically significant difference. However, the mean shear bond of Ceram X Mono was within the clinically acceptable range for bonding. Ceram-X Mono(TM†) and Transbond XT(TM†) showed cohesive fracture of adhesive in 72.6% and 66.6% of the specimens, respectively.

  17. Analysis of microleakage of temporary restorative materials in primary teeth

    Geórgia Linhares dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the coronal microleakage of restorative materials used between sessions of endodontic treatment in primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Forty healthy primary canines were chosen and randomly allocated to four groups: Group 1 - Cimpat Branco ® (n = 10, Group 2 - Bioplic ® (n = 10, Group 3 - Maxxion R ® glass ionomer cement (n = 10, and Group 4 (control - Z350 ® composite resin (n = 10. Class V cavities were created and fillings carried out following the manufacturer′s instructions. The teeth were submitted to thermocycling, sealed, and immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin solution for 24 h. The teeth were split along their long axis in the vestibulolingual direction and the tooth-restorative material interface was photographed. The percentage of microleakage was calculated using the ImageJ program. Data were analyzed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA F-test and Bonferroni′s t-test, with a 5% level of significance. Results: The following mean percentages of microleakage were found: Group 1 = 16.08%, Group 2 = 46.98%, Group 3 = 47.93%, and Group 4 = 11.03%. Statistically, significant differences were found in the comparison of Groups 1 and 4 to Groups 2 and 3. Conclusion: Cimpat Branco ® had a lower percentage of microleakage in comparison to Bioplic ® and Maxxion R ® glass ionomer cement.

  18. Backscattering from dental restorations and splint materials during therapeutic radiation

    Farman, A.G.; Sharma, S.; George, D.I.; Wilson, D.; Dodd, D.; Figa, R.; Haskell, B.

    1985-01-01

    Models were constructed to simulate as closely as possible the human oral cavity. Radiation absorbed doses were determined for controls and various test situations involving the presence of dental restorative and splint materials during cobalt-60 irradiation of the models. Adjacent gold full crowns and adjacent solid dental silver amalgam cores both increased the dose to the interproximal gingivae by 20%. Use of orthodontic full bands for splinting the jaws increased the dose to the buccal tissues by an average of 10%. Augmentation of dose through backscatter radiation was determined to be only slight for intracoronal amalgam fillings and stainless steel or plastic bracket splints

  19. Effect of the cavity configuration factor on the marginal microleakage of esthetic restorative materials.

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; Gonzaga Lopes, Lawrence; Lia Mondelli, Rafael Francisco; da Silva e Souza, Mário Honorato; Pereira Lauris, José Roberto

    2003-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of the cavity configuration factor (CF) on the marginal microleakage of cervical restorations with four aesthetic restorative materials. Conventional cavities, 2.9 mm in diameter and 1.5 mm deep, with CF=2.7 and "saucer"-shaped ones with CF=2 were created in 60 extracted premolars. The following groups were established: G1: Z100/Single Bond, G2: Freedom/Stae, G3: Vitremer/Primer and G4: Durafill/Durafill Bond, following each manufacturer's directions. Thermocycling of the specimens was performed in an aqueous solution of 2% buffered methylene blue, with the temperature varying between 5 to 55 degrees C, for a total of cycles of 60 minutes per day, for 7 days. The specimens were then sectioned and evaluated by two observers using photographs acquired from a stereomicroscope. The values were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis analysis and the Dunn and Wilcoxon test. The averages of the microleakage scores observed in the conventional and "saucer"-shaped cavities were respectively: G1: 0.66/0.46; G2: 0.92/0.69; G3: 1.8/1.86; G4: 3.54/2.3.

  20. Materials for nuclear diffusion-bonded compact heat exchangers

    Li, Xiuqing; Smith, Tim; Kininmont, David; Dewson, Stephen John

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the characteristics of materials used in the manufacture of diffusion bonded compact heat exchangers. Heatric have successfully developed a wide range of alloys tailored to meet process and customer requirements. This paper will focus on two materials of interest to the nuclear industry: dual certified SS316/316L stainless steel and nickel-based alloy Inconel 617. Dual certified SS316/316L is the alloy used most widely in the manufacture of Heatric's compact heat exchangers. Its excellent mechanical and corrosion resistance properties make it a good choice for use with many heat transfer media, including water, carbon dioxide, liquid sodium, and helium. As part of Heatric's continuing product development programme, work has been done to investigate strengthening mechanisms of the alloy; this paper will focus in particular on the effects of nitrogen addition. Another area of Heatric's programme is Alloy 617. This alloy has recently been developed for diffusion bonded compact heat exchanger for high temperature nuclear applications, such as the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for the very high temperature nuclear reactors for production of electricity, hydrogen and process heat. This paper will focus on the effects of diffusion bonding process and cooling rate on the properties of alloy 617. This paper also compares the properties and discusses the applications of these two alloys to compact heat exchangers for various nuclear processes. (author)

  1. Machine guides restoration by using a polymeric material

    В. Б. Струтинський

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The restoration of slide rest guides of the automatic lathe PUB 130 was made by using a polymeric material in the laboratory, and the measurements of the rest displacement strength were made on a specially created experimental stand with the ADC and the PC and subsequent determination of the coefficient of friction. The performed experiments revealed that in the speed range of saddle feed from 0,0228 to 0,075 m/s, the coefficient of friction is within 0,047-0,055. At the same time, the transition to the low-feed (0,0005-0,0022 m/s results in to marked increase of the friction coefficient and the rest hopping movement. However, this phenomenon is likely due to the fact that elastic tie in the form of steel beam with tensometers was put into the feeder of the rest. This explanation let us hope that, with rigid connection of the drive and the rest such a phenomenon will not take place and the value of friction will not differ substantially from the friction obtained at high speeds. The obtained results make it possible to consider the use of a polymer material to be the optimal way to restore worn-out machines

  2. In vitro color stability of provisional restorative materials

    Hamid Jalali

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of tea on provisional restorative materials. Setting and Design: This study was designed to measure the degree of color change of three acrylic resin provisional materials, before and after immersion in artificial saliva and artificial saliva-tea solution for 2 and 4 weeks. Materials and Methods : Three types of acrylic provisional materials (duralay, tempron, acropars TRP, were studied. Twenty disks (20±0.1 mm by 2±0.05 mm were fabricated from each material. Specimens were polished with acrylic bur using pumice and diamond polishing paste. Base line color was measured using a spectrophotometer. Ten disks were stored in artificial saliva and 10 were stored in a solution of artificial saliva and tea at room temperature. Color measurements were made after 2 and 4 weeks of immersion. Statistical analysis used: Differences in color changes were compared by two way ANOVA, across the six groups, followed by a Turkey-Kramer′s multiple comparison test. Results: For specimens immersed in artificial saliva, the color change of methyl methacrylate materials; duralay (ΔE=4.94 and tempron (ΔE=6.54, was significantly more than butyl methacrylate material; acropars (ΔE=4.10. After immersion in an artificial saliva- tea solution, tempron exhibited less color change (ΔE=8.50 compared to duralay (ΔE=10.93 and acropars (ΔE=15.64. Conclusion: Color stability of methyl methacrylate is higher than butyl methacrylates so if provisional materials are used for extended periods of time; tempron is preferred.

  3. Effects of surface treatment and artificial aging on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to four different provisional restorations.

    Al Jabbari, Youssef S; Al Taweel, Sara M; Al Rifaiy, Mohammed; Alqahtani, Mohammed Q; Koutsoukis, Theodoros; Zinelis, Spiros

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the combined effects of material type, surface treatment, and thermocycling on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets to materials used for the fabrication of provisional crowns. Four materials were included in this study (ProTemp, Trim Plus, Trim II, and Superpont C+B). Sixty cylindrical specimens (1 × 3 cm) were prepared from each material and equally divided into three groups. The first group was ground with silica carbide paper, the second was polished with pumice, and the last group was sandblasted with 50-µm aluminum oxide particles. Stainless-steel maxillary central incisor brackets (Victory Series, 3M) were bonded to the provisional material specimens with Transbond XT light-cured composite resin, and half of the specimens from each group were thermocycled 500 times in 5°C and 55°C water baths. Then the brackets were debonded with shear testing, and the results were statistically analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple-comparison tests at α  =  0.05. Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was also identified. Before and after thermocycling, ProTemp materials showed the highest shear bond strength with orthodontic brackets (10.3 and 13.1 MPa, respectively). The statistical analysis indicated an interaction among the three independent variables (P < .05) and statistically significant differences in bond strength among provisional materials (P < .001), surface treatments (P < .001), and thermocycling (P < .05). According to the ARI, most groups demonstrated adhesive failure. The provisional material type, surface treatment, and artificial aging have a significant effect on bond strength. Sandblasting treatment exerts a beneficial effect on shear bond strength.

  4. Influence of citric acid on the surface texture of glass ionomer restorative materials

    Reddy, Dappili Swami Ranga; Kumar, Ramachandran Anil; Venkatesan, Sokkalingam Mothilal; Narayan, Gopal Shankar; Duraivel, Dasarathan; Indra, Rajamani

    2014-01-01

    Aim: This study determined the effectiveness of G-coat plus surface protective agent over petroleum jelly on the surface texture of conventional Glass ionomer restorative materials. Materials and Methods: Three chemically cured conventional glass ionomer restorative materials type II, type IX and ketac molar were evaluated in this study. Sixty specimens were made for each restorative material. They were divided into two groups of thirty specimens each. Of the sixty specimens, thirty were...

  5. Fluoride uptake from restorative dental materials by human enamel

    Forsten, L.; Rytoemaa, I.; Anttila, A.; Keinonen, J.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the uptake in vitro of fluoride from restorative materials by tooth enamel and whether prior etching of the enamel causes a change of uptake. The outermost layer of the labial surface of extracted canines was removed by grinding and the enamel was covered with five different fluoride-containing materials ; a silicate, a composite resin, an amalgam, a silicophosphate, and a polycarboxylate luting cement. The material was either removed immediately or after storing the tooth in distilled water. The fluoride content was determined using a sensitive physical method based on the 19 F (p, αγ) 16 O reaction. In addition, the fluoride content of enamel after etching for different periods of time and of etched enamel which had been in contact with silicate cement was determined. The mean fluoride content of uncovered interior enamel was 226 parts 10 6 . All materials, except the composite, increased clearly the fluoride content of the underlying enamel. Etching of interior enamel also increased the fluoride values. No difference could be shown in fluoride uptake from silicate and composite resin between etched and unetched enamel. (author)

  6. Opalescence of human teeth and dental esthetic restorative materials.

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2016-12-01

    Human tooth enamel is opalescent, which renders teeth bluish in reflected and orange in transmitted color. The aim was to review opalescent property of teeth and application and mimetic reproduction in esthetic restorations. A PubMed search for articles published in English till 2015 on the opalescence of teeth and esthetic materials revealed 29 relevant papers. Opalescence was measured with OP-RT index, which was calculated as the difference in the yellow-blue and red-green color coordinates between the reflected and transmitted colors. Mean OP-RT value of human enamel was 22.9. OP-RT values of direct resin composites changed after polymerization, and the range in these materials was 5.7-23.7. OP-RT value ranges were 1.6-6.1 and 2.0-7.1 for the core and veneer ceramics, respectively. Since the OP-RT values of esthetic materials were lower than that of enamel, it is recommended that materials that can reproduce the opalescence of enamel be further designed.

  7. Effect of type of cavity preparation (bur,Er:YAG laser and restorative materials on prevention of caries lesion

    Masumeh Hasani Tabatabaei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Despite the reduction of incidence of dental caries in recent years, this disease is common and many efforts were conducted to decrease the prevalence of dental caries. On the other hand secondary caries lesions are the main reason for replacement of direct restorations. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to evaluate suitable methods of preparation and restorative materials to reduce caries recurrence. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, eighty human teeth were collected and stored in normal saline. The teeth were soft-tissue debrided and cleaned with water/pumice slurry and rubber cups in a low-speed handpiece. Speciments were randomly divided in two main groups. Cavities were prepared with diamond burs or Er:YAG laser (10 Hz, 300 mJ, 3W. Each group was divided into 4 sub-groups, and restored with a glass-ionomer cement (Fuji IX, resin modified glass-ionomer (Fuji II LC, total etch bonding + composite resin or self-etch bonding + composite resin. The specimens were submitted to pH cycling. Speciments were then sectioned, polished and Vickers microhardness measurements were performed on each specimen. Differences among the medians were analyzed using two way ANOVA test at a 95% confidence level and Tukey test. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant difference in the type of substrate (enamel, dentin in both main groups (P<0.0001 but no differences in the caries lesion development between the cavities restored with the same material and prepared with diamond burs or Er:YAG laser. Conclusion: The Er:YAG laser used for cavity preparation and different types of restorative materials used did not show the ability to guarantee significantly more acid-resistance tooth structure against demineralization.

  8. In vitro comparative evaluation of mechanical properties of temporary restorative materials used in fixed partial denture

    Saisadan, D.; Manimaran, P.; Meenapriya, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Materials used to fabricate provisional restorations can be classified as acrylics or resin composites. Provisional crows can be either prefabricated or custom made. Acrylics: These materials have been used to fabricate provisional restorations since the 1930s and usually available as powder and liquid. They are the most commonly used materials today for both single-unit and multiple-unit restorations. In general, their popularity is due to their low cost, acceptable esthetics, ...

  9. Influence of different restorative materials on the stress distribution in dental implants.

    Datte, Carlos-Eduardo; Tribst, João-Paulo-Mendes; Dal Piva, Amanda-Maria-de Oliveira; Nishioka, Renato-Sussumu; Bottino, Marco-Antonio; Evangelhista, Alexandre-Duarte M; Monteiro, Fabrício M de M; Borges, Alexandre-Luiz-Souto

    2018-05-01

    To assist clinicians in deciding the most suitable restorative materials to be used in the crowns and abutment in implant rehabilitation. For finite element analysis (FEA), a regular morse taper implant was created using a computer aided design software. The implant was inserted at the bone model with 3 mm of exposed threads. An anatomic prosthesis representing a first maxillary molar was modeled and cemented on the solid abutment. Considering the crown material (zirconia, chromium-cobalt, lithium disilicate and hybrid ceramic) and abutment (Titanium and zirconia), the geometries were multiplied, totaling eight groups. In order to perform the static analysis, the contacts were considered bonded and each material was assigned as isotropic. An axial load (200 N) was applied on the crown and fixation occurred on the base of the bone. Results using Von-Mises criteria and micro strain values were obtained. A sample identical to the CAD model was made for the Strain Gauge (SG) analysis; four SGs were bonded around the implant to obtain micro strain results in bone tissue. FEA results were 3.83% lower than SG. According to the crown material, it is possible to note that the increase of elastic modulus reduces the stress concentration in all system without difference for bone. Crown materials with high elastic modulus are able to decrease the stress values in the abutments while concentrates the stress in its structure. Zirconia abutments tend to concentrate more stress throughout the prosthetic system and may be more susceptible to mechanical problems than titanium. Key words: Finite element analysis, dental implants, ceramic.

  10. Effect of dual-cure composite resin as restorative material on marginal adaptation of class 2 restorations.

    Bortolotto, Tissiana; Melian, Karla; Krejci, Ivo

    2013-10-01

    The present study attempted to find a simple direct adhesive restorative technique for the restoration of Class 2 cavities. A self-etch adhesive system with a dual-cured core buildup composite resin (paste 1 + paste 2) was evaluated in its ability to restore proximo-occlusal cavities with margins located on enamel and dentin. The groups were: A, cavity filling (cf) with paste 1 (light-curing component) by using a layering technique; B, cf by mixing both pastes, bulk insertion, and dual curing; and C, cf by mixing both pastes, bulk insertion, and chemical curing. Two control groups (D, negative, bulk; and E, positive, layering technique) were included by restoring cavities with a classic three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive and a universal restorative composite resin. SEM margin analysis was performed before and after thermomechanical loading in a chewing simulator. Percentages (mean ± SD) of "continuous margins" were improved by applying the material in bulk and letting it self cure (54 ± 6) or dual cure (59 ± 9), and no significant differences were observed between these two groups and the positive control (44 ± 19). The present study showed that the dual-cured composite resin tested has the potential to be used as bulk filling material for Class 2 restorations. When used as filling materials, dual-cure composite resins placed in bulk can provide marginal adaptation similar to light-cured composites applied with a complex stratification technique.

  11. Synergistic effects of sodium 
ascorbate and acetone to restore compromised bond strength 
after enamel bleaching.

    Boruziniat, Alireza; Manafi, Safa; Cehreli, Zafer C

    To evaluate the effect of a new experimental solution containing sodium ascorbate (SA) and acetone on reversing compromised bonding to enamel immediately after bleaching. The buccal surface of intact, extracted human premolars (n = 60) was bleached. The teeth were then randomly assigned to 6  groups according to the type of pretreatment applied prior to adhesive procedures: 10% SA in acetone-water solution applied for 1 and 5 min (groups 1 and 2, respectively); aqueous solution of 10% SA applied for 10 min (group 3); 100% acetone applied for 10 min (group 4); no pretreatment (negative control; group 5). An additional group (positive control; group 6) comprised unbleached teeth (n = 12). Two composite microcylinders were bonded on each specimen for evaluation of microshear bond strength (MBS) and failure modes. Data were analyzed using the one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc and chi-square tests at P = 0.05. Groups 1 and 2 yielded similar MBS values to groups 4 and 6 (positive control). The mean MBS of groups 3 and 5 (negative control) were similar, and significantly lower than that of the positive control group. The application of 10% SA in an acetone-water solution prior to bonding procedures can restore compromised enamel bond strength to its unbleached state within a clinically acceptable time of 1 min.

  12. Machinable glass-ceramics forming as a restorative dental material.

    Chaysuwan, Duangrudee; Sirinukunwattana, Krongkarn; Kanchanatawewat, Kanchana; Heness, Greg; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2011-01-01

    MgO, SiO(2), Al(2)O(3), MgF(2), CaF(2), CaCO(3), SrCO(3), and P(2)O(5) were used to prepare glass-ceramics for restorative dental materials. Thermal properties, phases, microstructures and hardness were characterized by DTA, XRD, SEM and Vickers microhardness. Three-point bending strength and fracture toughness were applied by UTM according to ISO 6872: 1997(E). XRD showed that the glass crystallized at 892°C (second crystallization temperature+20°C) for 3 hrs consisted mainly of calcium-mica and fluorapatite crystalline phases. Average hardness (3.70 GPa) closely matched human enamel (3.20 GPa). The higher fracture toughness (2.04 MPa√m) combined with the hardness to give a lower brittleness index (1.81 µm(-1/2)) which indicates that they have exceptional machinability. Bending strength results (176.61 MPa) were analyzed by Weibull analysis to determine modulus value (m=17.80). Machinability of the calcium mica-fluorapatite glass-ceramic was demonstrated by fabricating with CAD/CAM.

  13. Development of a new bonding material and its trial application to accelerator technology

    Tanaka, Yasuhito; Yamano, Kiyoshi; Saito, Kenji

    2001-01-01

    We have succeeded to develop a new bonding material for new television technology, which has a very low outgas property. This bonding material has been tested and confirmed the excellent sealing or outgas property in various institutes. We have tried it to use as a vacuum sealant against the super-leaking in He-II. In this report, we will present the motivation of the bonding material development, and the result of the application to cryogenics. (author)

  14. Advanced Thermal Protection Systems (ATPS), Aerospace Grade Carbon Bonded Carbon Fiber Material, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Carbon bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulating material is the basis for several highly successful NASA developed thermal protection systems (TPS). Included among...

  15. Dangling bonds and crystalline inclusions in amorphous materials

    Ferrari, L [Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Matematica; Russo, G [Bologna Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica

    1981-02-07

    It is suggested that on the surface of crystalline inclusions dangling bond formation is favoured due to unbalanced local stresses. The energy for bond tearings is probably originated from the exothermic process leading to the crystalline inclusion configuration which is more stable than the original amorphous one. A thermodynamical calculation is performed giving the ratio nsub(k) of crystalline inclusions having k dangling bonds on their surface.

  16. Dislocations in materials with mixed covalent and metallic bonding

    Nguyen-Manh, D.; Cawkwell, M.J.; Groeger, R.; Mrovec, M.; Porizek, R.; Pettifor, D.G.; Vitek, V.

    2005-01-01

    Environment-dependent bond-order potentials have been developed for L1 0 TiAl, bcc Mo and fcc Ir. They comprise both the angular character of bonding and the screening effect of nearly free electrons. These potentials have been employed in atomistic studies of screw dislocations that revealed the non-planar character of their cores. It is argued that both covalent as well as metallic character of bonding govern these structures, which in turn control the mechanical behaviour

  17. Influence of increment thickness on dentin bond strength and light transmission of composite base materials.

    Omran, Tarek A; Garoushi, Sufyan; Abdulmajeed, Aous A; Lassila, Lippo V; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2017-06-01

    Bulk-fill resin composites (BFCs) are gaining popularity in restorative dentistry due to the reduced chair time and ease of application. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of increment thickness on dentin bond strength and light transmission of different BFCs and a new discontinuous fiber-reinforced composite. One hundred eighty extracted sound human molars were prepared for a shear bond strength (SBS) test. The teeth were divided into four groups (n = 45) according to the resin composite used: regular particulate filler resin composite: (1) G-ænial Anterior [GA] (control); bulk-fill resin composites: (2) Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill [TEBF] and (3) SDR; and discontinuous fiber-reinforced composite: (4) everX Posterior [EXP]. Each group was subdivided according to increment thickness (2, 4, and 6 mm). The irradiance power through the material of all groups/subgroups was quantified (MARC® Resin Calibrator; BlueLight Analytics Inc.). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. SBS and light irradiance decreased as the increment's height increased (p composite used. EXP presented the highest SBS in 2- and 4-mm-thick increments when compared to other composites, although the differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Light irradiance mean values arranged in descending order were (p composites. Discontinuous fiber-reinforced composite showed the highest value of curing light transmission, which was also seen in improved bonding strength to the underlying dentin surface. Discontinuous fiber-reinforced composite can be applied safely in bulks of 4-mm increments same as other bulk-fill composites, although, in 2-mm thickness, the investigated composites showed better performance.

  18. Load-Displacement Curves of Spot Welded, Bonded, and Weld-Bonded Joints for Dissimilar Materials and Thickness

    E.A. Al-Bahkali

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional finite element models of spot welded, bonded and weld-bonded joints are developed using ABAQUS software. Each model consists of two strips with dissimilar materials and thickness and is subjected to an axial loading. The bonded and weld-bonded joints have specific adhesive thickness. A detailed experimental plan to define many properties and quantities such as, the elastic - plastic properties, modulus of elasticity, fracture limit, and properties of the nugget and heat affected zones are carried out. Experiments include standard testing of the base metal, the adhesive, the nugget and heat affected zone. They also include employing the indentation techniques, and ductile fracture limits criteria, using the special notch tests. Complete load-displacement curves are obtained for all joining models and a comparison is made to determine the best combination.

  19. Sealing ability of a new calcium silicate based material as a dentin substitute in class II sandwich restorations: An in vitro study

    Raji Viola Solomon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Class ll sandwich restorations are routinely performed where conventional Glass ionomer cement (GIC or Resin-modified GIC (RMGIC is used as a base or dentin substitute and a light curing composite resin restorative material is used as an enamel substitute. Various authors have evaluated the microleakage of composite resin restorations where glass ionomer cement has been used as a base in class II sandwich restorations, but a literature survey reveals limited studies on the microleakage analysis of similar restorations with biodentine as a dentin substitute, as an alternative to glass ionomer cement. The aim of this study is: To evaluate the marginal sealing efficacy of a new calcium-silicate-based material (Biodentine as a dentin substitute, at the cervical margins, in posterior class II sandwich restorations.To compare and evaluate the microleakage at the biodentine/composite interface with the microleakage at the resin-modified GIC/composite interface, in posterior class II open sandwich restorations. To compare the efficacy between a water-based etch and rinse adhesive (Scotch bond multipurpose and an acetone-based etch and rinse adhesive (Prime and bond NT, when bonding biodentine to the composite. To evaluate the enamel, dentin, and interfacial microleakage at the composite and biodentine/RMGIC interfaces. Materials and Methods: Fifty class II cavities were prepared on the mesial and distal surfaces of 25 extracted human maxillary third molars, which were randomly divided into five groups of ten cavities each: (G1 Biodentine group, (G2 Fuji II LC GIC group, (G3 Biodentine as a base + prime and bond NT + Tetric N-Ceram composite, (G4 Biodentine + scotchbond multi-purpose + Tetric N-Ceram composite, (G5 Fuji II LC as a base + prime and bond NT+ Tetric-N Ceram composite. The samples were then subjected to thermocycling, 2500× (5°C to 55°C, followed by the dye penetration test. Scores are given from 0 to 3 based on the depth of

  20. Shear bond strengths of an indirect composite layering material to a tribochemically silica-coated zirconia framework material.

    Iwasaki, Taro; Komine, Futoshi; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Kubochi, Kei; Shinohara, Mitsuyo; Matsumura, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated shear bond strengths of a layering indirect composite material to a zirconia framework material treated with tribochemical silica coating. Zirconia disks were divided into two groups: ZR-PRE (airborne-particle abrasion) and ZR-PLU (tribochemical silica coating). Indirect composite was bonded to zirconia treated with one of the following primers: Clearfil Ceramic Primer (CCP), Clearfil Mega Bond Primer with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator (MGP+Act), ESPE-Sil (SIL), Estenia Opaque Primer, MR. Bond, Super-Bond PZ Primer Liquid A with Liquid B (PZA+PZB), and Super-Bond PZ Primer Liquid B (PZB), or no treatment. Shear bond testing was performed at 0 and 20,000 thermocycles. Post-thermocycling shear bond strengths of ZR-PLU were higher than those of ZR-PRE in CCP, MGP+Act, SIL, PZA+PZB, and PZB groups. Application of silane yielded better durable bond strengths of a layering indirect composite material to a tribochemically silica-coated zirconia framework material.

  1. Fracture resistance of prepared premolars restored with bonded new lab composite and all-ceramic inlay/onlay restorations: Laboratory study.

    Wafaie, Ramy Ahmed; Ibrahim Ali, Ashraf; Mahmoud, Salah Hasab

    2018-01-25

    To assess the influence of new light curing lab composite, lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic and yttrium-stabilized zirconia-based ceramic on the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars with class II inlay and onlay preparations. Seventy sound maxillary premolars were divided randomly into seven main groups. The first group was left intact (control group). The remaining six groups were prepared with inlay and onlay cavities and restored with lab composite (SR Nexco), lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press) and yttrium-stabilized zirconia-based ceramic (ICE Zirkon). The restorations were cemented with luting resin composite (Variolink N). All specimens were thermocycled 5000 cycles between 5°C ± 2°C and 55°C ± 2°C and were then cyclic loaded for 500 000 cycles. The specimens were subjected to a compressive load in a universal testing machine using a metal sphere until fracture occurred. The results were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post hoc tests. The level of significance was set at P  .05). However, statistically significant differences were found among the means of control group and the groups restored with lab composite inlays, lab composite onlays, pressable glass ceramic inlays and pressable glass ceramic onlays (P lab composite is used. Conversely, when a ceramic material being used, the prepared teeth for inlay and onlay restorations showed a comparable strength to the intact teeth especially zirconia ceramic. Premolar teeth restored with zirconia ceramic inlays and onlays exhibited fracture resistance comparable to intact teeth. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Influence of method and period of storage on the microtensile bond strength of indirect composite resin restorations to dentine

    Fernanda Ribeiro Santana

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of the method and period of storage on the adhesive bond strength of indirect composite resin to bovine dentin. Ninety bovine incisors were stored in three different solutions: 0.2% thymol, 10% formalin, and 0.2% sodium azide, during 3 periods of storage: 7 days, 30 days and 6 months, resulting in 9 groups (n = 10. The roots were cut off and the buccal surface was ground with #600-grit silicon carbide paper. The surface was conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s and a composite resin restoration (TPH Spectrum was fixed using a one-bottle adhesive system (Adper Single Bond and a dual-cured resinous cement (Rely X ARC under a load of 500 g for 5 minutes. The samples were serially cut perpendicular to the bonded interface to obtain slices of 1.2 mm in thickness. Each slab was trimmed with a cylindrical diamond bur resulting in an hourglass shape with a cross-sectional area of approximately 1 mm². The microtensile bond strength (μTBS testing was performed in a testing machine (EMIC 2000 DL at a 0.5 mm/minute crosshead-speed until failure. After fracture, the specimens were examined under SEM to analyze the mode of fracture. μTBS Means were expressed in MPa and the data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (3X3 and the Tukey test (α = 0.05. The storage times of 7 and 30 days produced no significant difference irrespective of the solution type. The formalin and thymol solutions, however, did have a negative influence on bond strength when the teeth were stored for 6 months.

  3. [Comparative study of the fracture resistance of sound upper premolars and upper premolars restored with bonded amalgam].

    Minto, André Marcelo Peruchi; Dinelli, Welingtom; Nonaka, Tomio; Thome, Luis Henrique de Camargo

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the fracture resistance of upper premolars which had received class II preparations (conservative and extensive) and were restored with bonded amalgam, with two different adhesive systems. Seventy teeth were divided in four groups: group 1 (control), with ten sound teeth; group 2, with twenty prepared teeth (10 teeth received conservative cavities and 10, extensive cavities) restored with amalgam without any kind of liner; groups 3 and 4, similar to group 2, though with linings of glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond - 3M) (group 3) and dental adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus - 3M) (group 4). The teeth were previously fixed in PVC cylinders with acrylic resin. After being restored and thermocycled, the test specimens were submitted to fracture by means of compression in an EMIC-MEM 2000 universal testing machine. After the application of the analysis of variance and complementary Tukey's test, we concluded that the utilized adhesive systems produced an increase of the fracture resistance of teeth presenting with conventional cavities; the teeth presenting with conservative cavities were more resistant in all experimental situations.

  4. Evaluation of the anti-cariogenic potential and bond strength to enamel of different fluoridated materials used for bracket bonding

    Sérgio Ricardo da SILVA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate the in vitro and in situ anti-cariogenic potential and bond strength to enamel of materials containing fluoride (F, used for bracket bonding: Transbond XT (GT, negative control, Transbond Plus Color Change (GTF, Transbond-Self-Etching Primer (GSAF and Vitremer (GV, positive control. Material and method In the in vitro study, the specimens were premolars with bonded brackets (n=12/group. After pH cycling, the F release, bond strength, fracture mode and presence of white spot lesions were assessed. In the in situ study, the specimens were enamel fragments with bonded brackets (n=12/group. Twelve volunteers wore palatal appliances in 4 phases, with cariogenic challenge. Bond strength, fracture mode and change in surface hardness (%SH were determined. Result Relative to the in vitro study, F release (ppm was: GT=0.257±0.068c; GTF=0.634±0.100b; GSAF=0.630±0.067b; GV=2.796±1.414a. Only GV showed no white spot lesions. Bond strength values (MPa were GT=7.62±7.18a; GTF=5.15±6.91ab; GSAF=3.42±2.97bc; GV=2.87±2.09c. Adhesive fracture was the most frequent type, except for GTF. In the in situ study, %SH was: GT=-56.0±18.3a; GTF=-57.6±11.9a; GSAF=-57.1±11.3a; GV=-52.4±25.8a. Bond strength values were GT=9.5±4.4a; GTF=11.1±5.9a; GSAF=13.2± 6.6a; GV=6.6±4.0a. Cohesive fracture in material was the most frequent type, except for GTF. Conclusion Vitremer (GV showed the highest anti-cariogenic potential in the in vitro study. However, it was not confirmed by the in situ study. Regarding bond strength values from the in situ study, all materials were shown to be adequate for clinical practice.

  5. Marginal microleakage of cervical composite resin restorations bonded using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives: two dimensional vs. three dimensional methods

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study was evaluated the marginal microleakage of two different adhesive systems before and after aging with two different dye penetration techniques. Materials and Methods Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 48 human molars. Clearfil SE Bond and Single Bond (self-etching and etch-and-rinse systems, respectively were applied, each to half of the prepared cavities, which were restored with composite resin. Half of the specimens in each group underwent 10,000 cycles of thermocycling. Microleakage was evaluated using two dimensional (2D and three dimensional (3D dye penetration techniques separately for each half of each specimen. Data were analyzed with SPSS 11.5 (SPSS Inc., using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α = 0.05. Results The difference between the 2D and 3D microleakage evaluation techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of Single bond groups (p = 0.002. The differences between 2D and 3D microleakage evaluation techniques were significant at both the occlusal and cervical margins of Clearfil SE Bond groups (p = 0.017 and p = 0.002, respectively. The difference between the 2D and 3D techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of non-aged groups (p = 0.003. The difference between these two techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of the aged groups (p = 0.001. The Mann-Whitney test showed significant differences between the two techniques only at the occlusal margins in all specimens. Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that the 3D technique has the capacity to detect occlusal microleakage more precisely than the 2D technique.

  6. The effects of various surface treatments on the shear bond strengths of stainless steel brackets to artificially-aged composite restorations.

    Eslamian, Ladan; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Mousavi, Nasim; Ghasemi, Amir

    2011-05-01

    To compare the shear bond strengths (SBS) of stainless steel brackets bonded to artificially-aged composite restorations after different surface treatments. Forty-five premolar teeth were restored with a nano-hybrid composite (Tetric EvoCeram), stored in deionised water for one week and randomly divided into three equal groups: Group I, he restorations were exposed to 5 per cent hydrofluoric acid for 60 seconds; Group II, the restorations were abraded with a micro-etcher (50 Iim alumina particles); Group III, the restorations were roughened with a coarse diamond bur. Similar premolar brackets were bonded to each restoration using the same resin adhesive and the specimens were then cycled in deionised water between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C (500 cycles). The shear bond strengths were determined with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The teeth and brackets were examined under a stereomicroscope and the adhesive remnants on the teeth scored with the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Specimens treated with the diamond bur had a significantly higher SBS (Mean: 18.45 +/- 3.82 MPa) than the group treated with hydrofluoric acid (Mean: 12.85 +/- 5.20 MPa). The mean SBS difference between the air-abrasion (Mean: 15.36 +/- 4.92 MPa) and hydrofluoric acid groups was not significant. High ARI scores occurred following abrasion with a diamond bur (100 per cent) and micro-etcher (80 per cent). In approximately two thirds of the teeth no adhesive was left on the restoration after surface treatment with hydofluoric acid. Surface treatment with a diamond bur resulted in a high bond strength between stainless steel brackets and artificially-aged composite restorations and was considered to be a safe and effective method of surface treatment. Most of the adhesive remained on the tooth following surface treatment with either the micro-etcher or the diamond bur.

  7. A field-trial of two restorative materials used with atraumatic restorative treatment in rural Turkey: 24-month results

    Ertugrul Ercan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical performance of high-strength glass ionomer cement (HSGIC and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGIC in single and multiple surface carious cavities in the field conditions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A split-mouth design, including ninety-one fillings placed on contra lateral molar pairs of 37 children, was used in permanent dentition. As filling materials, a HSGIC (Ketac Molar/3M ESPE and a RMGIC (Vitremer/ 3M ESPE were used with the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART. Baseline and 6, 12 and 24-month evaluations of the fillings were made with standard-ART and USPHS criteria by two examiners with kappa values of 0.92 and 0.87 for both criteria. RESULTS: According to the USPHS criteria, the retention rates of RMGIC and HSGIC restorations were 100% and 80.9% for single surface, and 100% and 41.2% for multiple surface restorations after 24 months, respectively. Irrespective of surface number, RMGIC was significantly superior to HSGIC (p= 0.004, according to both standard-ART and USPHS criteria. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that RMGIC may be an alternative restorative technique in comparison to high-strength GIC applications in ART-field-trials. However, further clinical and field trials are needed to support this conclusion.

  8. A comparison of fatigue resistance of three materials for cusp-replacing adhesive restorations.

    Kuijs, R.H.; Fennis, W.M.M.; Kreulen, C.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the fatigue resistance and failure behaviour of cusp-replacing restorations in premolars using different types of adhesive restorative materials. METHODS: A class 2 cavity was prepared and the buccal cusp was removed in an extracted sound human upper premolar. By using a

  9. Ceramic inlays : effect of mechanical cycling and ceramic type on restoration-dentin bond strength

    Trindade, F.Z.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; da Silva, L.H.; Feilzer, A.J.; Cesar, P.F.; Bottino, M.A.; Valandro, L.F.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between dentin and five different ceramic inlays in permanent maxillary premolars, with and without mechanical cycling. One hundred permanent maxillary premolars were prepared and divided into 10 groups (n=10) according to the ceramic system (IPS e.Max

  10. Biofilm Formation on Dental Restorative and Implant Materials

    Busscher, H. J.; Rinastiti, M.; Siswomihardjo, W.; van der Mei, H. C.

    Biomaterials for the restoration of oral function are prone to biofilm formation, affecting oral health. Oral bacteria adhere to hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, but due to fluctuating shear, little biofilm accumulates on hydrophobic surfaces in vivo. More biofilm accumulates on rough than on

  11. Ceramic Inlays: Effect of Mechanical Cycling and Ceramic Type on Restoration-dentin Bond Strength.

    Trindade, F Z; Kleverlaan, C J; da Silva, L H; Feilzer, A J; Cesar, P F; Bottino, M A; Valandro, L F

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between dentin and five different ceramic inlays in permanent maxillary premolars, with and without mechanical cycling. One hundred permanent maxillary premolars were prepared and divided into 10 groups (n=10) according to the ceramic system (IPS e.Max Press; IPS e.Max CAD; Vita PM9; Vita Mark II; and Vita VM7) and the mechanical cycling factor (with and without [100 N, 2 Hz, 1.2×10(6) cycles]). The inlays were adhesively cemented, and all of the specimens were cut into microbars (1×1 mm, nontrimming method), which were tested under microtensile loading. The failure mode was classified and contact angle, roughness, and microtopographic analyses were performed on each ceramic surface. The mechanical cycling had a significant effect (p=0.0087) on the bond strength between dentin and IPS e.max Press. The Vita Mark II group had the highest bond strength values under both conditions, with mechanical cycling (9.7±1.8 MPa) and without (8.2±1.9 MPa), while IPS e.Max CAD had the lowest values (2.6±1.6 and 2.2±1.4, respectively). The adhesive failure mode at the ceramic/cement interface was the most frequent. Vita Mark II showed the highest value of average roughness. IPS e.max Press and Vita Mark II ceramics presented the lowest contact angles. In conclusion, the composition and manufacturing process of ceramics seem to have an influence on the ceramic surface and resin cement bond strength. Mechanical cycling did not cause significant degradation on the dentin and ceramic bond strength under the configuration used.

  12. Thermal shock resistances of a bonding material of C/C composite and copper

    Kurumada, Akira; Oku, Tatsuo; Kawamata, Kiyohiro; Motojima, Osamu; Noda, Nobuaki; McEnaney, B.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute to the development and the safety design of plasma facing components for fusion reactor devices. We evaluated the thermal shock resistance and the thermal shock fracture toughness of a bonding material which was jointed a carbon-fiber-reinforced carbon composite (C/C composite) to oxygen-free copper. We also examined the microstructures of the bonding layers using a scanning electron microscope before and after thermal shock tests. The bonding material did not fracture during thermal shock tests. However, thermal cracks and delamination cracks were observed in the bonding layers. (author)

  13. Practitioner, patient and carious lesion characteristics associated with type of restorative material

    Makhija, Sonia K; Gordan, Valeria V; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to identify factors associated with the materials that dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) use when placing the first restoration on permanent posterior tooth surfaces....

  14. Guidelines for Preservation, Conservation, and Restoration of Local History and Local Genealogical Materials.

    RQ, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Presents guidelines adopted by the American Library Association (ALA) relating to the preservation, conservation, and restoration of local history and local genealogical materials. Topics addressed include assessing preservation needs; developing a plan; choosing appropriate techniques, including microduplication, photoduplication, electronic…

  15. Hydrogen-bond Specific Materials Modification in Group IV Semiconductors

    Tolk, Norman H. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Feldman, L. C. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Luepke, G. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2015-09-14

    Executive summary Semiconductor dielectric crystals consist of two fundamental components: lattice atoms and electrons. The former component provides a crystalline structure that can be disrupted by various defects or the presence of an interface, or by transient oscillations known as phonons. The latter component produces an energetic structure that is responsible for the optical and electronic properties of the material, and can be perturbed by lattice defects or by photo-excitation. Over the period of this project, August 15, 1999 to March 31, 2015, a persistent theme has been the elucidation of the fundamental role of defects arising from the presence of radiation damage, impurities (in particular, hydrogen), localized strain or some combination of all three. As our research effort developed and evolved, we have experienced a few title changes, which reflected this evolution. Throughout the project, ultrafast lasers usually in a pump-probe configuration provided the ideal means to perturb and study semiconductor crystals by both forms of excitation, vibrational (phonon) and electronic (photon). Moreover, we have found in the course of this research that there are many interesting and relevant scientific questions that may be explored when phonon and photon excitations are controlled separately. Our early goals were to explore the dynamics of bond-selective vibrational excitation of hydrogen from point defects and impurities in crystalline and amorphous solids, initiating an investigation into the behavior of hydrogen isotopes utilizing a variety of ultrafast characterization techniques, principally transient bleaching spectroscopy to experimentally obtain vibrational lifetimes. The initiative could be divided into three related areas: (a) investigation of the change in electronic structure of solids due to the presence of hydrogen defect centers, (b) dynamical studies of hydrogen in materials and (c) characterization and stability of metastable hydrogen

  16. Influence of citric acid on the surface texture of glass ionomer restorative materials.

    Reddy, Dappili Swami Ranga; Kumar, Ramachandran Anil; Venkatesan, Sokkalingam Mothilal; Narayan, Gopal Shankar; Duraivel, Dasarathan; Indra, Rajamani

    2014-09-01

    This study determined the effectiveness of G-coat plus surface protective agent over petroleum jelly on the surface texture of conventional Glass ionomer restorative materials. Three chemically cured conventional glass ionomer restorative materials type II, type IX and ketac molar were evaluated in this study. Sixty specimens were made for each restorative material. They were divided into two groups of thirty specimens each. Of the sixty specimens, thirty were coated with G-coat plus (a nano-filler coating) and the rest with petroleum jelly. Thirty samples of both protective coating agents were randomly divided into six groups of five specimens and conditioned in citric acid solutions of differing pH (pH 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 7). Each specimen was kept in citric acid for three hours a day, and the rest of time stored in salivary substitute. This procedure was repeated for 8 days. After conditioning, the surface roughness (Ra, μm) of each specimen was measured using a surface profilometer (Taylor & Habson, UK). Data was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's HSD test at a significance level of 0.05. The surface textures of all the tested glass ionomer restorative materials protected with G-coat plus were not significantly affected by acids at low pH. The surface textures of all the tested glass ionomer restorative materials protected with petroleum jelly coating were significantly affected by acids at low pH. The effects of pH on the surface texture of glass ionomer restoratives are material dependent. Among all the materials tested the surface texture of Type II GIC (Group I) revealed marked deterioration when conditioned in solutions of low pH and was statistically significant. Hence, a protective coating either with G-coat plus or with light polymerized low viscosity unfilled resin adhesives is mandatory for all the glass ionomer restorations to increase the wear resistance of the restorative materials.

  17. A study on the bonding residual thermal stress analysis of dissimilar materials using boundary element method

    Yi, Won; Yu, Yeong Chul; Jeong, Eui Seob; Lee, Chang Ho

    1995-01-01

    It is very important to evaluate the bonding residual thermal stress in dissimilar materials such as LSI package. In this study, the bonding residual thermal stress was calculated using the boundary element method, varing with the sub-element, geometry of specimen and adhesive thickness. The present results reveal a stress singularity at the edge of the interface, therefore the bonding strength of metal/resin interface can be estimated by taking into account it.

  18. Formation of Irreversible H-bonds in Cellulose Materials

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Sally A. Ralph; Rick S. Reiner; Nicole M. Stark

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of formation of irreversible Hbonds in cellulose is important in a number of fields. For example, fields as diverse as pulp and paper and enzymatic saccharification of cellulose are affected. In the present investigation, the phenomenon of formation of irreversible H-bonds is studied in a variety of celluloses and under two different drying conditions....

  19. Longevity of posterior composite restorations: not only a matter of materials.

    Demarco, Flávio F; Corrêa, Marcos B; Cenci, Maximiliano S; Moraes, Rafael R; Opdam, Niek J M

    2012-01-01

    Resin composites have become the first choice for direct posterior restorations and are increasingly popular among clinicians and patients. Meanwhile, a number of clinical reports in the literature have discussed the durability of these restorations over long periods. In this review, we have searched the dental literature looking for clinical trials investigating posterior composite restorations over periods of at least 5 years of follow-up published between 1996 and 2011. The search resulted in 34 selected studies. 90% of the clinical studies indicated that annual failure rates between 1% and 3% can be achieved with Class I and II posterior composite restorations depending on several factors such as tooth type and location, operator, and socioeconomic, demographic, and behavioral elements. The material properties showed a minor effect on longevity. The main reasons for failure in the long term are secondary caries, related to the individual caries risk, and fracture, related to the presence of a lining or the strength of the material used as well as patient factors such as bruxism. Repair is a viable alternative to replacement, and it can increase significantly the lifetime of restorations. As observed in the literature reviewed, a long survival rate for posterior composite restorations can be expected provided that patient, operator and materials factors are taken into account when the restorations are performed. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of Bond Strength between Grooved Titanium Alloy Implant Abutments and Provisional Veneering Materials after Surface Treatment of the Abutments: An In vitro Study.

    Venkat, Gowtham; Krishnan, Murugesan; Srinivasan, Suganya; Balasubramanian, Muthukumar

    2017-01-01

    Titanium has become the material of choice with greater applications in dental implants. The success of the dental implant does not only depend on the integration of the implant to the bone but also on the function and longevity of the superstructure. The clinical condition that demands long-term interim prosthesis is challenging owing to the decreased bond between the abutment and the veneering material. Hence, various surface treatments are done on the abutments to increase the bond strength. This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between the abutment and the provisional veneering materials by surface treatments such as acid etching, laser etching, and sand blasting of the abutment. Forty titanium alloy abutments of 3 mm diameter and 11 mm height were grouped into four groups with ten samples. Groups A, B, C, and D are untreated abutments, sand blasted with 110 μm aluminum particles, etched with 1% hydrofluoric acid and 30% nitric acid, and laser etched with Nd: YAG laser, respectively. Provisional crowns were fabricated with bis-acrylic resin and cemented with noneugenol temporary luting cement. The shear bond strength was measured in universal testing machine using modified Shell-Nielsen shear test after the cemented samples were stored in water at 25°C for 24 h. Load was applied at a constant cross head speed of 5 mm/min until a sudden decrease in resistance indicative of bond failure was observed. The corresponding force values were recorded, and statistical analysis was done using one-way ANOVA and Newman-Keuls post hoc test. The laser-etched samples showed higher bond strength. Among the three surface treatments, laser etching showed the highest bond strength between titanium alloy implant abutment and provisional restorations. The sand-blasted surfaces demonstrated a significant difference in bond strength compared to laser-etched surfaces. The results of this study confirmed that a combination of surface treatments and bond agents enhances the

  1. Shear bond strength between an indirect composite layering material and feldspathic porcelain-coated zirconia ceramics.

    Fushiki, Ryosuke; Komine, Futoshi; Blatz, Markus B; Koizuka, Mai; Taguchi, Kohei; Matsumura, Hideo

    2012-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of both feldspathic porcelain coating of zirconia frameworks and priming agents on shear bond strength between an indirect composite material and zirconia frameworks. A total of 462 airborne-particle-abraded zirconia disks were divided into three groups: untreated disks (ZR-AB), airborne-particle-abraded zirconia disks coated with feldspathic porcelain, (ZR-PO-AB), and hydrofluoric acid-etched zirconia disks coated with feldspathic porcelain (ZR-PO-HF). Indirect composite (Estenia C&B) was bonded to zirconia specimens with no (CON) or one of four priming agents--Clearfil Photo Bond (CPB), Clearfil Photo Bond with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator (CPB + activator), Estenia Opaque primer, or Porcelain Liner M Liquid B (PLB)--with or without an opaque material (Estenia C&B Opaque). All specimens were tested for shear bond strength before and after 20,000 thermocycles. The Steel-Dwass test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to compare shear bond strength. In ZR-AB specimens, the initial bond strength of the CPB and CPB + Activator groups was significantly higher as compared with the other three groups (P material, bond strength was significantly lower in ZR-AB specimens than in ZR-PO-AB and ZR-PO-HF specimens (P composite to zirconia independent of surface treatment. The use of a silane coupling agent and opaque material yields durable bond strength between the indirect composite and feldspathic-porcelain-coated zirconia. The results of the present study suggest that feldspathic porcelain coating of zirconia frameworks is an effective method to obtain clinically acceptable bond strengths of a layering indirect composite material to a zirconia framework.

  2. The effect of orthodontic bonding materials on dental plaque accumulation and composition in vitro.

    Badawi, H; Evans, R D; Wilson, M; Ready, D; Noar, J H; Pratten, J

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the accumulation and composition of microcosm dental plaque on different orthodontic bonding materials using an in vitro model. Microcosm plaques were grown on discs of a range of bonding materials in a constant depth film fermentor. The biofilms were derived from human saliva and supplied with artificial saliva as a source of nutrients. The number of viable bacteria in the biofilms was determined and the streptococci present were identified to species level. The results showed that there was no significant difference in bacterial accumulation between different bonding materials, however, biofilms grown on materials which were fluoride releasing, did not contain Streptococcus mutans. This in vitro study has shown that the use of fluoride-releasing bonding materials may support the growth of supragingival plaque, which does not contain S. mutans.

  3. The Market Gate of Miletus: damages, material characteristics and the development of a compatible mortar for restoration

    Siegesmund, Siegfried; Middendorf, Bernhard

    2008-12-01

    The indoor exhibit of the Market Gate of Miletus is unique for an archaeological monument. The reconstruction of the gate was done in such a way that most marble fragments were removed leaving cored marble columns 3-4 cm in thickness. These cored columns were mounted on a steel construction and filled with different mortars or filled with specially shaped blocks of brick combined with mortar. All the missing marble elements were replaced by copies made of a Portland cement based concrete, which is compositionally similar to the original building materials. During the Second World War the monument was heavily damaged by aerial bombardment. For 2 years the Market Gate of Miletus was exposed to weathering, because a brick wall protecting the gate was also destroyed. The deterioration phenomena observed are microcracks, macroscopic fractures, flaking, sugaring, greying, salt efflorescence, calcitic-sinter layers and iron oxide formation etc. The rapid deterioration seems to be due to indoor atmospheric effects, and also by a combination of incompatible materials (e.g. marble, steel, mortar, concrete, bricks etc.). Compatible building materials like mortars or stone replacing materials have to be developed for the planned restoration. The requirements for restoration mortars are chemical-mineralogical and physical-mechanical compatibilities with the existing building materials. In detail this means that the mortar should ensure good bonding properties, adapted strength development and not stain the marble when in direct contact. The favoured mortar was developed with a hydraulic binder based on iron-free white cement and pozzolana based on activated clay. A special limestone and quartz sand mixture was used as an aggregate. The cement was adjusted using chemical additives. Specially designed tests were applied extensively to prove whether the developed mortar is suitable for the restoration of this precious monument.

  4. Low temperature bonding of heterogeneous materials using Al2O3 as an intermediate layer

    Sahoo, Hitesh Kumar; Ottaviano, Luisa; Zheng, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Integration of heterogeneous materials is crucial for many nanophotonic devices. The integration is often achieved by bonding using polymer adhesives or metals. A much better and cleaner option is direct wafer bonding, but the high annealing temperatures required make it a much less attractive...... atomic layer deposited Al2O3 an excellent choice for the intermediate layer. The authors have optimized the bonding process to achieve a high interface energy of 1.7 J/m2 for a low temperature annealing of 300 °C. The authors also demonstrate wafer bonding of InP to SiO2 on Si and GaAs to sapphire using...

  5. NEW TECHNOLOGIES FOR RESTORATION AND PROTECTION OF POWER EQUIPMENT WITH THE AID OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    A. O. Ischenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of possible variants of reconstruction of the power equipment is fulfilled and the conclusion concerning the prospects of such work with the use of composite materials is reached. The data on the technical characteristics of composite repair materials for various purposes are presented, the results of repairs of power equipment, in particular the technology for the recovery of the boarding surfaces of the diffuser rings and protection of the pumps D1250 casings are provided. The technology of the recovery pneumatic cylinder, hydraulic cylinder rod, as well as the unique technology of restoration of working surfaces of the impeller vanes of transfer pump, that had been destroyed by corrosion in conjunction with the cavitation processes and were considered as not restorable is described. The restored impeller was in operation during a year and only thereafter it was removed for restoration. Another composite material discussed in the article – diagum – makes it possible to perform a series of repairs associated with restoration of the rubber-covered surfaces of pump casings as well as with restoration of various surfaces of the conveyor belts. Taking the excellent adhesive properties of this composite into account, restoration of worn stainless steel sieve screens to remove abrasive material was fulfilled with the aid of it. The restoration was accomplished via the use of the conveyor belt which application time had expired, that was glued to a metal sieve with diagum. The use of the composites is economically justified, because the application of them in repairs reduces, firstly, terms of restoration work and, secondly, the price of repairs. Third, equipment that was damaged beyond repair is being commissioned by the use of the mentioned composites. 

  6. Push-out bond strength of bioceramic materials in a synthetic tissue fluid.

    Noushin Shokouhinejad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the push-out bond strength of EndoSequence Root Repair Material (ERRM and Bioaggregate (BA, new bioceramic materials, to that of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA after incubation in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, a synthetic tissue fluid, for either 1 week or 2 months.One-hundred and twenty root sections were filled with ProRoot MTA, BA, or ERRM. Each tested material was then randomly divided into two subgroups (n = 20: root sections were immersed in PBS for 1 week or 2 months. The bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. After that, the failure modes were examined with stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The push-out data and failure mode categories were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and chi-square tests, respectively.The bond strength of ERRM was significantly higher than that of BA and MTA at both incubation periods. No significant difference was found between the bond strength of MTA and BA at either 1 week or 2 months. Increasing the incubation time to 2 months resulted in a significant increase in bond strength of all the materials. The failure mode was mainly mixed for MTA and BA, but cohesive for ERRM at both incubation periods.ERRM had significantly higher bond strength to root canal walls compared to MTA and BA. Increasing the incubation time significantly improved the bond strength and bioactive reaction products of all materials.

  7. Hydrogen bonds of sodium alginate/Antarctic krill protein composite material.

    Yang, Lijun; Guo, Jing; Yu, Yue; An, Qingda; Wang, Liyan; Li, Shenglin; Huang, Xuelin; Mu, Siyang; Qi, Shanwei

    2016-05-20

    Sodium alginate/Antarctic krill protein composite material (SA/AKP) was successfully obtained by blending method. The hydrogen bonds of SA/AKP composite material were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Nuclear magnetic resonance hydrogen spectrum (HNMR). Experiment manifested the existence of intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonds in SA/AKP system; strength of intermolecular hydrogen bond enhanced with the increase of AKP in the composite material and the interaction strength of hydrogen bonding followed the order: OH…Ether O>OH…π>OH…N. The percentage of intermolecular hydrogen bond decreased with increase of pH. At the same time, the effect of hydrogen bonds on properties of the composite material was discussed. The increase of intermolecular hydrogen bonding led to the decrease of crystallinity, increase of apparent viscosity and surface tension, as well as obvious decrease of heat resistance of SA/AKP composite material. SA/AKP fiber SEM images and energy spectrum showed that crystallized salt was separated from the fiber, which possibly led to the fibrillation of the composite fibers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A useful and non-invasive microanalysis method for dental restoration materials

    Hosoki, M.; Satsuma, T.; Nishigawa, K.; Takeuchi, H.; Asaoka, K.

    2012-12-01

    The elemental analysis of intraoral dental restorations provides considerable information for the treatment of dental metal allergy. Elemental analyses require specific instruments and complicated procedures, so this examination is not commonly carried out in private dental clinics. We describe a novel, simple and useful micro-analytical method for dental metal restorations. Micro metal dust was obtained by polishing the surface of restorative metal material with an unused silicone point (SUPER-SNAP). The metal dust on the silicone point was then rubbed onto adhesive tape, and this tape was covered with polyethylene film. The amount of metal dust material was film. Three types of dental metal alloy materials of known components were examined. The results of elementary analyses were compared with the specifications provided by the manufacturer. The same procedure was carried out for three dental metal restorations of an adult female volunteer in vivo. The results of elemental analyses for five alloy materials exactly matched the product specification. Three metal samples obtained from intraoral restoration were also available for elemental analyses. The distinct advantage of this method is that it enables sample extraction without an invasive effect for the restoration. The metal sample is in a polyethylene film, so it is easy to mail it for inspection at specialist institutes yet it can be also be used in general dental clinics.

  9. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulkfill flowable material and a resin composite.

    Isufi, Almira; Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola Maria; Ioppolo, Pietro; Testarelli, Luca; Bedini, Rossella; Al-Sudani, Dina; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    To determine and compare the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulk fill flowable material (SDR) and a traditional resin composite. Thirty maxillary and 30 mandibular first molars were selected based on similar dimensions. After cleaning, shaping and filling of the root canals and adhesive procedures, specimens were assigned to 3 subgroups for each tooth type (n=10): Group A: control group, including intact teeth; Group B: access cavities were restored with a traditional resin composite (EsthetX; Dentsply-Italy, Rome, Italy); Group C: access cavities were restored with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR; Dentsply-Italy), except 1.5 mm layer of the occlusal surface that was restored with the same resin composite as Group B. The specimens were subjected to compressive force in a material static-testing machine until fracture occurred, the maximum fracture load of the specimens was measured (N) and the type of fracture was recorded as favorable or unfavorable. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni tests (Pcomposite and with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR) was similar in both maxillary and mandibular molars and showed no significant decrease in fracture resistance compared to intact specimens. No significant difference was observed in the mechanical fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars restored with traditional resin composite restorations compared to bulk fill flowable composite restorations.

  10. Clinical Evaluation of Microhybrid Composite and Glass lonomer Restorative Material in Permanent Teeth.

    Kharma, Khalil; Zogheib, Tatiana; Bhandi, Shilpa; Mehanna, Carina

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to clinically compare glass ionomer cement (GIC) with microhybrid composite resin used in class I cavities on permanent teeth over a period of 9 months. A total of 40 teeth with class I cavities were divided into two groups (n = 20) and restored with GIC (EQUIA; GC) and microhybrid resin composite (Amelogen Plus; Ultradent). Restorations were evaluated at ×4.5 magnification using the United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria every 3 months. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher's exact test (a material handling, adaptation, and marginal staining. The results of this clinical study showed that GIC (EQUIA; GC) can be used for the restoration of permanent teeth and may be more appropriate for certain clinical situations than the resin composite material. EQUIA (GIC) is a viable alternative to resin composite in restoring class I cavities in permanent teeth.

  11. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with Biodentine, Resin Modified GIC and Hybrid Composite Resin as a Core Material.

    Subash, Dayalan; Shoba, Krishnamma; Aman, Shibu; Bharkavi, Srinivasan Kumar Indu; Nimmi, Vijayan; Abhilash, Radhakrishnan

    2017-09-01

    The restoration of a severely damaged tooth usually needs a post and core as a part of treatment procedure to provide a corono - radicular stabilization. Biodentine is a class of dental material which possess high mechanical properties with excellent biocompatibility and bioactive behaviour. The sealing ability coupled with optimum physical properties could make Biodentine an excellent option as a core material. The aim of the study was to determine the fracture resistance of Biodentine as a core material in comparison with resin modified glass ionomer and composite resin. Freshly extracted 30 human permanent maxillary central incisors were selected. After endodontic treatment followed by post space preparation and luting of Glass fibre post (Reforpost, Angelus), the samples were divided in to three groups based on the type of core material. The core build-up used in Group I was Biodentine (Septodont, France), Group II was Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (GC, Japan) and Group III was Hybrid Composite Resin (TeEconom plus, Ivoclar vivadent). The specimens were subjected to fracture toughness using Universal testing machine (1474, Zwick/Roell, Germany) and results were compared using One-way analysis of variance with Tukey's Post hoc test. The results showed that there was significant difference between groups in terms of fracture load. Also, composite resin exhibited highest mean fracture load (1039.9 N), whereas teeth restored with Biodentine demonstrated the lowest mean fracture load (176.66 N). Resin modified glass ionomer exhibited intermediate fracture load (612.07 N). The primary mode of failure in Group I and Group II was favourable (100%) while unfavourable fracture was seen in Group III (30%). Biodentine, does not satisfy the requirements to be used as an ideal core material. The uses of RMGIC's as a core build-up material should be limited to non-stress bearing areas. Composite resin is still the best core build-up material owing to its high fracture

  12. EFFECTS OF POLISHING TIME AND THERMALCYCLINGON THE MICROLEAKAGE OF FOUR TOOTH –COLOURED DIRECT RESTORATIVE MATERIALS

    V MORTAZAVI

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Introdaction. Microleakage has been recognized as a major clinical problem with direct filled dental restorations.The purpose of this study was to investigate and to compare the microleakage of four direct filled tooth-coloured materials, evaluation the effects of polishing time and thermocycling on the microleakage of these materials. Methods. Wedge-shaped class V cavities were prepared on buccal and lingual surfaces of 96 intact extracted human molar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into three treatment groups and four subgroups. The cavities of each subgroup were filled using one of these materials: a conventional glass ionomer; a resin modified glass ionomer; a composite resin and a compomer. Polishing in the teeth of group 1 was done immediately after placement of restorations and in group 2 one week later. In group 3 delayed polishing and thermocycling (X100 was done. All of the teeth were stored in distilled water for one week and then stained with dye, sectioned, and scored for microleakage on occlusal and cervical edges. Results were statistically analyzed by Kruskal wallis and Mann whitney tests. Results. There was a statistically difference between the microleakage scores of four materials (P < 0.001. Immediately polished glass ionomer and compomer groups have significantly more microleakage than delayed polished groups (P < 0.001. Thermocycting could infulence the microleakage of composite on cervical edges (P < 0.05. Discussion. The precense of differences between the nature of materials and also the surface treatment such as primer or etchant application could influence the microleakage. The prescence of differences in reaction rate between the materials and the time that they reach to their adequate mechanical strength and adhesive bond strength lead to presence of differences between the effect of polishing time on the microleakage scores of materials.

  13. Properties of New Glass Ionomer Restorative Materials Marketed for Stress Bearing Areas

    2018-03-22

    REPORT TYPE 22/03/2018 Poster 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prope1iies of New Glass-Ionomer Restorative Materials Marketed for Stress -Bearing Areas 6...Adobe Professional 7 .0 INTRODUCTION Equia Forte is a new GIC which is marketed for posterior stress bearing restorations due to its newer...research on this and other newer glass ionomer systems being indicated for use in class II posterior stress - bearing preparations. OBJECTIVE The

  14. Interfacial stresses in a bi-material assembly with a compliant bonding layer

    Suhir, E; Vujosevic, M

    2008-01-01

    We examine an elongated bi-material adhesively bonded or soldered assembly with a continuous compliant attachment (bonding layer). The assembly is subjected to external tensile forces or to bending moments applied to one of the assembly components. We develop simple predictive analytical ('mathematical') models for the evaluation of interfacial shearing (in the case of external tensile forces) and peeling (in the case of external bending moments) stresses and strains in the bonding material. The developed models can be helpful in stress-strain analyses of assemblies of the type in question and particularly for printed-circuit-board (PCB)/surface-mounted-device (SMD) assemblies employed in electronic packaging. These models enable one to particularly evaluate the maximum interfacial stresses in the bonding material from the predicted or measured strains in the PCB in the vicinity of but still outside the surface-mounted package

  15. Fuel pellets from biomass - Processing, bonding, raw materials

    Stelte, W.

    2011-12-15

    The present study investigates several important aspects of biomass pelletization. Seven individual studies have been conducted and linked together, in order to push forward the research frontier of biomass pelletization processes. The first study was to investigate influence of the different processing parameters on the pressure built up in the press channel of a pellet mill. It showed that the major factor was the press channel length as well as temperature, moisture content, particle size and extractive content. Furthermore, extractive migration to the pellet surface at an elevated temperature played an important role. The second study presented a method of how key processing parameters can be estimated, based on a pellet model and a small number of fast and simple laboratory trials using a single pellet press. The third study investigated the bonding mechanisms within a biomass pellet, which indicate that different mechanisms are involved depending on biomass type and pelletizing conditions. Interpenetration of polymer chains and close intermolecular distance resulting in better secondary bonding were assumed to be the key factors for high mechanical properties of the formed pellets. The outcome of this study resulted in study four and five investigating the role of lignin glass transition for biomass pelletization. It was demonstrated that the softening temperature of lignin was dependent on species and moisture content. In typical processing conditions and at 8% (wt) moisture content, transitions were identified to be at approximately 53-63 deg. C for wheat straw and about 91 deg. C for spruce lignin. Furthermore, the effects of wheat straw extractives on the pelletizing properties and pellet stability were investigated. The sixth and seventh study applied the developed methodology to test the pelletizing properties of thermally pre-treated (torrefied) biomass from spruce and wheat straw. The results indicated that high torrefaction temperatures above 275 deg

  16. Effect of adhesive resin cements on bond strength of ceramic core materials to dentin.

    Gundogdu, M; Aladag, L I

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements on the shear bond strength of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin. Extracted, caries-free, human central maxillary incisor teeth were selected, and the vestibule surfaces were cut flat to obtain dentin surfaces. Ceramic core materials (IPS e.max Press and Prettau Zirconia) were luted to the dentin surfaces using three self-etch adhesive systems (Duo-Link, Panavia F 2.0, and RelyX Ultimate Clicker) and two self-adhesive resin systems (RelyX U200 Automix and Maxcem Elite). A shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope, and bonding interfaces between the adhesive resin cements and the teeth were evaluated with a scanning electron microscope. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The type of adhesive resin cement significantly affected the shear bond strengths of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin (P materials when the specimens were luted with self-adhesive resin cements (P materials.

  17. Fuel Pellets from Biomass. Processing, Bonding, Raw Materials

    Stelte, Wolfgang

    in an increasing interest in biomass densification technologies, such as pelletization and briquetting. The global pellet market has developed quickly, and strong growth is to be expected for the coming years. Due to an increasing demand for biomass, the traditionally used wood residues from sawmills and pulp...... influence of the different processing parameters on the pressure built up in the press channel of a pellet mill. It showed that the major factor was the press channel length as well as temperature, moisture content, particle size and extractive content. Furthermore, extractive migration to the pellet...... surface at an elevated temperature played an important role. The second study presented a method of how key processing parameters can be estimated, based on a pellet model and a small number of fast and simple laboratory trials using a single pellet press. The third study investigated the bonding...

  18. DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGICAL SOLUTIONS FOR THE RESTORATION OF SEWERS USING ELEMENTS OF RECYCLED POLYMER COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    GONCHARENKO D. F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. Currently sanitary drainage systems of large cities in Ukraine are significantly worn down with prolonged use and due to inefficient solutions for protection of the structures from aggressive effects of the environment, poor quality of materials and construction and installation works during building. Restoration of performance characteristics, reliability and durability of sewer tunnels is the costly and technically complex task, which is urgently needed to be fulfilled to prevent accidents including those with serious environmental impact. Modern work technique and the materials used for restoration allow us to solve these problems with different levels of efficiency, while reducing the cost of restoration due to use of recycled polymeric raw material, as well as to improvement of technological solutions is a currently important direction of research. Purpose of the article. To develop solutions for restoring serviceability, reliability and durability of sewer tunnels taking into account the accumulated experience in renovation of water disposal networks. Conclusion. Use of components made of recycled polymer composite materials during restoring sewer tunnels has significant economic and environmental effects and allows to undertake repair work in hard-to-reach areas.

  19. Use of a Novel ORMOCER as a Universal Direct Restorative Material.

    Hakim, Foroud; Vallée, Jessie

    2018-01-01

    Composite resin is considered the material of choice for direct restoration of teeth when esthetic outcome is a high priority. While material science improvements have mitigated many of the traditional liabilities related to composite resin restorations, shrinkage and related shrinkage stress still play a role in outcomes, placement techniques, and overall success. This case report demonstrates two restorative scenarios using an ORMOCER® composite material. The first features a female patient who, upon completion of preliminary orthodontic treatment, determined in consultation with the orthodontist that her central incisors would present more idealistic display and esthetics if they were lengthened by approximately 1.5 mm. The lengthening of the incisors was to precede the phase II refinement with clear aligners, which would aim to extrude the remaining anterior teeth to develop incisal balance and symmetry. The second case is that of a woman who presented with a newly symptomatic upper right second bicuspid with an existing nearly decade old, large MODL composite resin restoration. This article demonstrates the universal nature of the novel direct restorative material used, making it well-suited for both anterior and posterior applications.

  20. Physical properties of a new sonically placed composite resin restorative material.

    Ibarra, Emily T; Lien, Wen; Casey, Jeffery; Dixon, Sara A; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2015-01-01

    A new nanohybrid composite activated by sonic energy has been recently introduced as a single-step, bulk-fill restorative material. The purpose of this study was to compare the physical properties of this new composite to various other composite restorative materials marketed for posterior or bulk-fill placement. The following physical properties were examined: depth of cure, volumetric shrinkage, flexural strength, flexural modulus, fracture toughness, and percent porosity. A mean and standard deviation were determined per group. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests were performed per property (α = 0.05). Percent porosity was evaluated with a Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney test (α = 0.005). Significant differences were found between groups (P composite restorative materials, the new nanohybrid composite showed low shrinkage and percent porosity, moderate fracture toughness and flexural modulus, and high flexural strength. However, it also demonstrated a relatively reduced depth of cure compared to the other composites.

  1. A comparison of microhardness of indirect composite restorative materials

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clóvis; Bottino, Marco Cícero

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the microhardness of four indirect composite resins. Forty cylindrical samples were prepared according to the manufacturer’s recommendations using a Teflon mold. Ten specimens were produced from each tested material, constituting four groups (n=10) as foll...... esthetics and adequate mechanical properties may be considered as substitutes of natural teeth....

  2. Covalently bonded disordered thin-film materials. Materials Research Society symposium proceedings Volume 498

    Siegal, M.P.; Milne, W.I.; Jaskie, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    The current and potential impact of covalently bonded disordered thin films is enormous. These materials are amorphous-to-nanocrystalline structures made from light atomic weight elements from the first row of the periodic table. Examples include amorphous tetrahedral diamond-like carbon, boron nitride, carbon nitride, boron carbide, and boron-carbon-nitride. These materials are under development for use as novel low-power, high-visibility elements in flat-panel display technologies, cold-cathode sources for microsensors and vacuum microelectronics, encapsulants for both environmental protection and microelectronics, optical coatings for laser windows, and ultra-hard tribological coatings. researchers from 17 countries and a broad range of academic institutions, national laboratories and industrial organizations come together in this volume to report on the status of key areas and recent discoveries. More specifically, the volume is organized into five sections. The first four highlight ongoing work primarily in the area of amorphous/nanocrystalline (disordered) carbon thin films; theoretical and experimental structural characterization; electrical and optical characterizations; growth methods; and cold-cathode electron emission results. The fifth section describes the growth, characterization and application of boron- and carbon-nitride thin films

  3. Effect of prophylactic polishing protocols on the surface roughness of esthetic restorative materials.

    Neme, A L; Frazier, K B; Roeder, L B; Debner, T L

    2002-01-01

    Many polishing protocols have been evaluated in vitro for their effect on the surface roughness of restorative materials. These results have been useful in establishing protocols for in vivo application. However, limited research has focused on the subsequent care and maintenance of esthetic restorations following their placement. This investigation evaluated the effect of five polishing protocols that could be implemented at recall on the surface roughness of five direct esthetic restorative materials. Specimens (n=25) measuring 8 mm diameter x 3 mm thick were fabricated in an acrylic mold using five light-cured resin-based materials (hybrid composite, microfilled composite, packable composite, compomer and resin-modified glass ionomer). After photopolymerization, all specimens were polished with Sof-Lex Disks to produce an initial (baseline) surface finish. All specimens were then polished with one of five prophylactic protocols (Butler medium paste, Butler coarse paste, OneGloss, SuperBuff or OneGloss & SuperBuff). The average surface roughness of each treated specimen was determined from three measurements with a profilometer (Surface 1). Next, all specimens were brushed 60,000 times at 1.5 Hz using a brush-head force of 2 N on a Manly V-8 cross-brushing machine in a 50:50 (w/w) slurry of toothpaste and water. The surface roughness of each specimen was measured after brushing (Surface 2) followed by re-polishing with one of five protocols, then final surface roughness values were determined (Surface 3). The data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Significant differences (p=0.05) in surface roughness were observed among restorative materials and polishing protocols. The microfilled and hybrid resin composite yielded significantly rougher surfaces than the other three materials following tooth brushing. Prophylactic polishing protocols can be used to restore a smooth surface on resin-based esthetic restorative materials following simulated tooth

  4. Long-term Bond Strength between Layering Indirect Composite Material and Zirconia Coated with Silicabased Ceramics.

    Fushiki, Ryosuke; Komine, Futoshi; Honda, Junichi; Kamio, Shingo; Blatz, Markus B; Matsumura, Hideo

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the long-term shear bond strength between an indirect composite material and a zirconia framework coated with silica-based ceramics, taking the effect of different primers into account. A total of 165 airborne-particle abraded zirconia disks were subjected to one of three pretreatments: no pretreatment (ZR-AB), airborne-particle abrasion of zirconia coated with feldspathic porcelain (ZR-PO-AB), and 9.5% hydrofluoric acid etching of zirconia coated with feldspathic porcelain (ZR-PO-HF). An indirect composite material (Estenia C&B) was then bonded to the zirconia disks after they were treated with one of the following primers: Clearfil Photo Bond (CPB), Clearfil Photo Bond with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator (CPB + Activator), Estenia Opaque Primer (EOP), Porcelain Liner M Liquid B (PLB), or no priming (CON, control group). Shear bond strength was tested after 100,000 thermocycles, and the data were analyzed using the Steel-Dwass U-test (α = 0.05). For ZR-PO-AB and ZR-PO-HF specimens, bond strength was highest in the CPB+Activator group (25.8 MPa and 22.4 MPa, respectively). Bond strengths were significantly lower for ZR-AB specimens in the CON and PLB groups and for ZR-PO-AB specimens in the CON, CPB, and EOP groups. Combined application of a hydrophobic phosphate monomer (MDP) and silane coupling agent enhanced the long-term bond strength of indirect composite material to a zirconia coated with silica-based ceramics.

  5. Particle beam technology for control of atomic-bonding state in materials

    Ishikawa, Junzo [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    The atomic-bonding state in materials can be controlled through `kinetic bonding` process by energetic particle beams which have a sufficient atomic kinetic energy. In order to clarify the `kinetic bonding` process the negative-ion beam deposition is considered as an ideal method because the negative ion has no additional active energies. Sputter type heavy negative-ion sources can be used for this purpose. Carbon films prepared by carbon negative-ion beam deposition have a strong dependency of the film properties on ion beam kinetic energy and have a quite high thermal conductivity which is comparable to that of the IIb diamond at a kinetic energy of 50-100 eV/atom. It suggests that new or metastable materials could be formed through the `kinetic bonding` process. Negative-ion beams can also be used for ion implantation, in which charging problems are perfectly reduced. (author)

  6. The use of differential scanning calorimetry for the evaluation of dental materials. I. Cements, cavity lining materials and anterior restorative materials.

    McCabe, J F; Wilson, H J

    1980-03-01

    Thermal changes occurring during the setting of restorative materials have been measured accurately using a differential scanning calorimeter. The results were used to evaluate setting characteristics. The heat of reaction and rate of heat output may be significant in determining thermal damage to the pulp. The heat capacity is related to thermal insulation properties. These properties have been determined and their effect on the efficacy of restorative materials discussed.

  7. In vitro comparative evaluation of mechanical properties of temporary restorative materials used in fixed partial denture

    D Saisadan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Materials used to fabricate provisional restorations can be classified as acrylics or resin composites. Provisional crows can be either prefabricated or custom made. Acrylics: These materials have been used to fabricate provisional restorations since the 1930s and usually available as powder and liquid. They are the most commonly used materials today for both single-unit and multiple-unit restorations. In general, their popularity is due to their low cost, acceptable esthetics, and versatility. Composites: Composite provisional materials use bis-acryl resin, a hydrophobic material that is similar to bis-GMA. Composites are available as auto-polymerized, dualpolymerized and visible light polymerized. Preformed Crowns: Preformed provisional crowns or matrices usually consist of tooth-shaped shells of plastic, cellulose acetate or metal. They are commercially available in various tooth sizes and are usually selected for a particular tooth anatomy. They are commonly relined with acrylic resin to provide a more custom fit before cementation, but the plastic and metal crown shells can also be cemented directly onto prepared teeth. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to choose a material to serve as a better interim prosthesis and to compare three different properties – flexural strength, compressive strength, and color stability. Materials and Methods: The samples were made with three different provisional materials (Revotek LC, Protemp 4, TemSpan. Result: It was inferred from the study that no one material was superior in all three tested parameters.

  8. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    Merghni, Abderrahmen, E-mail: abderrahmen_merghni@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Kammoun, Dorra [Laboratoire de Biomatériaux et Biotechnologie, Faculté de Médecine Dentaire, Monastir (Tunisia); Hentati, Hajer [Laboratoire de Recherche en Santé Orale et Réhabilitation Bucco-Faciale (LR12ES11), Faculté de Médecine Dentaire de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Janel, Sébastien [BioImaging Center Lille-FR3642, Lille (France); Popoff, Michka [Cellular Microbiology and Physics of Infection-CNRS UMR8204, INSERM U1019, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille University (France); Lafont, Frank [BioImaging Center Lille-FR3642, Lille (France); Cellular Microbiology and Physics of Infection-CNRS UMR8204, INSERM U1019, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille University (France); Aouni, Mahjoub [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Mastouri, Maha [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Laboratoire de Microbiologie, CHU Fattouma Bourguiba de Monastir (Tunisia)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • 4 dental restorative materials were characterized for roughness, angle contact water and surface free energy. • AFM adhesion forces of S. aureus to tested materials were achieved in presence and absence of salivary conditioning film. • S. aureus initial adhesion is dependent on the surface free energy and roughness. - Abstract: In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  9. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Kammoun, Dorra; Hentati, Hajer; Janel, Sébastien; Popoff, Michka; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • 4 dental restorative materials were characterized for roughness, angle contact water and surface free energy. • AFM adhesion forces of S. aureus to tested materials were achieved in presence and absence of salivary conditioning film. • S. aureus initial adhesion is dependent on the surface free energy and roughness. - Abstract: In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  10. A useful and non-invasive microanalysis method for dental restoration materials

    Hosoki, M.; Satsuma, T.; Nishigawa, K.; Takeuchi, H.; Asaoka, K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This method for the microanalysis of dental alloys is beneficial for patients with allergies to dental materials. ► This metal sample is easy to mail it for inspection at specialist institutes. ► This method can be also be used in general dental clinics. - Abstract: The elemental analysis of intraoral dental restorations provides considerable information for the treatment of dental metal allergy. Elemental analyses require specific instruments and complicated procedures, so this examination is not commonly carried out in private dental clinics. We describe a novel, simple and useful micro-analytical method for dental metal restorations. Micro metal dust was obtained by polishing the surface of restorative metal material with an unused silicone point (SUPER-SNAP). The metal dust on the silicone point was then rubbed onto adhesive tape, and this tape was covered with polyethylene film. The amount of metal dust material was <20 μg. An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer was used to carry out the elementary analysis of the metal dust on the polyethylene film. Three types of dental metal alloy materials of known components were examined. The results of elementary analyses were compared with the specifications provided by the manufacturer. The same procedure was carried out for three dental metal restorations of an adult female volunteer in vivo. The results of elemental analyses for five alloy materials exactly matched the product specification. Three metal samples obtained from intraoral restoration were also available for elemental analyses. The distinct advantage of this method is that it enables sample extraction without an invasive effect for the restoration. The metal sample is in a polyethylene film, so it is easy to mail it for inspection at specialist institutes yet it can be also be used in general dental clinics.

  11. A useful and non-invasive microanalysis method for dental restoration materials

    Hosoki, M., E-mail: hosoki@tokushima-u.ac.jp [Department of Fixed Prosthodontics, Institute of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan); Satsuma, T.; Nishigawa, K.; Takeuchi, H. [General Dentistry, Tokushima University Hospital, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan); Asaoka, K. [Department of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Institute of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method for the microanalysis of dental alloys is beneficial for patients with allergies to dental materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This metal sample is easy to mail it for inspection at specialist institutes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method can be also be used in general dental clinics. - Abstract: The elemental analysis of intraoral dental restorations provides considerable information for the treatment of dental metal allergy. Elemental analyses require specific instruments and complicated procedures, so this examination is not commonly carried out in private dental clinics. We describe a novel, simple and useful micro-analytical method for dental metal restorations. Micro metal dust was obtained by polishing the surface of restorative metal material with an unused silicone point (SUPER-SNAP). The metal dust on the silicone point was then rubbed onto adhesive tape, and this tape was covered with polyethylene film. The amount of metal dust material was <20 {mu}g. An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer was used to carry out the elementary analysis of the metal dust on the polyethylene film. Three types of dental metal alloy materials of known components were examined. The results of elementary analyses were compared with the specifications provided by the manufacturer. The same procedure was carried out for three dental metal restorations of an adult female volunteer in vivo. The results of elemental analyses for five alloy materials exactly matched the product specification. Three metal samples obtained from intraoral restoration were also available for elemental analyses. The distinct advantage of this method is that it enables sample extraction without an invasive effect for the restoration. The metal sample is in a polyethylene film, so it is easy to mail it for inspection at specialist institutes yet it can be also be used in general dental clinics.

  12. Own brand label restorative materials-A false bargain?

    Johnsen, Gaute Floer; Thieu, Minh Khai Le; Hussain, Badra; Pamuła, Elzbieta; Reseland, Janne Elin; Lyngstadaas, Ståle Petter; Haugen, Håvard

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating and comparing mechanical, chemical, and cytotoxicological parameters of a commercial brand name composite material against two 'own brand label' (OBL) composites. Parameters included depth of cure, flexural strength, degree of conversion, polymerization shrinkage, filler particle morphology and elemental analyzes, Vickers hardness, surface roughness parameters after abrasion, monomer elution, and cytotoxicity. The conventional composite outperformed the OBLS in terms of depth of cure (pbrand-name composites, but at a lower price. Dentists are highly recommended to reconsider utilization of OBLs lacking sound scientific scrutiny, and our findings underscore this recommendation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Marginal adaptation and CAD-CAM technology: A systematic review of restorative material and fabrication techniques.

    Papadiochou, Sofia; Pissiotis, Argirios L

    2018-04-01

    The comparative assessment of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology and other fabrication techniques pertaining to marginal adaptation should be documented. Limited evidence exists on the effect of restorative material on the performance of a CAD-CAM system relative to marginal adaptation. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate whether the marginal adaptation of CAD-CAM single crowns, fixed dental prostheses, and implant-retained fixed dental prostheses or their infrastructures differs from that obtained by other fabrication techniques using a similar restorative material and whether it depends on the type of restorative material. An electronic search of English-language literature published between January 1, 2000, and June 30, 2016, was conducted of the Medline/PubMed database. Of the 55 included comparative studies, 28 compared CAD-CAM technology with conventional fabrication techniques, 12 contrasted CAD-CAM technology and copy milling, 4 compared CAD-CAM milling with direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), and 22 investigated the performance of a CAD-CAM system regarding marginal adaptation in restorations/infrastructures produced with different restorative materials. Most of the CAD-CAM restorations/infrastructures were within the clinically acceptable marginal discrepancy (MD) range. The performance of a CAD-CAM system relative to marginal adaptation is influenced by the restorative material. Compared with CAD-CAM, most of the heat-pressed lithium disilicate crowns displayed equal or smaller MD values. Slip-casting crowns exhibited similar or better marginal accuracy than those fabricated with CAD-CAM. Cobalt-chromium and titanium implant infrastructures produced using a CAD-CAM system elicited smaller MD values than zirconia. The majority of cobalt-chromium restorations/infrastructures produced by DMLS displayed better marginal accuracy than those fabricated with the casting technique. Compared with copy

  14. Hydrogen bonded columnar liquid crystals for nanostructured functional materials

    Fitié, C.F.C.

    2010-01-01

    Many functional materials rely on a well-organized internal structure for their functional properties. The length scale of this organization can vary from the atomic level (e.g., piezoelectric crystals) to a macroscopic length scale exceeding the dimensions of individual molecules (e.g., porous

  15. In vitro Comparative Evaluation of Various Restorative Materials used for restoring Class III Cavities in Deciduous Anterior Teeth: A Clinical Study.

    Priyank, Harsh; Verma, Ankita; Gupta, Komal; Chaudhary, Esha; Khandelwal, Deepak; Nihalani, Shweta

    2016-12-01

    Beauty standards in today's modernized world scenario are formed by well-aligned and well-designed bright white teeth. One of the major reasons behind patients reporting to dental clinics is pain. Caries in the anterior primary teeth forms one of the major concerns from a restorative point of view. Very few studies are quoted in literature which stresses on the follow-up of anterior restorations in primary teeth. Hence, we evaluated and compared the efficacy of composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RGIC) for class III restorations in primary anterior teeth. The present study was conducted in the pediatric dental wing and included a total of 80 patients aged 3 to 5½ years who reported with the chief complaint of carious lesions in the primary anterior teeth. Patients having minimal of a pair of similar appearing small carious lesions on the same proximal surfaces of the deciduous maxillary incisors were included for the study. All the patients were randomly divided into two groups: One in which RGIC restoration was done and other in which composite restoration was done. Cavity preparation was done and filling of the cavity with the restorative materials was carried out. Assessment of the restorations was done at 4, 8, and 12 months time following criteria given by Ryge et al. All the results were analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Mann-Whitney test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to evaluate the level of significance; p value less than 0.05 was considered as significant. For composite and RGIC restorations, the mean score for anatomic shape was 1.21 and 1.10 respectively. While comparing the clinical parameters, nonsignificant results were obtained between composite and RGIC restorative materials at 4-, 8-, and 12-month interval. On comparing the clinical parameters for individual restorative materials at different time intervals, statistically significant results were obtained only for

  16. Evaluation of radiation effects on dental enamel hardness and dental restorative materials

    Adachi, Lena Katekawa; Saiki, Mitiko; Campos, Tomie Nakakuki

    2000-01-01

    This research presents the results of the microhardness of human dental enamel and of the following dental restorative materials: three dental porcelains - Ceramco II, Finesse and Noritake, and two resin restorative materials - Artglass and Targis, for materials submitted to different times of irradiation at the IEA-R1m nuclear reactor under a thermal neutron flux of 10 12 n cm -2 .s -1 . The results obtained indicated that there is a decrease of the surface microhardness when the enamel is irradiated for 1 h and when dental materials are irradiated for 3 h. However, enamels irradiated for 30 min. did not show significant change of their surface hardness. Therefore, the selection of irradiation time is an important factor to be considered when irradiated teeth or dental materials are used in the investigations of their properties. (author)

  17. Bonding Effectiveness of Luting Composites to Different CAD/CAM Materials.

    Peumans, Marleen; Valjakova, Emilija Bajraktarova; De Munck, Jan; Mishevska, Cece Bajraktarova; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    To evaluate the influence of different surface treatments of six novel CAD/CAM materials on the bonding effectiveness of two luting composites. Six different CAD/CAM materials were tested: four ceramics - Vita Mark II; IPS Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD; Celtra Duo - one hybrid ceramic, Vita Enamic, and one composite CAD/CAM block, Lava Ultimate. A total of 60 blocks (10 per material) received various mechanical surface treatments: 1. 600-grit SiC paper; 2. sandblasting with 30-μm Al2O3; 3. tribochemical silica coating (CoJet). Subsequent chemical surface treatments involved either no further treatment (control), HF acid etching (HF), silanization (S, or HF acid etching followed by silanization (HF+S). Two specimens with the same surface treatment were bonded together using two dual-curing luting composites: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (self-etching) or Panavia SA Cement (self-adhesive). After 1 week of water storage, the microtensile bond strength of the sectioned microspecimens was measured and the failure mode was evaluated. The bonding performance of the six CAD/CAM materials was significantly influenced by surface treatment (linear mixed models, p CAD (p = 0.0115), and Lava Ultimate (p CAD/CAM materials: Vita Mark II and IPS Empress CAD: S, HF+S; Celtra Duo: HF, HF+S; IPS e.max CAD: HF+S; Vita Enamic: HF+S, S. For Lava Ultimate, the highest bond strengths were obtained with HF, S, HF+S. Failure analysis showed a relation between bond strength and failure type: more mixed failures were observed with higher bond strengths. Mainly adhesive failures were noticed if no further surface treatment was done. The percentage of adhesive failures was higher for CAD/CAM materials with higher flexural strength (Celtra Duo, IPS e.max CAD, and Lava Ultimate). The bond strength of luting composites to novel CAD/CAM materials is influenced by surface treatment. For each luting composite, an adhesive cementation protocol can be specified in order to obtain the highest bond to the

  18. In vitro comparative evaluation of mechanical properties of temporary restorative materials used in fixed partial denture.

    Saisadan, D; Manimaran, P; Meenapriya, P K

    2016-10-01

    Materials used to fabricate provisional restorations can be classified as acrylics or resin composites. Provisional crows can be either prefabricated or custom made. These materials have been used to fabricate provisional restorations since the 1930s and usually available as powder and liquid. They are the most commonly used materials today for both single-unit and multiple-unit restorations. In general, their popularity is due to their low cost, acceptable esthetics, and versatility. Composite provisional materials use bis-acryl resin, a hydrophobic material that is similar to bis-GMA. Composites are available as auto-polymerized, dualpolymerized and visible light polymerized. Preformed provisional crowns or matrices usually consist of tooth-shaped shells of plastic, cellulose acetate or metal. They are commercially available in various tooth sizes and are usually selected for a particular tooth anatomy. They are commonly relined with acrylic resin to provide a more custom fit before cementation, but the plastic and metal crown shells can also be cemented directly onto prepared teeth. The aim of this study is to choose a material to serve as a better interim prosthesis and to compare three different properties - flexural strength, compressive strength, and color stability. The samples were made with three different provisional materials (Revotek LC, Protemp 4, TemSpan). It was inferred from the study that no one material was superior in all three tested parameters.

  19. Coronal microleakage of four temporary restorative materials in Class II-type endodontic access preparations

    Sang-Mi Yun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of 4 temporary materials in teeth with Class II-type endodontic access preparations by using a glucose penetration model. Materials and Methods Glucose reaction test was performed to rule out the presence of any reaction between glucose and temporary material. Class II-type endodontic access preparations were made in extracted human premolars with a single root (n = 10. Each experimental group was restored with Caviton (GC, Spacer (Vericom, IRM (Dentsply-Caulk, or Fuji II(GC. Microleakage of four materials used as temporary restorative materials was evaluated by using a glucose penetration model. Data were analyzed by the one-way analysis of variance followed by a multiple-comparison Tukey test. The interface between materials and tooth were examined under a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Results There was no significant reaction between glucose and temporary materials used in this study. Microleakage was significantly lower for Caviton and Spacer than for Fuji II and IRM. SEM observation showed more intimate adaptation of tooth-restoration interfaces in Caviton and Spacer than in IRM and Fuji II. Conclusions Compared to IRM and Fuji II, Caviton and Spacer can be considered better temporary sealing materials in Class II-type endodontic access cavities.

  20. Implementation Challenges for Sintered Silicon Carbide Fiber Bonded Ceramic Materials for High Temperature Applications

    Singh, M.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decades, a number of fiber reinforced ceramic composites have been developed and tested for various aerospace and ground based applications. However, a number of challenges still remain slowing the wide scale implementation of these materials. In addition to continuous fiber reinforced composites, other innovative materials have been developed including the fibrous monoliths and sintered fiber bonded ceramics. The sintered silicon carbide fiber bonded ceramics have been fabricated by the hot pressing and sintering of silicon carbide fibers. However, in this system reliable property database as well as various issues related to thermomechanical performance, integration, and fabrication of large and complex shape components has yet to be addressed. In this presentation, thermomechanical properties of sintered silicon carbide fiber bonded ceramics (as fabricated and joined) will be presented. In addition, critical need for manufacturing and integration technologies in successful implementation of these materials will be discussed.

  1. In vitro comparison of coronal microleakage of four temporary restorative materials used in endodontic treatment

    Shahi Sh.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: The use of proper temporary restorative materials between appointments is critical in successful root canal treatment. The purpose of this study was to compare the coronal microleakage of four temporary restorative materials including Zonalin, Zamherir, Coltosol and IRM. "nMaterials and Methods: In this in vitro study, standard access cavities were prepared in 120 intact extracted maxillary and mandibular human first molars. Canal preparation was carried out by the step-back technique, and obturation was performed with gutta-percha and AH26 sealer using the lateral condensation technique. Teeth were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups of 25 teeth each and two positive and negative control groups, each containing 10 teeth. In each experimental group the access cavity was restored with one of the tested materials (Zamherir, Zonalin, IRM and Coltosol. In the negative control group the access cavity was filled entirely with sticky wax and in the positive control group no restorative material was applied. Dye penetration technique was used to evaluate microleakage which was measured under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed with one way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. "nResults: Dye penetration was observed in all groups. Zonalin and Coltosol had the highest and the lowest dye penetration respectively, with a statistically significant difference (p<0.001. There was no significant difference in dye penetration between IRM, and either Coltosol or Zamherir (p>0.05. "nConclusion: The results of this study showed that using Coltosol as a temporary restorative material can provide a better coronal seal in endodontic treatments

  2. A new classification system for all-ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials.

    Gracis, Stefano; Thompson, Van P; Ferencz, Jonathan L; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2015-01-01

    Classification systems for all-ceramic materials are useful for communication and educational purposes and warrant continuous revisions and updates to incorporate new materials. This article proposes a classification system for ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials in an attempt to systematize and include a new class of materials. This new classification system categorizes ceramic restorative materials into three families: (1) glass-matrix ceramics, (2) polycrystalline ceramics, and (3) resin-matrix ceramics. Subfamilies are described in each group along with their composition, allowing for newly developed materials to be placed into the already existing main families. The criteria used to differentiate ceramic materials are based on the phase or phases present in their chemical composition. Thus, an all-ceramic material is classified according to whether a glass-matrix phase is present (glass-matrix ceramics) or absent (polycrystalline ceramics) or whether the material contains an organic matrix highly filled with ceramic particles (resin-matrix ceramics). Also presented are the manufacturers' clinical indications for the different materials and an overview of the different fabrication methods and whether they are used as framework materials or monolithic solutions. Current developments in ceramic materials not yet available to the dental market are discussed.

  3. Dematerialization of the Ruins : Glass as a Promising Restorative Material for the Consolidation of Historic Structures

    Barou, L.; Oikonomopoulou, F.; Bristogianni, T.; Veer, F.A.; Nijsse, R.; Louter, Christian; Bos, Freek; Belis, Jan; Veer, Fred; Nijsse, Rob

    This research investigates the potential of glass as a new design tool to highlight and safeguard our historic structures. Current restoration and conservation treatments with traditional materials bear the risk of conjecture between the original and new elements, whereas the high consolidation

  4. A strategy for maximizing native plant material diversity for ecological restoration, germplasm conservation and genecology research

    Berta Youtie; Nancy Shaw; Matt Fisk; Scott Jensen

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important steps in planning a restoration project is careful selection of ecologically adapted native plant material. As species-specific seed zone maps are not available for most species in the Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Wyoming big sagebrush) ecoregion in the Great Basin, USA, we are employing a provisional seed zone map based on annual...

  5. The effect of bleaching agents on the microhardness of dental aesthetic restorative materials.

    Türker, S B; Biskin, T

    2002-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of three home bleaching agents on the microhardness of various dental aesthetic restorative materials. The restorative materials were: feldspatic porcelain, microfilled composite resin and light-cured modified glass-ionomer cement and the bleaching agents Nite-White (16% carbamide peroxide), Opalescence (10% carbamide peroxide and carbapol jel) and Rembrandt (10% carbamide peroxide jel). A total of 90 restorative material samples were prepared 1 cm diameter and 6 mm thick and kept in distilled water for 24 h before commencing bleaching which was carried out for 8 h day-1 for 4 weeks. Microhardness measurements were then made using a Tukon tester. Statistically significant differences with respect to unbleached controls were found only for the feldspatic porcelain and microfilled composite resins (P light cured modified glass-ionomer cement. For the composite resin, whereas Nite-White increased its microhardness, the other bleaching agents decreased it. There were no significant differences between the bleaching agents for any of the restorative materials.

  6. An in vitro study of dental enamel wear by restorative materials using radiometric method

    Adachi, Lena Katekawa

    2000-01-01

    There is an increasing demand and interest to study the dental materials wear as well as about the abrasion effect on antagonistic teeth. Due to the fact that the existent restorative materials have no specifications about their abrasiveness, it is necessary the establishment of degrees of comparison among them to support clinical application. In this work, the radiometric method was applied to study the enamel wear caused by another enamel and by restorative materials (Ceramco II, Noritake and Finesse porcelains, Artglass and Targis). The dental enamel made radioactive by irradiation at the IEA-R1m nuclear research reactor under a thermal neutron flux was submitted to wear in a machine which allows sliding motion of an antagonistic surface in contact with this radioactive enamel. The enamel wear was evaluated by measuring beta activity of 32 P transferred to water from this irradiated tooth. Results obtained indicated that dental porcelains cause pronounced enamel wear when compared with that provoked by another enamel or by resin materials. Resin materials caused less enamel wear than another enamel. Vickers microhardness data obtained for antagonistic materials showed a correlation with the wear caused to the enamel. This study allowed to conclude that the radiometric method proposed can be used satisfactorily in the evaluation of enamel wear by restorative materials. This method presents advantages due to quick responses and ease of analyses There is (author)

  7. RESTORING A DAMAGED 16-YEAR -OLD INSULATING POLYMER CONCRETE DIKE OVERLAY: REPAIR MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGIES.

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this program was to design and formulate organic polymer-based material systems suitable for repairing and restoring the overlay panels of insulating lightweight polymer concrete (ILPC) from the concrete floor and slope wall of a dike at KeySpan liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, NY, just over sixteen years ago. It also included undertaking a small-scale field demonstration to ensure that the commercial repairing technologies were applicable to the designed and formulated materials.

  8. SU-E-T-89: Characterization of Dental Restoration Material for Cs-137 Radiation Dosimetry.

    Ratliff, S; Gustafson, B; Barry, K

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize the radiation-induced thermoluminescence properties of a dental restoration material and to see if the material might be feasible for use in retrospective radiation dosimetry. Retrospective, or accidental, dosimetry is the study of using nearby materials to measure radiation received by individuals. In this project we obtained samples of Ivoclar Vivadent e.max CAD material, a glass-ceramic used for making dental restorations such as full or partial crowns. The samples were machined into square chips .32 cm × .32 cm × .089 cm and annealed in the same furnace used by the dentist. The samples were exposed to a Cs-137 source using a PMMA source holder and then read in a Harshaw 3500 TLD reader. The samples were read without nitrogen gas flux using heating rates of 5 degrees C/s or 10 degrees C/s up to a maximum temperature of 400 degrees Celsius. The glow curves were analyzed using Systat PeakFIT peak-fitting software and Microsoft Excel spreadsheets. The authors gratefully thank Dr. Aaron Imdieke and the staff of River City Dental, St. Cloud, MN for the dental restoration materials and the use of their dental furnace. A sample subjected to a radiation exposure of .04 C/kg exhibits a glow curve with a prominent peak at approximately 140 degrees Celsius, which is well-modeled by the first order glow curve deconvolution formula developed by Kitis, Gomez-Ros, and Tuyn. The activation energy corresponding to this peak is approximately 1 eV. The thermoluminescent signal fades with time after exposure. Ivoclar Vivadent e.max CAD dental restoration material has the potential to be used as a material for retrospective Cs-137 radiation dosimetry. Future work could look at its thermoluminescent dosimetry properties in more detail and also at other dental restoration materials. The authors would like to thank Dr. Aaron Imdieke and the staff of River City Dental, St. Cloud, MN, for the donation of scrap dental restoration materials and

  9. An in vitro investigation of human enamel wear by restorative dental materials

    Adachi, L.K.; Saiki, M.; De Campos, T.N.

    2001-01-01

    A radiometric method was applied to asses enamel wear by another enamel and by restorative materials. The radioactive enamel was submitted to wear in a machine which allows sliding motion of an antagonistic surface in contact with the radioactive enamel. The enamel wear was evaluated by measuring the beta-activity of 32 P transferred to water from this irradiated tooth. Results obtained indicated that dental porcelains cause pronounced enamel wear when compared with that provoked by another natural enamel or by resin materials. Resin materials caused less enamel wear than another natural enamel. Vickers microhardness data obtained for antagonistic materials showed a correlation with the wear caused to the enamel. (author)

  10. Microstructure Images Restoration of Metallic Materials Based upon KSVD and Smoothing Penalty Sparse Representation Approach.

    Li, Qing; Liang, Steven Y

    2018-04-20

    Microstructure images of metallic materials play a significant role in industrial applications. To address image degradation problem of metallic materials, a novel image restoration technique based on K-means singular value decomposition (KSVD) and smoothing penalty sparse representation (SPSR) algorithm is proposed in this work, the microstructure images of aluminum alloy 7075 (AA7075) material are used as examples. To begin with, to reflect the detail structure characteristics of the damaged image, the KSVD dictionary is introduced to substitute the traditional sparse transform basis (TSTB) for sparse representation. Then, due to the image restoration, modeling belongs to a highly underdetermined equation, and traditional sparse reconstruction methods may cause instability and obvious artifacts in the reconstructed images, especially reconstructed image with many smooth regions and the noise level is strong, thus the SPSR (here, q = 0.5) algorithm is designed to reconstruct the damaged image. The results of simulation and two practical cases demonstrate that the proposed method has superior performance compared with some state-of-the-art methods in terms of restoration performance factors and visual quality. Meanwhile, the grain size parameters and grain boundaries of microstructure image are discussed before and after they are restored by proposed method.

  11. The Investigation of Knitted Materials Bonded Seams Behaviour upon Cyclical Fatigue Loading

    Gita BUSILIENĖ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this research uniaxial tension behaviour of PES knitted materials with bonded seams is analysed. The objects of the investigation were two types of knitted materials, having the same fibre composition (93 % PES, 7 % EL, but different in knitting pattern, i. e. plain single jersey and rib 1 × 1. Bonded overlap seams were formed by changing the orientation of knitted materials strips, i. e. parallel/parallel, parallel/bias, parallel/perpendicular, bias/bias and bias/perpendicular. The strips of each knitted material were joined by two types of thermoplastic polyurethane (PU films different in thickness (75 mm and 150 mm. Mechanical characteristics of bonded seams were defined in longitudinal direction. During uniaxial tension such parameters as maximal force Fmax (N and maximal elongation ɛmax (% were recorded from typical tension diagrams. The changes of tested specimens strength and deformation were compared before and after cyclical fatigue tension the conditions of which were 50 cycles up to tension force F equal 24.5 N. The results have shown that changes before and after cyclical fatigue tension are mostly determined by the structure of knitted materials, the orientation of knitted materials strips in bonded seam, but not effected by thermoplastic polyurethane film. These results are opposite compared to the results of biaxial tension of the same type of specimens, which have shown that changes before and after cyclical fatigue punching are mostly determined by the type of thermoplastic film, but not effected by the orientation of knitted materials strips in bonded seams. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.2.16065

  12. Evaluation of bond strength between grooved titanium alloy implant abutments and provisional veneering materials after surface treatment of the abutments: An in vitro study

    Gowtham Venkat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Titanium has become the material of choice with greater applications in dental implants. The success of the dental implant does not only depend on the integration of the implant to the bone but also on the function and longevity of the superstructure. The clinical condition that demands long-term interim prosthesis is challenging owing to the decreased bond between the abutment and the veneering material. Hence, various surface treatments are done on the abutments to increase the bond strength. Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between the abutment and the provisional veneering materials by surface treatments such as acid etching, laser etching, and sand blasting of the abutment. Materials and Methods: Forty titanium alloy abutments of 3 mm diameter and 11 mm height were grouped into four groups with ten samples. Groups A, B, C, and D are untreated abutments, sand blasted with 110 μm aluminum particles, etched with 1% hydrofluoric acid and 30% nitric acid, and laser etched with Nd: YAG laser, respectively. Provisional crowns were fabricated with bis-acrylic resin and cemented with noneugenol temporary luting cement. The shear bond strength was measured in universal testing machine using modified Shell–Nielsen shear test after the cemented samples were stored in water at 25°C for 24 h. Load was applied at a constant cross head speed of 5 mm/min until a sudden decrease in resistance indicative of bond failure was observed. The corresponding force values were recorded, and statistical analysis was done using one-way ANOVA and Newman–Keuls post hoc test. Results: The laser-etched samples showed higher bond strength. Conclusion: Among the three surface treatments, laser etching showed the highest bond strength between titanium alloy implant abutment and provisional restorations. The sand-blasted surfaces demonstrated a significant difference in bond strength compared to laser-etched surfaces. The results of this

  13. A comparative study of shear bond strength between metal and ceramic brackets and artificially aged composite restorations using different surface treatments.

    Eslamian, Ladan; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Mousavi, Nasim; Ghasemi, Amir

    2012-10-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the shear bond strength (SBS) between ceramic brackets (CBs) and resin composite restorations (RCRs) prepared using different surface treatments. The findings were also compared with a similar study that used stainless steel brackets (SSBs). Forty-five premolars were restored with a nano-hybrid composite resin (Tetric EvoCeram) and randomly assigned to three surface treatment groups: group 1, 5 per cent hydrofluoric acid (HF); group 2, air abrasion (50 μm alumina particles); and group 3, diamond bur. Specimens were bonded with CBs (Fascination) and exposed to thermo-cycling (500 cycles). The shear force at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute was transmitted to brackets. The adhesive remnant index (ARIs) scores were recorded after bracket failure. The analysis of SBS variance (P 0.05) and bond failure occurred mainly in adhesive-bracket base and resin-adhesive interfaces. The diamond bur surface treatment is recommended as a safe and cost-effective method of bonding CBs to RCRs.

  14. In vitro fracture resistance of molar teeth restored with a short fibre-reinforced composite material.

    Fráter, Márk; Forster, András; Keresztúri, Márk; Braunitzer, Gábor; Nagy, Katalin

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the efficiency of a short fibre-reinforced composite (SFRC) material compared to conventional composites when restoring class II. MOD cavities in molar teeth with different layering techniques. One hundred and thirty mandibular third molars were divided into 5 groups (n=26). Except for the control group (intact teeth), in all other groups MOD cavities were prepared. The cavities were restored by either conventional composite with horizontal and oblique layering or by SFRC with horizontal and oblique layering. The specimens were submitted to static fracture toughness test. Fracture thresholds and fracture patterns were evaluated. In general, no statistically significant difference was found in fracture toughness between the study groups, except for horizontally layered conventional composite restorations, which turned out to be significantly weaker than controls. However, SFRC yielded noticeably higher fracture thresholds and only obliquely applied SFRC restorations exhibited favourable fracture patterns above chance level. The application of SFRC did not lead to a statistically significant improvement of the fracture toughness of molar teeth with MOD cavities. Still, SFRC applied in oblique increments measurably reduces the chance of unrestorable fractures of molar teeth with class II MOD cavities. The restoration of severely weakened molar teeth with the use of SFRC combined with composite might have advantages over conventional composites alone. It was observed from the statistical data, that the application of SFRC with an oblique layering technique yielded not significantly but better fracture thresholds and more favourable fracture patterns than any other studied material/technique combination. Thus further investigations need to be carried out, to investigate the possible positive mechanical effects of SFRC. The application of the horizontal layering technique with conventional composite materials is inferior

  15. Microtensile Bond Strength of New Ceramic/Polymer Materials Repaired with Composite Resin

    2015-06-30

    also have been shown to have higher enamel wear rates than composite-resin CAD/CAM restorations (Mӧrmann et al, 2013). As material choices, cost, and...although the longevity of these repairs has not been validated by clinical studies. Paradigm MZ100 showed the least amount of opposing enamel wear...ability to absorb shock, resist staining and stop crack propagation. Further manufacturer claims are that ceramic/polymer materials are easily

  16. Penn gap rule in phase-change memory materials: No clear evidence for resonance bonds

    K. Shimakawa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although a proposal of resonance bonds in crystalline phase-change materials based on the GeSbTe system has been provided, we do not find any clear evidence in favor of the proposal. The ellipsometric study demonstrates that a change in the high frequency dielectric constant ε∞ between the amorphous and crystalline phases is only scaled by the average bandgap (the Penn gap rule. Even for a pure antimony film, regarded as a prototype resonance bonding material, ε∞ was found to follow the Penn gap rule. Experimentally, we did not find any evidence of a significant change in the optical transition matrix element during the phase change, which is necessary to support the idea of resonance bonds.

  17. Laser materials development by means of a solid-state bonding method

    Sugiyama, Akira

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews laser materials development via a bonding method without adhesives. Instead of conventional chemical etching, a dry etching technique using an argon beam has been newly developed for the bonding method. This method meets the requirement for the use of optical materials. We succeeded in the fabrication of a composite laser crystal with good heat conductivity by bonding two kinds of crystals; one is neodymium-doped YVO 4 crystal (Nd:YVO 4 ) and the other is its host crystal YVO 4 . In the comparison of the laser performance between the normal and composite crystal, the composite one shows the good lasing capability of increasing laser output without fracture of the crystal due to thermal stress which appeared in the normal one. (author)

  18. Monitoring the restoration of interfacial contact for self healing thermal interface materials for LED and microelectronic applications

    Lafont, U.L.; Van Zeijl, H.W.; Van der Zwaag, S.

    2013-01-01

    While conventional self healing materials focus on the restoration of mechanical properties, newer generations of self healing materials focus on the restoration of other functional (i.e. non-mechanical) properties. Thermal conductivity is an example of an important functional property of a Thermal

  19. A comparative evaluation of four restorative materials to support undermined occlusal enamel of permanent teeth

    Prabhakar A

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to test the support to undermined occlusal enamel provided by posterior restorative composite (FiltekTM P60, 3M Dental products USA, polyacid modified resin composite (F2000 compomer, 3M Dental products, USA., radiopaque silver alloy-glass ionomer cement (Miracle Mix. GC Corp, Tokyo, Japan and Glass Ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP. To test each material, 20 human permanent mandibular third molars were selected. The lingual cusps were removed and the dentin supporting the facial cusps was cut away, leaving a shell of enamel. Each group of prepared teeth was restored using the materials according to the manufacturer′s instructions. All the specimens were thermocycled (250 cycles, 6°C- 60°C, dwell time 30 seconds and then mounted on an acrylic base. Specimens were loaded evenly across the cusp tips at a crosshead speed of 5 mm /minute in Hounsfield universal testing machine until fracture occurred. Data obtained was analyzed using analysis of variance and Studentized- Newman- Keul′s range test. No significant differences were detected in the support provided by P-60, F 2000, Miracle Mix or Fuji IX GP groups. The support provided to undermined occlusal enamel by these materials was intermediate between no support and that provided by sound dentin. Without further development in dental material technology and evidence of its efficacy, restorative materials should not be relied upon to support undermined occlusal enamel to a level comparable to that provided by sound dentin.

  20. Coronal microleakage with five different temporary restorative materials following walking bleach technique: An ex-vivo study

    G. P. V Srikumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Walking bleach technique uses 30% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate, and this paste mixture causes loosening of the coronal temporary restorative materials and thus decreasing its clinical effectiveness and causing irritation to the patients oral tissues. In the present study, sealing ability of hygroscopic coronal temporary restorative materials were compared with the other commonly used temporary restorative materials. Aim: To evaluate the effects of walking bleach material on the marginal sealing ability and coronal microleakage of the hydrophilic temporary restorative materials with that of the other commonly used temporary restorative materials in endodontic practice. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five extracted human maxillary central incisor teeth were prepared chemo-mechanically and obturated with gutta-percha in lateral condensation technique. Surface of each tooth was double coated with cyanoacrylate glue. All the teeth were randomly divided in to five groups. Out of 15 teeth in each group, 10 teeth served as experimental specimens, in which bleaching agent was placed in the pulp chamber and 5 teeth served as control, in which no bleaching agent was placed. The access cavities were restored with temporary restorative materials being tested per each group respectively. The specimens were then immersed in 1% India ink dye and subjected to thermo cycling for 7 days. All the teeth were longitudinally sectioned and observed with stereomicroscope and were graded according to the depth of linear dye penetration. Statistical Analysis Used: Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Hydrophilic temporary restorative materials Cavit G and Coltosol F have shown minimal coronal dye leakage with better sealing ability when exposed to walking bleach paste mixture in the dye penetration tests compared to other commonly used temporary restorative materials. Conclusion: Marginal sealing ability of Cavit G and Coltosol F were

  1. Effect of two different bleaching regimens on the gloss of tooth colored restorative materials.

    Yalcin, Filiz; Gürgan, Sevil

    2005-05-01

    Vital tooth bleaching with peroxide is one of the most common cosmetic procedures in dentistry and can be accomplished using a variety of methods or regimens. Recently, new generation of tooth color restorative materials were introduced to market. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the gloss changes of three different tooth color restorative materials: Flowable composite (Filtek Flow/3M), packable composite (Filtek P60/3M) and ormocer (Definite/DEGUSSA) after two different bleaching regimens (Vivastyle/VIVADENT) and (Crest Professional Whitestrips/PROCTER and GAMBLE). 16 specimens 30 x 30 x 2 mm size were fabricated from each restorative material. After gloss values were measured with gloss meter, at two different angles of illumination (20 and 60 degrees ), 10% carbamide peroxide (Vivastyle) was applied for 2 h per day for fourteen days to the half of the specimens while 6.5% hydrogen peroxide strip bands (Crest Professional Whitestrips) were applied to the remaining eight of the specimens for 30 min twice daily for 14 days. During the test period the specimens were stored in 37 degrees C and 100% relative humidity. At the end of bleaching regimen the gloss measurements were repeated and the data were subjected to statistical analysis. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test analysis revealed that the gloss values were affected by both bleaching regimens (P=0.012). Whitestrips decreased the gloss values of Filtek P60 (at 20 and 60 degrees , Pgloss values of Definite did not show any significant change between Vivastyle and Whitestrips application (at 20 degrees P=0.279; at 60 degrees , P=0.279, Mann-Whitney U Test). The gloss values of materials were significantly different before (at 20 degrees Pgloss of tooth colored restorative materials could be affected by bleaching regimens, it is necessary to consider the type of the material before starting the treatment.

  2. Effects of Novel Structure Bonding Materials on Properties of Aeronautical Acrylic

    LI Zhisheng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Novel structure bonding materials, J-351 epoxy adhesive film with low curing temperature and liquid modified acrylate SY-50s adhesive were chosen and characterized. The effects of adhesives on the mechanical properties of acrylic were studied. The results reveal that both adhesives have excellent bonding properties to acrylic. The stress-solvent crazing value of J-351 is higher than that of SY-50s. With the application of adhesive on the surface, mechanical properties of acrylic are declined. Casting acrylic shows more drastic decline than that of oriented acrylic. Through the characterization of fracture surface, we find that fracture of tensile sample derives from the side with adhesive. Mechanical properties of acrylic are more sensitive to SY-50s, because the liquid adhesive presents integrate bonding interface with acrylic. The interface between J-351 and acrylic is clear, making acrylic insensitive to J-351 film. Edge attachment strength of samples bonded with J-351 are higher than that of samples bonded with SY-50s due to the effects of adhesives on acrylic. J-351 epoxy adhesive film presents preferable application performance in the structure bonding of aeronautical acrylic.

  3. Evidence for resonant bonding in phase-change materials studied by IR spectroscopy

    K. Shportko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Phase-change materials (PCM attract attention due to their unique properties. This remarkable portfolio also makes them promising for applications in novel data storage devices. In this study, we discuss differences in the optical properties of PCM and non-PCM in the IR caused by presence or absence of resonant bonding.

  4. Low temperature bonding of heterogeneous materials using Al2O3 as an intermediate layer

    Sahoo, Hitesh Kumar; Ottaviano, Luisa; Zheng, Yi

    2018-01-01

    bonding solution for heterogeneous material systems has not yet been developed. This has been a roadblock in the realization of novel devices which need the integration of new semiconductor platforms such as III-V on Si, Ge on Sapphire, LiNbO3 on GaAs etc. The large thermal expansion coefficient mismatch...

  5. Is there a best conventional material for restoring posterior primary teeth? A network meta-analysis.

    Pires, Carine Weber; Pedrotti, Djessica; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Soares, Fabio Zovico Maxnuck; Ziegelmann, Patricia Klarmann; Rocha, Rachel de Oliveira

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to compare the longevity of different conventional restorative materials placed in posterior primary teeth. This systematic review was conducted following the PRISMA statement and registered in PROSPERO (CRD42016035775). A comprehensive electronic search without date or language restrictions was performed in PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Scopus, Turning Research Into Practice (TRIP) and Clinical Trials databases up to January 2017, selecting randomized clinical trials that assessed the longevity of at least two different conventional restorative materials performed in primary molars. Seventeen studies were included in this systematic review. Pairwise and network meta-analyses were performed and relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (CI) calculated. Two reviewers independently selected the studies, extracted the data, and assessed the risk of bias. Restorations of primary molars with conventional glass ionomer cement showed increased risk of failure than compomer, resin-modified glass ionomer cement, amalgam, and composite resin. Risk of bias was low in most studies (45.38% of all items across studies). Pediatric dentists should avoid conventional glass ionomer cement for restoring primary molars.

  6. Optimum dose of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate based bonding material on pulp cells toxicity

    Saraswati, Widya

    2010-01-01

    Background: 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), one type of resins commonly used as bonding base material, is commonly used due to its advantageous chemical characteristics. Several preliminary studies indicated that resin is a material capable to induce damage in dentin-pulp complex. It is necessary to perform further investigation related with its biological safety for hard and soft tissues in oral cavity. Purpose: The author performed an in vitro test to find optimum dose of HEMA resin mon...

  7. Candida albicans adherence to resin-composite restorative dental material: influence of whole human saliva.

    Maza, José Luis; Elguezabal, Natalia; Prado, Carlota; Ellacuría, Joseba; Soler, Iñaki; Pontón, José

    2002-11-01

    Attachment of Candida albicans to oral surfaces is believed to be a critical event in the colonization of the oral cavity and in the development of oral diseases such as Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Although there is considerable information about the adhesion of C albicans to buccal epithelial cells and prosthetic materials, there is very little information about the adhesion of C albicans to composite restorative materials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree of adhesion of C albicans to a resin-composite restorative material (Herculite). The adhesion of 2 strains of C albicans, a germinative and a germ tube-deficient mutant, was studied by a visual method after incubating the fungus and the resin with and without human whole saliva. In absence of saliva, the adhesion of the C albicans germinative isolate to the resin showed an increase in parallel with the germination, reaching a maximum at the end of the experiment (120 minutes). However, no significant differences were observed in the adhesion of the agerminative mutant during the period of time studied. In the presence of saliva, the adhesion of both isolates to the resin was significantly lowered. Germination and the presence of human whole saliva are important factors in the adhesion of C albicans to the resin-composite restorative material Herculite.

  8. Preparation and fluorescent recognition properties for fluoride of a nanostructured covalently bonded europium hybrid material

    余旭东; 李景印; 李亚娟; 耿丽君; 甄小丽; 于涛

    2015-01-01

    A novel covalently bonded Eu3+-based silica hybrid material was designed and its spectrophotometric anion sensing prop-erty was studied. The fluorescent receptor (europium complex) was covalently grafted to the silica matrix via a sol-gel approach. FTIR, UV-vis spectra, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescent spectra were characterized, and the results revealed that the hybrid material with nanosphere structure displayed excellent photophysical property. In addition, the selective anion sensing property of the hybrid material was studied by UV-vis and fluorescence spectra. The results showed that the hybrid material exhibited a smart response with fluoride anions.

  9. The effect of different drinks on the color stability of different restorative materials after one month

    Neslihan Tekçe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of three different drinks on the color parameters of four different restorative materials. Materials and Methods Three different composites (Filtek Ultimate Universal Restorative, Filtek Ultimate Flowable, and Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE and a polyacid-modified composite resin material (Dyract XP, Dentsply DeTrey GmbH were evaluated. Eighty-four disc-shaped specimens of 8 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness were prepared (n = 21 each. Color coordinates (L*a*b*, ΔL*, Δa*, Δb*, and ΔE* were measured using a VİTA Easyshade Compact (VİTA Zahnfabrik after 24 hr of storage (baseline and after 30 day of storage in three different beverages of black tea, Coca cola, or water (control (n = 7. In each beverage, the specimens were stored three times a day, one hr each, for 30 day. The color changes (ΔE were calculated and were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn multiple comparison test. Results The color difference (ΔE* of the resin materials ranged between 1.31 and 15.28 after 30 day of immersion in the staining solutions. Dyract XP in Coca cola (15.28 ± 2.61 and black tea (12.22 ± 2.73 showed the highest mean ΔE* value after 30 day, followed by Filtek Ultimate Universal Restorative (5.99 ± 1.25 and Filtek Ultimate Flowable (4.71 ± 1.40 in black tea (p < 0.05. Conclusions The compomers displayed unacceptable color changes at the end of 30 day in all beverages. Among resin composites, the silorane based composite exhibited relatively good color stability than the others. Filtek Ultimate Universal Restorative and Filtek Flowable showed similar color changes in all beverages.

  10. Mechanical properties and three-body wear of dental restoratives and their comparative flowable materials.

    Schultz, Sabine; Rosentritt, Martin; Behr, Michael; Handel, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    To compare wear performance and resistance to crack propagation (K1C) of commercial restorative materials and their flowable variations. A potential correlation between three-body wear and fracture toughness, modulus of elasticity, fracture work, Vickers hardness, and filler content was investigated. Seven restoratives (five composites, one ormocer, and one compomer) and their corresponding flowable materials were used to determine and compare the three-body wear with a bolus of millet-seed shells and rice food (Willytec). The wear characteristics were measured by profilometry after 50,000, 100,000, 150,000, and 200,000 loading cycles. The fracture toughness value, K1C (MPam1/2), for each single-edged notched specimen was measured in a three-point bending test (universal testing machine 1446, Zwick). Fracture work and modulus of elasticity were calculated from the load curves. Vickers hardness was measured (HV hardness tester, Zwick) according to DIN 50133. The veneering composite Sinfony (3M ESPE) was used as a reference material. Heavily filled composites experienced less wear than their flowable variations. The nanofiller composites revealed better wear results than hybrid composites, compomers, and ormocers. After 200,000 load cycles, the lowest wear rates were detected for Grandio (14 microm; Voco), and the highest mean values were found for Dyract AP (104 microm; Dentsply DeTrey). The values for fracture toughness (K1C) ranged from 0.82 to 3.64 MPam1/2. Highest K1C data was exhibited by the nanocomposite Nanopaq (Schutz Dental). All tested restorative materials exhibited higher fracture toughness than their low-viscosity variations. The wear resistance of the newer generation composites with incorporated nanofiller or microfiller particles increased to a high extent. Flowables show less resistance against wear and crack propagation because of their lower filler content. The reduced mechanical properties limit their use as a restorative to small noncontact

  11. Influence of light-curing units and restorative materials on the micro hardness of resin cements

    Kuguimiya Rosiane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of indirect restorative materials (IRMs and light-curing units (LCUs on the micro hardness of dual-cured resin cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 36 cylindrical samples (2 mm thick were prepared with dual-cured resin cement (Relyx ARC photo-activated with either a QTH (Optilight Plus for 40s or a LED (Radii light-curing unit for 65s. Photo-activation was performed through the 2-mm- thick IRMs and the samples were divided into six groups (n=6 according to the combination of veneering materials (without, ceramic and indirect resin and LCUs (QTH and LED. In the control group, the samples were light-cured with a QTH unit without the interposition of any restorative material. Vickers micro hardness test was performed on the top and bottom surfaces of each sample (load of 50 g for 15 secs. The data were statistically analyzed using a three-way ANOVA followed by Tukey x s post-hoc test ( P < 0.05. Results: There were no statistically significant differences on the top surface between the light curing-units ( P > 0.05; however, the LED provided greater hardness on the bottom surface when a ceramic material was used ( P < 0.05. The mean hardness in photo-activated samples, in which there was no interposition of indirect materials, was significantly greater ( P < 0.01. Conclusions: It may be concluded that the interposition of the restorative material decreased the micro hardness in the deeper cement layer. Such decrease, however, was lower when the ceramic was interposed and the cement light-cured with LED.

  12. Use of diffusion bonded SS-Al composite material in the development of neutron detectors

    Alex, Mary; Prasad, K.R.; Pappachan, A.L.; Grover, A.K.; Krishnan, J.; Derose, D.J.; Bhanumurthy, K.; Kale, G.B.

    2005-01-01

    The present paper describes the development of a SS-Al composite plate in-house at BARC by diffusion bonding technique. Details of the several tests carried out on the composite material and the use of the plate in the development of a boron lined neutron chamber for Dhruva reactor control instrumentation has been described. The bonded sample has withstood tensile strength test, leak test and thermal cycling test and the leak rate was observed to be less than 3 x 10 -10 stdcc/sec. The chamber with the composite material has been installed in Dhruva Basket C location and connected to the log rate safety channel. It has been working successfully for the past two years. The use of SS-Al composite material has improved the reliability and long-term performance of the detector. (author)

  13. Process Simulation of Resistance Weld Bonding and Automotive Light-weight Materials

    Zhang, Wenqi; Chergui, Azeddine; Nielsen, Chris Valentin

    of mechanical, electrical, thermal and metallurgical processes, which are essential for simulation of resistance welding process to predict the welding results and evaluate the weldability of materials. These functions have been further extended with new functions for optimization of welding process parameters...... and predicting welding process window, for weld planning with optimal welding parameter settings, and for modeling microstructures and hardness distribution after welding. Latest developments have been made on simulation of resistance welding with nonconductive materials for applications in weld bonding......This paper presents the latest developments in numerical simulation of resistance welding especially with the new functions for simulation of microstructures, weld bonding and spot welding of new light-weight materials. The fundamental functions in SORPAS® are built on coupled modeling...

  14. Effect of dental restorative materials on total antioxidant capacity and calcium concentration of unstimulated saliva.

    Ramezani, Gholam H; Moghadam, Mona-Momeni; Saghiri, Mohammad-Ali; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Asatourian, Armen; Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Scarbecz, Mark; Sheibani, Nader

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of dental amalgam and composite restorations on total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and calcium (Ca) ion concentration of unstimulated saliva. Forty-eight children aged 6-10 years selected and divided into three groups of sixteen (8 males, 8 females). In group A and B, samples consisted of two class II dental composite or amalgam restorations, while in group C samples were caries-free (control group). Unstimulated saliva from all samples was collected and TAC was measured by spectrophotometry using an adaptation of 2, 2'-azino-di-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonate) (ABTS) assay. The Ca ion level was estimated by an auto- analyzer. Data were analyzed with one- and two-way ANOVA test, at a p difference between groups ( p differences within and between groups ( p Gender is an effective factor in changes induced in oral cavity as females showed more emphatic reaction to dental filling materials than males. Patients who have dental restorations, especially dental composites, should pay more attention to their dental hygiene, because dental restorations can increase oxidative stress and decrease Ca ion level in saliva, which might jeopardize remineralization process of tooth structures after demineralization. Key words: Amalgam, caries, composite, saliva, total antioxidant capacity.

  15. Shear bond strength of a denture base acrylic resin and gingiva-colored indirect composite material to zirconia ceramics.

    Kubochi, Kei; Komine, Futoshi; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Yagawa, Shogo; Mori, Serina; Matsumura, Hideo

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strengths of two gingiva-colored materials (an indirect composite material and a denture base acrylic resin) to zirconia ceramics and determine the effects of surface treatment with various priming agents. A gingiva-colored indirect composite material (CER) or denture base acrylic resin (PAL) was bonded to zirconia disks with unpriming (UP) or one of seven priming agents (n=11 each), namely, Alloy Primer (ALP), Clearfil Photo Bond (CPB), Clearfil Photo Bond with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator (CPB+Act), Metal Link (MEL), Meta Fast Bonding Liner (MFB), MR. bond (MRB), and V-Primer (VPR). Shear bond strength was determined before and after 5000 thermocycles. The data were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test and Steel-Dwass test. The mean pre-/post-thermalcycling bond strengths were 1.0-14.1MPa/0.1-12.1MPa for the CER specimen and 0.9-30.2MPa/0.1-11.1MPa for the PAL specimen. For the CER specimen, the ALP, CPB, and CPB+Act groups had significantly higher bond strengths among the eight groups, at both 0 and 5000 thermocycles. For the PAL specimen, shear bond strength was significantly lower after thermalcycling in all groups tested. After 5000 thermocycles, bond strengths were significantly higher in the CPB and CPB+Act groups than in the other groups. For the PAL specimens, bond strengths were significantly lower after thermalcycling in all groups tested. The MDP functional monomer improved bonding of a gingiva-colored indirect composite material and denture base acrylic resin to zirconia ceramics. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nordic dentists' opinions on the safety of amalgam and other dental restorative materials.

    Widström, E; Haugejorden, O; Sundberg, H; Birn, H

    1993-08-01

    The safety of amalgam and other restorative materials has caused concern among dental patients in recent years. The aim of this study was to obtain information on dentists' perceived competence in handling different filling materials and their opinions on the safety of these. A random sample of practising dentists in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden received a mail questionnaire in spring 1990. Answers were received from 1732 dentists (65%). The study showed that the respondents believed that their theoretic knowledge and clinical skills were generally at a high level regarding restorative materials. The risks of the side-effects of gold, ceramic materials, and glass ionomer were considered to be low by about 90% of the respondents. Amalgam was considered to be significantly more hazardous by the Swedish respondents than the others. Interestingly, composite was considered to be associated with a high risk of side-effects by about half of the dentists in all Nordic countries. The dentists' opinions were not found to be greatly influenced by their sex, age, or place of residence but rather by their country and service sector. Against the background of the present lack of scientific evidence on the hazardousness of amalgam or other restorative materials for patients' general health, these findings indicate that dentists are influenced by discussions in the mass media about dental treatment and materials and, of course, by the guidelines given by the health authorities in their own countries. Few dentists were shown to be concerned about occupational risks associated with the use of amalgam, and they had not had their own amalgam fillings replaced.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Effect of bulk-fill base material on fracture strength of root-filled teeth restored with laminate resin composite restorations.

    Taha, N A; Maghaireh, G A; Ghannam, A S; Palamara, J E

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of using a bulk-fill flowable base material on fracture strength and fracture patterns of root-filled maxillary premolars with MOD preparations restored with laminate restorations. Fifty extracted maxillary premolars were selected for the study. Standardized MOD cavities with endodontic treatment were prepared for all teeth, except for intact control. The teeth were divided randomly into five groups (n=10); (Group 1) sound teeth, (Group 2) unrestored teeth; (Group 3) MOD cavities with Vitrebond base and resin-based composite (Ceram. X One Universal); (Group 4) MOD cavities with 2mm GIC base (Fuji IX GP) and resin-based composite (Ceram. X One Universal) open laminate, (Group 5) MOD cavities were restored with 4mm of bulk-fill flowable base material (SDR) and resin-based composite (Ceram. X One Universal). All teeth were thermocycled and subjected to a 45° ramped oblique load in a universal testing machine. Fracture load and fracture patterns were recorded. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Dunnett's T3 test. Restoration in general increased the fracture strength compared to unrestored teeth. The fracture strength of group 5 (bulk-fill) was significantly higher than the fracture strength of the GIC laminate groups and not significantly different from the intact teeth (355±112N, P=0.118). The type of failure was unfavorable for most of the groups, with the majority being mixed failures. The use of a bulk-fill flowable base material significantly increased the fracture strength of extracted root-filled teeth with MOD cavities; however it did not improve fracture patterns to more favorable ones. Investigating restorative techniques that may improve the longevity of root-filled premolar teeth restored with direct resin restorations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of different drinks on the color stability of different restorative materials after one month.

    Tekçe, Neslihan; Tuncer, Safa; Demirci, Mustafa; Serim, Merve Efe; Baydemir, Canan

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of three different drinks on the color parameters of four different restorative materials. Three different composites (Filtek Ultimate Universal Restorative, Filtek Ultimate Flowable, and Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE) and a polyacid-modified composite resin material (Dyract XP, Dentsply DeTrey GmbH) were evaluated. Eighty-four disc-shaped specimens of 8 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness were prepared (n = 21 each). Color coordinates (L*a*b*, ΔL*, Δa*, Δb*, and ΔE*) were measured using a VİTA Easyshade Compact (VİTA Zahnfabrik) after 24 hr of storage (baseline) and after 30 day of storage in three different beverages of black tea, Coca cola, or water (control) (n = 7). In each beverage, the specimens were stored three times a day, one hr each, for 30 day. The color changes (ΔE) were calculated and were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn multiple comparison test. The color difference (ΔE*) of the resin materials ranged between 1.31 and 15.28 after 30 day of immersion in the staining solutions. Dyract XP in Coca cola (15.28 ± 2.61) and black tea (12.22 ± 2.73) showed the highest mean ΔE* value after 30 day, followed by Filtek Ultimate Universal Restorative (5.99 ± 1.25) and Filtek Ultimate Flowable (4.71 ± 1.40) in black tea (p < 0.05). The compomers displayed unacceptable color changes at the end of 30 day in all beverages. Among resin composites, the silorane based composite exhibited relatively good color stability than the others. Filtek Ultimate Universal Restorative and Filtek Flowable showed similar color changes in all beverages.

  19. Experimental investigation on material migration phenomena in micro-EDM of reaction-bonded silicon carbide

    Liew, Pay Jun [Department of Mechanical Systems and Design, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aoba 6-6-01, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Manufacturing Process Department, Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100, Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); Yan, Jiwang, E-mail: yan@mech.keio.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi 3-14-1, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, 223-8522 (Japan); Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto [Department of Mechanical Systems and Design, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aoba 6-6-01, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Material migration between tool electrode and workpiece material in micro electrical discharge machining of reaction-bonded silicon carbide was experimentally investigated. The microstructural changes of workpiece and tungsten tool electrode were examined using scanning electron microscopy, cross sectional transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray under various voltage, capacitance and carbon nanofibre concentration in the dielectric fluid. Results show that tungsten is deposited intensively inside the discharge-induced craters on the RB-SiC surface as amorphous structure forming micro particles, and on flat surface region as a thin interdiffusion layer of poly-crystalline structure. Deposition of carbon element on tool electrode was detected, indicating possible material migration to the tool electrode from workpiece material, carbon nanofibres and dielectric oil. Material deposition rate was found to be strongly affected by workpiece surface roughness, voltage and capacitance of the electrical discharge circuit. Carbon nanofibre addition in the dielectric at a suitable concentration significantly reduced the material deposition rate.

  20. Experimental investigation on material migration phenomena in micro-EDM of reaction-bonded silicon carbide

    Liew, Pay Jun; Yan, Jiwang; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto

    2013-01-01

    Material migration between tool electrode and workpiece material in micro electrical discharge machining of reaction-bonded silicon carbide was experimentally investigated. The microstructural changes of workpiece and tungsten tool electrode were examined using scanning electron microscopy, cross sectional transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray under various voltage, capacitance and carbon nanofibre concentration in the dielectric fluid. Results show that tungsten is deposited intensively inside the discharge-induced craters on the RB-SiC surface as amorphous structure forming micro particles, and on flat surface region as a thin interdiffusion layer of poly-crystalline structure. Deposition of carbon element on tool electrode was detected, indicating possible material migration to the tool electrode from workpiece material, carbon nanofibres and dielectric oil. Material deposition rate was found to be strongly affected by workpiece surface roughness, voltage and capacitance of the electrical discharge circuit. Carbon nanofibre addition in the dielectric at a suitable concentration significantly reduced the material deposition rate.

  1. Evaluation of effects of ionizing radiation on materials used in dental restorations

    Maio, Mireia Florencio

    2009-01-01

    This work consisted of quantitative studies of the effects caused by ionizing radiation on materials used in dental restorations (Titanium, Amalgam, Resin Composite and Glass Ionomer) aiming the deleterious effects of radiotherapy when patients with tumors in head and neck, arising when the teeth are restored within in the field of radiation. Samples were submitted to X-ray beams of 6 MV from a linear accelerator, VARIAN 2100C model. The samples were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence techniques to compare the chemical composition before and after the irradiation. The sample were submitted to Geiger-Mueller detectors and the ionization chambers in order to verify any residual radiation in the samples. The samples were also analyzed by gamma spectrometry by a Germanium detector. These tests were performed to determine small changes in the composition in the samples due to the radiation interaction. The results of this study may encourage the development of new research for alternative materials in dental restorations that can contribute to improve the quality of life of those patients with tumors of the mouth. (author)

  2. Material size effects on crack growth along patterned wafer-level Cu–Cu bonds

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Hutchinson, John W.

    2013-01-01

    together. Crack growth along the bond interface is here studied numerically using finite element analyses. The experiments have shown that plasticity in the Cu films makes a major contribution to the macroscopic interface toughness. To account for the size dependence of the plastic flow a strain gradient...... plasticity model is applied here for the metal. A cohesive zone model is applied to represent the crack growth along the bond between the two Cu films. This cohesive zone model incorporates the effect of higher order stresses in the continuum, such that the higher order tractions on the crack faces decay...... the toughness peak and the subsequent plateau level are highly sensitive to the value of the characteristic material length. A small material length, relative to the thickness of the Cu film, gives high toughness whereas a length comparable to the film thickness gives much reduced crack growth resistance...

  3. Explosion bonding of dissimilar materials for fabricating APS front end components: Analysis of metallurgical and mechanical properties and UHV applications

    Li, Yuheng; Shu, Deming; Kuzay, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    The front end beamline section contains photon shutters and fixed masks. These components are made of OFHC copper and GlidCOP AL-15. Stainless steels (304 or 316) are also used for connecting photon shutters and fixed masks to other components that operate in the ultrahigh vacuum system. All these dissimilar materials need to be joined together. However, bonding these dissimilar materials is very difficult because of their different mechanical and thermal properties and incompatible metallurgical properties. Explosion bonding is a bonding method in which the controlled energy of a detonating explosive is used to create a metallurgical bond between two or more similar or dissimilar materials. No intermediate filler metal, for example, a brazing compound or soldering alloy, is needed to promote bonding, and no external heat need be applied. A study of the metallurgical and mechanical properties and YGV applications of GlidCop AL-15, OFHC copper, and 304 stainless steel explosion-bonded joints has been done. This report contains five parts: an ultrasonic examination of explosion-bonded joints and a standard setup; mechanical-property and thermal-cycle tests of GlidCop AL-15/304 stainless steel explosion-bonded joints; leak tests of a GlidCop AL-15/304 stainless steel explosion-bonded interfaces for UHV application; metallurgical examination of explosion-bonded interfaces and failure analysis, and discussion and conclusion

  4. Matching the optical properties of direct esthetic dental restorative materials to those of human enamel and dentin

    Ragain, James Carlton, Jr.

    One of the goals of the restorative dentist is to restore the appearance of the natural dentition. Clinical matching of teeth and restorative materials are seldom accurate and shade selection techniques are subjective. The first specific aim of this research was to characterize the optical absorption and scattering that occurs within enamel, dentin, and composite resin and compomer restorative materials and to relate those phenomena to translucency and color. The second aim was to evaluate small color differences among composite restorative materials which would be detectable by humans. The last aim was to lay the foundation for developing an improved model of specifying layers of dental restorative materials in order to match the translucency and color to those of human enamel. The Kubelka-Munk theory was validated for enamel, dentin, and the restorative materials. These tissues and materials were then characterized in terms of their color parameters. Tooth cores were also characterized in terms of color space parameters. Human subjects were evaluated for their abilities to discriminate small color differences in the dental composite resin materials. The following conclusions were derived from this study: (1) Kubelka-Munk theory accurately predicts the diffuse reflectance spectra of enamel, dentin, and the direct esthetic dental restorative materials studied. (2) Scattering and absorption coefficients of the dental tissues and esthetic restorative materials can be directly calculated from diffuse reflectance measurements of a uniformly thick slab of tissue/material using black and white backings and the appropriate refractive index. (3) For tooth cores, there is a positive correlation between L* and b* and a negative correlation between L* and a*. (4) The range of translucency parameters for the restorative materials studied does not match those of enamel and dentin. (5) None of the shades of the dental composite resin restorative materials studied fit into the

  5. Preliminary results for HIP bonding Ta to W targets for the materials test station

    Dombrowski, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maloy, Stuart A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten targets for the Materials Test Station (MTS) were clad with thin tantalum cover plates and a tantalum frame using hot isostatic pressing (HIP). A preliminary HIP parameter study showed good bonding and intimate mechanical contact for Ta cover plate thicknesses of 0.25 mm (0.010 inch) and 0.38 mm (0.015 inch). HIP temperatures of full HIP runs were 1500 C (2732 F). HIP pressure was 203 MPa (30 ksi).

  6. A Deep Morphological Characterization and Comparison of Different Dental Restorative Materials

    R. Condò

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Giomer is a relatively new class of restorative material with aesthetics, handling and physical properties of composite resins, and benefits of glass ionomers: high radiopacity, antiplaque effect, fluoride release, and recharge. To verify the superior properties of Giomers, in this study, a deep morphological characterization has been performed with an in vitro comparative study among a Giomer (Beautifil® II by Shofu Dental Corporation, Osaka, Japan, a Compomer (Dyract Extra by Dentsply, Caulk, Germany, glass ionomer cement (Ketac fil plus by 3M ESPE, and a composite resin (Tetric Evoceram by Ivoclar. In particular, mechanical and optical properties and ageing effects have been compared to investigate materials similarities and differences. Indentation tests, UV-Visible spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and weight loss after storage in saliva or sugary drink have been carried out to analyze materials behavior in real conditions. The results confirm the high quality of Giomer material and indicate possible improvements in their usage.

  7. A study on the radiopacity of cavity lining materials for posterior composite resin restoration

    Moon, Joo Hoon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eui Hwan [Dept. of Conservative Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative radiopacities of cavity lining materials (Resin-modified Glass Ionomer cement, Compomer and Flowable resin) for posterior composite resin restoration. Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC, Vitrebond (TM)), Compomers (Dyract , Compoglass, F2000, Dyract(R) flow Compoglass Flow) and Flowable resins (Tetric (R) flow, Aeliteflo (TM) Revolution (TM)) were used. Five specimens of 5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were fabricated with each material. Human molars were horizontally sectioned 2 mm thick to include both enamel and dentin. The radiopacities of enamel, dentin, cavity lining materials, aluminum step wedge were obtained from conventional radiograph and NIH image program. All the tested lining materials showed levels of radiopacity the same as or greater than that of dentin. All compomer tested (Dyract (R), Compoglass, F2000, Dyract (R) flow, Compoglass Flow) and Vitrebond (TM), Tetric (R) flow were more radiopaque than enamel. The radiopacities of Fuji II LC and Revolution (TM) were between enamel and dentin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Compomer and Tetric (R) flow were greater than those of Revolution (TM), Aeliteflo (TM) or dentin. The level of radiopacity of the tested materials was variable; those with low radiopacity should be avoided in class II restorations, where a clear determination of recurrent caries by the examining clinician could be compromised. Clinician should be able to distinguish these cavity lining materials radiographically from recurrent decay, voids, gaps, or other defects that lead to clinical failure. Utilization of materials ranked more radiopaque than enamel would enable clinicians to distinguish the lining material from tooth structure.

  8. A study on the radiopacity of cavity lining materials for posterior composite resin restoration

    Moon, Joo Hoon; Choi, Eui Hwan

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative radiopacities of cavity lining materials (Resin-modified Glass Ionomer cement, Compomer and Flowable resin) for posterior composite resin restoration. Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC, Vitrebond (TM)), Compomers (Dyract , Compoglass, F2000, Dyract(R) flow Compoglass Flow) and Flowable resins (Tetric (R) flow, Aeliteflo (TM) Revolution (TM)) were used. Five specimens of 5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were fabricated with each material. Human molars were horizontally sectioned 2 mm thick to include both enamel and dentin. The radiopacities of enamel, dentin, cavity lining materials, aluminum step wedge were obtained from conventional radiograph and NIH image program. All the tested lining materials showed levels of radiopacity the same as or greater than that of dentin. All compomer tested (Dyract (R), Compoglass, F2000, Dyract (R) flow, Compoglass Flow) and Vitrebond (TM), Tetric (R) flow were more radiopaque than enamel. The radiopacities of Fuji II LC and Revolution (TM) were between enamel and dentin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Compomer and Tetric (R) flow were greater than those of Revolution (TM), Aeliteflo (TM) or dentin. The level of radiopacity of the tested materials was variable; those with low radiopacity should be avoided in class II restorations, where a clear determination of recurrent caries by the examining clinician could be compromised. Clinician should be able to distinguish these cavity lining materials radiographically from recurrent decay, voids, gaps, or other defects that lead to clinical failure. Utilization of materials ranked more radiopaque than enamel would enable clinicians to distinguish the lining material from tooth structure.

  9. A metallization and bonding approach for high performance carbon nanotube thermal interface materials

    Cross, Robert; Graham, Samuel; Cola, Baratunde A; Fisher, Timothy; Xu Xianfan; Gall, Ken

    2010-01-01

    A method has been developed to create vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) thermal interface materials that can be attached to a variety of metallized surfaces. VACNT films were grown on Si substrates using standard CVD processing followed by metallization using Ti/Au. The coated CNTs were then bonded to metallized substrates at 220 deg. C. By reducing the adhesion of the VACNTs to the growth substrate during synthesis, the CNTs can be completely transferred from the Si growth substrate and used as a die attachment material for electronic components. Thermal resistance measurements using a photoacoustic technique showed thermal resistances as low as 1.7 mm 2 K W -1 for bonded VACNT films 25-30 μm in length and 10 mm 2 K W -1 for CNTs up to 130 μm in length. Tensile testing demonstrated a die attachment strength of 40 N cm -2 at room temperature. Overall, these metallized and bonded VACNT films demonstrate properties which are promising for next-generation thermal interface material applications.

  10. Effects of different etching methods and bonding procedures on shear bond strength of orthodontic metal brackets applied to different CAD/CAM ceramic materials.

    Buyuk, S Kutalmış; Kucukekenci, Ahmet Serkan

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic metal brackets applied to different types of ceramic surfaces treated with different etching procedures and bonding agents. Monolithic CAD/CAM ceramic specimens (N = 120; n = 40 each group) of feldspathic ceramic Vita Mark II, resin nanoceramic Lava Ultimate, and hybrid ceramic Vita Enamic were fabricated (14 × 12 × 3 mm). Ceramic specimens were separated into four subgroups (n = 10) according to type of surface treatment and bonding onto the ceramic surface. Within each group, four subgroups were prepared by phosphoric acid, hydrofluoric acid, Transbond XT primer, and Clearfill Ceramic primer. Mandibular central incisor metal brackets were bonded with light-cure composite. The SBS data were analyzed using three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. The highest SBS was found in the Vita Enamic group, which is a hybrid ceramic, etched with hydrofluoric acid and applied Transbond XT Adhesive primer (7.28 ± 2.49 MPa). The lowest SBS was found in the Lava Ultimate group, which is a resin nano-ceramic etched with hydrofluoric acid and applied Clearfill ceramic primer (2.20 ± 1.21 MPa). CAD/CAM material types and bonding procedures affected bond strength ( P .05). The use of Transbond XT as a primer bonding agent resulted in higher SBS.

  11. The potential of novel native plant materials for the restoration of novel ecosystems

    T.A. Jones

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Extensive ecological change has been sustained by many dryland ecosystems throughout the world, resulting in conversion to so-called novel ecosystems. It is within such ecological contexts that native plant materials destined for ecological applications must be able to function. In the Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis [Beetle & A.M. Young] S.L. Welsh ecosystems of the Intermountain West, for example, novel ecosystem structure and functioning are pervasive. Invasive species, particularly annual grasses, fuel repeated wildfires that drive previously stable ecosystem states across thresholds to less desirable states that are highly recalcitrant to restoration efforts. Structural changes include reductions of native flora, damage to biological soil crusts, and alterations to soil microbiota. Functional changes include altered hydrologic and nutrient cycling, leading to permanent losses of soil organic matter and nitrogen that favor the invaders. We argue that there is an important place in restoration for plant materials that are novel and/or non-local that have been developed to be more effective in the novel ecosystems for which they are intended, thus qualifying them as “ecologically appropriate.” Such plant materials may be considered as an alternative to natural/local “genetically appropriate” plant materials, which are sometimes deemed best adapted due to vetting by historical evolutionary processes.

  12. Effect of type of cavity preparation (bur,Er:YAG laser) and restorative materials on prevention of caries lesion

    Masumeh Hasani Tabatabaei; Sakineh Arami; Fatemeh Khajavi; Zohreh Moradi

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Despite the reduction of incidence of dental caries in recent years, this disease is common and many efforts were conducted to decrease the prevalence of dental caries. On the other hand secondary caries lesions are the main reason for replacement of direct restorations. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to evaluate suitable methods of preparation and restorative materials to reduce caries recurrence. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, eighty...

  13. Effect of different composite core materials on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with FRC posts

    PANITIWAT, Prapaporn; SALIMEE, Prarom

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite posts, using three resin composite core build-up materials, (Clearfil Photo Core (CPC), MultiCore Flow (MCF), and LuxaCore Z-Dual (LCZ)), and a nanohybrid composite, (Tetric N-Ceram (TNC)). Material and Methods Forty endodontically treated lower first premolars were restored with quartz fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) cemented with resin cement (Panavia F2...

  14. Effect of Dental Restorative Material Type and Shade on Characteristics of Two-Layer Dental Composite Systems

    Atefeh Karimzadeh

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of shade and material type and shape in dental polymer composites on the hardness and shrinkage stress of bulk and two-layered restoration systems. For this purpose, some bulk and layered specimens from three different shades of dental materials were prepared and light-cured. The experiments were carried out on three types of materials: conventional restorative composite, nanohybrid composite and nanocomposite. Micro-indentation experiment was performed on the bulk and also on each layer of layered restoration specimens using a Vicker's indenter. The interface between the two layers was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results revealed significant differences between the values of hardness for different shades in the conventional composite and also in the nanohybrid composite. However, no statistically significant difference was observed between the hardness values for different shades in the nanocomposite samples. The layered restoration specimens of different restorative materials exhibited lower hardness values with respect to their bulk specimens. The reduction in the hardness value of the layered conventional composite samples was higher than those of the nanocomposite and nanohybrid composite specimens indicating more shrinkage stresses generated in the conventional composite restorations. According to the SEM images, a gap was observed between the two layers in the layered restorations.

  15. Translucency changes of direct esthetic restorative materials after curing, aging and treatment

    Yong-Keun Lee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article was to review the changes in translucency of direct esthetic restorative materials after curing, aging and treatment. As a criterion for the evaluation of clinical translucency changes, visual perceptibility threshold in translucency parameter difference (ΔTP of 2 was used. Translucency changes after curing were perceivable depending on experimental methods and products (largest ΔTP in resin composites = 15.9. Translucency changes after aging were reported as either relatively stable or showed perceivable changes by aging protocols (largest ΔTP in resin composites = -3.8. Translucency changes after curing, aging and treatment were perceivable in several products and experimental methods. Therefore, shade matching of direct esthetic materials should be performed considering these instabilities of translucency in direct esthetic materials.

  16. Competing covalent and ionic bonding in Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials.

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Sun, Jifeng; Subedi, Alaska; Siegrist, Theo; Singh, David J

    2016-05-19

    Ge2Sb2Te5 and related phase change materials are highly unusual in that they can be readily transformed between amorphous and crystalline states using very fast melt, quench, anneal cycles, although the resulting states are extremely long lived at ambient temperature. These states have remarkably different physical properties including very different optical constants in the visible in strong contrast to common glass formers such as silicates or phosphates. This behavior has been described in terms of resonant bonding, but puzzles remain, particularly regarding different physical properties of crystalline and amorphous phases. Here we show that there is a strong competition between ionic and covalent bonding in cubic phase providing a link between the chemical basis of phase change memory property and origins of giant responses of piezoelectric materials (PbTiO3, BiFeO3). This has important consequences for dynamical behavior in particular leading to a simultaneous hardening of acoustic modes and softening of high frequency optic modes in crystalline phase relative to amorphous. This different bonding in amorphous and crystalline phases provides a direct explanation for different physical properties and understanding of the combination of long time stability and rapid switching and may be useful in finding new phase change compositions with superior properties.

  17. New nanomaterials for applications in conservation and restoration of stony materials: A review

    Sierra-Fernandez, A.; Gomez-Villalba, L.S.; Rabanal, M.E.; Fort, R.

    2017-01-01

    In recent times, nanomaterials have been applied in the construction and maintenance of the world's cultural heritage with the aim of improving the consolidation and protection treatments of damaged stone. These nanomaterials include important advantages that could solve many problems found in the traditional interventions. The present paper aims to carry out a review of the state of art on the application of nanotechnology to the conservation and restoration of the stony cultural heritage. We highlight the different types of nanoparticles currently used to produce conservation treatments with enhanced material properties and novel functionalities.

  18. Clinical evaluation of combined surgical/ restorative treatment of gingival recession-type defects using different restorative materials: A randomized clinical trial

    Sila Cagri Isler

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/purpose: An ideal therapeutic procedure for the treatment of gingival recession associated with an NCCL has presented a challenge to clinicians. Various dental materials and surgical approaches have been used to manage gingival recessions associated with NCCLs for the most predictable combined surgical/restorative treatment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the treatment of gingival recessions associated with non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL using a modified coronally advanced flap (MCAF in combination with a connective tissue graft (CTG on restored root surfaces. Materials and methods: Twenty-three systemically healthy subjects, who were positive for the presence of three cervical lesions associated with gingival recessions in three different adjacent teeth, were enrolled in the study. The NCCL were each restored prior to surgery by using one of three different materials: nanofilled composite resin (NCR, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGI or giomer. The gingival recession defects were treated by CTG. Results: Inter-group differences were not statistically significant for probing depth (PD, relative recession height (rRH, relative clinical attachment level (rCAL, keratinized tissue width (KTW or keratinized tissue thickness (KTT (p > 0.05 among the groups at any time. The mean percentage of defect coverage was 71.18 ± 23.16% for NCR + CTG group; 71.33 ± 22.33% for RMGI + CTG group; and 64.23 ± 20.33% for giomer + CTG group at 1 year postoperatively (p > 0.05. Conclusion: The combined surgical/restorative treatments provided successful clinical results. Giomer + CTG may be less effective compared to other groups for treatment of gingival recession associated with NCCL. Keywords: cervical lesions, connective tissue grafts, gingival recession, restorative materials

  19. Functional organic materials based on polymerized liquid-crystal monomers: supramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems.

    Broer, Dirk J; Bastiaansen, Cees M W; Debije, Michael G; Schenning, Albertus P H J

    2012-07-16

    Functional organic materials are of great interest for a variety of applications. To obtain precise functional properties, well-defined hierarchically ordered supramolecular materials are crucial. The self-assembly of liquid crystals has proven to be an extremely useful tool in the development of well-defined nanostructured materials. We have chosen the illustrative example of photopolymerizable hydrogen-bonding mesogens to show that a wide variety of functional materials can be made from a relatively simple set of building blocks. Upon mixing these compounds with other reactive mesogens, nematic, chiral nematic, and smectic or columnar liquid-crystalline phases can be formed that can be applied as actuators, sensors and responsive reflectors, and nanoporous membranes, respectively. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Stable Failure-Inducing Micro-Silica Aqua Epoxy Bonding Material for Floating Concrete Module Connection

    Jang-Ho Jay Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Many recent studies in the development of floating concrete structures focused on a connection system made of modules. In the connection system, the modules are designed to be attached by pre-stressing (PS while floating on the water, which exposes them to loads on the surface of the water. Therefore, the development of a pre-connection material becomes critical to ensure successful bonding of floating concrete modules. Micro-silica mixed aqua-epoxy (MSAE was developed for this task. To find the proper MSAE mix proportion, 0% to 4% micro-silica was mixed in a standard mixture of aqua-epoxy for material testing. Also, the effect of micro-silica on the viscosity of the aqua epoxy was evaluated by controlling the epoxy silane at proportions of 0%, ±5%, and ±10%. After completion of the performance tests of the MSAE, we evaluated the effect of MSAE in a connected structure. The plain unreinforced concrete module joint specimens applied with MSAE at thicknesses of 5, 10, and 20 mm were prepared to be tested. Finally, we evaluated the performance of MSAE-applied reinforced concrete (RC module specimens connected by PS tendons, and these were compared with those of continuous RC and non-MSAE-applied beams. The results showed that the mix of micro-silica in the aqua-epoxy changed the performance of the aqua-epoxy and the mix ratio of 2% micro-silica gave a stable failure behavior. The flexural capacity of concrete blocks bonded with MSAE changed according to the bond thickness and was better than that of concrete blocks bonded with aqua-epoxy without micro-silica. Even though MSAE insignificantly increases the load-carrying capacity of the attached concrete module structure, the stress concentration reduction effect stabilized the failure of the structure.

  1. Using graphitic foam as the bonding material in metal fuel pins for sodium fast reactors

    Karahan, Aydın; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2013-01-01

    The study evaluates the possible use of graphite foam as the bonding material between U–Pu–Zr metallic fuel and steel clad for sodium fast reactor applications using FEAST-METAL fuel performance code. Furthermore, the applicability of FEAST-METAL to the advanced fuel designs is demonstrated. Replacing the sodium bond with a chemically stable foam material would eliminate fuel clad metallurgical interactions, and allow for fuel swelling under low external stress. Hence, a significant improvement is expected for the steady state and transient performance. FEAST-METAL was used to assess the thermo-mechanical behavior of the new fuel form and a reference metallic fuel pin. Nearly unity conversion ratio, 75% smear density U–15Pu–6Zr metallic fuel pin with sodium bond, and T91 cladding was selected as a reference case. It was found that operating the reference case at high clad temperatures (600–660 °C) results in (1) excessive clad wastage formation/clad thinning due to lanthanide migration and formation of brittle phases at clad inner surface, and (2) excessive clad hoop strain at the upper axial section due mainly to the occurrence of thermal creep. The combination of these two factors may lead to cladding breach. The work concludes that replacing the sodium bond with 80% porous graphite foam and reducing the fuel smear density to 70%, it is likely that the fuel clad metallurgical interaction would be eliminated while the fuel swelling is allowed without excessive fuel clad mechanical interaction. The suggested design appears as an alternative for a high performance metallic fuel design for sodium fast reactors

  2. Using graphitic foam as the bonding material in metal fuel pins for sodium fast reactors

    Karahan, Aydın, E-mail: karahan@alum.mit.edu; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2013-10-15

    The study evaluates the possible use of graphite foam as the bonding material between U–Pu–Zr metallic fuel and steel clad for sodium fast reactor applications using FEAST-METAL fuel performance code. Furthermore, the applicability of FEAST-METAL to the advanced fuel designs is demonstrated. Replacing the sodium bond with a chemically stable foam material would eliminate fuel clad metallurgical interactions, and allow for fuel swelling under low external stress. Hence, a significant improvement is expected for the steady state and transient performance. FEAST-METAL was used to assess the thermo-mechanical behavior of the new fuel form and a reference metallic fuel pin. Nearly unity conversion ratio, 75% smear density U–15Pu–6Zr metallic fuel pin with sodium bond, and T91 cladding was selected as a reference case. It was found that operating the reference case at high clad temperatures (600–660 °C) results in (1) excessive clad wastage formation/clad thinning due to lanthanide migration and formation of brittle phases at clad inner surface, and (2) excessive clad hoop strain at the upper axial section due mainly to the occurrence of thermal creep. The combination of these two factors may lead to cladding breach. The work concludes that replacing the sodium bond with 80% porous graphite foam and reducing the fuel smear density to 70%, it is likely that the fuel clad metallurgical interaction would be eliminated while the fuel swelling is allowed without excessive fuel clad mechanical interaction. The suggested design appears as an alternative for a high performance metallic fuel design for sodium fast reactors.

  3. Push-out bond strength of different tricalcium silicate-based filling materials to root dentin

    Jorge Henrique Stefaneli Marques

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of different triccalcium silicate cements to retrograde cavity using a push out test. Thirty maxillary central incisors were shaped using #80 hand files and sectioned transversally. Root slices were obtained from the apical 4 mm after eliminating the apical extremity. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin and positioned at 45° to the horizontal plane for preparation of root-end cavities with a diamond ultrasonic retrotip. The samples were divided into three groups according to the root-end filling material (n = 10: MTA Angelus, ProRoot MTA and Biodentine. A gutta-percha cone (#80 was tugged-back at the limit between the canal and the root-end cavity. The root-end cavity was filled and the gutta-percha cone was removed after complete setting of the materials. The specimens were placed in an Instron machine with the root-end filling turned downwards. The push-out shaft was inserted in the space previously occupied by the gutta-percha cone and push out testing was performed at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. There was no statistically significant difference in resistance to push out by the materials tested (p > 0.01. MTA Angelus and ProRoot MTA showed predominantly mixed failure while Biodentine exhibited mixed and cohesive failures. The tricalcium silicate-based root-end filling materials showed similar bond strength retrograde cavity.

  4. Push-out bond strength of different tricalcium silicate-based filling materials to root dentin.

    Stefaneli Marques, Jorge Henrique; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Corrêa; Rached-Júnior, Fuad Jacob Abi; Macedo, Luciana Martins Domingues de; Mazzi-Chaves, Jardel Francisco; Camilleri, Josette; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2018-03-08

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of different triccalcium silicate cements to retrograde cavity using a push out test. Thirty maxillary central incisors were shaped using #80 hand files and sectioned transversally. Root slices were obtained from the apical 4 mm after eliminating the apical extremity. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin and positioned at 45° to the horizontal plane for preparation of root-end cavities with a diamond ultrasonic retrotip. The samples were divided into three groups according to the root-end filling material (n = 10): MTA Angelus, ProRoot MTA and Biodentine. A gutta-percha cone (#80) was tugged-back at the limit between the canal and the root-end cavity. The root-end cavity was filled and the gutta-percha cone was removed after complete setting of the materials. The specimens were placed in an Instron machine with the root-end filling turned downwards. The push-out shaft was inserted in the space previously occupied by the gutta-percha cone and push out testing was performed at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. There was no statistically significant difference in resistance to push out by the materials tested (p > 0.01). MTA Angelus and ProRoot MTA showed predominantly mixed failure while Biodentine exhibited mixed and cohesive failures. The tricalcium silicate-based root-end filling materials showed similar bond strength retrograde cavity.

  5. Using modified polyetheretherketone (PEEK) as an alternative material for endocrown restorations: A short-term clinical report.

    Zoidis, Panagiotis; Bakiri, Eleonora; Polyzois, Gregory

    2017-03-01

    A modified polyetheretherketone (PEEK) framework material veneered with indirect light-polymerized composite resin was used as an alternative material for the fabrication of an endocrown restoration for an extensively damaged molar. The elastic modulus of the polyetheretherketone framework (4 GPa) veneered with indirect composite resin could dampen the occlusal forces protecting tooth structures better than ceramic materials. This is important in the restoration of extensively damaged molars with weak roots. Long-term clinical evidence is required before recommending the application as a substitute material. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Edge chipping resistance and flexural strength of polymer infiltrated ceramic network and resin nanoceramic restorative materials.

    Argyrou, Renos; Thompson, Geoffrey A; Cho, Seok-Hwan; Berzins, David W

    2016-09-01

    Two novel restorative materials, a polymer infiltrated ceramic network (PICN) and a resin nanoceramic (RNC), for computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD-CAM) applications have recently become commercially available. Little independent evidence regarding their mechanical properties exists to facilitate material selection. The purpose of this in vitro study was to measure the edge chipping resistance and flexural strength of the PICN and RNC materials and compare them with 2 commonly used feldspathic ceramic (FC) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic (LRGC) CAD-CAM materials that share the same clinical indications. PICN, RNC, FC, and LRGC material specimens were obtained by sectioning commercially available CAD-CAM blocks. Edge chipping test specimens (n=20/material) were adhesively attached to a resin substrate before testing. Edge chips were produced using a 120-degree, sharp, conical diamond indenter mounted on a universal testing machine and positioned 0.1 to 0.7 mm horizontally from the specimen's edge. The chipping force was plotted against distance to the edge, and the data were fitted to linear and quadratic equations. One-way ANOVA determined intergroup differences (α=.05) in edge chipping toughness. Beam specimens (n=22/material) were tested for determining flexural strength using a 3-point bend test. Weibull statistics determined intergroup differences (α=.05). Flexural modulus and work of fracture were also calculated, and 1-way ANOVA determined intergroup differences (α=.05) RESULTS: Significant (Pmaterials for the 4 mechanical properties. Specifically, the material rankings were edge chipping toughness: RNC>LRGC=FC>PICN; flexural strength: RNC=LRGC>PICN>FC; flexural modulus: RNCLRGC=PICN>FC. The RNC material demonstrated superior performance for the mechanical properties tested compared with the other 3 materials. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  7. Morphological characterization of ceramic fillers made from Indonesian natural sand as restorative dental materials

    Karlina, E.; Susra, S.; Fatmala, Y.; Hartoyo, H. M.; Takarini, V.; Usri, K.; Febrida, R.; Djustiana, N.; Panatarani, C.; Joni, I. M.

    2018-02-01

    Dental composite as restorative dental materials can be reinforced using ceramic fillers. Homogeneous distribution of filler particles shall improve its mechanical properties. This paper presents the results of the preliminary study on the ZrO2-Al2O3-SiO2 ceramic fillers made from Indonesian natural sand that can increase the mechanical properties of dental composite. The synthesis was done using zirconium silicate sand (ZrSiO4) and aluminium oxide (Al2O3) precursors, which dissolved together with 70:30 weight ratios. Two types of sand were used: (1) manufactured sand (mesh #80) and (2) natural sand (mesh #400). The samples then heated in the furnace at 1100 °C for 8 hours. The morphological characterization was then evaluated using JEOL Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for the surface structure that analyze particles size and distribution. Ceramic fillers made from natural sand is homogenous, well distributed with average particle size of 5-10 µm. Comparably, ceramic filler made from the manufactured sand is heterogeneous, poorly distributed and appear as agglomerates with average particle size are 30-50 µm. The results suggest that ceramic fillers made from natural sand demonstrate better character to represent as a functional restorative dental material.

  8. Thermal Performance and Reliability Characterization of Bonded Interface Materials (BIMs): Preprint

    DeVoto, D.; Paret, P.; Mihalic, M.; Narumanchi, S.; Bar-Cohen, A.; Matin, K.

    2014-08-01

    Thermal interface materials are an important enabler for low thermal resistance and reliable electronics packaging for a wide array of applications. There is a trend towards bonded interface materials (BIMs) because of their potential for low thermal resistivity (< 1 mm2K/W). However, BIMs induce thermomechanical stresses in the package and can be prone to failures and integrity risks. Deteriorated interfaces can result in high thermal resistance in the package and degradation and/or failure of the electronics. DARPA's Thermal Management Technologies program has addressed this challenge, supporting the development of mechanically-compliant, low resistivity nano-thermal interface (NTI) materials. In this work, we describe the testing procedure and report the results of NREL's thermal performance and reliability characterization of an initial sample of four different NTI-BIMs.

  9. Adhesive bonding and brazing of nanocrystalline diamond foil onto different substrate materials

    Lodes, Matthias A.; Sailer, Stefan; Rosiwal, Stefan M.; Singer, Robert F.

    2013-10-01

    Diamond coatings are used in heavily stressed industrial applications to reduce friction and wear. Hot-filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) is the favourable coating method, as it allows a coating of large surface areas with high homogeneity. Due to the high temperatures occurring in this CVD-process, the selection of substrate materials is limited. With the desire to coat light materials, steels and polymers a new approach has been developed. First, by using temperature-stable templates in the HFCVD and stripping off the diamond layer afterwards, a flexible, up to 150 μm thick and free standing nanocrystalline diamond foil (NCDF) can be produced. Afterwards, these NCDF can be applied on technical components through bonding and brazing, allowing any material as substrate. This two-step process offers the possibility to join a diamond layer on any desired surface. With a modified scratch test and Rockwell indentation testing the adhesion strength of NCDF on aluminium and steel is analysed. The results show that sufficient adhesion strength is reached both on steel and aluminium. The thermal stress in the substrates is very low and if failure occurs, cracks grow undercritically. Adhesion strength is even higher for the brazed samples, but here crack growth is critical, delaminating the diamond layer to some extent. In comparison to a sample directly coated with diamond, using a high-temperature CVD interlayer, the brazed as well as the adhesively bonded samples show very good performance, proving their competitiveness. A high support of the bonding layer could be identified as crucial, though in some cases a lower stiffness of the latter might be acceptable considering the possibility to completely avoid thermal stresses which occur during joining at higher temperatures.

  10. Solid Liquid Interdiffusion Bonding of Zn4Sb3 Thermoelectric Material with Cu Electrode

    Lin, Y. C.; Lee, K. T.; Hwang, J. D.; Chu, H. S.; Hsu, C. C.; Chen, S. C.; Chuang, T. H.

    2016-10-01

    The ZnSb intermetallic compound may have thermoelectric applications because it is low in cost and environmentally friendly. In this study, a Zn4Sb3 thermoelectric element coated with a Ni barrier layer and a Ag reaction layer was bonded with a Ag-coated Cu electrode using a Ag/Sn/Ag solid-liquid interdiffusion bonding process. The results indicated that a Ni5Zn21 intermetallic phase formed easily at the Zn4Sb3/Ni interface, leading to sound adhesion. In addition, Sn film was found to react completely with the Ag layer to form a Ag3Sn intermetallic layer having a melting point of 480°C. The resulting Zn4Sb3 thermoelectric module can be applied at the optimized operation temperature (400°C) of Zn4Sb3 material as a thermoelectric element. The bonding strengths ranged from 14.9 MPa to 25.0 MPa, and shear tests revealed that the Zn4Sb3/Cu-joints fractured through the interior of the thermoelectric elements.

  11. Au–Sn bonding material for the assembly of power integrated circuit module

    Zhu, Z.X.; Li, C.C. [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liao, L.L.; Liu, C.K. [Electronic and Optoelectronics Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Kao, C.R., E-mail: crkao@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2016-06-25

    Insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) chips are the key components in high-temperature power electronic modules, which have to efficiently convert electricity between direct and alternating current. In this study, the eutectic Au–Sn (20 wt.% Sn) is successfully used to assemble IGBT chips and direct-bond-copper substrates by using solid liquid interdiffusion (SLID) bonding. During subsequent isothermal aging at 150, 200, and 240 °C, the microstructure evolution and growth kinetics of intermetallic compounds are investigated. Excellent thermal stability and mechanical strength are observed. It is concluded that the eutectic Au–Sn solder is ideal to assemble high-temperature IGBT by using the SLID process. - Highlights: • Au–20Sn serves as a promising bonding material for IGBT operating at T < 519 °C. • The Au–20Sn reacted with Ni to form (Ni,Au){sub 3}Sn{sub 2}/(Au{sub 5}Sn + AuSn)/(Ni,Au){sub 3}Sn{sub 2}. • Once the AuSn was nearly exhausted, the whole joint could withstand higher temperatures. • A cost-effective way for long-term operations at high temperature.

  12. The Effect of Interlayer Materials on the Joint Properties of Diffusion-Bonded Aluminium and Magnesium

    Stefan Habisch

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion bonding is a well-known technology for a wide range of advanced joining applications, due to the possibility of bonding different materials within a defined temperature-time-contact pressure regime in solid state. For this study, aluminium alloys AA 6060, AA 6082, AA 7020, AA 7075 and magnesium alloy AZ 31 B are used to produce dissimilar metal joints. Titanium and silver were investigated as interlayer materials. SEM and EDXS-analysis, micro-hardness measurements and tensile testing were carried out to examine the influence of the interlayers on the diffusion zone microstructures and to characterize the joint properties. The results showed that the highest joint strength of 48 N/mm2 was reached using an aluminium alloy of the 6000 series with a titanium interlayer. For both interlayer materials, intermetallic Al-Mg compounds were still formed, but the width and the level of hardness across the diffusion zone was significantly reduced compared to Al-Mg joints without interlayer.

  13. A bond-order theory on the phonon scattering by vacancies in two-dimensional materials.

    Xie, Guofeng; Shen, Yulu; Wei, Xiaolin; Yang, Liwen; Xiao, Huaping; Zhong, Jianxin; Zhang, Gang

    2014-05-28

    We theoretically investigate the phonon scattering by vacancies, including the impacts of missing mass and linkages (τ(V)(-1)) and the variation of the force constant of bonds associated with vacancies (τ(A)(-1)) by the bond-order-length-strength correlation mechanism. We find that in bulk crystals, the phonon scattering rate due to change of force constant τ(A)(-1) is about three orders of magnitude lower than that due to missing mass and linkages τ(V)(-1). In contrast to the negligible τ(A)(-1) in bulk materials, τ(A)(-1) in two-dimensional materials can be 3-10 folds larger than τ(V)(-1). Incorporating this phonon scattering mechanism to the Boltzmann transport equation derives that the thermal conductivity of vacancy defective graphene is severely reduced even for very low vacancy density. High-frequency phonon contribution to thermal conductivity reduces substantially. Our findings are helpful not only to understand the severe suppression of thermal conductivity by vacancies, but also to manipulate thermal conductivity in two-dimensional materials by phononic engineering.

  14. Characteristics of pristine volcanic materials: Beneficial and harmful effects and their management for restoration of agroecosystem

    Anda, Markus, E-mail: markusandas@yahoo.com; Suparto; Sukarman

    2016-02-01

    Eruption of Sinabung volcano in Indonesia began again in 2010 after resting for 1200 years. The volcano is daily emitting ash and pyroclastic materials since September 2013 to the present, damaging agroecosystems and costing for management restoration. The objective of the study was to assess properties and impacts of pristine volcanic material depositions on soil properties and to provide management options for restoring the affected agroecosytem. Land satellite imagery was used for field studies to observe the distribution, thickness and properties of ashfall deposition. The pristine ashfall deposits and the underlying soils were sampled for mineralogical, soluble salt, chemical, physical and toxic compound analyses. Results showed that uneven distribution of rainfall at the time of violent eruption caused the areas receiving mud ashfall developed surface encrustation, which was not occur in areas receiving dry ashfall. Ashfall damaged the agroecosytem by burning vegetation, forming surface crusts, and creating soil acidity and toxicity. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of encrustated layer indicated the presence of gypsum and jarosite minerals. Gypsum likely acted as a cementing agent in the formation of the encrustation layer with extremely low pH (2.9) and extremely high concentrations of Al, Ca and S. Encrustation is responsible for limited water infiltration and root penetration, while the extremely high concentration of Al is responsible for crop toxicity. Mud ashfall and dry ashfall deposits also greatly changed the underlying soil properties by decreasing soil pH and cation exchange capacity and by increasing exchangeable Ca, Al, and S availability. Despite damaging vegetation in the short-term, the volcanic ashfall enriched the soil in the longer term by adding nutrients like Ca, Mg, K, Na, P, Si and S. Suggested management practices to help restore the agroecosystem after volcanic eruptions include: (i) the

  15. Analysis of explosion-induced releases of toxic materials at an environmental restoration project

    Bloom, S.G.; Moon, W.H. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Prior to 1988, a variety of materials were buried on the US DOE Oak Ridge Reservation. Records of the disposal operations are incomplete and toxic materials may have been placed adjacent to potential explosives. One of the safety concerns in conducting an environmental restoration project at the burial sites, is the possibility of an explosion which could release toxic materials to the atmosphere. A safety analysis examined the consequences of such releases by first postulating an upper bound for the strength of an explosive. A correlation, developed by Steindler and Seefeldt of Argonne National Laboratory, was then used to estimate the amount and particle-size distribution of the material that could become airborne from the explosion. The estimated amount of airborne material was the source term in an atmospheric dispersion model which was used to calculate infinite-time, concentration-time integrals and 5-minute, time- weighted average concentrations at locations down-wind from the explosion. The dispersion model includes particle deposition as a function of particle-size distribution class. The concentration-time integrals and average concentrations were compared to published guidelines to assess the consequences of an accidental explosion

  16. ANALYTICAL MODEL OF DAMAGED AIRCRAFT SKIN BONDED REPAIRS ASSUMING THE MATERIAL PROPERTIES DEGRADATION

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The search of optimal variants for composite repair patches allows to increase the service life of a damaged air- plane structure. To sensibly choose the way of repair, it is necessary to have a computational complex to predict the stress- strain condition of "structure-adhesive-patch" system and to take into account the damage growth considering the material properties change. The variant of the computational complex based on inclusion method is proposed.For calculation purposes the repair bonded joint is divided into two areas: a metal plate with patch-shaped hole and a "patch-adhesive layer-skin" composite plate (inclusion.Calculation stages:Evaluation of the patch influence to the skin stress-strain condition, stress distribution between skin and patch in the case of no damage. Calculation of the stress-strain condition is performed separately for the skin with hole and for the inclusion; solutions are coupled based on strain compatibility.Definition of the damage growth parameters at new stress-strain condition due to bonded patch existence. Skincrack stress intensity factors are found to identify the crack growth velocity. Patch is modelled as a set of "springs" bridging the crack.Degradation analysis of elasticity properties for the patch material.Repair effectiveness is evaluated with respect to crack growth velocity reduction in the initial material in compari- son with the case of the patch absence.Calculation example for the crack repair effectiveness depending on number of loading cycles for the 7075-T6 aluminum skin is given. Repair patches are carbon-epoxy, glass-epoxy and boron-epoxy material systems with quasi- isotropic layup and GLARE hybrid metal-polymeric material.The analysis shows the high effectiveness of the carbon-epoxy patch. Due to low stiffness, the glass-epoxy patchdemonstrates the least effectiveness. GLARE patch containing the fiberglass plies oriented across the crack has the same effectiveness as the carbon and

  17. Thermal stress in a bi-material assembly with a 'piecewise-continuous' bonding layer: theorem of three axial forces

    Suhir, E

    2009-01-01

    We consider a bi-material assembly with a 'piecewise-continuous' bonding layer. The layer is characterized by different elastic constants of its 'pieces' (segments) and is assumed to be thin. Young's moduli of all the 'pieces' of the bonding layer are significantly lower than the moduli of the adherend materials. In such a situation the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the bonding material need not be accounted for. Only the interfacial compliance of the bonding layer is important. This is indeed the case for the majority of electronic, opto-electronic or photonic assemblies. We consider the situation when the assembly is manufactured at an elevated temperature and is subsequently cooled down to a low (say, room) temperature. The objective of the analysis is to develop a simple, easy-to-use and physically meaningful analytical ('mathematical') predictive model for the evaluation of the interfacial shearing stresses that arise at the boundaries of the 'pieces' (segments) of the bonding layer and at the assembly edge. The basic equation is obtained for the thermally induced forces acting in the adherends' cross-sections that correspond to the boundaries between the dissimilar portions of the bonding layer. This equation has the form of the theorem of three (bending) moments in the theory of multi-span beams lying on separate simple supports and could therefore be called the 'theorem of three axial forces'. We show, as an illustration, how this equation could be employed to design a bi-material assembly with an inhomogeneous bonding layer and with low interfacial shearing stresses. Low shearing stresses will certainly result in lower peeling stresses as well. The numerical example is carried out for an assembly with a relatively high-modulus bonding material in its mid-portion (aimed primarily at providing good adhesion and, if necessary, good heat transfer as well) and a low-modulus material in its peripheral portions (aimed primarily at bringing down the

  18. Influence of different adhesive systems on bond strength of carbon fiber posts used to restore endodontically treated teeth

    Silva, Lorena dos Santos; Reis, Kátia Rodrigues; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Chuí, Fabíola Mendonça da Silva; Sena, Neylla Teixeira; Carvalhal, Cintia Iara Oda; Oliveira, Jonas Alves de

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of three adhesive systems on resinous bonding of carbon fiber posts on roots of endodontically treated bovine incisors. Thirty bovine lower incisors with similar dimensions were selected for this study. The roots were endodontically treated and subsequently prepared for post cementation. The posts were treated with adhesive systems Scotchbond MultiPurpose Plus – 3M chemical cure (Group I), light cure (Group II) and dual cure (Group III). Car...

  19. Sub-ablative Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation under all-ceramic restorations: effects on demineralization and shear bond strength.

    Bağlar, Serdar

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the caries resistant effects of sub-ablative Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation alone and combined with fluoride in comparison with fluoride application alone on enamel prepared for veneer restorations. And also, evaluated these treatments' effects on the shear bond strength of all-ceramic veneer restorations. One hundred and thirty-five human maxillary central teeth were assigned to groups of 1a-control, 1b-laser treated, 1c-fluoride treated, 1d-laser + fluoride treated for shear bond testing and to groups of 2a-positive control(non-demineralised), 2b-laser treated, 2c-fluoride treated, 2d-laser + fluoride treated, 2e-negative control (demineralised) for microhardness testing (n = 15, N = 135). Demineralisation solutions of microhardness measurements were used for the ICP-OES elemental analysis. The parameters for laser irradiation were as follows: power output, 0.25 W; total energy density, 62.5 J/cm 2 and energy density per pulse, 4.48 J/cm 2 with an irradiation time of 20 s and with no water cooling. Five percent NaF varnish was used as fluoride preparate. ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests were performed (α = 5%). Surface treatments showed no significant effects on shear bond strength values (p = 0.579). However, significant differences were found in microhardness measurements and in elemental analysis of Ca and P amounts (p < 0.01). Surface-treated groups showed significantly high VNH values and significantly low ICP-OES values when compared with non-treated (-control) group while there were no significance among surface-treated groups regarding VHN and ICP-OES values. Sub-ablative Er,Cr:YSGG treatment alone or combined with fluoride is as an effective method as at least fluoride alone for preventing the prepared enamel to demineralization with no negative effect on shear bond strength.

  20. Radiopacity of restorative materials using digital images Radiopacidade de materiais restauradores utilizando imagens digitais

    Leda Maria Pescinini Salzedas

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The radiopacity of esthetic restorative materials has been established as an important requirement, improving the radiographic diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of six restorative materials using a direct digital image system, comparing them to the dental tissues (enamel-dentin, expressed as equivalent thickness of aluminum (millimeters of aluminum. Five specimens of each material were made. Three 2-mm thick longitudinal sections were cut from an intact extracted permanent molar tooth (including enamel and dentin. An aluminum step wedge with 9 steps was used. The samples of different materials were placed on a phosphor plate together with a tooth section, aluminum step wedge and metal code letter, and were exposed using a dental x-ray unit. Five measurements of radiographic density were obtained from each image of each item assessed (restorative material, enamel, dentin, each step of the aluminum step wedge and the mean of these values was calculated. Radiopacity values were subsequently calculated as equivalents of aluminum thickness. Analysis of variance (ANOVA indicated significant differences in radiopacity values among the materials (PA radiopacidade dos materiais tem sido valorizada como importante requisito, incrementando o diagnóstico radiográfico. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar, no sistema digital Digora, as densidades radiográficas de 06 materiais restauradores comparando-os aos tecidos dentais (esmalte e dentina, expressos em milímetros de alumínio (mm Al. Foram confeccionadas 05 amostras de cada material e três cortes de um molar extraído hígido (incluindo esmalte e dentina, com 2 mm de espessura, e um penetrômetro de alumínio com 09 degraus. Sobre cada placa óptica foram colocados amostras dos diferentes materiais, um corte do dente humano, o penetrômetro e a identificação, e feita a exposição utilizando um aparelho de raios X. Foram obtidas 05 medidas de densidade radiográfica de

  1. Evaluation of patients with oral lichenoid lesions by dental patch testing and results of removal of the dental restoration material

    Emine Buket Şahin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Oral lichenoid lesions (OLL are contact stomatitis characterized by white reticular or erosive patches, plaque-like lesions that are clinically and histopathologically indistinguishable from oral lichen planus (OLP. Amalgam dental fillings and dental restoration materials are among the etiologic agents. In the present study, it was aimed to evaluate the standard and dental series patch tests in patients with OLL in comparison to a control group and evaluate our results. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients with OLL or OLP and 30 healthy control subjects, who had at least one dental restoration material and/or dental filling, were included in the study. Both groups received standard series and dental patch test and the results were evaluated simultaneously. Results: The most frequent allergens in the dental series patch test in the patient group were palladium chloride (n=4; 12.12% and benzoyl peroxide (n=2, 6.06%. Of the 33 patients with OLL; 8 had positive reaction to allergents in the standard patch test series and 8 had positive reaction in the dental patch test series. There was no significant difference in the rate of patch test reaction to the dental and standard series between the groups. Ten patients were advised to have the dental restoration material removed according to the results of the patch tests. The lesions improved in three patients [removal of all amalgam dental fillings (n=1, replacement of all amalgam dental fillings with an alternative filling material (n=1 and replacement of the dental prosthesis (n=1] following the removal or replacement of the dental restoration material. Conclusion: Dental patch test should be performed in patients with OLL and dental restoration material. Dental filling and/or prosthesis should be removed/replaced if there is a reaction against a dental restoration material-related allergen.

  2. Comparison of chemical composition of materials used in dental restorations 08 years after the irradiation

    Maio, Mireia Florencio; Santos, Adimir dos; Fernandes, Marco A.R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work consisted of quantitative studies of the effects caused by ionizing radiation on the materials commonly used in dental restorations (amalgam, composite resin and Compomer), to mitigate the deleterious effects of radiotherapy when patients with tumors in head and neck, observed when the teeth are restored within the field of radiation. Samples were submitted to the beam of radiation from a source of cobalt-therapy, and analyzed by a X-ray fluorescence technique, by comparing the chemical composition of samples before and after irradiation. Gamma spectrometry was performed with detector of NaI and HPGe in the same samples. Then, the samples were kept in an appropriate place and after 08 years is repeated the same analysis. With these tests, it was possible to verify small changes in the composition of bodies of evidence due to the interaction 08 years after exposure to gamma radiation beams, simulating a patient who develops deleterious effects of radiation after the end radiotherapy treatment. (author)

  3. Comparison of chemical composition of materials used in dental restorations 08 years after the irradiation

    Maio, Mireia Florencio; Santos, Adimir dos, E-mail: mfmaio@ipen.b, E-mail: asantos@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, Marco A.R., E-mail: marcosrf@salesiano-ata.b [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this work consisted of quantitative studies of the effects caused by ionizing radiation on the materials commonly used in dental restorations (amalgam, composite resin and Compomer), to mitigate the deleterious effects of radiotherapy when patients with tumors in head and neck, observed when the teeth are restored within the field of radiation. Samples were submitted to the beam of radiation from a source of cobalt-therapy, and analyzed by a X-ray fluorescence technique, by comparing the chemical composition of samples before and after irradiation. Gamma spectrometry was performed with detector of NaI and HPGe in the same samples. Then, the samples were kept in an appropriate place and after 08 years is repeated the same analysis. With these tests, it was possible to verify small changes in the composition of bodies of evidence due to the interaction 08 years after exposure to gamma radiation beams, simulating a patient who develops deleterious effects of radiation after the end radiotherapy treatment. (author)

  4. Recycling of Manganese Secondary Raw Material Via Cold-Bond Pelletizing Process

    Ahmed, Y.M.Z.; Mohamed, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Large quantities of fines were produced during the shipping, transportation, handling and storage of manganese ore sinter imported from different countries to Sinai Company for ferromanganese production. These fines are generally considered as valuable secondary raw materials. Hence, they have a potential to be recycled back to the submerged arc furnace after having been agglomerated. For agglomerates to be considered as feed materials for submerged arc furnace they must have sufficient room temperature strength. Cold-bonded penalization process offers an economically attractive and environmentally viable method for achieving this. Ordinary Portland cement was used in this investigation for the purpose of producing a suitable cold-bonded pellet from such fines. In this investigation, the effect of adding different percentages of Portland cement on the mechanical properties of both green and pellet dried at room temperature for 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days of normal curing were studied. The results revealed that, although the compressive strength of green pellets improved with the increase of the amount of cement added. retardation in pellet drop strength was reported. Whereas, the increase in both the cement content and time of drying leads to increase in the mechanical properties of pellets normally cured at room temperature. pellets obtain with the addition of 9% cement shows reasonable mechanical properties to be charged in the submerged are furnace. ferromanganese alloy having a standard range composition was produced in a laboratory submerged are furnace using such pellets

  5. The effect of aging on the fracture toughness of esthetic restorative materials.

    Bagheri, Rafat; Azar, Mohammad R; Tyas, Martin J; Burrow, Michael F

    2010-06-01

    To compare the fracture toughness (KIc) of tooth-colored restorative materials based on a four-point bending; to assess the effect of distilled water and a resin surface sealant (G-Coat Plus) on the resistance of the materials to fracture. Specimens were prepared from six materials: Quix Fil; Dyract (Dentsply), Freedom (SDI), Fuji VII (GC), Fuji IX (GC); Fuji II LC (GC). Fuji II LC and Fuji IX were tested both with and without applying G-Coat Plus (GC). The specimens were divided into the three groups which were conditioned in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 48 hours, 4 and 8 weeks. The specimens were loaded in a four-point bending test using a universal testing machine. The maximum load to specimen failure was recorded and the fracture toughness calculated. There were significant differences among most of the materials (P G-Coat Plus affected Fuji II LC positively while it had no effect on the Fuji IX.

  6. A modified bonded-interface technique with improved features for studying indentation damage of materials

    Low, I.M.

    1998-01-01

    A modified 'bonded-interface' technique with improved features for studying contact damage of ceramic (Al 2 O 3 graded Al 2 TiO 5 /Al 2 O 3 , Ti 3 SiC 2 ) and non-ceramic (epoxy, tooth) materials is developed and compared with the conventional method. This technique enables the surface damage around and below an indentor to be studied. When used in conjunction with Nomarski illumination and atomic force microscopy, this technique can reveal substantial information on the topography of indentation surface damage. In particular, it is ideal for monitoring the evolution of deformation-micro fracture damage of quasi-plastic materials. The technique is much less sophisticated, less time consuming, and user-friendly. It does not require a highly experience user to be proficient in the procedure. When compared with the conventional tool- clamp method, this modified technique gives similar, if not, identical results. Copyright (1998) Australasian Ceramic Society

  7. Mechanical properties of chemically bonded sand core materials dipped in sol-gel coating impregnated with filter

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2012-01-01

    A novel sol-gel coating impregnated with filter dust was applied on chemically bonded sand core materials by dipping. After curing, the strengths of the core materials were measured under uniaxial loading using a new strength testing machine (STM). The STM presents the loading history as a force-...... of the chemically bonded sand core materials, a combination of flexural and compression tests is suggested for improving the casting quality. © 2012 W. S. Maney & Son Ltd.......A novel sol-gel coating impregnated with filter dust was applied on chemically bonded sand core materials by dipping. After curing, the strengths of the core materials were measured under uniaxial loading using a new strength testing machine (STM). The STM presents the loading history as a force...... the strengths were increased under compression. The mode of fracture of the chemically bonded sand core materials was observed to be intergranular through the binder. The stiffness of the chemically bonded sand core materials was determined. For better understanding of the mechanical properties...

  8. Comparison of the color stability of provisional restorative materials after storing in different drinks

    Merve Bankoğlu Güngör

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to compare the color stability of provisional restorative materials after stroring in different drinks. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Thirty specimens (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness were prepared from three different materials (Temdent, TRIAD ve TelioCAD. Specimens were divided into six groups according to drinks (distilled water, coffee, tea, cola, red wine and fruit juice; n=5. Specimens were stored in these drinks at 37 °C for 48 hours. The L*, a*, b* values of the specimens were measured with a spectrophometer and recorded before and after storing in drinks. Then ΔE* values were calculated. The data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post hoc tests (α=0.05. RESULTS: Difference between the ΔE* values of specimens stored in different drinks was statistically significant (p<0.05. Color change of TelioCAD specimens was smallest in cola drink and greatest in red wine. Color change of Temdent specimens was smallest in fruit juice and greatest in coffee. For TRIAD specimens, greater color change was observed in coffee, red wine, and tea, in descending order. When the results of storing in the same drink were compared, TRIAD showed the greatest values of color change in coffee and red wine in comparison to the other provisional materials (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Color stability changed according to the type of the provisional material and the drink. When the drinks were evaluated, greater color changes were observed in coffee, and when the materials were evaluated greater color changes were observed in TRIAD.

  9. Influence of different conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of novel light-curing nano-ionomer restorative to enamel and dentin.

    Korkmaz, Yonca; Ozel, Emre; Attar, Nuray; Ozge Bicer, Ceren

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate shear bond strength (SBS) between a light-curing nano-ionomer restorative and enamel or dentin after acid etching, after erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser etching, or after combined treatment. Forty third molars were selected, the crowns were sectioned, and 80 tooth slabs were obtained. The specimens were assigned to two groups, which were divided into four subgroups(n = 10). Group 1 [enamel (e)], treated with 37% phosphoric acid (A) + Ketac nano-primer (K); group 2 [dentin (d)], (A) + (K); group 3(e), Er:YAG laser etching (L) + (A) + (K); group 4(d), (L) + (A) + (K); group 5(e), (L) + (K); group 6(d), (L) + (K); group 7(e), (K); group 8(d), (K). The SBS of the specimens was measured with a universal test machine (1 mm/min). Data were analyzed by independent samples t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a post-hoc Duncan test (p 0.05). Group 7 exhibited higher SBS values than those of groups 3 and 5 (p 0.05). No difference was observed between groups 2 and 4 (p > 0.05). However, group 2 presented higher SBSs than did group 6 (p adhesion of the light-curing nano-ionomer restorative to both enamel and dentin.

  10. Characteristics of pristine volcanic materials: Beneficial and harmful effects and their management for restoration of agroecosystem.

    Anda, Markus; Suparto; Sukarman

    2016-02-01

    Eruption of Sinabung volcano in Indonesia began again in 2010 after resting for 1200 years. The volcano is daily emitting ash and pyroclastic materials since September 2013 to the present, damaging agroecosystems and costing for management restoration. The objective of the study was to assess properties and impacts of pristine volcanic material depositions on soil properties and to provide management options for restoring the affected agroecosytem. Land satellite imagery was used for field studies to observe the distribution, thickness and properties of ashfall deposition. The pristine ashfall deposits and the underlying soils were sampled for mineralogical, soluble salt, chemical, physical and toxic compound analyses. Results showed that uneven distribution of rainfall at the time of violent eruption caused the areas receiving mud ashfall developed surface encrustation, which was not occur in areas receiving dry ashfall. Ashfall damaged the agroecosytem by burning vegetation, forming surface crusts, and creating soil acidity and toxicity. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of encrustated layer indicated the presence of gypsum and jarosite minerals. Gypsum likely acted as a cementing agent in the formation of the encrustation layer with extremely low pH (2.9) and extremely high concentrations of Al, Ca and S. Encrustation is responsible for limited water infiltration and root penetration, while the extremely high concentration of Al is responsible for crop toxicity. Mud ashfall and dry ashfall deposits also greatly changed the underlying soil properties by decreasing soil pH and cation exchange capacity and by increasing exchangeable Ca, Al, and S availability. Despite damaging vegetation in the short-term, the volcanic ashfall enriched the soil in the longer term by adding nutrients like Ca, Mg, K, Na, P, Si and S. Suggested management practices to help restore the agroecosystem after volcanic eruptions include: (i) the

  11. Fluorides leaching from restorative materials and the effect on adjacent teeth

    Qvist, Vibeke; Poulsen, Agneta; Teglers, Poul Thorpen

    2010-01-01

    Placing a Class II restoration in a tooth changes the local environment, including that for the adjacent tooth. Apart from the change to a less- or non-cariogenic environment for the restored tooth, the effect of leachable components from a restoration in the adjacent tooth should be taken into c...

  12. Mechanical properties of resin-ceramic CAD/CAM restorative materials.

    Awada, Abdallah; Nathanson, Dan

    2015-10-01

    The recent development of polymer-based computer-aided design and computer-aided manufactured (CAD/CAM) milling blocks and the limited availability of independent studies on these materials make it pertinent to evaluate their properties and identify potential strengths and limitations. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine and compare mechanical properties (flexural strength, flexural modulus, modulus of resilience) and compare the margin edge quality of recently introduced polymer-based CAD/CAM materials with some of their commercially available composite resin and ceramic counterparts. The materials studied were Lava Ultimate Restorative (LVU; 3M ESPE), Enamic (ENA; Vita Zahnfabrik), Cerasmart (CES; GC Dental Products), IPS Empress CAD (EMP; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), Vitablocs Mark II (VM2; Vita Zahnfabrik), and Paradigm MZ100 Block (MZ1; 3M ESPE). Polished 4×1×13.5 mm bars (n=25) were prepared from standard-sized milling blocks of each tested material. The bars were subjected to a 3-point flexural test on a 10-mm span with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. In addition, 42 conventional monolithic crowns (7 per material) were milled. Margin edge quality was observed by means of macrophotography and optical microscopy, providing a qualitative visual assessment and a measurement of existing roughness. The results were analyzed by ANOVA followed by the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The mean flexural strength of the tested materials ranged from 105 ±9 MPa (VM2) to 219 ±20 MPa (CES). The mean flexural modulus ranged from 8 ±0.25 GPa (CES) to 32 ±1.9 GPa (EMP). The mean modulus of resilience ranged from 0.21 ±0.02 MPa (VM2) to 3.07 ±0.45 MPa (CES). The qualitative assessment of margin edge roughness revealed visible differences among the tested materials, with mean roughness measurements ranging from 60 ±16 μm (CES) to 190 ±15 μm (EMP). The material factor had a significant effect on the mean flexural strength (Pmaterials tested in this study exhibited

  13. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Zirconium Crowns.

    Mehmeti, Blerim; Azizi, Bleron; Kelmendi, Jeta; Iljazi-Shahiqi, Donika; Alar, Željko; Anić-Milošević, Sandra

    2017-06-01

    An increasing demand for esthetic restorations has resulted in an increased use of all-ceramic restorations, such as zirconium. However, one of the challenges the orthodontist must be willing to face is how to increase bond strength between the brackets and various ceramic restorations.Bond strength can beaffected bybracket type, by the material that bracketsaremade of, and their base surface design or retention mode. ​: A im: of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of the shear bond strength (SBS) of metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets bonded to all-zirconium ceramic surfaces used for prosthetic restorations, and also to evaluate the fracture mode of these two types of orthodontic brackets. Twenty samples/semi-crowns of all-zirconium ceramic, on which orthodontic brackets were bonded, 10 metallic and 10 ceramic polycrystalline brackets, were prepared for this research. SBS has been testedby Universal Testing Machine, with a load applied using a knife edged rod moving at a fixed rate of 1 mm/min, until failure occurred. The force required to debond the brackets was recorded in Newton, then SBS was calculated to MPa. In addition, the samples were analyzed using a digital camera magnifier to determine Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Statistical data were processed using t-test, and the level of significance was set at α = 0.05. Higher shear bond strength values were observed in metallic brackets bonded to zirconium crowns compared tothoseof ceramic brackets, with a significant difference. During the test, two of the ceramic brackets were partially or totally damaged. Metallic brackets, compared to ceramic polycrystalline brackets, seemed tocreate stronger adhesion with all-zirconium surfaces due to their better retention mode. Also, ceramic brackets showed higher fragility during debonding.

  14. Models for mean bonding length, melting point and lattice thermal expansion of nanoparticle materials

    Omar, M.S., E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin-Erbil, Arbil, Kurdistan (Iraq)

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Three models are derived to explain the nanoparticles size dependence of mean bonding length, melting temperature and lattice thermal expansion applied on Sn, Si and Au. The following figures are shown as an example for Sn nanoparticles indicates hilly applicable models for nanoparticles radius larger than 3 nm. Highlights: ► A model for a size dependent mean bonding length is derived. ► The size dependent melting point of nanoparticles is modified. ► The bulk model for lattice thermal expansion is successfully used on nanoparticles. -- Abstract: A model, based on the ratio number of surface atoms to that of its internal, is derived to calculate the size dependence of lattice volume of nanoscaled materials. The model is applied to Si, Sn and Au nanoparticles. For Si, that the lattice volume is increases from 20 Å{sup 3} for bulk to 57 Å{sup 3} for a 2 nm size nanocrystals. A model, for calculating melting point of nanoscaled materials, is modified by considering the effect of lattice volume. A good approach of calculating size-dependent melting point begins from the bulk state down to about 2 nm diameter nanoparticle. Both values of lattice volume and melting point obtained for nanosized materials are used to calculate lattice thermal expansion by using a formula applicable for tetrahedral semiconductors. Results for Si, change from 3.7 × 10{sup −6} K{sup −1} for a bulk crystal down to a minimum value of 0.1 × 10{sup −6} K{sup −1} for a 6 nm diameter nanoparticle.

  15. Models for mean bonding length, melting point and lattice thermal expansion of nanoparticle materials

    Omar, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Three models are derived to explain the nanoparticles size dependence of mean bonding length, melting temperature and lattice thermal expansion applied on Sn, Si and Au. The following figures are shown as an example for Sn nanoparticles indicates hilly applicable models for nanoparticles radius larger than 3 nm. Highlights: ► A model for a size dependent mean bonding length is derived. ► The size dependent melting point of nanoparticles is modified. ► The bulk model for lattice thermal expansion is successfully used on nanoparticles. -- Abstract: A model, based on the ratio number of surface atoms to that of its internal, is derived to calculate the size dependence of lattice volume of nanoscaled materials. The model is applied to Si, Sn and Au nanoparticles. For Si, that the lattice volume is increases from 20 Å 3 for bulk to 57 Å 3 for a 2 nm size nanocrystals. A model, for calculating melting point of nanoscaled materials, is modified by considering the effect of lattice volume. A good approach of calculating size-dependent melting point begins from the bulk state down to about 2 nm diameter nanoparticle. Both values of lattice volume and melting point obtained for nanosized materials are used to calculate lattice thermal expansion by using a formula applicable for tetrahedral semiconductors. Results for Si, change from 3.7 × 10 −6 K −1 for a bulk crystal down to a minimum value of 0.1 × 10 −6 K −1 for a 6 nm diameter nanoparticle.

  16. Evaluation of the effect of food and beverages on enamel and restorative materials by SEM and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Sari, Mustafa Erhan; Erturk, Aliye Gediz; Koyuturk, Alp Erdin; Bekdemir, Yunus

    2014-01-01

    To examine different types of restorative materials used in children as well as primary and permanent teeth enamel when affected by erosive foods. Buttermilk, fruit yoghurt, Coca-cola, fruit juice, Filtek Z-250, Dyract Extra, Fuji II LC, and Fuji IX and tooth enamel were used. Measurements were performed on 1-day, 1-week, 1-month, 3-month, 6-month time periods by using ATR-FTIR technique and surface of the specimens were examined with SEM. Permanent tooth showed the least change among human tooth samples when compared to restorative materials. Among filler materials, the most change was observed in Fuji IX. In terms of beverages the most changes on absorption peaks obtained from spectra were seen on the samples held in Coca-Cola and orange-juice. The exposure of human enamel and restorative materials to acidic drinks may accelerate the degradation process and so reduce the life time of filler materials at equivalent integral exposure times longer than three months. Clinical Relevance Erosive foods and drinks having acidic potential destroy not only tooth enamel but also restorative materials. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Measurement of color in different construction materials. The restoration in sandstone buildings

    García Pascua, N.

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of construction materials and their subsequent repair purposes include a search of knowledge and preservation of their original appearance. For this reason, the main aim of this study is to determine a color range which does not change with the possible actions on a building, both when restoration works which imply the use and repair of "ancient" materials are carried out, and when construction is carried out with new materials. It is necessary to obtain the quantification of this property in order to check its variation over the passage of time. Each construction material must be taken into account as an isolated problem, since the color is different in each case.

    El empleo de materiales de construcción y la aplicación sobre ellos de productos de reparación requiere un detallado estudio sobre su forma de actuación y la importancia de la conservación del aspecto original de los mismos. Por este motivo, el objetivo principal de este estudio es el determinar un intervalo de color que se conserve a pesar de todas las posibles intervenciones que se acometan en el edificio, tanto cuando se realizan trabajos de restauración, que implican el uso y reparación de materiales "viejos", o bien cuando se llevan a cabo trabajos de construcción con materiales nuevos. Es necesario cuantificar dicha propiedad para poder controlar el paso del tiempo. Cada material de construcción debe ser considerado como un problema aislado, ya que el color es distinto en cada caso.

  18. Comparison Of Internal Adaptation Of Fixed Restorations Fabricated From Four Different Materials By A Three Axis Mill

    2016-06-26

    COMP ARIS ON OF INTERNAL ADAPTATION OF FIXED RESTO RA TIO NS FABRICATED FROM FOUR DIFFERENT MATERIALS BY A THREE-AXIS MILL by Bryan Paul...MATERIALS BY A THREE-AXIS MILL is appropriately acknowledged and, beyond brief excerpts, is with the permission of the copyright owner. ~r2L~ Bryan Paul...RESTORATIONS FABRICATED FROM FOUR DIFFERENT MATERIALS BY A THREE-AXIS MILL LCDR Bryan Paul Rasmussen, DC USN Prosthodontics Dept., 2016 Directed by

  19. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO 2 (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO 2+x . Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  20. Indirect Versus Direct Heating of Sheet Materials: Superplastic Forming and Diffusion Bonding Using Lasers

    Jocelyn, Alan; Kar, Aravinda; Fanourakis, Alexander; Flower, Terence; Ackerman, Mike; Keevil, Allen; Way, Jerome

    2010-06-01

    Many from within manufacturing industry consider superplastic forming (SPF) to be ‘high tech’, but it is often criticized as too complicated, expensive, slow and, in general, an unstable process when compared to other methods of manipulating sheet materials. Perhaps, the fundamental cause of this negative perception of SPF, and also of diffusion bonding (DB), is the fact that the current process of SPF/DB relies on indirect sources of heating to produce the conditions necessary for the material to be formed. Thus, heat is usually derived from the electrically heated platens of hydraulic presses, to a lesser extent from within furnaces and, sometimes, from heaters imbedded in ceramic moulds. Recent evaluations of these isothermal methods suggest they are slow, thermally inefficient and inappropriate for the process. In contrast, direct heating of only the material to be formed by modern, electrically efficient, lasers could transform SPF/DB into the first choice of designers in aerospace, automotive, marine, medical, architecture and leisure industries. Furthermore, ‘variable temperature’ direct heating which, in theory, is possible with a laser beam(s) may provide a means to control material thickness distribution, a goal of enormous importance as fuel efficient, lightweight structures for transportation systems are universally sought. This paper compares, and contrasts, the two systems and suggests how a change to laser heating might be achieved.

  1. Mechanical strength model for plastic bonded granular materials at high strain rates and large strains

    Browning, R.V.; Scammon, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Modeling impact events on systems containing plastic bonded explosive materials requires accurate models for stress evolution at high strain rates out to large strains. For example, in the Steven test geometry reactions occur after strains of 0.5 or more are reached for PBX-9501. The morphology of this class of materials and properties of the constituents are briefly described. We then review the viscoelastic behavior observed at small strains for this class of material, and evaluate large strain models used for granular materials such as cap models. Dilatation under shearing deformations of the PBX is experimentally observed and is one of the key features modeled in cap style plasticity theories, together with bulk plastic flow at high pressures. We propose a model that combines viscoelastic behavior at small strains but adds intergranular stresses at larger strains. A procedure using numerical simulations and comparisons with results from flyer plate tests and low rate uniaxial stress tests is used to develop a rough set of constants for PBX-9501. Comparisons with the high rate flyer plate tests demonstrate that the observed characteristic behavior is captured by this viscoelastic based model. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  2. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  3. Material and orientation dependent activity for heterogeneously catalyzed carbon-bromine bond homolysis

    Walch, Hermann; Gutzler, Rico; Sirtl, Thomas; Eder, Georg; Lackinger, Markus [LMU Munich, Section Crystallography (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Adsorption of the organic molecule 1,3,5-tris(4-bromophenyl)benzene on different metallic substrates, namely Cu(111), Ag(111) and Ag(110) has been studied by variable temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). Depending on substrate temperature, material and orientation, we observe a surface-catalyzed dehalogenation reaction. Deposition onto the catalytically active substrates Cu(111) and Ag(110) held at room temperature leads to cleavage of the carbon-bromine bonds and subsequent formation of protopolymers, i.e radical metal coordination complexes. However upon deposition on Ag(111) no such reaction has been observed. Instead, various self-assembled ordered structures based on intact molecules could be identified. Also sublimation onto either substrate held at 80 K did not result in any dehalogenation, thereby exemplifying that the dehalogenation reaction is thermally activated. We explain the differences in catalytic activity by charge transfer into unoccupied molecular orbitals and subsequent destabilization of the C-Br bond, whereby enhanced molecule-substrate interaction leads to an increasing magnitude of charge transfer. The interaction strength follows the general reactivity order Cu>Ag>Au for (111) faces and is generally enhanced on higher corrugated surfaces as the (110) facet in case of fcc substrates.

  4. Interim restorations.

    Gratton, David G; Aquilino, Steven A

    2004-04-01

    Interim restorations are a critical component of fixed prosthodontic treatment, biologically and biomechanically. Interim restoration serves an important diagnostic role as a functional and esthetic try-in and as a blueprint for the design of the definitive prosthesis. When selecting materials for any interim restoration, clinicians must consider physical properties, handling properties, patient acceptance, and material cost. Although no single material meets all the requirements and material classification alone of a given product is not a predictor of clinical performance, bis-acryl materials are typically best suited to single-unit restorations, and poly(methylmethacrylate) interim materials are generally ideal for multi-unit, complex, long-term, interim fixed prostheses. As with most dental procedures, the technique used for fabrication has a greater effect on the final result than the specific material chosen.

  5. Review on fluoride-releasing restorative materials--fluoride release and uptake characteristics, antibacterial activity and influence on caries formation.

    Wiegand, Annette; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Attin, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the fluoride release and recharge capabilities, and antibacterial properties, of fluoride-releasing dental restoratives, and discuss the current status concerning the prevention or inhibition of caries development and progression. Information from original scientific full papers or reviews listed in PubMed (search term: fluoride release AND (restorative OR glass-ionomer OR compomer OR polyacid-modified composite resin OR composite OR amalgam)), published from 1980 to 2004, was included in the review. Papers dealing with endodontic or orthodontic topics were not taken into consideration. Clinical studies concerning secondary caries development were only included when performed in split-mouth design with an observation period of at least three years. Fluoride-containing dental materials show clear differences in the fluoride release and uptake characteristics. Short- and long-term fluoride releases from restoratives are related to their matrices, setting mechanisms and fluoride content and depend on several environmental conditions. Fluoride-releasing materials may act as a fluoride reservoir and may increase the fluoride level in saliva, plaque and dental hard tissues. However, clinical studies exhibited conflicting data as to whether or not these materials significantly prevent or inhibit secondary caries and affect the growth of caries-associated bacteria compared to non-fluoridated restoratives. Fluoride release and uptake characteristics depend on the matrices, fillers and fluoride content as well as on the setting mechanisms and environmental conditions of the restoratives. Fluoride-releasing materials, predominantly glass-ionomers and compomers, did show cariostatic properties and may affect bacterial metabolism under simulated cariogenic conditions in vitro. However, it is not proven by prospective clinical studies whether the incidence of secondary caries can be significantly reduced by the fluoride release of

  6. The effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength of a gingiva-colored indirect composite veneering material to three implant framework materials.

    Koizuka, Mai; Komine, Futoshi; Blatz, Markus B; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Taguchi, Kohei; Matsumura, Hideo

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate and compare the shear-bond strength of a gingiva-colored indirect composite material to three different implant framework materials (zirconia ceramics, gold alloy, and titanium), and to investigate the effect of surface pretreatment by air-particle abrasion and four priming agents. A gingiva-colored indirect composite (Ceramage) was bonded to three framework materials (n = 80): commercially pure titanium (CP- Ti ), ADA (American Dental Association)-type 4 casting gold alloy (Type IV), and zirconia ceramics (Zirconia) with or without airborne-particle abrasion. Before bonding, the surface of the specimens was treated using no (control) or one of four priming agents: Alloy Primer (ALP), Estenia Opaque Primer (EOP), Metal Link Primer (MLP), and V-Primer (VPR). Shear-bond strength was determined after 24-h wet storage. Data were analyzed using Steel-Dwass for multiple comparisons, and Mann-Whitney U-test (P = 0.05). For both CP- Ti and Zirconia substrates, three groups, ALP, EOP, and MLP, showed significantly higher bond strengths (P composite material to commercially pure titanium and zirconia frameworks. Combined use of a thione monomer with a phosphoric monomer enhances the bond strengths to airborne-particle abraded type IV gold alloy. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Adhesive dental materials

    Unlu, N.

    2005-01-01

    Two main classes of material are involved, the glass-ionomer cements and the composite resins. This investigation describes the way they are bonded to the tooth and highlights their differences. Glass ionomers develop a zone of interaction with the tooth as they age which ultimately gives an extremely strong bond, and results in excellent retention rates. By contrast, bonding of composite resins is more complicated and possibly less effective, though these materials have better wear resistance and better aesthetics than glass ionomers. Assessment of bond durability is difficult. This is because a dental restorative can fail by a number of mechanisms apart from de bonding: for example, through wear or fracture

  8. Total dose radiation effects of pressure sensors fabricated on uni-bond-SOI materials

    Zhu Shiyang; Huang Yiping; Wang Jin; Li Anzhen; Shen Shaoqun; Bao Minhang

    2001-01-01

    Piezoresistive pressure sensors with a twin-island structure were successfully fabricated using high quality Uni-bond-SOI (On Insulator) materials. Since the piezoresistors were structured by the single crystalline silicon overlayer of the SOI wafer and were totally isolated by the buried SiO 2 , the sensors are radiation-hard. The sensitivity and the linearity of the pressure sensors keep their original values after being irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays up to 2.3 x 10 4 Gy(H 2 O). However, the offset voltage of the sensor has a slight drift, increasing with the radiation dose. The absolute value of the offset voltage deviation depends on the pressure sensor itself. For comparison, corresponding polysilicon pressure sensors were fabricated using the similar process and irradiated at the same condition

  9. Non-destructive and micro-invasive testing techniques for characterizing materials, structures and restoration problems in mural paintings

    Tortora, Mariagrazia; Sfarra, Stefano; Chiarini, Marco; Daniele, Valeria; Taglieri, Giuliana; Cerichelli, Giorgio

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, chemical and structural studies of medieval wall paintings in Ocre (L'Aquila, Italy) are presented. During the latest restoration campaign, non-destructive (Near-Infrared Reflectography and Infrared Thermography) and micro-invasive (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, μ-Raman, Scanning Electron Microscopy with X-ray Microanalysis, X-Ray Diffraction, X-Ray Fluorescence, Optical Microscopy, Mass Spectrometry, Thermogravimetry) analyses were performed in order to determine the detachments of wall surfaces and the characterization of original and restoration materials. Data integration allowed to reconstruct the conservative history, the execution techniques and the conservation problems of the artefact, as well as to assess the effectiveness of restoration activities adopted. The combined use of physical and micro-chemical techniques proved to be effective for an in-depth study of materials stratification of paintings.

  10. Real time in-situ sensing of damage evolution in nanocomposite bonded surrogate energetic materials

    Sengezer, Engin C.; Seidel, Gary D.

    2016-04-01

    The current work aims to explore the potential for in-situ structural health monitoring in polymer bonded energetic materials through the introduction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into the binder phase as a means to establish a significant piezoresistive response through the resulting nanocomposite binder. The experimental effort herein is focused towards electro-mechanical characterization of surrogate materials in place of actual energetic (explosive) materials in order to provide proof of concept for the strain and damage sensing. The electrical conductivity and the piezoresistive behavior of samples containing randomly oriented MWCNTs introduced into the epoxy (EPON 862) binder of 70 wt% ammonium perchlorate-epoxy hybrid composites are quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated. Brittle failure going through linear elastic behavior, formation of microcracks leading to reduction in composite load carrying capacity and finally macrocracks resulting in eventual failure are observed in the mechanical response of MWNT-ammonium perchlorateepoxy hybrid composites. Incorporating MWNTs into local polymer binder improves the effective stiffness about 40% compared to neat ammonium perchlorate-polymer samples. The real time in-situ relative change in resistance for MWNT hybrid composites was detected with the applied strains through piezoresistive response.

  11. Thermodynamic parameters of bonds in glassy materials from viscosity-temperature relationships

    Ojovan, Michael I; Travis, Karl P; Hand, Russell J

    2007-01-01

    Doremus's model of viscosity assumes that viscous flow in amorphous materials is mediated by broken bonds (configurons). The resulting equation contains four coefficients, which are directly related to the entropies and enthalpies of formation and motion of the configurons. Thus by fitting this viscosity equation to experimental viscosity data these enthalpy and entropy terms can be obtained. The non-linear nature of the equation obtained means that the fitting process is non-trivial. A genetic algorithm based approach has been developed to fit the equation to experimental viscosity data for a number of glassy materials, including SiO 2 , GeO 2 , B 2 O 3 , anorthite, diopside, xNa 2 O-(1-x)SiO 2 , xPbO-(1-x)SiO 2 , soda-lime-silica glasses, salol, and α-phenyl-o-cresol. Excellent fits of the equation to the viscosity data were obtained over the entire temperature range. The fitting parameters were used to quantitatively determine the enthalpies and entropies of formation and motion of configurons in the analysed systems and the activation energies for flow at high and low temperatures as well as fragility ratios using the Doremus criterion for fragility. A direct anti-correlation between fragility ratio and configuron percolation threshold, which determines the glass transition temperature in the analysed materials, was found

  12. Two-component bond for coating materials coming into contact with radioactivity

    Svoboda, L.; Fajfr, K.

    1989-01-01

    The two-component bonding agent consists of an epoxy resin of the diane-bis-glycidyl ether type and an amine hardener containing benzyl alcohol and bis-2-ethylhexyl phthalate. The claimed bond features high radiation stability and very good decontaminability. Thanks to low viscosity of the bond, pigmented reactor-plastics can be prepared. The procedure is described of applying the bond onto a concrete surface. (E.S.)

  13. Engineered disulfide bonds restore chaperone-like function of DJ-1 mutants linked to familial Parkinson's disease.

    Logan, Todd; Clark, Lindsay; Ray, Soumya S

    2010-07-13

    Loss-of-function mutations such as L166P, A104T, and M26I in the DJ-1 gene (PARK7) have been linked to autosomal-recessive early onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Cellular and structural studies of the familial mutants suggest that these mutations may destabilize the dimeric structure. To look for common dynamical signatures among the DJ-1 mutants, short MD simulations of up to 1000 ps were conducted to identify the weakest region of the protein (residues 38-70). In an attempt to stabilize the protein, we mutated residue Val 51 to cysteine (V51C) to make a symmetry-related disulfide bridge with the preexisting Cys 53 on the opposite subunit. We found that the introduction of this disulfide linkage stabilized the mutants A104T and M26I against thermal denaturation, improved their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), and restored a chaperone-like function of blocking alpha-synuclein aggregation. The L166P mutant was far too unstable to be rescued by introduction of the V51C mutation. The results presented here point to the possible development of pharmacological chaperones, which may eventually lead to PD therapeutics.

  14. Developments of a bonding technique for optical materials by a surface activation method

    Sugiyama, Akira; Oda, Tomohiro; Abe, Tomoyuki; Kusunoki, Isao

    2005-01-01

    We started developing the laser crystal bounding by the surface activation method which can splice crystals together without using hydrogen bonding. For the surface activation, neutral argon beams were used for irradiation of specimens. In the bonding trials with sapphire crystals, we recognized possibility of the bonding method for optical elements. (author)

  15. Drying time of tray adhesive for adequate tensile bond strength between polyvinylsiloxane impression and tray resin material.

    Yi, Myong-Hee; Shim, Joon-Sung; Lee, Keun-Woo; Chung, Moon-Kyu

    2009-07-01

    Use of custom tray and tray adhesive is clinically recommended for elastomeric impression material. However there is not clear mention of drying time of tray adhesive in achieving appropriate bonding strength of tray material and impression material. This study is to investigate an appropriate drying time of tray adhesives by evaluating tensile bonding strength between two types of polyvinylsiloxane impression materials and resin tray, according to various drying time intervals of tray adhesives, and with different manufacturing company combination of impression material and tray adhesive. Adhesives used in this study were Silfix (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del, USA) and VPS Tray Adhesive (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) and impression materials were Aquasil Ultra (monophase regular set, Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del, USA) and Imprint II Garant (regular body, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany). They were used combinations from the same manufacture and exchanged combinations of the two. The drying time was designed to air dry, 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, 20 minutes, and 25 minutes. Total 240 of test specimens were prepared by auto-polymerizing tray material (Instant Tray Mix, Lang, Wheeling, Il, USA) with 10 specimens in each group. The specimens were placed in the Universal Testing machine (Instron, model 3366, Instron Corp, University avenue, Nowood, MA, USA) to perform the tensile test (cross head speed 5 mm/min). The statistically efficient drying time was evaluated through ANOVA and Scheffe test. All the tests were performed at 95% confidence level. The results revealed that at least 10 minutes is needed for Silfix-Aquasil, and 15 minutes for VPS Tray Adhesive-Imprint II, to attain an appropriate tensile bonding strength. VPS Tray Adhesive-Imprint II had a superior tensile bonding strength when compared to Silfix-Aquasil over 15 minutes. Silfix-Aquasil had a superior bonding strength to VPS Tray Adhesive-Aquasil, and VPS Tray Adhesive-Imprint II had a superior tensile

  16. Effects of hydrogen peroxide bleaching strip gels on dental restorative materials in vitro: surface microhardness and surface morphology.

    Duschner, Heinz; Götz, Hermann; White, Donald J; Kozak, Kathleen M; Zoladz, James R

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effects of peroxide tooth bleaching, including Crest Whitestrips hydrogen peroxide gel treatments, on the surface hardness and morphology of common dental restorative treatments. American Dental Association (ADA) recommended dental restorative materials, including amalgam, dental gold, porcelain, glass ionomer, and composites, were prepared according to manufacturers' instructions. A cycling treatment methodology was employed which alternated ex vivo human salivary exposures with bleaching treatments under conditions of controlled temperature and durations of treatment. Bleaching treatments included commercial Crest Whitestrips bleaching gels, which utilize hydrogen peroxide as the in situ bleaching source, and several commercial carbamide peroxide bleaching gels. Control treatments included placebo gels and an untreated group. Crest Whitestrips bleaching included treatment exposures simulating recommended clinical exposures (14 hours), along with excess bleaching simulating exposure to five times suggested Crest Whitestrips use. At the conclusion of treatments, surface microhardness measures and surface morphological assessments with standard and variable pressure (VP-) SEMs were conducted to assess the effects of bleaching exposure on the surface morphology and structural integrity of the restoratives. Surface microhardness and SEM measures revealed no significant deleterious effects on the restoration surfaces from Whitestrips gels. These results confirm that tooth bleaching from the selected commercial hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide bleaching systems does not produce changes in surface morphology or microhardness of common dental restorative materials. These results support the clinical safety of the selected commercial bleaching systems to the oral environment, matching results obtained from long-term use of these ingredients applied in dental offices and available in commercial formulations.

  17. Ultrashort pulse laser processing of hard tissue, dental restoration materials, and biocompatibles

    Yousif, A.; Strassl, M.; Beer, F.; Verhagen, L.; Wittschier, M.; Wintner, E.

    2007-07-01

    During the last few years, ultra-short laser pulses have proven their potential for application in medical tissue treatment in many ways. In hard tissue ablation, their aptitude for material ablation with negligible collateral damage provides many advantages. Especially teeth representing an anatomically and physiologically very special region with less blood circulation and lower healing rates than other tissues require most careful treatment. Hence, overheating of the pulp and induction of microcracks are some of the most problematic issues in dental preparation. Up till now it was shown by many authors that the application of picosecond or femtosecond pulses allows to perform ablation with very low damaging potential also fitting to the physiological requirements indicated. Beside the short interaction time with the irradiated matter, scanning of the ultra-short pulse trains turned out to be crucial for ablating cavities of the required quality. One main reason for this can be seen in the fact that during scanning the time period between two subsequent pulses incident on the same spot is so much extended that no heat accumulation effects occur and each pulse can be treated as a first one with respect to its local impact. Extension of this advantageous technique to biocompatible materials, i.e. in this case dental restoration materials and titanium plasma-sprayed implants, is just a matter of consequence. Recently published results on composites fit well with earlier data on dental hard tissue. In case of plaque which has to be removed from implants, it turns out that removal of at least the calcified version is harder than tissue removal. Therefore, besides ultra-short lasers, also Diode and Neodymium lasers, in cw and pulsed modes, have been studied with respect to plaque removal and sterilization. The temperature increase during laser exposure has been experimentally evaluated in parallel.

  18. Surface Characterization of Some Novel Bonded Phase Packing Materials for HPLC Columns Using MAS-NMR Spectroscopy

    Jude Abia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Information on the surface properties of three novel chemically bonded phase packing materials for High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC were obtained using spectra obtained by solid state cross-polarization (CP magic-angle spinning (MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopic experiments for the 29Si, and 13C nuclei. These packing materials were: Cogent bidentate C18 bonded to type-C silica, hybrid packing materials XTerra MS C18, and XBridge Prep. C18. The spectra obtained using cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS on the Cogent bidentate C18 bonded to type-C silica show the surface to be densely populated with hydride groups (Si-H, with a relative surface coverage exceeding 80%. The hybrid packing materials XTerra and XBridge gave spectra that reveal the silicon atoms to be bonded to organic moieties embedded in the molecular structure of these materials with over 90% of the alkyl silicon atoms found within the completely condensed silicon environments. The hydrolytic stability of these materials were investigated in acidic aqueous solutions at pHs of 7.0 and 3.0, and it was found that while the samples of XTerra and XBridge were not affected by hydrolysis at this pH range, the sample of Cogent lost a significant proportion of its Si-H groups after five days of treatment in acidic aqueous solution.

  19. The Effect of Food-Simulating Agents on the Bond Strength of Hard Chairside Reline Materials to Denture Base Resin.

    Fatemi, Farzaneh Sadat; Vojdani, Mahroo; Khaledi, Amir Ali Reza

    2018-06-08

    To investigate the influence of food-simulating agents on the shear bond strength between direct hard liners and denture base acrylic resin. In addition, mode of failure was evaluated. One hundred fifty cylindrical columns of denture base resin were fabricated and bonded to three types of hard reline materials (Hard GC Reline, Tokuyama Rebase II Fast, TDV Cold Liner Rebase). Specimens of each reline material were divided into five groups (n = 10) to undergo 12-day immersion in distilled water, 0.02 N citric acid aqueous solution, heptane, and 40% ethanol/water solution at 37°C. The control group was not immersed in any solution. The shear bond strength test was performed, and the failure mode was determined. Statistics were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and chi-square test (α = 0.05). Significant interaction was found between the hard liners and food simulating agents (p < 0.001). The shear bond strength of Tokuyama in 40% ethanol and TDV in heptane decreased significantly (p = 0.001, p < 0.001 respectively); however, none of the solutions could significantly affect the shear bond strength of Hard GC Reline (p = 0.208). The mixed failure mode occurred more frequently in Hard GC Reline compared with the other liners (p < 0.001) and was predominant in specimens with higher bond strength values (p = 0.012). Food simulating agents did not adversely affect the shear bond strength of Hard GC Reline; however, ethanol and heptane decreased the bond strength of Tokuyama and TDV, respectively. These findings may provide support to dentists to recommend restricted consumption of some foods and beverages for patients who have to use dentures relined with certain hard liners. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  20. Coronal leakage of provisional restorative materials used in endodontics with and without intracanal medication after exposure to human saliva

    P Udayakumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the coronal leakage of various provisional restorations with and without intracanal medication over time after being exposed to human saliva. Materials and Methods: This study investigated Coltosol F, Cavit, Ketac Molar, and IRM as provisional restorative material. Calcium hydroxide and chlorhexidine were used as an intracanal medicament. Ninety-eight single rooted teeth were randomly selected and then mounted in an apparatus that isolated the crown portion of the tooth. Provisional restorative materials were placed in the access cavity following manufacturer guidelines after placement of intracanal medicament. Human saliva and brain heart infusion broth in 3:1 ratio were applied to the samples, incubated at 37°C, and results were tabulated over the course of 4 weeks by the appearance of turbidity in the lower part of the apparatus. Statistical Analysis: The data were statistically analyzed using proportional Z-test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Coltosol F and Cavit could significantly prevent the bacterial leakage up to a period of 7 days with a P value of 0.01 and 0.005, respectively. Bacterial recontamination was relatively less in the samples treated with intracanal medicaments up to 14 days. After 14 days, however, all materials leaked in over half of the samples. Conclusion: No provisional restorative material can be considered superior in providing a reliable seal after 14 days. Inter-appointments schedule should not extend beyond 2 weeks and after endodontic therapy final restoration should be completed within 1 week.

  1. Longevity of posterior composite restorations: not only a matter of materials

    Demarco, F.F.; Correa, M.B.; Cenci, M.S.; Moraes, R.R.; Opdam, N.J.

    2012-01-01

    Resin composites have become the first choice for direct posterior restorations and are increasingly popular among clinicians and patients. Meanwhile, a number of clinical reports in the literature have discussed the durability of these restorations over long periods. In this review, we have

  2. Reliability, failure probability, and strength of resin-based materials for CAD/CAM restorations

    Kiatlin Lim

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: This study investigated the Weibull parameters and 5% fracture probability of direct, indirect composites, and CAD/CAM composites. Material and Methods: Discshaped (12 mm diameter x 1 mm thick specimens were prepared for a direct composite [Z100 (ZO, 3M-ESPE], an indirect laboratory composite [Ceramage (CM, Shofu], and two CAD/CAM composites [Lava Ultimate (LU, 3M ESPE; Vita Enamic (VE, Vita Zahnfabrik] restorations (n=30 for each group. The specimens were polished, stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C. Weibull parameters (m= modulus of Weibull, σ0= characteristic strength and flexural strength for 5% fracture probability (σ5% were determined using a piston-on-three-balls device at 1 MPa/s in distilled water. Statistical analysis for biaxial flexural strength analysis were performed either by both one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc (α=0.05 or by Pearson's correlation test. Results: Ranking of m was: VE (19.5, LU (14.5, CM (11.7, and ZO (9.6. Ranking of σ0 (MPa was: LU (218.1, ZO (210.4, CM (209.0, and VE (126.5. σ5% (MPa was 177.9 for LU, 163.2 for CM, 154.7 for Z0, and 108.7 for VE. There was no significant difference in the m for ZO, CM, and LU. VE presented the highest m value and significantly higher than ZO. For σ0 and σ5%, ZO, CM, and LU were similar but higher than VE. Conclusion: The strength characteristics of CAD/ CAM composites vary according to their composition and microstructure. VE presented the lowest strength and highest Weibull modulus among the materials.

  3. Early biofilm formation and the effects of antimicrobial agents on orthodontic bonding materials in a parallel plate flow chamber

    Chin, Yeen; Busscher, HJ; Evans, R; Noar, J; Pratten, J

    Decalcification is a commonly recognized complication of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. A technology, based on a parallel plate flow chamber, was developed to investigate early biofilm formation of a strain of Streptococcus sanguis on the surface of four orthodontic bonding materials:

  4. Corrosion Behavior and Strength of Dissimilar Bonding Material between Ti and Mg Alloys Fabricated by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Pripanapong, Patchara; Kariya, Shota; Luangvaranunt, Tachai; Umeda, Junko; Tsutsumi, Seiichiro; Takahashi, Makoto; Kondoh, Katsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Ti and solution treated Mg alloys such as AZ31B (ST), AZ61 (ST), AZ80 (ST) and AZ91 (ST) were successfully bonded at 475 °C by spark plasma sintering, which is a promising new method in welding field. The formation of Ti3Al intermetallic compound was found to be an important factor in controlling the bonding strength and galvanic corrosion resistance of dissimilar materials. The maximum bonding strength and bonding efficiency at 193 MPa and 96% were obtained from Ti/AZ91 (ST), in which a thick and uniform nano-level Ti3Al layer was observed. This sample also shows the highest galvanic corrosion resistance with a measured galvanic width and depth of 281 and 19 µm, respectively. The corrosion resistance of the matrix on Mg alloy side was controlled by its Al content. AZ91 (ST) exhibited the highest corrosion resistance considered from its corrode surface after corrosion test in Kroll’s etchant. The effect of Al content in Mg alloy on bonding strength and corrosion behavior of Ti/Mg alloy (ST) dissimilar materials is discussed in this work. PMID:28773788

  5. Effect of ultrasonic agitation on push-out bond strength and adaptation of root-end filling materials.

    Alcalde, Murilo Priori; Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci; Marciano, Marina Angélica; Duque, Jussaro Alves; Fernandes, Samuel Lucas; Rosseto, Mariana Bailo; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro

    2018-05-01

    This study evaluated the effect of ultrasonic agitation of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium silicate-based cement (CSC), and Sealer 26 (S26) on adaptation at the cement/dentin interface and push-out bond strength. Sixty maxillary canines were divided into 6 groups ( n = 10): MTA, S26, and CSC, with or without ultrasonic activation (US). After obturation, the apical portions of the teeth were sectioned, and retrograde cavities were prepared and filled with cement by hand condensation. In the US groups, the cement was activated for 60 seconds: 30 seconds in the mesio-distal direction and 30 seconds in the buccal-lingual direction, using a mini Irrisonic insert coupled with the ultrasound transducer. After the materials set, 1.5-mm thick sections were obtained from the apexes. The presence of gaps and the bond between cement and dentin were analyzed using low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy. Push-out bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Ultrasonic agitation increased the interfacial adaptation of the cements. The S26 US group showed a higher adaptation value than MTA ( p < 0.05). US improved the push-out bond strength for all the cements ( p < 0.05). The US of retrograde filling cements enhanced the bond to the dentin wall of the root-end filling materials tested.

  6. Corrosion Behavior and Strength of Dissimilar Bonding Material between Ti and Mg Alloys Fabricated by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Patchara Pripanapong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ti and solution treated Mg alloys such as AZ31B (ST, AZ61 (ST, AZ80 (ST and AZ91 (ST were successfully bonded at 475 °C by spark plasma sintering, which is a promising new method in welding field. The formation of Ti3Al intermetallic compound was found to be an important factor in controlling the bonding strength and galvanic corrosion resistance of dissimilar materials. The maximum bonding strength and bonding efficiency at 193 MPa and 96% were obtained from Ti/AZ91 (ST, in which a thick and uniform nano-level Ti3Al layer was observed. This sample also shows the highest galvanic corrosion resistance with a measured galvanic width and depth of 281 and 19 µm, respectively. The corrosion resistance of the matrix on Mg alloy side was controlled by its Al content. AZ91 (ST exhibited the highest corrosion resistance considered from its corrode surface after corrosion test in Kroll’s etchant. The effect of Al content in Mg alloy on bonding strength and corrosion behavior of Ti/Mg alloy (ST dissimilar materials is discussed in this work.

  7. Effect of fluoride varnishes on color stability of esthetic restorative materials.

    Autio-Gold, Jaana T; Barrett, Allyson A

    2004-01-01

    (deltaE*=1.19 and deltaL*=-1.03), indicating the effect of the color change was due to absorption. After fluoride varnish applications, Duraphat varnish produced significant changes in all tested materials and shades, resulting in color changes with deltaE greater than (>) 1 but less than (dental literature as clinically acceptable. Fluoride varnishes can be used without adversely affecting the color of restorative materials.

  8. Non-destructive and micro-invasive testing techniques for characterizing materials, structures and restoration problems in mural paintings

    Tortora, Mariagrazia; Sfarra, Stefano; Chiarini, Marco; Daniele, Valeria; Taglieri, Giuliana; Cerichelli, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Infrared thermography allowed to identify structural damage and rising damp effect. • The present approach provided insights on the used pigments and painting techniques. • FT-IR, XRF and XRD analyses of the mortar sample showed the peculiar composition. • 1D, 2D NMR analyses were useful for the identification of the restoration polymer. • NMR technique also allowed to characterize the plasticizing agents. - Abstract: In this paper, chemical and structural studies of medieval wall paintings in Ocre (L’Aquila, Italy) are presented. During the latest restoration campaign, non-destructive (Near-Infrared Reflectography and Infrared Thermography) and micro-invasive (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, μ-Raman, Scanning Electron Microscopy with X-ray Microanalysis, X-Ray Diffraction, X-Ray Fluorescence, Optical Microscopy, Mass Spectrometry, Thermogravimetry) analyses were performed in order to determine the detachments of wall surfaces and the characterization of original and restoration materials. Data integration allowed to reconstruct the conservative history, the execution techniques and the conservation problems of the artefact, as well as to assess the effectiveness of restoration activities adopted. The combined use of physical and micro-chemical techniques proved to be effective for an in-depth study of materials stratification of paintings.

  9. Non-destructive and micro-invasive testing techniques for characterizing materials, structures and restoration problems in mural paintings

    Tortora, Mariagrazia, E-mail: Mariagrazia.Tortora@univaq.it [University of L’Aquila, Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Via Vetoio (Coppito 1), I-67100, Loc. Coppito, L’Aquila, AQ (Italy); Sfarra, Stefano, E-mail: Stefano.Sfarra@univaq.it [Las.E.R. Laboratory, University of L’Aquila, Department of Industrial and Information Engineering and Economics, Piazzale E. Pontieri 1, I-67100, Loc. Monteluco di Roio, Roio Poggio, L’Aquila, AQ, Italy, (Italy); Chiarini, Marco, E-mail: mchiarini@unite.it [University of Teramo, Department of Bioscience and Technology for Food Agriculture and Environment, Via Carlo Lerici 1, I-64023, Mosciano Sant’Angelo, Teramo, TE, Italy, (Italy); Daniele, Valeria, E-mail: Valeria.Daniele@univaq.it [University of L’Aquila, Department of Industrial and Information Engineering and Economics, Piazzale E. Pontieri 1, I-67100, Loc. Monteluco di Roio, Roio Poggio, L’Aquila, AQ (Italy); Taglieri, Giuliana, E-mail: Giuliana.Taglieri@univaq.it [University of L’Aquila, Department of Industrial and Information Engineering and Economics, Piazzale E. Pontieri 1, I-67100, Loc. Monteluco di Roio, Roio Poggio, L’Aquila, AQ (Italy); Cerichelli, Giorgio, E-mail: Giorgio.Cerichelli@univaq.it [University of L’Aquila, Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Via Vetoio (Coppito 1), I-67100, Loc. Coppito, L’Aquila, AQ (Italy)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Infrared thermography allowed to identify structural damage and rising damp effect. • The present approach provided insights on the used pigments and painting techniques. • FT-IR, XRF and XRD analyses of the mortar sample showed the peculiar composition. • 1D, 2D NMR analyses were useful for the identification of the restoration polymer. • NMR technique also allowed to characterize the plasticizing agents. - Abstract: In this paper, chemical and structural studies of medieval wall paintings in Ocre (L’Aquila, Italy) are presented. During the latest restoration campaign, non-destructive (Near-Infrared Reflectography and Infrared Thermography) and micro-invasive (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, μ-Raman, Scanning Electron Microscopy with X-ray Microanalysis, X-Ray Diffraction, X-Ray Fluorescence, Optical Microscopy, Mass Spectrometry, Thermogravimetry) analyses were performed in order to determine the detachments of wall surfaces and the characterization of original and restoration materials. Data integration allowed to reconstruct the conservative history, the execution techniques and the conservation problems of the artefact, as well as to assess the effectiveness of restoration activities adopted. The combined use of physical and micro-chemical techniques proved to be effective for an in-depth study of materials stratification of paintings.

  10. New Redox Polymers that Exhibit Reversible Cleavage of Sulfur Bonds as Cathode Materials.

    Baloch, Marya; Ben Youcef, Hicham; Li, Chunmei; Garcia-Calvo, Oihane; Rodriguez, Lide M; Shanmukaraj, Devaraj; Rojo, Teofilo; Armand, Michel

    2016-11-23

    Two new cathode materials based on redox organosulfur polymers were synthesized and investigated for rechargeable lithium batteries as a proof-of-concept study. These cathodes offered good cycling performance owing to the absence of polysulfide solubility, which plagues Li/S systems. Herein, an aliphatic polyamine or a conjugated polyazomethine was used as the base to tether the redox-active species. The activity comes from the cleavage and formation of S-S or N-S bonds, which is made possible by the rigid conjugated backbone. The synthesized polymers were characterized through FTIR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Galvanostatic measurements were performed to evaluate the discharge/charge cycles and characterize the performance of the lithium-based cells, which displayed initial discharge capacities of approximately 300 mA h g -1 at C/5 over 100 cycles with approximately 98 % Coulombic efficiency. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The use of a masticatory robot to analyze the shock absorption capacity of different restorative materials for implant prosthesis

    M. Menini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research was to measure in vitro the chewing load forces transmitted through crowns made of different prosthetic restorative materials onto the dental implant. A masticatory robot that is able to reproduce the mandibular movements and the forces exerted during mastication was used. The forces transmitted to the simulated periimplant bone during the robot mastication were analysis of variance (ANOVA was used. The zirconia and the ceramic crowns transmitted significantly greater forces (p-value < 0.0001 than the other crowns tested. Dental materials with lower elastic modulus were better able to ansorb shock from acclusal forces than more rigid materials.

  12. Adhesive bond strength evaluation in composite materials by laser-generated high amplitude ultrasound

    Perton, M; Blouin, A; Monchalin, J-P

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of composites laminates is highly efficient but is not used for joining primary aircraft structures, since there is presently no nondestructive inspection technique to ensure the quality of the bond. We are developing a technique based on the propagation of high amplitude ultrasonic waves to evaluate the adhesive bond strength. Large amplitude compression waves are generated by a short pulse powerful laser under water confinement and are converted after reflection by the assembly back surface into tensile waves. The resulting tensile stresses can cause a delamination inside the laminates or at the bond interfaces. The adhesion strength is evaluated by increasing the laser pulse energy until disbond. A good bond is unaffected by a certain level of stress whereas a weaker one is damaged. The method is shown completely non invasive throughout the whole composite assembly. The sample back surface velocity is measured by an optical interferometer and used to estimate stress history inside the sample. The depth and size of the disbonds are revealed by a post-test inspection by the well established laser-ultrasonic technique. Experimental results show that the proposed method is able to differentiate weak bond from strong bonds and to estimate quantitatively their bond strength.

  13. [Effect of saliva contamination on microleakage around class-5 cavities restored with three different types of adhesive materials].

    Iovan, Gianina; Stoleriu, Simona; Andrian, S; Dia, V; Căruntu, Irina Draga

    2004-01-01

    The recent improvement of adhesive materials should decrease the risk related to saliva contamination. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of saliva contamination on the microleakage within class V cavities restored with three different types of materials: conventional glass ionomer cement, composite resin and compomer. 30 human extracted teeth were randomly divided in 3 equal groups. In each group, class V cavities were prepared on both facial and lingual surfaces (but joint for glass ionomer cement and bevelled incisal margin for composite resin and compomer). The lingual cavities were contaminated with saliva prior to restoration, while the facial cavities were not contaminated, serving as control. After water storage for 24 hours, teeth were immersed in 1% methylene blue solution for 24 hours. The axial sections were viewed under an optical microscope and the extent of dye penetration along cervical, axial and incisal margins was measured in millimetres. Statistic analysis showed that under salivary contamination, microleakage increased along the cervical margin of restoration for all three tested materials. Saliva contamination resulted in microleakage within the axial wall of the cavity only for the conventional glass ionomer cement. These data indicate that composite resin and compomer used together with new adhesives seem to be less sensitive to saliva contamination compared to conventional materials. However, under saliva contamination, cervical microleakage cannot be completely prevented and proper isolation should still be mandatory.

  14. Esthetic smile rehabilitation of anterior teeth by treatment with biomimetic restorative materials: a case report

    Gouveia TH

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Thayla Hellen Nunes Gouveia, Jéssica Dias Theobaldo, Waldemir Francisco Vieira-Junior, Débora Alves Nunes Leite Lima, Flávio Henrique Baggio Aguiar Department of Restorative Dentistry, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Campinas, SP, Brazil Background: In daily clinical practice, esthetics of anterior teeth is a common presenting complaint of patients.Objective: This case report discusses the management of asymmetric smile associated with unsatisfactory extensive composite restorations and describes a clinical protocol using the direct composite resin for smile enhancement to restore the dental harmony of anterior teeth.Methods: The treatment planning was based on a diagnostic wax-up and cosmetic mock-up. After clinical and patient approvals were obtained, the patient was subjected to direct and indirect restorative treatment.Conclusion: Nanocomposites are an effective alternative for anterior teeth restorations. Additionally, good planning enables satisfactory esthetic results, leading to the correction of an inappropriate axial inclination of incisors. Keywords: composite, adhesive, smile, esthetic, restoration

  15. Effect of a self-adhesive coating on the load-bearing capacity of tooth-coloured restorative materials.

    Bagheri, R; Palamara, Jea; Mese, A; Manton, D J

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the flexural strength and Vickers hardness of tooth-coloured restorative materials with and without applying a self-adhesive coating for up to 6 months. Specimens were prepared from three resin composites (RC), two resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RM-GIC) and two conventional glass-ionomer cements (CGIC). All materials were tested both with and without applying G-Coat Plus (GCP). Specimens were conditioned in 37 °C distilled deionized water for 24 h, and 1, 3 and 6 months. The specimens were strength tested using a four-point bend test jig in a universal testing machine. The broken specimen's halves were used for Vickers hardness testing. Representative specimens were examined under an environmental scanning electron microscope. Data analysis showed that regardless of time and materials, generally the surface coating was associated with a significant increase in the flexural strength of the materials. Applying the GCP decreased the hardness of almost all materials significantly (P < 0.05) and effect of time intervals on hardness was material dependent. The load-bearing capacity of the restorative materials was affected by applying self-adhesive coating and ageing. The CGIC had significantly higher hardness but lower flexural strength than the RM-GIC and RC. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  16. Adhesives in Building--Lamination of Structural Timber Beams, Bonding of Cementitious Materials, Bonding of Gypsum Drywall Construction. Proceedings of a Conference of the Building Research Institute, Division of Engineering and Industrial Research (Spring 1960).

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    The role of adhesives in building design is discussed. Three major areas are as follows--(1) lamination of structural timber beams, (2) bonding of cementitious materials, and (3) bonding of gypsum drywall construction. Topical coverage includes--(1) structural lamination today, (2) adhesives in use today, (3) new adhesives needed, (4) production…

  17. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of soft denture lining materials to an acrylic resin denture base.

    Gundogdu, Mustafa; Yesil Duymus, Zeynep; Alkurt, Murat

    2014-10-01

    Adhesive failure between acrylic resin and resilient liner material is commonly encountered in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength of 2 different resilient lining materials to an acrylic resin denture base. Ninety-six dumbbell-shaped specimens were fabricated from heat-polymerized acrylic resin, and 3 mm of the material was cut from the thin midsection. The specimens were divided into 6 groups according to their surface treatments: no surface treatment (control group), 36% phosphoric acid etching (acid group), erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (laser group), airborne-particle abrasion with 50-μm Al2O3 particles (abrasion group), an acid+laser group, and an abrasion+laser group. The specimens in each group were divided into 2 subgroups according to the resilient lining material used: heat-polymerized silicone based resilient liner (Molloplast B) and autopolymerized silicone-based resilient liner (Ufi Gel P). After all of the specimens had been polymerized, they were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 1 week. A tensile bond strength test was then performed. Data were analyzed with a 2-way ANOVA, and the Sidak multiple comparison test was used to identify significant differences (α=.05). The effects of the surface treatments and resilient lining materials on the surface of the denture base resin were examined with scanning electron microscopy. The tensile bond strength was significantly different between Molloplast B and Ufi Gel P (P<.001). The specimens of the acid group had the highest tensile bond strength, whereas those of the abrasion group had the lowest tensile bond strength. The scanning electron microscopy observations showed that the application of surface treatments modified the surface of the denture base resin. Molloplast B exhibited significantly higher bond strength than Ufi Gel P. Altering the surface of the acrylic resin denture base with 36

  18. The development of learning materials based on core model to improve students’ learning outcomes in topic of Chemical Bonding

    Avianti, R.; Suyatno; Sugiarto, B.

    2018-04-01

    This study aims to create an appropriate learning material based on CORE (Connecting, Organizing, Reflecting, Extending) model to improve students’ learning achievement in Chemical Bonding Topic. This study used 4-D models as research design and one group pretest-posttest as design of the material treatment. The subject of the study was teaching materials based on CORE model, conducted on 30 students of Science class grade 10. The collecting data process involved some techniques such as validation, observation, test, and questionnaire. The findings were that: (1) all the contents were valid, (2) the practicality and the effectiveness of all the contents were good. The conclusion of this research was that the CORE model is appropriate to improve students’ learning outcomes for studying Chemical Bonding.

  19. Evaluation of performance of materials used in the ceramic materials restoration of the Plaza de España (Sevilla

    Alejandre Sánchez, F. J.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Different commercial mortars and stuecos used to cold restore the glazing on deteriorated tile in Seville s Plaza de España were tested for performance and durability. Five types of samples were applied to ceramic bisques and subsequently coloured and protected with resins. The samples were subjected to accelerated weathering consisting in salt crystallization, temperature and relative humidity cycles and ultraviolet radiation. Durability was assessed by visually comparing the effect of salt crystallization, determining the colour parameters with colourimetry and measuring adherence and capillary water absorption. The results obtained were used to differentiate the materials tested in two respects: stucco and protective resin performance under the environmental conditions prevailing in the Plaza de España on the one hand and colour stability on the other.

    En el presente trabajo se estudia el comportamiento y la durabilidad de diferentes morteros y estucos comerciales que se han utilizado para restituir enfrío las pérdidas de vidriado en azulejos deteriorados de la Plaza de España (Sevilla. Para ello se han preparado 5 tipos de muestras que se han aplicado sobre bizcochos cerámicos y que posteriormente se han coloreado y protegido con resinas. Las muestras se han sometido a ensayos de alteración acelerada: cristalización de sales, ciclos de temperatura y humedad relativa, y radiación ultravioleta. La evaluación de la durabilidad se ha llevado a cabo mediante la comparación visual del efecto de cristalización de las sales, la determinación de los parámetros de color mediante colorimetría, de la adherencia y de la absorción de agua por capilaridad. Los resultados obtenidos, permiten realizar una diferenciación en dos aspectos, por un lado, el comportamiento del estuco y su protección para soportar las condiciones medioambientales de la Plaza de España, y, por otro, la estabilidad de los diferentes colores.

  20. HIP bonding for the different material between Niobium and Stainless steel

    Inoue, H.; Saito, K.; Abe, K.; Fujino, T.; Hitomi, N.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2000-01-01

    In the future advanced cryomodule for superconducting RF cavities, a helium vessel made from titanium or stainless steel has to be welded directly to the niobium cavity wall in order to be simple structure. For that, we need a transformer from niobium to titanium or stainless steel. Stainless steel will have many benefits if the reliable bonding to the niobium is developed. We have tested the niobium/stainless steel bonding by HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing) with the heat shock between 1023K and 2K. The bonding interface was also observed by SEM. These test results will be presented. (author)

  1. Bond strength and microleakage of current dentin adhesives.

    Fortin, D; Swift, E J; Denehy, G E; Reinhardt, J W

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate shear bond strengths and microleakage of seven current-generation dentin adhesive systems. Standard box-type Class V cavity preparations were made at the cemento-enamel junction on the buccal surfaces of eighty extracted human molars. These preparations were restored using a microfill composite following application of either All-Bond 2 (Bisco), Clearfil Liner Bond (Kuraray), Gluma 2000 (Miles), Imperva Bond (Shofu), OptiBond (Kerr), Prisma Universal Bond 3 (Caulk), Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (3M), or Scotchbond Dual-Cure (3M) (control). Lingual dentin of these same teeth was exposed and polished to 600-grit. Adhesives were applied and composite was bonded to the dentin using a gelatin capsule technique. Specimens were thermocycled 500 times. Shear bond strengths were determined using a universal testing machine, and microleakage was evaluated using a standard silver nitrate staining technique. Clearfill Liner Bond and OptiBond, adhesive systems that include low-viscosity, low-modulus intermediate resins, had the highest shear bond strengths (13.3 +/- 2.3 MPa and 12.9 +/- 1.5 MPa, respectively). Along with Prisma Universal Bond 3, they also had the least microleakage at dentin margins of Class V restorations. No statistically significant correlation between shear bond strength and microleakage was observed in this study. Adhesive systems that include a low-viscosity intermediate resin produced the high bond strengths and low microleakage. Similarly, two materials with bond strengths in the intermediate range had significantly increased microleakage, and one material with a bond strength in the low end of the spectrum exhibited microleakage that was statistically greater. Thus, despite the lack of statistical correlation, there were observable trends.

  2. In vitro effects of alcohol-containing and alcohol-free mouthrinses on microhardness of some restorative materials.

    Gürgan, S; Onen, A; Köprülü, H

    1997-03-01

    Daily application of mouthrinses has been recommended for the prevention and control of caries and periodontal disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of alcohol-containing and alcohol-free mouthrinses on the microhardness of three restorative materials. Materials tested included visible light cured (VLC) composite resin (Amelogen), VLC glass-ionomer cement (Fuji II LC) and a fissure sealant (Ultra Seal XT). Eighteen cylinders of each restorative were fabricated and initially stored in distilled water for 24 h. Six samples of the restoratives were stored for 12 hours to simulate a 2 min/day for 1 year exposure to mouthrinses in the following solutions: distilled water (control), alcohol-containing mouthrinse (Viadent) and alcohol-free mouthrinse (Rembrandt). At the end of the test period microhardness was measured with a Tukon microhardness tester. Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance was used to analyse the data. Both mouthrinses affected the hardness of the materials tested.

  3. Identifying the material of original and restored parts of a 14^{th} century alabaster annunciation group through stable isotopes

    Kloppmann, Wolfram; Leroux, Lise; Le Pogam, Pierre-Yves; Bromblet, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    The origin of raw materials for sculpture is often obscure before the 17th century due to the scarcity of written sources. Identifying this origin provides hints to economic exchanges but also, potentially, allows for attributing sculptures to a specific context of creation (regional workshops, artists). Another challenge for art historians is the identification of restorations and their potential chronology. We present an example of a 14th century group of two statues, made of gypsum alabaster, representing an annunciation group, with the Virgin Mary and the angel Gabriel. Their original position was a near Troyes in the eastern Paris Basin, they are now separated being conserved at the Louvre Museum (Virgin Mary) and the Cleveland Museum of Art (Gabriel). Our multi-isotope study revealed the common origin of the material used for both sculptures, their isotope fingerprints being identical within the analytical error. These fingerprints are highly specific and point to an origin in a historical gypsum and alabaster quarry in the northern part of Provence, France, first mentioned at the end of the 13th century. We were also able to identify an unknown restoration of lower part of the Virgin Mary statue with an optically undistinguishable material, using Tuscan alabaster, most likely in the 19th century. This underlines the potential and usefulness of independent geochemical evidence to underpin stylistic hypotheses on grouping of individual artworks, historical economic relationships between regions and on past restoration activities.

  4. Effect of different composite core materials on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with FRC posts.

    Panitiwat, Prapaporn; Salimee, Prarom

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite posts, using three resin composite core build-up materials, (Clearfil Photo Core (CPC), MultiCore Flow (MCF), and LuxaCore Z-Dual (LCZ)), and a nanohybrid composite, (Tetric N-Ceram (TNC)). Forty endodontically treated lower first premolars were restored with quartz fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) cemented with resin cement (Panavia F2.0). Samples were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Each group was built-up with one of the four core materials following its manufacturers' instructions. The teeth were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Nickel-Chromium crowns were fixed on the specimens with resin cement. The fracture resistance was determined using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min at 1350 to the tooth axis until failure occurred. All core materials used in the study were subjected to test for the flexural modulus according to ISO 4049:2009. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni multiple comparisons test indicated that the fracture resistance was higher in the groups with CPC and MCF, which presented no statistically significant difference (p>0.05), but was significantly higher than in those with LCZ and TNC (paligned with the same tendency of fracture loads. Among the cores used in this study, the composite core with high filler content tended to enhance fracture thresholds of teeth restored with fiber posts more than others.

  5. Evaluation of Surface Roughness of Ceramic and Resin Composite Material Used for Conservative Indirect Restorations, after Repolishing by Intraoral Means.

    Vrochari, Areti D; Petropoulou, Aikaterini; Chronopoulos, Vasilios; Polydorou, Olga; Massey, Ward; Hellwig, Elmar

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate and compare the mean surface roughness (Ra) of one ceramic and one resin composite material used for indirect restorations, after grinding and repolishing by intraoral means. The materials used were the lithium disilicate glass ceramic IPS e.max Press (EMP) and the indirect resin composite restoration system Gradia (GR). Twelve specimen disks were prepared from each material according to the manufacturer of each material. Five initial measurements of the Ra (Ra 1 ) were made on each specimen as a referral basis, and the specimens were ground with a fine (red) diamond bur. The specimens were repolished using (a) Komet Dialite Polishing Kit for EMP and (b) Enhance Finishing and Polishing System and Prisma Gloss Polishing Paste for GR. Five final Ra (Ra 2 ) measurements were performed on each specimen. All measurements were made using a laser profilometer. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was also used to visualize the initial surface morphology and the morphological changes on the specimens' surface after repolishing. A highly significant difference was found between Ra 1EMP and Ra 2EMP (p materials exhibited Ra 2 above the critical threshold for increased plaque accumulation and periodontal inflammation. If enamel-to-enamel roughness found in occlusal contact areas is considered as baseline, both materials were clinically acceptable after repolishing. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. High-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar thermal storage materials using AZO/graphene hybrids by optimizing hydrogen bonds.

    Luo, Wen; Feng, Yiyu; Qin, Chengqun; Li, Man; Li, Shipei; Cao, Chen; Long, Peng; Liu, Enzuo; Hu, Wenping; Yoshino, Katsumi; Feng, Wei

    2015-10-21

    An important method for establishing a high-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar heat system is by designing and preparing novel photo-isomerizable molecules with a high enthalpy and a long thermal life by controlling molecular interactions. A meta- and ortho-bis-substituted azobenzene chromophore (AZO) is covalently grafted onto reduced graphene oxide (RGO) for solar thermal storage materials. High grafting degree and close-packed molecules enable intermolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) for both trans-(E) and cis-(Z) isomers of AZO on the surface of nanosheets, resulting in a dramatic increase in enthalpy and lifetime. The metastable Z-form of AZO on RGO is thermally stabilized with a half-life of 52 days by steric hindrance and intermolecular H-bonds calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The AZO-RGO fuel shows a high storage capacity of 138 Wh kg(-1) by optimizing intermolecular H-bonds with a good cycling stability for 50 cycles induced by visible light at 520 nm. Our work opens up a new method for making advanced molecular solar thermal storage materials by tuning molecular interactions on a nano-template.

  7. Bonding of Glass Ceramic and Indirect Composite to Non-aged and Aged Resin Composite

    Gresnigt, Marco; Ozcan, Mutlu; Muis, Maarten; Kalk, Warner

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Since adhesion of the restorative materials to pre-polymerized or aged resin composites presents a challenge to the clinicians, existing restorations are often removed and remade prior to cementation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). This study evaluated bond strength of non-aged and aged

  8. Effect of Setting Time on the Shear Bond Strength Between Biodentine and Composite

    2015-06-01

    Adhesive ( 3M ESPE, St. Paul MN, USA), Scotchbond Universal Etchant ( 3M ESPE, St. Paul MN, USA), and Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal Restorative...bonding agent ( Scotchbond Universal Adhesive ) and composite resin restorative material (Filtek Supreme Ultra). After bonding of the composite resin... Scotchbond Universal Etchant, 32% phosphoric acid ( 3M ESPE) • Apply for 15 seconds • Rinse with water 15 seconds, dry with cotton pellet

  9. Temperature changes under demineralized dentin during polymerization of three resin-based restorative materials using QTH and LED units

    Sayed-Mostafa Mousavinasab

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Light-curing of resin-based materials (RBMs increases the pulp chamber temperature, with detrimental effects on the vital pulp. This in vitro study compared the temperature rise under demineralized human tooth dentin during light-curing and the degrees of conversion (DCs of three different RBMs using quartz tungsten halogen (QTH and light-emitting diode (LED units (LCUs. Materials and Methods Demineralized and non-demineralized dentin disks were prepared from 120 extracted human mandibular molars. The temperature rise under the dentin disks (n = 12 during the light-curing of three RBMs, i.e. an Ormocer-based composite resin (Ceram. X, Dentsply DeTrey, a low-shrinkage silorane-based composite (Filtek P90, 3M ESPE, and a giomer (Beautifil II, Shofu GmbH, was measured with a K-type thermocouple wire. The DCs of the materials were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results The temperature rise under the demineralized dentin disks was higher than that under the non-demineralized dentin disks during the polymerization of all restorative materials (p 0.05. Conclusions Although there were no significant differences in the DCs, the temperature rise under demineralized dentin disks for the silorane-based composite was higher than that for dimethacrylate-based restorative materials, particularly with QTH LCU.

  10. Effects of delayed finishing/polishing on surface roughness, hardness and gloss of tooth-coloured restorative materials.

    Yazici, A Ruya; Tuncer, Duygu; Antonson, Sibel; Onen, Alev; Kilinc, Evren

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of delayed finishing/polishing on the surface roughness, hardness and gloss of tooth-coloured restorative materials. Four different tooth-coloured restoratives: a flowable resin composite- Tetric Flow, a hybrid resin composite- Venus, a nanohybrid resin composite- Grandio, and a polyacid modified resin composite- Dyract Extra were used. 30 specimens were made for each material and randomly assigned into three groups. The first group was finished/polished immediately and the second group was finished/polished after 24 hours. The remaining 10 specimens served as control. The surface roughness of each sample was recorded using a laser profilometer. Gloss measurements were performed using a small-area glossmeter. Vickers microhardness measurements were performed from three locations on each specimen surface under 100g load and 10s dwell time. Data for surface roughness and hardness were analyzed by Kruskal Wallis test and data for gloss were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey test (P gloss values were recorded under Mylar strip for all materials. While delayed finishing/polishing resulted in a significantly higher gloss compared to immediate finishing/polishing in Venus samples (P .05). The lowest hardness values were found under Mylar strip. Delayed finishing/polishing significantly increased the hardness of all materials. The effect of delayed finishing/polishing on surface roughness, gloss and hardness appears to be material dependent.

  11. Effect of different composite core materials on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with FRC posts

    Prapaporn PANITIWAT

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite posts, using three resin composite core build-up materials, (Clearfil Photo Core (CPC, MultiCore Flow (MCF, and LuxaCore Z-Dual (LCZ, and a nanohybrid composite, (Tetric N-Ceram (TNC. Material and Methods Forty endodontically treated lower first premolars were restored with quartz fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post cemented with resin cement (Panavia F2.0. Samples were randomly divided into four groups (n=10. Each group was built-up with one of the four core materials following its manufacturers’ instructions. The teeth were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Nickel-Chromium crowns were fixed on the specimens with resin cement. The fracture resistance was determined using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min at 1350 to the tooth axis until failure occurred. All core materials used in the study were subjected to test for the flexural modulus according to ISO 4049:2009. Results One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni multiple comparisons test indicated that the fracture resistance was higher in the groups with CPC and MCF, which presented no statistically significant difference (p>0.05, but was significantly higher than in those with LCZ and TNC (p<0.05. In terms of the flexural modulus, the ranking from the highest values of the materials was aligned with the same tendency of fracture loads. Conclusion Among the cores used in this study, the composite core with high filler content tended to enhance fracture thresholds of teeth restored with fiber posts more than others.

  12. Amino acid derivative-mediated detoxification and functionalization of dual cure dental restorative material for dental pulp cell mineralization.

    Minamikawa, Hajime; Yamada, Masahiro; Iwasa, Fuminori; Ueno, Takeshi; Deyama, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Kuniaki; Yawaka, Yasutaka; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2010-10-01

    Current dental restorative materials are only used to fill the defect of hard tissues, such as dentin and enamel, because of their cytotoxicity. Therefore, exposed dental pulp tissues in deep cavities must be first covered by a pulp capping material like calcium hydroxide to form a layer of mineralized tissue. However, this tissue mineralization is based on pathological reaction and triggers long-lasting inflammation, often causing clinical problems. This study tested the ability of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), amino acid derivative, to reduce cytotoxicity and induce mineralized tissue conductivity in resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), a widely used dental restorative material having dual cure mechanism. Rat dental pulp cells were cultured on untreated or NAC-supplemented RMGI. NAC supplementation substantially increased the percentage of viable cells from 46.7 to 73.3% after 24-h incubation. Cell attachment, spreading, proliferative activity, and odontoblast-related gene and protein expressions increased significantly on NAC-supplemented RMGI. The mineralization capability of cells, which was nearly suppressed on untreated RMGI, was induced on NAC-supplemented RMGI. These improved behaviors and functions of dental pulp cells on NAC-supplemented RMGI were associated with a considerable reduction in the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and with the increased level of intracellular glutathione reserves. These results demonstrated that NAC could detoxify and functionalize RMGIs via two different mechanisms involving in situ material detoxification and antioxidant cell protection. We believe that this study provides a new approach for developing dental restorative materials that enables mineralized tissue regeneration.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide bleaching induces changes in the physical properties of dental restorative materials: Effects of study protocols.

    Yu, Hao; Zhang, Chang-Yuan; Wang, Yi-Ning; Cheng, Hui

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of study protocols on the effects of bleaching on the surface roughness, substance loss, flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM), Weibull parameters, and color of 7 restorative materials. The test materials included 4 composite resins, 1 glass-ionomer cement, 1 dental ceramic, and 1 polyacid-modified composite. The specimens were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 20) according to different study protocols: a bleaching group at 25°C (group 25B), a bleaching group at 37°C (group 37B), a control group at 25°C (group 25C), and a control group at 37°C (group 37C). The specimens in the bleaching group were treated with 40% hydrogen peroxide for 80 min at the respective environmental temperatures. The surface roughness, substance loss, FS, FM, and color of the specimens were measured before and after treatment. FS data were also subjected to Weibull analysis, which was used to estimate of the Weibull modulus (m) and the characteristic strength (σ 0 ). Surface roughness increased and significant color changes were observed for all tested specimens after bleaching treatment, except for the ceramic. After bleaching at 37°C, the polyacid-modified composite showed significantly reduced FS, FM, m, and σ 0 values in comparison to the control specimens stored at 37°C in whole saliva. Significant differences were also found between the 37B and 25B polyacid-modified composite groups in terms of surface roughness, FS, m, σ 0 , and color changes. Varying effects of bleaching on the physical properties of dental restorative materials were observed, and the influences of the study protocols on bleaching effects were found to be material-dependent. The influence of study protocols on the effects of bleaching on the surface roughness, flexural properties, and color of dental restorative materials are material-dependent and should be considered when evaluating the effects of bleaching on dental restorative

  14. Research on the Bond Anchorage Properties of Alkali-Activated Slag Cementitious Material

    Zhu, J.; Zheng, W. Z.; Leng, Y. F.; Qin, C. Z.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2017-12-01

    By bond-anchorage property tests at 20°C ∼500°C, the distribution of shear stress between carbon fiber sheets and concrete at all levels of loading and anchorage lengths were measured, which means the bond lengths during CFRP sheets are pulled off at the same time when the concrete is torn and stripped were gotten. The failure modes were obtained. In addition, the failure loads were measured, and the calculated formulas of anchorage lengths were identified by fitting at high temperature. It can be seen that the anchorage lengths of carbon fiber sheets increase with increasing temperature at 20°C ∼100°C, the anchorage lengths of carbon fiber sheets decrease with increasing temperature at 100°C ∼500°C. Tests prove that AASCM has favorable high-temperature resistant and bond anchorage properties.

  15. X-ray electron density investigation of chemical bonding in van der Waals materials

    Kasai, Hidetaka; Tolborg, Kasper; Sist, Mattia; Zhang, Jiawei; Hathwar, Venkatesha R.; Filsø, Mette Ø.; Cenedese, Simone; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Overgaard, Jacob; Nishibori, Eiji; Iversen, Bo B.

    2018-03-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) solids have attracted great attention ever since the discovery of graphene, with the essential feature being the weak chemical bonding across the vdW gap. The nature of these weak interactions is decisive for many extraordinary properties, but it is a strong challenge for current theory to accurately model long-range electron correlations. Here we use synchrotron X-ray diffraction data to precisely determine the electron density in the archetypal vdW solid, TiS2, and compare the results with density functional theory calculations. Quantitative agreement is observed for the chemical bonding description in the covalent TiS2 slabs, but significant differences are identified for the interactions across the gap, with experiment revealing more electron deformation than theory. The present data provide an experimental benchmark for testing theoretical models of weak chemical bonding.

  16. Temperature changes under demineralized dentin during polymerization of three resin-based restorative materials using QTH and LED units.

    Mousavinasab, Sayed-Mostafa; Khoroushi, Maryam; Moharreri, Mohammadreza; Atai, Mohammad

    2014-08-01

    Light-curing of resin-based materials (RBMs) increases the pulp chamber temperature, with detrimental effects on the vital pulp. This in vitro study compared the temperature rise under demineralized human tooth dentin during light-curing and the degrees of conversion (DCs) of three different RBMs using quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) and light-emitting diode (LED) units (LCUs). Demineralized and non-demineralized dentin disks were prepared from 120 extracted human mandibular molars. The temperature rise under the dentin disks (n = 12) during the light-curing of three RBMs, i.e. an Ormocer-based composite resin (Ceram. X, Dentsply DeTrey), a low-shrinkage silorane-based composite (Filtek P90, 3M ESPE), and a giomer (Beautifil II, Shofu GmbH), was measured with a K-type thermocouple wire. The DCs of the materials were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The temperature rise under the demineralized dentin disks was higher than that under the non-demineralized dentin disks during the polymerization of all restorative materials (p 0.05). Although there were no significant differences in the DCs, the temperature rise under demineralized dentin disks for the silorane-based composite was higher than that for dimethacrylate-based restorative materials, particularly with QTH LCU.

  17. Microtensile bond strength of enamel after bleaching

    Andréa Dias Neves Lago

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the bond strength of a composite resin to the bovine enamel bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide. It was used an etching-and-rinse adhesive system employed immediately, 7 and 14 days after the bleaching. Materials and Methods: Twenty bovine teeth were randomly distributed into 4 groups (n = 5, 3 experimental and 1 control. G1: Unbleached + restoration 14 days after storage in artificial saliva (control; G2: Bleached + restoration immediately after bleaching; G3: Bleached + restoration 7 days after bleaching; G4: Bleached + restoration 14 days after bleaching. Their buccal enamel surfaces were flattened, and a 25 mm² (5 × 5 mm area from each one of these regions was outlined so as to standardize the experimental region. Universal hybrid composite resin Filtek™Z350 was inserted into four layers of 1 mm each and photo-activated. The bond strength was quantitatively evaluated by a microtensile test (1.0 mm/min 24 h after the restorative procedures. The failure mode was assessed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results: There was a significant reduction in the bond strength of the restored teeth immediately after the bleaching (G2. There were no significant differences in enamel bond strength between groups G1, G3, and G4. There was a predominance of adhesive and mixed (cohesive + adhesive failure in all groups. Conclusion: The 7-day-period after the end of the bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide was enough to achieve the appropriate values of bond strength to the enamel.

  18. Surface topography of composite restorative materials following ultrasonic scaling and its Impact on bacterial plaque accumulation. An in-vitro SEM study

    Hossam, A. Eid; Rafi, A. Togoo; Ahmed, A Saleh; Sumanth, Phani CR

    2013-01-01

    Background: This is an in vitro study to investigate the effects of ultrasonic scaling on the surface roughness and quantitative bacterial count on four different types of commonly used composite restorative materials for class V cavities.

  19. Bulk fill restoratives: to cap or not to cap--that is the question?

    Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Kearns, Jennifer O; Ilie, Nicoleta; Fleming, Garry J P

    2015-03-01

    To assess the cuspal deflection and cervical microleakage scores of standardised large mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) cavities filled with different restoration protocols: (1) conventional resin restoratives, (2) bulk fill flowable base materials 'capped' with a conventional dimethacrylate resin-based composite (RBC) or (3) bulk fill resin restorative materials. Standardised MOD cavities were prepared in sixty-four sound maxillary premolar teeth and randomly allocated to eight groups. Restorations were placed in conjunction with a universal bonding system and resin restorative materials were irradiated with a quartz-tungsten-halogen light-curing-unit. Restoration protocol (eight oblique increments of conventional resin restorative, bulk fill flowable base and two occlusal 'capping' RBC increments (three increments in total) or bulk fill resin restorative (two increments)) was the dependent variable. A twin channel deflection measuring gauge measured the buccal and palatal cuspal deflections. Teeth were thermally fatigued, immersed in a 0.2% basic fuchsin dye for 24h, sectioned and examined for cervical microleakage score. Post hoc Tukey's tests highlighted significant differences in the mean total cuspal deflection values between resin restoratives (p fill flowable base materials with occlusal 'capping' RBC increments (restoration protocol 2) compared with bulk fill resin restoratives (restoration protocol 3). Not all bulk fill flowable materials or bulk fill resin restoratives behave in a similar fashion when used to restore standardised MOD cavities in maxillary premolar teeth and material selection is vital in the absence of clinical data. Poorly performing bulk fill flowable materials or bulk fill restoratives can be identified using the cuspal deflection and cervical microleakage protocol which could save the complications encountered clinically when restoring Class II restorations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bond expectations for milled surfaces and typical tack coat materials used in Virginia.

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate purpose of the program of research of which this study was a part is to identify a test method and acceptance criteria for bonding of HMA layers. In this study, three tasks were performed to help achieve that purpose: a laboratory compar...

  1. Development of a novel oxirane-acrylate composite restorative resin material

    Sripathi Panditaradhyula, Anuhya

    The need for resin with a long clinical life can be satiated through the novel formulation of varying concentrations of oxirane and acrylate monomers with an increase in filler loading in the sample, which will allow the creation of a resin that is less susceptible to chemical degradation along with improved mechanical properties. Various concentrations of oxirane and acrylate monomers with a three-component photoinitiation system, which is capable of both free radical (acrylate) and cationic (oxirane) initiation, are used. The resin composites were placed in the Speedmixer for 30 seconds and gravitation convection oven for one minute, repeated 5-7 times. The resin composites were used to create a 9.525 mm diameter * 1.5875 mm thick resin mold. The mold was then photocured for twenty seconds on both sides using VALO blue LED light. The Rockwell hardness and shore D durometer hardness served as relative measures of bonding between the monomers. The ideal formulation of oxirane and acrylate concentrations were used to perform the Instron 3 point bend test, as well as contact angle determination. The goal is to identify a resin with a clinical life twice that of the resins being used in practice. Potential findings include ideal oxirane and acrylate concentrations with the highest shore D durometer hardness, Rockwell hardness, contact angle values, and Instron 3 point bend test values. Ideal color, transparency and properties of the resin are taken into account. Optimization of oxirane and acrylate monomers, impact while using various filler components (salination, number of fillers), filler particle size variations and variations in using different filler concentrations are observed. Results of using micro and nano-sized monomers are also studied. Addition of fluorinated acrylate monomer to the micro and nano composite was the next goal. A comparison of all the above stated compositions to the control group 70/30 BisTEG was done. A study on the degradation behavior

  2. Posterior composite restoration update: focus on factors influencing form and function

    Bohaty, Brenda S; Ye, Qiang; Misra, Anil; Sene, Fabio; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    Restoring posterior teeth with resin-based composite materials continues to gain popularity among clinicians, and the demand for such aesthetic restorations is increasing. Indeed, the most common aesthetic alternative to dental amalgam is resin composite. Moderate to large posterior composite restorations, however, have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries, and increased frequency of replacement. Investigators across the globe are researching new materials and techniques that will improve the clinical performance, handling characteristics, and mechanical and physical properties of composite resin restorative materials. Despite such attention, large to moderate posterior composite restorations continue to have a clinical lifetime that is approximately one-half that of the dental amalgam. While there are numerous recommendations regarding preparation design, restoration placement, and polymerization technique, current research indicates that restoration longevity depends on several variables that may be difficult for the dentist to control. These variables include the patient’s caries risk, tooth position, patient habits, number of restored surfaces, the quality of the tooth–restoration bond, and the ability of the restorative material to produce a sealed tooth–restoration interface. Although clinicians tend to focus on tooth form when evaluating the success and failure of posterior composite restorations, the emphasis must remain on advancing our understanding of the clinical variables that impact the formation of a durable seal at the restoration–tooth interface. This paper presents an update of existing technology and underscores the mechanisms that negatively impact the durability of posterior composite restorations in permanent teeth. PMID:23750102

  3. Effect of raw material ratios on the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics

    Wang, Ai-juan; Yuan, Zhi-long; Zhang, Jiao; Liu, Lin-tao; Li, Jun-ming; Liu, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics is important in biomedical field. In this work, the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics was investigated with different liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratios. X-ray diffractometer was applied to characterize its phase composition. The microstructure was imaged using a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the compressive strength of the chemically bonded ceramics increased with the decrease of liquid-to-solid ratio due to the change of the packing density and the crystallinity of hydrated product. However, with the increase of MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 weight ratio, its compressive strength increased firstly and then decreased. The low compressive strength in lower MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratio might be explained by the existence of the weak phase KH 2 PO 4 . However, the low value of compressive strength with the higher MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratio might be caused by lack of the joined phase in the hydrated product. Besides, it has been found that the microstructures were different in these two cases by the scanning electron microscope. Colloidal structure appeared for the samples with lower liquid-to-solid and higher MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratios possibly because of the existence of amorphous hydrated products. The optimization of both liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratios was important to improve the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics. - Highlights: • High packing density and amorphous hydrated phase improved the compressive strength. • Residual KH 2 PO 4 and poor bonding phase lower the compressive strength. • MPCBC fabricated with optimized parameters had the highest compressive strength

  4. Efficacy of ceramic repair material on the bond strength of composite resin to zirconia ceramic.

    Kirmali, Omer; Kapdan, Alper; Harorli, Osman Tolga; Barutcugil, Cagatay; Ozarslan, Mehmet Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of composite resin in five different repair systems. Sixty specimens (7 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height) of zirconia ceramic were fabricated. All specimen surfaces were prepared with a 30 µm fine diamond rotary cutting instrument with water irrigation for 10 s and dried with oil-free air. Specimens were then randomly divided into six groups for the following different intra-oral repair systems (n = 10): Group 1, control group; Group 2, Cojet system (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany); Group 3, Cimara® System (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany); Group 4, Z-Prime Plus System (Bisco Inc., Schaumburg, IL); Group 5, Clearfil™ System (Kuraray, Osaka, Japan); and Group 6, Z-Bond System (Danville, CA). After surface conditioning, a composite resin Grandio (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany) was applied to the zirconia surface using a cylindrical mold (5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length) and incrementally filled up, according to the manufacturer's instructions of each intra-oral system. Each specimen was subjected to a shear load at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until fracture. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post-hoc tests were used to analyze the bond strength values. There were significant differences between Groups 2-6 and Group 1. The highest bond strength values were obtained with Group 2 (17.26 ± 3.22) and Group 3 (17.31 ± 3.62), while the lowest values were observed with Group 1 (8.96 ± 1.62) and Group 6 (12.85 ± 3.95). All repair systems tested increased the bond strength values between zirconia and composite resin that used surface grinding with a diamond bur.

  5. Comparison of Micro-Leakage around Temporary Restorative Materials Placed in Complex Endodontic Access Cavities: An In-Vitro Study

    Adnan, S.; Khan, F. R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare mean micro-leakage around 3 types of temporary restorative materials in-vitro, when placed adjacent to permanent restorations (amalgam) in complex endodontic access cavities. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Dental Clinics, Dental Laboratory and Research Laboratory at The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from January to Jun 2014. Methodology: After random allocation of 60 teeth into 3 experimental groups, each group had conventional class II cavities prepared and amalgam placed. After 14 days, endodontic access cavities were made in these teeth, followed byplacement of Cavit, IRM and CLIP (depth of 4 mm each). After thermo-cycling and immersion in 0.5 percentage methylene blue dye, the teeth were sectioned mesio-distally and observed under stereoscopic microscope (magnification * 4) along 2 interfaces 'a' and 'b' (tooth-temporary restoration and temporary restoration-primary restoration), respectively. Depth of dye penetration was measured in millimeters. Results: IRM was leakiest at interface 'a', cavit had highest dye penetration at interface 'b', while CLIP exhibited least micro-leakage at 'a' and 'b'. The mean dye penetration for Cavit was 0.80 ± 0.23 mm at 'a', and 2.24 ± 0.48 mm at 'b'. For IRM, it was 1.82 ± 0.09 mm at 'a', and 0.44 ± 0.13 mm at 'b'. For CLIP, the mean dye penetration was 0.43 ± 0.05 mm at 'a', and 0.32 ± 0.12 mm at 'b'. The difference in dye penetration observed between the 3 groups at both interfaces was statistically significant. Conclusion: In a complex access cavity made adjacent to a pre-existing amalgam restoration, CLIP exhibits the least micro-leakage, followed by IRM and Cavit. (author)

  6. Evaluation of enamel mineral loss around cavities prepared by the Er,Cr:YSGG laser and restored with different materials

    Navarro, Ricardo Scarparo; Lago, Andréa. Dias Neves; Bonifácio, Clarissa Calil; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; de Freitas, Patrícia Moreira; Baptista, Alessandra; Nunez, Silvia Cristina; Matos, Adriana Bona; Imparato, José Carlos P.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the enamel demineralization around cavities prepared by Er,Cr:YSGG laser (2780 nm) and restored with different materials after an acid challenge. The human dental enamel samples were randomly divided in 12 groups (n=10): G1- high-speed drill (HD); G2- Er,Cr:YSGG laser L (3 W, 20 Hz, 53.05 J/cm2)(air 65% - water 55%); G3- L (4 W, 20 Hz, 70.74 J/cm2); G4- L (5 W, 20 Hz, 88.43 J/cm2). Each group was divided in subgroups: 1- glass ionomer cement (GIC), 2- resin modified GIC (RMGIC), 3- composite resin (C). Samples were submitted to an acid challenge (4.8 pH) for7 days. The calcium ion contend (ppm/mm2) from demineralizing solutions were analyzed by atomic emission spectrometry. ANOVA and LSD tests were performed (α=5%). The significant lower average values of calcium loss were observed on G2 + GIC, G2 + RMGIC, G1 + RMGIC (penamel demineralization. The findings of this in vitro study suggest that the Er,Cr:YSGG lased cavities restored with GIC or RMGIC or conventional drill cavities with RMGIC were effective on reducing the demineralization around restorations, showing an important potential in preventing secondary caries.

  7. A strategy to synthesize graphene-incorporated lignin polymer composite materials with uniform graphene dispersion and covalently bonded interface engineering

    Wang, Mei; Duong, Le Dai; Ma, Yifei; Sun, Yan; Hong, Sung Yong; Kim, Ye Chan; Suhr, Jonghwan; Nam, Jae-Do

    2017-08-01

    Graphene-incorporated polymer composites have been demonstrated to have excellent mechanical and electrical properties. In the field of graphene-incorporated composite material synthesis, there are two main obstacles: Non-uniform dispersion of graphene filler in the matrix and weak interface bonding between the graphene filler and polymer matrix. To overcome these problems, we develop an in-situ polymerization strategy to synthesize uniformly dispersed and covalently bonded graphene/lignin composites. Graphene oxide (GO) was chemically modified by 4,4'-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) to introduce isocyanate groups and form the urethane bonds with lignin macromonomers. Subsequential polycondensation reactions of lignin groups with caprolactone and sebacoyl chloride bring about a covalent network of modified GO and lignin-based polymers. The flexible and robust lignin polycaprolactone polycondensate/modified GO (Lig-GOm) composite membranes are achieved after vacuum filtration, which have tunable hydrophilicity and electrical resistance according to the contents of GOm. This research transforms lignin from an abundant biomass into film-state composite materials, paving a new way for the utilization of biomass wastes.

  8. Dentin-bonding agents

    João Carlos Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available New dental restorative materials have been developed to meet not only the functional demands, but esthetics as well, and in the last few years an enormous range of new materials has appeared for use in dentistry. Among them, several adhesive systems, and different operative techniques for each group materials. Therefore, is indispensable for the professional to know about the properties, characteristics, and association of these materials with the dental structures, in order to select and use them correctly. Should conventional self-etching adhesive systems be used? This question encouraged this literature review to be conducted, with the aim of comparing the conventional adhesive systems with the self-etching systems and to look for scientific data that would help professionals to choose which adhesive system to use. When compared to conventional systems, it was noted that the self-etching systems show less sensitivity to technique, especially as regards errors the operator could commit. The self-etching systems, particularly the 2-step type, have shown equivalent values of bond strength, marginal microleakage and performance, therefore, will be an option for direct composite resin restorations in posterior teeth.

  9. Low temperature bonding of heterogeneous materials using Al2O3 as an intermediate layer

    Sahoo, Hitesh Kumar; Ottaviano, Luisa; Zheng, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Integration of heterogeneous materials is crucial for many nanophotonic devices. The integration is often achieved by bonding using polymer adhesives or metals. A much better and cleaner option is direct wafer bonding, but the high annealing temperatures required make it a much less attractive...

  10. Bonding to oxide ceramics—laboratory testing versus clinical outcome.

    Kern, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Despite a huge number of published laboratory bonding studies on dental oxide ceramics clinical long-term studies on resin bonded oxide ceramic restorations are rare. The purpose of this review is to present the best available clinical evidence for successful bonding of dental oxide ceramic restorations. Clinical trials with resin-bonded restorations that had no or only limited mechanical retention and were made from alumina or zirconia ceramic were identified using an electronic search in PubMed database. Overall 10 publications with clinical trials could be identified. Their clinical outcome was compared with that laboratory bond strength studies. Clinical data provide strong evidence that air-abrasion at a moderate pressure in combination with using phosphate monomer containing primers and/or luting resins provide long-term durable bonding to glass-infiltrated alumina and zirconia ceramic under the humid and stressful oral conditions. As simple and clinically reliable bonding methods to oxide ceramics exist, the rationale for development of alternative bonding methods might be reconsidered especially when these methods are more time consuming or require rather complicated and/or technique sensitive procedures. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Longterm survival and reason for failure of anterior composite restoration

    Nina Djustiana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Composites resin restorations have been used for repairing and restoring anterior teeth for decades due to the growing needs for a cost- effective aesthetic restoration and the advancement in dental material and polymer technology. Failure of composite restorations cannot be neglected, due to multiple factors, i.e. failure to diagnose the gingival tissue, inadequate tissue management, quality of remaining tooth structure, and inadequate preparation. The aim of this review is to improve clinical performances of direct composite as permanent restorations. Long lasting aesthetic composite restorations required proper mouth preparations ,which  includes supporting and dental hard tissue preparations, tooth preparation, proper isolation, bonding procedures, light cure unit, and the resin composite itself.

  12. Developments of a bonding technique for optical materials by a surface activation method

    Sugiyama, Akira; Oda, Tomohiro; Abe, Tomoyuki; Kusunoki, Isao

    2007-01-01

    We have been developing a pair of sample holder used for optics in the surface activation bonding equipment. The holder can adjust the relative position of samples in the order of sub mm. To study the degree of dislocation appearing crystal surface activated by a fast atomic beam, irradiated sapphire crystals were examined by RBS, XPS, and AFM analysis. The heat treatment recovered the surface roughness of irradiated sapphire when the heating temperature reached at 1573 K. (author)

  13. Mechanism of forming interfacial intermetallic compounds at interface for solid state diffusion bonding of dissimilar materials

    He, P.; Liu, D.

    2006-01-01

    The formation of brittle intermetallic compounds at the interfaces of diffusion bonds is the main cause which leads to poor bond strength. Therefore, it is very important to study and establish the formation and growth model of intermetallic compounds at the interfaces for the control process of diffusion bonding. In this paper, according to the diffusion kinetics and the thermodynamics, the principle of formation of intermetallic compounds at interfaces in the multi-component diffusion couple, the flux-energy principle, is put forward. In the light of diffusion theory, the formation capacity of the phase at the interfaces is determined by specific properties of the composition in the diffusion couple and the composition ratio of the formed phase is in agreement with the diffusion flux. In accordance with the flux-energy principle, the microstructure of the Ni/TC4 interface is Ni/TiNi 3 /TiNi/Ti 2 Ni/TC4, the microstructure of the TC4/00Cr18Ni9Ti interface is 00Cr18Ni9Ti/TiFe 2 /TiFe/Ti 2 Fe/TC4, and the microstructure of the TiAl/40Cr interface is 40Cr/TiC/Ti 3 Al + FeAl + FeAl 2 /TiAl. Multi-intermetallic compounds with the equivalent flux-energy can be formed at the interfaces at the same time

  14. Porcelain veneer post-bonding crack repair by resin infiltration.

    Gresnigt, Marco; Magne, Michel; Magne, Pascal

    Ceramic laminate veneer restorations are indicated in several clinical situations. Indirect restorations are usually chosen if the less-invasive options - bleaching, resin infiltration, or composite resin restorations - are not possible, or when it is too difficult to achieve an esthetically pleasing result in the long term. Bonded indirect partial restorations are highly dependent on their adhesive interface, as these thin restorations have a relatively low cohesive strength. Therefore, preservation of sound enamel, conditioning of the restorations and of the substrate, and luting procedures are of paramount importance for a successful outcome. Even when utmost care is taken during every step of the procedure, failures such as fractures, chipping, or marginal discoloration and defects sometimes occur. Only very few of these cases of failure are presented or are a subject of interest. In this case presentation, a fracture repair is performed using an infiltration technique with a resin composite material.

  15. Shear bond strengths of tooth coating materials including the experimental materials contained various amounts of multi-ion releasing fillers and their effects for preventing dentin demineralization.

    Arita, Shoko; Suzuki, Masaya; Kazama-Koide, Miku; Shinkai, Koichi

    2017-10-01

    We examined shear bond strengths (SBSs) of various tooth-coating-materials including the experimental materials to dentin and demineralization resistance of a fractured adhesive surface after the SBS testing. Three resin-type tooth-coating-materials (BC, PRG Barrier Coat; HC, Hybrid Coat II; and SF, Shield force plus) and two glass-ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials (CV, Clinpro XT Varnish; and FJ, Fuji VII) were selected. The experimental PRG Barrier Coat containing 0, 17, and 33 wt% S-PRG filler (BC0, BC17, and BC33, respectively) were developed. Each tooth-coating-material was applied to flattened dentin surfaces of extracted human teeth for SBS testing. After storing in water for 32 days with 4000 thermal cycling, the specimens were subjected to the SBS test. Specimens after SBS testing were subjected to a pH cycling test, and then, demineralization depths were measured using a polarized-light microscope. ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test were used for statistical analysis. The SBS value of FJ and CV was significantly lower than those of other materials except for BC (p coating-materials demonstrated significantly higher SBS for dentin than the glass-ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials; however, they were inferior to the glass ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials in regards to the acid resistance of the fractured adhesion surface.

  16. To evaluate and compare the effect of different Post Surface treatments on the Tensile Bond Strength between Fiber Posts and Composite Resin.

    Shori, Deepa; Pandey, Swapnil; Kubde, Rajesh; Rathod, Yogesh; Atara, Rahul; Rathi, Shravan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Fiber posts are widely used for restoration of mutilated teeth that lack adequate coronal tooth structure to retain a core for definitive restoration, bond between the fiber post and composite material depends upon the chemical reaction between the post surface and the resin material used for building up the core. In attempt to maximize the resin bonding with fiber post, different post surface conditioning is advocated. Therefore the purpose of the study is to examine the interfac...

  17. Compatibility improvement method of empty fruit bunch fibre as a replacement material in cement bonded boards: A review

    Dullah, Hayana; Abidin Akasah, Zainal; Zaini Nik Soh, Nik Mohd; Mangi, Sajjad Ali

    2017-11-01

    The utilization of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fibre on bio-composite product has been introduced to replace current material mainly wood fibre. OPEFB is widely available as palm oil is one of the major agricultural crops in Malaysia. EFB fibre are lignocellulosic materials that could replace other natural fibre product especially cement bonded board. However, the contains of residual oil and sugar in EFB fibre has been detected to be the reason for incompatibility issue between EFB fibre and cement mixtures. Regarding on the issue, a study has been conducted widely on finding the suitable pre-treatment method for EFB fibre to remove carbohydrate contained in the said fibre that are known to inhibit cement hydration. Aside from that, cement accelerator was introduced to enhance the hydration of cement when it was mixed with natural fibre. Hence, this paper will summaries the previous findings and in-depth study on the use of EFB fibre as a replacement material in cement bonded fibre boards.

  18. Micro-shear bond strength of different resin cements to ceramic/glass-polymer CAD-CAM block materials.

    Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Ergun, Gulfem; Egilmez, Ferhan; Vallittu, Pekka Kalevi; Lassila, Lippo Veli Juhana

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid treatment on bond strength of resin cements to three different types of ceramic/glass containing CAD-CAM block composite materials. CAD-CAM block materials of polymer infiltrated (Vita Enamic), resin nanoceramic (Lava Ultimate) and nanoceramic (Cerasmart) with a thickness of 1.5mm were randomly divided into two groups according to the surface treatment performed. In Group 1, specimens were wet-ground with silicon carbide abrasive papers up to no. 1000. In Group 2, 9.6% hydrofluoric acid gel was applied to ceramics. Three different resin cements (RelyX, Variolink Esthetic and G-CEM LinkAce) were applied to the tubes in 1.2-mm thick increments and light-cured for 40s using LED light curing unit. Half of the specimens (n=10) were submitted to thermal cycling (5000 cycles, 5-55°C). The strength measurements were accomplished with a universal testing machine (Lloyd Instruments) at a cross-head speed of 0.5mm/min until the failure occurs. Failure modes were examined using a stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope. The data were analyzed with multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc tests (α=0.05). There were significant differences between ceramics and resin cements (pceramics (pceramic/glass-polymer materials might promote the bonding capacity of these systems. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Materials and technologies in Art Nouveau architecture: Facade decoration cases in Italy, Portugal and Poland for a consistent restoration

    Sandrolini, F.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of a diagnostic survey on the materials of representative Art Nouveau buildings in Italy, Portugal and Poland are here presented and compared, as a contribution to their understanding and, hence, to support compatible restoration. In particular, the facade decorations were investigated for the appraisal of their materials and technologies, often neglected in current maintenance/restoration works and so cancelled, leading to a severe loss in architectural image. The ongoing diagnostic campaign, in collaboration among different universities, is aimed to set up a database on materials and technologies of Art Nouveau facade decorations at a European scale, as a technical-scientific background for the highlighting of preservation guidelines.

    En este trabajo se presentan los resultados de un estudio de diagnóstico sobre materiales representativos de edificios del periodo del Modernismo en Italia, Portugal y Polonia. Con la comparación de estos resultados se pretende contribuir a incrementar el conocimiento de los materiales usados en este patrimonio, que permita realizar más eficazmente las futuras intervenciones de restauración. En particular, se analizan las decoraciones de las fachadas, pasando por el reconocimiento de sus materiales constituyentes y de las tecnologías usadas, que muchas veces no son adecuadamente estudiados en intervenciones de mantenimiento y/o restauración, provocando graves pérdidas en su imagen y lenguaje arquitectónico original. Con la campaña de trabajos de diagnóstico, en colaboración con varias universidades, se pretende crear una base de datos sobre materiales y tecnologías usados en las decoraciones de fachada en el periodo del Modernismo a una escala europea. El material podrá constituirse en una herramienta técnico-científica de soporte al desarrollo de directrices y recomendaciones para la preservación de este patrimonio.

  20. Evaluation of Nystatin Containing Chitosan Hydrogels as Potential Dual Action Bio-Active Restorative Materials: in Vitro Approach

    V. Tamara Perchyonok

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Healing is a specific biological process related to the general phenomenon of growth and tissue regeneration and is a process generally affected by several systemic conditions or as detrimental side-effects of chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced inflammation of the oral mucosa. The objectives of this study is to evaluate the novel chitosan based functional drug delivery systems, which can be successfully incorporated into “dual action bioactive restorative materials”, capable of inducing in vitro improved wound healing prototype and containing an antibiotic, such as nystatin, krill oil as an antioxidant and hydroxyapatite as a molecular bone scaffold, which is naturally present in bone and is reported to be successfully used in promoting bone integration when implanted as well as promoting healing. The hydrogels were prepared using a protocol as previously reported by us. The physico-chemical features, including surface morphology (SEM, release behaviors, stability of the therapeutic agent-antioxidant-chitosan, were measured and compared to the earlier reported chitosan-antioxidant containing hydrogels. Structural investigations of the reactive surface of the hydrogel are reported. Release of nystatin was investigated for all newly prepared hydrogels. Bio-adhesive studies were performed in order to assess the suitability of these designer materials. Free radical defense capacity of the biomaterials was evaluated using established in vitro model. The bio-adhesive capacity of the materials in the in vitro system was tested and quantified. It was found that the favorable synergistic effect of free radical built-in defense mechanism of the new functional materials increased sustainable bio-adhesion and therefore acted as a functional multi-dimensional restorative material with potential application in wound healing in vitro.

  1. Effect of composite resin placement techniques on the microleakage of two self-etching dentin-bonding agents.

    Santini, A.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.; Mitchell, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate microleakage of Class V resin-based composites (RBC) bonded with two self-etching dentin adhesive systems. Class V cavities were restored with either one or three increments of RBC to determine whether the restorative method affected microleakage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 60

  2. Evaluation of the penetration of restoration materials in stone. A new method

    Rodríguez-Gordillo, J.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available We have used the measurements of the water-stone contact angle on the surface of sections of biocalcarenite samples to evaluate the penetration of organic and silico-organic restoration products in this rock. The method has been found to be effective and precise, allowing us to distinguish the depth of the zone with water-repellent characteristics from that with merely a consolidating effect.

    Se utilizan las medidas del ángulo de contacto agua-piedra sobre la superficie de secciones de probetas de biocalcarenita, para evaluar la penetrabilidad de productos de restauración orgánicos y silicoorgánicos en esta roca. El método se revela como eficaz y preciso, permitiendo discriminar la profundidad de la zona con características hidrófugas de aquélla exclusivamente consolidada.

  3. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives. [bonding metal and composite material structures for aircraft and spacecraft

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A rubber-toughened, addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber-containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride has been mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  4. Apical adaptation, sealing ability and push-out bond strength of five root-end filling materials

    Pablo Andrés AMOROSO-SILVA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the fluid filtration, adaptation to the root canal walls, and the push-out bond strength of two resin-based sealers and three calcium silicate-based retrograde filling materials. Fifty maxillary canines were shaped using manual instruments and the apical portion was sectioned. Retrograde cavities of 3-mm depth were prepared. The specimens were divided into five groups (n = 10: Sealer 26 (S26; MBPc (experimental; MTA; Portland cement with 20% zirconium oxide (PC/ZO, and Portland cement with 20% calcium tungstate (PC/CT. The fluid filtration was measured at 7 and 15 days. To evaluate the interfacial adaptation, sections of the teeth, 1 and 2 mm from the apex, were prepared and the percentage of gaps was calculated. The push-out bond strength at 2 mm from the apex was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA/Tukey’s test (p < 0.05. At 7 and 15 days (p = 0.0048, p = 0.006, the PC/CT group showed higher fluid filtration values when compared to other groups. At 1 mm from the apex, no statistical differences in the adaptation were found among the cements (p = 0.44. At 2 mm from the apex, the PC/ZO group presented statistically lower percentage of gaps than S26, MBPc, and MTA (p = 0.0007. The MBPc group showed higher push-out bond strength than other cements evaluated (p = 0.0008. The fluid filtration and interfacial adaptation of the calcium silicate-based cements were similar to those of the resin-based cements. The resinous cement MBPc showed superior push-out bond strength.

  5. A comparison of the sealing ability of various temporary restorative materials to seal the access cavity: An in vitro study

    Aji Markose

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In multiple-appointment root canal treatment, a temporary filling material is used to seal the access cavity between visits. The primary function of this material is to prevent the contamination of the root canal system by fluids, organic debris, and bacteria from the oral cavity. Material and Methods: A total of fifty extracted noncarious unrestored human maxillaryanterior teeth with intact crowns and roots were selected The canals were instrumented using stepback technique and sodium hypochlorite (3% and hydrogen peroxide (3% were used as irrigants for each specimen alternatively. The coronal two-thirds of each canal were flared using Gates-Glidden drills up to no. 3 size and obturated with Gutta-percha using zinc oxide-eugenol (ZnOE as sealer. The teeth were then randomly selected and divided into six groups out of which four were experimental groups and two control groups. The teeth were then immersed in 2% methylene blue dye solution for 3 days. All sealing materials and Gutta-percha were gently removed from the walls of the canal, and the entire circumference of the canal wall examined for dye penetration. Results: The lowest mean leakage was in the Fermit-N group followed by Cavit-W, ZnOE, intermediate restorative materials (IRM, and positive control. Conclusion: Fermit-N showed better sealing ability compared to cavit, ZnOE and IRM.

  6. Effect of nightguard vital bleaching gel on the color stability of provisional restorative materials.

    Bajunaid, Salwa Omar

    2016-01-01

    To assess the hypothesis that there was no difference in effect of 10% and 15% tooth bleaching agents on color stability of materials used for provisional fixed dental prosthesis. Fifteen samples from two materials used for provisional fixed dental prosthesis: methacrylate-based and composite-based materials and 15 preformed polycarbonate crowns soaked in bleaching gel or distilled water. Spectrophotometer recorded color of specimens at baseline, after 3, 7, and 14 days. Data were statistically analyzed using two-factor ANOVA test to compare the color stability of tested materials. Methyl-based provisional material exhibited statistically higher color change when exposed to 10% and 15% bleaching gel (delta EFNx01: 9.0 and 11.1, respectively) as compared to distilled water (delta EFNx01: 2.9). Delta EFNx01 of composite-based material specimens exposed to distilled water was statistically higher (6.3) than specimens exposed to 10% and 15% bleaching gel (1.5 and 1.1, respectively). Polycarbonate crowns showed a statistically lower color change when exposed to 15% (0.9) than to 10% bleaching gel (5.1) or distilled water (5.5). Composite-based provisional material showed highest color stability when exposed to vital tooth bleaching gel, whereas methacrylate-based material was the least color stable. Polycarbonate crowns were more color stable when exposed to 15% bleaching gel as opposed to 10% bleaching gel.

  7. Effect of nightguard vital bleaching gel on the color stability of provisional restorative materials

    Salwa Omar Bajunaid

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Composite-based provisional material showed highest color stability when exposed to vital tooth bleaching gel, whereas methacrylate-based material was the least color stable. Polycarbonate crowns were more color stable when exposed to 15% bleaching gel as opposed to 10% bleaching gel.

  8. A comparison of stresses in molar teeth restored with inlays and direct restorations, including polymerization shrinkage of composite resin and tooth loading during mastication.

    Dejak, Beata; Młotkowski, Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of composites is one of the main causes of leakage around dental restorations. Despite the large numbers of studies there is no consensus, what kind of teeth reconstruction--direct or indirect composite restorations are the most beneficial and the most durable. The aim was to compare equivalent stresses and contact adhesive stresses in molar teeth with class II MOD cavities, which were restored with inlays and direct restorations (taking into account polymerization shrinkage of composite resin) during simulated mastication. The study was conducted using the finite elements method with the application of contact elements. Three 3D models of first molars were created: model A was an intact tooth; model B--a tooth with a composite inlay, and model C--a tooth with a direct composite restoration. Polymerization linear shrinkage 0.7% of a direct composite restoration and resin luting cement was simulated (load 1). A computer simulation of mastication was performed (load 2). In these 2 situations, equivalent stresses according to the modified von Mises criterion (mvM) in the materials of mandibular first molar models with different restorations were calculated and compared. Contact stresses in the luting cement-tooth tissue adhesive interface around the restorations were also assessed and analyzed. Equivalent stresses in a tooth with a direct composite restoration (the entire volume of which was affected by polymerization shrinkage) were many times higher than in the tooth restored with a composite inlay (where shrinkage was present only in a thin layer of the luting cement). In dentin and enamel the stress values were 8-14 times higher, and were 13 times higher in the direct restoration than in the inlay. Likewise, contact stresses in the adhesive bond around the direct restoration were 6.5-7.7 times higher compared to an extraorally cured restoration. In the masticatory simulation, shear contact stresses in the adhesive bond around the direct

  9. Influence of Cavity Margin Design and Restorative Material on Marginal Quality and Seal of Extended Class II Resin Composite Restorations In Vitro.

    Soliman, Sebastian; Preidl, Reinhard; Karl, Sabine; Hofmann, Norbert; Krastl, Gabriel; Klaiber, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the influence of three cavity designs on the marginal seal of large Class II cavities restored with low-shrinkage resin composite limited to the enamel. One hundred twenty (120) intact human molars were randomly divided into 12 groups, with three different cavity designs: 1. undermined enamel, 2. box-shaped, and 3. proximal bevel. The teeth were restored with 1. an extra-low shrinkage (ELS) composite free of diluent monomers, 2. microhybrid composite (Herculite XRV), 3. nanohybrid composite (Filtek Supreme XTE), and 4. silorane-based composite (Filtek Silorane). After artificial aging by thermocycling and storage in physiological saline, epoxy resin replicas were prepared. To determine the integrity of the restorations' approximal margins, two methods were sequentially employed: 1. replicas were made of the 120 specimens and examined using SEM, and 2. the same 120 specimens were immersed in AgNO3 solution, and the dye penetration depth was observed with a light microscope. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis and the Dunn-Bonferroni tests. After bevel preparation, SEM observations showed that restorations did not exhibit a higher percentage of continuous margin (SEM-analysis; p>0.05), but more leakage was found than with the other cavity designs (pcomposite restorations and is no longer recommended. However, undermined enamel should be removed to prevent enamel fractures.

  10. Effect of Various Treatment Modalities on Surface Characteristics and Shear Bond Strengths of Polyetheretherketone-Based Core Materials.

    Çulhaoğlu, Ahmet Kürşat; Özkır, Serhat Emre; Şahin, Volkan; Yılmaz, Burak; Kılıçarslan, Mehmet Ali

    2017-11-13

    ), and silicoated PEEK surfaces (8.07 ± 2.54 MPa). Acetone-treated (5.98 ± 1.54 MPa) and untreated PEEK surfaces (5.09 ± 2.14 MPa) provided the lowest mean shear bond strengths. The highest mean shear bond strengths were observed for acid-etched PEEK surfaces, followed by laser-irradiated, airborne particle abraded, and silicoated PEEK surfaces providing similar mean shear bond strengths. Since shear bond strengths higher than 10 MPa are considered acceptable, acid etching, laser irradiation, and airborne particle abrasion of PEEK surfaces may be considered viable surface treatment modalities for the PEEK material tested. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  11. Failure in a composite resin-dentin adhesive bond

    Rezgui, B. (Dept. de Genie Mecanique, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Monastir, Monastir (Tunisia)); Abdennagi, H. (Dept. de Genie Mecanique, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Monastir, Monastir (Tunisia)); Sahtout, S. (Dept. de Genie Mecanique, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Monastir, Monastir (Tunisia) Dept. d' Odontologie, Faculte de Chirurgie Dentaire de Monastir (Tunisia)); Belkhir, M.S. (Dept. de Genie Mecanique, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Monastir, Monastir (Tunisia) Dept. d' Odontologie, Faculte de Chirurgie Dentaire de Monastir (Tunisia))

    1993-11-01

    Composites are drawing more and more attention as preferred materials for teeth restoration. The success of teeth restoration has been generally limited by the Composite Resin-Dentin bond strength. A testing device has been developped to allow a satisfactory testing method for evaluating bonding strength in tension and shear, which led to reproducible results. A comparaison between different bond systems has shown no significant difference in the tensile and the shear strength as well as in the fracture behavior. Moreover, results showed difference between tensile and shear strength, when considering one same bond system. Failure mode examination turned out to be, either cohesive (composite rupture), or adhesive (interface rupture) or both (mixed rupture). (orig.).

  12. Effect of storage in water and thermocycling on hardness and roughness of resin materials for temporary restorations

    Jerusa Cleci de Oliveira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study evaluated the effect of storage in water and thermocycling on hardness and roughness of resin materials for temporary restorations. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three acrylic resins (Dencor-De, Duralay-Du, and Vipi Cor-VC were selected and one composite resin (Opallis-Op was used as a parameter for comparison. The materials were prepared according to the manufacturers' instructions and were placed in stainless steel moulds (20 mm in diameter and 5 mm thick. Thirty samples of each resin were made and divided into three groups (n = 10 according to the moment of Vickers hardness (VHN and roughness (Ra analyses: C (control group: immediately after specimen preparation; Sw: after storage in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 hours; Tc: after thermocycling (3000 cycles; 5-55 °C, 30 seconds dwell time. Data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (α = 0.05. RESULTS: Op resin had higher surface hardness values (p 0.05 in roughness among materials (De = 0.31 ± 0.07; Du = 0.51 ± 0.20; VC = 0.41 ± 0.15; Op = 0.42 ± 0.18. Storage in water did not change hardness and roughness of the tested materials (p > 0.05. There was a significant increase in roughness after thermocycling (p < 0.05, except for material Du, which showed no significant change in roughness in any evaluated period (p = 0.99. CONCLUSION: Thermocycling increased the roughness in most tested materials without affecting hardness, while storage in water had no significant effect in the evaluated properties.

  13. Quality restoration of waste polyolefin plastic material through the dissolution-reprecipitation technique

    Hadi Jasim Arkan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the restoration of waste plastic polymers based on LDPE, HDPE or PP through dissolution/reprecipitation. Experimental conditions of the recycling process, including type of solvent/non-solvent, original polymer concentration and dissolution temperature were optimized. Results revealed that by using the different prepared solvents/non-solvents at various ratios and temperatures, the polymer recovery was always greater than 94%. The FTIR spectra and the thermal properties (melting point and crystallinity of the polymers before and after recycling were measured using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC. Mechanical properties of the waste polymer before and after recycling were also measured. Besides small occasional deviations, the properties did not change. The tensile strength at maximum load was 7.1, 18.8, and 7.4 MPa for the recycled LDPE, HDPE and PP, respectively and 7.78, 18.54 and 7.86 MPa for the virgin polymer. For the waste, the strength was 6.2, 15.58 and 6.76 MPa.

  14. Functional organic materials based on polymerized liquid-crystal monomers: supramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems

    Broer, D.J.; Bastiaansen, C.W.M.; Debije, M.G.; Schenning, A.P.H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Functional organic materials are of great interest for a variety of applications. To obtain precise functional properties, well-defined hierarchically ordered supramolecular materials are crucial. The self-assembly of liquid crystals has proven to be an extremely useful tool in the development of

  15. STRATIFICATION TECHNIQUE IN MAXILLARY ANTERIOR INCISORS RESTORATION

    Janet Kirilova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Because of their main characteristics: transparency, opalescence and color density, the tooth structures are extremely difficult to restore by means of completely inconspicuous restorations of the natural tooth tissue characteristics. The aim is to show successful aesthetic restoration of III Class dental lesions in upper incisors by means of high quality composites. Materials and method: A female patient visited the clinic being not satisfied with the esthetics of her front teeth. The intraoral examination showed previous restorations and carious lesions in 12, 11, 21, 22. After defining the tooth color a silicone key was made. The treatment was performed under anesthesia, the existing restorations were removed and the carious lesions in teeth 11, 12, 21, 22 were treated with restorations using Vanini edge preparation. The teeth were restored by means of stratification technique. After etching and rinsing, bonding was applied for 20 sec. and then polymerized. After fixing the silicone key enamel shade was applied and then dentine shades UD2, UD3, UD4 of 0.5mm thickness each. The polymerization was done layer by layer. Applied were 10 to 15 layers in total. The composite material was preheated in oven up to 55. Teeth 21 and 22 are restored with Enamel Plus HRi (Micerium. Results and Discussion: Excellent aesthetics is achieved with composite material. They have enamel and dentine shades and allow high quality aesthetics. The polishing is excellent in Enamel Plus HRi (Micerium which is typical for this type of composite. The result of the carious lesion treatment in this patient is real improvement of the dental appearance of her anterior incisors. Conclusion: Materials show excellent aesthetic results due to their characteristics and the stratification technique used.

  16. Microtensile bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system using different bonding strategies

    Laura AlveBastos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pre-etching on the bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin. Materials and Methods Thirty human molars were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the different bonding strategies. For teeth restored with silorane-based composite (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE, the specific self-etching adhesive system (Adhesive System P90, 3M ESPE was used with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Silorane and Silorane groups. Teeth restored with methacrylate based-composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE were hybridized with the two-step self-etching system (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray, with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Methacrylate and Methacrylate groups, or three-step adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE (Three-step/Methacrylate group (n = 6. The restored teeth were sectioned into stick-shaped test specimens (1.0 × 1.0 mm, and coupled to a universal test machine (0.5 mm/min to perform microtensile testing. Results Pre-etching/Methacrylate group presented the highest bond strength values, with significant difference from Silorane and Three-step/Methacrylate groups (p < 0.05. However, it was not significantly different from Preetching/Silorane and Methacrylate groups. Conclusions Pre-etching increased bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin.

  17. Wire bonding in microelectronics

    Harman, George G

    2010-01-01

    Wire Bonding in Microelectronics, Third Edition, has been thoroughly revised to help you meet the challenges of today's small-scale and fine-pitch microelectronics. This authoritative guide covers every aspect of designing, manufacturing, and evaluating wire bonds engineered with cutting-edge techniques. In addition to gaining a full grasp of bonding technology, you'll learn how to create reliable bonds at exceedingly high yields, test wire bonds, solve common bonding problems, implement molecular cleaning methods, and much more. Coverage includes: Ultrasonic bonding systems and technologies, including high-frequency systems Bonding wire metallurgy and characteristics, including copper wire Wire bond testing Gold-aluminum intermetallic compounds and other interface reactions Gold and nickel-based bond pad plating materials and problems Cleaning to improve bondability and reliability Mechanical problems in wire bonding High-yield, fine-pitch, specialized-looping, soft-substrate, and extreme-temperature wire bo...

  18. Evaluation of the effects of high energy X-ray radiation in materials used in dental restorations

    Maio, Mireia Florencio; Santos, Adimir dos; Fernandes, Marco Antonio Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    This work studied the behavior of the physical features and chemical composition of materials used in dental restorations (titanium, amalgam, composite resin and glass ionomer cement) which were submitted to x-ray radiation of 6.0 Mega-Volt (MV) of energy produced in a linear accelerator that is used in radiotherapy of head and neck tumors 1 2. The samples were analyzed using a x-ray fluorescence technique by comparing the chemical composition before and after irradiation. In order to check the residual radiation in the samples, measurements of the sample dosimetry were performed with Geiger-Mueller radiation detectors and an ionization chamber. The samples were also analyzed by gamma-ray spectrometry using a hyper-pure Germanium (HPGe) detector. From these tests, we aimed to verify small changes in the composition of the test bodies due to the radiation. (author)

  19. Evaluation of the effects of high energy X-ray radiation in materials used in dental restorations

    Maio, Mireia Florencio; Santos, Adimir dos, E-mail: mfmaio@ipen.br, E-mail: asantos@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, Marco Antonio Rodrigues, E-mail: marfernandes@fmb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia

    2011-07-01

    This work studied the behavior of the physical features and chemical composition of materials used in dental restorations (titanium, amalgam, composite resin and glass ionomer cement) which were submitted to x-ray radiation of 6.0 Mega-Volt (MV) of energy produced in a linear accelerator that is used in radiotherapy of head and neck tumors 1 2. The samples were analyzed using a x-ray fluorescence technique by comparing the chemical composition before and after irradiation. In order to check the residual radiation in the samples, measurements of the sample dosimetry were performed with Geiger-Mueller radiation detectors and an ionization chamber. The samples were also analyzed by gamma-ray spectrometry using a hyper-pure Germanium (HPGe) detector. From these tests, we aimed to verify small changes in the composition of the test bodies due to the radiation. (author)

  20. Toxicity Testing of Restorative Dental Materials Using Brine Shrimp Larvae (Artemia salina

    Manar M. Milhem

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of extracts of different composites, glass ionomer cement (GICs and compomers on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. Ethanolic extracts of four dental composites (Z-100; Solitaire 2; Filtek P60 and Synergy, a conventional GIC (Ketac-Fil, a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer, two compomers (F2000; Dyract AP, and a flowable compomer (Dyract Flow were prepared from each material. Following evaporation of the ethanol, the extracts were resuspended in distilled water, which was then used to test the effects on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. For the composites, the extract of Synergy was the least toxic (88% viability followed by the extracts of Solitaire 2, Z100 and P60 (75%, 67.5% and 50% viability, respectively. One-way ANOVA revealed highly significant differences between the resin composite materials (p<0.001. Follow-up comparison between the composite groups by Tukey's pairwise multiple-comparison test (α =0.05 showed that the extract of Synergy was significantly less toxic than the extracts of all the other materials except that of Solitaire 2. The compomers showed 100% lethality, while the percentage of viable larvae for the extracts of Ketac-Fil, and Vitremer were 32.3%, and 37.0%, respectively. One-way ANOVA revealed highly significant differences between the groups of materials (p<0.001. Follow-up comparison between the groups by Tukey's test (α = 0.05 showed that the toxic effect of the extracts of the compomers were significantly greater than that of Ketac-Fil, and Vitremer. The differences in the toxic effects of Vitremer and Ketac-Fil were not statistically significant. In conclusion, the toxicity of composite materials varied according to their chemical composition. Compomers were the most lethal materials to brine shrimp larvae followed by GICs and then composites.

  1. Effects of three silane primers and five adhesive agents on the bond strength of composite material for a computer-aided design and manufacturing system.

    Shinohara, Ayano; Taira, Yohsuke; Sakihara, Michino; Sawase, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of combinations of silane primers and adhesive agents on the bond strength of a composite block for a computer-aided design and manufacturing system. Material and Methods Three silane primers [Clearfil Ceramic Primer (CP), Super-Bond PZ Primer (PZ), and GC Ceramic Primer II (GP)] were used in conjunction with five adhesive agents [G-Premio Bond (P-Bond), Repair Adhe Adhesive (R-Adhesive), Super-Bond D-Liner Dual (SB-Dual), Super-Bond C&B (SB-Self), and SB-Dual without tributylborane derivative (SB-Light)]. The surface of a composite block (Gradia Block) was ground with silicon carbide paper. After treatment with a silane primer, a adhesive agent was applied to each testing specimen. The specimens were then bonded with a light-curing resin composite. After 24 h, the shear bond strength values were determined and compared using a post hoc test (α=0.05, n=8/group). We also prepared control specimens without primer (No primer) and/or without adhesive agent (No adhesive). Results PZ/SB-Dual and GP/SB-Dual presented the highest bond strength, followed by GP/P-Bond, CP/SB-Dual, CP/R-Adhesive, No primer/SB-Dual, GP/R-Adhesive, CP/P-Bond, No primer/R-Adhesive, PZ/R-Adhesive, CP/SB-Self, PZ/P-Bond, PZ/SB-Self, and GP/SB-Self in descending order of bond strength. No primer/P-Bond, No primer/SB-Self, and all specimens in the SB-Light and No adhesive groups presented the lowest bond strengths. Conclusion A dual-curing adhesive agent (SB-Dual) containing a tributylborane derivative in combination with a silane primer (GP or PZ) presents a greater bond strength between the composite block and the repairing resin composite than the comparators used in the study.

  2. Influence of curing time, overlay material and thickness on three light-curing composites used for luting indirect composite restorations.

    D'Arcangelo, Camillo; De Angelis, Francesco; Vadini, Mirco; Carluccio, Fabio; Vitalone, Laura Merla; D'Amario, Maurizio

    2012-08-01

    To assess the microhardness of three resin composites employed in the adhesive luting of indirect composite restorations and examine the influence of the overlay material and thickness as well as the curing time on polymerization rate. Three commercially available resin composites were selected: Enamel Plus HRI (Micerium) (ENA), Saremco ELS (Saremco Dental) (SAR), Esthet-X HD (Dentsply/DeTrey) (EST-X). Post-polymerized cylinders of 6 different thicknesses were produced and used as overlays: 2 mm, 3 mm, 3.5 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm, and 6 mm. Two-mm-thick disks were produced and employed as underlays. A standardized amount of composite paste was placed between the underlay and the overlay surfaces which were maintained at a fixed distance of 0.5 mm. Light curing of the luting composite layer was performed through the overlays for 40, 80, or 120 s. For each specimen, the composite to be cured, the cured overlay, and the underlay were made out of the same batch of resin composite. All specimens were assigned to three experimental groups on the basis of the resin composite used, and to subgroups on the basis of the overlay thickness and the curing time, resulting in 54 experimental subgroups (n = 5). Forty-five additional specimens, 15 for each material under investigation, were produced and subjected to 40, 80, or 120 s of light curing using a microscope glass as an overlay; they were assigned to 9 control subgroups (n = 5). Three Vicker's hardness (VH) indentations were performed on each specimen. Means and standard deviations were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using 3-way ANOVA. Within the same material, VH values lower than 55% of control were not considered acceptable. The used material, the overlay thickness, and the curing time significantly influenced VH values. In the ENA group, acceptable hardness values were achieved with 3.5-mm or thinner overlays after 120 or 80 s curing time (VH 41.75 and 39.32, respectively), and with 2-mm overlays after 40 s (VH 54

  3. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with Zirconia filler containing composite core material and fiber posts.

    Jeaidi, Zaid Al

    2016-01-01

    To assess the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth with a novel Zirconia (Zr) nano-particle filler containing bulk fill resin composite. Forty-five freshly extracted maxillary central incisors were endodontically treated using conventional step back preparation and warm lateral condensation filling. Post space preparation was performed using drills compatible for fiber posts (Rely X Fiber Post) on all teeth (n=45), and posts were cemented using self etch resin cement (Rely X Unicem). Samples were equally divided into three groups (n=15) based on the type of core materials, ZirconCore (ZC) MulticCore Flow (MC) and Luxacore Dual (LC). All specimens were mounted in acrylic resin and loads were applied (Universal testing machine) at 130° to the long axis of teeth, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. The loads and the site at which the failures occurred were recorded. Data obtained was tabulated and analyzed using a statistical program. The means and standard deviations were compared using ANOVA and Multiple comparisons test. The lowest and highest failure loads were shown by groups LC (18.741±3.02) and MC (25.16±3.30) respectively. Group LC (18.741±3.02) showed significantly lower failure loads compared to groups ZC (23.02±4.21) and MC (25.16±3.30) (pcomposite cores was comparable to teeth restored with conventional Zr free bulk fill composites. Zr filled bulk fill composites are recommended for restoration of endodontically treated teeth as they show comparable fracture resistance to conventional composite materials with less catastrophic failures.

  4. A resin composite material containing an eugenol derivative for intracanal post cementation and core build-up restoration.

    Almaroof, A; Rojo, L; Mannocci, F; Deb, S

    2016-02-01

    To formulate and evaluate new dual cured resin composite based on the inclusion of eugenyl methacrylate monomer (EgMA) with Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin systems for intracanal post cementation and core build-up restoration of endodontically treated teeth. EgMA was synthesized and incorporated at 5% (BTEg5) or 10% (BTEg10) into dual-cure formulations. Curing properties, viscosity, Tg, radiopacity, static and dynamic mechanical properties of the composites were determined and compared with Clearfil™DC Core-Plus, a commercial dual-cure, two-component composite. Statistical analysis of the data was performed with ANOVA and the Tukey's post-hoc test. The experimental composites were successfully prepared, which exhibited excellent curing depths of 4.9, 4.7 and 4.2 mm for BTEg0, BTEg5 and BTEg10 respectively, which were significantly higher than Clearfil™DC. However, the inclusion of EgMA initially led to a lower degree of cure, which increased when measured at 24 h with values comparable to formulations without EgMA, indicating post-curing. The inclusion of EgMA also lowered the polymerization exotherm thereby reducing the potential of thermal damage to host tissue. Both thermal and viscoelastic analyses confirmed the ability of the monomer to reduce the stiffness of the composites by forming a branched network. The compressive strength of BTEg5 was significantly higher than the control whilst flexural strength increased significantly from 95.9 to 114.8 MPa (BTEg5) and 121.9 MPa (BTEg10). Radiopacity of the composites was equivalent to ∼3 mm Al allowing efficient diagnosis. The incorporation of EgMA within polymerizable formulations provides a novel approach to prepare reinforced resin composite material for intracanal post cementation and core build-up and the potential to impart antibacterial properties of eugenol to endodontic restorations. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiation Tolerance of A2Ti2O7 Materials - A Question of Bonding?

    Whittle, Karl R.; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Smith, Katherine L.; Blackford, Mark G.; Harvey, Elizabeth J.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    2007-01-01

    The resistance of Ln 2 Ti 2 O 7 (Ln = lanthanide) compounds to radiation damage is an important topic in the understanding and development of new materials by which radioactive nuclear waste can safely be immobilised. A model has been developed, from previously published density functional theory and molecular orbital theory simulations of the band structure for Ln 2 Ti 2 O 7 materials. This model provides a chemical interpretation of radiation stability. (authors)

  6. Quantum double-well chain: Ground-state phases and applications to hydrogen-bonded materials

    Wang, X.; Campbell, D.K.; Gubernatis, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Extrapolating the results of hybrid quantum Monte Carlo simulations to the zero temperature and infinite-chain-length limits, we calculate the ground-state phase diagram of a system of quantum particles on a chain of harmonically coupled, symmetric, quartic double-well potentials. We show that the ground state of this quantum chain depends on two parameters, formed from the ratios of the three natural energy scales in the problem. As a function of these two parameters, the quantum ground state can exhibit either broken symmetry, in which the expectation values of the particle's coordinate are all nonzero (as would be the case for a classical chain), or restored symmetry, in which the expectation values of the particle's coordinate are all zero (as would be the case for a single quantum particle). In addition to the phase diagram as a function of these two parameters, we calculate the ground-state energy, an order parameter related to the average position of the particle, and the susceptibility associated with this order parameter. Further, we present an approximate analytic estimate of the phase diagram and discuss possible physical applications of our results, emphasizing the behavior of hydrogen halides under pressure

  7. Low-Temperature Bonding of Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 Thermoelectric Material with Cu Electrodes Using a Thin-Film In Interlayer

    Lin, Yan-Cheng; Yang, Chung-Lin; Huang, Jing-Yi; Jain, Chao-Chi; Hwang, Jen-Dong; Chu, Hsu-Shen; Chen, Sheng-Chi; Chuang, Tung-Han

    2016-09-01

    A Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 thermoelectric material electroplated with a Ni barrier layer and a Ag reaction layer was bonded with a Ag-coated Cu electrode at low temperatures of 448 K (175 °C) to 523 K (250 °C) using a 4- μm-thick In interlayer under an external pressure of 3 MPa. During the bonding process, the In thin film reacted with the Ag layer to form a double layer of Ag3In and Ag2In intermetallic compounds. No reaction occurred at the Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3/Ni interface, which resulted in low bonding strengths of about 3.2 MPa. The adhesion of the Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3/Ni interface was improved by precoating a 1- μm Sn film on the surface of the thermoelectric element and preheating it at 523 K (250 °C) for 3 minutes. In this case, the bonding strengths increased to a range of 9.1 to 11.5 MPa after bonding at 473 K (200 °C) for 5 to 60 minutes, and the shear-tested specimens fractured with cleavage characteristics in the interior of the thermoelectric material. The bonding at 448 K (175 °C) led to shear strengths ranging from 7.1 to 8.5 MPa for various bonding times between 5 and 60 minutes, which were further increased to the values of 10.4 to 11.7 MPa by increasing the bonding pressure to 9.8 MPa. The shear strengths of Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3/Cu joints bonded with the optimized conditions of the modified solid-liquid interdiffusion bonding process changed only slightly after long-term exposure at 473 K (200 °C) for 1000 hours.

  8. Color stability of sealed composite resin restorative materials after ultraviolet artificial aging and immersion in staining solutions.

    Catelan, Anderson; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Sundfeld, Renato Hermann; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique

    2011-04-01

    The color alteration of resin-based materials is one of the most common reasons to replace esthetic dental restorations. This study assessed the influence of surface sealant (Biscover) on the color stability of nanofilled (Supreme XT) and microhybrid (Vit-l-escence and Opallis) composite resins after artificial aging. One hundred disc-shaped (6 × 1.5 mm) specimens were made for each composite resin. After 24 hours, all specimens were polished and sealant was applied to 50 specimens of each material. Baseline color was measured according to the CIE L*a*b* system using a reflection spectrophotometer. Ten specimens of each group were aged for 252 h in an ultraviolet (UV)-accelerated aging chamber or immersed for 4 weeks in cola soft drink, orange juice, red wine staining solutions or distilled water as control. Color difference (ΔE) after aging was calculated based on the color coordinates before (baseline) and after aging/staining treatment. Data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and Fisher's test (α=.05). The results showed significant changes in color after artificial aging in all the groups (Paging, and the cola soft drink. The lowest values of ΔE were found for specimens stored in distilled water. All composite resins showed some color alteration after the aging methods. The surface sealant did not alter the color stability of the tested materials. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. New Bond Coat Materials for Thermal Barrier Coating Systems Processed Via Different Routes

    Soare, A.; Csaki, I.; Sohaciu, M.; Oprea, C.; Soare, S.; Costina, I.; Petrescu, M. I.

    2017-06-01

    This paper aims at describing the development of new Ru-based Bond Coats (BC) as part of Thermal Barrier Coatings. The challenge of this research was to obtain an adherent and uniform layer of alumina protective layer after high temperature exposure. We have prepared a RuAl 50/50 at% alloy in an induction furnace which was subsequently subjected to oxidation in an electric furnace, in air, at 1100C, for 10h and 100h. Mechanical alloying of Ru and Al powders was another processing route used in an attempt to obtain a stoichiometric RuAl. The alloy was sintered by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) and then oxidized at 1100C for 1 and10h. The alloys obtained as such were analysed before and after oxidation using advanced microscopy techniques (SEM and TEM). The encouraging results in case of RuAl alloys prepared by induction melting reveal that we obtained an adherent and uniform layer of alumina, free of delta-Ru. The results for the samples processed by powder metallurgy were positive but need to be further investigated. We should note here the novelty of this method for this particular type of application - as a BC part of a TBC system.

  10. Experimental Studies on Improved Plastic Bonded Explosives Materials (PBXs for Controlled Fragmentation Warheads

    Elsharkawy Karim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes formulations of plastic bonded explosives (PBXs based on three highly brisant explosives, namely 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (RDX, 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX and pentaerythritoltetranitrate (PETN with polyurethane (PU based on Glycidyl azide polymer (GAP as an energetic binder in comparison with composition-B, which used in the fragmentation warheads. The sensitivity and performance properties of different types of PBXs were evaluated by experimental results of prepared selected PBX compositions. Casting technique was used to prepare the selected compositions containing 14% PU based on GAP. It has been observed that the brisance of the PBX based on HMX was higher than that of comp-B by 21.3 %, the detonation velocity showed a remarkable increase of the order of 8480 (m/s while that of comp-B was 7638 (m/s. A controlled fragmentation warhead with an outer grooving warhead case of dimensions 100x35x4 mm was used and arena test was carried out to determine the lethal zone of the fragmentation warhead. The lethal zone obtained from arena test for PBX composition based on HMX named PBXHG4 was higher than that based on RDX or PETN, and than that of comp-B by 40%.

  11. Molecular assembly of materials with covalent bonding: Path to robust structures

    Puniredd, Sreenivasa Reddy; Zhang Fengxiang; Srinivasan, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Ultrathin films were fabricated using synthesized polyimide (HPI) with hydroxyl pendant groups in a layer-by-layer fashion on amine-terminated substrates of silicon, quartz and gold. The interlayer linkages were established by using terephthaloyl chloride as a bridging agent to form ester groups between HPI layers. Furthermore, when working on the nanometer scale in liquid solvents, necessity of a solvent rinse after each deposition step and the presence of residual solvent are problematic. To avoid the problems related to residual solvent we have fabricated an ultrathin film of oligoimide on amine-modified substrates of silicon and quartz through alternate layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) and diaminodiphenylether (DDE), with inter-layer links established by covalent bonds. The assembly was formed in supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO 2 ), and in solution (N,N-dimethylacetamide, DMAc), and the imidization reaction was performed by thermal and chemical methods, in benzene and in the supercritical medium. We have compared these films with those assembled in a conventional solvent medium. The comparison is further extended to carrying out the imidization reaction by various methods. The films show excellent stability and strength, which can be attributed to the covalent interlayer linkage

  12. High-κ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} material in low temperature wafer-level bonding for 3D integration application

    Fan, J., E-mail: fanji@hust.edu.cn; Tu, L. C. [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurement, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Tan, C. S. [School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2014-03-15

    This work systematically investigated a high-κ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} material for low temperature wafer-level bonding for potential applications in 3D microsystems. A clean Si wafer with an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer thickness of 50 nm was applied as our experimental approach. Bonding was initiated in a clean room ambient after surface activation, followed by annealing under inert ambient conditions at 300 °C for 3 h. The investigation consisted of three parts: a mechanical support study using the four-point bending method, hermeticity measurements using the helium bomb test, and thermal conductivity analysis for potential heterogeneous bonding. Compared with samples bonded using a conventional oxide bonding material (SiO{sub 2}), a higher interfacial adhesion energy (∼11.93 J/m{sup 2}) and a lower helium leak rate (∼6.84 × 10{sup −10} atm.cm{sup 3}/sec) were detected for samples bonded using Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. More importantly, due to the excellent thermal conductivity performance of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, this technology can be used in heterogeneous direct bonding, which has potential applications for enhancing the performance of Si photonic integrated devices.

  13. Color stability of restorative materials in response to Arabic coffee, Turkish coffee and Nescafe.

    Al-Samadani, Khalid H

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of Arabic coffee, Turkish coffee and Nescafe on the color stability of four different composite resins after a period of aging time 1, 7 and 30 days. Twenty specimens from each type of tested composite resin material were prepared. Five specimens from each tested material (Z350 XT, Artist, GC and Z250) was evaluated after storage in Arabic coffee, Turkish coffee, Nescafe and distil water (control) at 37°C in a dark container for 1, 7 and 30 days. Color measurement was done using colorimeter based on the CIE L* a* b* color scale. Color differences ΔE*ab, Δb* and Δa* among specimens immersed in distil water and staining coffee beverages were evaluated overtime. Mean values were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by Tukey test with p Nescafe except Δa*. The highest total color difference ΔE*ab after 30 days was in group A Arabic coffee (ΔE > 1.5 perceivable) and not perceivable in group B Turkish coffee and group C Nescafe. For Δb* all materials discolored toward yellowness after 30 days except Arabic coffee group which shifted from yellowness toward blueness (Δb*> 1.5 perceivable). The effect of staining beverages on the resin composite materials increases with time of aging toward yellowness and not perceivable in all groups except with Arabic coffee which had highest effect after 30 days and the discoloration shifted from yellowness to blueness perceivable.

  14. Stability Thresholds and Performance Standards for Flexible Lining Materials in Channel and Slope Restoration Applications

    2012-07-01

    number method, hydraulic modeling (e.g., HEC -15, HEC - RAS ), or evaluation of historical gage records or flood frequency distributions. The materials used...Recommendations for product selection and field installation monitoring are summarized. INTRODUCTION: Conventional river engineering and stream... river engineering. New York: John Wiley and Sons. Citing Fortier, S., and F. C. Scobey. 1926. Permissible canal velocities. In Transactions of the ASCE

  15. Toxicity testing of restorative dental materials using brine shrimp larvae (Artemia salina).

    Milhem, Manar M; Al-Hiyasat, Ahmad S; Darmani, Homa

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of extracts of different composites, glass ionomer cement (GIC)s and compomers on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. Ethanolic extracts of four dental composites (Z-100; Solitaire 2; Filtek P60 and Synergy), a conventional GIC (Ketac-Fil), a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer), two compomers (F2000; Dyract AP), and a flowable compomer (Dyract Flow) were prepared from each material. Following evaporation of the ethanol, the extracts were resuspended in distilled water, which was then used to test the effects on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. For the composites, the extract of Synergy was the least toxic (88% viability) followed by the extracts of Solitaire 2, Z100 and P60 (75%, 67.5% and 50% viability, respectively). One-way ANOVA revealed highly significant differences between the resin composite materials (plarvae for the extracts of Ketac-Fil, and Vitremer were 32.3%, and 37.0%, respectively. One-way ANOVA revealed highly significant differences between the groups of materials (pshrimp larvae followed by GICs and then composites.

  16. Interfacial characterization of ceramic core materials with veneering porcelain for all-ceramic bi-layered restorative systems.

    Tagmatarchis, Alexander; Tripodakis, Aris-Petros; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Zinelis, Spiros; Eliades, George

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the elemental distribution at the interface between all-ceramic core and veneering porcelain materials. Three groups of all-ceramic cores were selected: A) Glass-ceramics (Cergo, IPS Empress, IPS Empress 2, e-max Press, Finesse); B) Glass-infiltrated ceramics (Celay Alumina, Celay Zirconia) and C) Densely sintered ceramics (Cercon, Procera Alumina, ZirCAD, Noritake Zirconia). The cores were combined with compatible veneering porcelains and three flat square test specimens were produced for each system. The core-veneer interfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis. The glass-ceramic systems showed interfacial zones reach in Si and O, with the presence of K, Ca, Al in core and Ca, Ce, Na, Mg or Al in veneer material, depending on the system tested. IPS Empress and IPS Empress 2 demonstrated distinct transitional phases at the core-veneer interface. In the glassinfiltrated systems, intermixing of core (Ce, La) with veneer (Na, Si) elements occurred, whereas an abrupt drop of the core-veneer elemental concentration was documented at the interfaces of all densely sintered ceramics. The results of the study provided no evidence of elemental interdiffusion at the core-veneer interfaces in densely sintered ceramics, which implies lack of primary chemical bonding. For the glass-containing systems (glassceramics and glass-infiltrated ceramics) interdiffusion of the glass-phase seems to play a critical role in establishing a primary bonding condition between ceramic core and veneering porcelain.

  17. The effects of lasers on bond strength to ceramic materials: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    García-Sanz, Verónica; Paredes-Gallardo, Vanessa; Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Carbonell-Leal, Miguel; Albaladejo, Alberto; Montiel-Company, José María; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Lasers have recently been introduced as an alternative means of conditioning dental ceramic surfaces in order to enhance their adhesive strength to cements and other materials. The present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to review and quantitatively analyze the available literature in order to determine which bond protocols and laser types are the most effective. A search was conducted in the Pubmed, Embase and Scopus databases for papers published up to April 2017. PRISMA guidelines for systematic review and meta-analysis were followed. Fifty-two papers were eligible for inclusion in the review. Twenty-five studies were synthesized quantitatively. Lasers were found to increase bond strength of ceramic surfaces to resin cements and composites when compared with control specimens (p-value < 0.01), whereas no significant differences were found in comparison with air-particle abraded surfaces. High variability can be observed in adhesion values between different analyses, pointing to a need to standardize study protocols and to determine the optimal parameters for each laser type.

  18. The effects of lasers on bond strength to ceramic materials: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    García-Sanz, Verónica; Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Carbonell-Leal, Miguel; Albaladejo, Alberto; Montiel-Company, José María; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Lasers have recently been introduced as an alternative means of conditioning dental ceramic surfaces in order to enhance their adhesive strength to cements and other materials. The present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to review and quantitatively analyze the available literature in order to determine which bond protocols and laser types are the most effective. A search was conducted in the Pubmed, Embase and Scopus databases for papers published up to April 2017. PRISMA guidelines for systematic review and meta-analysis were followed. Fifty-two papers were eligible for inclusion in the review. Twenty-five studies were synthesized quantitatively. Lasers were found to increase bond strength of ceramic surfaces to resin cements and composites when compared with control specimens (p-value < 0.01), whereas no significant differences were found in comparison with air-particle abraded surfaces. High variability can be observed in adhesion values between different analyses, pointing to a need to standardize study protocols and to determine the optimal parameters for each laser type. PMID:29293633

  19. Deflection control of functionally graded material beams with bonded piezoelectric sensors and actuators

    Gharib, Ahmad; Salehi, Manouchehr; Fazeli, Saeed

    2008-01-01

    An analytical solution is developed for analysis of functionally graded material (FGM) beams containing two layers of piezoelectric material, used as sensor and actuator. The properties of FGM layer are functionally graded in the thickness direction according to the volume fraction power law distribution. The equations of motion are derived by using Hamilton's principle, based on the first-order shear deformation theory. By using a displacement potential function, and assumption of harmonic vibration, the equations of motion have been solved analytically. Finally, the effects of FGM constituent volume fraction in the peak responses for various volume fraction indexes have been graphically illustrated

  20. Bonding Durability of Four Adhesive Systems

    Leila Atash Biz Yeganeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to compare the durability of four adhesive systems by assessing their microtensile bond strength (MTBS and microleakage during six months of water storage.Materials and Methods: A total of 128 human third molars were used. The adhesives tested were Scotch Bond Multipurpose (SBMP, Single Bond (SB, Clearfil-SE bond (CSEB, and All-Bond SE (ABSE. After sample preparation for MTBS testing, the microspecimens were subjected to microtensile tester after one day and six months of water storage. For microleakage evaluation, facial and lingual class V cavities were prepared and restored with composite. After thermocycling, microleakage was evaluated. Bond strength values were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tamhane’s test, and the microleakage data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn, Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (P<0.05.Results: Single Bond yielded the highest and ABSE yielded the lowest bond strength at one day and six months. Short-term bond strength of SBMP and CSEB was similar. After six months, a significant decrease in bond strength was observed in ABSE and SBMP groups. At one day, ABSE showed the highest microleakage at the occlusal margin; however, at the gingival margin, there was no significant difference among groups. Long-term microleakage of all groups at the occlusal margins was similar, whilst gingival margins of SBMP and SB showed significantly higher microleakage.Conclusion: The highest MTBS and favorable sealability were obtained by Clearfil SE bond. Water storage had no effect on microleakage of self-etch adhesives at the gingival margin or MTBS of CSEB and SB. 

  1. Significance of Shrinkage Induced Clamping Pressure in Fiber-Matrix Bonding in Cementitious Composite Materials

    Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    used in high performance cementitious composite materials.Assuming a Coulomb type of friction on the fiber/matrix interface andusing typical values for the frictional coefficient it is shownthat the shrinkage induced clamping pressure could be one of the mostimportant factors determining the frictional...

  2. Polyacrylonitrile based composite materials with extracting agents containing chemically bonded CMPO groups for separation of actinoids

    Kameník, Jan; Šebesta, F.; John, J.; Böhmer, V.; Rudzevich, V.; Grüner, Bohumír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 304, č. 1 (2015), s. 313-319 ISSN 0236-5731 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : actinoids * CMPO * Calix[4]arene * cobalt bis(dicarbollide) * polyacrylonitrile * composite material Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.983, year: 2015

  3. Microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance and porcelain shear bond strength comparison between cast and hot pressed CoCrMo alloy for metal-ceramic dental restorations.

    Henriques, B; Soares, D; Silva, F S

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance and metal-porcelain bond strength of a CoCrMo dental alloy obtained by two routes, cast and hot pressing. CoCrMo alloy substrates were obtained by casting and hot pressing. Substrates' microstructure was examined by the means of Optical Microscopy (OM) and by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Hardness tests were performed in a microhardness indenter. The electrochemical behavior of substrates was investigated through potentiodynamic tests in a saline solution (8g NaCl/L). Substrates were bonded to dental porcelain and metal-porcelain bond strength was assessed by the means of a shear test performed in a universal test machine (crosshead speed: 0.5 mm/min) until fracture. Fractured surfaces as well as undestroyed interface specimens were examined with Stereomicroscopy and SEM-EDS. Data was analyzed with Shapiro-Wilk test to test the assumption of normality. The t-test (pmicrostructures whereas hot pressed specimens exhibited a typical globular microstructure with a second phase spread through the matrix. The hardness registered for hot pressed substrates was greater than that of cast specimens, 438±24HV/1 and 324±8HV/1, respectively. Hot pressed substrates showed better corrosion properties than cast ones, i.e. higher OCP; higher corrosion potential (E(corr)) and lower current densities (i(corr)). No significant difference was found (p<0.05) in metal-ceramic bond strength between cast (116.5±6.9 MPa) and hot pressed (114.2±11.9 MPa) substrates. The failure type analysis revealed an adhesive failure for all specimens. Hot pressed products arise as an alternative to cast products in dental prosthetics, as they impart enhanced mechanical and electrochemical properties to prostheses without compromising the metal-ceramic bond strength. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biogenic Hydroxyapatite: A New Material for the Preservation and Restoration of the Built Environment.

    Turner, Ronald J; Renshaw, Joanna C; Hamilton, Andrea

    2017-09-20

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) is by weight the world's most produced man-made material and is used in a variety of applications in environments ranging from buildings, to nuclear wasteforms, and within the human body. In this paper, we present for the first time the direct deposition of biogenic hydroxyapatite onto the surface of OPC in a synergistic process which uses the composition of the cement substrate. This hydroxyapatite is very similar to that found in nature, having a similar crystallite size, iron and carbonate substitution, and a semi-crystalline structure. Hydroxyapatites with such a structure are known to be mechanically stronger and more biocompatible than synthetic or biomimetic hydroxyapatites. The formation of this biogenic hydroxyapatite coating therefore has significance in a range of contexts. In medicine, hydroxyapatite coatings are linked to improved biocompatibility of ceramic implant materials. In the built environment, hydroxyapatite coatings have been proposed for the consolidation and protection of sculptural materials such as marble and limestone, with biogenic hydroxyapatites having reduced solubility compared to synthetic apatites. Hydroxyapatites have also been established as effective for the adsorption and remediation of environmental contaminants such as radionuclides and heavy metals. We identify that in addition to providing a biofilm scaffold for nucleation, the metabolic activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens increases the pH of the growth medium to a suitable level for hydroxyapatite formation. The generated ammonia reacts with phosphate in the growth medium, producing ammonium phosphates which are a precursor to the formation of hydroxyapatite under conditions of ambient temperature and pressure. Subsequently, this biogenic deposition process takes place in a simple reaction system under mild chemical conditions and is cheap and easy to apply to fragile biological or architectural surfaces.

  5. Wear mechanisms of dental composite restorative materials by two different in-vitro methods

    Juliana Antonino de Souza

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work two very simple apparatuses, namely the ball crater (or ball-on-plate and the linear reciprocating (or pin-on-plate tests, were used in order to investigate the wear mechanisms of TPH Spectrum® and Resilab Master® dental composite resins. Loads in the range of 100 g to 1 kg and a total number of up to 24000 cycles were employed. During some of these tests, aqueous aluminum oxide suspensions were used as abrasive agent either diluted or not in distilled water. In case of the ball-on-plate test wear is dominated by abrasive and/or adhesive mechanisms, and is characterized by scratches which are composed of wear defects comprising particle detachment, wear of the polymer matrix and ceramic particle abrasion. However, the relative contributions of the two wear mechanisms could not be determined separately. In case of the pin-on-plate test wear is governed by the fatigue mechanism, although abrasive and adhesive wear mechanism are also present. After a certain number of cycles fatigue wear dominates the wear behavior and results in severe material loss. This mechanism seems to be more important in case of more brittle materials and when higher loads are employed. Qualitative analysis of the results suggests that the combination of these two very simple methods under appropriate conditions can yield sound results which may be representative of a number of clinical situations.

  6. Wear mechanisms of dental composite restorative materials by two different in-vitro methods

    Juliana Antonino de Souza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work two very simple apparatuses, namely the ball crater (or ball-on-plate and the linear reciprocating (or pin-on-plate tests, were used in order to investigate the wear mechanisms of TPH Spectrum® and Resilab Master® dental composite resins. Loads in the range of 100 g to 1 kg and a total number of up to 24000 cycles were employed. During some of these tests, aqueous aluminum oxide suspensions were used as abrasive agent either diluted or not in distilled water. In case of the ball-on-plate test wear is dominated by abrasive and/or adhesive mechanisms, and is characterized by scratches which are composed of wear defects comprising particle detachment, wear of the polymer matrix and ceramic particle abrasion. However, the relative contributions of the two wear mechanisms could not be determined separately. In case of the pin-on-plate test wear is governed by the fatigue mechanism, although abrasive and adhesive wear mechanism are also present. After a certain number of cycles fatigue wear dominates the wear behavior and results in severe material loss. This mechanism seems to be more important in case of more brittle materials and when higher loads are employed. Qualitative analysis of the results suggests that the combination of these two very simple methods under appropriate conditions can yield sound results which may be representative of a number of clinical situations.

  7. Microtensile bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system using different bonding strategies

    Bastos, Laura Alves; Sousa, Ana Beatriz Silva; Drubi-Filho, Brahim; Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pre-etching on the bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin. Materials and Methods Thirty human molars were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the different bonding strategies. For teeth restored with silorane-based composite (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE), the specific self-etching adhesive system (Adhesive System P90, 3M ESPE) was used with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/S...

  8. Evaluation of radiation effects on dental enamel hardness and dental restorative materials; Avaliacao do efeito da irradiacao na dureza do esmalte dental e de materiais odontologicos

    Adachi, Lena Katekawa; Saiki, Mitiko [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Supervisao de Radioquimica; Campos, Tomie Nakakuki [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Protese

    2000-07-01

    This research presents the results of the microhardness of human dental enamel and of the following dental restorative materials: three dental porcelains - Ceramco II, Finesse and Noritake, and two resin restorative materials - Artglass and Targis, for materials submitted to different times of irradiation at the IEA-R1m nuclear reactor under a thermal neutron flux of 10{sup 12}n cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} . The results obtained indicated that there is a decrease of the surface microhardness when the enamel is irradiated for 1 h and when dental materials are irradiated for 3 h. However, enamels irradiated for 30 min. did not show significant change of their surface hardness. Therefore, the selection of irradiation time is an important factor to be considered when irradiated teeth or dental materials are used in the investigations of their properties. (author)

  9. The use of a reinforced glass-ionomer cermet for the restoration of primary molars: a clinical trial.

    Kilpatrick, N M; Murray, J J; McCabe, J F

    1995-09-09

    The development of adhesive restorative materials has led to more conservative cavity design with greater reliance being placed upon the bond of a material with tooth tissue for retention of the restoration. Glass-ionomer cements may offer particular advantages but have yet to achieve the durability reported for amalgam. This study reports on the results of a 2.5-year prospective clinical trial comparing the durability of two glass-ionomer cements, a conventional material (Ketac Fil) and a metal reinforced cermet (Ketac Silver) in the restoration of Class II lesions in primary molars. Forty-six pairs of restorations were assessed in 37 children. The failure rate of Ketac Fil, 23%, was significantly lower than that of Ketac Silver, 41% (P < 0.05). The median survival time of the Ketac Fil restorations was significantly greater, 25.3 months, than that of the Ketac Silver restorations, 20.3 months (P < 0.05). These values may be an underestimate of the true longevity of both restoration types as many of the restorations survived intact at the censor date. Neither the age of the child nor the tooth restored influenced the durability of the restoration. The deterioration in both marginal integrity and anatomic form of the Ketac Silver restorations was significantly greater than the Ketac Fil restorations (P < 0.05). The durability of Ketac Silver was such that it cannot be recommended for use in restoring carious primary molars.

  10. Adhesively bonded joints composed of pultruded adherends: Considerations at the upper tail of the material strength statistical distribution

    Vallee, T.; Keller, Th. [Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, CCLab, CH-1015 Lausanne, (Switzerland); Fourestey, G. [Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, IACS, Chair Modeling and Sci Comp, CH-1015 Lausanne, (Switzerland); Fournier, B. [CEA SACLAY ENSMP, DEN, DANS, DMN, SRMA, LC2M, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Correia, J.R. [Univ Tecn Lisbon, Inst Super Tecn, Civil Engn and Architecture Dept, P-1049001 Lisbon, (Portugal)

    2009-07-01

    The Weibull distribution, used to describe the scaling of strength of materials, has been verified on a wide range of materials and geometries: however, the quality of the fitting tended to be less good towards the upper tail. Based on a previously developed probabilistic strength prediction method for adhesively bonded joints composed of pultruded glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) adherends, where it was verified that a two-parameter Weibull probabilistic distribution was not able to model accurately the upper tail of a material strength distribution, different improved probabilistic distributions were compared to enhance the quality of strength predictions. The following probabilistic distributions were examined: a two-parameter Weibull (as a reference), m-fold Weibull, a Grafted Distribution, a Birnbaum-Saunders Distribution and a Generalized Lambda Distribution. The Generalized Lambda Distribution turned out to be the best analytical approximation for the strength data, providing a good fit to the experimental data, and leading to more accurate joint strength predictions than the original two-parameter Weibull distribution. It was found that a proper modeling of the upper tail leads to a noticeable increase of the quality of the predictions. (authors)

  11. Adhesively bonded joints composed of pultruded adherends: Considerations at the upper tail of the material strength statistical distribution

    Vallee, T.; Keller, Th.; Fourestey, G.; Fournier, B.; Correia, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The Weibull distribution, used to describe the scaling of strength of materials, has been verified on a wide range of materials and geometries: however, the quality of the fitting tended to be less good towards the upper tail. Based on a previously developed probabilistic strength prediction method for adhesively bonded joints composed of pultruded glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) adherends, where it was verified that a two-parameter Weibull probabilistic distribution was not able to model accurately the upper tail of a material strength distribution, different improved probabilistic distributions were compared to enhance the quality of strength predictions. The following probabilistic distributions were examined: a two-parameter Weibull (as a reference), m-fold Weibull, a Grafted Distribution, a Birnbaum-Saunders Distribution and a Generalized Lambda Distribution. The Generalized Lambda Distribution turned out to be the best analytical approximation for the strength data, providing a good fit to the experimental data, and leading to more accurate joint strength predictions than the original two-parameter Weibull distribution. It was found that a proper modeling of the upper tail leads to a noticeable increase of the quality of the predictions. (authors)

  12. Tensile and shear bond strength of hard and soft denture relining materials to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin: An In-vitro study.

    Lau, Mayank; Amarnath, G S; Muddugangadhar, B C; Swetha, M U; Das, Kopal Anshuraj Ashok Kumar

    2014-04-01

    The condition of the denture bearing tissues may be adversely affected by high stress concentration during function. Chairside Denture (Hard and Soft) reliners are used to distribute forces applied to soft tissues during function. Tensile and shear bond strength has been shown to be dependent on their chemical composition. A weak bond could harbor bacteria, promote staining and delamination of the lining material. To investigate tensile and shear bond strength of 4 different commercially available denture relining materials to conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin. 4 mm sections in the middle of 160 Acrylic cylindrical specimens (20 mm x 8 mm) were removed, packed with test materials (Mollosil, G C Reline Soft, G C Reline Hard (Kooliner) and Ufi Gel Hard and polymerized. Specimens were divided into 8 groups of 20 each. Tensile and shear bond strength to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin were examined by Instron Universal Tensile Testing Machine using the equation F=N/A (F-maximum force exerted on the specimen (Newton) and A-bonding area= 50.24 mm2). One-way ANOVA was used for multiple group comparisons followed by Bonferroni Test and Hsu's MCB for multiple pairwise comparisons to asses any significant differences between the groups. The highest mean Tensile bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (6.49+0.08 MPa) and lowest for G C Reline Soft (0.52+0.01 MPa). The highest mean Shear bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (16.19+0.1 MPa) and lowest for Mollosil (0.59+0.05 MPa). The Benferroni test showed a significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength and the mean shear bond strength when the two denture soft liners were compared as well as when the two denture hard liners were compared. Hsu's MCB implied that Ufi gel hard is better than its other closest competitors. The Tensile and Shear bond strength values of denture soft reliners were significantly lower than denture hard reliners. How to cite the

  13. Nanofiber-bonded cloth materials based on poly-3-hydroxybutyrate with antibacterial properties for medical purposes

    Tyubaeva, P. M.; Olkhov, A. A.; Karpova, S. G.; Iordansky, A. L.; Popov, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Different transdermal systems based on solid polymer matrices or gels containing functional substances with antiseptic (antibacterial) properties have application to the therapy of many infectious diseases and cancer. Today the most promising type of matrices with antiseptic characteristics are the nano- and microfiber nonwoven materials. Fibers on the biopolymer (poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)) basis were obtained using the electrospinning method. In the present work, the effects of iron (III) complex with tetraphenylporphyrin and its influence on bactericidal and antibacterial properties of the ultrathin PHB fibers were investigated.

  14. Effect of Curing Direction on Microtensile Bond Strength of Fifth and Sixth Generation Dental Adhesives

    Ali Nadaf

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Composite restorative materials and dental adhesives are usually cured with light sources. The light direction may influence the bond strength of dental adhesives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light direction on the microtensile bond strength of fifth and sixth generation dental adhesives.Materials and Methods: Prime & Bond NT and Clearfil SE bond were used with different light directions.Sixty human incisor teeth were divided into 4 groups (n=15. In groups A and C, Clearfil SE bond with light curing direction from buccal was used for bonding a composite resin to dentin. In groups B and D, Prime & Bond NT with light curing direction from composite was used. After thermocycling the specimens were subjected to tensile force until debonding occurred and values for microtensile bond strength were recorded. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test.Results: The findings showed that the bond strength of Clearfil SE bond was significantly higher than that of Prime&Bond NT (P<0.001. There was no significant difference between light curing directions (P=0.132.Conclusion: Light curing direction did not have significant effect on the bond strength. Sixth generation adhesives was more successful than fifth generation in terms of bond strength to dentin.

  15. An in vitro study of dental enamel wear by restorative materials using radiometric method; Estudo in vitro do desgaste do esmalte dental pelos materiais restauradores utilizando metodo radiometrico

    Adachi, Lena Katekawa

    2000-07-01

    There is an increasing demand and interest to study the dental materials wear as well as about the abrasion effect on antagonistic teeth. Due to the fact that the existent restorative materials have no specifications about their abrasiveness, it is necessary the establishment of degrees of comparison among them to support clinical application. In this work, the radiometric method was applied to study the enamel wear caused by another enamel and by restorative materials (Ceramco II, Noritake and Finesse porcelains, Artglass and Targis). The dental enamel made radioactive by irradiation at the IEA-R1m nuclear research reactor under a thermal neutron flux was submitted to wear in a machine which allows sliding motion of an antagonistic surface in contact with this radioactive enamel. The enamel wear was evaluated by measuring beta activity of {sup 32}P transferred to water from this irradiated tooth. Results obtained indicated that dental porcelains cause pronounced enamel wear when compared with that provoked by another enamel or by resin materials. Resin materials caused less enamel wear than another enamel. Vickers microhardness data obtained for antagonistic materials showed a correlation with the wear caused to the enamel. This study allowed to conclude that the radiometric method proposed can be used satisfactorily in the evaluation of enamel wear by restorative materials. This method presents advantages due to quick responses and ease of analyses There is (author)

  16. THE EFFECT OF BONDING AND SURFACE SEALANT APPLICATION ON POSTOPERATIVE SENSITIVITY FROM POSTERIOR COMPOSITES

    Neslihan TEKÇE

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the postoperative sensitivity of posterior Class I composite restoration at short-term, restorated with two different all-in-one self-etch adhesives with or without surface sealant application. Materials and Methods: 44 restorations were inserted in 11 patients who required Class I restorations in their molars. Each patient received 4 restorations, thus four groups were formed; (1 G-Aenial Bond (GC, Japan; (2 Clearfil S3 Bond (Kuraray, Japan; (3 G-Aenial Bond+Fortify Plus (Bisco, USA, (4 Clearfil S3 Bond+Fortify Plus. Sensitivity was evaluated at 24h, 7, 15, and 30 days using cold air, ice, and pressure stimuli using a visual analog scale. Comparisons of continuous variables between the sensitivity evaluations were performed using the Friedman’s One-Way Analysis of Variance with repeated measures test (p0.05. The use of Clearfil S3 Bond resulted in almost the same level of postoperative sensitivity as did the use of G-Aenial Bond. The highest sensitivity scores were observed for the surface sealant applied teeth without any statistical significance (p>0.05. Conclusions: Self etch adhesives displayed postoperative sensitivity. The sensitivity scores slightly decreased at the end of 30 days (p>0.05. Surface sealant application did not result in a decrease in sensitivity scores for either dentin adhesives.

  17. Adsorption Studies of Lead by Enteromorpha Algae and Its Silicates Bonded Material

    Hassan H. Hammud

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead adsorption by green Enteromorpha algae was studied. Adsorption capacity was 83.8 mg/g at pH 3.0 with algae (E and 1433.5 mg/g for silicates modified algae (EM. FTIR and thermal analysis of algae materials were studied. Thomas and Yoon-Nelson column model were best for adsorbent (E and algae after reflux (ER and Yan model for (EM with capacity 76.2, 71.1, and 982.5 mg/g, respectively. (ER and (EM show less swelling and better flow rate control than (E. Nonlinear methods are more appropriate technique. Error function calculations proved valuable for predicting the best adsorption isotherms, kinetics, and column models.

  18. Liberação de flúor de materiais restauradores Fluoride releasing of restorative materials

    Adriana Silva de CARVALHO

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Atualmente no mercado odontológico existem diversos tipos de materiais restauradores que liberam flúor com o objetivo de diminuir ou eliminar as cáries recorrentes. Considerando-se a diferença de composição desses materiais, foi avaliada sua capacidade de liberação de flúor. Foram avaliados os materiais restauradores: Chelon-fil (ESPE, Vitremer (3M, Variglass (Dentsply, Dyract (Dentsply e Tetric (Vivadent. Confeccionaram-se seis amostras cilíndricas (área = 1,65 cm2 de cada material, as quais foram imersas individualmente em 2,0 ml de água deionizada, que foi trocada diariamente durante 15 dias. A liberação de flúor foi determinada após adição de volume igual de tampão TISAB II às soluções. Para a análise da concentração de flúor foi utilizado um eletrodo específico para flúor Orion 96-09, acoplado a um analisador de íons Orion EA-940. Todos os materiais seguiram o mesmo padrão de liberação de flúor. As maiores médias de flúor liberado dentro de cada material foram encontradas no 1º dia, decrescendo bruscamente no 2º e 3º dias, e a quantidade de flúor liberado apresentou um decréscimo com o passar dos dias até atingir um nível quase constante. A liberação média de flúor durante o período de avaliação (média e desvio padrão em µg F/cm2 foi: CHE = 7,62 ± 0,76A, VIT = 5,91 ± 0,79B, VAR = 2,72 ± 0,25C, DYR = 1,50 ± 0,17 D, TET = 0,136 ± 0,016 E. Médias seguidas por letras distintas diferem entre si ao nível de significância de 5% (Tukey. Os resultados mostraram que a composição dos materiais restauradores influencia de maneira significativa sua liberação de flúor.Nowadays there are several types of restorative materials with fluoride release properties. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the fluoride release from the following restorative materials, considering their different compositions. The materials used were: Chelon Fil-ESPE (CHE, Vitremer-3M (VIT, Variglass

  19. Simulation of bonding effects in HRTEM images of light element materials

    Simon Kurasch

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of multislice high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM simulation can be improved by calculating the scattering potential using density functional theory (DFT. This approach accounts for the fact that electrons in the specimen are redistributed according to their local chemical environment. This influences the scattering process and alters the absolute and relative contrast in the final image. For light element materials with well defined geometry, such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers, the DFT based simulation scheme turned out to be necessary to prevent misinterpretation of weak signals, such as the identification of nitrogen substitutions in a graphene network. Furthermore, this implies that the HRTEM image does not only contain structural information (atom positions and atomic numbers. Instead, information on the electron charge distribution can be gained in addition.In order to produce meaningful results, the new input parameters need to be chosen carefully. Here we present details of the simulation process and discuss the influence of the main parameters on the final result. Furthermore we apply the simulation scheme to three model systems: A single atom boron and a single atom oxygen substitution in graphene and an oxygen adatom on graphene.

  20. Correlation between native bonds in a polymeric material and molecular emissions from the laser-induced plasma observed with space and time resolved imaging

    Gregoire, S. [CRITT Materiaux Alsace, 19 rue de St Junien, 67300 Schiltigheim (France); Laboratoire de Recherche des Monuments Historiques, 29 rue de Paris, 77420 Champs-sur-Marne (France); Institut Charles Sadron, CNRS and University of Strasbourg, 23 rue de Loess, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Motto-Ros, V.; Ma, Q.L.; Lei, W.Q.; Wang, X.C. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, France, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France); Pelascini, F.; Surma, F. [CRITT Materiaux Alsace, 19 rue de St Junien, 67300 Schiltigheim (France); Detalle, V., E-mail: vincent.detalle@culture.gouv.fr [Laboratoire de Recherche des Monuments Historiques, 29 rue de Paris, 77420 Champs-sur-Marne (France); Yu, J. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, France, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France)

    2012-08-15

    Emissions from C{sub 2} molecules and CN radicals in laser-induced plasmas on polymeric materials were observed with time-resolved spectroscopic imaging. More precisely, differential imaging with a pair of narrowband filters (one centered on the emission line and another out of the line) was used to extract emission images of interested molecules or radicals. The correlation between the molecular emission image of the plasma and the molecular structure of the polymer to be analyzed was studied for four different types of materials: polyamide (PA) with native CN bonds, polyethylene (PE) with simple CC bonds, polystyrene (PS) with delocalized double CC bonds, and polyoxymethylene (POM) which neither contains CC nor CN bonds. A clear correlation is demonstrated between emission and molecular structure of the material, allowing the identification of several organic compounds by differential spectroscopic imaging. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plasma imaging method to discriminate different type of polymers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular emissions (CN and C{sub 2}) are spatially and temporally correlated to native bonds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Several formation processes of molecular fragments are observed.

  1. Influence of dentinal regions on bond strengths of different adhesive systems.

    Ozer, F; Unlü, N; Sengun, A

    2003-06-01

    This in vitro study assessed comparatively the shear bond strengths of three composite resins, 3M Valux Plus (3MVP), Herculite (H), Clearfil AP-X (CAP-X), a polyacid modified composite resin Dyract (D), and a resin modified glass-ionomer materials Vitremer (V), to cervical and buccal dentine regions of extracted human molar teeth. Four different bonding systems, 3M ScotchBond Multipurpose (SB), Clearfil Liner Bond 2 (LB2), Opti Bond (OB), and Prime & Bond 2.1 (PB 2.1) were used with the manufacturer's respective composite and compomer materials. One hundred freshly extracted mandibular molar teeth were selected for this study. Flat buccal dentine surfaces were created on 50 teeth and cylindrical rods of the five materials were bonded to the dentine surfaces. For assessment of cervical bond strengths, the materials were bonded to mesial and distal enamel bordered occlusal dentinal surfaces of the remaining 50 teeth. The five groups of restorative procedures were applied as follows; Group 1: SB + 3MVP, Group 2: LB2 + CAP-X, Group 3: OB + H, Group 4: PB2.1 + D, Group 5: Vitremer primer (VP) VP + V. Each restorative procedure thus had 20 specimens (10 buccal + 10 cervical). After 24 h of water storage (37 degrees C), the specimens were tested on a Universal Testing machine in shear with a cross head speed of 0.5 mm min-1. The bond strength values were calculated in MPa and the results were evaluated statistically using Kruskal-Wallis one-way/anova and Mann-Whitney U-tests. It was found that the bond strengths of SB + 3MVP, LB2 + CAP-X and VP + V to buccal dentine surfaces were significantly stronger (P 0.05). Vitremer was found the least successful adhesive material in terms of shear bond strength on both buccal and occluso-cervical dentine surfaces.

  2. Effect of at-home whitening strips on the surface roughness and color of a composite and an ormocer restorative material.

    Gurbuz, Ayhan; Ozkan, Pelin; Yilmaz, Kerem; Yilmaz, Burak; Durkan, Rukiye

    2013-01-01

    Oxygenating agents like carbamide peroxide or H(2) O(2) are commonly used whitening agents. They have varying influence on the color and surface roughness of resin-based restorative materials and teeth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an at-home peroxide whitening agent applied through a whitening strip on the color and surface roughness of a nanofilled composite resin and an ormocer-based resin. Disc-shaped (2 mm thick, 10 mm diameter) nanofilled resin composite (n = 10) and ormocer (n = 10) specimens were prepared. All specimens were treated with a whitening strip. Whitening procedures were performed applying a 6.5% hydrogen peroxide whitening strip (Crest White Strips Professional) for 30 minutes twice each day for a period of 21 consecutive days. During the test intervals, the specimens were rinsed under running distilled water for 1 minute to remove the whitening agents and immersed in 37°C distilled water until the next treatment. Surface roughness and color of the specimens were measured with a profilometer and a colorimeter, respectively, before and after whitening. Color changes were calculated (ΔE) using L*, a*, and b* coordinates. Repeated measures of variance analysis and Duncan test were used for statistical evaluation (α= 0.05). The average surface roughness of composite increased from 1.4 Ra to 2.0 Ra, and from 0.8 Ra to 0.9 Ra for the ormocer material; however, these changes in roughness after whitening were not significant (p > 0.05). Also, when two materials were compared, the surface roughness of restorative materials was not different before and after whitening (p > 0.05). L* and b* values for each material changed significantly after whitening (p composite (11.9) and ormocer (16.1) were not significantly different from each other (p > 0.05). The tested whitening agent did not affect the surface roughness of either resin-based restorative material. Both materials became brighter after whitening. The behavior of the

  3. Effect of Storage Time on Bond Strength and Nanoleakage Expression of Universal Adhesives Bonded to Dentin and Etched Enamel.

    Makishi, P; André, C B; Ayres, Apa; Martins, A L; Giannini, M

    2016-01-01

    To investigate bond strength and nanoleakage expression of universal adhesives (UA) bonded to dentin and etched enamel. Extracted human third molars were sectioned and ground to obtain flat surfaces of dentin (n = 36) and enamel (n = 48). Dentin and etched enamel surfaces were bonded with one of two UAs, All-Bond Universal (ABU) or Scotchbond Universal (SBU); or a two-step self-etching adhesive, Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB). A hydrophobic bonding resin, Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Bond (ASMP Bond) was applied only on etched enamel. Following each bonding procedure, resin composite blocks were built up incrementally. The specimens were sectioned and subjected to microtensile bond strength (MTBS) testing after 24 hours or one year water storage, or immersed into ammoniacal silver nitrate solution after aging with 10,000 thermocycles and observed using scanning electron microscopy. The percentage distribution of silver particles at the adhesive/tooth interface was calculated using digital image-analysis software. The MTBS (CSEB = SBU > ABU, for dentin; and CSEB > ABU = SBU = ASMP Bond, for etched enamel) differed significantly between the adhesives after 24 hours. After one year, MTBS values were reduced significantly within the same adhesive for both substrates (analysis of variance, Bonferroni post hoc, padhesives for etched enamel. Silver particles could be detected within the adhesive/dentin interface of all specimens tested. Kruskal-Wallis mean ranks for nanoleakage in ABU, SBU, and CSEB were 16.9, 18.5 and 11, respectively (p>0.05). In the short term, MTBS values were material and dental-substrate dependent. After aging, a decrease in bonding effectiveness was observed in all materials, with nanoleakage at the adhesive/dentin interface. The bonding of the UAs was equal or inferior to that of the conventional restorative systems when applied to either substrate and after either storage period.

  4. Shear bond strength of composite bonded with three adhesives to Er,Cr:YSGG laser-prepared enamel.

    Türkmen, Cafer; Sazak-Oveçoğlu, Hesna; Günday, Mahir; Güngör, Gülşad; Durkan, Meral; Oksüz, Mustafa

    2010-06-01

    To assess in vitro the shear bond strength of a nanohybrid composite resin bonded with three adhesive systems to enamel surfaces prepared with acid and Er,Cr:YSGG laser etching. Sixty extracted caries- and restoration-free human maxillary central incisors were used. The teeth were sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The crowns were embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin with the labial surfaces facing up. The labial surfaces were prepared with 0.5-mm reduction to receive composite veneers. Thirty specimens were etched with Er,Cr:YSGG laser. This group was also divided into three subgroups, and the following three bonding systems were then applied on the laser groups and the other three unlased groups: (1) 37% phosphoric acid etch + Bond 1 primer/adhesive (Pentron); (2) Nano-bond self-etch primer (Pentron) + Nano-bond adhesive (Pentron); and (3) all-in-one adhesive-single dose (Futurabond NR, Voco). All of the groups were restored with a nanohybrid composite resin (Smile, Pentron). Shear bond strength was measured with a Zwick universal test device with a knife-edge loading head. The data were analyzed with two-factor ANOVA. There were no significant differences in shear bond strength between self-etch primer + adhesive and all-in-one adhesive systems for nonetched and laser-etched enamel groups (P > .05). However, bond strength values for the laser-etched + Bond 1 primer/adhesive group (48.00 +/- 13.86 MPa) were significantly higher than the 37% phosphoric acid + Bond 1 primer/adhesive group (38.95 +/- 20.07 MPa) (P enamel surface more effectively than 37% phosphoric acid for subsequent attachment of composite material.

  5. Periapical tissue response after use of intermediate restorative material, gutta-percha, reinforced zinc oxide cement, and mineral trioxide aggregate as retrograde root-end filling materials: a histologic study in dogs.

    Wälivaara, Dan-Åke; Abrahamsson, Peter; Isaksson, Sten; Salata, Luiz Antonio; Sennerby, Lars; Dahlin, Christer

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the periapical tissue response of 4 different retrograde root-filling materials, ie, intermediate restorative material, thermoplasticized gutta-percha, reinforced zinc oxide cement (Super-EBA), and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), in conjunction with an ultrasonic root-end preparation technique in an animal model. Vital roots of the third and fourth right mandibular premolars in 6 healthy mongrel dogs were apicectomized and sealed with 1 of the materials using a standardized surgical procedure. After 120 days, the animals were sacrificed and the specimens were analyzed radiologically, histologically, and scanning electron microscopically. The Fisher exact test was performed on the 2 outcome values. Twenty-three sections were analyzed histologically. Evaluation showed better re-establishment of the periapical tissues and generally lower inflammatory infiltration in the sections from teeth treated with the intermediate restorative material and the MTA. New root cement on the resected dentin surfaces was seen on all sections regardless of the used material. New hard tissue formation, directly on the surface of the material, was seen only in the MTA sections. There was no statistical difference in outcome among the tested materials. The results from this dog model favor the intermediate restorative material and MTA as retrograde fillings when evaluating the bone defect regeneration. MTA has the most favorable periapical tissue response when comparing the biocompatibility of the materials tested. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Understanding of chemical bonding towards the enhancement of catalytic of Co(III)-doped ZrO2 catalyst material using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Nor Aziah Buang; Wan Azelee Wan Abu Bakar; Harrison, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis has demonstrated the formation metal ions in different oxidation states or similar oxidation state with different bonding character in the ZrO 2 based catalyst material. Interaction of cobalt oxide with ZrO 2 matrixes shows the formation of surface species of Zr-O-Co with Co in the +2 oxidation state and Co 3 O 4 -CoO in a mixture of +2 and +3 oxidation states. The formation of Zr-O-Co species in sample calcined at 400 degree C results in the more ionic character of Co-O bond and more covalent character of Zr-0 bond compared to their ordinary oxides. These behaviour cause the shifting of Co(2p) XPS peaks position towards higher binding energy and the Zr(3d) XPS peaks position towards lower binding energy. Meanwhile, the formation Of Co 3 0 4 -CoO in sample calcined at temperature of 600 degree C exhibits Co(2p) XPS peaks in the region correspond to the Co in the +2 and +3 oxidation states, which is more covalent in bonding character. The catalytic activity measurement of the catalyst material calcined at 600 o C showed that the existence of Co-O species with more covalent in bonding character gave the best catalytic performance towards 100 % conversion of carbon monoxide and propane. (Author)

  7. Hydrogen bond nature of ferroelectric material studied by X-ray and neutron diffraction. Electric dipole moment and proton tunneling

    Noda, Yukio; Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Mochida, Tomoyuki; Sugawara, Tadashi

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen bond nature of MeHPLN and BrHPLN is studied using x-ray and neutron diffraction technique. We found that electric dipole moment of hydrogen atom plays an important role for the phase transition, and proton tunneling model is confirmed on this isolated hydrogen bond system. (author)

  8. BiOBr@SiO2 flower-like nanospheres chemically-bonded on cement-based materials for photocatalysis

    Wang, Dan; Hou, Pengkun; Yang, Ping; Cheng, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Endowment of photocatalytic property on the surface of concrete structure can contribute to the self-cleaning of the structure and purification of the polluted environment. We developed a nano-structured BiOBr@SiO2 photocatalyst and innovatively used for surface-treatment of cement-based materials with the hope of attaining the photocatalytic property in visible-light region and surface modification/densification performances. The SiO2 layer on the flower-like BiOBr@SiO2 helps to maintain a stable distribution of the photocatalyst, as well as achieving a chemical bonding between the coating and the cement matrix. Results showed that the color fading rate of during the degradation of Rhodamine B dye of the BiOBr-cem sample is 2 times higher compared with the commonly studied C, N-TiO2-cem sample. The photo-degradation rates of samples BiOBr-cem and BiOBr@SiO2-cem are 93 and 81% within 150 min, respectively, while sample BiOBr@SiO2-cem reveals a denser and smoother surface after curing for 28 days and pore-filling effect at size within 0.01-0.2 μm when compared with untreated samples. Moreover, additional C-S-H gel can be formed due to the pozzolanic reaction between BiOBr@SiO2 and the hardened cement matrix. Both advantages of the BiOBr@SiO2 favor its application for surface-treatment of hardened cement-based material to acquire an improved surface quality, as well as durable photocatalytic functionality.

  9. Site Restoration

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A

    2002-04-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of SCK-CEN's Site Restoration Department for 2001 are described. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and the management of spent fuel and the flow of dismantled materials and the recycling of materials from decommissioning activities based on the smelting of metallic materials in specialised foundries. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations and performs R and D on new techniques including processes for the treatment of various waste components including the reprocessing of spent fuel, the treatment of tritium, the treatment of liquid alkali metals into cabonates through oxidation, the treatment of radioactive organic waste and the reconditioning of bituminised waste products.

  10. Evaluation of the effect of tooth and dental restoration material on electron dose distribution and production of photon contamination in electron beam radiotherapy.

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Akbari, Fatemeh; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Sobhkhiz Sabet, Leila

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of tooth and dental restoration materials on electron dose distribution and photon contamination production in electron beams of a medical linac. This evaluation was performed on 8, 12 and 14 MeV electron beams of a Siemens Primus linac. MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized and a 10 × 10 cm(2) applicator was simulated in the cases of tooth and combinations of tooth and Ceramco C3 ceramic veneer, tooth and Eclipse alloy and tooth and amalgam restoration materials in a soft tissue phantom. The relative electron and photon contamination doses were calculated for these materials. The presence of tooth and dental restoration material changed the electron dose distribution and photon contamination in phantom, depending on the type of the restoration material and electron beam's energy. The maximum relative electron dose was 1.07 in the presence of tooth including amalgam for 14 MeV electron beam. When 100.00 cGy was prescribed for the reference point, the maximum absolute electron dose was 105.10 cGy in the presence of amalgam for 12 MeV electron beam and the maximum absolute photon contamination dose was 376.67 μGy for tooth in 14 MeV electron beam. The change in electron dose distribution should be considered in treatment planning, when teeth are irradiated in electron beam radiotherapy. If treatment planning can be performed in such a way that the teeth are excluded from primary irradiation, the potential errors in dose delivery to the tumour and normal tissues can be avoided.

  11. Evaluation of the effect of tooth and dental restoration material on electron dose distribution and production of photon contamination in electron beam radiotherapy

    Bahreyni Toossi, M.T.; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Akbari, Fatemah; Sabet, Leila S.; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of tooth and dental restoration materials on electron dose distribution and photon contamination production in electron beams of a medical linac. This evaluation was performed on 8, 12 and 14 MeV electron beams of a Siemens Primus linac. MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized and a 10 × 10 cm 2 applicator was simulated in the cases of tooth and combinations of tooth and Ceramco C3 ceramic veneer, tooth and Eclipse alloy and tooth and amalgam restoration materials in a soft tissue phantom. The relative electron and photon contamination doses were calculated for these materials. The presence of tooth and dental restoration material changed the electron dose distribution and photon contamination in phantom, depending on the type of the restoration material and electron beam’s energy. The maximum relative electron dose was 1.07 in the presence of tooth including amalgam for 14 MeV electron beam. When 100.00 cGy was prescribed for the reference point, the maximum absolute electron dose was 105.10 cGy in the presence of amalgam for 12 MeV electron beam and the maximum absolute photon contamination dose was 376.67 μGy for tooth in 14 MeV electron beam. The change in electron dose distribution should be considered in treatment planning, when teeth are irradiated in electron beam radiotherapy. If treatment planning can be performed in such a way that the teeth are excluded from primary irradiation, the potential errors in dose delivery to the tumour and normal tissues can be avoided.

  12. Adhesive/Dentin Interface: The Weak Link in the Composite Restoration

    Spencer, Paulette; Ye, Qiang; Park, Jonggu; Topp, Elizabeth M.; Misra, Anil; Marangos, Orestes; Wang, Yong; Bohaty, Brenda S.; Singh, Viraj; Sene, Fabio; Eslick, John; Camarda, Kyle; Katz, J. Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Results from clinical studies suggest that more than half of the 166 million dental restorations that were placed in the United States in 2005 were replacements for failed restorations. This emphasis on replacement therapy is expected to grow as dentists use composite as opposed to dental amalgam to restore moderate to large posterior lesions. Composite restorations have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries, and increased frequency of replacement as compared to amalgam. Penetration of bacterial enzymes, oral fluids, and bacteria into the crevices between the tooth and composite undermines the restoration and leads to recurrent decay and premature failure. Under in vivo conditions the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface can be the first defense against these noxious, damaging substances. The intent of this article is to review structural aspects of the clinical substrate that impact bond formation at the adhesive/dentin interface; to examine physico-chemical factors that affect the integrity and durability of the adhesive/dentin interfacial bond; and to explore how these factors act synergistically with mechanical forces to undermine the composite restoration. The article will examine the various avenues that have been pursued to address these problems and it will explore how alterations in material chemistry could address the detrimental impact of physico-chemical stresses on the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface. PMID:20195761

  13. [The application of universal adhesives in dental bonding].

    Guo, Jingmei; Lei, Wenlong; Yang, Hongye; Huang, Cui

    2016-03-01

    The bonding restoration has become an important clinical technique for the development of dental bonding technology. Because of its easy operation and the maximum preservation of tooth tissues, bonding repair is widely used in dental restoration. The recent multi-mode universal adhesives have brought new progress in dental bonding restoration. In this article the universal adhesives were reviewed according to its definition, development, improvement, application features and possible problems.

  14. A 3-year prospective study of implant-supported, single-tooth restorations of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic materials in patients with tooth agenesis.

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to describe outcome variables of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic implant-supported, single-tooth restorations. A total of 59 patients (mean age: 27.9 years) with tooth agenesis and treated with 98 implant-supported single-tooth restorations were included in this study. Two patients did not attend baseline examination, but all patients were followed for 3 years. The implants supported 52 zirconia, 21 titanium and 25 gold alloy abutments, which retained 64 all-ceramic and 34 metal-ceramic crowns. At baseline and 3-year follow-up examinations, the biological outcome variables such as survival rate of implants, marginal bone level, modified Plaque Index (mPlI), modified Sulcus Bleeding Index (mBI) and biological complications were registered. The technical outcome variables included abutment and crown survival rate, marginal adaptation of crowns, cement excess and technical complications. The aesthetic outcome was assessed by using the Copenhagen Index Score, and the patient-reported outcomes were recorded using the OHIP-49 questionnaire. The statistical analyses were mainly performed by using mixed model of ANOVA for quantitative data and PROC NLMIXED for ordinal categorical data. The 3-year survival rate was 100% for implants and 97% for abutments and crowns. Significantly more marginal bone loss was registered at gold-alloy compared to zirconia abutments (P = 0.040). The mPlI and mBI were not significantly different at three abutment materials. The frequency of biological complications was higher at restorations with all-ceramic restorations than metal-ceramic crowns. Loss of retention, which was only observed at metal-ceramic crowns, was the most frequent technical complication, and the marginal adaptations of all-ceramic crowns were significantly less optimal than metal-ceramic crowns (P = 0.020). The professional-reported aesthetic outcome demonstrated significantly superior colour match of all-ceramic over metal

  15. Restorative dentistry for children.

    Donly, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses contemporary pediatric restorative dentistry. Indications and contraindications for the choice of different restorative materials in different clinical situations, including the risk assessment of the patient, are presented. The specific use of glass ionomer cement or resin-modified glass ionomer cement, resin-based composite, and stainless steel crowns is discussed so that preparation design and restoration placement is understood. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Surface Treatments on Micro Push-Out Bond Strength of Fiber Posts to Composite Resin Core Materials

    Mehrsima Ghavami-Lahiji

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of problem: The bonding of fiber post to resin core or root dentin is challenged by limited penetration of resin material to the polymeric matrix of fiber posts. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG on micro push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to resin core material. Materials and Methods: We used 2 commercially available fiber posts, Exacto (Angelus and White Post DC (FGM, which had similar coronal diameters. Specimens of each fiber post (n=36 were randomly divided into three subgroups (n=12 posts per group according to different surface treatment methods: control (no surface treatment, irradiation by 1W Er,Cr:YSGG, and irradiation by 1.5W Er,Cr:YSGG. A cylindrical plastic tube was placed around the post. Resin core material was filled into the tube and cured. Coronal portions of the posts were sectioned into 1-mm-thick slices. Then, the specimens were subjected to a thermocyling device for 3000 cycles. The micro push-out test was carried out using a Universal Testing Machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s HSD post hoc test to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on each type of fiber post. Results: The 1.5W Er,Cr:YSGG laser statistically reduced micro push-out bond strength values in the Exacto groups (P0.05. Mode of failure analysis showed that mixed failure was the predominant failure type for all surface treatment groups. Conclusions: The beneficial effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser application could not be confirmed based on the results of this in vitro study. Er,Cr:YSGG laser could not significantly enhance the bond strength values. However, the 1.5W laser statistically decreased micro push-out bond strength in the Exacto fiber posts.

  17. Electronic dipole moment and tunneling state of hydrogen atom in hydrogen-bond materials revealed by neutron and X-ray structure analyses

    Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Noda, Yukio; Mochida, Tomoyuki; Sugawara, Tadashi

    2007-01-01

    The isolated hydrogen-bonded materials, 5-methyl-9-hydroxyphenalenone (MeHPLN) and 5-bromo-9-hydroxyphenalenone (Br-HPLN), were studied by means of X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. It was found that the position of the nucleus of the hydrogen atom in the hydrogen-bond region does not agree with the center of mass of the electron cloud of the hydrogen atom. This leads to a local electronic dipole moment in the hydrogen-bond region. Using the experimentally obtained dipole moment, phase transition temperatures for MeHPLN and BrHPLN were calculated based on a tunneling model. Result shows good agreement with the ones obtained by a dielectric measurement. (author)

  18. Sol-gel-graphene-based fabric-phase sorptive extraction for cow and human breast milk sample cleanup for screening bisphenol A and residual dental restorative material before analysis by HPLC with diode array detection.

    Samanidou, Victoria; Filippou, Olga; Marinou, Eirini; Kabir, Abuzar; Furton, Kenneth G

    2017-06-01

    Fabric-phase sorptive extraction has already been recognized as a simple and green alternative to the conventional sorbent-based sorptive microextraction techniques, using hybrid organic-inorganic sorbent coatings chemically bonded to a flexible fabric surface. Herein, we have investigated the synergistic combination of the advanced material properties offered by sol-gel graphene sorbent and the simplicity of Fabric phase sorptive extraction approach in selectively extracting bisphenol A and residual monomers including bisphenol A glycerolatedimethacrylate, urethane dimethacrylate, and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate derived dental restorative materials from cow and human breast milk samples. Different coatings were evaluated. Final method development employed sol-gel graphene coated media. The main experimental parameters influencing extraction of the compounds, such as sorbent chemistry used, sample loading conditions, elution solvent, sorption stirring time, elution time, impact of protein precipitation, amount of sample, and matrix effect, were investigated and optimized. Absolute recovery values from standard solutions were 50% for bisphenol A, 78% for T triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 110% for urethane dimethacrylate, and 103% for bisphenol A glycerolatedimethacrylate, while respective absolute recovery values from milk were 30, 52, 104, and 42%. Method validation was performed according to European Decision 657/2002/EC in terms of selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy, and precision. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Surface topography of composite restorative materials following ultrasonic scaling and its Impact on bacterial plaque accumulation. An in-vitro SEM study.

    Hossam, A Eid; Rafi, A Togoo; Ahmed, A Saleh; Sumanth, Phani Cr

    2013-06-01

    This is an in vitro study to investigate the effects of ultrasonic scaling on the surface roughness and quantitative bacterial count on four different types of commonly used composite restorative materials for class V cavities. Nanofilled, hybrid, silorane and flowable composites were tested. Forty extracted teeth served as specimen and were divided into 4 groups of 10 specimens, with each group receiving a different treatment and were examined by a Field emission scanning electron microscope. Bacterial suspension was then added to the pellicle-coated specimens, and then bacterial adhesion was analyzed by using image analyzing program. Flowable and silorane-based composites showed considerably smoother surfaces and lesser bacterial count in comparison to other types, proving that bacterial adhesion is directly proportional to surface roughness. The use of ultrasonic scalers affects the surfaces of composite restorative materials. Routine periodontal scaling should be carried out very carefully, and polishing of the scaled surfaces may overcome the alterations in roughness, thus preventing secondary caries, surface staining, plaque accumulation and subsequent periodontal inflammation. How to cite this article: Eid H A, Togoo R A, Saleh A A, Sumanth C R. Surface Topography of Composite Restorative Materials following Ultrasonic Scaling and its Impact on Bacterial Plaque Accumulation. An In-Vitro SEM Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(3):13-19.

  20. Cuspal deflection and microleakage in premolar teeth restored with bulk-fill flowable resin-based composite base materials.

    Moorthy, A; Hogg, C H; Dowling, A H; Grufferty, B F; Benetti, A R; Fleming, G J P

    2012-06-01

    To assess the cuspal deflection and cervical microleakage of standardised Class II cavities incrementally filled with a dimethacrylate RBC or bulk-fill flowable RBC bases. Twenty-four sound upper premolar teeth with Class II cavities were allocated to three groups (n=8). Restoration of the teeth involved the placement of an RBC (GrandioSO) in eight oblique increments (Group A) or Groups B and C were restored to within 2 mm of the palatal cusp in a single increment with bulk-fill flowable RBC bases (SDR and x-tra base) before the two occlusal cavity increments were placed with GrandioSO. Buccal and palatal cusp deflections were recorded postirradiation using a twin channel deflection measuring gauge. Following restoration, the teeth were thermocycled, immersed in 0.2% basic fuchsin dye for 24h, sectioned and examined for cervical microleakage. The mean total cuspal deflection for the oblique incremental restoration technique was 11.26 (2.56) μm (Group A) and 4.63 (1.19) μm (Group B) and 4.73 (0.99) μm (Group C) for the bulk-fill flowable RBC bases. A significant increase in the mean total cuspal deflection for the incrementally filled GrandioSO compared with the SDR (P=0.007) and x-tra base (P=0.005) restored teeth was evident. No significant difference in the cervical microleakage scores was recorded between groups AC (P>0.05). The bulk-fill flowable RBC bases significantly reduced cuspal deflection compared with a conventional RBC restored in an oblique incremental filling technique with no associated change in cervical microleakage recorded. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relating mechanical properties and chemical bonding in an inorganic-organic framework material: a single-crystal nanoindentation study.

    Tan, Jin Chong; Furman, Joshua D; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2009-10-14

    We report the application of nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy to establish the fundamental relationships between mechanical properties and chemical bonding in a dense inorganic-organic framework material: Ce(C(2)O(4))(HCO(2)), 1. Compound 1 is a mixed-ligand 3-D hybrid which crystallizes in an orthorhombic space group, in which its three basic building blocks, i.e. the inorganic metal-oxygen-metal (M-O-M) chains and the two organic bridging ligands, (oxalate and formate) are all oriented perpendicular to one another. This unique architecture enabled us to decouple the elastic and plastic mechanical responses along the three primary axes of a single crystal to understand the contribution associated with stiff vs compliant basic building blocks. The (001)-oriented facet that features rigid oxalate ligands down the c-axis exhibits the highest stiffness and hardness (E approximately 78 GPa and H approximately 4.6 GPa). In contrast, the (010)-oriented facet was found to be the most compliant and soft (E approximately 43 GPa and H approximately 3.9 GPa), since the formate ligand, which is the more compliant building block within this framework, constitutes the primary linkages down the b-axis. Notably, intermediate stiffness and hardness (E approximately 52 GPa and H approximately 4.1 GPa) were measured on the (100)-oriented planes. This can be attributed to the Ce-O-Ce chains that zigzag down the a-axis (Ce...Ce metal centers form an angle of approximately 132 degrees) and also the fact that the 9-coordinated CeO(9) polyhedra are expected to be geometrically more compliant. Our results present the first conclusive evidence that the crystal orientation dominated by inorganic chains is not necessarily more robust from the mechanical properties standpoint. Rigid organic bridging ligands (such as oxalate), on the other hand, can be used to produce greater stiffness and hardness properties in a chosen crystallographic orientation. This study demonstrates that

  2. [Advantages and disadvantages of endocrown restorations of endodontically treated teeth with large coronal destruction].

    Bao, X D

    2018-04-09

    The strength of endodontically treated teeth were reduced apparently because of structural damage, therefore further reduction of healthy tissue should be avoided as much as possible in restoration. Endocrown made by chair-side CAD/CAM is some kind of minimal invasive restoration, and the retention of restoration is achieved by reliable bonding and macromechanial retention forces. Without post preparation, the root structure could be resevered. Following the indications and use of biomechanical dentin-like CAD/CAM materials could reduce the adverse effect of tensile stress on cervical part.

  3. Degree of conversion of resin-based orthodontic bonding materials cured with single-wave or dual-wave LED light-curing units.

    Santini, Ario; McGuinness, Niall; Nor, Noor Azreen Md

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the degree of conversion (DC) of orthodontic adhesives (RBOAs) cured with dual peak or single peak light-emitting diode (LED) light-curing units (LCUs). Standardized samples of RBOAs, APCPlus, Opal® Bond® and LightBond(TM) were prepared (n = 3) and cured with one of two dual peak LCUs (bluephase® G2-Ivoclar-Vivadent or Valo-Ultradent) or a single peak control (bluephase® Ivoclar-Vivadent). The DC was determined using micro-Raman spectroscopy. The presence or absence of initiators other than camphorquinone was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Data were analysed using general linear model in Minitab 15 (Minitab Inc., State College, PA, USA). There was no significant difference in DC between APCPlus, and Opal® Bond (confidence interval: -3.89- to 2.48); significant difference between APCPlus and LightBond(TM) (-18.55 to -12.18) and Opal® Bond and Lightbond(TM) (-17.85 to -11.48); no significant difference between bluephase (single peak) and dual peak LCUs, bluephase G2 (-4.896 to 1.476) and Valo (-3.935 to 2.437) and between bluephase G2 and Valo (-2.225 to 4.147). APCPlus and Opal® Bond showed higher DC values than LightBond(TM) (P<0.05). Lucirin® TPO was found only in Vit-l-escence. Lucirin® TPO was not identified in the three orthodontic adhesives. All three LCUs performed similarly with the orthodontic adhesives: orthodontic adhesive make had a greater effect on DC than the LCUs. It is strongly suggested that manufacturers of resin-based orthodontic materials test report whether or not dual peak LCUs should be used with their materials. Dual peak LED LCUs, though suitable in the majority of cases, may not be recommended for certain non Lucirin® TPO-containing materials. © 2014 British Orthodontic Society.

  4. Shear Bond Strengths between Three Different Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Dental Materials and Veneering Ceramic and Their Susceptibility to Autoclave Induced Low-Temperature Degradation

    Manoti Sehgal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of artificial aging through steam and thermal treatment as influencing the shear bond strength between three different commercially available zirconia core materials, namely, Upcera, Ziecon, and Cercon, layered with VITA VM9 veneering ceramic using Universal Testing Machine. The mode of failure between zirconia and ceramic was further analyzed as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed using stereomicroscope. X-ray diffraction and SEM (scanning electron microscope analysis were done to estimate the phase transformation (m-phase fraction and surface grain size of zirconia particles, respectively. The purpose of this study was to simulate the clinical environment by artificial aging through steam and thermal treatment so as the clinical function and nature of the bond between zirconia and veneering material as in a clinical trial of 15 years could be evaluated.

  5. Influence of restorative materials on color of implant-supported single crowns in esthetic zone: A spectrophotometric evaluation

    M., Peng; W.-J., Zhao; M., Hosseini

    2017-01-01

    of the esthetic outcome of soft tissue around implant-supported single crowns in the anterior zone, and the crown color match score was used for subjective evaluation of the esthetic outcome of implant-supported restoration. ANOVA analysis was used to compare the differences among groups and Spearman correlation...

  6. Copper wire bonding

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Zhong, ZhaoWei; Pecht, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    This critical volume provides an in-depth presentation of copper wire bonding technologies, processes and equipment, along with the economic benefits and risks.  Due to the increasing cost of materials used to make electronic components, the electronics industry has been rapidly moving from high cost gold to significantly lower cost copper as a wire bonding material.  However, copper wire bonding has several process and reliability concerns due to its material properties.  Copper Wire Bonding book lays out the challenges involved in replacing gold with copper as a wire bond material, and includes the bonding process changes—bond force, electric flame off, current and ultrasonic energy optimization, and bonding tools and equipment changes for first and second bond formation.  In addition, the bond–pad metallurgies and the use of bare and palladium-coated copper wires on aluminum are presented, and gold, nickel and palladium surface finishes are discussed.  The book also discusses best practices and re...

  7. Evaluation of effects of ionizing radiation on materials used in dental restorations;Avaliacao dos efeitos da radiacao ionizante em materiais utilizados em restauracoes dentarias

    Maio, Mireia Florencio

    2009-07-01

    This work consisted of quantitative studies of the effects caused by ionizing radiation on materials used in dental restorations (Titanium, Amalgam, Resin Composite and Glass Ionomer) aiming the deleterious effects of radiotherapy when patients with tumors in head and neck, arising when the teeth are restored within in the field of radiation. Samples were submitted to X-ray beams of 6 MV from a linear accelerator, VARIAN 2100C model. The samples were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence techniques to compare the chemical composition before and after the irradiation. The sample were submitted to Geiger-Mueller detectors and the ionization chambers in order to verify any residual radiation in the samples. The samples were also analyzed by gamma spectrometry by a Germanium detector. These tests were performed to determine small changes in the composition in the samples due to the radiation interaction. The results of this study may encourage the development of new research for alternative materials in dental restorations that can contribute to improve the quality of life of those patients with tumors of the mouth. (author)

  8. Tensile Bond Strength of Metal Bracket Bonding to Glazed Ceramic Surfaces With Different Surface Conditionings

    M. Imani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of metal brackets bonding to glazed ceramic surfaces using three various surface treatments.Materials and Methods: Forty two glazed ceramic disks were assigned to three groups. In the first and second groups the specimens were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HFA. Subsequently in first group, ceramic primer and adhesive were applied, but in second group a bonding agent alone was used. In third group, specimens were treated with 35% phosphoric acid followed by ceramic primerand adhesive application. Brackets were bonded with light cure composites. The specimens were stored in distilled water in the room temperature for 24 hours and thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C. The universal testing machine was used to test the tensile bond strength and the adhesive remenant index scores between three groups was evaluated. The data were subjected to one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Kruskal-Wallis tests respectively.Results: The tensile bond strength was 3.69±0.52 MPa forfirst group, 2.69±0.91 MPa for second group and 3.60±0.41 MPa for third group. Group II specimens showed tensile strength values significantly different from other groups (P<0.01.Conclusion: In spite of limitations in laboratory studies it may be concluded that in application of Scotch bond multipurpose plus adhesive, phosphoric acid can be used instead of HFA for bonding brackets to the glazed ceramic restorations with enough tensile bond strength.

  9. Microshear bonding effectiveness of different dentin regions

    Anelise F Montagner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of dentin surfaces with different tubule orientation on bond strength of a multimode adhesive system. Materials and Methods: Twenty human molars were selected and prepared in different ways in order to produce different dentin regions. The teeth were randomized (n = 5 according to the application modes of a multimode adhesive system (etch-and-rinse and self-etching and to the dentin region (occlusal and proximal - 1.5 mm depth from dentinoenamel junction. Cylindrical restorations were performed on dentin with a starch tube. The samples remained immersed in distilled water for 24 h and the microshear bond strength (μSBS test was performed. The μSBS values were expressed in MPa and analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey′s test (P < 0.05. Results: There was no significant difference in the bond strength values between the application modes of the adhesive system (P = 0.19; however, the dentin regions (P < 0.05 significantly affected the μSBS. The proximal dentin presented higher bond strength values than occlusal dentin. Conclusion: The dentin surfaces with different tubule orientation influenced the bonding effectiveness of the adhesive system tested.

  10. Creation of Polyurethane Injection Materials, Their Pilot-industrial Production, Development and Industrial Introduction of the Technology of Strengthening and Restoring the Operability of Damaged Constructions and Buildings

    Marukha, V.І.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane and foam polyurethane fluid injection materials not conceding foreign analogues and technology technology of restoration and strengthening the operability of concrete and reinforced concrete structures and buildings damaged by cracks were developed. Normative and technical documentation on the injection materials and technological processes was created. The diagnosticrestoring complex for implementing the above technologies was designed, installed and utilized at the construction sites. The equipment is designed and manufactured; the technology of the research and industrial production of «A» and «B» components of injecting polyurethane materials is designed and developed. The pilot-scale batch is manufactured. Technological processes of preparation and application of the «A» and «B» componentsof the injecting materials in industrial conditions are worked out and implemented.

  11. Investigation of the shear bond strength to dentin of universal adhesives applied with two different techniques

    Elif Yaşa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of universal adhesives applied with self-etch and etch&rinse techniques to dentin. Materials and Method: Fourty-eight sound extracted human third molars were used in this study. Occlusal enamel was removed in order to expose the dentinal surface, and the surface was flattened. Specimens were randomly divided into four groups and were sectioned vestibulo-lingually using a diamond disc. The universal adhesives: All Bond Universal (Group 1a and 1b, Gluma Bond Universal (Group 2a and 2b and Single Bond Universal (Group 3a and 3b were applied onto the tooth specimens either with self-etch technique (a or with etch&rinse technique (b according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Clearfil SE Bond (Group 4a; self-etch and Optibond FL (Group 4b; etch&rinse were used as control groups. Then the specimens were restored with a nanohybrid composite resin (Filtek Z550. After thermocycling, shear bond strength test was performed with a universal test machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fracture analysis was done under a stereomicroscope (×40 magnification. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey tests. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant differences in shear bond strength values between the universal adhesives (p<0.05. Significantly higher bond strength values were observed in self-etch groups (a in comparison to etch&rinse groups (b (p<0.05. Among all groups, Single Bond Universal showed the greatest shear bond strength values, whereas All Bond Universal showed the lowest shear bond strength values with both application techniques. Conclusion: Dentin bonding strengths of universal adhesives applied with different techniques may vary depending on the adhesive material. For the universal bonding agents tested in this study, the etch&rinse technique negatively affected the bond strength to dentin.

  12. Contact of ZnSb thermoelectric material to metallic electrodes using S-Bond 400 solder alloy

    Malik, Safdar Abbas; Le, Thanh Hung; Van Nong, Ngo

    2018-01-01

    and metallic electrodes. In this paper, we investigate the joining of ZnSb to Ni and Ag electrodes using a commercial solder alloy S-Bond 400 and hot-pressing technique. Ti and Cr layers are also introduced as a diffusion barrier and microstructure at the interfaces is observed by scanning electron microscopy....... We found that S-bond 400 solder reacts with Ag and Ni electrodes to form different alloys at the interfaces. Cr layer was found to be broken after joining, resulting in a thicker reaction/diffusion layer at the interface, while Ti layer was preserved....

  13. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with short fiber composite used as a core material-An in vitro study.

    Garlapati, Tejesh Gupta; Krithikadatta, Jogikalmat; Natanasabapathy, Velmurugan

    2017-10-01

    This in-vitro study tested the fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars with Mesial-Occluso-Distal (MOD) cavities restored with fibre reinforced composite material everX posterior in comparision with hybrid composite and ribbond fiber composite. Fifty intact freshly extracted human mandibular first molars were collected and were randomly divided into five groups (n=10). Group 1: positive control (PC) intact teeth without any endodontic preparation. In groups 2 through 6 after endodontic procedure standard MOD cavities were prepared and restored with their respective core materials as follows: group 2, negative control (NC) left unrestored or temporary flling was applied. Group 3, Hybrid composite (HC) as a core material (Te-Econom Plus Ivoclar Vivadent Asia) group 4, Ribbond (Ribbond; Seattle, WA, USA)+conventional composite resin (RCR) group 5, everX posterior (everX Posterior GC EUROPE)+conventional composite resin (EXP) after thermocycling fracture resistance for the samples were tested using universal testing machine. The results were analysed using ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc tests. Mean fracture resistance (in Newton, N) was group 1: 1568.4±221.71N, group 2: 891.0±50.107N, group 3: 1418.3±168.71N, group 4:1716.7±199.51N and group 5: 1994.8±254.195N. Among the materials tested, endodontically treated teeth restored with everX posterior fiber reinforced composite showed superior fracture resistance. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of application methods of one-step self-etching adhesives on microtensile bond strength

    Chul-Kyu Choi,

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various application methods of one-step self-etch adhesives to microtensile resin-dentin bond strength. Materials and Methods Thirty-six extracted human molars were used. The teeth were assigned randomly to twelve groups (n = 15, according to the three different adhesive systems (Clearfil Tri-S Bond, Adper Prompt L-Pop, G-Bond and application methods. The adhesive systems were applied on the dentin as follows: 1 The single coating, 2 The double coating, 3 Manual agitation, 4 Ultrasonic agitation. Following the adhesive application, light-cure composite resin was constructed. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours, and prepared 15 specimens per groups. Then microtensile bond strength was measured and the failure mode was examined. Results Manual agitation and ultrasonic agitation of adhesive significantly increased the microtensile bond strength than single coating and double coating did. Double coating of adhesive significantly increased the microtensile bond strength than single coating did and there was no significant difference between the manual agitation and ultrasonic agitation group. There was significant difference in microtensile bonding strength among all adhesives and Clearfil Tri-S Bond showed the highest bond strength. Conclusions In one-step self-etching adhesives, there was significant difference according to application methods and type of adhesives. No matter of the material, the manual or ultrasonic agitation of the adhesive showed significantly higher microtensile bond strength.

  15. A 7-year randomized prospective study of a one-step self-etching adhesive in non-carious cervical lesions. The effect of curing modes and restorative material

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical retention of a one-step self-etching adhesive system (Xeno III) in Class V non-carious cervical lesions and the effect of restorative material and curing techniques on longevity of the restorations. Material and methods: A total of 139...... be evaluated. No post-operative sensitivity was reported by the participants. Overall relative cumulative loss rate frequencies for the adhesive system at 6, 18 and 7 years, independent of curing technique and restorative material, were 0.8%, 6.9% and 23.0%, respectively. The self-etching adhesive fulfilled...... secondary caries was observed. Significance: The single-step self-etching adhesive showed acceptable clinical long-time retention rates to dentin surfaces independent of restorative material and curing technique used....

  16. Posterior composite restoration update: focus on factors influencing form and function

    Bohaty BS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Brenda S Bohaty,1,2 Qiang Ye,3 Anil Misra,3,4 Fabio Sene,6 Paulette Spencer3,51Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Dentistry, Kansas City, MO, USA; 2Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO, USA; 3Bioengineering Research Center, 4Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, 5Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA; 6Department of Restorative Dentistry, State University of Londrina, School of Dentistry, Londrina, BrazilAbstract: Restoring posterior teeth with resin-based composite materials continues to gain popularity among clinicians, and the demand for such aesthetic restorations is increasing. Indeed, the most common aesthetic alternative to dental amalgam is resin composite. Moderate to large posterior composite restorations, however, have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries, and increased frequency of replacement. Investigators across the globe are researching new materials and techniques that will improve the clinical performance, handling characteristics, and mechanical and physical properties of composite resin restorative materials. Despite such attention, large to moderate posterior composite restorations continue to have a clinical lifetime that is approximately one-half that of the dental amalgam. While there are numerous recommendations regarding preparation design, restoration placement, and polymerization technique, current research indicates that restoration longevity depends on several variables that may be difficult for the dentist to control. These variables include the patient's caries risk, tooth position, patient habits, number of restored surfaces, the quality of the tooth–restoration bond, and the ability of the restorative material to produce a sealed tooth–restoration interface. Although clinicians tend to focus on tooth form when evaluating the success and failure of

  17. In vitro shear bond strength of Y-TZP ceramics to different core materials with the use of three primer/resin cement systems.

    Al-Harbi, Fahad A; Ayad, Neveen M; Khan, Zahid A; Mahrous, Amr A; Morgano, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Durability of the bond between different core materials and zirconia retainers is an important predictor of the success of a dental prosthesis. Nevertheless, because of its polycrystalline structure, zirconia cannot be etched and bonded to a conventional resin cement. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effects of 3 metal primer/resin cement systems on the shear bond strength (SBS) of 3 core materials bonded to yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic retainers. Zirconia ceramic (Cercon) disks (5×3 mm) were airborne-particle abraded, rinsed, and air-dried. Disk-shaped core specimens (7×7 mm) that were prepared of composite resin, Ni-Cr, and zirconia were bonded to the zirconia ceramic disks by using one of 3 metal primer/cement systems: (Z-Prime Plus/BisCem, Zirconia Primer/Multilink Automix, or Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil SA). SBS was tested in a universal testing machine. Stereomicroscopy was used to evaluate the failure mode of debonded specimens. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc analysis using the Scheffe procedure (α=.05). Clearfil SA/Clearfil Ceramic Primer system with an Ni-Cr core yielded the highest SBS value (19.03 MPa), whereas the lowest SBS value was obtained when Multilink Automix/Zirconia Primer system was used with the zirconia core group (4.09 MPa). Differences in mean SBS values among the cement/primer groups were statistically significant, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem with both composite resin and zirconia cores. Differences in mean SBS values among the core subgroups were not statistically significant, except for zirconia core with BisCem, Multilink, and Clearfil SA. The predominant failure mode was adhesive, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem luting agents with composite resin cores, which displayed cohesive failure, and Multilink Automix with a composite resin, core as well as Clearfil SA with Ni-Cr cores, where the debonded specimens of each group displayed a mixed

  18. Impact of physicochemical properties of porous silica materials conjugated with dexamethasone via pH-responsive hydrazone bond on drug loading and release behavior

    Numpilai, Thanapha; Witoon, Thongthai; Chareonpanich, Metta; Limtrakul, Jumras

    2017-02-01

    The conjugation of dexamethasone (DEX) onto modified-porous silica materials via a pH-responsive hydrazone bond has been reported to be highly efficient method to specifically deliver the DEX to diseased sites. However, the influence of physicochemical properties of porous silica materials has not yet been fully understood. In this paper, the impact of pore sizes, particle sizes and silanol contents on surface functionalization, drug loading and release behavior of porous silica materials conjugated with dexamethasone via pH-responsive hydrazone bond was investigated. The grafting density was found to relate to the number of silanol groups on the surface of porous silica materials. The particle size and macropores of the porous silica materials played an vital role on the drug loading and release behavior. Although the porous silica materials with larger particle sizes possessed a lower grafting density, a larger amount of drug loading could be achieved. Moreover, the porous silica materials with larger particle sizes showed a slower release rate of DEX due to a longer distance for cleaved DEX diffusion out of pores. DEX release rate exhibited pH-dependent, sustained release. At pH 4.5, the amount of DEX release within 10 days could be controlled in the range of 12.74-36.41%, depending on the host material. Meanwhile, less than 1.5% of DEX was released from each of type of the porous silica materials at pH 7.4. The results of silica dissolution suggested that the degradation of silica matrix did not significantly affect the release rate of DEX. In addition, the kinetic modeling studies revealed that the DEX releases followed Korsmeyer-Peppas model with a release exponent (n) ranged from 0.3 to 0.47, indicating a diffusion-controlled release mechanism.

  19. Clinical Investigation of a New Bulk Fill Composite Resin in the Restoration of Posterior Teeth

    2017-09-14

    Dental Restoration Failure of Marginal Integrity; Dental Caries; Unrepairable Overhanging of Dental Restorative Materials; Poor Aesthetics of Existing Restoration; Secondary Dental Caries Associated With Failed or Defective Dental Restorations; Fractured Dental Restorative Materials Without Loss of Materials; Fracture of Dental Restorative Materials With Loss of Material

  20. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with 2 Different Fiber-reinforced Composite and 2 Conventional Composite Resin Core Buildup Materials: An In Vitro Study.

    Eapen, Ashly Mary; Amirtharaj, L Vijay; Sanjeev, Kavitha; Mahalaxmi, Sekar

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with 2 fiber-reinforced composite resins and 2 conventional composite resin core buildup materials. Sixty noncarious unrestored human maxillary premolars were collected, endodontically treated (except group 1, negative control), and randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 10). Group 2 was the positive control. The remaining 40 prepared teeth were restored with various direct core buildup materials as follows: group 3 teeth were restored with dual-cure composite resin, group 4 with posterior composite resin, group 5 with fiber-reinforced composite resin, and group 6 with short fiber-reinforced composite resin. Fracture strength testing was performed using a universal testing machine. The results were statistically analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance and the post hoc Tukey test. Fracture patterns for each sample were also examined under a light microscope to determine the level of fractures. The mean fracture resistance values (in newtons) were obtained as group 1 > group 6 > group 4 > group 3 > group 5 > group 2. Group 6 showed the highest mean fracture resistance value, which was significantly higher than the other experimental groups, and all the fractures occurred at the level of enamel. Within the limitations of this study, a short fiber-reinforced composite can be used as a direct core buildup material that can effectively resist heavy occlusal forces against fracture and may reinforce the remaining tooth structure in endodontically treated teeth. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. To Analyse the Erosive Potential of Commercially Available Drinks on Dental Enamel and Various Tooth Coloured Restorative Materials - An In-vitro Study.

    Karda, Babita; Jindal, Ritu; Mahajan, Sandeep; Sandhu, Sanam; Sharma, Sunila; Kaur, Rajwinder

    2016-05-01

    With the enormous change in life style pattern of a common man through the past few decades, there has been proportional variation in the amount and frequency of consumption of drinks. An increased consumption of these drinks will concurrently increase enamel surface roughness by demineralization, resulting in hypersensitivity and elevated caries risk. The present study was designed to evaluate the erosive potential of commercially available drinks on tooth enamel and various tooth coloured restorative materials. Extracted human teeth were taken and divided into four groups i.e. tooth enamel, glass ionomer cement, composite and compomer. Four commercially available drinks were chosen these were Coca -Cola, Nimbooz, Frooti and Yakult. The pH of each drink was measured. Each group was immersed in various experimental drinks for a period of 14 days. The erosive potential of each drink was measured by calculating the change in average surface roughness of these groups after the immersion protocol in various drinks. The data analysis was done by One Way Anova, Post-Hoc Bonferroni, and paired t -test. Group II-GIC showed highest values for mean of change in average surface roughness and the values were statistically significant (pCoca-cola showed the highest erosive potential and Yakult showed the lowest, there was no statistical significant difference between the results shown by Yakult and Frooti. Characteristics which may promote erosion of enamel and tooth coloured restorative materials were surface texture of the material and pH of the drinks.

  2. Materials

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available . It is generally included as part of a structurally insulated panel (SIP) where the foam is sandwiched between external skins of steel, wood or cement. Cement composites Cement bonded composites are an important class of building materials. These products... for their stone buildings, including the Egyptians, Aztecs and Inca’s. As stone is a very dense material it requires intensive heating to become warm. Rocks were generally stacked dry but mud, and later cement, can be used as a mortar to hold the rocks...

  3. The effect of different surface treatments of stainless steel crown and different bonding agents on shear bond strength of direct composite resin veneer

    Ajami B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Stainless steel crown (SSC is the most durable and reliable restoration for primary teeth with extensive caries but its metalic appearance has always been a matter of concern. With advances in restorative materials and metal bonding processes, composite veneer has enhanced esthetics of these crowns in clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of SSC to composite resin using different surface treatments and adhesives. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 90 stainless steel crowns were selected. They were mounted in molds and divided into 3 groups of 30 each (S, E and F. In group S (sandblast, buccal surfaces were sandblasted for 5 seconds. In group E (etch acidic gel was applied for 5 minutes and in group F (fissure bur surface roughness was created by fissure diamond bur. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (SB, AB, P based on different adhesives: Single Bond, All Bond2 and Panavia F. Composite was then bonded to specimens. Cases were incubated in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength was measured by Zwick machine with crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test with p0.05 so the two variables were studied separately. No significant difference was observed in mean shear bond strength of composite among the three kinds of adhesives (P>0.05. Similar results were obtained regarding surface treatments (P>0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, treating the SSC surface with bur and using single bond adhesive and composite can be used successfully to obtain esthetic results in pediatric restorative treatments.

  4. What's new in dentine bonding? Self-etch adhesives.

    Burke, F J Trevor

    2004-12-01

    Bonding to dentine is an integral part of contemporary restorative dentistry, but early systems were not user-friendly. The introduction of new systems which have a reduced number of steps--the self-etch adhesives--could therefore be an advantage to clinicians, provided that they are as effective as previous adhesives. These new self-etch materials appear to form hybrid layers as did the previous generation of materials. However, there is a need for further clinical research on these new materials. Advantages of self-etch systems include, no need to etch and rinse, reduced post-operative sensitivity and low technique sensitivity. Disadvantages include, the inhibition of set of self- or dual-cure resin materials and the need to roughen untreated enamel surfaces prior to bonding.

  5. Provisional Restorations – A Permanent Problem?

    Keys, William F; Keirby, Naomi; Ricketts, David N J

    2016-12-01

    Provisional restorations play an important role when providing indirect restorations. There are a number of materials and techniques available for their construction. Careful planning and construction can protect the prepared tooth surface, improve the periodontal condition and help plan for the definitive restoration. A good provisional restoration can save time, money and effort. Clinical relevance: Provisional restoration construction is an integral part of the indirect restorative process for inlays, onlays, crowns and bridges.

  6. The influence of flushing time on the bonding quality of liquid white cast iron on the solid surface of similar material

    Bandanadjaja, Beny; Purwadi, Wiwik; Idamayanti, Dewi; Lilansa, Noval; Hanaldi, Kus; Nurzaenal, Friya Kurnia

    2018-05-01

    Hard metal castings are widely used in the coal mill pulverizer as construction material for coal crushers. During its operation crushers and mills experience degradation caused by abrasion load. This research dealed with the surface overlaying of similiar material on the surface of white cast iron by mean of gravity casting. The die blank casting was preheated prior to the casting process of outer layer made of Ni-Hard white cast iron to guarantee bonding processes and avoid any crack. The preheating temperature of die blankin ther range of 500C up to 850C was set up to reach the interface temperature in the range of 887°C -1198°C and the flushing time was varied between 10-20 seconds. Studies carried on the microstructure of sample material revealed a formation of metallurgical bonding at the preheating temperature above 625 °C by pouring temperature ranging from 1438 °C to 1468 °C. Metallographical and chemical composition by mean of EDS examination were performed to observed the resut. This research concludes that the casting of Ni-Hard 1 overlay by applying gravity casting method can be done by preheating the surface of casting to 625 °C, interface temperature of 1150 °C, flushing time of 7 seconds and pouring temperature of 1430 °C. Excellent metallurgical bonding at the contact area between dieblank and overlay material has been achieved in which there is no parting line at the interface area to be observed.

  7. A comparative evaluation of the shear bond strength of five different orthodontic bonding agents polymerized using halogen and light-emitting diode curing lights: An in vitro investigation

    Sujoy Banerjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: With the introduction of photosensitive (light-activated restorative materials in orthodontics, various methods have been suggested to enhance the polymerization of the materials used, including use of more powerful light curing devices. Bond strength is an important property and determines the amount of force delivered and the treatment duration. Many light-cured bonding materials have become popular but it is the need of the hour to determine the bonding agent that is the most efficient and has the desired bond strength. Aim: To evaluate and compare the shear bond strengths of five different orthodontic light cure bonding materials cured with traditional halogen light and low-intensity light-emitting diode (LED light curing unit. Materials and Methods: 100 human maxillary premolar teeth, extracted for orthodontic purpose, were used to prepare the samples. 100 maxillary stainless steel bicuspid brackets of 0.018 slot of Roth prescription, manufactured by D-tech Company, were bonded to the prepared tooth surfaces of the mounted samples using five different orthodontic bracket bonding light-cured materials, namely, Enlight, Fuji Ortho LC (resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Orthobond LC, Relybond, and Transbond XT. The bond strength was tested on an Instron Universal testing machine (model no. 5582. Results: In Group 1 (halogen group, Enlight showed the highest shear bond strength (16.4 MPa and Fuji Ortho LC showed the least bond strength (6.59 MPa (P value 0.000. In Group 2 (LED group, Transbond showed the highest mean shear bond strength (14.6 MPa and Orthobond LC showed the least mean shear bond strength (6.27 MPa (P value 0.000. There was no statistically significant difference in the shear bond strength values of all samples cured using either halogen (mean 11.49 MPa or LED (mean 11.20 MPa, as the P value was 0.713. Conclusion: Polymerization with both halogen and LED resulted in shear bond strength values which were above the

  8. Application of Flash Setting Material for Temporary Earthquake Disaster Restoration of Gas Pipelines Using Fly Ash Cement Mixtures

    Shimada, Hideki; Sasaoka, Takashi; Matsui, Kikuo; 島田, 英樹; 笹岡, 孝司; 松井, 紀久男

    2010-01-01

    There are many earthquakes in Japan. If a large earthquake were to occur, it is necessary to consider how pipelines such as: gas, sewage, telecommunications, and so on are restored quickly. At that time, damaged gas pipelines are very dangerous because fire in large areas could be caused by the leakage of gas from the damaged pipeline. Accordingly, it is necessary for gas companies to stop the supply of gas to houses over a large area. Once the gas supply is stopped, there is a considerable a...

  9. Fracture Strength of Indirect Resin Composite Laminates to Teeth with Existing Restorations : An Evaluation of Conditioning Protocols

    Mese, Ayse; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the fracture strength and failure types of indirect resin-based composite laminates bonded to teeth with aged Class III composite restorations that were conditioned according to various protocols. Materials and Methods: Maxillary central incisors (N = 60) with

  10. A predictive formula of the contraction stress in restorative and luting materials attending to free and adhered surfaces, volume and deformation.

    Miguel, A; de la Macorra, J C

    2001-05-01

    To find a predictive formula of stress, considering the surfaces (free, adhered) involved, the volume and characteristics of material and the deformation of the measuring system. 231 samples of five chemically cured restoratives (Silar (SIL, 23), Clearfil F2 (CLE, 39), P10 (P10, 33), Concise (CON, 30), Isopast (ISO, 28)) and four luting (3M Experimental 241 (EXM, 20), Variolink II (VAR, 13), Vitremer LC (VTM, 20) and Dyract Cem (DYR, 25)) materials were allowed to polymerize until they reached a maximum tension (T(max), 25 min) between six pairs (null 5.81, 8.5, 11.26, 12.42, 17.02, 23.14 mm) of polished metallic discs (range of distances: 0.02-5.9 mm) mounted in a tension machine. The deformation of the measuring system was measured for the recorded forces. A descriptive non-linear formula T(max)=KVol(-3.267)FS(3.283)AS(0.642)Def(0.561) was found that individualizes the material's characteristics (K) that considers volume (Vol), free (FS) and adhered (AS) surfaces and deformation (Def) of the system for each force. This formula renders good correlation (material K (r(2) coefficient)): SIL 0.9998 (0.995), CLE 1.0062 (0.989), P10 1.0224 (0.990), CON 0.9908 (0.992), ISO 0.9648 (0.974), EXM 1.0083 (0.991), VAR 0.9777 (0.996), VTM 0.9925 (0.993), DYR 0.9971 (0.997) between actual T(max) and calculated Tension. There are statistically significant differences (p=0.002) between K values of both (restorative and luting) groups. Predictive parameters have influence in a different way to what is actually considered, if the system is allowed to have deformation, as occurs naturally and volume and material's characteristics are considered.

  11. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    Milly, Hussam; Andiappan, Manoharan; Thompson, Ian; Banerjee, Avijit

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  12. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    Milly, Hussam [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Andiappan, Manoharan [Unit of Dental Public Health, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Thompson, Ian [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Banerjee, Avijit, E-mail: avijit.banerjee@kcl.ac.uk [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Unit of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  13. Restoration of landfill sites

    Jones, A K; Chamley, M E

    1986-10-01

    Many excavated quarries are subsequently used for waste disposal operations and frequently imported landfill provides the only means of restoring a former quarry to some beneficial afteruse. Concentrating solely on the final surface cover, this paper sets out some of the principles, which should be considered by those involved in landfill operations to ensure the long term success of restoration schemes. With the emphasis on restoration to agriculture, factors such as availability of cover materials and depths necessary are discussed in terms of requirements to support plant growth, protect clay capping layers and prevent damage to agricultural implements. Soil handling and appropriate after care management are considered. 4 refs.

  14. Phase transition scheme of isolated hydrogen-bonded material h-MeHPLN studied by neutron and X-ray diffraction

    Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masashi; Noda, Yukio; Kojima, Akiko; Mochida, Tomoyuki; Sugawara, Tadashi

    2005-01-01

    The antiferroelectric mat