WorldWideScience

Sample records for restaurants art galleries

  1. Opportunities for Innovation Adoption in Art Galleries

    Ieva VITKAUSKAITĖ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the opportunities for innovation adoption in art galleries. It provides systematised information on innovation processes and innovations used in business models of art galleries. The empirical research conducted has revealed the attitude of art galleries towards innovations, as well as the benefits and opportunities to realise them. The first part of the article distinguishes the stages of innovation process and management. The following part describes the factors that influence the management of innovation process. The final part of the article analyses the application of innovations for the improvement of a business model, with Business Model Canvas by Alexander Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur selected as the starting point for analysis and, finally, the outcomes of empirical research are provided.

  2. Genesis of a Joint Gallery of Sport Art.

    Kozar, Andrew J.

    1989-01-01

    The University of Pennsylvania's dual sport art gallery showcases the work of R. Taft McKenzie and Joe Brown, two of the premier sport artists of our time. This article briefly outlines the artists' careers and describes the planning which led to establishment of the gallery. (IAH)

  3. The art of compromise: the founding of the National Gallery of British Art, 1890-1892

    Amy Woodson-Boulton

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that the press played a key role in defining the Tate Gallery by facilitating a national debate about the siting, nature, and purpose of the proposed National Gallery of British Art. Art critics, politicians, journalists and a variety of newspaper editors weighed in on whether Britain should create a museum of modern art, a museum of national art, or both. The understanding of British art as quintessentially modern at the time of the founding of the Gallery meant that from the beginning the Tate Gallery was founded as both the National Gallery of British Art and a museum of modern art. The changing definition of modern art in the twentieth century, however, created fractures between these two identities that eventually led to the split between Tate Britain and Tate Modern.

  4. Restauration et non-restauration en art contemporain,

    Catherine Defeyt

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available La conservation-restauration se doit d’être en phase avec la production artistique contemporaine, qu’il s’agisse des matériaux utilisés ou des idées véhiculées. Au risque d’ébranler certains principes adaptés aux œuvres dites classiques, des questions de fond émanant du caractère ontologique et polymorphique de l’art contemporain méritent d’être débattues. A ce titre,  les actes des journées d’études, Du refus de l’impossibilité de la restauration, Ecole supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Tours, 14...

  5. Restauration et non-restauration en art contemporain 2,

    Catherine Defeyt

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available La diversification autant que la profusion des matériaux et techniques mis en œuvre dans le champ de la création artistique actuelle implique le collectage d’une documentation tout aussi riche et diversifiée de la part des responsables de collection.  Documenter l’art contemporain, c’est précisément sur ce thème que s’est clôturé le 5 juin 2008,le cycle des journées d’étude organisé par la section conservation-restauration des œuvres sculptées de l’École supérieure des beaux-arts de Tours (Es...

  6. Museums and art galleries as partners for public health interventions.

    Camic, Paul M; Chatterjee, Helen J

    2013-01-01

    The majority of public health programmes are based in schools, places of employment and in community settings. Likewise, nearly all health-care interventions occur in clinics and hospitals. An underdeveloped area for public health-related planning that carries international implications is the cultural heritage sector, and specifically museums and art galleries. This paper presents a rationale for the use of museums and art galleries as sites for public health interventions and health promotion programmes through discussing the social role of these organisations in the health and well-being of the communities they serve. Recent research from several countries is reviewed and integrated into a proposed framework for future collaboration between cultural heritage, health-care and university sectors to further advance research, policy development and evidence-based practice.

  7. Measurements of indoor 222Rn concentration in two art galleries

    Carneiro, Luana Gomes; Braz, Delson; Jesus, Edgar Francisco de; Cunha, Kenya Dias da; Medeiros, Geiza; Zouain, Felipe; Pitassi, Gabriel; Leite, Carlos Barros; Cardoso, Katia

    2009-01-01

    It is point out that radon and their decay products in environment give high dose to human lung. Studies indicate that the indoor radon inhalation by humans has been considered probably the second most important cause of lung cancer after of smoking. A passive-type radon detector was used for measuring indoor radon concentration in two art galleries at Rio de Janeiro city during 90 days January to March, 2009. The aim of this study is to evaluate the occupational and public radon exposure in art galleries and museums. This paper shows the preliminary results of samples collected at two art galleries located in Gavea, Rio de Janeiro city. 30 LEXAN (GE) track detectors were exposed in the air (indoor as well as outdoor). The samples were collected in the same building which is a construction of XIX century. The analysis of the results suggests that the 222 Rn concentration levels are different in both sampling site, in closed environmental, demonstrating that, although the construction materials are the same the absence of circulating air is a factor very important to increase the concentration of indoor Rn. (author)

  8. InfoGallery: Informative Arts Services for Physical Library Spaces

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Rohde, Anne; Sundararajah, Balasuthas

    2006-01-01

    Much focus in digital libraries research has been devoted to new online services rather than services for the visitors in the physical library. This paper describes InfoGallery, which is a web-based infrastructure for enriching the physical library space with informative art "exhibitions......" of digital library material and other relevant information, such as RSS news streams, event announcements etc. InfoGallery presents information in an aesthetically attractive manner on a variety of surfaces in the library, including cylindrical displays and floors. The infrastructure consists of a server...... structure, an editor application and a variety of display clients. The paper discusses the design of the infrastructure and its utilization of RSS, podcasts and manually edited news. Applications in the library domain are described and the experiences are discussed....

  9. Australian doctors and the visual arts. Part 4. Doctors as supporters of art galleries and artists in Victoria.

    Hamilton, D G

    1986-07-07

    The contribution of doctors to the visual arts is being discussed in a series of six articles. Doctor-artists in New South Wales and Victoria, and doctors as collectors, donors, gallery supporters and writers in New South Wales, have been discussed in earlier articles. This, the fourth article, deals with doctors as supporters of art galleries and artists in Victoria.

  10. Restauration contemporaine, restauration de l’Art contemporain

    Anne van Grevenstein-Kruse

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available MVB : Vous avez été l’instigatrice et la directrice d’un établissement réputé dans le monde de la conservation-restauration, le Stichting Restauratie Atelier Limburg (SRAL. Voudriez-vous nous le présenter ?AVG : Le SRAL est un institut d’études et de recherches subsidié par le gouvernement provincial du Limbourg aux Pays-Bas.  Il s’est fixé pour but l’aide à la préservation de l’héritage culturel des Pays-Bas, et propose un ensemble de services liés à la conservation-restauration, de même qu...

  11. Science Outreach through Art: A Journal Article Cover Gallery

    McCullough, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Research faculty journal covers were used to create a gallery in the Science & Technology branch library at the University of Akron. The selection, presentation, and promotion process is shared along with copyright considerations and a review of galleries used for library outreach. The event and display was a great success attracting faculty…

  12. Krasotshnõje snõ Sed Arte Gallery / Irina Butjajeva

    Butjajeva, Irina

    2007-01-01

    Valgevene kunstnike Jelena Shlegeli, Vladimir Gontsharuki, Dmitri Zenkovitshi ja Dmitri Masli maalinäitus "Valgevene värvilised unenäod" Tallinna galeriis Aatrium. Näitust vahendas Sed Arte Gallery, galerist Olga Ljubaskina

  13. Lifelong Learning for People Aged 64+ within the Contemporary Art Gallery Context

    Goulding, Anna

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the initial findings from Contemporary Visual Art and Identity Construction--Wellbeing Amongst Older People: a two-year research project that aims to understand how the lives of older people can be improved by examining their use of contemporary visual art in the art gallery and museum. It will focus on data relating to lifelong…

  14. Experiences from a Real-Time Mobile Collaborative Writing System in an Art Gallery

    Korn, Matthias; Polli, Anna Maria; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    We present first experiences from Local Area Artworks, a system enabling collaborative art interpretation on-site, deployed during an exhibition in a local art gallery. Through the system, we explore ways to re-connect people to local places by making use of their personal mobile devices...... as interfaces to the shared physical space. With a collocated collaborative writing system in the semi-public space of a gallery, we encourage local art discussions and provide a platform for the public to actively participate in interpretations of individual artworks. In this paper, we focus on the experiences...

  15. Theorizing How Art Gallery Interventions Impact People With Dementia and Their Caregivers.

    Camic, Paul M; Baker, Erin L; Tischler, Victoria

    2016-12-01

    Dementia refers to a variety of diseases that are characterized by cognitive difficulties and an overall decline in daily living skills. Psychologically informed arts and health programs may be particularly beneficial ways of improving the lives of people with dementia and their caregivers. This study sought to better understand how programs at contemporary and traditional art galleries might play a role in the lives of people with dementia. Participants included 12 people with mild-to-moderate dementia, their 12 caregivers and 4 gallery facilitators. Those with dementia and their caregivers were engaged in art viewing followed by art making over an 8-week period. Data, collected through postintervention interviews with participants, field notes and extensive written communication between the facilitators and research team, were analyzed using grounded theory methodology to theorize how gallery-based interventions affect people with dementia and those who care for them. The emerging theory has four primary components: the art gallery is seen as being a physically valued place that provides intellectual stimulation and offers opportunities for social inclusion that can change how dementia is perceived. These components coalesced to create positive emotional and relational effects for those with dementia and caregivers. The resulting theory has potential implications for the use of gallery-based programs in dementia care within public health, healthcare, and museum/art gallery policy and practice. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. From the galleries to the clinic: applying art museum lessons to patient care.

    Miller, Alexa; Grohe, Michelle; Khoshbin, Shahram; Katz, Joel T

    2013-12-01

    Increasingly, medical educators integrate art-viewing into curricular interventions that teach clinical observation-often with local art museum educators. How can cross-disciplinary collaborators explicitly connect the skills learned in the art museum with those used at the bedside? One approach is for educators to align their pedagogical approach using similar teaching methods in the separate contexts of the galleries and the clinic. We describe two linked pedagogical exercises--Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) in the museum galleries and observation at the bedside--from "Training the Eye: Improving the Art of Physical Diagnosis," an elective museum-based course at Harvard Medical School. It is our opinion that while strategic interactions with the visual arts can improve skills, it is essential for students to apply them in a clinical context with faculty support-requiring educators across disciplines to learn from one another.

  17. Experiences from a Real-Time Mobile Collaborative Writing System in an Art Gallery

    Korn, Matthias; Polli, Anna Maria; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    as interfaces to the shared physical space. With a collocated collaborative writing system in the semi-public space of a gallery, we encourage local art discussions and provide a platform for the public to actively participate in interpretations of individual artworks. In this paper, we focus on the experiences...

  18. Contemporary Adult Education Philosophies and Practices in Art Galleries and Museums in Canada and the UK

    Clover, Darlene E.; Bell, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Public art galleries and museums have been mandated to become more relevant and useful to the lived experiences of the broad communities they claim to serve. Adult education has long been part of the work of these institutions, although historically the relationship has been uneasy, and they seldom feature in the adult education literature. To…

  19. A study of grandparents and grandchildren as visitors to museums and art galleries in the UK

    Ela Beaumont

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses one aspect of a major research project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council of family group visitors to museums and galleries in the UK. Grandparents visiting with their grandchildren are a little understood phenomenon in terms of visitor research and this paper aims to address that balance. The research project focuses on three art galleries and museums in the UK where 44 sets of grandparents were interviewed during the initial stages of the research. Findings have shown a number of interesting facets, some of which are presented in this paper. Grandparents are motivated to visit the museum with their grandchildren in the main because they are seeking an entertaining visit, a day out that is also educational and linked to school projects. They are likely to be the children’s primary carers as parents are out to work and the destination might not link with their own interests but those of the parents. They have social roles to play in their grandchildren’s lives. They often seek activity or workshops in the museum/art gallery that will be of benefit for their grandchildren and encourage them to explore the activities provided. These and other aspects are discussed within the paper. We conclude by suggesting how the findings can be used to inform more sophisticated approaches to ‘family friendly’ initiatives in museums and art galleries.

  20. ARTS@CERN Dance Session At Restaurant 1

    Anna Pantelia

    2012-01-01

    Walls and floors are the surfaces on which the German ar5st Gerhard Mayer draws large scale works. From art galleries to public buildings in Europe and the US, including even churches, Gerhard Mayer makes site specific drawings, with energe5c flowing lines of ink. He is par5cularly aEracted to drawing clouds, twisted swirls , shapes and eddies, reflec5ng flow in the micro and macro world. He also works in sculpture and pain5ng too – crea5ng complex puzzles and collages with an intensity reminiscent of Brueghel. On the occasion of his visit to CERN curated by Arts@CERN, Gerhard Mayer will talk about his love of drawing, his aErac5on to making work in public spaces and present his work for Nürnbergs Neues Museum called LHC. See examples of Gerhard Mayer’s work here hEp://www.gerhard-­‐mayer.com/

  1. Art review Keith Tyson, South London Gallery, London

    Jones, J

    2002-01-01

    Keith Tyson's new exhibition is called Supercollider, the nickname of the CERN particle accelerator in Geneva. "Tyson's attempts to evoke the wonders of the universe include a sphere that changes colour (at least this is pretty), a big, tedious revolving machine with pieces of meteor stuck to it, a massive painting of the "infinite cellular blanket" that resembles a jokey version of the last days of 1960s art, and a 12-part drawing that can be arranged in any order called A Night in a Billion. Chance and the infinite unlikeliness of existence is his heavily stated theme."

  2. The Art Gallery Test: A Preliminary Comparison between Traditional Neuropsychological and Ecological VR-Based Tests

    Pedro Gamito

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ecological validity should be the cornerstone of any assessment of cognitive functioning. For this purpose, we have developed a preliminary study to test the Art Gallery Test (AGT as an alternative to traditional neuropsychological testing. The AGT involves three visual search subtests displayed in a virtual reality (VR art gallery, designed to assess visual attention within an ecologically valid setting. To evaluate the relation between AGT and standard neuropsychological assessment scales, data were collected on a normative sample of healthy adults (n = 30. The measures consisted of concurrent paper-and-pencil neuropsychological measures [Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB, and Color Trails Test (CTT] along with the outcomes from the three subtests of the AGT. The results showed significant correlations between the AGT subtests describing different visual search exercises strategies with global and specific cognitive measures. Comparative visual search was associated with attention and cognitive flexibility (CTT; whereas visual searches involving pictograms correlated with global cognitive function (MoCA.

  3. Telerobotic Haptic Exploration in Art Galleries and Museums for Individuals with Visual Impairments.

    Park, Chung Hyuk; Ryu, Eun-Seok; Howard, Ayanna M

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a haptic telepresence system that enables visually impaired users to explore locations with rich visual observation such as art galleries and museums by using a telepresence robot, a RGB-D sensor (color and depth camera), and a haptic interface. The recent improvement on RGB-D sensors has enabled real-time access to 3D spatial information in the form of point clouds. However, the real-time representation of this data in the form of tangible haptic experience has not been challenged enough, especially in the case of telepresence for individuals with visual impairments. Thus, the proposed system addresses the real-time haptic exploration of remote 3D information through video encoding and real-time 3D haptic rendering of the remote real-world environment. This paper investigates two scenarios in haptic telepresence, i.e., mobile navigation and object exploration in a remote environment. Participants with and without visual impairments participated in our experiments based on the two scenarios, and the system performance was validated. In conclusion, the proposed framework provides a new methodology of haptic telepresence for individuals with visual impairments by providing an enhanced interactive experience where they can remotely access public places (art galleries and museums) with the aid of haptic modality and robotic telepresence.

  4. Hospitality Service: Hotel and Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Curriculum Guide.

    Joliet Junior Coll., IL.

    This publication contains competency-based materials for hotel/restaurant management and culinary arts. The materials are designed for students to learn from a work station concept by rotating through a variety of real work settings in a hotel/restaurant environment. In addition, the materials indicate whether or not the students have developed…

  5. Visual events and the friendly eye: modes of educating vision in new educational settings in Danish art galleries

    Illeris, Helene

    2009-01-01

      New, experimental educational settings such as ‘art laboratories', ‘digital workshops' and ‘theme-based tours' are important to the processes of change towards more inclusive practices, which have been initiated in many Danish art galleries. While traditional gallery education was constructed...... as visual events, and it discusses how ‘the desiring eye' of some constructivist approaches, along with traditional practices of looking, have contributed to the formation of the modern, autonomous individual. The second part of the article analyses two cases from Danish art galleries and, inspired by Mieke...... in order to stimulate the ‘disciplined eye' or the ‘aesthetic eye' of the visitors, this article aims to discuss the practices of looking encouraged by contemporary and experimental educational projects. The first part of the article develops a theoretical perspective on educational settings conceived...

  6. Restaurering

    Bock, Lars Nicolai

    2007-01-01

    Kompendiet, der pt. kun foreligger som digital fil på Arkitektskolens hjemmeside, omhandler fagdiciplinen restaurering, sådan som forfatteren ser denne i arkitektfaget. Kompendiet belyser fagdisciplinens omfang, indhold og de forskellige teoretiske og metodiske tilgange, der er til fagområdet...... restaurering. Kompendiet mangler stadig nogle væsentlige kapitler og vil blive færdigskrevet på et senere tidspunkt...

  7. Australian doctors and the visual arts. Part 2. Doctors as collectors, donors, gallery supporters and writers in New South Wales.

    Hamilton, D G

    1986-04-28

    The contribution of doctors to the visual arts if being discussed in a series of six articles. The first article dealt with doctor-artists in new South Wales. In this, the second, doctors are discussed as collectors, donors, gallery supporters and writers in this State.

  8. An Insurgent Curatorial Strategy: Using Dialogue and Collaboration to Create Meaning in Public Art Galleries and Museums

    Marsden, Scott

    2018-01-01

    My insurgent curatorial strategy incorporates theory around dialogue and is used to develop a participatory and collaborative process that gives voice to those who are marginalised and/or disfranchised and are suppressed by dominant social narratives. My strategy demonstrates how art galleries and museums can function as sites for community…

  9. Adult Education for Social and Environmental Change in Contemporary Public Art Galleries and Museums in Canada, Scotland and England

    Clover, Darlene E.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, pubic art galleries and museums have a well-deserved reputation for elitism, colonialism and exclusion and they are, therefore, frequently omitted from the discourse of adult education. However, the escalating social, cultural and ecological problems of this new century have placed pressure on these public institutions to change and…

  10. Social Phenomenological Analysis as a Research Method in Art Education: Developing an Empirical Model for Understanding Gallery Talks

    Hofmann, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Social phenomenological analysis is presented as a research method to study gallery talks or guided tours in art museums. The research method is based on the philosophical considerations of Edmund Husserl and sociological/social science concepts put forward by Max Weber and Alfred Schuetz. Its starting point is the everyday lifeworld; the…

  11. Visual events and the friendly eye: modes of educating vision in new educational settings in Danish art galleries

    Helene Illeris

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available New, experimental educational settings such as ‘art laboratories’, ‘digital workshops’ and ‘theme-based tours’ are important to the processes of change towards more inclusive practices, which have been initiated in many Danish art galleries. While traditional gallery education was constructed in order to stimulate the ‘disciplined eye’ or the ‘aesthetic eye’ of the visitors, this article aims to discuss the practices of looking encouraged by contemporary and experimental educational projects. The first part of the article develops a theoretical perspective on educational settings conceived as visual events, and it discusses how ‘the desiring eye’ of some constructivist approaches, along with traditional practices of looking, have contributed to the formation of the modern, autonomous individual. The second part of the article analyses two cases from Danish art galleries and, inspired by Mieke Bal, proposes the ‘friendly eye’ as a possible dialogical and collective practice of looking that can be stimulated in educational settings.

  12. Sulla digitalizzazione della street art. Linee guida per un'analisi del museo virtuale Reggiane Urban Gallery

    Damiano Razzoli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Reggiane Urban Gallery is a virtual museum based on the abandoned industrial plant of ex-Officine Reggiane in Reggio Emilia, now in restoration. Along the years the place has become an open space for local and national street-artists. The aim of this paper is to analyze the use of virtual reality and navigable interface as a solution for the conservation of the Street Art, in relation to the fact that many pieces would have been lost due to the demolition of several walls. Also, the analysis proposes guidelines for a digitalization of Street Art that could prevent the displacement of situated Street Art pieces in museums and encourage the creation of street art locative media museum, supported on four concepts - dispositive/device, locativity, topographic database, interface - and one discoursive feature designing the mediated experience of urban crossing practices: the mimetical relation between the software cultural components and Street Art.

  13. Post-occupancy evaluation of a restored industrial building: A contemporary art and design gallery in Mexico

    J. Mundo-Hernández

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results obtained from a post-occupancy evaluation (POE study conducted in an old fabric building called “La Violeta”. This structure has been recently converted into a contemporary art gallery. La Violeta is located in Puebla City, Mexico. The building dates from the beginning of the 19th century; it was built and used as a textile factory until the first decades of the 20th century. This POE study aims to assess the new use of the building from the users׳ point of view. Methodology involves historical research of the building, analysis of the conversion strategy, walkthrough investigation, and a user survey. Questions regarding the re-utilization strategy used in the building and its current use are included in the survey, such as “How do people perceive the space regarding its functionality, accessibility, and comfort?” Although the re-utilization process destroyed several historic elements, the re-use of old industrial spaces that otherwise would be obsolete and disused seems pertinent. Developing small renovation projects as part of an integral and wider project seems feasible. Users perceive the building as comfortable but not properly advertised as an art gallery, and its location is difficult to find.

  14. Walk, Look, Remember: The Influence of the Gallery's Spatial Layout on Human Memory for an Art Exhibition.

    Krukar, Jakub

    2014-09-01

    The spatial organisation of museums and its influence on the visitor experience has been the subject of numerous studies. Previous research, despite reporting some actual behavioural correlates, rarely had the possibility to investigate the cognitive processes of the art viewers. In the museum context, where spatial layout is one of the most powerful curatorial tools available, attention and memory can be measured as a means of establishing whether or not the gallery fulfils its function as a space for contemplating art. In this exploratory experiment, 32 participants split into two groups explored an experimental, non-public exhibition and completed two unanticipated memory tests afterwards. The results show that some spatial characteristics of an exhibition can inhibit the recall of pictures and shift the focus to perceptual salience of the artworks.

  15. Crafting glass vessels: current research on the ancient glass collections in the Freer Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

    Nagel, Alexander; McCarthy, Blythe; Bowe, Stacy

    Our knowledge of glass production in ancient Egypt has been well augmented by the publication of recently excavated materials and glass workshops, but also by more recent materials analysis, and experiments of modern glass-makers attempting to reconstruct the production process of thin-walled coreformed glass vessels. From the mounting of a prefabricated core to the final glass product our understanding of this profession has much improved. The small but well preserved glass collection of the Freer Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. is a valid tool for examining and studying the technology and production of ancient Egyptian core formed glass vessels. Charles Lang Freer (1854-1919) acquired most of the material from Giovanni Dattari in Cairo in 1909. Previously the glass had received only limited discussion, suggesting that most of these vessels were produced in the 18th Dynasty in the 15th and 14th centuries BCE, while others date from the Hellenistic period and later. In an ongoing project we conducted computed radiography in conjunction with qualitative x-ray fluorescence analysis on a selected group of vessels to understand further aspects of the ancient production process. This paper will provide an overview of our recent research and present our data-gathering process and preliminary results. How can the examinations of core formed glass vessels in the Freer Gallery contribute to our understanding of ancient glass production and technology? By focusing on new ways of looking at old assumptions using the Freer Gallery glass collections, we hope to increase understanding of the challenges of the production process of core-vessel technology as represented by these vessels.

  16. Image Gallery

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Image Gallery Share: The Image Gallery contains high-quality digital photographs available from ... Select a category below to view additional thumbnail images. Images are available for direct download in 2 ...

  17. Diversity and biocide susceptibility of fungal assemblages dwelling in the Art Gallery of Magura Cave, Bulgaria

    Mitova, M.M.; Iliev, M.; Nováková, Alena; Gorbushina, A.A.; Groudeva, V.I.; Martin-Sanchez, P.M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2017), s. 67-80 ISSN 0392-6672 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : fungi * cultivable microorganisms * rock-art caves Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 1.439, year: 2016

  18. Contrefaire l’art ou contrefaire la nature : l’analogie artistique pour la restauration écologique

    Andrew Light

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cet article se présente comme une réflexion critique sur les thèses d’un certain nombre de spécialistes d’éthique de l’environnement quant à la valeur éthique des pratiques de restauration écologique. La principale référence de l’article est aux travaux de Robert Elliot, qui a assimilé la restauration d’espaces naturels dégradés à une contrefaçon : restaurer la nature ne peut être que le travail d’un faussaire. Mais, comme le montre Andrew Light, cette position est intenable : rejeter toute restauration de terrains plus ou moins dégradés, c’est se priver des moyens de faire la différence entre ce qui est gravement détérioré (un dépôt d’ordures ou complètement transformé (comme un paysage urbain et ce qui a été restauré. La position inverse n’est pas non plus tenable : dire que tout peut être restauré, que l’homme peut, à volonté, recréer la nature, c’est être prêt à accepter toutes les dégradations, puisque, de toute façon, on pourra restaurer un paysage naturel. Il faut donc trouver un critère permettant de distinguer entre bonne et mauvaise restauration. La référence est à la nature originelle : une nature restaurée peut-elle avoir autant de valeur qu’une nature originelle ? Dans cet objectif, Andrew Light propose une analogie entre la restauration écologique et la restauration des œuvres d’art. Proposant que l’on juge de la valeur de la restauration non sur l’intention de celui qui restaure, mais sur le processus, il ajoute à cela une distinction entre le processus et le produit ou le résultat, tout en suggérant que le produit ne soit pas considéré isolément, mais dans l’ensemble dans lequel il s’insère. Cessant de considérer la restauration écologique comme un faux ou une contrefaçon, mais en l’envisageant à la façon des restaurations d’œuvres d’art, Andrew Light propose ainsi des critères de distinction entre les différents types de

  19. Annotating Fine Art Images

    Isemann, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The project's objective is to work with art galleries to help them find innovative ways of indexing images, especially by having automatically created and updated thesauri. National Gallery of Ireland Douglas Hyde Gallery Trinity Long Room Hub

  20. Restauration virtuelle de l’art pariétal paléolithique : le cas de la grotte de Marsoulas

    Carole Fritz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Les techniques de scanner 3D sont appliquées dans des grottes et abris préhistoriques ornés avec un succès croissant. L’imagerie 3D peut même aider à restaurer les fresques des cavernes endommagées par le temps et les hommes. Pour la première fois, la « restauration virtuelle » d’une galerie ornée a été réalisée dans la grotte de Marsoulas ; cette opération n’a pu être accomplie qu’en combinant la technologie 3D aux résultats de l’étude scientifique du site et du relevé des parois ornées.The techniques of 3D scanning are being applied in prehistoric caves and rock-shelters with increasing success. 3D imaging can even help restore the paintings of caves damaged by weathering or by human interventions (graffiti. For the first time, the ‘virtual restoration’ of a decorated gallery was undertaken in the cave of Marsoulas. This operation required the combination of 3D technology with the results of the scientific study of the site and the decorated walls.

  1. Activities Using a Restaurant Theme.

    Modlin, Ruth

    Designed for use with elementary students, 44 activities using a restaurant theme integrate creative thinking and decision-making skills with language arts, mathematics, and art. The activities, which can be used independently by the students, deal with types of restaurants, names and themes, floor plans, interior and exterior design, house…

  2. Restaurant closures

    Novae Restauration

    2012-01-01

    Christmas Restaurant closures Please note that the Restaurant 1 and Restaurant 3 will be closed from Friday, 21 December at 5 p.m. to Sunday, 6 January, inclusive. They will reopen on Monday, 7 January 2013.   Restaurant 2 closure for renovation To meet greater demand and to modernize its infrastructure, Restaurant 2 will be closed from Monday, 17 December. On Monday, 14 January 2013, Sophie Vuetaz’s team will welcome you to a renovated self-service area on the 1st floor. The selections on the ground floor will also be expanded to include pasta and pizza, as well as snacks to eat in or take away. To ensure a continuity of service, we suggest you take your break at Restaurant 1 or Restaurant 3 (Prévessin).

  3. Rael Artel Gallery Tartus ja Varssavis

    2006-01-01

    Rael Artel Gallery : Non-Profit Project Space'i tegevusest Tartus. 27.04-27.05. 2006 Varssavis Warszawski Aktyw Artystov'i ruumides näitus "Estonian Video Art. The blood project", osalesid Flo Kasearu, Gert Hatsukov, Külli K. Kaats, Allan Tõnissoo, Marko Nautras, Tanja Muravskaja ja Airi Triisberg

  4. NAIP Status Maps Gallery

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — NAIP Status Maps Gallery. These maps illustrate what aerial imagery collection is planned, whats been collected, when it is available and how it is available. These...

  5. Engaging Families in the Galleries Using Design Thinking

    Larson, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    The Palo Alto Art Center sought a solution to the challenge that loyal family audiences, visiting weekly for art studio classes, rarely visit the contemporary art exhibition galleries. This article relates the experience of using the human-centered design process, often called Design Thinking, as the methodology to create a solution for family…

  6. National Gallery in Prague

    Mikeš, Stanislav; Haindl, Michal; Holub, Radek

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2011, č. 86 (2011), s. 23-24 ISSN 0926-4981 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG11009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : virtrual reality * information system Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/RO/haindl-national gallery in prague.pdf

  7. Advertising identities: virtual galleries as places of identity

    Alexandra Zontea

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the public presentation of self through virtual art galleries, singling out the field of photography. Photography has always been disputed as being part of the highbrow arts because of its popular character. Today, anyone who owes a photo camera can experience photography as art, without a rigorous training. Everybody is able to expose the photos freely to a large number of people, on the Internet. Consequently, the Internet opens up a virtual space, in which photo artists and amateurs can promote their works and exhibit them in a personal online gallery, which represents their place in the virtual vastness. Therefore, my research approaches the matter of the virtual gallery as an identitary place, being focused on finding out why artists choose to exhibit in virtual galleries. I asked myself what are the new functions of the virtual art galleries?Are they understood as online markers that distinguish the owners in these virtual environments? In other words, are these personal galleries a way of expressing online identities?

  8. Triumphs Show: What Makes Art History? Year 7 Exploit the Resources of the Victoria and Albert Museum's Medieval Gallery to Create and Curate Their Own Answer

    Copsey, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    What do 14 Year 7 students, an art teacher, a history teacher and the Victoria and Albert Museum have in common? They are all part of the "Stronger Together" Museum Champion project run by The Langley Academy and the River & Rowing Museum and supported by Arts Council England, designed to engage students, teachers and museum staff…

  9. A gallery support

    Erokhin, A I; Orekhov, D M; Romanov, P D; Semenov, U N; Sokov, G D; Trubnikov, V P

    1981-10-15

    The gallery support includes a middle section consisting of forward and aft hydraulic walls, a roof timber and a foundation on which the cross beam is connected to a longitudinal element, and outer sections mounted on both sides of the longitudinal element behind the cross beam; these outer sections contain the roof timbers, the hydraulic walls and the foundations which are connected to the cross beam by a hydraulic jack. In order to increase the areas where it may be used, particularly for variable-level mining works, the connector between the longitudinal element and the cross beam is hinge mounted, while the roof timbers of the outer sections are connected together by an adjustible jack and are constructed to allow detachable beams to be mounted on them under the arched support; the forward hydraulic props of the mid section are mounted on the ends of the cross beam.

  10. Three Renowned Turkish Restaurant

    2000-01-01

    Taha Toros Arşivi, Dosya No: 112-Lokantalar İstanbul Kalkınma Ajansı (TR10/14/YEN/0033) İstanbul Development Agency (TR10/14/YEN/0033) Beyti Meat Restaurant, Divan Restaurant, Park Şamdan Beyti Meat Restaurant Divan Restaurant Park Şamdan

  11. Alannah Coleman: 1970—A Year at Bonython’s Sydney Gallery

    Simon Pierse

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available When art dealer and entrepreneur Kym Bonython’s new gallery opened in Sydney in 1967, it was believed to be the largest commercial gallery in the southern hemisphere. In early 1970, Bonython brought Melbourne-born art dealer Alannah Coleman over from London to take on the management of his gallery. Sadly, her appointment was not a success and lasted less than a year. Coleman re-organised the records and accounts along European lines and tried to put the gallery on a firm financial footing, but she met with opposition from staff, artists and Bonython himself. Bonython wanted the gallery as a showcase for new talent and was always on the lookout to spot ‘the next goer’. The opening parties at Bonython’s deplored by Coleman as ‘open slather’ evenings proved to be significant social events and the focus for cultural exchange, whilst in his solo shows, Brett Whiteley made innovative use of the gallery as a ‘theatre’, combining painting and sculpture with light and sound to transform the exhibition into a completely new synesthetic experience. In 1971, with funding from John Kaldor’s Public Art Project scheme, Swiss curator and gallerist Harald Szeemann used the Bonython Gallery to stage a groundbreaking show of conceptual art that went on to show at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. Without a regular external source of sponsorship or support, however, Coleman’s fears for the financial viability of the gallery were eventually proved right when, after several further years of losses, it finally closed in 1976.

  12. Art on the Moon?

    Lee, Rosemary; Minch, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Manuel Minch launched Internet Moon Gallery in 2016 with the intention of exploring new modes of creating and engaging with digital art. This article is the result of a collaborative conversation between Manuel Minch and Rosemary Lee, which has evolved from their work together on the exhibition...... “Memory Palace”, launched on Internet Moon Gallery on the full moon, May 2017....

  13. Chinese restaurant syndrome

    Chinese restaurant syndrome is a set of symptoms that some people have after eating Chinese food. A food additive ... Chinese restaurant syndrome is most often diagnosed based on the symptoms. The health care provider may ask the following ...

  14. Management of Chinese restaurant

    Cui , Longbo

    2009-01-01

    With Chinese economy developing rapidly, the Chinese restaurant is under the spotlight, but the management of Chinese restaurant is weak at the moment, especially on the service management, which is an important part of service management in the Chinese restaurant. On the other hand, the managers of Chinese restaurant should pay more attention on the service management for instance brand, service innovation. Service management is core and essential concept for every service company recently, ...

  15. Restaurants closed over Christmas

    2011-01-01

    The restaurants will be closed during the Christmas holiday period : please note that all three CERN Restaurants will be closed from 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 21 December until Wednesday, 4 January inclusive. The Restaurants will reopen on Thursday, 5 January 2012.

  16. Business Plan: Elpis Restaurant

    Tran, Luu Quoc Phong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this Bachelor’s thesis is to create a business plan for starting up a restaurant in European – Asian style in Helsinki. While the restaurants are in European or Asian style separately, this restaurant will be unique with dishes which are based on local traditional dishes, traditional Asian dishes and mixture between them as well as creation of new dishes. This business plan is created to minimize the risk when starting up a restaurant. The plan will not only help the restaur...

  17. Artistic Sensibility in the Studio and Gallery Model: Revisiting Process and Product

    Thompson, Geoffrey

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the cultivation of artistic sensibility and its impact on the art therapy process and product in a community mental health center. Artistic sensibility embodies the sense of self as an artist through the integration of artistic and aesthetic attributes of self and other. The formation of a gallery to exhibit patient art was…

  18. Restaurant Selection in Dublin

    Cullen, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to investigate the selection process used by consumers when choosing a restaurant to dine. This study examined literature on consumer behaviour, restaurant selection, and decision-making, underpinning the contention that service quality is linked to the consumer’s selection of a restaurant. It supports the utility theories that consumers buy bundles of attributes that simultaneously combined represent a certain level of service quality at a certain p...

  19. Lab, Field, Gallery and Beyond

    Binder, Thomas; Koskinen, Ilpo; Redström, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Over the last ten years we have seen a growing number of researchers integrating design experiments in their research inquiries. Initially, this work borrowed heavily from neighboring fields, employing a dual strategy in which design experiments and their evaluation were largely treated as separate...... processes that were often carried out by different people. More recently, design researchers have developed several approaches that integrate design-specific work methods to research. This paper takes a methodological look at three such established approaches that we call Lab, Field, and Gallery. We...

  20. Restaurant food cooling practices.

    Brown, Laura Green; Ripley, Danny; Blade, Henry; Reimann, Dave; Everstine, Karen; Nicholas, Dave; Egan, Jessica; Koktavy, Nicole; Quilliam, Daniela N

    2012-12-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study.

  1. Information about Restaurants

    2007-01-01

    Please note that Restaurant 1 will NOT be closed during the weekend of 5th-6th May as previously announced but will be closed Friday 11th May from 15.00 until Sunday 13th May inclusive. Restaurant 2 will be open on Friday 11th May until 20.00 and on Saturday 12th and Sunday 13th April from 9.00 20.00. Hot meals will be served from 12.00 - 14.00 and from 18.00 - 19.30. See http://cern.ch/restaurant2 for more information. Restaurant 2 will be closed on Thursday 17 th May and Friday 18th May for the Ascension bank holiday. Restaurant 1 will remain open for the whole of that weekend (Thursday 17th Sunday 20th May).

  2. Artfulness

    Chemi, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    a collage of previously published materials on Artfulness, in this journal targeted teachers for dysfunctional behaviour children.......a collage of previously published materials on Artfulness, in this journal targeted teachers for dysfunctional behaviour children....

  3. L’art désœuvré, modes d’emploi. Entre esthétique et théorie de la restauration

    Filippo Fimiani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the ontology of the work of art and its regimes of existence, Gérard Genette  gives but little room to the theory and practice of restoration. However, restoration is seen in relation to the identity of the work itself and to its material and  pragmatic temporality and anachronism. In the wake of Nelson Goodman, it is also understood as a form of actuation of the aesthetic experience. Starting from these premises, the present essay intends to examine the relationship between Genette’s and Daniel Arasse’s reflections on restoration and the history of art, highlighting their similarities and differences with Cesare Brandi’s theory of restoration and, therefore, pointing out their as yet undischarged debts to Sartre’s phenomenology of image.  

  4. Restaurant closures during holiday period

    2015-01-01

    CERN restaurant opening times on Friday, 1 May: Restaurant No. 1 will be opened from 7.00 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. Restaurants No. 2 and No. 3 will be closed.   CERN restaurant opening times during the Ascension weekend: Restaurant No. 1 will be open from 7.00 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. on Thursday, 14 and Friday 15 May. Restaurant No. 2 will be closed on Thursday, 14 May and open on Friday, 15 May until 3.30 p.m. (no table service). Restaurant No. 3 will be closed.   CERN restaurant opening times on Whit Monday, 25 May: Restaurant No. 1 will be open from 7.00 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. Restaurants No. 2 and No. 3 will be closed.

  5. Restaurant closures: summer 2014

    2014-01-01

    Restaurant 2 Table service/brasserie: closed from Monday 28 July to Friday 12 September (open upon reservation for groups of 20+)   Snack bars Bldg. 54: closed from Monday 7 July to Friday 12 September (self-service Nespresso machine available) Bldg. 40: closed every day at 4.30 p.m instead of 5 p.m. from Monday 7 July to Friday 12 September   Jeûne Genevois Restaurant 2, Restaurant 3, Bldg. 6, Bldg. 13, Bldg. 30 and Bldg. 54 will all be closed 11 and 12 September 2014 Bldg. 40 and Restaurant 1 will remain open

  6. Special restaurant opening times

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    1-EASTER Restaurant No. 1 (Novae) will be closed from Friday, 21 March to Monday, 24 March inclusive and will re-open at 7.00 a.m. on Tuesday, 25 March. Restaurant No. 2 (DSR) will remain open during the four days in question (the opening hours can be consulted at: http://resto2.web.cern.ch/resto2/Events/easter2008.html 2-ASCENSION Restaurant No. 2 (DSR) will be closed from Thursday, 1st May to Friday, 2 May. Restaurant No. 2 (Novae) will remain open during the two days in question (from 7.00 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. on the Thursday and from 7.00 till midnight, as usual, on the Friday).

  7. L’art désœuvré, modes d’emploi. Entre esthétique et théorie de la restauration

    Filippo Fimiani

    2012-01-01

    In the ontology of the work of art and its regimes of existence, Gérard Genette  gives but little room to the theory and practice of restoration. However, restoration is seen in relation to the identity of the work itself and to its material and  pragmatic temporality and anachronism. In the wake of Nelson Goodman, it is also understood as a form of actuation of the aesthetic experience. Starting from these premises, the present essay intends to examine the relationship between Genette’s and ...

  8. Restaurant Food Cooling Practices†

    BROWN, LAURA GREEN; RIPLEY, DANNY; BLADE, HENRY; REIMANN, DAVE; EVERSTINE, KAREN; NICHOLAS, DAVE; EGAN, JESSICA; KOKTAVY, NICOLE; QUILLIAM, DANIELA N.

    2017-01-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study. PMID:23212014

  9. RESTAURANT No. 1

    2002-01-01

    Customers are kindly requested to note the modified opening times of restaurant no. 1 from Monday, February 4 to Sunday, March 3, 2002 : from Monday to Friday 07h00 - 23h00 Saturday / Sunday 08h00 - 21h00 Hot meals will be served between 11h30 and 14h00, then from 18h00 to 19h30. Restaurant Supervisory Committee, tel. 77551

  10. Kajian Pustaka Mengenai Restaurant Atmosphere

    Adeline Agoes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Restaurant is one of the businesses that support tourism development. Restaurants nowadays don’t only provide food, but also the service and atmosphere to their customers. The purpose of this study is to discover theaspects defining restaurant atmosphere and the implications of restaurant atmosphere to other particular aspects related to restaurant business. This article is written based on a study conducted through a literature review. Through the examination, it is found that the atmosphere of a restaurant is one important aspect and can be considered as a competitive advantage as well as one of the determinants of customer satisfaction.

  11. Summer Restaurant opening times

    2015-01-01

    Restaurant No. 1: Open as usual in July and August. Open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Thursday, 10 September (Jeûne genevois).   Restaurant No. 2: Open as usual in July and August. Closed on Thursday, 10 September (Jeûne genevois) and Friday, 11 September. The Brasserie (table service) will be closed from Monday, 4 August to Friday, 11 September.   Restaurant No. 3: Open as usual in July and August, but closed on Saturday, 1 August; Saturday, 15 August; Thursday, 10 September (Jeûne genevois); and Friday, 11 September.   Snack bar in Building 54: Closed from Monday, 4 August to Friday, 11 September.   Snack bars in Buildings 13, 30 and 6: Closed on Thursday, 10 September (Jeûne genevois) and Friday, 11 September.

  12. Ananda Restaurant Wine List 2017

    Ananda Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Ananda is Ireland’s premier fine dining restaurant. Ananda’s impeccable pedigree, enviable location and stunning interior design made it Dublin’s most anticipated restaurant opening of 2008. A series of superlative restaurant reviews quickly cemented its reputation as one of Ireland’s finest dining experiences. Ananda’s décor redefines customer’s expectations of Indian restaurants. The dining room features a number of striking design statements, which are quietly opulent while complementing t...

  13. Ananda Restaurant Value Menu 2017

    Ananda Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Ananda is Ireland’s premier fine dining restaurant. Ananda’s impeccable pedigree, enviable location and stunning interior design made it Dublin’s most anticipated restaurant opening of 2008. A series of superlative restaurant reviews quickly cemented its reputation as one of Ireland’s finest dining experiences. Ananda’s décor redefines customer’s expectations of Indian restaurants. The dining room features a number of striking design statements, which are quietly opulent while complementing t...

  14. Ananda Restaurant Lunch Menu 2017

    Ananda Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Ananda is Ireland’s premier fine dining restaurant. Ananda’s impeccable pedigree, enviable location and stunning interior design made it Dublin’s most anticipated restaurant opening of 2008. A series of superlative restaurant reviews quickly cemented its reputation as one of Ireland’s finest dining experiences. Ananda’s décor redefines customer’s expectations of Indian restaurants. The dining room features a number of striking design statements, which are quietly opulent while complementing t...

  15. Pembangunan Model Restaurant Management System

    Fredy Jingga; Natalia Limantara

    2014-01-01

    Model design for Restaurant Management System aims to help in restaurant business process, where Restaurant Management System (RMS) help the waitress and chef could interact each other without paper limitation.  This Restaurant Management System Model develop using Agile Methodology and developed based on PHP Programming Langguage. The database management system is using MySQL. This web-based application model will enable the waitress and the chef to interact in realtime, from the time they a...

  16. ARTS

    Mahadevan, Shankar; Virk, Kashif M.; Madsen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    and load conditions, consequences of different task mappings to processors (software or hardware) including memory and power usage, and effects of RTOS selection, including scheduling, synchronization and resource allocation policies. We present the application and platform models of ARTS as well...

  17. Landslide Caused Damages in a Gallery

    Poisel, R.; Mair am Tinkhof, K.; Preh, A.

    2016-06-01

    On October 5th, 2010, cracks were found in a gallery 1.8 m high and 1.4 m wide. The gallery is 100 years old, runs parallel to a valley flank and was excavated in a tectonically strongly stressed, weathered and slightly dipping sandwich of clayey shales, sandstones and marls. The cracks in the roof as well as in the invert ran parallel to the axis of the gallery. Monitoring showed that crack widths were increasing 1.5 mm per year, sidewall distances were increasing 3.5 mm per year, whereas the height of the gallery was decreasing 2.5 mm per year. After eliminating several possible causes of cracking, a landslide producing the damages had to be taken into consideration. Monitoring of the valley flank surface as well as inclinometer readings revealed that a landslide was occurring, loading the gallery lining. Most probably the landslide had been reactivated by excessive rainfall in 2009 as well as by works for the renewal of a weir in the valley bottom. As stabilization of the slope was not an option for several reasons, it was decided to replace the gallery by a new one deeper inside the slope, which will be ready for operation in 2017. Thus the old gallery has to be kept in operation till then and it was decided to reinforce the old gallery by a heavily reinforced shotcrete lining 10 cm thick. As slope displacements went on, cracks in the shotcrete lining developed with a completely different pattern: in the section where the gallery lies completely in the landslide shear zone no cracks formed until now due to heavy reinforcement, whereas in the transition sections stable ground-landslide and landslide-stable ground diagonal tension cracks in the roof due to shear by the landslide developed. Numerical models showed that cracking and spalling of the shotcrete lining would occur only after some centimetres of additional displacements of the slope, which hopefully will not occur before 2017.

  18. The Habitable Zone Gallery and its Applications

    Gelino, Dawn M.; Kane, S. R.

    2012-05-01

    The Habitable Zone Gallery (www.hzgallery.org) is a service to the exoplanet community which provides Habitable Zone (HZ) information for each of the exoplanetary systems with known planetary orbital parameters. The service includes a sortable table, a plot with the period and eccentricity of each of the planets with respect to their time spent in the HZ, a gallery of known systems which plot the orbits and the location of the HZ with respect to those orbits, and orbital movies. Here we discuss various educational and scientific applications of the site such as target selection, exploring planets with eccentric orbits, and investigating habitability.

  19. Restaurant 1: dance theatre for a day

    Caroline Duc

    2012-01-01

    On Tuesday 31 July, CERN’s Restaurant 1 transformed into a dance studio for the duration of a public rehearsal. The performers from the dance troupe of Geneva choreographer Gilles Jobin, CERN’s current artist in residence, presented their 2011 creation, Spider Galaxies. The result: a voyage of bodies suspended between art and science.   Just two months after the choreographer’s “Strangels” invaded the library, the same bodies returned to take over another iconic CERN space: Restaurant 1. While a black floor covering was spread over the dance floor, bordered on three sides by the glass partitions overlooking the terrace, the four dancers warmed up. Gilles Jobin, the first prize winner of the “Collide@CERN” competition held last March in the dance/performance category, briefly introduced the dance that would follow, called Spider Galaxies. The piece, created in 2011, features four dancers moving to music...

  20. Dimensioning of lining galleries in deep clays

    Bernaud, D.; Rousset, G.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the work presented in this report is to study the mechanical behaviour of lining galleries in deep clays. This text constitutes a part of the researches on the feasibility of a geological disposal of radioactive waste, which the scope is to assure the gallery long term stabilization and also to optimize its dimensioning. In particular, we are interested here in the study of a closure controlled lining, that constitutes a direct application of the convergence-confinement method, especially well fitted to deep clays. The presentation and interpretation of the convergence controlled lining test, which was performed in the experimental gallery of Mol in Belgium, is given in this report. The instrumentation was conceived in order to find out the stress field exerced by the rockmass on the lining, the internal stress field inside the lining and the gallery closure. The analysis of all measurements results, obtained between november 1987 and December 1989, shows that they are all in good agreement and that the lining design was well chosen. Two years after the gallery construction, the average closure is of the order of 2% and the average confinement pressure is about 1.6 MPa (the third of the lithostatic pressure). The time dependent effects of the rockmass are very well modelled by the non linear elasto-viscoplastic law developed at L.M.S. with the laboratory tests. The elastic-plastic model of the lining are shown to be well fitted to simulate the sliding of the ribs. Finally, the numerical results have shown a very good agreement with the measurements results

  1. Renovation work at Restaurant 1

    2006-01-01

    Due to the age of the present kitchen and freeflow installations in Restaurant 1, essential renovation work is due to be carried out. The work is scheduled to last from September 2006 to May 2007. Work on the self-service area of the restaurant will commence in November. Every effort will be made to minimise the inconvenience caused to users of the restaurant and we thank you in advance for your co-operation during this period.

  2. Renovation works at Restaurant 1

    2006-01-01

    Due to the age of the present kitchen and freeflow installations in Restaurant 1, essential renovations are due to be carried out. The planned period for this project is September 2006 to May 2007. Work on the self-service area of the restaurant will commence in November. Every effort will be made to minimise the inconvenience caused to users of the restaurant and we thank you in advance for your co-operation during this period.

  3. Careers in Culinary Arts

    Murphy, James Peter

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation was to give individuals interested in pursuing a career in culinary arts the advice and access to education surrounding this field. Culinary arts covers the multidisciplinary field and areas of practice and study which includes culinary performing arts (cooking), gastronomy (food studies), bakery and pastry arts, food and beverage studies (bar, restaurant, barista), wine studies , food product development and health, hygiene and nutrition. So many individuals ...

  4. Advanced sensing with micro-optical whispering-gallery-mode resonators

    Righini, Giancarlo C

    2017-01-01

    This Spotlight examines an increasingly popular class of optical sensors that comprises microresonators based on the propagation of whispering gallery modes (WGMs). Several 2D and 3D WGM microresonators have already proved their capabilities as general-purpose sensors (especially as biosensors), and they have potential applications outside of research laboratories. Topics include the fundamentals of WGM propagation, types and characterization of microresonators, microfabrication issues, categories of sensing (physical, chemical, and biological), and state of the art sensors.

  5. Restaurant Forty One Dinner Menu 2017

    Restaurant Forty One

    2017-01-01

    This is fine-dining without the stuffiness. The restaurant can host up to 52 guests in the front and main room, with an additional two private dining rooms (with both catering for up to 10 guests each). Tasting menus and special requests are willingly accommodated, and wine tastings and dinner evenings are always available. Our welcoming team are proud to have recently hosted US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on her visit to Dublin. They now await your visit. “Exquisite works of art, and ...

  6. Amuse Restaurant Menus 2017

    Amuse Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Since opening, Amuse Restaurant has garnered rave reviews from the Country’s most trusted and renowned food critics. Praise has flowed for Conor’s individual style of cooking, which brings Asian flavours, namely Japanese, to modern French cuisine. The menu focuses mainly on tasting menus as it is the best way to experience this kind of food, however there is a three course set menu available Tuesday to Thursday for mid week dining. The lunch menu is a three course affair with the option of a ...

  7. Rasam Indian Restaurant: Menu

    Rasam Indian Restaurant

    2013-01-01

    Rasam Indian Restaurant is located in the Glasthule, a suburb of Dublin and opened in 2003. The objective is to serve high quality, authentic Indian cuisine. "We blend, roast and grind our own spices daily to provide a flavour that is unique to Rasam. Cooking Indian food is founded upon long held family traditions. The secret is in the varying elements of heat and spices, the tandoor clay oven is a hugely important fixture in our kitchen. Marinated meats are lowered into the oven on long m...

  8. Critical Adult Education and the Art Gallery Museum

    Clover, Darlene E.

    2018-01-01

    Although burdened by legacies of elitism, exclusion and paternalism, some public museums are attempting to respond to the socio-environmental problems currently facing our planet by developing critical non-formal educational activities to foster consciousness and change. This article explores one such response; a six-week non-formal course…

  9. Researching Student Experiences of Digital Workshops in Art Gallery Education

    Kobbernagel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In the development of methods to explore student views on creative learning processes using digital media, Q methodology and its applications offer a promising framework. The method addresses the complexity of subjective viewpoints by applying a technique and analysis that combine materials...... to investigate shared patterns among students’ experiences. The integration of a qualitative approach with quantitative technique provides a special interview and ensures that the analysis remains focused on the students’ perspective. This approach offers a way to overcome problems with weak links between data...... materials in mixed-method studies, as the viewpoints expressed by study participants are initially mapped by a quantification procedure designed to integrate open-ended questioning and survey technique. The study presented here illustrates the use of this approach in an enquiry into students’ experiences...

  10. RESTAURANT No. 2 'New Look'

    2003-01-01

    The Restaurant Supervisory Committee (CSR) would like to thank the concession-holder for having seen to it that the restaurant and cafétéria will shortly take on a 'new look'. To mark the inuaguration, a little surprise has been prepared for the clientèle at lunch-time on Friday, February 21, 2003. CSR, tel. 77551.

  11. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE : EASTER WEEKEND

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2002-01-01

    As Friday 29 March and Monday 1st April 2002 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (COOP, bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (Avenance, bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain so on Saturday and Sunday 30-31 March. They will reopen on Tuesday 2 April at 7h00. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (DSR, bldg. 504 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. On Thursday 28 March, all three restaurants will operate according to the usual times except for restaurant no. 1 which will close at 21h00 instead of 1 o'clock in the morning. Restaurant Supervisory Committee Tel. 77551

  12. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: EASTER WEEKEND

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2001-01-01

    As Friday 13 and Monday 16 April 2001 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (COOP, bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (Générale de Restauration, bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain so on Saturday 14 and Sunday 15 April. They will reopen on Tuesday 17 April at 7h00. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (DSR, bldg. 504 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. On Thursday 12 April, all three restaurants will operate according to the usual times except for restaurant no 1, which will close at 21h00 instead of 1 o'clock in the morning.

  13. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE : EASTER WEEKEND

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2002-01-01

    As Friday, March 29 and Monday, April 1st, 2002 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (COOP : Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (Avenance : Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain so on Saturday and Sunday, March 30 - 31. They will reopen on Tuesday, April 2 at 7h00. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (DSR : Bldg. 504 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. On Thursday, March 28, all three restaurants will operate according to the usual times except for restaurant no. 1 which will close at 21h00 instead of 1 o'clock in the morning.   Restaurant Supervisory Committee, tel. 77551

  14. The restaurant syndromes.

    Settipane, G A

    1987-01-01

    The Restaurant syndromes can be caused by five major factors: food allergens, sulfites, monosodium glutamate (MSG), tartrazine, and scombroidosis (and other seafood poisoning). A history of atopy and ingestion of known food allergens such as peanuts, egg, fish, and walnuts, together with positive results of skin tests or RAST to these foods, will favor a diagnosis of food allergy. Allergic reactions to peanuts have produced fatalities in minutes through an IgE mediated reaction. An extremely rapid onset (minutes) of symptoms consisting of flushing, bronchospasm and hypotension is consistent with a sulfite reaction. Burning, pressure, and tightness or numbness in the face, neck, and upper chest following ingestion of Chinese food favors a diagnosis of adverse reaction to MSG. Also, development of late onset bronchospasm (up to 14 hours) may be related to MSG reactions. Bronchospasm and urticaria in a patient with a history of aspirin intolerance suggests tartrazine sensitivity. If everyone ingesting a fish meal develops flushing, urticaria, pruritus, gastrointestinal complaints, or bronchospasm, this implies scombroidosis, ciguatera, or other seafood poisoning. Finally, severe headache or hypertension can result from ingestion of naturally occurring amines, such as tyramine (cheese, red wine) and phenylethylamine (chocolate). A double-blind oral challenge test may be the only way of confirming the diagnosis for most of the etiological factors of the Restaurant syndromes. The treatment of choice for acute reaction is epinephrine followed by antihistamine. Proper labeling and avoidance of these ingredients in sensitive individuals are the best preventive measures.

  15. Exhibiting Western Desert Aboriginal painting in Australia’s public galleries: an institutional analysis, 1981-2002

    Jim Berryman

    2012-01-01

    This paper documents and analyses the exhibition history of Aboriginal painting in Australia’s public art galleries over a two-decade period. It concentrates on Western Desert acrylics but is not confined to this movement or region alone. Based on a review of catalogues from key exhibitions, it identifies three interpretative frameworks used by curators to validate the presence of Aboriginal painting in the contemporary art realm. These modes of interpretation are called the aesthetic, ethnog...

  16. Elements of experience in a restaurant. Case: Restaurant Havis

    Lindholm, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to find out what kind of elements of experience can be found in a Finnish fish and seafood restaurant and what elements the customers find important. The thesis also attempts to examine the service delivery process and the importance of different touchpoints in the service delivery. The thesis goes through culinary trends and if these have a deep affect on visitors of the restaurant. The focus is put on three aspects of the restaurant, which are the food, the atmosph...

  17. Art and Architectural Space

    Unterrainer, Walter

    2014-01-01

    art and architectural space museums and other exhibition spaces or how artists learn to love architects Over the last two decades, innumerable new museums, art galleries and other exhibition spaces have been built and opened all over the globe. The most extreme growth happened in China, where...... purpose of ´uniqueness´ often fail to be a ´home´, a large scale ´picture frame´ or a productive space for communicating art and even do not fulfil basic technical aspects in terms of a consistent indoor climate, optimized lighting or safety. The lecture will focus on inspiring examples of spaces for art...

  18. Work at Restaurant No. 1

    GS Department

    2011-01-01

    Concerning the replacement of the flooring in the free-flow level of Restaurant No. 1, we would like to inform you that access to the restaurant from the Main Building will be closed between 31 January and 6 February. During this period, access to the restaurant will be through the south entrance, opposite Building 40 (see map); paper cups and plates will be used, and the opening hours for lunch will be extended from 11.00 am. to 3 pm in order to guarantee service to the users. Thank you for your understanding and cooperation. GS/SE Group

  19. Art and Delusion: Unreality in Art School

    Neher, Ross

    2010-01-01

    The author teaches painting in a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) program at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. Each fall semester he asks his students why they have come to Pratt and what they want to do when they graduate. The common answer is to develop as artists and find a commercial gallery to show and sell their work. Some want the MFA degree…

  20. Whispering gallery effect in relativistic optics

    Abe, Y.; Law, K. F. F.; Korneev, Ph.; Fujioka, S.; Kojima, S.; Lee, S.-H.; Sakata, S.; Matsuo, K.; Oshima, A.; Morace, A.; Arikawa, Y.; Yogo, A.; Nakai, M.; Norimatsu, T.; d'Humières, E.; Santos, J. J.; Kondo, K.; Sunahara, A.; Gus'kov, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2018-03-01

    relativistic laser pulse, confined in a cylindrical-like target, under specific conditions may perform multiple scattering along the internal target surface. This results in the confinement of the laser light, leading to a very efficient interaction. The demonstrated propagation of the laser pulse along the curved surface is just yet another example of the "whispering gallery" effect, although nonideal due to laser-plasma coupling. In the relativistic domain its important feature is a gradual intensity decrease, leading to changes in the interaction conditions. The proccess may pronounce itself in plenty of physical phenomena, including very efficient electron acceleration and generation of relativistic magnetized plasma structures.

  1. Microwave oscillator with 'whispering gallery' resonator

    Kirichenko, A.Ya.; Prokopenko, Yu.V.; Filippov, Yu.F.; Lonin, Yu.F.; Papkovich, V.G.; Ponomarev, A.G.; Prokopenko, Yu.V.; Uvarov, V.T.

    2010-01-01

    It was presented researches of a generation of microwave radiation into system with azimuthally periodical relativistic electron beam current that excites a high-Q quasi-optical dielectric resonator. The Eigen parameters of cylindrical Teflon resonator were determined by numerical computation. Registration of the microwave radiation realizes by a crystal set of 8-mm wavelength range. Research projects of microwave oscillators with high-Q resonators, in which 'whispering gallery' oscillations are excited by an electron flow, are presented. Multiresonator oscillators ideology is based on principles of microwave generation in klystrons with both subcritical and supercritical electron beams currents.

  2. Penerapan Ornamen Sebagai Ciri Budaya Tionghoa pada Chinese Restaurant di Jakarta

    Polniwati Salim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chinese restaurants are obviously connected to Chinese culture for it holds a great importance and is even the core point of creating art. The art would be based upon the aesthetic contents which contain symbolic meaning in Chinese philosophy. In a typical chinese restaurant the connection between tradition and art is represented in the form of ornaments that acts functionally and has specific unique characteristics. This study was conducted by qualitative method with survey, interview, and documentation of the ornaments in chinese restaurant. This study aims to introduce and enrich the knowledge, as the ornaments stand for showing the identity of chinese culture in chinese restaurant. The aesthetical theory about the art of design and the implementation of chinese ornaments took part in the study as well. Result of the study shows that the chinese restaurant observed has implemented the interior and applied the ornaments well in showing chinese identity. Besides, the materials used for furniture and interior elements have given the nuances of Chinese culture. Study concludes that the aesthetic atmosphere of the interior of Dian Xiao Er Restaurant is calm, peaceful, and relaxing like sitting in a modest diner. The dynamics that was created is something impressed repetitive yet not boring 

  3. Pembangunan Model Restaurant Management System

    Fredy Jingga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Model design for Restaurant Management System aims to help in restaurant business process, where Restaurant Management System (RMS help the waitress and chef could interact each other without paper limitation.  This Restaurant Management System Model develop using Agile Methodology and developed based on PHP Programming Langguage. The database management system is using MySQL. This web-based application model will enable the waitress and the chef to interact in realtime, from the time they accept the customer order until the chef could know what to cook and checklist for the waitress wheter the order is fullfill or not, until the cahsier that will calculate the bill and the payment that they accep from the customer.

  4. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE : EASTER WEEKEND

    2003-01-01

    As Friday, April 18 and Monday, April 21, 2003 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (COOP : Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (AVENANCE : Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain so on Saturday and Sunday, April 19 - 20. They will reopen on Tuesday, April 22 at 7h00. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (DSR : Bldg. 504 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. On Thursday, April 17, all three restaurants will operate according to the usual times except for restaurant no. 1 which will close at 21h00 instead of 1 o'clock in the morning.

  5. RocKeTeria restaurant

    2000-01-01

    When StenniSphere at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., opened in May 2000, it introduced the RocKeTeria, a new 1960s-style, space-themed restaurant located in the newly expanded visitor center. The restaurant, operated by the owners of Mary's Drive Inn of Biloxi, features an extensive collection of space-related photos from that era, as well as a full menu of home-style cooking.

  6. Presence and its absences. The 17th century gallery picture

    Bogh, Mikkel

    A discussion of how pictures made specifically for the gallery viewer in the 17th century produce certain kinds of presence in order to catch attention......A discussion of how pictures made specifically for the gallery viewer in the 17th century produce certain kinds of presence in order to catch attention...

  7. Coral Reefs: A Gallery Program, Grades 7-12.

    National Aquarium in Baltimore, MD. Dept. of Education.

    Gallery classes at the National Aquarium in Baltimore give the opportunity to study specific aquarium exhibits which demonstrate entire natural habitats. The coral reef gallery class features the gigantic western Atlantic coral reef (325,000 gallons) with over 1,000 fish. The exhibit simulates a typical Caribbean coral reef and nearby sandy…

  8. Art and Architectural Space

    Unterrainer, Walter

    2014-01-01

    and its content. The urban and spatial question goes far beyond museums and other buildings for art: how in democratic societies should public spaces be supported by art and how can public art support ´cityness´ and meaning versus spaces of consumerism. Famous but egocentric buildings with the main......art and architectural space museums and other exhibition spaces or how artists learn to love architects Over the last two decades, innumerable new museums, art galleries and other exhibition spaces have been built and opened all over the globe. The most extreme growth happened in China, where...... historically considered even the mother of all arts) - but more relevant: what are appropriate architectural spaces for presenting, exhibiting, contemplating, reflecting, meditating, discussing, enjoying, dissenting, debating creations of art. Simplified, this is a question about the relation between package...

  9. Aptasensors Based on Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators

    Gualtiero Nunzi Conti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review the literature on optical evanescent field sensing in resonant cavities where aptamers are used as biochemical receptors. The combined advantages of highly sensitive whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR-based transducers, and of the unique properties of aptamers make this approach extremely interesting in the medical field, where there is a particularly high need for devices able to provide real time diagnosis for cancer, infectious diseases, or strokes. However, despite the superior performances of aptamers compared to antibodies and WGMR to other evanescent sensors, there is not much literature combining both types of receptors and transducers. Up to now, the WGMR that have been used are silica microspheres and silicon oxynitride (SiON ring resonators.

  10. Industrial Art: Mission to Meaning

    Wilhelm, Mike

    2009-01-01

    This is a story about industrial art. It is certainly not a story about smart studios and fashionable galleries, subtle techniques and aesthetic beauty. This is a story of sheet rock, nails, and low-grade lumber in the hands of unskilled teenage laborers. While this story boasts of no future museum pieces, it tells a heartwarming story of rare…

  11. Promenade Among Words and Things: The Gallery as Catalogue, the Catalogue as Gallery

    Mari Lending

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the mid nineteenth century new casting techniques allowed for the production of huge architectural fragments. Well-selected collections could ideally display perfect series in galleries in which the visitor could wander among monuments and experience architecture history on full scale. The disembodied material of plaster was considered capable of embodying a number of modern historical taxonomies and aesthetical programs, most importantly chronology, comparison, style, and evolution. Veritable showcases of historicism, the casts could illustrate in spatial arrangements new conceptions on the history, contemporaneity and future of architecture. Plaster cast became a main medium in which to publish antiquities as novelties for grand audiences, taking the printed and published beyond the two-dimensional space of words and images. However, due to the increasing market of casts and their sheere size and weight, the reproductions as mounted in the galleries often behaved as unruly as architecture does outside curatorial control. In the end only the catalogues, the paper versions of these imaginary museums were capable to create the orders that their plaster referents constantly aspired to destroy. An important chapter in the history of the architecture museum these plaster monuments belong to a part of architectural print culture in which catalogues were curated and galleries edited. Metaphors drawn from the realm of writing saturated the discourse on the display of casts. Images and texts fluctuated and the image-objects were compared to books, paper, pages, documents and libraries but above all to illustrations inviting promenades in time and space.

  12. Ananda Restaurant A La Carte Menu 2017

    Ananda Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Ananda is Ireland’s premier fine dining restaurant. Ananda’s impeccable pedigree, enviable location and stunning interior design made it Dublin’s most anticipated restaurant opening of 2008. A series of superlative restaurant reviews quickly cemented its reputation as one of Ireland’s finest dining experiences. Ananda’s décor redefines customer’s expectations of Indian restaurants. The dining room features a number of striking design statements, which are quietly opulent while complementin...

  13. Administrative Information Systems Design Beautiful Restaurant Tour

    Risman Risman; Drs. Soetirto Sadikin. M.A

    1999-01-01

    Satisfactory service is the key to business done wonderful tourist restaurants. One ofthe restaurant management efforts to meet these demands is to build informationsystems that can handle sales, handling of inventory until the purchase of rawmaterials, so the restaurant will be increasing productivity.To meet these needs, the author conducted the analysis and design of administrativeinformation system that handles its restaurant sales, purchasing, accounts payable andinventory handling. The ...

  14. Restaurant Management System Over Private Network

    Amanat Dhillon; Shreya Tuli

    2017-01-01

    Restaurant Management System over Private Network is an automated business environment which allows restaurants to reduce operational costs increase efficiency of business improve customer satisfaction cut down labour costs decrease order processing time and provide better Quality-of-ServiceQ-S. This system manages a digital menu allowing the customers to place orders easily. Authentication fields for employees enable better administration of the restaurant. The whole restaurant is integrated...

  15. A Vocabulary Analysis of the Restaurant Menus

    MIHUT Silvia

    2010-01-01

    The present paper explores the genre of restaurant menus by analyzing existing online lists of breakfast, lunch and dinner options. It shows that a menu is a reflection of the restaurant itself and its vocabulary, whether formal, casual or playful, matches the restaurant concept, location or theme. In addition to providing the food and drink items, menus can also be used to offer other information to the customers. The restaurant menu vocabulary describes the owner/chef's philosophy about foo...

  16. Effect of Galleries on Thermal Conditions of Urban Open Areas

    Shahab Kariminia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Computer simulations were performed by ENVI-met model along with physical measurements in two urban squares under hot summer conditions in Isfahan, central Iran. Each scenario concentrated on adding or extending galleries in each square. The results confirmed the role of galleries on thermal conditions; however, it was found that the effectiveness of this strategy depends on the square geometry. It presented higher efficiency for the small square with higher H/W ratio. This solution is advisable for smaller squares and when the peripheral parts are frequently used compared to the middle areas. Galleries are most efficient when allowing enough natural ventilation.

  17. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: WHITSUNTIDE WEEKEND

    2003-01-01

    Details of the arrangements to ensure the provision of a restaurant service during the Whitsuntide weekend are given below. On all the days indicated, hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and 18h00 to 19h30. DATE RESTAURANT No. Opening times Saturday, June 7 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 and 3 closed Sunday, June 8 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 and 3 closed Monday, June 9 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 and 3 closed SATELLITE CAFETERIAS (Bldgs. 30, 40, 54) and the KIOSK will be closed on 7, 8 and 9 June.

  18. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: EASTER WEEKEND

    2003-01-01

    As Friday, April 18 and Monday, April 21, 2003 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (COOP : Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (AVENANCE : Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain so on Saturday and Sunday, April 19 - 20. They will reopen on Tuesday, April 22 at 7h00. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (DSR : Bldg. 504 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30.

  19. Art Medium and Art Infrastructure Development in Contemporary Indonesian Art

    A. Rikrik Kusmara

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This research review Indonesian contemporary artists that used the various media in the presentation in his works over the years since 2000 until now. Survey at Pameran Besar Indonesia "Manifesto" in May 2008, were around 670 Indonesian living artists, 350 are consistently professional artists, 41 artists who utilize a variety of media in each works and 6 of them are artists who used a various of media on their solo exhibition including combining conventional media with new media and installation approaches. 6 artists are analyzed on the structure of the media presentation configuration their used, and generally they used more than 3 types of media in their solo exhibition, first, painting/drawing, second, sculpture/object/installation, and third video/photography. In the study of each exhibition process, generally utilizing the curatorial and sponsored by promotor (gallery. This research shows a rapid development of economic infrastructure in Indonesian the art in 2000-an era with the emergence of many auction hall, a new generation of collectors and galleries, and the Asian art market and global orientation, it became one of the holding in contemporary art of Indonesia, has been shifting art situation from cultural appreciation in the era of 90-to an era to cultural production.

  20. Introduction: Art and finance

    Gerald Nestler

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The editorial premise of this special issue is that the adage ‘art and money do not mix’ is now wholly untenable. As detailed in our extended interview with Clare McAndrew, the art market has grown rapidly over the last twenty years, leading to systemic and structural changes in the art field. For some, this growth of the market and its significance for art is an institutional misfortune that, for all of its effects, is nonetheless inconsequential to the normative claim that art and money shouldn’t mix. This commonplace premise looks to keep the sanctity or romance of art from the business machinations of market mechanisms, as eloquently summarised by Oscar Wilde’s definition of cynicism (‘knowing the price of everything and the value of nothing’. This issue repudiates that normative moral code, and precisely for the reasons just stated: by now, the interests of the art market permeate all the way through the art system. The interests of the art market shape what is exhibited and where; what kinds of discourse circulate around which art (or even as art and in what languages; and what, in general, is understood to count as art. In short, the art market – comprising mainly of collectors, galleries and auction houses – is now the primary driver in what is valuable in art.

  1. Neighborhood Disparities in the Restaurant Food Environment.

    Martinez-Donate, Ana P; Espino, Jennifer Valdivia; Meinen, Amy; Escaron, Anne L; Roubal, Anne; Nieto, Javier; Malecki, Kristen

    2016-11-01

    Restaurant meals account for a significant portion of the American diet. Investigating disparities in the restaurant food environment can inform targeted interventions to increase opportunities for healthy eating among those who need them most. To examine neighborhood disparities in restaurant density and the nutrition environment within restaurants among a statewide sample of Wisconsin households. Households (N = 259) were selected from the 2009-2010 Survey of the Health of Wisconsin (SHOW), a population-based survey of Wisconsin adults. Restaurants in the household neighborhood were enumerated and audited using the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey for Restaurants (NEMS-R). Neighborhoods were defined as a 2- and 5-mile street-distance buffer around households in urban and non-urban areas, respectively. Adjusted linear regression models identified independent associations between sociodemographic household characteristics and neighborhood restaurant density and nutrition environment scores. On average, each neighborhood contained approximately 26 restaurants. On average, restaurants obtained 36.1% of the total nutrition environment points. After adjusting for household characteristics, higher restaurant density was associated with both younger and older household average age (P restaurant food environment in Wisconsin neighborhoods varies by age, race, and urbanicity, but offers ample room for improvement across socioeconomic groups and urbanicity levels. Future research must identify policy and environmental interventions to promote healthy eating in all restaurants, especially in young and/or rural neighborhoods in Wisconsin.

  2. What's Cooking at the Restaurant School

    Binzen, Peter

    1975-01-01

    Describes the operation and program of the Restaurant School in Philadelphia, which in a one-year course of formal instruction and on-the-job training teaches students how to own and operate small restaurants and invests in the restaurants of some of its graduates. (JT)

  3. UOC Restaurant : gestió integral d'un restaurant

    Vidal Andrade, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Desenvolupament d'una aplicació amb Microsoft.net per la gestió d'un restaurant i de la seva plana web. Desarrollo de una aplicación con Microsoft.net para la gestión de un restaurante y de su página web.

  4. Exhibiting Western Desert Aboriginal painting in Australia’s public galleries: an institutional analysis, 1981-2002

    Jim Berryman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents and analyses the exhibition history of Aboriginal painting in Australia’s public art galleries over a two-decade period. It concentrates on Western Desert acrylics but is not confined to this movement or region alone. Based on a review of catalogues from key exhibitions, it identifies three interpretative frameworks used by curators to validate the presence of Aboriginal painting in the contemporary art realm. These modes of interpretation are called the aesthetic, ethnographic and the ownership discourses. Despite being a problematic art at odds with conventional art-historical classifications, Aboriginal painting was elevated to a position of prominence in Australian art history. Institutionally, Western Desert painting found legitimacy in the dominant aesthetic legacy of modernism. This modernist art historiography overrode the minority interests of cultural pluralism and critical postmodernism.

  5. Restaurant No. 1 fully renovated

    2007-01-01

    The Restaurant No. 1 team. After several months of patience and goodwill on the part of our clients, we are delighted to announce that the major renovation work which began in September 2006 has now been completed. From 21 May 2007 we look forward to welcoming you to a completely renovated restaurant area designed with you in mind. The restaurant team wishes to thank all its clients for their patience and loyalty. Particular attention has been paid in the new design to creating a spacious serving area and providing a wider choice of dishes. The new restaurant area has been designed as an open-plan space to enable you to view all the dishes before making your selection and to move around freely from one food access point to another. It comprises user-friendly areas that fully comply with hygiene standards. From now on you will be able to pick and choose to your heart's content. We invite you to try out wok cooking or some other speciality. Or select a pizza or a plate of pasta with a choice of two sauces fr...

  6. Sustainable restaurants: A research agenda

    Research in Hospitality Management is co-published by NISC (Pty) Ltd and Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. Copyright © The ... discussed several concepts for sustainable restaurants. Teng, .... using the MOA model in a case study they are performing into .... We propose a research strategy for three fields of research.

  7. Australian doctors and the visual arts. Part 6. Photography.

    Hamilton, D G

    This is the final article in this series. In previous articles the contributions of doctors in Australia as painters, sculptors, writers on art and supporters of art galleries and artists have been discussed. Photography is very much a fine art form, and several outstanding doctor-photographers are discussed in this article.

  8. The Effect of Active Learning Techniques on Class Teacher Candidates' Success Rates and Attitudes toward Their Museum Theory and Application Unit in Their Visual Arts Course

    Dilmac, Oguz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect that using active learning techniques during museum and gallery visits has on teacher candidates' academic success rates in and attitudes toward their Visual Arts Course. In this study, the importance and requirement of education to take place in museums and art galleries is emphasized. The…

  9. Developing the Model of "Pedagogical Art Communication" Using Social Phenomenological Analysis: An Introduction to a Research Method and an Example for Its Outcome

    Hofmann, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Social phenomenological analysis is presented as a research method for museum and art education. After explaining its methodological background, it is shown how this method has been applied in a study of gallery talks or guided tours in art museums: Analyzing the situation by description and interpretation, a model for understanding gallery talks…

  10. Innovation in Swedish Restaurant Franchises

    Loikkanen, Jenny; Mazura, Jekaterina; Schrader, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Background – The franchising industry in Sweden has experienced a vast growth in the recent years, and it makes up a significant part of the Swedish economy. The restaurant industry accounts for a large amount of the Swedish franchises. Due to the dynamic business environment today, companies need to increasingly strive for improvement in order to sustain their competitive advantage and to enhance their performance. Innovation may be required, and franchises are no exceptions. However, due to...

  11. Restaurant 2 goes Cordon Bleu

    2007-01-01

    The Domaine de Chouilly. Who said fine cuisine was too expensive? For a whole week between the 19th and 23rd February you will have the opportunity to enjoy gastronomic delights a short walk away from your office for only 17 CHF. The Chef and his colleagues from the famous Chateauvieux restaurant at the Domaine de Chouilly will be coming to Restaurant No. 2 to prepare a different gastronomic delight each day and will bring with them their own ingredients, equipment and even their own crockery! The list of fare is mouthwatering: Limousin lamb filet au gratin served with two-olive tapenade, and filet of char served with dill and candied lemon are just two of the delicious dishes on the week's menu. Restaurant No. 2 has rustled up another innovation: at the beginning of March it will be starting a pasta serving area on the ground floor called 'The Olivetto Corner'. 'The Corner is designed for customers who don't have much time and for those who like their pasta al dente,' explains Jean-Marie Fornerod, who mana...

  12. The Institute for Southern Contemporary Art (ISCA

    João Enxuto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available João Enxuto and Erica Love are artists and writers living in New York City. Their writing has appeared in Art in America, Mousse Contemporary Art Magazine, Wired, and X-TRA Contemporary Art Quarterly. They have given talks and exhibited work at the Centre Pompidou, Whitney Museum of Art, the New Museum, Anthology Film Archives, Walker Art Center, Yossi Milo Gallery, Carriage Trade, Louisiana Museum in Denmark, ArtCenter/South Florida, and the Tamayo Museum in Mexico City.

  13. Spatial Characteristics of Art Trade in Hungary

    Ibolya Várnai

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Century-long traditons of art trade in Hungary are strongly connected to the capital, famous, elite auction houses and galleries are concentrated in the downtown area of Budapest. Although art market in Hungary is capital-centered, remarkable amount of art trade takes place in the countryside too. This study aims to give insight into the presence of the different types of art trade (antique shops, second-hand book stores, art galleries and auction houses in rural settlements, compared to the characteristics of art trade in Budapest. The research – based on primary data collection – reveals the social, economic, and cultural factors which explain the regional differences in art trade. During the field work in Budapest, semi-structured interviews were conducted with art gallery owners, auctioners, and antiquarians. The penetration index (PEX which was applied in the case of researches in the countryside shows the rate in which the different types of art trade are present in settlements of different sizes. The results are demonstrated on the map with the help of the Mapinfo 12.5 software.

  14. Restaurant Management System Over Private Network

    Amanat Dhillon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Restaurant Management System over Private Network is an automated business environment which allows restaurants to reduce operational costs increase efficiency of business improve customer satisfaction cut down labour costs decrease order processing time and provide better Quality-of-ServiceQ-S. This system manages a digital menu allowing the customers to place orders easily. Authentication fields for employees enable better administration of the restaurant. The whole restaurant is integrated into one private network thereby improving security and eliminating the need for a constant internet connection.

  15. Conserver, restaurer : écrire le temps en Afrique

    Pol Pierre Gossiaux

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available L'art africain, bien présent dans les collections et les musées éthnographiques, est un art le plus souvent amputé de son contexte culturel. Aussi, sa restauration débouche-t-elle le plus souvent sur des contre-sens esthétiques et historiques. Est-il possible d'appréhender encore leur sens et leur fonction, pour mieux les conserver et restaurer ?African Art, well represented in the collections and ethnographical museums, is most of the times an Art outside its cultural context. Hence, its restoration ends up frequently in esthetical and historical non-senses. Is it still possible to apprehend the meaning and function of these objects in order to restore and conserve them better?

  16. Art + Bioéthique : expériences interdisciplinaires dans une galerie émergente

    Lorrain, Aïda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This review retraces the exhibition and the principle events of the collaborative project Art + Bioéthique. These were held at the Montreal gallery Espace Projet from February 25 to March 21, 2016.

  17. The Library and Museum for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center

    Sperber, Ann

    1972-01-01

    The Lincoln Center Library offers a variety of services, including circulating collections, art galleries, a bookstore, free movies, a children's room, special exhibits, and a small, neat auditorium that features everything from community drama to film retrospectives. (Author/NH)

  18. Wind galleries: an instrument for environmental impact assessment

    Zunino, C.

    1998-01-01

    In the last decades wind galleries for non-aeronautic utilisation have proved to be a useful investigation tool in various fields, such as studies on environmental impact and risk assessment, associated with permanent or incidental release of harmful substances. In this framework the feasibility of a new installation has been evaluated in Italy, having as main target the reproduction of thermal stratification phenomena. The great deal of 'hazardous' industries, often in areas having a complex orography, as well as the high pollution levels in Italian cities, lead to the conclusion that a thermally stratified wind gallery might be an economically viable investment [it

  19. Whispering Gallery Mode Spectroscopy as a Diagnostic for Dusty Plasmas

    Thieme, G.; Basner, R.; Ehlbeck, J.; Roepcke, J.; Maurer, H.; Kersten, H.; Davies, P. B.

    2008-01-01

    Whispering-gallery-mode spectroscopy is being assessed as a diagnostic method for the characterisation of size and chemical composition of spherical particles levitated in a plasma. With a pulsed laser whispering gallery modes (cavity resonances) are excited in individual microspheres leading to enhanced Raman scattering or fluorescence at characteristic wavelengths. This method can be used to gain specific information from the particle surface and is thus of great interest for the characterisation of layers deposited on microparticles, e.g. in molecular plasmas. We present investigations of different microparticles in air and results from fluorescent particles levitated in an Argon rf plasma.

  20. Amuse Restaurant Lunch Menu 2017

    Amuse Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Since opening, Amuse Restaurant has garnered rave reviews from the Country’s most trusted and renowned food critics. Praise has flowed for Conor’s individual style of cooking, which brings Asian flavours, namely Japanese, to modern French cuisine. The menu focuses mainly on tasting menus as it is the best way to experience this kind of food, however there is a three course set menu available Tuesday to Thursday for mid week dining. The lunch menu is a three course affair with the option of a ...

  1. Amuse Restaurant Wine List 2017

    Amuse Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Since opening, Amuse Restaurant has garnered rave reviews from the Country’s most trusted and renowned food critics. Praise has flowed for Conor’s individual style of cooking, which brings Asian flavours, namely Japanese, to modern French cuisine. The menu focuses mainly on tasting menus as it is the best way to experience this kind of food, however there is a three course set menu available Tuesday to Thursday for mid week dining. The lunch menu is a three course affair with the option of a ...

  2. Amuse Restaurant Set Lunch 2017

    Amuse Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Since opening, Amuse Restaurant has garnered rave reviews from the Country’s most trusted and renowned food critics. Praise has flowed for Conor’s individual style of cooking, which brings Asian flavours, namely Japanese, to modern French cuisine. The menu focuses mainly on tasting menus as it is the best way to experience this kind of food, however there is a three course set menu available Tuesday to Thursday for mid week dining. The lunch menu is a three course affair with the option of a ...

  3. Amuse Restaurant Spring Menu 2017

    Amuse Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Since opening, Amuse Restaurant has garnered rave reviews from the Country’s most trusted and renowned food critics. Praise has flowed for Conor’s individual style of cooking, which brings Asian flavours, namely Japanese, to modern French cuisine. The menu focuses mainly on tasting menus as it is the best way to experience this kind of food, however there is a three course set menu available Tuesday to Thursday for mid week dining. The lunch menu is a three course affair with the option of a ...

  4. Economic effect of restaurant smoking restrictions on restaurant business in Massachusetts, 1992 to 1998.

    Bartosch, William J; Pope, G C

    2002-06-01

    To determine if restaurant business declines or improves after the implementation of restrictive restaurant smoking policies. Analysis used a pre/post-quasi-experimental design that compared town meals tax receipts before and after the imposition of highly restrictive restaurant smoking policies in adopting versus non-adopting communities. The effect of restaurant smoking policies was estimated using a fixed effects regression model, entering a panel of 84 months of data for the 239 towns in the study. A separate model estimated the effect of restaurant smoking policies on establishments that served alcohol. Change in the trend in meals tax revenue (adjusted for population) following the implementation of highly restrictive restaurant smoking policies. The local adoption of restrictive restaurant smoking policies did not lead to a measurable deviation from the strong positive trend in revenue between 1992 and 1998 that restaurants in Massachusetts experienced. Controlling for other less restrictive restaurant smoking policies did not change this finding. Similar results were found for only those establishments that served alcoholic beverages. Highly restrictive restaurant smoking policies do not have a significant effect on a community's level of meal receipts, indicating that claims of community wide restaurant business decline under such policies are unwarranted.

  5. Art imitating high-energy physics

    Abbott, A

    2000-01-01

    Artists have been brought to CERN to learn about particle physics. In response they will each create an original piece of art which will be exhibited in "Signatures of the Invisible", a roadshow that will visit galleries across Europe next year (1/2 page).

  6. The Art of Buddhism. A Teacher's Guide.

    Forsgren, Krista; Benskin, Elizabeth

    While the art of Buddhism has an enduring tradition throughout Asia, this teaching guide focuses on the cultures of three countries in which the Smithsonian's Freer and Sackler Galleries' collections are particularly strong: India, China, and Japan. The guide identifies grade level appropriateness for some lessons and activities. It contains 15…

  7. Promoting Influenza Vaccination to Restaurant Employees.

    Graves, Meredith C; Harris, Jeffrey R; Hannon, Peggy A; Hammerback, Kristen; Parrish, Amanda T; Ahmed, Faruque; Zhou, Chuan; Allen, Claire L

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate an evidence-based workplace approach to increasing adult influenza vaccination levels applied in the restaurant setting We implemented an intervention and conducted a pre/post analysis to determine effect on vaccination. Eleven Seattle-area restaurants. Restaurants with 25+ employees speaking English or Spanish and over 18 years. Restaurants received influenza vaccination promotion materials, assistance arranging on-site vaccination events, and free influenza vaccinations for employees. Pre/post employee surveys of vaccination status with direct observation and employer interviews to evaluate implementation. We conducted descriptive analysis of employee survey data and performed qualitative analysis of implementation data. To assess intervention effect, we used a mixed-effects logistic regression model with a restaurant-specific random effect. Vaccination levels increased from 26% to 46% (adjusted odds ratio 2.33, 95% confidence interval 1.69, 3.22), with 428 employees surveyed preintervention, 305 surveyed postintervention, and response rates of 73% and 55%, respectively. The intervention was effective across subgroups, but there were restaurant-level differences. An access-based workplace intervention can increase influenza vaccination levels in restaurant employees, but restaurant-level factors may influence success. © 2016 by American Journal of Health Promotion, Inc.

  8. Consumentenonderzoek in het Restaurant van de Toekomst

    Wijk, de R.A.; Gorselink, M.; Steenbekkers, L.P.A.; Wabeke, M.; Thomasson, T.

    2010-01-01

    Miljoenen mensen lunchen dagelijks op hun werk. Over bijvoorbeeld motieven bij de keuze van maaltijdcomponenten, de invloed van de inrichting van het restaurant of variaties in het assortiment op dit keuzegedrag is weinig tot niets bekend. In het Restaurant van de Toekomst doet de Consumer Science

  9. Survey of restaurants regarding smoking policies.

    Williams, Alcia; Peterson, Elizabeth; Knight, Susan; Hiller, Marc; Pelletier, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The New Hampshire Indoor Smoking Act was implemented in 1994 to protect the public's health by regulating smoking in enclosed places. A survey was conducted of New Hampshire restaurants to determine smoking policies, to determine restaurant characteristics associated with smoking policies, and to evaluate compliance with the Indoor Smoking Act. A list of New Hampshire restaurants was obtained from a marketing firm. Establishments were selected randomly until 400 had completed a 22-question telephone survey. Forty-four percent of restaurants permitted smoking. Characteristics positively associated with permitting smoking were being a non-fast-food restaurant, selling alcohol, selling tobacco, and having greater than the median number of seats. Of restaurants permitting smoking, 96.1% had a designated smoking area, 87.0% had a ventilation system to minimize secondhand smoke, 83.6% had a physical barrier between smoking and nonsmoking areas, and 53.1% exhibited signs marking the smoking area. Forty percent of restaurants permitting smoking met all four requirements of the Indoor Smoking Act. Smoking policies differ, by type of restaurant. Compliance with the Indoor Smoking Act is low.

  10. Application of gallery-drilling exploration in underground uranium mining and its evaluation

    Chen Ruichun; Zou Guohe

    1990-01-01

    Combination method of gallery and drilling is an effective one in production exploration. On the basis of the 20 years practice of a uranium mine using the gallery-drilling combination method in production exploration, the advantages, applications, engineering networks, principles of application of the gallery-drilling combination method and the results of its application are described

  11. Official CERN holidays | Restaurant opening hours

    2013-01-01

    Please note that the CERN Restaurants will have the following opening hours during the upcoming holidays: Restaurant #1 will be open from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Wednesday 1 May, Thursday 9 May (Ascension Thursday) and Monday 20 May (Pentecost) - on Friday 10 May the restaurant will be open at the usual times. Restaurant #2 will be closed over the 3 official CERN holidays, but will be open on Friday 10 May at the usual times (brasserie will be closed). Restaurant #3 will be closed over the 3 official CERN holidays, as well as Friday 10 May.

  12. Local Area Artworks: Collaborative Art Interpretation On-Site

    Polli, Anna Maria; Korn, Matthias; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present Local Area Artworks, a system enabling collaborative art interpretation on-site deployed during an exhibition in a local art gallery. Through the system, we explore ways to re-connect people to the local place by making use of their personal mobile devices as interfaces...

  13. Making Restaurant No. 1 greener

    Roberto Cantoni

    2010-01-01

    The extension of a section of the terrace of Restaurant No. 1, which was part of the infrastructure consolidation programme that began in April 2009, will be completed at the end of this year. The new terrace will have an area of 1770 m² (compared with 1650 m²  today) and will stretch the length of the restaurant extension.   The new building is a striking example of the use of renewable energies, comprising high-performance photovoltaic panels with an innovative sealing system integrated in the roof that cope particularly well with low amounts of sun. The electric cables and connections of each module are hidden and integrated in the roof, giving it a uniform appearance. The roof comprises two rows of 12 modules, each measuring 11.6 m². Their total annual energy production capacity is around 14 MWh. By comparison, the building's estimated annual energy consumption is 98 MWh, depending on the conditions of use.

  14. Whispering gallery mode selection in optical bottle microresonators

    Ding, Ming; Senthil Murugan, Ganapathy; Brambilla, Gilberto; Zervas, Michalis N.

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrated a method to excite selected whispering gallery modes in optical bottle microresonators (BMR) by inscribing microgroove scars on their surface by focused ion beam milling. Substantial spectral clean-up is obtained in appropriately scarred BMRs, providing the potential for high performance sensors and other optical devices.

  15. Thermal simulation of storage in TSS-Galleries

    Lain Huerta, R.; Martinez Santiago, T.; Ramirez Oyangueren, P.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the experiment ''thermal simulation of storage in TSS-galleries'' what is been developed in salt mine of Asse, Germany. The report has 3 part: 1) Analysis of objectives and general description of boundary layers. 2) Geomechanics parameters of salt mine. 3) Thermal modelization, thermomechanics modelization and data acquisition

  16. Noise in restaurants: levels and mathematical model.

    To, Wai Ming; Chung, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Noise affects the dining atmosphere and is an occupational hazard to restaurant service employees worldwide. This paper examines the levels of noise in dining areas during peak hours in different types of restaurants in Hong Kong SAR, China. A mathematical model that describes the noise level in a restaurant is presented. The 1-h equivalent continuous noise level (L(eq,1-h)) was measured using a Type-1 precision integral sound level meter while the occupancy density, the floor area of the dining area, and the ceiling height of each of the surveyed restaurants were recorded. It was found that the measured noise levels using Leq,1-h ranged from 67.6 to 79.3 dBA in Chinese restaurants, from 69.1 to 79.1 dBA in fast food restaurants, and from 66.7 to 82.6 dBA in Western restaurants. Results of the analysis of variance show that there were no significant differences between means of the measured noise levels among different types of restaurants. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was employed to determine the relationships between geometrical and operational parameters and the measured noise levels. Results of the regression analysis show that the measured noise levels depended on the levels of occupancy density only. By reconciling the measured noise levels and the mathematical model, it was found that people in restaurants increased their voice levels when the occupancy density increased. Nevertheless, the maximum measured hourly noise level indicated that the noise exposure experienced by restaurant service employees was below the regulated daily noise exposure value level of 85 dBA.

  17. Noise in restaurants: Levels and mathematical model

    Wai Ming To

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise affects the dining atmosphere and is an occupational hazard to restaurant service employees worldwide. This paper examines the levels of noise in dining areas during peak hours in different types of restaurants in Hong Kong SAR, China. A mathematical model that describes the noise level in a restaurant is presented. The 1-h equivalent continuous noise level (Leq,1-h was measured using a Type-1 precision integral sound level meter while the occupancy density, the floor area of the dining area, and the ceiling height of each of the surveyed restaurants were recorded. It was found that the measured noise levels using Leq,1-h ranged from 67.6 to 79.3 dBA in Chinese restaurants, from 69.1 to 79.1 dBA in fast food restaurants, and from 66.7 to 82.6 dBA in Western restaurants. Results of the analysis of variance show that there were no significant differences between means of the measured noise levels among different types of restaurants. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was employed to determine the relationships between geometrical and operational parameters and the measured noise levels. Results of the regression analysis show that the measured noise levels depended on the levels of occupancy density only. By reconciling the measured noise levels and the mathematical model, it was found that people in restaurants increased their voice levels when the occupancy density increased. Nevertheless, the maximum measured hourly noise level indicated that the noise exposure experienced by restaurant service employees was below the regulated daily noise exposure value level of 85 dBA.

  18. Statistical Image Properties in Large Subsets of Traditional Art, Bad Art, and Abstract Art.

    Redies, Christoph; Brachmann, Anselm

    2017-01-01

    Several statistical image properties have been associated with large subsets of traditional visual artworks. Here, we investigate some of these properties in three categories of art that differ in artistic claim and prestige: (1) Traditional art of different cultural origin from established museums and art collections (oil paintings and graphic art of Western provenance, Islamic book illustration and Chinese paintings), (2) Bad Art from two museums that collect contemporary artworks of lesser importance (© Museum Of Bad Art [MOBA], Somerville, and Official Bad Art Museum of Art [OBAMA], Seattle), and (3) twentieth century abstract art of Western provenance from two prestigious museums (Tate Gallery and Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen). We measured the following four statistical image properties: the fractal dimension (a measure relating to subjective complexity); self-similarity (a measure of how much the sections of an image resemble the image as a whole), 1st-order entropy of edge orientations (a measure of how uniformly different orientations are represented in an image); and 2nd-order entropy of edge orientations (a measure of how independent edge orientations are across an image). As shown previously, traditional artworks of different styles share similar values for these measures. The values for Bad Art and twentieth century abstract art show a considerable overlap with those of traditional art, but we also identified numerous examples of Bad Art and abstract art that deviate from traditional art. By measuring statistical image properties, we quantify such differences in image composition for the first time.

  19. Changing Subjects: The Gallery at Cleveland House and the Highland Clearances

    Anne Nellis Richter

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In 1812, a porter named William Cantrill published a small volume of etchings dedicated to his employer, the Marchioness of Stafford. Cantrill characterized his reproductions of a select group of small Netherlandish pictures from the art gallery at the Marchioness’s London residence, Cleveland House, as “first attempts from an untutored hand”, calling attention to his status as a servant and untrained artist. In this article, I examine this idiosyncratic volume in light of the reception of small subject pictures in the early nineteenth century, and also within the context of the Marchioness of Stafford’s involvement in the Highland Clearances. At a moment when the Marchioness and her husband were under scrutiny for the heavy-handed tactics used against their Scottish tenants, this book used the category of genre painting to smooth over the gaps between landowner and tenant that the Clearances had made evident.

  20. Lesbian identity and the politics of representation in Betty Parsons's gallery.

    Gibson, A

    1994-01-01

    Although Betty Parsons had been unusually open about her love relationships with women in the twenties and thirties, she later became reticent, retiring to the closet. Her increased discretion after World War II, during the Cold War, coincided with her rise as the art dealer most prominently associated with the international emergence of Abstract Expressionism. Parsons incurred the objections of her Abstract Expressionists, however, by showing artists who included both abstraction and naturalism in their work, such as Sonia Sekula, Forrest Bess, and Hedda Sterne. This article examines her definition of abstraction as difference through her friend Theodoros Stamos's notion of camp and helps to explain her admiration of Barnett Newman despite her refusal to devote her gallery exclusively to his narrower version of significant abstraction.

  1. The Strossmayer Gallery in Zagreb in the interwar period: from a utopian project to a renowned institution

    Ljerka Dulibic

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The basis of today’s Strossmayer Gallery’s collection is the bequest of European Old Masters’ paintings collected by Bishop J. J. Strossmayer (1815-1905, with the fundamental desire to enlarge the scope of the Croatian cultural tradition through the appropriation of European elite culture. The meaning and function of the Gallery changed considerably over time. Before WWI, the Strossmayer Gallery was a utopian project in the sense that its mission was not only to fabricate what was seen to be a missing artistic past, but also to create the foundations for a future, native art. After WWI, with the formation of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, the national state was, at least in some form, realized, and the Gallery now turned its attention to concrete matters. In this paper, we follow the paths of intensive professionalization of the wide range of activities in the interwar period, retracing not only the history of museum presentation, or the history of Art History and of Art Conservation in Croatia, but also some traces of the general development of the dynamic, intertwined and significant relationship between Art History, Art Conservation and the museum. Il nucleo dell’odierna collezione della Galleria Strossmayer è costituito dal lascito delle opere dei maestri antichi europei raccolti dal vescovo J.J. Strossmayer (1815-1905, il cui scopo fondamentale fu di allargare la tradizione culturale croata con l’appropriazione della cultura elitaria europea. Con il passare del tempo, il signifi cato e la funzione della Galleria cambiò considerevolmente. Prima della Prima guerra mondiale la Galleria Strossmayer fu un progetto utopistico nel senso che la sua missione non era solo di riempire il vuoto visto come il passato artistico mancante, ma anche di creare le fondamenta per una futura arte locale. Dopo la guerra, con la formazione del Regno dei Serbi, Croati e Sloveni, lo stato nazionale fu, almeno in un certo senso, realizzato, e

  2. Restaurant volatility and the Iowa City, Iowa, smoke-free restaurant ordinance.

    Sheffer, Megan A; Squier, Christopher A; Gilmore, Gary D

    2013-01-01

    To determine the economic impact of the Iowa City, Iowa, smoke-free restaurant ordinance (IC-SFRO) using an immediate and novel approach. In this retrospective study, food permit licensure served as the measure to assess the IC-SFRO impact. The Iowa City experience provided an excellent experimental setting, as the ordinance was enacted March 1, 2002, and repealed May 7, 2003, because of preemption. The city of Coralville served as a natural control, as it is contiguous to Iowa City, has similar population demographics, and has never enacted a smoke-free restaurant ordinance. Food permit licensure data for all Iowa City and Coralville restaurants were obtained from the Johnson County Health Department. Differences in restaurant volatility were assessed using Fisher's exact probability test. The number of restaurants increased in both Iowa City and Coralville throughout the ordinance period. The ratio of the total number of restaurants in Iowa City to the total number of restaurants in the Iowa City-Coralville metropolitan area remained stable. The proportion of restaurants for each city did not differ significantly during the preordinance, ordinance, and postordinance periods. The IC-SFRO did not adversely impact the restaurant industry in terms of restaurant closures. The Iowa legislature was urged to draft evidence-based legislation, such as amending preemption of the IC-SFRO, to protect and promote the health of its communities.

  3. Enquête de satisfaction des restaurants

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Comité de surveillance des restaurants L’Association du personnel est représentée dans plusieurs comités dont le Comité de surveillance des restaurants (CSR) qui a pour mandat : de donner son avis sur toute question relative à la politique générale de l’Organisation en matière de restauration sur le site, y compris en ce qui concerne les termes et l’attribution des contrats d’exploitation des restaurants ; de définir dans le cadre des contrats d’exploitation des restaurants, les prestations correspondant aux besoins et, dans la mesure du possible, aux désirs du personnel ; de surveiller les prestations des restaurants, y compris en ce qui concerne la qualité et la préparation des produits ; de négocier avec les concessionnaires des restaurants au sujet des tarifs et de surveill...

  4. Chefs' opinions of restaurant portion sizes.

    Condrasky, Marge; Ledikwe, Jenny H; Flood, Julie E; Rolls, Barbara J

    2007-08-01

    The objectives were to determine who establishes restaurant portion sizes and factors that influence these decisions, and to examine chefs' opinions regarding portion size, nutrition information, and weight management. A survey was distributed to chefs to obtain information about who is responsible for determining restaurant portion sizes, factors influencing restaurant portion sizes, what food portion sizes are being served in restaurants, and chefs' opinions regarding nutrition information, health, and body weight. The final sample consisted of 300 chefs attending various culinary meetings. Executive chefs were identified as being primarily responsible for establishing portion sizes served in restaurants. Factors reported to have a strong influence on restaurant portion sizes included presentation of foods, food cost, and customer expectations. While 76% of chefs thought that they served "regular" portions, the actual portions of steak and pasta they reported serving were 2 to 4 times larger than serving sizes recommended by the U.S government. Chefs indicated that they believe that the amount of food served influences how much patrons consume and that large portions are a problem for weight control, but their opinions were mixed regarding whether it is the customer's responsibility to eat an appropriate amount when served a large portion of food. Portion size is a key determinant of energy intake, and the results from this study suggest that cultural norms and economic value strongly influence the determination of restaurant portion sizes. Strategies are needed to encourage chefs to provide and promote portions that are appropriate for customers' energy requirements.

  5. Don't Just Applaud - Send Money! The Most Successful Strategies for Funding and Marketing the Arts.

    Reiss, Alvin H.

    This handbook/guidebook/manual details marketing and fund-raising strategies that might benefit art organizations. Drawing on sources from the arts community, including orchestras, opera, dance and theater companies, galleries, museums, arts councils, performing arts centers, and a zoo, ideas are presented which have proven successful in actual…

  6. ROLE AND IMPORTANCE OF PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES IN RESTAURANT BUSINESS

    Ivica Batinić

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern restaurant business, as part of a catering business, offers a variety of meals and beverages in restaurants and various related facilities. Promotional activities play a very important role in managing a restaurant and related facilities, because any serious restaurant facility must take all the necessary and effective measures in order to maintain regular guests and approach potential new guests. In this paper, I will write about conceptualizing restaurant business and elementary business systems in restaurant business. In a separate part, I will write about conceptualizing promotions and promotional activities as important factors in achieving better and more efficient communication of restaurants with regular and potential guests.

  7. Annual closure of the CERN restaurants

    2014-01-01

    On Friday, 19 December 2014: Restaurant 1 will close at 4 p.m. and the newspaper kiosk at 2.30 p.m. The ‘Grab & Go’ stand will not open at all that day. Restaurant 2 and the snack-bars in Buildings 13, 40 and 30 will close at 3 p.m. and the snack-bars in Buildings 6 and 54 at 11 a.m. Restaurant 3 will close at 4 p.m. and the coffee bars in Buildings 864 and 865 at noon. All outlets will open again at the usual times on Monday, 5 January 2015.

  8. RESTAURANT Nr 1 (building 501 - Meyrin site)

    2003-01-01

    OPENING TIMES in JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004 Customers are kindly requested to note the modified opening times of restaurant nr. 1 and the adjoining newspaper stand from Monday, January 5 to Sunday February 29, 2004: Kiosquefrom Monday to Friday07:30 - 17:00 hrs Restaurant from Monday to FridaySaturday / Sunday 07:00 - 23:00 hrs08:00 - 21:00 hrs Hot meals will be served between 11:30 and 14:00 hrs, then from 18:00 to 19:30 hrs. Restaurant Supervisory Committee

  9. >RESTAURANT Nr 1 (building 501 - Meyrin site)

    2004-01-01

    Customers are kindly requested to note the modified opening times of restaurant nr. 1 and the adjoining newspaper stand from Monday, January 5 to Sunday February 29, 2004: - Kiosque from Monday to Friday 07:30 - 17:00 hrs - Restaurant from Monday to Friday Saturday / Sunday 07:00 - 23:00 hrs08:00 - 21:00 hrs Hot meals will be served between 11:30 and 14:00 hrs, then from 18:00 to 19:30 hrs. Restaurant Supervisory Committee

  10. Art engagement and mental health: experiences of service users of a community-based arts programme at Tate Modern, London.

    McKeown, Eamonn; Weir, Hannele; Berridge, Emma-Jane; Ellis, Liz; Kyratsis, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    To examine the experiences of mental health service users who took part in an arts-based programme at Tate Modern, a major London art gallery. Exploratory qualitative design. Data were collected using in-depth semi-structured interviews with 10 mental health service users who had taken part in a community-based programme at Tate Modern. Additionally, six art educators from Tate Modern were interviewed. Concepts that emerged from the text were identified using thematic analysis. All participants valued the gallery-based programme. The three overarching thematic areas were: the symbolic and physical context in which the programme workshops were located; the relational and social context of the programme workshops; and reflections on the relationship between the arts-based programme and subsequent mental health. Art galleries are increasingly seen to function as vehicles for popular education with mental health service users. This study adds to the growing body of evidence related to how mental health service users experience and reflect on arts-related programmes targeted at them. This study indicates that emphasis on how users experience gallery-based programmes may contribute to a more nuanced understanding of the relationship between art and mental health. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Economic effect of restaurant smoking restrictions on restaurant business in Massachusetts, 1992 to 1998

    Bartosch, W; Pope, G

    2002-01-01

    Design: Analysis used a pre/post-quasi-experimental design that compared town meals tax receipts before and after the imposition of highly restrictive restaurant smoking policies in adopting versus non-adopting communities. The effect of restaurant smoking policies was estimated using a fixed effects regression model, entering a panel of 84 months of data for the 239 towns in the study. A separate model estimated the effect of restaurant smoking policies on establishments that served alcohol.

  12. Cacophony of Voices and Emotions Dialogic of Buying and Selling Art

    Can-Seng Ooi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The importance of galleries as go-betweens for artists and art buyers is acknowl-edged in art world research. Using a Bakhtinian dialogic approach, this article examines social encounters of three artists, two art buyers and one gallery sales executive in Singapore. Specifically, it looks into the social interactional dynam-ics of artists and art buyers when they trade directly. Situational ambiguities and emotional ambivalence arise during such meetings from the different expectations and demands that are imposed, which have the effect of placing the parties in-volved in conflicting social contexts. For instance, when art connoisseurs and art-ists discuss aesthetics, monetary value is not of primary concern, nonetheless when they want to trade, commercial concerns become central; this can lead to discomfort between the parties. Similarly, art buyers may want to go behind the scenes to know more about the artist and the art practice; getting away from the glitter of the commercial gallery and into the modest art studio for an authentic experience may reveal too much for visitors; such experiences may break their illusion of the glamorous artist. This article looks at the microscopic interaction between artists and art buyers and shows how the ambiguities and ambivalence that can be generated by their encounters become constraining factors in encour-aging artists and art buyers to trade directly, by-passing commercial art galleries and dealers.

  13. The past: a gallery of arthritics.

    Appelboom, T

    1989-12-01

    Rheumatism in its many forms has affected mankind since ancient times. Numerous examples exist of the powerful and the famous who suffered these afflictions. In some cases the disease process in thought to have, through the sufferers, altered the course of history itself. Throughout history, the arts have served as a means by which man expressed life's broad range of emotions: love, beauty, despair, loneliness. But the works of several prominent artists also reflect the pain and frustration of arthritis. Examples of common diseases include low back pain and sciatica, which disabled Aneas of Greek mythology, Jacob of Biblical times, Sister Catherine and Jefferson. Lincoln and Paganini are both thought to have suffered from Marfan's syndrome. Ankylosing spondylitis affected Cosimo de Medici and the poet Scarron, while the disability of Columbus is thought to be more compatible with Reiter's Syndrome. Without even considering the numerous examples of famous personnages who had gout, one can find multiple historical and artistic figures who suffered from chronic polyarthritis. A brief list would include the Emperor Constantine, Rubens, Mary Queen of Scots, Madison, Renoir, Verlaine, and Dufy. Since these disorders can also be found in historical references, one wonders if, having affected the lives and temperaments of the eminent, the powerful, or an entire population, they may have in some circumstances exerted some influence on the course of world history, or, through artistic talents, contributed to the intellectual enrichment of society.

  14. Are fast food restaurants an environmental risk factor for obesity?

    Jeffery, Robert W; Baxter, Judy; McGuire, Maureen; Linde, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective Eating at "fast food" restaurants has increased and is linked to obesity. This study examined whether living or working near "fast food" restaurants is associated with body weight. Methods A telephone survey of 1033 Minnesota residents assessed body height and weight, frequency of eating at restaurants, and work and home addresses. Proximity of home and work to restaurants was assessed by Global Index System (GIS) methodology. Results Eating at "fast food" restaurants was p...

  15. The Analysis of Restaurant Industry In Kuopio Region

    Tang, Yuanjia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract “Hunger breeds discontentment”, people are the basis of a country and food is paramount necessity for people. With the rapid development of restaurant industry, nowadays restaurants already spread all over the world The objective of the thesis was to collect information from existed restaurants and forecast the restaurant industry developing trend in the future. The thesis was also prepared for the new entrepreneurs who want to open new restaurants in Kuopio. Before they open...

  16. What Can the Habitable Zone Gallery Do For You?

    Gelino, Dawn M.; Kane, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    The Habitable Zone Gallery (www.hzgallery.org) came online in August 2011 as a service to the exoplanet community that provides Habitable Zone (HZ) information for each of the exoplanetary systems with known planetary orbital parameters. The service includes a sortable table, a plot with the period and eccentricity of each of the planets with respect to their time spent in the HZ, a gallery of known systems which plot the orbits and the location of the HZ with respect to those orbits, and orbital movies. Recently, we have added new features including: implementation of both conservative and optimistic HZs, more user-friendly table and movies, movies for circumbinary planets, and a count of planets whose orbits lie entirely within the system's HZ. Here we discuss various educational and scientific applications of the site such as target selection, exploring planets with eccentric or circumbinary orbits, and investigating habitability.

  17. Going Smokefree Matters - Bars and Restaurants Infographic

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Explore the Going Smokefree Matters – Bars and Restaurants Infographic which outlines key facts related to the effects of secondhand smoke exposure in bars and...

  18. Going Smokefree Matters - Bars and Restaurants Infographic

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Explore the Going Smokefree Matters – Bars and Restaurants Infographic which outlines key facts related to the effects of secondhand smoke exposure in bars and...

  19. Information regarding restaurants 1 and 2

    2007-01-01

    Please note that Restaurant 1 will be closed during the Easter weekend from Friday 6th April until Monday 9th April inclusive. Restaurant 2 will remain open during this period. See http://resto2.web.cern.ch/resto2/Events/easter2007.html for more information. Restaurant 1 will also be closed for technical reasons during the weekend of 5th-6th May. Restaurant 2 will be open on Saturday 5th May from 8.00-20.00 and on Sunday 6th May from 9.00-20.00. Hot meals will be served on both days from 12.00-14.00 and from 18.00-19.30. See http://resto2.web.cern.ch/resto2/Events/5-6May2007.html for more information. Thank you for your understanding.

  20. The Use of Market Feasibility Studies in the Restaurant Industry for Small and Medium-sized Restaurants

    Kolster, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The goals of this thesis are to provide the reader with new information about market feasibility studies in the restaurant industry and to design a market feasibility template for the international restaurant industry which can be used for small and medium-sized restaurants before entering the market. The objectives are to define the ideal factors of a market feasibility study for the international restaurant industry, to learn and become an expert in feasibility studies for the restaurant i...

  1. Profit by conserving energy in your restaurant

    1981-01-01

    This manual is aimed at the Canadian restaurant sector with a view of promoting sound energy conservation practices. Monitoring is recommended to identify energy consumption and measure results of a conservation effects. These efforts can be done with respect to selection, operation, and maintenance of restaurant equipment used in food preparation, HVAC systems, refrigeration, water heating, and lighting. Overall building design and planning of new installations are also considered. 27 figs.

  2. Application for Suggesting Restaurants Using Clustering Algorithms

    Iulia Alexandra IANCU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present an application whose purpose is to make suggestions of restaurants to users. The application uses as input the descriptions of restaurants, reviews, user reviews available on the specialized Internet sites and blogs. In the application there are used processing techniques of natural language implemented using parsers, clustering algorithms and techniques for data collection from the Internet through web crawlers.

  3. SUCCESS FACTORS OF A CHINESE RESTAURANT

    Xu, Peipei

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The thesis serves two main purposes. First, it aims to find out the factors that make the Chinese restaurant Dragon Sheng succeed. Second, its objective is to know customers’ satisfaction of Dragon Sheng. The comprehensive literature review traces the management in restaurant, brand building, service design, and customer relationship development. The primary data was collected through qualitative research method and personal interview were applied to collect information about...

  4. Reingeniería del restaurant clarita

    Gómez Briones, Pedro; Fernández Ruiz, Víctor

    2010-01-01

    This work is based on the concepts used for administrative, financial and service reengineering applied to Restaurant Clarita; which has remained in the business of catering sector for over 30 years, located in the city of Guayaquil, experiencing a gradually growth, based on the quality of the products, as well as the personalized attention of his owner. Restaurant Clarita offers its customers, prepared meals, such as soups, mashed potatoes, meat, beans, pork chop rice, as well...

  5. Service orientation of the restaurant employees

    Gagić, Snježana; Vuković-Jovičić, Ana; Petrović, Marko D.

    2017-01-01

    The service orientation program developed for restaurant employees can be a competitive advantage for a restaurant operation. Service orientation has been characterized as the disposition of employees to be helpful, thoughtful, considerate, and co-operative towards customers. Customer-oriented behaviors include: helping customers; helping customers to assess their needs; offering service that will satisfy those needs; describing services accurately; avoiding deceptive manipulations; and avoid...

  6. Wine Price Markup in California Restaurants

    Amspacher, William

    2011-01-01

    The study quantifies the relationship between retail wine price and restaurant mark-up. Ordinary Least Squares regressions were run to estimate how restaurant mark-up responded to retail price. Separate regressions were run for white wine, red wine, and both red and white combined. Both slope and intercept coefficients for each of these regressions were highly significant and indicated the expected inverse relationship between retail price and mark-up.

  7. A gallery approach for off-angle iris recognition

    Karakaya, Mahmut; Yoldash, Rashiduddin; Boehnen, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    It has been proven that hamming distance score between frontal and off-angle iris images of same eye differs in iris recognition system. The distinction of hamming distance score is caused by many factors such as image acquisition angle, occlusion, pupil dilation, and limbus effect. In this paper, we first study the effect of the angle variations between iris plane and the image acquisition systems. We present how hamming distance changes for different off-angle iris images even if they are coming from the same iris. We observe that increment in acquisition angle of compared iris images causes the increment in hamming distance. Second, we propose a new technique in off-angle iris recognition system that includes creating a gallery of different off-angle iris images (such as, 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 degrees) and comparing each probe image with these gallery images. We will show the accuracy of the gallery approach for off-angle iris recognition.

  8. Australian doctors and the visual arts. Part 1. Doctor-artists in New South Wales.

    Hamilton, D G

    Since Europeans first settled in Australia their doctors have been interested in the visual arts. Some have been hobby painters and sculptors, a few with great distinction. Some have been gallery supporters and administrators. A few have written art books. Some have been outstanding photographers. Of the larger number of doctors who have collected art, only those are mentioned who have made their collections public or have made important donations to galleries. The subject of Australian doctors and the visual arts will be discussed in six articles in this and following issues of the journal. The first deals with doctor-artists in New South Wales.

  9. What menu changes do restaurants make after joining a voluntary restaurant recognition program?

    Gase, Lauren N; Kaur, Mandip; Dunning, Lauren; Montes, Christine; Kuo, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Programs that recognize restaurants for offering healthful options have emerged as a popular strategy to address the obesity epidemic; however, program fidelity and business responses to such programs are rarely assessed. This study sought to examine how retail restaurants in Los Angeles County chose to comply with participation criteria required by the Choose Health LA Restaurants initiative in the region; the program recognizes restaurants for offering reduced-size portions and healthy children's meals. Menus of all restaurants that joined within 1 year of program launch (n = 17 restaurant brands) were assessed for changes. Nine of the 17 brands made changes to their menus to meet participation criteria for reduced-size portions while 8 of the 10 restaurant brands that offered children's menus made changes to improve the healthfulness of children's meals. Results of this comparative assessment lend support to restaurant compliance with program criteria and menu improvements, even though they are voluntary, representing an important step toward implementing this strategy in the retail environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Incorporation And Exploration Of Local Imageries And Identities In Malaysia's Graffiti Art

    Sarena Abdullah; Norshahidan Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    The production of graffiti art in Malaysia can be traced back to the late 1990’s. Since then, graffiti art has beenembraced by local municipalities as well as the National Visual Art Gallery (NVAG) in their public programming and activities. Despite these positive developments, how the local graffiti artists infused local imageries and indentities in their work had not been examined. The parallels between graffiti art practices and the development of modern art in Malaysia, made the emergence...

  11. Higgs boson pizza day | 4 July 2016 | Restaurant 1

    2016-01-01

    Four years after the historic announcement of the discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN, a collaboration between INFN and CERN has declared 4 July 2016 “Higgs Boson Pizza Day”.    The Novae Restaurant 1 at CERN will offer two special “Higgs Boson Pizzas” (one vegetarian and one ham and cheese), from 11.30 a.m. to 2.15 p.m., for the usual pizza price. The idea was born in Naples (where else?), the hometown of Pierluigi Paolucci, who - while chatting with INFN president Fernando Ferroni - realised the striking resemblance between Higgs boson event displays and the delicious pizzas in front of them. A specially designed pizza was then created by the chef of the historic “Ettore” pizzeria in St. Lucia, in time for the opening of an Art&Science exhibition on 15 September 2015 in Naples. The owner of the restaurant, Ms Iolanda Canale, has been invited by INFN to come to CERN and help Novae in the preparation of 400 pizzas on thi...

  12. From Menu to Mouth: Opportunities for Sodium Reduction in Restaurants

    Gunn, Janelle Peralez

    2014-01-01

    Restaurant foods can be a substantial source of sodium in the American diet. According to the Institute of Medicine, the significant contribution made by restaurants and food service menu items to Americans’ sodium intake warrants targeted attention. Public health practitioners are uniquely poised to support sodium-reduction efforts in restaurants and help drive demand for lower-sodium products through communication and collaboration with restaurant and food service professionals and through incentives for restaurants. This article discusses the role of the public health practitioner in restaurant sodium reduction and highlights select strategies that have been taken by state and local jurisdictions to support this effort. PMID:24456646

  13. Communication from the Restaurants 1 and 2

    2006-01-01

    Please note that due to the renovation work taking place in Restaurant 1, the 'free-flow' area will be moved to a temporary position at the far end of the restaurant from Thursday 30th November. A marquee will be erected in front of the restaurant to provide an additional seating area during this time. Please also note that Restaurant 1 will be closed from Friday 1st December at 15:00 until the morning of 3rd December. Restaurant 2 will remain open during this period with the following opening times: Friday 1st December: hot meals available from 18:00 - 19:30, closing time 20:00; Saturday 2nd December: Opening time 8:00, hot meals available 12:00 - 14:00 and 18:00 - 19:30, closing time 20:00; Sunday 3rd December: Opening time 9:00, hot meals available 12:00 - 14:00 and 18:00 - 19:30, closing time 20:00. For further details please see http://cern.ch/resto2/DSR/Welcome.html

  14. Limited restaurant service over the Easter weekend

    2005-01-01

    As Friday, 25 March and Monday, 28 March 2005 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain closed on Saturday, 26 March and Sunday, 27 March. They will re-open on Tuesday, 29 March. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (Bldg. 504 - Meyrin): on Friday and Monday from 8 a.m. to 8.30 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. Hot meals will be served from 12.00 p.m. to 2 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. They will be served at the self-service restaurant on the first floor on Friday and at the cafeteria on the ground floor on Saturday, Sunday and Monday. On Thursday, March 24, all three restaurants will operate according to their usual opening times except for restaurant no. 1 which will close at 9 p.m. instead of 1 a.m.

  15. Limited restaurant service over the Easter weekend

    2005-01-01

    As Friday, 25 March and Monday, 28 March 2005 are CERN holidays, restaurants No. 1 (Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and No. 3 (Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain closed on Saturday, 26 March and Sunday, 27 March. They will re-open on Tuesday, 29 March at 7.00 a.m. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant No. 2 (Bldg. 504 - Meyrin): on Friday and Monday from 8 a.m. to 8.30 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. Hot meals will be served from 12.00 p.m. to 2 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. They will be served at the self-service restaurant on the first floor on Friday and at the cafeteria on the ground floor on Saturday, Sunday and Monday. On Thursday, March 24, all three restaurants will operate according to their usual opening times except for restaurant No. 1, which will close at 9 p.m. instead of 1 a.m.

  16. Communication from the Restaurants 1 and 2

    2006-01-01

    Please note that due to the renovation work taking place in Restaurant 1, the 'free-flow' area will be moved to a temporary location at the far end of the restaurant from Thursday 30th November. A marquee will be erected in front of the restaurant to provide an additional seating area during this time. Please also note that Restaurant 1 will be closed from Friday 1st December at 15:00 until the morning of 3rd December. Restaurant 2 will remain open during this period with the following opening times: Friday 1st December: hot meals available from 18:00 - 19:30, closing time 20:00. Saturday 2nd December: Opening time 8:00, hot meals available 12:00 - 14:00 and 18:00 - 19:30, closing time 20:00. Sunday 3rd December: Opening time 9:00, hot meals available 12:00 - 14:00 and 18:00 - 19:30, closing time 20:00. For further details please see http://cern.ch/resto2/DSR/Welcome.html

  17. Career Focus: Culinary Arts--Education for a Taste of Success

    Reese, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Career and technical education is serving up great opportunities for students in culinary arts programs across the country. According to the National Restaurant Association (NRA), it is estimated that a total of 13.5 million workers will be needed for the rapidly growing restaurant and food-service industry by the year 2014. This article provides…

  18. Detecting single viruses and nanoparticles using whispering gallery microlasers.

    He, Lina; Ozdemir, Sahin Kaya; Zhu, Jiangang; Kim, Woosung; Yang, Lan

    2011-06-26

    There is a strong demand for portable systems that can detect and characterize individual pathogens and other nanoscale objects without the use of labels, for applications in human health, homeland security, environmental monitoring and diagnostics. However, most nanoscale objects of interest have low polarizabilities due to their small size and low refractive index contrast with the surrounding medium. This leads to weak light-matter interactions, and thus makes the label-free detection of single nanoparticles very difficult. Micro- and nano-photonic devices have emerged as highly sensitive platforms for such applications, because the combination of high quality factor Q and small mode volume V leads to significantly enhanced light-matter interactions. For example, whispering gallery mode microresonators have been used to detect and characterize single influenza virions and polystyrene nanoparticles with a radius of 30 nm (ref. 12) by measuring in the transmission spectrum either the resonance shift or mode splitting induced by the nanoscale objects. Increasing Q leads to a narrower resonance linewidth, which makes it possible to resolve smaller changes in the transmission spectrum, and thus leads to improved performance. Here, we report a whispering gallery mode microlaser-based real-time and label-free detection method that can detect individual 15-nm-radius polystyrene nanoparticles, 10-nm gold nanoparticles and influenza A virions in air, and 30 nm polystyrene nanoparticles in water. Our approach relies on measuring changes in the beat note that is produced when an ultra-narrow emission line from a whispering gallery mode microlaser is split into two modes by a nanoscale object, and these two modes then interfere. The ultimate detection limit is set by the laser linewidth, which can be made much narrower than the resonance linewidth of any passive resonator. This means that microlaser sensors have the potential to detect objects that are too small to be

  19. Directional interacting whispering-gallery modes in coupled dielectric microdisks

    Ryu, Jung-Wan; Lee, Soo-Young; Kim, Chil-Min; Park, Young-Jai

    2006-01-01

    We study the optical interaction in a coupled dielectric microdisks by investigating the splitting of resonance positions of interacting whispering-gallery modes (WGM's) and their pattern change, depending on the distance between the microdisks. It is shown that the interaction between the WGM's with odd parity about the y axis becomes appreciable at a distance less than a wavelength and causes directional emissions of the resulting interacting WGM's. The directionality of the interacting WGM's can be understood in terms of an effective boundary deformation in ray dynamical analysis. We also discuss the oscillation of the splitting when the distance is greater than a wavelength

  20. Government quality bases in the field of restaurant economy

    Naumenko, M.; Vanichev, V.

    2010-01-01

    In the article is considered question of quality management as one of backer-ups competitiveness of enterprises of restaurant business and the problems of quality of grant of services restaurant economies are reflected.

  1. Restaurant eating in nonpurge binge-eating women.

    Timmerman, Gayle M

    2006-11-01

    This study describes restaurant-eating behaviors for nonpurge binge-eating women in comparison to dieters. Restaurant-eating behaviors were determined from a content analysis of 14-day food diaries using a convenience sample of 71 women who reported binging without purging and 46 dieters without a recent binge history. Comparing bingers to dieters, there were no significant differences in frequency of eating out, dessert consumption at restaurants, or fast food eating. Bingers more often perceived restaurant eating to be uncontrolled and excessive. Both bingers and dieters consumed significantly more calories (226-253 kcal) and fat (10.4-16.0 gm) on restaurant days. Extra calories consumed on restaurant-eating days may contribute to weight gain over time, especially with frequent restaurant eating. Restaurants may present a high-risk food environment for bingers and dieters, contributing to loss of control and excess consumption.

  2. Marketing strategies and profitability analysis of restaurants in ...

    Marketing strategies and profitability analysis of restaurants in Sokoto metropolis, Nigeria. ... Abstract. The study examined the marketing strategies and profitability of restaurants in Sokoto metropolis. ... EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  3. Annual closure of the CERN restaurants

    2015-01-01

      Restaurant No. 1 will close at 4 p.m. on Friday, 18 December 2015. The newspaper kiosk will close at 2.30 p.m. The ‘Grab & Go’ stand will not open at all that day.   Restaurant No. 2 and the snack-bars in Buildings 6, 13, 30 and 40 will close at 3 p.m. on Friday, 18 December 2015. The snack-bar in Building 54 will close at 10.30 a.m.   Restaurant No. 3 will close at 4 p.m. on Friday, 18 December 2015. The coffee bar in Building 864 will close at 10.30 a.m. and the one in Building 865 at 10.45 a.m. All outlets will open again at the usual times on Monday, 4 January 2015.

  4. Organisational ecology in the Danish restaurant sector

    Hjalager, Anne Mette

    2000-01-01

    The article demonstrates the high rates of organisational turmoil in the restaurant sector. The intensity of natural selection depends mainly on the age and size of the enterprise. Affiliation with other enterprises increases the chances of survival, but only if there is a substantial number...... of units co-operating in a group. Surprisingly, the level of staff competence and managerial capacity - measured in quantitative terms - cannot explain the level of success or failure in the restaurant business to any significant degree. Organisational ecology, which constitutes the theoretical...... and methodological base of this article, is a promising research approach to tourism issues. The article, which focuses on explanations for the occurrence of life events in the restaurant sector, calls for more careful policy considerations than are often the case. In particular, human-resource- and labour...

  5. Transformational and transactional leadership and problem solving in restaurant industry

    Huhtala, Nina

    2013-01-01

    The study tries to give information on the leadership behavior of restaurant managers in their problem solving. The results of the study were collected by evaluating three restaurant managers by interviewing them. The restaurant managers’ answers were compared to transformational and transactional leadership model and the aspects of it. Their problem solving skills were evaluated by the help of a rational and creative problem solving model. The study showed that restaurant managers have both ...

  6. TO IMPROVE QUALITY MANAGEMENT PROCESS : Case: Aiya Restaurant Chain

    Nguyen Thi, Tram Anh

    2012-01-01

    The commissioner of this thesis was Aiya Restaurant Chain, a newly opened yet well known restaurant chain in Vietnam. The core idea of this restaurant is to provide its customers with high quality and hygienic street-side foods. However, the current food quality control process in Aiya is incomplete and leaves space for many defects. Food quality has always been the crucial issue to all restaurants. Yet to Aiya, it is considered even more important, because the quality of food relates directl...

  7. Successful foundation for concept entirety and marketing: Case Restaurant Fregatti

    Mäenpää, Janina; Brandt, Annina

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is produced in co-operation with Restaurant Fregatti, which is going through a concept change process. Objectives for this thesis was to found out key aspects in creating successful concept, define steps for the change process and what kind of a role marketing plays in the concept change process. Restaurant Fregatti is a family owned restaurant which was established 1998. Fregatti is a part of Finncrespo Oy, which owns two additional restaurants, but it is not a chain restauran...

  8. Artful creation

    Darsø, Lotte

    2013-01-01

    An introduction to the field of Arts-in-Business outlining 4 different approaches: 1) Art as decoration, 2) Art as intertainment, 3) Arts as instrumental, 4) Art as strategic......An introduction to the field of Arts-in-Business outlining 4 different approaches: 1) Art as decoration, 2) Art as intertainment, 3) Arts as instrumental, 4) Art as strategic...

  9. Restaurant information system model and implementation

    Dzenkauskas, Paulinas

    2006-01-01

    The recent stabilization of the Internet is now driving easy aspect of life into an Internet presence and the accompanying e-commerce solutions. In the coming years, the Internet will see growth in numbers unlike the world has ever seen. E-commerce has built itself with this in mind and is making every effort it can to seize the strongest position possible. The idea of e-restaurant extends the restaurant to the web and therefore to the home of customers. It provides the basic services, suc...

  10. 10% discount at Novae restaurants for students

    2016-01-01

    A 10% discount will be granted for students dining in restaurants 1 and 2 (on the Meyrin site) during the summer from 15 June 2016 to 15 September 2016.   A special badge will be issued by the respective secretariats if the student fulfils the following criteria:  Is under 25 years old; Is in possession of a student card issued by a University or college; Has a CERN contract > 1 month (Users, Summer Students, Trainees, etc). This badge and the CERN access card will have to be shown at the Novae restaurants in order to benefit from this discount.

  11. RESTAURANT No. 1 (building 501 - Meyrin site)

    2005-01-01

    Opening times in January - February 2005 Customers are kindly requested to note the modified opening times of restaurant no. 1 and the adjoining newspaper stand from Monday 3 January to Sunday 27 February 2005: Kiosque from Monday to Friday 07:30 - 17:00 Restaurant from Monday to Friday 07:00 - 23:00 Saturday / Sunday 08:00 - 21:00 Hot meals will be served between 11:30 and 14:00, then from 18:00 to 19:30.

  12. RESTAURANT No. 1 (building 501 - Meyrin site)

    2004-01-01

    Opening times in January - February 2005 Customers are kindly requested to note the modified opening times of restaurant no. 1 and the adjoining newspaper stand from Monday 3 January to Sunday 27 February 2005: Kiosque from Monday to Friday 07:30 - 17:00 Restaurant from Monday to Friday 07:00 - 23:00 Saturday / Sunday 08:00 - 21:00 Hot meals will be served between 11:30 and 14:00, then from 18:00 to 19:30.

  13. 21 CFR 101.10 - Nutrition labeling of restaurant foods.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nutrition labeling of restaurant foods. 101.10... restaurant foods. Nutrition labeling in accordance with § 101.9 shall be provided upon request for any restaurant food or meal for which a nutrient content claim (as defined in § 101.13 or in subpart D of this...

  14. Restaurant Dining: Seven Tips for Staying Gluten Free

    GiG Education Bulletin Restaurant Dining: Seven Tips for Staying Gluten-Free Updated May 2014 Tips for Dining Away from Home 1. Selection of ... a number of factors, including the type of restaurant you choose. • Be careful in restaurants where language ...

  15. 27 CFR 31.42 - Restaurants serving liquors with meals.

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Restaurants serving... Part Certain Organizations, Agencies, and Persons § 31.42 Restaurants serving liquors with meals. Proprietors of restaurants and other persons who serve liquors with meals to paying customers, even if no...

  16. Are fast food restaurants an environmental risk factor for obesity?

    Linde Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Eating at "fast food" restaurants has increased and is linked to obesity. This study examined whether living or working near "fast food" restaurants is associated with body weight. Methods A telephone survey of 1033 Minnesota residents assessed body height and weight, frequency of eating at restaurants, and work and home addresses. Proximity of home and work to restaurants was assessed by Global Index System (GIS methodology. Results Eating at "fast food" restaurants was positively associated with having children, a high fat diet and Body Mass Index (BMI. It was negatively associated with vegetable consumption and physical activity. Proximity of "fast food" restaurants to home or work was not associated with eating at "fast food" restaurants or with BMI. Proximity of "non-fast food" restaurants was not associated with BMI, but was associated with frequency of eating at those restaurants. Conclusion Failure to find relationships between proximity to "fast food" restaurants and obesity may be due to methodological weaknesses, e.g. the operational definition of "fast food" or "proximity", or homogeneity of restaurant proximity. Alternatively, the proliferation of "fast food" restaurants may not be a strong unique cause of obesity.

  17. The Novohrad Museum and Gallery in Lučenec past and present (História a súčasnosť Novohradského múzea a galérie v Lučenci

    Michaela Škodová

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Novohrad Museum and Gallery in Lučenec specializes in the regional history of enamel- and glass-making and visual arts. It holds a collection of over 30,000 art, archeo-logical, historical and ethnological objects. Since 1983, the musem and gallery have been a host to the annual Acquarelle Triennale and since 1989, it has hosted the oldest symposium of its kind in Slovakia, the International Ceramic Symposium, which showcases the contemporary ceramic production in Slovakia. This paper outlines the history of the museum and its focus, concentrating on the work done in the last decade.

  18. Introducing New Library Services: Nuclear Malaysia Gallery Photos and Videos

    Mohd Hafizal Yusof; Nasaruddin Ahmad; Habibah Adnan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the existing of library is to preserve books and journals for the organizations main business. The role of library itself is to organize the books such as borrowing and renewal services as consulting their customers on getting the best references for the customers need and demand. Nowadays, the role of library also expands and the need for storing and preserving non-monograph resources such as photo and video also increase. Follow that current situation, Nuclear Malaysia's Library also take a step forwards by introducing new services so called Photo and Video Gallery. Realizing that Nuclear Malaysia also have their valuable photo and video that contains so called memorable moment and must be preserve for future reference, the management of Nuclear Malaysia's Library have decided to buy the system so called P-Canvas. The main purpose of this paper is to explain the library new services, Photo and Video Gallery, development and advantage of this system in storing and preserving Nuclear Malaysia's photo and video. (author)

  19. Sensitivity optimization in whispering gallery mode optical cylindrical biosensors

    Khozeymeh, F.; Razaghi, M.

    2018-01-01

    Whispering-gallery-mode resonances propagated in cylindrical resonators have two angular and radial orders of l and i. In this work, the higher radial order whispering-gallery-mode resonances, (i = 1 - 4), at a fixed l are examined. The sensitivity of theses resonances is analysed as a function of the structural parameters of the cylindrical resonator like different radii and refractive index of composed material of the resonator. A practical application where cylindrical resonators are used for the measurement of glucose concentration in water is presented as a biosensor demonstrator. We calculate the wavelength shifts of the WG1-4, in several glucose/water solutions, with concentrations spanning from 0.0% to 9.0.% (weight/weight). Improved sensitivity can be achieved using multi-WGM cylindrical resonators with radius of R = 100 μm and resonator composed material of MgF 2 with refractive index of nc = 1.38. Also the effect of polarization on sensitivity is considered for all four WGMs. The best sensitivity of 83.07 nm/RIU for the fourth WGM with transverse magnetic polarization, is reported. These results propose optimized parameters aimed to fast designing of cylindrical resonators as optical biosensors, where both the sensitivity and the geometries can be optimized.

  20. Main Street as Art Museum: Metaphor and Teaching Strategies

    Vallance, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    A walk down Main Street can be very much like a stroll through a museum gallery--visually rich, inviting unexpected choices, aesthetically rewarding. This article explores the concept of shop windows as visually ordered compositions, much like paintings and other art objects, and suggests some approaches to applying this concept in teaching a…

  1. Modern Masters from the Smithsonian American Art Museum

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    A new traveling exhibition and catalogue produced by the Smithsonian's American Art Museum features works by 31 artists from the United States who came to maturity in the mid-20th century. These artists have become the most significant and influential artists over the past 50 years as their works adorn the modern galleries of hundreds of museums.…

  2. The effect of restaurant attributes on customers' expectations and experiences in formal full service restaurants in Port Elizabeth, South Africa

    O Mhlanga; Z Hattingh; HJ Moolman

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of restaurant attributes on customers’ expectations and experiences in formal full service restaurants. The attributes included in this research were food, service and ambience as independent variables and expectations and experiences as dependent variables. The aims were to: (a) assess restaurant attributes that are important for customers’ expectations and experiences, (b) to determine which restaurant attributes had...

  3. IN A “GREEN” RESTAURANT, WHAT MAKES THE CUSTOM ERS SATISFIED? THE RESTAURANT ATTRIBUTES OF TRIP ADVISOR REVIEWERS

    TÜVER, Ilgaz Feray; GÜZEL, Berrin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to examine the restaurant attributes of green restaurants that make customers satisfied and dissatisfied. After the sustainability and green movement in food sector has gained importance, green restaurants have emerged. In this study, the main attributes that created satisfaction in a green restaurant are the food, atmosphere and the location, while food, price and the staff are the dissatisfaction creating attributes. However, none of the themes are related to sustain...

  4. Is Nonsmoking Dangerous to the Health of Restaurants? The Effect of California's Indoor Smoking Ban on Restaurant Revenues

    Stolzenberg, Lisa; D'Alessio, Stewart J.

    2007-01-01

    The state of California passed the Smoke-Free Workplace Act on January 1, 1995. This legislation effectively banned indoor smoking in all public and private workplaces including restaurants. Many restaurant owners, especially owners of restaurants that served alcohol, opposed the ban for fear that their businesses would be affected adversely…

  5. Multiplicity and Self-Identity: Trauma and Integration in Shirley Mason's Art

    Thompson, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    This viewpoint appeared in its original form as the catalogue essay that accompanied the exhibition "Multiplicity and Self-Identity: Trauma and Integration in Shirley Mason's Art," curated by the author for Gallery 2110, Sacramento, CA, and the 2010 Annual Conference of the American Art Therapy Association. The exhibition featured 17 artworks by…

  6. Impacts of social media in restaurant businesses : A case study of restaurants based on Oulu region

    Timilsina, Manoj

    2017-01-01

    Social media’s acceptance rate has been increasing day by day. All kinds of business are adopting social media as crucial tool for implementing business and marketing strategies. This research is done to highlight the impacts of social media in restaurants of Oulu based restaurants. The main objective of this thesis is to examine the impacts social media has in business and how social media is influencing business activities. Furthermore, this research provides a brief information of soci...

  7. Effects of whispering gallery mode in microsphere super-resolution imaging

    Zhou, Song; Deng, Yongbo; Zhou, Wenchao; Yu, Muxin; Urbach, H. P.; Wu, Yihui

    2017-09-01

    Whispering Gallery modes have been presented in microscopic glass spheres or toruses with many applications. In this paper, the possible approaches to enhance the imaging resolution by Whispering Gallery modes are discussed, including evanescent waves coupling, transformed and illustration by Whispering Gallery modes. It shows that the high-order scattering modes play the dominant role in the reconstructed virtual image when the Whispering Gallery modes exist. Furthermore, we find that the high image resolution of electric dipoles can be achieved, when the out-of-phase components exist from the illustration of Whispering Gallery modes. Those results of our simulation could contribute to the knowledge of microsphere-assisted super-resolution imaging and its potential applications.

  8. Restaurant Role-Play in Psychology

    Borya, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Research methods is perceived as a technical and difficult topic by some students. Using role-play to teach it can make it more accessible, meaningful and engaging. Role-playing the familiar roles of customer and waiting staff at a restaurant and discussing the variables that may affect the size of tips can help students to learn some of the key…

  9. Making Texas Restaurants Healthier for Children

    Sylvia Crixell, PhD, RD, Professor of Nutrition at Texas State University, discusses her study which details the success of a community-based program in Texas aimed at combatting childhood obesity by improving children’s menus in restaurants.

  10. A much needed makeover for Restaurant 3

    CERN Bulletin

    Inaugurated on 23 November, the newly renovated restaurant room and bar area in Prévessin is already welcoming 50% more CERNois than it used to before the construction. A preliminary project has also been submitted to Management for the construction of a new building designed to become the new nerve-centre of the Prévessin site.   The newly renovated bar area in Restaurant 3 (Prévessin site). The restaurant and bar area on the Prévessin site had not seen much renovation work until this year when, in just a few months, the whole area received a complete makeover. The new installations are in conformity with hygiene and safety rules for food products and are more welcoming for customers. “In the past, the restaurant used to serve an average of 400 visitors at lunchtime but this number had dwindled to about 200 in more recent times”, says Cristiana Colloca(GS-SEM), project leader of the renovation work. “The new room is more ...

  11. Restaurant innovativeness: A case study of Vojvodina

    Snježana Gagić

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It is of vital importance to continuously work on the improvement and identification of significant factors to ensure and sustain the desired level of quality. The paper aims to analyze the innovativeness level of restaurants in Vojvodina in view of the fact that it keeps their portfolio competitive and thereby achieves a long-term competitive advantage. The innovativeness level was defined on the basis of the instrument designed for measuring innovation in the field of products and services, marketing, processes and socially responsible behavior. In order to determine the level of innovativeness, it was necessary to first determine the percentage of innovativeness based on the number of innovations introduced by the restaurants in all of the four study areas. The results show that a significant number of restaurants pays attention to innovations in order to become more appealing to guests and increase their profitability. On the other hand, more than half of the observed restaurants have a very low or low degree of innovation, which indicates that we still do not pay enough attention to innovations and advancement of their business implementation.

  12. RESTAURANT NO 3 - BUILDING 866 (PREVESSIN)

    Comité de Surveillance des Restaurants

    1999-01-01

    Closure on Monday, November 1st, 1999Restaurant No. 3 will be closed for maintenance throughout the day on Monday, November 1st, 1999. The bar will remain open however so that drinks, sandwiches and snacks remain available. The decentralised cafeterias (bldgs. 864, 865 and 892) will also continue to operate as usual. The restaurant will resume normal service on Tuesday, November 2nd, 1999 but with slightly modified opening times (see below). Meal serving timesAs from Tuesday, November 2nd, 1999, lunches will be served between 11h30 and 13h45, instead of 14h00 as in the past. This change, requested by the concession-holder in view of the fact that demand between13h45 and 14h00 is practically non-existent, has been accepted by the Restaurant Supervisory Committee after consultation with the authorities of SL Division.We thank you for your collaboration and trust that no inconvenience will be suffered.Restaurant Supervisory Committee, tel. 77551

  13. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: EASTER WEEK-END

    2004-01-01

    As Friday April 9 and Monday April 12 2004 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain closed on Saturday and Sunday, April 10 - 11. They will reopen on Tuesday, April 13 at 7 a.m. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (Bldg. 504 - Meyrin): on Friday and Monday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 8.30 p.m. Hot meals will be served from 11.30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. On Thursday, April 8, all three restaurants will operate according to the usual times except for restaurant no. 1 which will close at 9 p.m. instead of 1 a.m.

  14. Restaurant Training Recipe At Triton College

    Quagliano, Joseph

    1974-01-01

    The successful restaurant training program at Triton College (Illinois) involves a broadly based, two-year curriculum offering practical training in nearly all the areas associated with a comprehensive food operation--management, food preparation, menu planning, nutrition, personnel vending, dining room service, and cost control. (Author/EA)

  15. Dual Nation : Is the restaurant suited for franchise?

    Gudmundsson, Erik; Jönsson, Marcus; Björnberg, Jenny

    2006-01-01

    Problem Dual Nation is a local restaurant and pub located in the centre of Helsingborg. The seven year old business has grown fast and established itself as a successful restaurant in the city. After a initial growth period, the restaurant has now reached a point where a change in its structure, strategy or system must be performed in order to witness renewed growth. A popular business system for expanding restaurants is the concept of franchise. Is the restau-rant suitable for such an expans...

  16. Restaurants With Calories Displayed On Menus Had Lower Calorie Counts Compared To Restaurants Without Such Labels.

    Bleich, Sara N; Wolfson, Julia A; Jarlenski, Marian P; Block, Jason P

    2015-11-01

    Beginning in December 2016, calorie labeling on menus will be mandatory for US chain restaurants and many other establishments that serve food, such as ice cream shops and movie theaters. But before the federal mandate kicks in, several large chain restaurants have begun to voluntarily display information about the calories in the items on their menus. This increased transparency may be associated with lower overall calorie content of offered items. This study used data for the period 2012-14 from the MenuStat project, a data set of menu items at sixty-six of the largest US restaurant chains. We compared differences in calorie counts of food items between restaurants that voluntarily implemented national menu labeling and those that did not. We found that the mean per item calorie content in all years was lower for restaurants that voluntarily posted information about calories (the differences were 139 calories in 2012, 136 in 2013, and 139 in 2014). New menu items introduced in 2013 and 2014 showed a similar pattern. Calorie labeling may have important effects on the food served in restaurants by compelling the introduction of lower-calorie items. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  17. Restaurants With Calories Displayed On Menus Had Lower Calorie Counts Compared To Restaurants Without Such Labels

    Bleich, Sara N.; Wolfson, Julia A.; Jarlenski, Marian P.; Block, Jason P.

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in December 2016, calorie labeling on menus will be mandatory for US chain restaurants and many other establishments that serve food, such as ice cream shops and movie theaters. But before the federal mandate kicks in, several large chain restaurants have begun to voluntarily display information about the calories in the items on their menus. This increased transparency may be associated with lower overall calorie content of offered items. This study used data for the period 2012–14 from the MenuStat project, a data set of menu items at sixty-six of the largest US restaurant chains. We compared differences in calorie counts of food items between restaurants that voluntarily implemented national menu labeling and those that did not. We found that the mean per item calorie content in all years was lower for restaurants that voluntarily posted information about calories (the differences were 139 calories in 2012, 136 in 2013, and 139 in 2014). New menu items introduced in 2013 and 2014 showed a similar pattern. Calorie labeling may have important effects on the food served in restaurants by compelling the introduction of lower-calorie items. PMID:26526245

  18. ON THE ART OF ZURAB KONSTANTINOVIÇ TSERETELI

    Terlan Mehdiyeva AZIZZADE

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The creativity of Zurab Konstantinoviç Tsereteli, a world renowned Russian painter from a Georgian origin is the topic of this article. His brave critical and expressionist attitude during both Soviet period and in the aftermath provided him a unique and a privileged position in the art world. Tsreteli, also the current head of the Russian Academy of Arts, has always embraced the socio-political matters and thus managed to be accepted as a contemporary model throughout the periods of his creativity. The painter is the first contemporary Russian artist to hold a solo exhibition in Turkey which took place in Tophane-i Amirane, the Gallery of Mimar Sinan University of Fine Arts, within the frame of cultural relations between Russia and Turkey. This article will touch upon the works of this exhibition as well as the other works of the artist being displayed in the gallery in Moscow which is named after him. ‘Apple’, his prominent work in this gallery, will be given special emphasis.

  19. Calorie Changes in Large Chain Restaurants

    Bleich, Sara N.; Wolfson, Julia A.; Jarlenski, Marian P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Large chain restaurants reduced the number of calories in newly introduced menu items in 2013 by about 60 calories (or 12%) relative to 2012. This paper describes trends in calories available in large U.S. chain restaurants to understand whether previously documented patterns persist. Methods Data (a census of items for included restaurants) were obtained from the MenuStat project. This analysis included 66 of the 100 largest U.S. restaurants that are available in all three 3 of the data (2012–2014; N=23,066 items). Generalized linear models were used to examine: (1) per-item calorie changes from 2012 to 2014 among items on the menu in all years; and (2) mean calories in new items in 2013 and 2014 compared with items on the menu in 2012 only. Data were analyzed in 2014. Results Overall, calories in newly introduced menu items declined by 71 (or 15%) from 2012 to 2013 (p=0.001) and by 69 (or 14%) from 2012 to 2014 (p=0.03). These declines were concentrated mainly in new main course items (85 fewer calories in 2013 and 55 fewer calories in 2014; p=0.01). Although average calories in newly introduced menu items are declining, they are higher than items common to the menu in all 3 years. No differences in mean calories among items on menus in 2012, 2013, or 2014 were found. Conclusions The previously observed declines in newly introduced menu items among large restaurant chains have been maintained, which suggests the beginning of a trend toward reducing calories. PMID:26163168

  20. Obesogenic and youth oriented restaurant marketing in public housing neighborhoods.

    Lee, Rebecca E; Heinrich, Katie M; Reese-Smith, Jacqueline Y; Regan, Gail R; Adamus-Leach, Heather J

    2014-03-01

    To compare restaurant marketing by restaurant and neighborhood type. All restaurants (61=fast food, FF; 72=table service, TS) within an 800-meter radius of 13 public housing developments (HD) and 4 comparison neighborhoods were audited using the Restaurant Assessment Tool©2010. HD neighborhoods were lower income and higher minority than comparison neighborhoods with similar density and street connectivity. Restaurants in HD neighborhoods had fewer healthy entrées than comparison neighborhoods. FF restaurants had cheaper beverages and more children's meals, supersize drinks, free prize with purchase, super-size items, special characters, and more items geared to driving than TS restaurants. Residents of lower socioeconomic neighborhoods may be differentially exposed to unhealthy food options.

  1. Publicly Accessible Art Collections in Copenhagen during the Napoleonic Era

    Svenningsen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    collections of Old Masters, the Moltke Gallery opened in 1804 as the first fully accessible collection of this kind. Though this happened almost by coincidence, as Count Moltke had simply found himself unable to dispose of his father’s collection and decided to put it on show, his initiative soon found...... ideological backing in a period of wartime nationalism. In this climate, the exhibiting of private art collections was increasingly represented as an act of patriotism and charity. The foremost representative of this movement was the idealist collector Hans West, whose own gallery ultimately came to play...

  2. Video gallery of educational lectures integrated in faculty's portal

    Jaroslav Majerník

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a web based educational video-clips exhibition created to share various archived lectures for medical students, health care professionals as well as for general public. The presentation of closely related topics was developed as video gallery and it is based solely on free or open source tools to be available for wide academic and/or non-commercial use. Even if the educational video records can be embedded in any websites, we preferred to use our faculty’s portal, which should be a central point to offer various multimedia educational materials. The system was integrated and tested to offer open access to infectology lectures that were captured and archived from live-streamed sessions and from videoconferences.

  3. Elementary modes of coupled oscillators as whispering-gallery microresonators

    Banerjee, Rabin; Mukherjee, Pradip

    2015-10-01

    We obtain the elementary modes of a system of parity-time reversal (PT)-symmetric coupled oscillators with balanced loss and gain. These modes are used to give a physical picture of the phase transition recently reported [C. M. Bender, M. Gianfreda, B. Peng, S. K. Özdemir and L. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 062111 (2013); L. Yang, S. K. Özdemir and B. Peng, 12th Int. Workshop and Conf. Pseudo-Hermitian Hamiltonians in Quantum Physics, Istanbul, Turkey, July 2013; B. Peng, S. K. Özdemir, F. Lei, F. Monifi, M. Gianfreda, G. L. Long, S. Fan, F. Nori, C. M. Bender and L. Yang, Nat. Phys. 10, 394 (2014)] in experiments with whispering-gallery microresonators.

  4. Microwave photonics systems based on whispering-gallery-mode resonators.

    Coillet, Aurélien; Henriet, Rémi; Phan Huy, Kien; Jacquot, Maxime; Furfaro, Luca; Balakireva, Irina; Larger, Laurent; Chembo, Yanne K

    2013-08-05

    Microwave photonics systems rely fundamentally on the interaction between microwave and optical signals. These systems are extremely promising for various areas of technology and applied science, such as aerospace and communication engineering, sensing, metrology, nonlinear photonics, and quantum optics. In this article, we present the principal techniques used in our lab to build microwave photonics systems based on ultra-high Q whispering gallery mode resonators. First detailed in this article is the protocol for resonator polishing, which is based on a grind-and-polish technique close to the ones used to polish optical components such as lenses or telescope mirrors. Then, a white light interferometric profilometer measures surface roughness, which is a key parameter to characterize the quality of the polishing. In order to launch light in the resonator, a tapered silica fiber with diameter in the micrometer range is used. To reach such small diameters, we adopt the "flame-brushing" technique, using simultaneously computer-controlled motors to pull the fiber apart, and a blowtorch to heat the fiber area to be tapered. The resonator and the tapered fiber are later approached to one another to visualize the resonance signal of the whispering gallery modes using a wavelength-scanning laser. By increasing the optical power in the resonator, nonlinear phenomena are triggered until the formation of a Kerr optical frequency comb is observed with a spectrum made of equidistant spectral lines. These Kerr comb spectra have exceptional characteristics that are suitable for several applications in science and technology. We consider the application related to ultra-stable microwave frequency synthesis and demonstrate the generation of a Kerr comb with GHz intermodal frequency.

  5. Methodics of computing the results of monitoring the exploratory gallery

    Krúpa Víazoslav

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available At building site of motorway tunnel Višòové-Dubná skala , the priority is given to driving of exploration galley that secures in detail: geologic, engineering geology, hydrogeology and geotechnics research. This research is based on gathering information for a supposed use of the full profile driving machine that would drive the motorway tunnel. From a part of the exploration gallery which is driven by the TBM method, a fulfilling information is gathered about the parameters of the driving process , those are gathered by a computer monitoring system. The system is mounted on a driving machine. This monitoring system is based on the industrial computer PC 104. It records 4 basic values of the driving process: the electromotor performance of the driving machine Voest-Alpine ATB 35HA, the speed of driving advance, the rotation speed of the disintegrating head TBM and the total head pressure. The pressure force is evaluated from the pressure in the hydraulic cylinders of the machine. Out of these values, the strength of rock mass, the angle of inner friction, etc. are mathematically calculated. These values characterize rock mass properties as their changes. To define the effectivity of the driving process, the value of specific energy and the working ability of driving head is used. The article defines the methodics of computing the gathered monitoring information, that is prepared for the driving machine Voest – Alpine ATB 35H at the Institute of Geotechnics SAS. It describes the input forms (protocols of the developed method created by an EXCEL program and shows selected samples of the graphical elaboration of the first monitoring results obtained from exploratory gallery driving process in the Višòové – Dubná skala motorway tunnel.

  6. How to use The National Gallery as a cross curricular approach to weather and climate studies at primary level.

    Hansen, P. J. K.

    2009-09-01

    How to use The National Gallery as a cross curricular approach to weather and climate studies at primary level. Pål J. Kirkeby Hansen Faculty of Education and International Studies, Oslo University College (PalKirkeby.Hansen@lui.hio.no) Weather and climate are topics in natural science and geography in primary and secondary education in most countries. The pupils are often doing own weather observations and measurements and are presenting the results oral, by posters or with digital aids. They also use the Internet with all its relevant resources in their studies to develop vocabulary, practical and conceptual knowledge. Knowledge about weather and climate is parts of liberal education and could be projected to other topics in science and to topics in other subjects, for instance: history, social geography, literature and arts. This article reports from a case study in grade 3 classes (age 9 year) during their Weather Week. Their science teacher was, quite untypical, also educated in art history. She arranged a visited to The National Gallery with the double agenda: 1. To introduce the pupils to Norwegian canon paintings from the national romantic period, our so-called "golden age”. 2. To look for and discuss weather elements in this paintings. For one hour the museum curator guided the pupils around the water cycle by using the paintings. While the pupils' own observations of weather, clouds and wind and measurements of temperature and precipitation during the Weather Week only are point checks, the guided tour in The National Gallery gave literally "the whole picture” of the Norwegian weather and climate and of the water cycle. During the tour, the curator constantly invited the pupils to tell about and discuss what weather and water elements they were looking at when standing in front of a painting. The pupils were responsive and interested all the time. Back at school, they demonstrated that they had learned much about both weather elements, the water

  7. Nutrition-labeling regulation impacts on restaurant environments.

    Saelens, Brian E; Chan, Nadine L; Krieger, James; Nelson, Young; Boles, Myde; Colburn, Trina A; Glanz, Karen; Ta, Myduc L; Bruemmer, Barbara

    2012-11-01

    Recent attempts to improve the healthfulness of away-from-home eating include regulations requiring restaurants to post nutrition information. The impact of such regulations on restaurant environments is unknown. To examine changes in restaurant environments from before to after nutrition-labeling regulation in a newly regulated county versus a nonregulated county. Using the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey-Restaurant version audit, environments within the same quick-service chain restaurants were evaluated in King County (regulated) before and 6 and 18 months after regulation enforcement and in Multnomah County (nonregulated) restaurants over a 6-month period. Data were collected in 2008-2010 and analyses conducted in 2011. Overall availability of healthy options and facilitation of healthy eating did not increase differentially in King County versus Multnomah County restaurants aside from the substantial increase in onsite nutrition information posting in King County restaurants required by the new regulation. Barriers to healthful eating decreased in King County relative to Multnomah County restaurants, particularly in food-oriented establishments. King County restaurants demonstrated modest increases in signage that promotes healthy eating, although the frequency of such promotion remained low, and the availability of reduced portions decreased in these restaurants. The healthfulness of children's menus improved modestly over time, but not differentially by county. A restaurant nutrition-labeling regulation was accompanied by some, but not uniform, improvements in other aspects of restaurant environments in the regulated compared to the nonregulated county. Additional opportunities exist for improving the healthfulness of away-from-home eating beyond menu labeling. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Cosmology Gallery: Unity through diversity in a vast and awe-inspiring universe.

    Goldsmith, John

    2011-06-01

    Scientists, artists, religious and cultural leaders have come together to create the Cosmology Gallery at the Gravity Discovery Centre (GDC) located 70 km north of Perth, Western Australia. The Cosmology Gallery exhibitions include the multicultural cosmology artworks, Celestial Visions astronomical photography exhibition and the Timeline of the Universe. The multicultural cosmology artworks are new artworks inspired by Australian Indigenous, Christian, Buddhist, Islamic, Hindu, scientific and technological perspectives of the universe. The Celestial Visions exhibition features astronomical events above famous landmarks, including Stonehenge and the Pyramids. The AUD 400,000+ project was funded by Lotterywest, Western Australia and the Cosmology Gallery was officially opened in July 2008 by the Premier of Western Australia.

  9. Energy modeling issues in quick service restaurants

    Smith, V.A.; Johnson, K.F.

    1997-03-01

    The complexity of monitoring and modeling the energy performance of food-service facilities was discussed. Usually, less than one third of the energy consumed in a commercial food-service facility is used by equipment and systems typically modeled in building simulation software such as DOE-2. Algorithms have not yet been developed to handle independent makeup air units and the kitchen and dining room HVAC systems. The energy used by food process equipment and water heating is based on customer-volume and operation-hours. Monitoring projects have been undertaken to provide detailed energy use profiles of individual appliances and whole restaurants. Some technical issues that are unique to food-service modeling in current versions of DOE-2.1E software in the context of quick service restaurants, such as difficulties in modelling internal heat gains of hooded cooking appliances and walk-in refrigeration, and system and zone limitations on tracking energy consumption, were discussed. 1 fig.

  10. CERN restaurants: opening hours during summer

    2016-01-01

    In the summer, the three CERN restaurants remain open during their usual hours. On Monday 1st August and Thursday 8 September, the Restaurant 1 will be open from 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.   The satellites will be open as follows: Building 6: normal hours Building 13: normal hours Building 30: normal hours Building 40: closing at 4:30 p.m. instead of 5:00 pm Building 54: normal hours in July, closed in August Building 864: normal hours Building 865: normal hours Building 774: normal hours

  11. Dynamical study of symmetries: breaking and restauration

    Schuck, P.

    1986-09-01

    First symmetry breaking (spontaneous) is explained and the physical implication discussed for infinite systems. The relation with phase transitions is indicated. Then the specific aspects of symmetry breaking in finite systems is treated and illustrated in detail for the case of translational invariance with the help of an oversimplified but exactly solvable model. The method of projection (restauration of symmetry) is explained for the static case and also applied to the model. Symmetry breaking in the dynamical case and for instance the notion of a soft mode responsible for the symmetry breaking is discussed in the case of superfluidity and another exactly solvable model is introduced. The Goldstone mode is treated in detail. Some remarks on analogies with the breaking of chiral symmetry are made. Some recent developments in the theory of symmetry restauration are briefly outlined [fr

  12. The Chinese restaurant syndrome: an anecdote revisited.

    Kenney, R A

    1986-04-01

    The Chinese Restaurant Syndrome arose from an anecdote of discomfort experienced after eating Chinese cuisine. Monosodium glutamate has been implicated as the causative agent. Work over the past 17 years has consistently failed to reveal any objective sign accompanying the transient sensations that some individuals experience after the experimental ingestion of monosodium glutamate and it is questionable whether the term 'Chinese Restaurant Syndrome' has any validity. When some common food materials are used in the same experimental setting, similar symptoms can be produced in a limited number of people. Double-blind testing of individuals who identify themselves as suffering the 'syndrome' has failed to confirm the role of monosodium glutamate as the provocative agent.

  13. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: EASTER WEEK-END

    2004-01-01

    As Friday April 9 and Monday April 12 2004 are CERN holidays, restaurants no. 1 (Bldg. 501- Meyrin) and no. 3 (Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed and will remain closed on Saturday and Sunday, April 10 - 11. They will reopen on Tuesday, April 13 at 7 a.m. During these four days, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 2 (Bldg. 504 - Meyrin): on Friday and Monday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 8.30 p.m. Hot meals will be served from 11.30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7.30 p.m.

  14. Hardronic Festival | 23 July | Restaurant 3

    2016-01-01

    Hardronic is back and the 2016 edition will take place on Saturday 23 July behind the Restaurant 3. Come celebrate our 25th edition with 11 bands, 2 stages, bouncy castle, drinks and a food stand (profits go to charity)! Hardronic is made thanks to sponsors and volunteers, if you would like to volunteer, please send a message to contact-hardronic@cern.ch - http://hardronic.web.cern.ch.  

  15. Women entrepreneurs in the Bangladeshi restaurant business.

    Khan, M R

    1995-08-01

    The Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) is a nongovernmental organization involved with multisectoral programs and income generation schemes for rural poor women. The program objective is the search for effective income generation activities to be owned, operated, and managed by BRAC's landless members. The evaluation was conducted among five restaurants in the Restaurant Program, which was initiated in 1991. Entrepreneurs started with a loan of Taka 6500 and sold tea, snacks, and meals. 273 such establishments were started by January 1993. In practice, selection of entrepreneurs was different from the designated formal selection process. Preference was given to women whose husbands or brothers already had some involvement in the marketplace. The women tended to handle the cooking, washing, cleaning, and maybe some shopping and serving, but men controlled handling of cash and keeping accounts. Restaurants make modest profits in general, but a detailed accounting of employee wages and meals for owner-operators indicated lower profits. Loans were being repaid. The analysis shows that women's position did not change, women were just as or more dependent on men, and women's respect in the community did not increase. The restaurants were run in ways reinforcing the traditional purdah and definition of space. The goal should be women's independence, access to markets, and acquisition of business skills. The recommendations are made for strictly following the selection criteria, providing training before starting the business, operating of the business in a building separate from family, assuring a uniform system of accounting, maintaining BRAC files on individual women, and testing whether a fixed amount of loan would stimulate business capability.

  16. Customer Satisfaction Level in Mount Sherpa Restaurant

    Shrestha, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Customer satisfaction is the key to every successful business in the sense of profit motive, as well as in the long run. It is the desire of every business to be able to understand their customers’ need. Many businesses, especially related with the service industry, carry out different surveys and conduct research in order to know what their customers really want. This research was carried out to measure the customer satisfaction level in Mount Sherpa restaurant. The results and findings ...

  17. Making Texas Restaurants Healthier for Children

    2014-12-30

    Sylvia Crixell, PhD, RD, Professor of Nutrition at Texas State University, discusses her study which details the success of a community-based program in Texas aimed at combatting childhood obesity by improving children’s menus in restaurants.  Created: 12/30/2014 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/30/2014.

  18. Aaron Douglas and Hale Woodruff: African American Art Education, Gallery Work, and Expanded Pedagogy

    Bey, Sharif

    2011-01-01

    This analysis of archival materials discovered at Fisk and Atlanta Universities examines the teaching careers of Aaron Douglas and Hale Woodruff, two African American artists who came to prominence during the New Negro Movement in the 1920s and taught at historically Black universities in the 1930s and 1940s. These artists had a profound influence…

  19. WASTE MANAGEMENT IN A SCHOOL RESTAURANT

    Bianca Peruchin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the amount of waste generated and its proper final destination is one of the greatest environmental issues. The higher education institutions are an important source of waste due to its diversity of teaching, researching and extension activities undertaken by academic world. The university restaurant supplies meals to the university community and ends up generating a kind of waste similar to the domestic waste, but in a bigger amount. The aim of this study was to investigate the gravimetric composition of the waste generated in the school restaurant of a higher-education institution in southern Brazil and provide a diagnostic of the current waste management. The data were obtained through a characterization process of the solid waste generated in one week; an interview with the responsible managers and direct observation of the local structure. It was found non-existence of a Management Plan for Solid Waste, as well as a lack of practices relative to its management. The waste segregation is impaired due the lack of specific and labeled bins, besides the overworked employees. Along the experimental period it were characterized 547,068 Kg of solid waste, in which more than 80% were organic waste. The paper concludes that the organic waste could be treated by composting. It is recommended the formulation and implementation of an integrated management plan for solid waste in order to provide adequate infrastructure for waste management in the school restaurant.

  20. THE PROFIT TARGET IN A RESTAURATION UNIT

    Briciu Sorin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The hospitality industry represents one of the most dynamic sectors of the contemporary society, with an emphasised role in the process of globalization. Currently, the hospitality industry does not only face the challenges of the economic crisis but the changes in the market, the consumers behaviour and the technological trends, too. That is why, in this time, it is extremely important to apply the management accounting and the cost calculation in any entity in the hospitality industry in order to cope with the market challenges. The main services are performed through the hospitality industry: the accommodation and the restauration. These services satisfy the vital needs of the tourists, but this industry must meet other needs or requests such as the acknowledgement of the social status, the desire to know other cultures or traditions, to spend free time in a pleasant manner etc. Our intention and goal in the current article is to approach an image of the CVP analysis in the decision making process with an emphasis on the restauration in the hospitality industry. In order to cope with this critical time, the competition and to achieve the profits estimated, the managers in the hospitality industry can apply the CVP analysis, one of the simplest and most useful analytical instruments. The paper will tackle with the problem of the break even point in a restaurant, one of the main indicators of the CVP model and also the possibility of the decision making process orientation.

  1. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE : ASCENSION AND WHITSUNTIDE WEEKENDS

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2002-01-01

    Details of the arrangements to ensure the provision of a restaurant service during the Ascension and Whitsuntide weekends are given below. On all the days indicated, hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and 18h00 to 19h30.   RESTAURANT SATELLITE CAFETERIAS KIOSQUE No. Opening times Usual opening times ASCENSION Thursday 9 May 1 2 3 08h00 - 21h00 Friday 10 May 1 2 3   07h00 - 21h00 07h00 - 18h00 Bldg. 40 Bldg. 30, 54 Bldg. 864 08h00 - 17h00     Saturday 11 May 1 2 3 07h00 - 23h00     Sunday 12 May 1 2 3 07h00 - 23h00     WHITSUNTIDE Saturday 18 May 1 2 3 08h00 - 21h00     Sunday 19 May 1 2 3 08h00 - 21h00     Monday 20 May 1 2 3 08h00 - 21h00     Restaurant Supervisory Committee Tel. 77551

  2. Beijing Experimental Electronic Musicians on the Phenomenon of Commercialization and Tourism in the Contemporary Chinese Art

    Matic Urbanija

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article provides opinions of some Beijing experimental electronic musicians about the situation of contemporary art in China and in the world, primarily about the background of the so called Christmas performance in Art District 798's gallery UCCA in Beijing. This was a sort of protest against destroying art with commercialization as the only measure of art gallery's success. The article first describes the situation of contemporary art in the world at the beginning of 21st century as it is described in Julian Stallabrass' book Art Incorporated. It can be deduced from the words of experimental electronic musicians in Beijing that the situation is similar in China. During the debate about the Christmas performance in UCCA gallery, a problem with galleries was emphasize. These became more similar to tourist venues than places for enriching one's thoughts and awareness about the world surrounding us, through artwork. Therefore, the Christmas performance tried to express this sentiment. It offered visitors a tourist show brought to the point of absurd. The employees and the leader of UCCA couldn't comprehend the symbolic meaning of this happening, which, symbolically, took place on Christmas, the most commercialized holiday in the West as well as in China.

  3. WHY RESTAURANTS SHOULD GO GREEN? – MAIN ENVIRONMENTAL PRACTICES IN RESTAURANTS INDUSTRY

    Stefan-Dragos CÎRSTEA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hospitality businesses influence the sustainability of their natural environment by consuming significant amounts of natural resources. Restaurant industry employs one in every three retail workers and consumes one-third of all retail electricity use and almost 30% of all meals were eaten away from home, last year. This study attempted to identify the most important benefits obtained from green practices implementation and which are the basic environmental practices that can be adopted by the organisations in order the improve their image and reduce their costs. Moreover, our research has been undertaken in parallel with worldwide existing trends in order to better understand the direction in which green restaurants are moving. This study results inventories the main environmental practices and actions that can be implemented in restaurants.

  4. Restaurant opening times for the Ascension and Whitsun weekends

    2012-01-01

    For the Ascension weekend (from Thursday, 17 May to Sunday, 20 May inclusive) and the Whitsun weekend (from Saturday, 26 May to Monday, 28 May inclusive), the restaurant opening times will be as follows: Restaurant No.1 will be open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., with hot meals being served from 11.30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 6.30 p.m. to 8 p.m. (except Friday 18 May, when the restaurant will be open as normal). Restaurant No.2 will be closed (except Friday 18 May, when the restaurant will be open as normal). Restaurant No.3 will be closed.

  5. Comparing nutrition environments in bodegas and fast food restaurants

    Neckerman, Kathryn M.; Lovasi, Laszlo; Yousefzadeh, Paulette; Sheehan, Daniel; Milinkovic, Karla; Baecker, Aileen; Bader, Michael D. M.; Weiss, Christopher; Lovasi, Gina S.; Rundle, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Many small grocery stores or “bodegas” sell prepared or ready-to-eat items, filling a similar niche in the food environment as fast food restaurants. However, little comparative information is available about the nutrition environments of bodegas and fast food outlets. This study compared the nutrition environments of bodegas and national chain fast food restaurants using a common audit instrument, the Nutrition Environment Measures Study in Restaurants (NEMS-R) protocol. The analytic sample ...

  6. Restaurant quality: the case of Central Slovenian region

    Uran Maravić, Maja

    2016-01-01

    The purpose – This study has two key goals. The first part presents and compares different expert systems for assessing quality in the restaurants alongside the Ljubljana Quality Selection assessment methodology - LQS. In the second part, this study presents the results of a restaurant assessment in the Central Slovenian region using the LQS methodology. Design/methodology – In the first part of the study, we compare restaurant assessment systems through different criteria. In the second p...

  7. Ljubljana quality selection (LQS) - innovative case of restaurant assessment system

    Maja Uran Maravić; Daniela Gračan; Zrinka Zadel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose – The purpose of this paper is to briefly present the most well-known restaurant assessment systems where restaurant are assessed by experts. The aim is to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of each system. Design –The special focus is to give answers on questions: how are the restaurants assessed by experts, which are the elements and standards of assessment and whether they are consistent with the quality dimensions as advocated in the theory of service quality. Methodology ...

  8. Restaurant Policies and Practices for Serving Raw Fish in Minnesota.

    Hedeen, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    The number of restaurants serving sushi within Minnesota is continuously increasing. The practices and protocols of serving raw fish are complex and require detailed planning to ensure that food served to patrons will not cause illness. Although the popularity of sushi is increasing, there is a lack of research on food safety issues pertaining to preparation of raw fish and sushi rice. To address this gap, the Minnesota Department of Health Environmental Health Specialists Network Food program collected descriptive data on restaurant practices and policies concerning the service of raw fish and sushi rice in 40 Minnesota restaurants. At each restaurant, a specialist interviewed a restaurant manager, conducted an observation of the sushi prep areas in the restaurant kitchen, and reviewed parasite destruction letters and invoices from fish supplier(s). Over half of the restaurants (59%) were missing one or more of the parasite destruction letters from their fish supplier(s) guaranteeing that fish had been properly frozen to the time and temperature requirements in the Minnesota Food Code. A total of 42 parasite destruction letters from suppliers were observed; 10% were considered "adequate" letters. The majority of the letters were missing details pertaining to the types of fish frozen, the length of time fish were frozen, or details on what temperatures fish were held frozen or a combination of all three. Most restaurants were using time as a public health control for their sushi rice. For those restaurants using time as a public health control, 26% had a written procedure on-site, and approximately 53% were keeping track of time. Bare hand contact during sushi prep was observed in 17% of restaurants, and in more than 40% of the restaurants, at least one fish was mislabeled on the menu. Findings from this study indicate that many Minnesota restaurants are not complying with the Food Code requirements pertaining to parasite destruction for the service of raw fish or

  9. The energy content of restaurant foods without stated calorie information.

    Urban, Lorien E; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Gary, Christine E; Fierstein, Jamie L; Equi, Ashley; Kussmaul, Carolyn; Dallal, Gerard E; Roberts, Susan B

    2013-07-22

    National recommendations for the prevention and treatment of obesity emphasize reducing energy intake through self-monitoring food consumption. However, little information is available on the energy content of foods offered by nonchain restaurants, which account for approximately 50% of restaurant locations in the United States. To measure the energy content of foods from independent and small-chain restaurants that do not provide stated information on energy content. We used bomb calorimetry to determine the dietary energy content of the 42 most frequently purchased meals from the 9 most common restaurant categories. Independent and small-chain restaurants were randomly selected, and 157 individual meals were analyzed. Area within 15 miles of downtown Boston. A random sample of independent and small-chain restaurants. Dietary energy. All meal categories provided excessive dietary energy. The mean energy content of individual meals was 1327 (95% CI, 1248-1406) kcal, equivalent to 66% of typical daily energy requirements. We found a significant effect of food category on meal energy (P ≤ .05), and 7.6% of meals provided more than 100% of typical daily energy requirements. Within-meal variability was large (average SD, 271 kcal), and we found no significant effect of restaurant establishment or size. In addition, meal energy content averaged 49% greater than those of popular meals from the largest national chain restaurants (P restaurants have been criticized for offering meals with excess dietary energy. This study finds that independent and small-chain restaurants, which provide no nutrition information, also provide excessive dietary energy in amounts apparently greater than popular meals from chain restaurants or information in national food databases. A national requirement for accurate calorie labeling in all restaurants may discourage menus offering unhealthy portions and would allow consumers to make informed choices about ordering meals that promote weight

  10. Kolkata Restaurant Problem as a Generalised El Farol Bar Problem

    Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    Generalisation of the El Farol bar problem to that of many bars here leads to the Kolkata restaurant problem, where the decision to go to any restaurant or not is much simpler (depending on the previous experience of course, as in the El Farol bar problem). This generalised problem can be exactly analysed in some limiting cases discussed here. The fluctuation in the restaurant service can be shown to have precisely an inverse cubic behavior, as widely seen in the stock market fluctuations.

  11. Demand uncertainty and investment in the restaurant industry

    Sohn, Jayoung

    2016-01-01

    Since the collapse of the housing market, the prolonged economic uncertainty lingering in the U.S. economy has dampened restaurant performance. Economic uncertainty affects consumer sentiment and spending, turning into demand uncertainty. Nevertheless, the highly competitive nature of the restaurant industry does not allow much room for restaurants to actively control prices, leaving most food service firms exposed to demand uncertainty. To investigate the impact of demand uncertainty in the ...

  12. The Vital Components of Restaurant Quality that Affect Guest Satisfaction

    Snježana Gagić; Dragan Tešanović; Ana Jovičić

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, the trend of dining in restaurants has become quite prominent in Serbia. Frequent restaurant visits are not only the reflection of satisfying hedonistic needs, but also the result of increasing number of single-person households as well as adjustment to the European business hours.In an increasingly competitive environment, restaurants must be focused on guests using marketing concepts that identify their needs thus leading to their satisfaction and inc...

  13. Evaluation of Customer Satisfaction with Restaurant Services with ACSI Application

    Derli Luís Angnes; Carlos Alberto Mello Moyano; Jorge Francisco Bertinetti Lengler

    2015-01-01

    Brazil has more than a million bars and restaurants, which are responsible for about 40% of the tourism GDP of the country. Restaurants are business organizations in the gastronomy and service sectors that besides providing individual satisfaction and social life are of great importance for people’s health. The main objective of this study was to validate a model for the customer satisfaction related to the service attributes in restaurants. The American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) wa...

  14. For or against the smoking ban in restaurants?

    Marinakou, Evangelia

    2011-01-01

    A considerable number of countries have applied laws for the ban of smoking in public places. Furthermore, the separate area for smokers and non-smokers customers in private places such as restaurants and bars, is a significant change that has caused positive or negative attitudes. The different views of customers and restaurant owners have created a legal and social debate. The findings suggest that on the one hand, the majority of the restaurant owners impose the law, but not actively. On t...

  15. Mobile Restaurant Information System Integrating Reservation Navigating and Parking Management

    Chih-Yao Lo,; Chun-Ta Lin,; Chia-Lung Tsai

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, with the pace of technological development, people have become more and more demanding in terms of quality of life. At the same time the restaurant industry has become one of the largest industries in the world. To follow international trends and development in the restaurant business in Taiwan, various types of theme restaurants and cafes have emerged. Needless to saycompetition is intense. In such an environment, raising service quality and management performance are the fo...

  16. HR PRACTICES, EMPLOYEE BEHAVIOR, CUSTOMER SATISFACTION, AND RESTAURANT PERFORMANCE

    Smela, Stephen J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper looks at performance at the individual restaurant level from the perspective of management, customers and employees. The results are based on surveys of each of these three groups conducted between June and September 2001 at a sit-down, casual restaurant chain. There are several key findings. Service-related employee training and giving staff a say in making decisions improves customer satisfaction and loyalty. How employees perceive the service climate in their restaurant is a bet...

  17. Customer Satisfaction and Service Quality at Fafa's Restaurant

    Tcvetkova, Daria

    2017-01-01

    The commissioning company of this thesis is Fafa’s restaurant, which opened in Tampere in 2016. Fafa’s restaurant is a chain of fast-food concept restaurants located in several cities in Finland. The purpose of the research is to analyse customer satisfaction and service quality at the commissioning company and find positive solutions for its improvement. The theoretical framework of the study includes different theories on customer satisfaction and quality of the service, models and dime...

  18. Cooking smoke and respiratory symptoms of restaurant workers in Thailand

    Juntarawijit, Chudchawal; Juntarawijit, Yuwayong

    2017-01-01

    Background Restaurant workers are at risk from exposure to toxic compounds from burning of fuel and fumes from cooking. However, the literature is almost silent on the issue. What discussion that can be found in the literature focuses on the potential effects from biomass smoke exposure in the home kitchen, and does not address the problem as occurring in the workplace, particularly in restaurants. Methods This was a cross-sectional survey of 224 worker from 142 food restaurants in the Tha Ph...

  19. The business plan of Izakaya restaurant in Helsinki

    Du, Peng

    2017-01-01

    The objective of thesis was to study the main areas of creating a business plan and to make research toward the current market environment of Asian fusion restaurant in the Helsinki area in order to make a realistic business plan of a Japanese Izakaya restaurant. The theoretical study is based on several business books, some suggestion from different types of restaurant owners in Helsinki, the business plan outline was finally made. For the empirical study, a survey of market analysis,...

  20. The Habitable Zone Gallery 2.0: The Online Exoplanet System Visualization Suite

    Chandler, C. O.; Kane, S. R.; Gelino, D. M.

    2017-11-01

    The Habitable Zone Gallery 2.0 provides new and improved visualization and data analysis tools to the exoplanet habitability community and beyond. Modules include interactive habitable zone plotting and downloadable 3D animations.

  1. The influence of the whispering gallery modes resonators shape on their sensitivity to the movement

    Filatov, Yuri V.; Govorenko, Ekaterina V.; Kukaev, Alexander S.; Shalymov, Egor V.; Venediktov, Vladimir Yu.

    2017-05-01

    The optical whispering gallery modes resonators are axially symmetrical resonators with smooth edges, supporting the existence of the whispering gallery modes by the total internal reflection on the surface of the resonator. For today various types of such resonators were developed, namely the ball-shaped, tor-shaped, bottle-shaped, disk-shaped etc. The movement of whispering gallery modes resonators in inertial space causes the changes of their shape. The result is a spectral shift of the whispering gallery modes. Optical methods allow to register this shift with high precision. It can be used in particular for the measurement of angular velocities in inertial orientation and navigation systems. However, different types of resonators react to the movement on a miscellaneous. In addition, their sensitivity to movement can be changed when changing the geometric parameters of these resonators. This work is devoted to a research of these aspects.

  2. Whispering gallery mode emission from a composite system of J-aggregates and photonic microcavity

    Melnikau, Dzmitry; Savateeva, Diana [Centro de Física de Materiales (MPC, CSIC-UPV/EHU) and Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Po Manuel de Lardizabal 5, Donostia, San Sebastian 20018 (Spain); Rusakov, Konstantin I. [Department of Physics, Brest State Technical University, Brest 224017 (Belarus); Rakovich, Yury P., E-mail: Yury.Rakovich@ehu.es [Centro de Física de Materiales (MPC, CSIC-UPV/EHU) and Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Po Manuel de Lardizabal 5, Donostia, San Sebastian 20018 (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-01-15

    We report on development and characterization of Whispering Gallery Modes spherical microcavities integrated with organic dye molecules in a J-aggregate state. The microcavities are studied using micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy, and fluorescence lifetime imaging confocal microscopy. Directional emission of light from the microcavity is also experimentally demonstrated and attributed to the photonic jets generated in the microsphere. -- Highlights: • Report on the development and characterization of hybrid system consisting of thin shell of J-aggregates and spherical Whispering Gallery Mode microcavity. • An investigation of spontaneous emission rate in the shell of J-aggregates integrated with a Whispering Gallery Mode cavity. • Demonstration of directional emission from Whispering Gallery Mode cavity with J-aggregates which is highly desirable functionality for both micro- and nano-scale cavities.

  3. COMMON GROUNDS BETWEEN PRINTMAKING AND STREET ART

    Burcak Balamber

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Graffiti movement, born as a result of an effort of the youth, who felt themselves socially excluded and alone, to show their existence and identities during the 1960s, expanded its scope owing to street based artists such as Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat entering to the galleries, and transformed into an artistic manner of expression having aesthetic concerns by adopting a more inclusive definition ‘street art’. During this transformation of street art,street artists experimented with various methods from many different disciplines and hence created works in a wide range of varieties in terms of plastic and artistic values. Among these disciplines, printmakinghastaken its own place in street artas a discipline thatdeeply influenced street artists.Printmaking has fascinated street artists and become a part of their production process, not only with its philosophy sharing common grounds with street art and advantages in terms of its tecnical practices but also its unique plastic and linear values.Thanks to the opportunities of printmaking, street art has succeeded creating a tremendous impression worldwide, and even positioned itself into today’s greatest museums/gallery halls. This article aims to show how and in what way printmaking has influenced street art being in a transformation since the 1960s, and to put an emphasis on theimportance of printmaking on today’s street art.

  4. Constraining the age of rock art by dating a rockfall event using sediment and rock-surface luminescence dating techniques

    Chapot, Melissa; Sohbati, Reza; Murray, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is used to determine the age of a rockfall event that removed part of the pictograph figures at the Great Gallery rock art panel in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA. Analyses from the outer millimeter of the buried surface of a rockfall boulder and quartz...... rock art with a controversial and unknown origin....

  5. When a Body Meets a Body: An Exploration of the Negative Impact of Social Interactions on Museum Experiences of Art

    Pelowski, Matthew; Liu, Tao; Palacios, Victor; Akiba, Fuminori

    2014-01-01

    We consider the phenomenon of social interactions within the art museum, arguing that even the bare possibility of meeting others or intruding into their gaze can have a profoundly detrimental effect on art experience. This is done by tracing a finding from our previous studies in which we considered three museum galleries--each with the same…

  6. The attractiveness of green restaurants among the youth

    Codruța Adina BĂLTESCU

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest of the population in a healthy life is a constant of modern society. The culinary habits are essential elements in this respect. Concerns about the opening of green restaurants are related directly to the people's intentions to serve meals in such public catering establishments. The present article analyses the views of the youth on the attributes considered to be significant to outline the activity of green restaurants and the prospects of their consumption within these restaurants. The results obtained show the young people's willingness to eat in green restaurants, as well as their availability to allocate higher amounts of money for the consumption of healthy foods.

  7. Work on the extension of Restaurant No. 1

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    The work on the extension of Restaurant No. 1 began on 12 April and is expected to take 6 months to complete. For safety reasons, a worksite perimeter fence has been erected on the terrace, and a watertight shielding wall has been put up inside the restaurant. Restaurant customers are requested to comply with the signs in place. Various activities associated with the work are likely to generate noise and dust. As the terrace is used by diners in the summer, such activities will be kept to a minimum during mealtimes. We should like to thank the customers of the restaurant for their understanding. GS/SEM Group

  8. A Comparison of Student Performance in a National Restaurant Association Foodservice Sanitation Exam by Students Taking versus Those Not Taking a Review Seminar.

    Fleury, Ernest

    A practicum was conducted to examine and improve the performance of students enrolled in a college of culinary arts on the National Restaurant Association Foodservice (NRAF) sanitation certification examination. Because the pass rate among students retaking the examination was lower than that among students taking the examination for the first…

  9. The effect of a smoke-free law on restaurant business in South Australia.

    Wakefield, Melanie; Siahpush, Mohammad; Scollo, Michelle; Lal, Anita; Hyland, Andrew; McCaul, Kieran; Miller, Caroline

    2002-08-01

    Despite evidence to the contrary from overseas research, the introduction of smoke-free legislation in South Australia (SA), which required all restaurants to go smoke-free in January 1999, sparked concerns among the hospitality industry about loss of restaurant business. This study aimed to determine whether the law had a detrimental impact on restaurant business in SA. Using time series analysis, we compared the ratio of monthly restaurant turnover from restaurants and cafés in SA to (a) total retail tumover in SA (minus restaurants) for the years 1991 to 2001 and (b) Australian restaurant tumover (minus SA, Westem Australia and the Australian Capital Territory) for the years 1991-2000. There was no decline in the ratio of (a) SA restaurant turnover to SA retail turnover or (b) SA restaurant tumover to Australian restaurant turnover. The introduction of a smoke-free law applying to restaurants in SA did not adversely affect restaurant business in SA.

  10. 75 FR 68361 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Restaurant Menu...

    2010-11-05

    ...] Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Restaurant Menu and... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Restaurant Menu and Vending Machine Labeling... restaurants and similar retail food establishments (SRFE) with 20 or more locations doing business under the...

  11. Optothermal transport behavior in whispering gallery mode optical cavities

    Soltani, Soheil [Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering-Electrophysics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Armani, Andrea M., E-mail: armani@usc.edu [Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering-Electrophysics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States)

    2014-08-04

    Over the past century, whispering gallery mode optical cavities have enabled numerous advances in science and engineering, such as discoveries in quantum mechanics and non-linear optics, as well as the development of optical gyroscopes and add drop filters. One reason for their widespread appeal is their ability to confine light for long periods of time, resulting in high circulating intensities. However, when sufficiently large amounts of optical power are coupled into these cavities, they begin to experience optothermal or photothermal behavior, in which the optical energy is converted into heat. Above the optothermal threshold, the resonance behavior is no longer solely defined by electromagnetics. Previous work has primarily focused on the role of the optothermal coefficient of the material in this instability. However, the physics of this optothermal behavior is significantly more complex. In the present work, we develop a predictive theory based on a generalizable analytical expression in combination with a geometry-specific COMSOL Multiphysics finite element method model. The simulation couples the optical and thermal physics components, accounting for geometry variations as well as the temporal and spatial profile of the optical field. To experimentally verify our theoretical model, the optothermal thresholds of a series of silica toroidal resonant cavities are characterized at different wavelengths (visible through near-infrared) and using different device geometries. The silica toroid offers a particularly rigorous case study for the developed optothermal model because of its complex geometrical structure which provides multiple thermal transport paths.

  12. Photoluminescence and lasing in whispering gallery mode glass microspherical resonators

    Ristić, D. [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Division of Materials Physics, Laboratory for Molecular Physics, Bijenička c. 54, Zagreb (Croatia); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials and Sensing Devices, Research unit New Functional Materials, Bijenička c. 54, Zagreb (Croatia); Berneschi, S.; Camerini, M. [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Farnesi, D.; Pelli, S. [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Centro Studi e Ricerche ' E. Fermi' , Piazza del Viminale 2, 00184 Roma (Italy); Trono, C. [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Chiappini, A.; Chiasera, A.; Ferrari, M. [CSMFO Group, Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, IFN-CNR, Via alla Cascata 56/C, 38050 Povo-Trento (Italy); Lukowiak, A. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, PAS, ul. Okolna 2, Wroclaw 50-950 (Poland); Dumeige, Y.; Féron, P. [Laboratoire d' Optronique, (CNRS-UMR 6082-Foton), ENSSAT, 6 rue de Kérampont, 22300 Lannion (France); Righini, G.C. [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Centro Studi e Ricerche ' E. Fermi' , Piazza del Viminale 2, 00184 Roma (Italy); Soria, S., E-mail: s.soria@ifac.cnr.it [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Conti, G. Nunzi [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Centro Studi e Ricerche ' E. Fermi' , Piazza del Viminale 2, 00184 Roma (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    We report experimental results regarding the development of Er{sup 3+}-doped glass microspherical cavities for the fabrication of compact sources at 1.55 μm. We investigate several different approaches in order to fabricate the microspheres including direct melting of Er{sup 3+}-doped glass powders, synthesis of Er{sup 3+}-doped monolithic microspheres by drawing Er{sup 3+}-doped glass, and coating of silica microspheres with an Er{sup 3+}-doped sol–gel layer. Details of the different fabrication processes are presented together with the photoluminescence characterization in free space configuration of the microspheres and of the glass precursor. We have analyzed the photoluminescence spectra of the whispering gallery modes of the microspheres excited using evanescent coupling and we demonstrate tunable laser action in a wide range of wavelengths around 1.55 μm. As much as 90 μW of laser output power was measured in Er{sup 3+}-doped glass microspheres. - Highlights: • Different approaches in microsphere fabrication and various types of post-processing. • Trimming of photorefractive glass microsphere lasers with UV light. • Peak power record of 90 μW by pumping at 1480 nm.

  13. Whispering galleries and the control of artificial atoms.

    Forrester, Derek Michael; Kusmartsev, Feodor V

    2016-04-28

    Quantum computation using artificial-atoms, such as novel superconducting circuits, can be sensitively controlled by external electromagnetic fields. These fields and the self-fields attributable to the coupled artificial-atoms influence the amount of quantum correlation in the system. However, control elements that can operate without complete destruction of the entanglement of the quantum-bits are difficult to engineer. Here we investigate the possibility of using closely-spaced-linear arrays of metallic-elliptical discs as whispering gallery waveguides to control artificial-atoms. The discs confine and guide radiation through the array with small notches etched into their sides that act as scatterers. We focus on π-ring artificial-atoms, which can generate their own spontaneous fluxes. We find that the micro-discs of the waveguides can be excited by terahertz frequency fields to exhibit whispering-modes and that a quantum-phase-gate composed of π-rings can be operated under their influence. Furthermore, we gauge the level of entanglement through the concurrence measure and show that under certain magnetic conditions a series of entanglement sudden-deaths and revivals occur between the two qubits. This is important for understanding the stability and life-time of qubit operations using, for example, a phase gate in a hybrid of quantum technologies composed of control elements and artificial-atoms.

  14. The Sulphate Effect on Lijiaxia Concrete Dam (China Gallery

    Xufen Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The concrete degradation is one of the most serious problems for a dam construct during the normal operation, which determines the dam service life. Hence, it is very important to reduce the extent of the dam concrete degradation for the safety of the dam normal operation. Here, Lijiaxia hydroelectric station is taken as an example, and a comprehensive method to assess the sulphate effect on dam gallery is proposed. Eleven samples in total were taken from three difference locations by the drill bore. The microstructural investigations including X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS were conducted to assess the sulphate attack and the degradation degree. Meanwhile, the water chemical analysis was applied to reveal the mechanism of concrete degradation. The experimental and analysis results indicate that the concrete degradation degree varies with the location of the samples. The components of the concrete change and the content of SO3 increase dramatically during degradation. Moreover, the mineral facies of the concrete change correspondingly, with the cement paste substituted by the calcite, calcium vitriol, and gypsum. The reinforcement and precaution measures are suggested based on the results of the degradation assessment.

  15. Eat Smart! Ontario's Healthy Restaurant Program: focus groups with non-participating restaurant operators.

    Dwyer, John J M; Macaskill, Lesley A; Uetrecht, Connie L; Dombrow, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Eat Smart! Ontario's Healthy Restaurant Program is a standard provincial health promotion program. Public health units give an award of excellence to restaurants that meet nutrition, food safety, and non-smoking seating standards. The purpose of this study was to determine why some restaurant operators have not applied to participate in the program, and how to get them to apply. Four focus group interviews were conducted with 35 operators who didn't apply to participate. The analysis of responses yielded various themes. The participants' perceived barriers to participation were misunderstandings about how to qualify for the program, lack of time, concern about different non-smoking bylaw requirements, and potential loss of revenue. Their perceived facilitators to participation were convenience of applying to participate, franchise executives' approval to participate, a 100% non-smoking bylaw, flexibility in the assessment of restaurants, the opportunity for positive advertising, alternative payment for food handler training, and customer demand. Program staff can use the findings to develop and use strategies to encourage participation.

  16. Kolkata Paise Restaurant Problem: An Introduction

    Ghosh, Asim; Biswas, Soumyajyoti; Chatterjee, Arnab; Chakrabarti, Anindya Sundar; Naskar, Tapan; Mitra, Manipushpak; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    We discuss several stochastic optimization strategies in games with many players having large number of choices (Kolkata Paise Restaurant Problem) and two choices (minority game problem). It is seen that a stochastic crowd avoiding strategy gives very efficient utilization in KPR problem. A slightly modified strategy in the minority game problem gives full utilization but the dynamics stops after reaching full efficiency, thereby making the utilization helpful for only about half of the population (those in minority). We further discuss the ways in which the dynamics may be continued and the utilization becomes effective for all the agents keeping fluctuation arbitrarily small.

  17. Amuse Restaurant Set Dinner Menu 2017

    Amuse Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Since opening, Amuse Restaurant has garnered rave reviews from the Country’s most trusted and renowned food critics. Praise has flowed for Conor’s individual style of cooking, which brings Asian flavours, namely Japanese, to modern French cuisine. The menu focuses mainly on tasting menus as it is the best way to experience this kind of food, however there is a three course set menu available Tuesday to Thursday for mid week dining. The lunch menu is a three course affair with the option of a ...

  18. Rasam Indian Restaurant: Early Bird Menu

    Rasam Indian Restaurant

    2013-01-01

    Rasam Indian Restaurant is located in the Glasthule, a suburb of Dublin and opened in 2003. The objective is to serve high quality, authentic Indian cuisine. "We blend, roast and grind our own spices daily to provide a flavour that is unique to Rasam. Cooking Indian food is founded upon long held family traditions. The secret is in the varying elements of heat and spices, the tandoor clay oven is a hugely important fixture in our kitchen. Marinated meats are lowered into the oven on lon...

  19. ALA Conference 2009: The Second City's Newest Restaurants

    Daugherty, Robert Allen

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author lists some of his favorites among Chicago's new restaurants. Most of the restaurants listed are easily accessible from the conference hotels by foot, taxi, or public transportation. The Chicago Transit Authority's (CTA) helpful trip planner can be used to determine the quickest and easiest routes. The price guide is…

  20. Store and Restaurant Advertising and Health of Public Housing Residents

    Heinrich, Katie M.; Li, Dongmei; Regan, Gail R.; Howard, Hugh H.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.; Lee, Rebecca E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine relationships between food and beverage signs and health. Methods: In 12 public housing neighborhoods, food and alcohol signs were counted for stores and restaurants. Health and demographic data were from 373 adults. Results: Multilevel modeling showed higher BMI was related to more store and restaurant alcohol signs,…

  1. The Methanizer : A Small Scale Biogas Reactor for a Restaurant

    Vasudevan, R.; Karlsson, O.; Dhejne, K.; Derewonko, P.; Brezet, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of a smallscale bioreactor called the Methanizer for a restaurant. The bioreactor converts organic waste produced by the restaurant into methane. This methane can be used to power the restaurant’s cooking stoves. The

  2. More than Food and Drink: Careers in Restaurants

    Liming, Drew

    2009-01-01

    In restaurants, the food's the thing. But the drinks, presentation, service, and ambiance are important, too. And it's up to restaurant workers to provide diners with a square meal that's well rounded. The hard work of the kitchen, bar, and dining-room staff gets food and drink from menu to mouth. Some of the more visible workers may include…

  3. Alcohol Service Practices: A Survey of Bar and Restaurant Managers

    Nederhoff, Dawn M.; Lenk, Kathleen M.; Horvath, Keith J.; Nelson, Toben F.; Ecklund, Alexandra M.; Erickson, Darin J.; Toomey, Traci L.

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can result from illegal sales to intoxicated patrons at bars and restaurants. We surveyed bar/restaurant managers about their practices in reducing illegal sales to intoxicated patrons. We found that managers were confident that they could refuse service to intoxicated customers but were less likely to have…

  4. Outdoor ultrafine particle concentrations in front of fast food restaurants.

    Vert, Cristina; Meliefste, Kees; Hoek, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) have been associated with negative effects on human health. Emissions from motor vehicles are the principal source of UFPs in urban air. A study in Vancouver suggested that UFP concentrations were related to density of fast food restaurants near the monitoring sites. A previous monitoring campaign could not separate the contribution of restaurants from road traffic. The main goal of this study has been the quantification of fast food restaurants' contribution to outdoor UFP concentrations. A portable particle number counter (DiscMini) has been used to carry out mobile monitoring in a largely pedestrianized area in the city center of Utrecht. A fixed route passing 17 fast food restaurants was followed on 8 days. UFP concentrations in front of the restaurants were 1.61 times higher than in a nearby square without any local sources used as control area and 1.22 times higher compared with all measurements conducted in between the restaurants. Adjustment for other sources such as passing mopeds, smokers or candles did not explain the increase. In conclusion, fast food restaurants result in significant increases in outdoor UFP concentrations in front of the restaurant.

  5. Restaurant challenge offers healthful meal options and builds diabetes awareness.

    Blair, Angela M; Drass, Janice A; Stone, Marylou; Rhoades, Deborah; Baldwin, Susan A; Russ, Kelsey M

    2011-01-01

    The Frederick Restaurant Challenge is an innovative project based on a collaborative effort among community organizations and partners designed to offer delicious healthful meal options at local restaurants during the month of November for American Diabetes Month. Local restaurants were challenged to participate and submitted recipes for healthful meals to the Frederick County Diabetes Coalition for review by registered dietitians. Diners voted on meals to determine the challenge winner(s), and were eligible to win prizes as well. Publicity prior to and during the month was effective in creating positive news about healthful meals when eating out, raised awareness about diabetes, and provided restaurants with desirable advertising opportunities. Feedback from restaurants and diners was overwhelmingly positive. The purpose of this article is to describe this successful low-budget project to encourage its replication in local communities. The Frederick Restaurant Challenge proved to be a very successful, innovative, low-budget project that met its intended goals: to develop healthful meal options for people with diabetes (or for anyone wishing to eat healthier); to demonstrate that healthful food can taste delicious; and to encourage restaurants to continue offering healthful options on their menus beyond the challenge month. Community interventions such as the Frederick Restaurant Challenge offer unique and important strategies for affecting change and raising awareness not only for people with diabetes but also for the entire community.

  6. Critical Success Factors for Franchised Restaurants Entering the Kenyan Market

    Lucy Gikonyo; Adele Berndt; Joseph Wadawi

    2015-01-01

    In today’s globalized world, businesses look to expand to have a global presence. Restaurant businesses have expanded internationally using franchising. This study sought to determine the critical success factors (CSFs) of a franchised restaurant system entering the Kenyan market from the franchisors’ perspective. It sought to establish how franchisors define, identify, and evaluate success. This study provides a theor...

  7. The Study Of Ethical Issues In Restaurant Of Karachi Pakistan

    Rimsha Zafar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ethics includes social cultural and moral values of an organization. Nowadays restaurant are involving in deceptive advertisement unhygienic food and poor food quality these out key ethical issues in restaurants of Karachi Pakistan. In this study researcher focuses on three main variables hygienic factor deceptive advertisements and food quality. All these three variables have been taken and gathered the data through mail survey questionnaire and email sample size of 200 respondents from different areas of Karachi male and female age group between 20 to 40 years. Data compiled and analyzed through Statistical techniques like descriptive correlate and regression. The results show that ethics influence hygienic factor whereas deceptive advertisement and food quality of a restaurant is better known when a family buy the food at restaurant. Therefore it is very important for restaurants to train their employees and give them a better knowledge of ethics.

  8. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: ASCENSION AND WHITSUNTIDE WEEKENDS

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2001-01-01

    Details of the arrangements to ensure the provision of a restaurant service during the Ascension and Whitsuntide weekends are given below. On all the days indicated, hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and 18h00 to 19h30. RESTAURANT CAFETERIAS PERIPHERIQUES SATELLITE CAFETERIAS KIOSQUE No. Horaire Opening times Horaire : comme d'habitude Usual opening times   ASCENSION         Jeudi 24 mai 1       Thursday, May 24 2 08h00 - 21h00 3           Vendredi 25 mai 1   Bâts. /Bldgs 6 13 17 40Bâts. /Bldgs. 30 54 Bâts. /Bldgs 864 08h00 — 17h00 Friday, May 25 2 07h00 - 21h00   3 07h00 - 18h00           Samedi 26 mai 1 07h00 - 23h00     Saturday, May 26 2   3           Dimanche 27 mai 1 07h00 - 23h00     Sunday, May 27 2   3                   PENTECOTE WHITSUNTIDE         Samedi 2 juin 1 08h00 - 21h00     Saturday, June 2 2   3           Dimanche 3 juin 1 08h00 — 21h00     Sunday, Jun...

  9. An innovative art therapy program for cancer patients.

    Deane, K; Fitch, M; Carman, M

    2000-01-01

    Art therapy is a healing art intended to integrate physical, emotional, and spiritual care by facilitating creative ways for patients to respond to their cancer experience. A new art therapy program was designed to provide cancer patients with opportunities to learn about the McMichael Canadian Art Collection and to explore personal feelings about their cancer experience through combined gallery and studio components. The role of the facilitator was to assist in the interpretation of a participant's drawing in order to reveal meaning in the art. This paper presents patients' perspectives about the new art therapy program. Content analysis of participant feedback provided information about the structure, process, and outcomes of the program. Evaluation of the art therapy/museum education program demonstrated many benefits for cancer patients including support, psychological strength, and new insights about their cancer experience.

  10. Influenza vaccination status and attitudes among restaurant employees.

    Parrish, Amanda T; Graves, Meredith C; Harris, Jeffrey R; Hannon, Peggy A; Hammerback, Kristen; Allen, Claire L

    2015-01-01

    Restaurant employees represent a substantial portion of the US workforce, interact closely with the public, and are at risk for contracting influenza, yet their influenza vaccination rates and attitudes are unknown. Assess influenza vaccination rates and attitudes among Seattle restaurant employees, to identify factors that could enhance the success of a restaurant-based vaccination program. In 2012, we invited employees of Seattle restaurants to complete an anonymous paper survey assessing participant demographics, previous influenza vaccination status, and personal attitudes toward influenza vaccination (using a 5-point scale). Sit-down, full service restaurants in or near Seattle, Washington, were eligible if they had no previous history of offering worksite influenza vaccinations and had more than 20 employees who were older than 18 years and spoke either English or Spanish. We invited staff in all restaurant positions (servers, bussers, kitchen staff, chefs, managers, etc) to complete the survey, which was available in English and Spanish. Of 428 restaurant employees surveyed, 26% reported receiving the seasonal influenza vaccine in 2011-2012 (response rate = 74%). Across 8 attitude statements, participants were most likely to agree that the vaccine is not too expensive (89%), and least likely to agree that it is relevant for their age group (25%), or normative at their workplace (13%). Vaccinated participants reported significantly more positive attitudes than unvaccinated participants, and Hispanics reported significantly more positive attitudes than non-Hispanic whites. Increasing influenza vaccination rates among restaurant employees could protect a substantial portion of the US workforce, and the public, from influenza. Seattle restaurant employees have low vaccination rates against seasonal influenza. Interventions aimed at increasing vaccination among restaurant employees should highlight the vaccine's relevance and effectiveness for working-age adults.

  11. Restaurant owners' perspectives on a voluntary program to recognize restaurants for offering reduced-size portions, Los Angeles County, 2012.

    Gase, Lauren; Dunning, Lauren; Kuo, Tony; Simon, Paul; Fielding, Jonathan E

    2014-03-20

    Reducing the portion size of food and beverages served at restaurants has emerged as a strategy for addressing the obesity epidemic; however, barriers and facilitators to achieving this goal are not well characterized. In fall 2012, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health conducted semistructured interviews with restaurant owners to better understand contextual factors that may impede or facilitate participation in a voluntary program to recognize restaurants for offering reduced-size portions. Interviews were completed with 18 restaurant owners (representing nearly 350 restaurants). Analyses of qualitative data revealed 6 themes related to portion size: 1) perceived customer demand is central to menu planning; 2) multiple portion sizes are already being offered for at least some food items; 3) numerous logistical barriers exist for offering reduced-size portions; 4) restaurant owners have concerns about potential revenue losses from offering reduced-size portions; 5) healthful eating is the responsibility of the customer; and 6) a few owners want to be socially responsible industry leaders. A program to recognize restaurants for offering reduced-size portions may be a feasible approach in Los Angeles County. These findings may have applications for jurisdictions interested in engaging restaurants as partners in reducing the obesity epidemic.

  12. Restaurant Owners’ Perspectives on a Voluntary Program to Recognize Restaurants for Offering Reduced-Size Portions, Los Angeles County, 2012

    Dunning, Lauren; Kuo, Tony; Simon, Paul; Fielding, Jonathan E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Reducing the portion size of food and beverages served at restaurants has emerged as a strategy for addressing the obesity epidemic; however, barriers and facilitators to achieving this goal are not well characterized. Methods In fall 2012, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health conducted semistructured interviews with restaurant owners to better understand contextual factors that may impede or facilitate participation in a voluntary program to recognize restaurants for offering reduced-size portions. Results Interviews were completed with 18 restaurant owners (representing nearly 350 restaurants). Analyses of qualitative data revealed 6 themes related to portion size: 1) perceived customer demand is central to menu planning; 2) multiple portion sizes are already being offered for at least some food items; 3) numerous logistical barriers exist for offering reduced-size portions; 4) restaurant owners have concerns about potential revenue losses from offering reduced-size portions; 5) healthful eating is the responsibility of the customer; and 6) a few owners want to be socially responsible industry leaders. Conclusion A program to recognize restaurants for offering reduced-size portions may be a feasible approach in Los Angeles County. These findings may have applications for jurisdictions interested in engaging restaurants as partners in reducing the obesity epidemic. PMID:24650622

  13. Factors That Lead to Environmentally Sustainable Practices in the Restaurant Industry: A Qualitative Analysis of Two Green Restaurant Innovators

    Nyheim, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, more organizations, including restaurants, have concerned themselves with sustainability. As with any new endeavor, guidance is needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors that lead to environmentally sustainable practices in the restaurant industry. Using Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation Theory as a…

  14. Note méthodologique : Exemple de restauration de la plaine de la Crau : l’écologie de la restauration face à la restauration écologique

    Renaud Jaunatre, Baptiste Dolidon, Élise Buiison et Thierry Dutoit

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Quel peut être l’apport des recherches en écologie de la restauration pour la réhabilitation d’une communauté végétale unique à forte valeur patrimoniale ? Comment s’intègrent-elles aux opérations de restauration sur le terrain ? Exemple en plaine de Crau pour la réhabilitation des steppes méditerranéennes de Cossure.

  15. Do Adolescents Who Live or Go to School Near Fast Food Restaurants Eat More Frequently From Fast Food Restaurants?

    Forsyth, Ann; Wall, Melanie; Larson, Nicole; Story, Mary; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    This population-based study examined whether residential or school neighborhood access to fast food restaurants is related to adolescents’ eating frequency of fast food. A classroom-based survey of racially/ethnically diverse adolescents (n=2,724) in 20 secondary schools in Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota was used to assess eating frequency at five types of fast food restaurants. Black, Hispanic, and Native American adolescents lived near more fast food restaurants than white and Asian adolescents and also ate at fast food restaurants more often. After controlling for individual-level socio-demographics, adolescent males living near high numbers fast food restaurants ate more frequently from these venues compared to their peers. PMID:23064515

  16. Changing the restaurant food environment to improve cardiovascular health in a rural community: implementation and evaluation of the Heart of New Ulm restaurant programme.

    Lindberg, Rebecca; Sidebottom, Abbey C; McCool, Brigitte; Pereira, Raquel F; Sillah, Arthur; Boucher, Jackie L

    2018-04-01

    The goals of the present study were to: (i) describe the implementation of a programme to improve the restaurant food environment in a rural community; and (ii) describe how practices changed in community restaurants. The intervention included a baseline assessment of all community restaurants (n 32) and a report on how they could increase the availability and promotion of healthful options. The assessment focused on sixteen healthy practices (HP) derived from the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey for Restaurants. Restaurants were invited to participate at gold, silver or bronze levels based on the number of HP attained. Participating restaurants received dietitian consultation, staff training and promotion of the restaurant. All community restaurants were reassessed 1·5 years after baseline. The restaurant programme was part of the Heart of New Ulm Project, a community-based CVD prevention programme in a rural community. All community restaurants (n 32) were included in the study. Over one-third (38 %) of community restaurants participated in the programme. At baseline, 22 % achieved at least a bronze level. This increased to 38 % at follow-up with most of the improvement among participating restaurants that were independently owned. Across all restaurants in the community, the HP showing the most improvement included availability of non-fried vegetables (63-84 %), fruits (41-53 %), smaller portions and whole grains. Findings demonstrate successes and challenges of improving healthful food availability and promotion in a community-wide restaurant programme.

  17. Where Are They Now: Nathalie Walker Moves from Science to Activism and Art Communications | Poster

    Whether it’s in a flowerbed or an art gallery, former Werner H. Kirsten (WHK) student intern Nathalie Walker can’t help but to cause a buzz. Since completing her WHK internship in the summer of 2015, Walker has been attending Loyola University Maryland, where she is striving to make a positive impact on campus.

  18. Emerging: An Art Field Placement's Impact on Practice

    Averett, Paige; Spence, Christina Hall

    2018-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the experiences of 9 stakeholders in an art gallery field placement during their social work education. The study sought to understand how the nontraditional field placement prepared students for practice. In addition, personality traits of students that best fit the placement was examined. Findings suggest that…

  19. Using Whispering-Gallery-Mode Resonators for Refractometry

    Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry; Iltchenko, Vladimir; Maleki, Lute

    2010-01-01

    A method of determining the refractive and absorptive properties of optically transparent materials involves a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis of electromagnetic responses of whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonator disks made of those materials. The method was conceived especially for use in studying transparent photorefractive materials, for which purpose this method affords unprecedented levels of sensitivity and accuracy. The method is expected to be particularly useful for measuring temporally varying refractive and absorptive properties of photorefractive materials at infrared wavelengths. Still more particularly, the method is expected to be useful for measuring drifts in these properties that are so slow that, heretofore, the properties were assumed to be constant. The basic idea of the method is to attempt to infer values of the photorefractive properties of a material by seeking to match (1) theoretical predictions of the spectral responses (or selected features thereof) of a WGM of known dimensions made of the material with (2) the actual spectral responses (or selected features thereof). Spectral features that are useful for this purpose include resonance frequencies, free spectral ranges (differences between resonance frequencies of adjacently numbered modes), and resonance quality factors (Q values). The method has been demonstrated in several experiments, one of which was performed on a WGM resonator made from a disk of LiNbO3 doped with 5 percent of MgO. The free spectral range of the resonator was approximately equal to 3.42 GHz at wavelengths in the vicinity of 780 nm, the smallest full width at half maximum of a mode was approximately equal to 50 MHz, and the thickness of the resonator in the area of mode localization was 30 microns. In the experiment, laser power of 9 mW was coupled into the resonator with an efficiency of 75 percent, and the laser was scanned over a frequency band 9 GHz wide at a nominal wavelength of

  20. The Vital Components of Restaurant Quality that Affect Guest Satisfaction

    Snježana Gagić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the trend of dining in restaurants has become quite prominent in Serbia. Frequent restaurant visits are not only the reflection of satisfying hedonistic needs, but also the result of increasing number of single-person households as well as adjustment to the European business hours.In an increasingly competitive environment, restaurants must be focused on guests using marketing concepts that identify their needs thus leading to their satisfaction and increased retention.Service quality is fundamental component which produce higher levels of guest satisfaction, which in turn lead to higher sales revenue.The main purpose of this study was to examine the quality dimensions that affect guest satisfaction in restaurant industry. Food and beverage quality, the quality of service delivery, physical environment and price fairness are analyzed as a key components of restaurant experience. The results could be helpful tool for restaurant managers to invest their resources more efficiently, making changes to crucial quality attributes that elicit the guests’ satisfaction level. A management approach focused on guest satisfaction can improve restaurant business performance.

  1. Restaurant No. 1 seating capacity increases by 240

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    These days you need patience when looking for a seat in Restaurant No. 1 to eat your lunch. The opening of the new dining room, which will increase the restaurant’s seating capacity by 240, should alleviate the problem and improve service.   The new restaurant area. For the past several years the number of people using Restaurant No. 1 has grown steadily. Now, for a change, the restaurant itself is growing. Luz Lopez-Hernandez, leader of the project in the GS Department, explains: “Enlarging the restaurant has been on the GS Department's agenda for several years, but the project really got off the ground in 2009. Once it was approved and the design completed, construction itself only took seven months.” Seven months later, the restaurant extension is indeed on the verge of opening. One of the people who will be particularly happy is Joël Nallet, who manages the Novae restaurant: “I am thrilled, because until now, even if we managed to increase...

  2. Choice attributes in restaurant services: An exploratory study

    Derli Luís Angnes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There are about one million of bars and restaurants that generate around six millions of jobs in Brazil. Among the most important reasons to choose a restaurant are the service attributes. Attributes are judgments the client makes about the performance and quality of the service provided. The identification of restaurant choice attributes is important in order to propose a higher value to services and to make marketing strategies. This article aims to identify the choice attributes of service quality in restaurants. The methodology employed was a qualitative exploratory study based on interviews made using the critical incident technique. It was used a sample of 72 restaurant customers. The content analysis technique was used to treat and analyze the critical incidents obtained in the interviews. The result obtained was a relation of 615 critical incidents, which after being analyzed generated a list of 27 attributes that influence customer’s choice and customer’s evaluation of service quality provided in restaurants. The identified attributes can subsidize and contribute to improvement of future research and studies in the academic environment, besides contributing for the management of restaurants business.

  3. Public knowledge and attitudes regarding public health inspections of restaurants.

    Jones, Timothy F; Grimm, Karen

    2008-06-01

    Foodborne diseases cause 76 million illnesses in the U.S. each year, and almost half of all money spent on food is spent in restaurants. Restaurant inspections are a critical public health intervention for the prevention of foodborne disease. A telephone survey of randomly selected Tennessee residents aged > or =18 was performed. Data were collected on respondents' demographics, knowledge, attitudes, and expectations regarding restaurant inspections. Of 2000 respondents, 97% were aware that restaurants are inspected regularly by the health department. More than half of the respondents believed that inspections should be performed at least 12 times per year; only one third were aware that inspections currently occur only twice per year in Tennessee. More than one third of the respondents considered an inspection score of > or =90 acceptable for a restaurant at which they would eat; the mean score in Tennessee is 82. When presented with a variety of scenarios, an overwhelming number of respondents felt that public health responses to safety violations should be far more draconian than they actually are. Survey answers did not differ consistently based on respondents' race, gender, or history of having worked in a restaurant. This study identified a number of public misconceptions and unrealistically high expectations of the public health restaurant-inspection system. It is important to improve consumers' understanding of inspection scores and the limitations of regulatory inspections, as well as the role of such inspections in disease prevention.

  4. Eating Well While Dining Out: Collaborating with Local Restaurants to Promote Heart Healthy Menu Items

    Thayer, Linden M.; Pimentel, Daniela C.; Smith, Janice C.; Garcia, Beverly A.; Sylvester, Laura Lee; Kelly, Tammy; Johnston, Larry F.; Ammerman, Alice S.; Keyserling, Thomas C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Because Americans commonly consume restaurant foods with poor dietary quality, effective interventions are needed to improve food choices at restaurants. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate a restaurant-based intervention to help customers select and restaurants promote heart healthy menu items with healthful…

  5. Identifying fast-food restaurants using a central register as a measure of the food environment

    Toft, Ulla; Erbs-Maibing, Peter; Glümer, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    To validate the identification and location of fast-food restaurants according to a government list of inspected food stores and restaurants.......To validate the identification and location of fast-food restaurants according to a government list of inspected food stores and restaurants....

  6. 29 CFR 779.386 - Restaurants may qualify as exempt 13(a)(2) establishments.

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Restaurants may qualify as exempt 13(a)(2) establishments... Service Establishments Restaurants and Establishments Providing Food and Beverage Service § 779.386 Restaurants may qualify as exempt 13(a)(2) establishments. (a) A restaurant may qualify as an exempt retail or...

  7. Availability, Location, and Format of Nutrition Information in Fast-food Chain Restaurants in Ontario, Canada.

    Hobin, Erin; Lebenbaum, Michael; Rosella, Laura; Hammond, David

    2015-03-01

    To assess the availability, location, and format of nutrition information in fast-food chain restaurants in Ontario. Nutrition information in restaurants was assessed using an adapted version of the Nutrition Environment Measures Study for Restaurants (NEMS-R). Two raters independently visited 50 restaurants, 5 outlets of each of the top-10 fast-food chain restaurants in Canada. The locations of the restaurants were randomly selected within the Waterloo, Wellington, and Peel regions in Ontario, Canada. Descriptive results are presented for the proportion of restaurants presenting nutrition information by location (e.g., brochure), format (e.g., use of symbols), and then by type of restaurant (e.g., quick take-away, full-service). Overall, 96.0% (n = 48) of the restaurants had at least some nutrition information available in the restaurant. However, no restaurant listed calorie information for all items on menu boards or menus, and only 14.0% (n = 7) of the restaurants posted calorie information and 26.0% (n = 13) of restaurants posted other nutrients (e.g., total fat) for at least some items on menus boards or menus. The majority of the fast-food chain restaurants included in our study provided at least some nutrition information in restaurants; however, very few restaurants made nutrition information readily available for consumers on menu boards and menus.

  8. An empirical study of the relationship between restaurant image and customer loyalty

    Oh, Heung Chul

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to empirically determine the relationship between restaurant images and loyalties toward seven competing casual dinner house restaurant chains, and to understand the nature of their competition by matching patronage behavior toward alternative restaurant chains with perceptions of alternative restaurants on particular image attributes.

  9. Estimated Cost to a Restaurant of a Foodborne Illness Outbreak.

    Bartsch, Sarah M; Asti, Lindsey; Nyathi, Sindiso; Spiker, Marie L; Lee, Bruce Y

    Although outbreaks of restaurant-associated foodborne illness occur periodically and make the news, a restaurant may not be aware of the cost of an outbreak. We estimated this cost under varying circumstances. We developed a computational simulation model; scenarios varied outbreak size (5 to 250 people affected), pathogen (n = 15), type of dining establishment (fast food, fast casual, casual dining, and fine dining), lost revenue (ie, meals lost per illness), cost of lawsuits and legal fees, fines, and insurance premium increases. We estimated that the cost of a single foodborne illness outbreak ranged from $3968 to $1.9 million for a fast-food restaurant, $6330 to $2.1 million for a fast-casual restaurant, $8030 to $2.2 million for a casual-dining restaurant, and $8273 to $2.6 million for a fine-dining restaurant, varying from a 5-person outbreak, with no lost revenue, lawsuits, legal fees, or fines, to a 250-person outbreak, with high lost revenue (100 meals lost per illness), and a high amount of lawsuits and legal fees ($1 656 569) and fines ($100 000). This cost amounts to 10% to 5790% of a restaurant's annual marketing costs and 0.3% to 101% of annual profits and revenue. The biggest cost drivers were lawsuits and legal fees, outbreak size, and lost revenue. Pathogen type affected the cost by a maximum of $337 000, the difference between a Bacillus cereus outbreak (least costly) and a listeria outbreak (most costly). The cost of a single foodborne illness outbreak to a restaurant can be substantial and outweigh the typical costs of prevention and control measures. Our study can help decision makers determine investment and motivate research for infection-control measures in restaurant settings.

  10. A Gallery of Visual Responses: Artwork in the Literature Classroom.

    Eisenkraft, Stacey L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how a middle school English/language arts teacher had students paint in watercolors their responses to the novel the class was reading. Describes how this approach signficantly improved the rate and quality of student participation, and brought out new voices and fresh readings of the text. (SR)

  11. RESTAURANT RESERVATION MANAGEMENT CONSIDERING TABLE COMBINATION

    Qing Miao

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper presents a case study of table reservation practice for restaurant business within Walt Disney World. A unique feature here is to consider table combination to capture revenue potentials from different party sizes and at different time periods. For example, a party of large size can be served by combining two or more small tables. A mixed integer programming (MIP model is developed to make the reservation recommendation. We propose a rolling horizon reservation policy such that the value of a particular table is periodically evaluated and updated. This is a typical revenue management method in the airlines and other industries, the essence of which is to compare the future expected revenue with a currently offered price. Using historical data, numerical test shows a significant revenue improvement potential from our proposed model.

  12. Estimation of restaurant solid waste generation rates

    Heck, H.H.; Major, I.

    2002-01-01

    Most solid waste utilities try to create a billing schedule that is proportional to solid waste generation rates. This research was trying to determine if the current billing rate structure was appropriate or if a different rate structure should be implemented. A multiple regression model with forward stepwise addition was developed which accurately predicts weekly solid waste generation rates for restaurants. The model was based on a study of daily solid waste generation at twenty-one different businesses. The weight and volume of solid waste generated was measure daily for two weeks during the winter and two weeks during the summer. Researchers followed the collection truck and measured the volume and weight of the container contents. Data was collected on the following independent variables describing each establishment; weight of waste per collection, volume per collection, container utilization factor, building area, contract haulers bill, yearly property tax, yearly solid waste tax, average number of collections per week, type of restaurant, modal number of collections per week, storage container size, waste density, number of employees, number of hours open per week, and weekly collection capacity (collections per week times storage container size). Independent variables were added to the regression equation based on their partial correlation coefficient and confidence level. The regression equations developed had correlation coefficients of 0.87 to 1.00, which was much better than the correlation coefficient (0.84) of an existing model DeGeare and Ongerth (1971) and a correlation coefficient of 0.54 based on the current solid waste disposal tax. (author)

  13. Improving Novice Radiology Trainees' Perception Using Fine Art.

    Goodman, Thomas Rob; Kelleher, Michael

    2017-10-01

    To determine if fine art perception training improved performance in novice radiology trainees. On the first day of their residency, 15 radiology residents underwent a basic radiology perception test in which they were shown 15 different radiographs that each had a significant abnormality. This was followed by a focused session of interpretation training at a local art gallery where art experts taught the trainees how to thoroughly analyze a painting. After this fine art session, the residents were once again shown 15 different radiographs and asked, in the same manner as before, to identify the location of the abnormality. The results of both radiograph assessments were then compared. The 15 residents correctly identified the areas of abnormality on 35 of 225 cases pre-art training with a mean score of 2.33 and a SD of 1.4. After art training, the figure for correctly identifying the area of abnormality rose to 94 of 225 cases with a mean score of 6.27 and a SD of 1.79 (P art gallery may be a novel, effective transitional starting point for novice radiology trainees. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Overview Michelin Star Reputation Restaurant in Hospitality Industry

    Agung Gita Subakti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available For most chefs and Restaurateur, having his restaurant being awarded one or more stars in the famous Michelin Guide Rouge represents a major achievement, recognition of their work, and also important publicity generating increased notoriety. In this specific industry, experts play a decisive role, and reputation of restaurants and chefs are basically established according to their opinions. The aim of this paper is to overview some of the Restaurants achieving the Michelin Star Reputation and able to sustain it for years. Moreover, how these reputations are made and to understand better the development of gaining such a high reputation.

  15. Assessment of the quality seen in a restaurant typical theme

    Francisco Alves Pinheiro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available To ensure the satisfaction of external customers it is necessary to know their needs. In this perspective, these work objectives assess the perception of quality by the customer outside of a restaurant located in the a restaurant typical theme located in the square of food “Bodódromo” the city of Petrolina/Pe. For both this was a case study, using the model servqual, Parasuraman et al (1985, for removal of information. The results indicated a need for improvement in the services provided by the restaurant.

  16. Evaluating two infiltration gallery designs for managed aquifer recharge using secondary treated wastewater.

    Bekele, Elise; Toze, Simon; Patterson, Bradley; Fegg, Wolfgang; Shackleton, Mark; Higginson, Simon

    2013-03-15

    As managed aquifer recharge (MAR) becomes increasingly considered for augmenting water-sensitive urban areas, fundamental knowledge of the achievable scale, longevity and maintenance requirements of different options will become paramount. This paper reports on a 39 month pilot scale MAR scheme that infiltrated secondary treated wastewater through unsaturated sand into a limestone and sand aquifer. Two types of infiltration gallery were constructed to compare their hydraulic performance, one using crushed, graded gravel, the other using an engineered leach drain system (Atlantis Leach System(®)). Both galleries received 25 kL of nutrient-rich, secondary treated wastewater per day. The Atlantis gallery successfully infiltrated 17 ML of treated wastewater over three years. The slotted distribution pipe in the gravel gallery became clogged with plant roots after operating for one year. The infiltration capacity of the gravel gallery could not be restored despite high pressure cleaning, thus it was replaced with an Atlantis system. Reduction in the infiltration capacity of the Atlantis system was only observed when inflow was increased by about 3 fold for two months. The performance of the Atlantis system suggests it is superior to the gravel gallery, requiring less maintenance within at least the time frame of this study. The results from a bromide tracer test revealed a minimum transport time of 3.7 days for the recharged water to reach the water table below 9 m of sand and limestone. This set a limit on the time available for attenuation by natural treatment within the unsaturated zone before it recharged groundwater. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Beyond the Museum Walls : Situating Art in Virtual Space (Polemic Overlay and Three Movements

    Vince Dziekan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In recognition of digital communication’s profound effects on social relations and institutions, this paper explores the influence of digitisation on our notions of art through the design of its institutions. No longer can the museum, as the primary technology of art, be viewed as just a physical container. With the additional of the hidden infrastructure of electronic and multimedia technologies that are to be found “behind the walls”, as it were, the architectural issues of negotiating spaces and manipulating locative settings for displaying artworks are as much virtual as physical.As a contribution to the negotiation of a distributed aesthetics, this paper entertains the possibility that transplanting art to the virtual site of the Internet disrupts our understanding of art itself. From presence on the gallery wall to the plane of the screen, if this translation offers an alternative way of seeing, then what does the Web offer to a different apperception of art? How to position the digital in the discourse surrounding art and the role it plays within contemporary cultural practice?In an attempt to ground these concerns, I will frame the subsequent discussion by focussing my attention upon one particularly representative instance: The National Gallery of Victoria’s Ian Potter Gallery of Australian Art; recognising in this localised, site-specific experience a microexample of a much more ubiquitous phenomenon.

  18. Viability of microcomputed tomography to study tropical marine worm galleries in humid muddy sediments

    Pennafirme, Simone F.; Machado, Alessandra S.; Lima, Inaya; Suzuki, Katia N.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2013-01-01

    Bioturbation is an ecological process driven by organisms, which transports nutrients and gases from air/water to sediment through their galleries, by the time they feed, burrow and/or construct galleries. This exchange is vital to the maintenance of micro and macrobenthic organisms, mainly in muddy flat environments. Species with distinct galleries could create levels of bioturbation, affecting the benthic interactions. In this sense, it is fundamental developing a non-destructive method that permits identifying/quantifying the properties of these galleries. The recent advances in micro-computed tomography are allowing the high resolution 3D images generation. However, once muddy sediments are rich in organic matter and interstitial water, these would lead to motion artifacts which could, in turn, decrease the accuracy of galleries identification/quantification. In this context, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol which combines laboratory experiments and microtomography analysis in order to generate accurate 3D images of the small marine worm's galleries within humid muddy sediments. The sediment was collected at both muddy flats of Surui's and Itaipu lagoon's mangroves (RJ-Brazil), sieved (0.5mm mesh) and introduced with one individual of the marine worm Laeonereis acuta (Nereididae, Polychaeta) in each acrylic corer holders (4.4cm of internal diameter). High energy microtomography scanner was used to obtain 3D images and the setup calibration was 130 kV and 61 mA. Each acquisition image time was among 4h and 6h. Several procedures of drying remained water inside the cores were performed aiming obtaining images without movement artifacts due to circulating water, and this issue was one of the main studied parameter. In order to investigate possible chemical effects, 2ml of formalin (35%) with menthol were added to the surface of the cores. The results show that although the drying time was appropriated, the chemicals created bubbles within the

  19. Viability of microcomputed tomography to study tropical marine worm galleries in humid muddy sediments

    Pennafirme, Simone F., E-mail: sipennafirme@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biologia Marinha; Machado, Alessandra S.; Lima, Inaya; Suzuki, Katia N.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: machado@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: inaya@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: norisuzuki6@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Bioturbation is an ecological process driven by organisms, which transports nutrients and gases from air/water to sediment through their galleries, by the time they feed, burrow and/or construct galleries. This exchange is vital to the maintenance of micro and macrobenthic organisms, mainly in muddy flat environments. Species with distinct galleries could create levels of bioturbation, affecting the benthic interactions. In this sense, it is fundamental developing a non-destructive method that permits identifying/quantifying the properties of these galleries. The recent advances in micro-computed tomography are allowing the high resolution 3D images generation. However, once muddy sediments are rich in organic matter and interstitial water, these would lead to motion artifacts which could, in turn, decrease the accuracy of galleries identification/quantification. In this context, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol which combines laboratory experiments and microtomography analysis in order to generate accurate 3D images of the small marine worm's galleries within humid muddy sediments. The sediment was collected at both muddy flats of Surui's and Itaipu lagoon's mangroves (RJ-Brazil), sieved (0.5mm mesh) and introduced with one individual of the marine worm Laeonereis acuta (Nereididae, Polychaeta) in each acrylic corer holders (4.4cm of internal diameter). High energy microtomography scanner was used to obtain 3D images and the setup calibration was 130 kV and 61 mA. Each acquisition image time was among 4h and 6h. Several procedures of drying remained water inside the cores were performed aiming obtaining images without movement artifacts due to circulating water, and this issue was one of the main studied parameter. In order to investigate possible chemical effects, 2ml of formalin (35%) with menthol were added to the surface of the cores. The results show that although the drying time was appropriated, the chemicals created bubbles

  20. The whispering gallery as an optical component in the X-ray region

    Howells, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    The whispering gallery phenomenon in acoustics has been known and studied for more than a century, and the same effect has been observed to take place with waves other than sound waves. In this paper we review the theoretical basis and attractive features of the whispering gallery as a soft x-ray optical component and indicate some of its potential applications. We then describe what may be its most unique capability which, in favorable cases, is to provide a way. to manipulate the phase difference between the s and p polarization components and thus to generate circularly or elliptically polarized soft x-rays

  1. On the Problem of Filtration to an Imperfect Gallery in a Pressureless Bed

    Bereslavskii, É. N.; Dudina, L. M.

    2018-01-01

    The problem of plane steady-state filtration in a pressureless bed to an imperfect gallery in the presence of evaporation from the flow free surface is considered. To study such type of flow, a mixed boundary-value problem of the theory of analytical functions is formulated and solved with application of the Polubarinova-Kochina method. Based on the model suggested, an algorithm for computing the discharge of the gallery and the ordinate of free surface emergence to the impermeable screen is developed. A detailed hydrodynamic analysis of the influence of all physical parameters of the model on the desired filtration characteristics is given.

  2. Mechanical behavior of galleries in deep clay - Study of a concrete example

    Rousset, G.; Jehan, R.A.; Bonne, A.; Fernique, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    At important depths such as those envisaged for the construction of a radioactive waste disposal, clay appears to be a material of rather weak resistance. One of the first problems to be studied is the technical feasibility of a disposal facility. The time-dependent and strain-softening behavior of the clay plays a significant role in the long term stability of the lined galleries. The in-situ measurements carried out during the digging of a gallery in Boom clay (Belgium), under a 250 m overburden are presented. The data obtained are analyzed by means of an elastoviscoplastic model including strain softening behavior of the clay

  3. Memorializing the Wars of Religion in Early Seventeenth-Century French Picture Galleries : Protestants and Catholics Painting the Contested Past

    van der Linden, David

    2017-01-01

    This article examines how Protestant and Catholic elites in early seventeenth-century France memorialized the Wars of Religion in purpose-built picture galleries. Postwar France remained a divided nation, and portrait galleries offered a sectarian memory of the conflict, glorifying party heroes.

  4. Development of restaurant serviceology based on the methodology of general theory of service

    Glushchenko V.; Glushchenko I.; Katz S.; Olshevskaya K.; Pryazhnikova A.; Stashkova E.

    2018-01-01

    The positions of restaurant service (service in restaurant business — restaurantology) are formed as a scientific basis for designing a business and assessing the quality of services in restaurant business, developing the service sector in restaurant business, exploring and forming theoretical bases for the development of economy and management in the restaurant business in the globalization of the market for such a kind of services, development of service and information technologies and com...

  5. Effects of new logistics services on restaurants' business model and strategy

    Vlassis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    The restaurant industry is present in every part of the world and has been a subject of significant interest for academic scholars. Despite being a more stable industry, technological innovations have started to reach restaurants as well. The purpose of this research is to study and analyze one of these innovations introduced to the full-service restaurant industry. Traditional delivery services in the restaurant industry have been acting as agents between restaurants and customers with the r...

  6. Digital Mayhem 3D machine techniques where inspiration, techniques and digital art meet

    Evans, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    From Icy Tundras to Desert savannahs, master the art of landscape and environment design for 2D and 3D digital content. Make it rain, shower your digital scene with a snow storm or develop a believable urban scene with a critical eye for modeling, lighting and composition. Move beyond the limitations of gallery style coffee table books with Digital Mayhem: 3D Landscapes-offering leading professional techniques, groundbreaking inspiration, and artistic mastery from some of the greatest digital artists. More than just a gallery book - each artist has written a breakdown overview, with supporting

  7. Whispering gallery mode resonators for frequency metrology applications

    Baumgartel, Lukas

    This dissertation describes an investigation into the use of whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators for applications towards frequency reference and metrology. Laser stabilization and the measurement of optical frequencies have enabled myriad technologies of both academic and commercial interest. A technology which seems to span both motivations is optical atomic clocks. These devices are virtually unimaginable without the ultra stable lasers plus frequency measurement and down-conversion afforded by Fabry Perot (FP) cavities and model-locked laser combs, respectively. However, WGM resonators can potentially perform both of these tasks while having the distinct advantages of compactness and simplicity. This work represents progress towards understanding and mitigating the performance limitations of WGM cavities for such applications. A system for laser frequency stabilization to a the cavity via the Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) method is described. While the laser lock itself is found to perform at the level of several parts in 1015, a variety of fundamental and technical mechanisms destabilize the WGM frequency itself. Owing to the relatively large thermal expansion coefficients in optical crystals, environmental temperature drifts set the stability limit at time scales greater than the thermal relaxation time of the crystal. Uncompensated, these drifts pull WGM frequencies about 3 orders of magnitude more than they would in an FP cavity. Thus, two temperature compensation schemes are developed. An active scheme measures and stabilizes the mode volume temperature to the level of several nK, reducing the effective temperature coefficient of the resonator to 1.7x10-7 K-1; simulations suggest that the value could eventually be as low as 3.5x10-8 K-1, on par with the aforementioned FP cavities. A second, passive scheme is also described, which employs a heterogeneous resonator structure that capitalizes on the thermo-mechanical properties of one material and the optical

  8. Research of the Localization of Restaurant Service Robot

    Yu Qing-xiao

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper designs a restaurant service robot which could be applicable to providing basic service, such as ordering, fetching and sending food, settlement and so on, for the customers in the robot restaurant. In this study, both three landmarks positioning and landmark-based localization algorithms are proposed to localize the mobile robot with rough precision in the restaurant. And Optical Character Recognition (OCR technology is used to distinguish the unique table number of different landmarks. When the high localization precision must be granted around the pantry table, the RFID-based localization algorithm is proposed to localize the mobile robot. Various experiments show that the proposed algorithms could estimate the robot pose reasonably well and could accurately evaluate the localization performance. Finally, the proposed service robot could realize real-time self-localization in the restaurant.

  9. Research of the Localization of Restaurant Service Robot

    Yu Qing-xiao

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper designs a restaurant service robot which could be applicable to providing basic service, such as ordering, fetching and sending food, settlement and so on, for the customers in the robot restaurant. In this study, both three landmarks positioning and landmark-based localization algorithms are proposed to localize the mobile robot with rough precision in the restaurant. And Optical Character Recognition (OCR technology is used to distinguish the unique table number of different landmarks. When the high localization precision must be granted around the pantry table, the RFID-based localization algorithm is proposed to localize the mobile robot.Various experiments show that the proposed algorithms could estimate the robot pose reasonably well and could accurately evaluate the localization performance. Finally, the proposed service robot could realize real-time self-localization in the restaurant.

  10. Kolkata Paise Restaurant Problem and the Cyclically Fair Norm

    Banerjee, Priyodorshi; Mitra, Manipushpak; Mukherjee, Conan

    In this paper we revisit the Kolkata Paise Restaurant problem by allowing for a more general (but common) preference of the n customers defined over the set of n restaurants. This generalization allows for the possibility that each pure strategy Nash equilibrium differs from the Pareto efficient allocation. By assuming that n is small and by allowing for mutual interaction across all customers we design strategies to sustain cyclically fair norm as a sub-game perfect equilibrium of the Kolkata Paise Restaurant problem. We have a cyclically fair norm if n strategically different Pareto efficient strategies are sequentially sustained in a way such that each customer gets serviced in all the n restaurants exactly once between periods 1 and n and then again the same process is repeated between periods (n+1) and 2n and so on.

  11. Subjective evaluation of restaurant acoustics in a virtual sound environment

    Nielsen, Nicolaj Østergaard; Marschall, Marton; Santurette, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Many restaurants have smooth rigid surfaces made of wood, steel, glass, and concrete. This often results in a lack of sound absorption. Such restaurants are notorious for high sound noise levels during service that most owners actually desire for representing vibrant eating environments, although...... surveys report that noise complaints are on par with poor service. This study investigated the relation between objective acoustic parameters and subjective evaluation of acoustic comfort at five restaurants in terms of three parameters: noise annoyance, speech intelligibility, and privacy. At each...... location, customers filled out questionnaire surveys, acoustic parameters were measured, and recordings of restaurant acoustic scenes were obtained with a 64-channel spherical array. The acoustic scenes were reproduced in a virtual sound environment (VSE) with 64 loudspeakers placed in an anechoic room...

  12. Mrs. B.'s Lakeside Restaurant (In the Classroom).

    Borysiewicz, Pat

    1992-01-01

    Describes how the author and her kindergarten students created a cooking center and restaurant in which they participate in regular cooking projects to provide opportunities to apply newly acquired skills in reading, writing, and math. (MG)

  13. Investigation of Noise Pollution in Restaurants in Morogoro ...

    MICHAEL

    suggesting little or no impact of the indoor environment on the outdoor environment's noise level. ... provided by the music systems which are run in most restaurants. Therefore, proper ... people who visit or work in those areas depend on.

  14. Occupational Programs for the Restaurant/Hotel Business

    Hoenninger, Ronald W.; Riegel, Carl D.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the development of a Hotel and Restaurant Management Program, designed to provide career training, develop educational opportunities, and provide a forum through which the continuing education needs of the local hospitality industry could be assessed and evaluated. (TP)

  15. RESTAURANT AND CAFETERIA SERVICES ARRANGEMENTS FOR 1 MAY 2002

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2002-01-01

    1. Restaurants As Wednesday 1 May is an official CERN holiday, restaurants no. 2 (DSR: bldg. 504 - Meyrin) and no. 3 (Avenance: bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed as from Tuesda 30 April at 18h00. They will reopen on Thursday 2 May at 6h30 (rest. no. 2) and at 7h00 (rest. no. 3). On 1 May, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 1 (COOP: bldg. 501 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. 2. Decentralised services No decentralised services (satellite cafétérias etc.) will operate. 3. Newspaper stand The newspaper kiosque in building 501 will be closed. Restaurant Supervisory Committee, tel. 77551

  16. Restaurant inspection frequency: The RestoFreq Study.

    Medu, Olanrewaju; Turner, Hollie; Cushon, Jennifer A; Melis, Deborah; Rea, Leslie; Abdellatif, Treena; Neudorf, Cory O; Schwandt, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Foodborne illness is an important contributor to morbidity and health system costs in Canada. Using number of critical hazards as a proxy for food safety, we sought to better understand how to improve food safety in restaurants. We compared the current standard of annual inspections to twice-yearly inspections among restaurants "at risk" for food safety infractions. These were restaurants that had three or more elevated-risk inspection ratings in the preceding 36 months. We conducted a two-arm randomized controlled trial between November 2012 and October 2014. The intervention was twice-yearly routine restaurant inspection compared to standard once-yearly routine inspection. Included were all restaurants within Saskatoon Health Region that were assessed as "at risk", with 73 restaurants in the intervention arm and 78 in the control arm. Independent sample t-tests were conducted between groups to compare: i) average number of critical hazards per inspection; and ii) proportion of inspections resulting in a rating indicating an elevated hazard. Over time we noted statistically significant improvements across both study arms, in number of both critical food safety hazards (decreased by 61%) and elevated-risk inspection ratings (decreased by 45%) (p < 0.0001). We observed no significant differences between the two groups pre- or post-intervention. Results suggest increasing the number of annual routine inspections in high-risk restaurants was not associated with a significant difference in measures of compliance with food safety regulations. Findings of this study do not provide evidence supporting increased frequency of restaurant inspection from annually to twice annually.

  17. DISPARITIES BETWEEN SERVICES DEMANDED AND SERVICES RECEIVED IN TAIWANESE RESTAURANTS

    Jui-Kuei Chen; I-Shuo Chen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the service quality performance of Taiwanese foreign restaurants. After a review of the literature on service quality and discussions with managers of Taiwanese foreign restaurants, we decided to use the DINERSERV questionnaire. The methodology, an Importance-Performance Analysis (IPA), is used to categorize whole service items into four dimensions: 1) keep up the good work, 2) possible overkill, 3) low priority, and 4) concentrate here, all in accordance ...

  18. The Restaurant as Hybrid: Lean Manufacturer and Service Provider

    Christopher Muller

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniquely positioned as both consumer service providers and tangible finished goods manufacturers, restaurants sell at retail an inventory that is fabricated from raw materials at the site of consumption. This article illustrates how restaurant managers have historically used the fundamentals of just-in-time and lean manufacturing production, often without understanding the power for efficiency and profit each brings. The goal is to encourage restaurateurs to seek a better understanding of where these principles interface with service management theory.

  19. Added sugars in kids' meals from chain restaurants

    Scourboutakos, Mary J.; Semnani-Azad, Zhila; L'Abbé, Mary R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the added sugars in kids' meals from Canadian chain restaurants in relation to the World Health Organization's proposed sugar recommendation (less than 5% of total daily calories should come from added sugars) and current recommendation (less than 10% of total daily calories should come from added sugars). Methods Total sugar levels were retrieved from the websites of 10 fast-food and 7 sit-down restaurants in 2010. The added sugar levels in 3178 kids' meals from Canadian...

  20. Public health inspectors in restaurants: what they do and why.

    Isaacs, S; Abernathy, T; Hart, B; Wilson, J

    1999-01-01

    This report identifies strategies used by public health inspectors in the Central West Region of Ontario during restaurant inspections, based on and comparing the perceptions of inspectors, their managers, and restaurant operators. Factors influencing the choice of strategies are reviewed, putting into perspective the importance of manager and policy expectations relative to other influences experienced by inspectors in the field. The need to set pragmatic and reality-tested criteria and objectives for a HACCP-based inspection protocol is discussed.

  1. Wireless Application for Ordering Management System in A Restaurant

    Purnama, James; Wibowo, Andrea Yunita

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this application is to build a PDA (Personal Data Assistance) utility forordering in a restaurant. The benefits of implementing PDA on ordering management system in a restaurantare to make the waiters or waitresses’ works more efficient and also to make the orders more organized. Thefinding from this project is that PDA as a smart client has several benefits compare to other ordering systemin a restaurant. The conclusion of this project is that implementing PDA with its...

  2. Technology Integration for Restaurants & Hospitality Industry in the Year 2025

    Jasonos, Michael; McCormick , Richard

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to serve the reader with an experience that evaluates the direction of how technology in restaurants and the overall hospitality industry will change throughout the coming decade and how it will look in the year 2025. The key concepts pertaining to the restaurant and hospitality industries growth through technological integration is based primarily on trends that have helped define today’s society. Everything moves faster and that is a direct reflection as t...

  3. Service design for Chinese restaurant management in Finland

    Yang, Yan

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of the thesis is focused on understanding the service and operation model of Chinese restaurants in Finland, identifying the gaps between the service suppliers’ and the customers’ view on service quality and trying to find out the best Chinese restaurant service design in Finland. The conceptual framework of the thesis is based on the service design, the scale to measure the service quality - SERVQUAL model, and the comparison of Finnish and Chinese food culture and...

  4. How atmosphere in a restaurant can influence positively wine consumption?

    Vangelisti, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Master's thesis in International hotel and tourism management : Culinary leadership and innovation In today's restaurant industry, the global atmosphere of a place (ambiance, decoration, food, music…) has more influence on consumption behavior than the food itself. That is why the aims of this paper is to know how to manage the restaurant atmosphere in order to increase wine sales. Based on a literature review, an atmospheric model has been defined, by referring to this model, the restaura...

  5. Restaurant manager and worker food safety certification and knowledge.

    Brown, Laura G; Le, Brenda; Wong, Melissa R; Reimann, David; Nicholas, David; Faw, Brenda; Davis, Ernestine; Selman, Carol A

    2014-11-01

    Over half of foodborne illness outbreaks occur in restaurants. To combat these outbreaks, many public health agencies require food safety certification for restaurant managers, and sometimes workers. Certification entails passing a food safety knowledge examination, which is typically preceded by food safety training. Current certification efforts are based on the assumption that certification leads to greater food safety knowledge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted this study to examine the relationship between food safety knowledge and certification. We also examined the relationships between food safety knowledge and restaurant, manager, and worker characteristics. We interviewed managers (N=387) and workers (N=365) about their characteristics and assessed their food safety knowledge. Analyses showed that certified managers and workers had greater food safety knowledge than noncertified managers and workers. Additionally, managers and workers whose primary language was English had greater food safety knowledge than those whose primary language was not English. Other factors associated with greater food safety knowledge included working in a chain restaurant, working in a larger restaurant, having more experience, and having more duties. These findings indicate that certification improves food safety knowledge, and that complex relationships exist among restaurant, manager, and worker characteristics and food safety knowledge.

  6. Restaurant Manager and Worker Food Safety Certification and Knowledge

    Brown, Laura G.; Le, Brenda; Wong, Melissa R.; Reimann, David; Nicholas, David; Faw, Brenda; Davis, Ernestine; Selman, Carol A.

    2017-01-01

    Over half of foodborne illness outbreaks occur in restaurants. To combat these outbreaks, many public health agencies require food safety certification for restaurant managers, and sometimes workers. Certification entails passing a food safety knowledge examination, which is typically preceded by food safety training. Current certification efforts are based on the assumption that certification leads to greater food safety knowledge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted this study to examine the relationship between food safety knowledge and certification. We also examined the relationships between food safety knowledge and restaurant, manager, and worker characteristics. We interviewed managers (N = 387) and workers (N = 365) about their characteristics and assessed their food safety knowledge. Analyses showed that certified managers and workers had greater food safety knowledge than noncertified managers and workers. Additionally, managers and workers whose primary language was English had greater food safety knowledge than those whose primary language was not English. Other factors associated with greater food safety knowledge included working in a chain restaurant, working in a larger restaurant, having more experience, and having more duties. These findings indicate that certification improves food safety knowledge, and that complex relationships exist among restaurant, manager, and worker characteristics and food safety knowledge. PMID:25361386

  7. Influence of season and type of restaurants on sashimi microbiota.

    Miguéis, S; Moura, A T; Saraiva, C; Esteves, A

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, an increase in the consumption of Japanese food in European countries has been verified, including in Portugal. These specialities made with raw fish, typical Japanese meals, have been prepared in typical and on non-typical restaurants, and represent a challenge to risk analysis on HACCP plans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the type of restaurant, season and type of fish used on sashimi microbiota. Sashimi samples (n = 114) were directly collected from 23 sushi restaurants and were classified as Winter and Summer Samples. They were also categorized according to the type of restaurant where they were obtained: as typical or non-typical. The samples were processed using international standards procedures. A middling seasonality influence was observed in microbiota using mesophilic aerobic bacteria, psychrotrophic microorganisms, Lactic acid bacteria, Pseudomonas spp., H 2 S positive bacteria, mould and Bacillus cereus counts parameters. During the Summer Season, samples classified as unacceptable or potentially Hazardous were observed. Non-typical restaurants had the most cases of Unacceptable/potentially hazardous samples 83.33%. These unacceptable results were obtained as a result of high values of pathogenic bacteria like Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus No significant differences were observed on microbiota counts from different fish species. The need to implement more accurate food safety systems was quite evident, especially in the warmer season, as well as in restaurants where other kinds of food, apart from Japanese meals, was prepared. © Crown copyright 2016.

  8. Mandating nutrient menu labeling in restaurants: potential public health benefits.

    Stran, Kimberly A; Turner, Lori W; Knol, Linda

    2013-03-01

    Many Americans have replaced home-cooked meals with fast food and restaurants meals. This contributes to increased incidences of overweight and obesity. Implementing policies that require restaurants to disclose nutrition information has the potential to improve nutrition knowledge and food behaviors. The purpose of this paper was to examine the potential health benefits of nutrient menu labeling in restaurants, the progress of this legislation and to provide results regarding the implementation of these policies. Data sources were obtained from a search of multiple databases including PubMed, Science Direct, Academic Search Premier, and Google Scholar. Study inclusion criteria were publication in the past ten years, obesity prevention, and utilization of nutrition labeling on menus in restaurants. The initial policies to provide consumers with nutrition information in restaurant settings began at the state levels in 2006. These laws demonstrated success, other states followed, and a national law was passed and is being implemented. Mandating nutrient menu disclosure has the potential to influence a large number of people; this legislation has the opportunity to impact Americans who dine at a fast food or chain restaurant. Given the growing obesity epidemic, continued research is necessary to gauge the effectiveness of this new law and its effects on the health status of the American people.

  9. Evaluation of Customer Satisfaction with Restaurant Services with ACSI Application

    Derli Luís Angnes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Brazil has more than a million bars and restaurants, which are responsible for about 40% of the tourism GDP of the country. Restaurants are business organizations in the gastronomy and service sectors that besides providing individual satisfaction and social life are of great importance for people’s health. The main objective of this study was to validate a model for the customer satisfaction related to the service attributes in restaurants. The American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI was used as a model and methodology reference, based on a survey with 270 clients. The methodology employed was characterized by a qualitative exploratory study, for the understanding of the relevant attributes of restaurant services, and, a descriptive evaluation, with a qualitative approach based on the ACSI model and methodology. The data analysis involved multivariate statistics with structured equation modeling. The main results from the exploratory step resulted in a list of 27 evaluation attributes for restaurant services and the analyses with a modeling of structural equations used to validate this model suggest that the relationship, the quality and the valued experienced by the customers influence their satisfaction and loyalty towards the evaluated restaurants.

  10. Durability of visitable concrete sewer gallery under the effect of domestic wastewater

    Salhi, Aimed; Kriker, Abdelouahed; Tioua, Tahar; Abimiloud, Youcef; Barluenga, Gonzalo

    2016-07-01

    The durability of concrete structures for the disposal of wastewater depends on their behavior when faced to different aggressions such as mechanics, chemical and biological, causing a deterioration often cementing matrix. The deterioration of recent evacuations wastewater infrastructure, made of reinforced concrete less than 15 years ago, has become an important concern. The aim of this study was to investigate the degradation and the factors responsible for the deterioration of the concrete visitable gallery of sewage from the town of Touggourt (south-east of Algeria). Thus, samples from different parts of the gallery were extracted and unaltered samples were selected as a reference. A degraded sample exposed to H2S gas and another sample of the gallery submerged into wastewater were analyzed to characterize the internal and external damage to the gallery as well as the chemical and mineralogical changes. These tests were complemented by a physical and mechanical characterization of the samples. The experimental results showed the strong anisotropy of both internal and external damage.

  11. Identifying modes of large whispering-gallery mode resonators from the spectrum and emission pattern

    Schunk, Gerhard; Fuerst, Josef U.; Förtsch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the mode numbers in whispering-gallery mode resonators (WGMRs) is important for tailoring them to experimental needs. Here we report on a novel experimental mode analysis technique based on the combination of frequency analysis and far-field imaging for high mode numbers of large WGMR...

  12. Integrated optics nano-opto-fluidic sensor based on whispering gallery modes for picoliter volume refractometry

    Gilardi, G.; Beccherelli, R.

    2013-01-01

    We propose and numerically investigate an integrated optics refractometric nano-opto-fluidic sensor based on whispering gallery modes in sapphire microspheres. A measurand fluid is injected in a micromachined reservoir defined in between the microsphere and an optical waveguide. The wavelength shift

  13. The Spiral Gallery: Non-Market Creativity and Belonging in an Australian Country Town

    Waitt, Gordon; Gibson, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks to explore creative practice in an Australian country town, and in so doing, to unsettle market-orientated interpretations of creativity that privilege the urban. Instead of focusing on creative practice as a means to develop industries, we focus on how creativity is a means to establish a cooperative gallery space that helps to…

  14. Retention of external and internal markers by southern pine beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) during gallery

    Douglas J. Rhodes; Jane Leslie Hayes; Chris Steiner

    1998-01-01

    If retained, markers used in mark-release-recapture studies of bark beetle dispersal could provide valuable tools in the determination of post-dispersal fate. Retention of the internal marker rubidium (Rb) and of the external marker fluorescent powder during egg gallery construction, oviposition, and feeding were quantified at intervals from 0 to 96 hours by allowing...

  15. Fra Bartolomeo della Porta detto Fra Bartolomeo, Adorazione del Bambino, National Gallery, London

    Fischer, Chris

    2014-01-01

    En artikel om et maleri af Fra Bartolomeo i National Gallery i London udlånt til en udstilling i Museo Tosio Martinengo I Brescia i forbindelse med opdagelsen af et fuldstændigt overensstemmende maleri i dette museums magasiner. Hypotesen var at Bresciabilledet var et værkstedsarbejde lavet på ba...

  16. Analyzing Factors to Improve Service Quality of Local Specialties Restaurants: A Comparison with Fast Food Restaurants in Southern Vietnam

    Lai Wang Wang; Thanh Tuyen Tran

    2014-01-01

    The top fast food restaurant brands like KFC and MacDonald?s have gone global and demonstrated their successful business strategies through providing quick-service and convenience for customers. Meanwhile, local specialty food has recently emerged as a phenomenon attracting customers? attention on traditional value of ethnic food culture. The purpose of this study is to conduct a regional survey in Vietnamese restaurant companies to identify some key factors that make customers interested in ...

  17. ‘Aimless and Absurd Wanderings’? Children at the Museum of Old and New Art (Mona

    Adrian Franklin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis article reports on the experience of children at the Museum of New and Old Art (Mona in Hobart, Tasmania.  Referred to by its innovative owner as a ‘subversive adult Disneyland’, Mona went further than most new contemporary art galleries in designing a radically new experience of art.  It captured the imagination of people new to art in its own locality as well as a global art public.  Favoured by leading international contemporary artists for the freedom it gave art unmediated by art history, Mona also seemingly captured the imagination of children. Through an ethnographic approach in which five young children’s visits were documented in great detail, the article considers these in the light of children’s experiences of previous exhibitionary platforms and the relevance of Mona’s museological interventions for building their dispositions to art and broadening art publics.

  18. Predictors of total calories purchased at fast-food restaurants: restaurant characteristics, calorie awareness, and use of calorie information.

    Brissette, Ian; Lowenfels, Ann; Noble, Corina; Spicer, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    To examine purchase patterns at fast-food restaurants and their relation to restaurant characteristics, customer characteristics, and use of calorie information. Cross-sectional survey. Fast-food restaurants in New York State. Adult fast-food restaurant customers (n = 1,094). Restaurant characteristics (fast-food chain type, presence of calorie labels, and poverty of location), participant characteristics (demographics, calorie knowledge, awareness, and use), and customer purchasing patterns (ordering low-calorie or no beverage, small or no fries, or restaurant and customer characteristics, fast-food chain customer age, sex, calorie use, and calorie awareness were independently associated with total calories purchased (all P < .05; model R2 = .19). When 3 purchasing patterns were added to the model, calorie use (P = .005), but not calorie awareness, remained associated with total calories purchased. The 3 purchase patterns collectively accounted for the majority of variance in calorie totals (Δ model R2 = .40). Promoting use of calorie information, purchase strategies, and calorie awareness represents complementary ways to support lower-calorie choices at fast-food chains. Copyright © 2013 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Service quality provision in upmarket restaurants: a survey of diners in three restaurants in a Gauteng casino complex

    A Nicolaides

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have established that service quality has a direct impact on a restaurant’s profitability. This study made an empirical assessment of customers’ perceptions and expectations of service to measure service quality in three restaurants in a casino complex in Gauteng Province in South Africa. The research helped to assess the levels of customer satisfaction with service provision in three restaurants and identified factors that contribute to customer satisfaction and dissatisfaction; It also determined the current status of service and compared and ranked three restaurants service provision. Another importance was the aiding in the establishment of customer service standards for the restaurants concerned. The tipping of waitrons was also used as an indicator of customer satisfaction with service provision in general. A three-column SERVQUAL instrument was used together with part of the Fishbein model. The study was able to firstly determine and analyze service gaps that exist in the service delivery procedure to measure service quality as well as general customer satisfaction and secondly, to evaluate customers’ attitudes towards the service measure attributes of similar restaurants in the same location. The findings offer implications to improve service quality in restaurant business in general.

  20. On the Making of One's Art

    Ruchika Wason Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ruchika Wason Singh holds degrees in B.F.A., Painting (1997 and M.F.A., Painting, (1999 from College of Art, New Delhi, India. In 2008 she received a degree for Doctoral Research on the sociological frameworks in Indian Contemporary Art, as a U.G.C. Junior Research Fellow at the University of Delhi. Ruchika has had two Solo Exhibitions Yesterday Once More, Triveni Gallery (2002 and Transit Spaces, Lalit Kala Akademi (2007 New Delhi. She has participated in international platforms such as Shanti-Sadhana–Sunyata-Contemporary Indian Art, Wilhelm Lehmbruck Museum, Germany (2001-02; Theertha International Painters' Residency, Sri Lanka (2007; Third Beijing International Art Biennale, China (2008; 11th Asia Arts Festival, Ordos, China (2009 and Experiences: Asian Women in Global Culture, Book-Project of the IWAB, Korea (2011. She has had slide presentations at Tsinghua University, China (2009 and Anadolu Universities, Turkey (2014 and is the recipient of the Travel Grant from Arts Network Asia (2008. Ruchika is currently Assoc. Professor (Contractual, BFA Dept. of Painting, College of Art, New Delhi.

  1. Smoke-free restaurants in Shanghai: should it be mandatory and is it acceptable?

    Zheng, Pinpin; Fu, Hua; Li, Guangyao

    2009-02-01

    This study aims to describe secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure in restaurants in Shanghai and to explore the impact on the health of restaurant workers. Attitude to smoke-free restaurants among restaurant workers and customers was also determined in this study. A random sample of 242 workers, 284 customers, and 46 restaurant owners participated in face-to-face questionnaire interviews. A total of 219 (90.7%) restaurant workers surveyed were found to be exposed to SHS during working hours with 24.2+/-18.6h of exposure on average per week. Exposure time each week was significantly associated with the symptoms of dyspnea and irritated eyes. Among the customers surveyed 73.9% supported the concept of a 100% smoke-free law in restaurants and 49.6% expressed that they would be more likely to eat in restaurants if smoking was banned in restaurants. And 58.6% of the restaurant owners surveyed regarded smoke-free laws banning smoking in restaurant as feasible and 56.5% estimated such bans would decrease the profit. Both restaurant workers and customers are substantially exposed to SHS. Although some restaurant owners are concerned about a decrease in profits, the fear of losing business is not supported by the response among customers. Therefore, introducing a law-banning smoking in restaurants appears to be feasible and acceptable in Shanghai.

  2. Obstacles to nutrition labeling in restaurants.

    Almanza, B A; Nelson, D; Chai, S

    1997-02-01

    This study determined the major obstacles that foodservices face regarding nutrition labeling. Survey questionnaire was conducted in May 1994. In addition to demographic questions, the directors were asked questions addressing willingness, current practices, and perceived obstacles related to nutrition labeling. Sixty-eight research and development directors of the largest foodservice corporations as shown in Restaurants & Institutions magazine's list of the top 400 largest foodservices (July 1993). P tests were used to determine significance within a group for the number of foodservices that were currently using nutrition labeling, perceived impact of nutrition labeling on sales, and perceived responsibility to add nutrition labels. Regression analysis was used to determine the importance of factors on willingness to label. Response rate was 45.3%. Most companies were neutral about their willingness to use nutrition labeling. Two thirds of the respondents were not currently using nutrition labels. Only one third thought that it was the foodservice's responsibility to provide such information. Several companies perceived that nutrition labeling would have a potentially negative effect on annual sales volume. Major obstacles were identified as menu or personnel related, rather than cost related. Menu-related obstacles included too many menu variations, limited space on the menu for labeling, and loss of flexibility in changing the menu. Personnel-related obstacles included difficulty in training employees to implement nutrition labeling, and not enough time for foodservice personnel to implement nutrition labeling. Numerous opportunities will be created for dietetics professionals in helping foodservices overcome these menu- or personnel-related obstacles.

  3. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: ASCENSION AND WHITSUNTIDE WEEKENDS

    2003-01-01

    Details of the arrangements to ensure the provision of a restaurant service during the Ascension and Whitsuntide weekends are given below. On all the days indicated, hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and 18h00 to 19h30. DATERESTAURANT No.Opening times ASCENSION Thursday, May 29 1 2 08h00 - 21h00 3 Friday, May 30 1 2 07h00 - 21h00 3 07h00 - 18h00 Saturday, May 31 1 2 09h00 - 20h00 3 Sunday, June 1st 1 2 09h00 - 20h00 3 WHITSUNTIDE Saturday, June 7 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 3 Sunday, June 8 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 3 Monday, June 9 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 3 SATELLITE CAFETERIAS (Bldgs. 30, 40, 54) will open at the usual hours on Friday 30 May only. The KIOSK will open from 8:00 to 17:00 hrs on Friday 30 May.

  4. Comparing nutrition environments in bodegas and fast-food restaurants.

    Neckerman, Kathryn M; Lovasi, Laszlo; Yousefzadeh, Paulette; Sheehan, Daniel; Milinkovic, Karla; Baecker, Aileen; Bader, Michael D M; Weiss, Christopher; Lovasi, Gina S; Rundle, Andrew

    2014-04-01

    Many small grocery stores or "bodegas" sell prepared or ready-to-eat items, filling a niche in the food environment similar to fast-food restaurants. However, little comparative information is available about the nutrition environments of bodegas and fast-food outlets. This study compared the nutrition environments of bodegas and national chain fast-food restaurants using a common audit instrument, the Nutrition Environment Measures Study in Restaurants (NEMS-R) protocol. The analytic sample included 109 bodegas and 107 fast-food restaurants located in New York City neighborhoods in the upper third and lower third of the census tract poverty rate distribution. Inter-rater reliability was evaluated in 102 food outlets, including 31 from the analytic sample and 71 from a supplementary convenience sample. The analysis compared scores on individual NEMS-R items, a total summary score, and subscores indicating healthy food availability, nutrition information, promotions of healthy or unhealthy eating, and price incentives for healthy eating, using t tests and χ(2) statistics to evaluate differences by outlet type and neighborhood poverty. Fast-food restaurants were more likely to provide nutrition information, and bodegas scored higher on healthy food availability, promotions, and pricing. Bodegas and fast-food restaurants had similar NEMS-R total scores (bodegas 13.09, fast food 14.31; P=0.22). NEMS-R total scores were higher (indicating healthier environments) in low- than high-poverty neighborhoods among both bodegas (14.79 vs 11.54; P=0.01) and fast-food restaurants (16.27 vs 11.60; Pnutrition environments in the two types of food outlets. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Food allergy knowledge and attitude of restaurant personnel in Turkey.

    Sogut, Ayhan; Kavut, Ayşe Baççıoğlu; Kartal, İbrahim; Beyhun, Ercument Nazim; Çayır, Atilla; Mutlu, Mehmet; Özkan, Behzat

    2015-02-01

    The incidence of food-induced allergic reactions is gradually increasing. Most of these allergic reactions occur in restaurants. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the awareness of restaurant personnel about food allergy. The training, knowledge levels on food allergy, and comfort level in providing safe food of 351 restaurant personnel in Erzurum Province, Turkey, were assessed through a face-to-face survey. Among the participants, 81.5% were male (mean age 28.5 ± 8.5 years). Among them, 17.1% were chefs, 11.1% managers, 5.7% owners, and 66.1% waiters. Food allergy training was reported by 17.1% of the participants. The rates of restaurant personnel who gave the correct answers to the 4 questionnaire items, "Customers with food allergies can safely consume a small amount of that food/Food allergic reaction can cause death/If a customer is having an allergic reaction, it is appropriate to immediately serve them water to 'dilute' the allergen/Removing an allergen from a finished meal (eg, taking off nuts) may be all that is necessary to provide a safe meal for an allergic customer," which measure food allergy knowledge levels, were 46.4%, 65.7%, 55.0%, and 65.7%, respectively. According to our study, there are gaps in the food allergy knowledge of restaurant personnel. Because preparing and serving safe meals to patients with food allergy in restaurants is important, the training of restaurant personnel in food allergy is necessary. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  6. Enteric pathogen sampling of tourist restaurants in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Teague, Nathan S; Srijan, Apichai; Wongstitwilairoong, Boonchai; Poramathikul, Kamonporn; Champathai, Thanaporn; Ruksasiri, Supaporn; Pavlin, Julie; Mason, Carl J

    2010-01-01

    Travelers' diarrhea (TD) is the most prevalent disorder affecting travelers to developing countries. Thailand is considered "moderately risky" for TD acquisition, but the risk by city visited or behavior of the visitor has yet to be definitely defined. Restaurant eating is consistently associated with the acquisition of diarrhea while traveling, and pathogen-free meals serve as a marker of public health success. This study seeks to ascertain a traveler's risk of exposure to certain bacterial gastric pathogens while eating at Bangkok restaurants recommended in popular tourist guide books. A cross-sectional tourist restaurant survey was conducted. Thirty-five restaurants recommended in the two top selling Bangkok guidebooks on Amazon.com were sampled for bacterial pathogens known to cause diarrhea in Thailand, namely Salmonella, Campylobacter, and Arcobacter (a Campylobacter-like organism). A total of 70 samples from two meals at each restaurant were obtained. Suspected bacterial pathogens were isolated by differential culture and tested for antibiotic resistance. Salmonella group E was isolated from one meal (2%), and Arcobacter butzleri from nine meals (13%). Campylobacter spp. were not found. The large majority of A butzleri isolates were resistant to azithromycin but susceptible to ciprofloxacin and an aminoglycoside. A traveler's risk of exposure to established bacterial pathogens, Salmonella and Campylobacter, by eating in recommended restaurants is small. Arcobacter butzleri exposure risk is 13% per meal eaten, and rises to 75% when 10 meals are eaten. All restaurants, regardless of price, appear to be equally "risky." Current evidence points to Arcobacter being pathogenic in humans; however, further research is needed to conclusively define pathogenicity. Routine prophylaxis for diarrhea is not recommended; however, travelers should be aware of the risk and come prepared with adequate and appropriate self-treatment medications.

  7. Factors associated with worker slipping in limited-service restaurants.

    Courtney, Theodore K; Verma, Santosh K; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Chang, Wen-Ruey; Li, Kai Way; Filiaggi, Alfred J

    2010-02-01

    Slips, trips and falls (STF) are responsible for a substantial injury burden in the global workplace. Restaurant environments are challenged by STF. This study assessed individual and work environment factors related to slipping in US limited-service restaurant workers. Workers in 10 limited-service restaurants in Massachusetts were recruited to participate. Workers' occupational slip and/or fall history within the past 4 weeks was collected by multilingual written questionnaires. Age, gender, job tenure, work hours per week and work shift were also collected. Shoe type, condition and gross shoe contamination were visually assessed. Floor friction was measured and each restaurant's overall mean coefficient of friction (COF) was calculated. The logistic generalised estimating equations model was used to compute adjusted odds ratios (OR). Of 125 workers, 42 reported one or more slips in the past 4 weeks with two reporting a resultant fall. Results from multivariable regression showed that higher restaurant mean COF was significantly associated with a decreased risk of self-reported slipping (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.82). From the highest to the lowest COF restaurant, the odds of a positive slip history increased by a factor of more than seven. Younger age, male gender, lower weekly work hours and the presence of gross contamination on worker's shoe sole were also associated with increased odds of slip history. Published findings of an association between friction and slipping and falling in actual work environments are rare. The findings suggest that effective intervention strategies to reduce the risk of slips and falls in restaurant workers could include increasing COF and improving housekeeping practices.

  8. Organisational Art

    Ferro-Thomsen, Martin

    creation of a practical utopia (?heterotopia?) in the organisational context. The case study makes use of both art- and organisational theory. The thesis concludes with an outline of a framework for OA that is derived from contemporary theory of mainly Relational Aesthetics (Bourriaud), Conceptual Art......University of Copenhagen / Learning Lab Denmark. 2005 Kort beskrivelse: Organisational Art is a tentative title for an art form that works together with organisations to produce art. This is most often done together with non-artist members of the organisation and on-site in their social context. OA...... is characterised as socially engaged, conceptual, discursive, site-specific and contextual. Abstract: This investigation is about Organisational Art (OA), which is a tentative title for an art form that works together with organisations (companies, institutions, communities, governments and NGOs) to produce art...

  9. Art Forms.

    Hoekstra, Joel

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Fine Arts Interdisciplinary Resource (FAIR) Arts Middle School in Crystal, Minnesota, an award-winning school building that the architects hope will create a more conducive learning environment. Includes photographs and floor plans. (EV)

  10. Rock Art

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  11. THE ANALYSIS OF THE ART MARKET FROM REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA WITH INNOVATIVE MARKETING ELEMENTS (based on the author's interview

    Olga PERCINSCHI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The actuality of this research consists in the less developed of art market in the Republic of Moldova and lack of researches in this domain. The goal of the article is to analyze the art market of the Republic of Moldova with innovative marketing elements. The method of this article is based on interviews conducted with painters, owners of art galleries, art salons were highlighted barriers that hinder the development of the art market in Moldova. The main results are identified ways to overcome and directions for the development of effective marketing that will enhance the country's competitiveness as a whole.

  12. Conveying Environmental Issues with and through Art

    Abeles, K. V.

    2016-12-01

    Art has the ability to convey serious environmental issues, inspiring people to respond personally Kim Abeles is an artist who crosses disciplines and media to explore and map urban and global environments. She has exhibited with a unique range of collaborators including smog control agencies, science and natural history museums, and educational and healthcare professionals. Her work has been exhibited across the world. Since 1985, her art projects have explored topics including air and water pollution, refuse and recycling, and consumption. This presentation will discuss three unconventional art projects from inspiration to impact including results. Most can be replicated in any educational or community setting to increase understanding of environmental issues. Abeles's Smog Collector series makes images from polluted air, helping viewers to see the air they breathe in an accessible, engaging, and visceral way. In addition to exhibitions of this work in art museums and galleries, it has been displayed in vehicle emissions testing booths to increase awareness and behavior change, and the process has been taught as curriculum in schools. Abeles sees consumption as a primary problem that leads to environmental decay. Her Paper Person was made from the California Science Center's paper trash that was generated on a single day by their visitors (Earth Day 2009). The 40' x 48' sculpture is in the permanent collection of the CSC, and the text accompanying the artwork prompts visitors to consider bringing their lunches next time instead of buying fast food. Similarly, Paper Person (Harvard Westlake School) is a figurative sculpture made of one week of students' paper trash. Exhibited in the school's gallery, students were able to identify their own scraps, and to see how their consumption and trash adds up. When the artwork was exhibited, the school decided to change the way they handled their lunch preparation, bottled water, and trash. gallery-of-solutions was a recent

  13. Absolute and relative densities of fast-food versus other restaurants in relation to weight status: Does restaurant mix matter?

    Polsky, Jane Y; Moineddin, Rahim; Dunn, James R; Glazier, Richard H; Booth, Gillian L

    2016-01-01

    Given the continuing epidemic of obesity, policymakers are increasingly looking for levers within the local retail food environment as a means of promoting healthy weights. To examine the independent and joint associations of absolute and relative densities of restaurants near home with weight status in a large, urban, population-based sample of adults. We studied 10,199 adults living in one of four cities in southern Ontario, Canada, who participated in the Canadian Community Health Survey (cycles 2005, 2007/08, 2009/10). Multivariate models assessed the association of weight status (obesity and body mass index) with absolute densities (numbers) of fast-food, full-service and other restaurants, and the relative density (proportion) of fast-food restaurants (FFR) relative to all restaurants within ~10-minute walk of residential areas. Higher numbers of restaurants of any type were inversely related to excess weight, even in models adjusting for a range of individual covariates and area deprivation. However, these associations were no longer significant after accounting for higher walkability of areas with high volumes of restaurants. In contrast, there was a direct relationship between the proportion of FFR relative to all restaurants and excess weight, particularly in areas with high volumes of FFR (e.g., odds ratio for obesity=2.55 in areas with 5+ FFR, 95% confidence interval: 1.55-4.17, across the interquartile range). Policies aiming to promote healthy weights that target the volume of certain retail food outlets in residential settings may be more effective if they also consider the relative share of outlets serving more and less healthful foods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. DETERMINANTS OF CONSUMER PREFERENCES IN ADDIS ABABA RESTAURANTS

    Dejene Mamo BEKANA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was proposed to explore the determinants of consumer preferences in Addis Ababa restaurants. Using consumer behavior literatures and theories it was hypothesized that disposable income, price, quality, hygiene practices, friendliness of restaurant staff, safety of food and range or menu variety are important determinants of consumer choice for restaurants. Primary data were generated from 265 customers of 55 restaurants randomly selected with the use of questionnaire of which 258 of the questionnaire ended usable. The non parametric hypothesis testing statistical tool, chi –square tests, and measures of variation were used for statistical analysis purposes. The anticipation of the researcher was that the hypothesis testing results would be significant in parallel with the hypothesized facts. The findings of the research suggest that income has insignificant impact up on quality price trade of among consumers of different income categories. Other hypothesis associated with price, quality, friendliness of restaurant staff, quick table service and range or menu varieties are found to be statistically significant. Over all, the research results suggest that restaurateurs should design marketing strategy that integrates the attributes used in this study to satisfy the needs and wants of their customers and differentiation of their products and services on the basis of the variables scored as they are significant considerations by consumers.

  15. Restaurant Food Allergy Practices - Six Selected Sites, United States, 2014.

    Radke, Taylor J; Brown, Laura G; Faw, Brenda; Hedeen, Nicole; Matis, Bailey; Perez, Priscela; Viveiros, Brendalee; Ripley, Danny

    2017-04-21

    Food allergies affect an estimated 15 million persons in the United States (1), and are responsible for approximately 30,000 emergency department visits and 150-200 deaths each year (2). Nearly half of reported fatal food allergy reactions over a 13-year period were caused by food from a restaurant or other food service establishment (3). To ascertain the prevalence of food allergy training, training topics, and practices related to food allergies, CDC's Environmental Health Specialists Network (EHS-Net), a collaborative forum of federal agencies and state and local health departments with six sites, interviewed personnel at 278 restaurants. Fewer than half of the 277 restaurant managers (44.4%), 211 food workers (40.8%), and 156 servers (33.3%) interviewed reported receiving food allergy training. Among those who reported receiving training, topics commonly included the major food allergens and what to do if a customer has a food allergy. Although most restaurants had ingredient lists for at least some menu items, few had separate equipment or areas designated for the preparation of allergen-free food. Restaurants can reduce the risk for allergic reactions among patrons by providing food allergy training for personnel and ingredient lists for all menu items and by dedicating equipment and areas specifically for preparing allergen-free food.

  16. Methodological Grounds of Managing Innovation Development of Restaurants

    Naidiuk V. S.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article lies in identification and further development of methodological grounds of managing the innovation development of restaurants. Based on the data of the critical analysis of existing scientific views on interpretation of the essence of the “managing innovation development of an enterprise” notion, the article conducts clarification of this definition. In the result of the study the article builds up a cause-effect diagram of solution of the problem of ensuring efficient management of the innovation development of a restaurant. The article develops a conceptual scheme of development and realisation of the strategy of innovation development in a restaurant. It experimentally confirms the hypothesis of availability of a very strong density of the feedback between resistance to innovation changes and a variable share of qualified personnel that is capable of permanent development (learning and generation of new ideas, in restaurants and builds a model of dependency between them. The prospects of further studies in this direction could become scientific studies directed at development of methodical approaches to identification of the level of innovation potential and assessment of efficiency of managing innovation development of different (by type, class, size, etc. restaurants. The obtained data could also be used for development of a new or improvement of the existing tools of strategic management of innovation development at the micro-level.

  17. Added sugars in kids' meals from chain restaurants.

    Scourboutakos, Mary J; Semnani-Azad, Zhila; L'Abbé, Mary R

    2016-06-01

    To analyze the added sugars in kids' meals from Canadian chain restaurants in relation to the World Health Organization's proposed sugar recommendation (less than 5% of total daily calories should come from added sugars) and current recommendation (less than 10% of total daily calories should come from added sugars). Total sugar levels were retrieved from the websites of 10 fast-food and 7 sit-down restaurants in 2010. The added sugar levels in 3178 kids' meals from Canadian chain restaurants were calculated in 2014 (in Toronto, Canada) by subtracting all naturally occurring sugars from the total sugar level. The average amount of added sugars in restaurant kids' meals (25 ± 0.36 g) exceeded the WHO's proposed daily recommendation for sugar intake. There was a wide range of added sugar levels in kids' meals ranging from 0 g to 114 g. 50% of meals exceeded the WHO's proposed daily sugar recommendation, and 19% exceeded the WHO's current daily sugar recommendation. There is a wide range of sugar levels in kids' meals from restaurants, and many contain more than a day's worth of sugar.

  18. Restaurant menu labeling use among adults--17 states, 2012.

    Lee-Kwan, Seung Hee; Pan, Liping; Maynard, Leah; Kumar, Gayathri; Park, Sohyun

    2014-07-11

    Many persons underestimate the calories in restaurant foods. Increased attention has been given to menu labeling (ML) as a way to provide consumers with point-of-purchase information that can help them reduce calorie intake and make healthier dietary choices. In 2010, a federal law was passed requiring restaurants with 20 or more establishments to display calorie information on menus and menu boards.* The regulations to implement this federal law have not been finalized, but some states and local jurisdictions have implemented their own ML policies, and many restaurants have already begun providing ML. To assess fast food and chain restaurant ML use by state and by demographic subgroup, CDC examined self-reported ML use by adults in 17 states that used the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Menu Labeling optional module in the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey. Based on approximately 97% of adult BRFSS respondents who noticed ML information at restaurants, the estimated overall proportion of ML users in the 17 states was 57.3% (range = 48.7% in Montana to 61.3% in New York). The prevalence of ML use was higher among women than men for all states; the patterns varied by age group and race/ethnicity across states. States and public health professionals can use these findings to track the use of ML and to develop targeted interventions to increase awareness and use of ML among nonusers.

  19. The end of an era for the CERN Restaurant

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2015-01-01

    She’s known ten Directors-General, six managers and dozens of colleagues. Her small frame and silver hair, which seem to defy time, are well-known to the thousands of people who use the restaurant. Martine Schmitt is leaving CERN’s Restaurant 1 on 30 January, after an incredible 45 years of service.   “I've been here my whole life," she sighs. "I've seen generation after generation of CERN people and have watched their children grow up." Martine started working at the CERN Restaurant in October 1969, when she was 18 years old. At the time, the restaurant was run by the Coop and Martine was assigned to the kiosk, where she worked until 1990. For the past 25 years, though, she has been a cashier in the restaurant, a role that she has always performed impeccably, greeting her clients with unfailing politeness. “She's reserved and very sensitive, and always wants to hear our news,” her colleagues say. ...

  20. Hospitalizations among employees in the Danish hotel and restaurant industry.

    Hannerz, Harald; Tüchsen, Finn; Kristensen, Tage S

    2002-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to provide a broad picture of the morbidity among employees in the Danish hotel and restaurant industry. Cohorts of all 20-59-year-old employees in the Danish hotel and restaurant industry in the years 1981, 1986, 1991 and 1994 were formed to calculate age-standardized hospitalization ratios (SHR) and time trends (1981-1997) for many different diagnoses. Both for women and men, significantly higher SHRs were found for infectious and parasitic diseases, neoplasms, diseases in the nervous system and sense organs, diseases of the circulatory system, diseases of the respiratory system, diseases of the digestive system and diseases of the musculoskeletal system among employees in hotels and restaurants than in the digestive system and diseases of the musculoskeletal system among employees in hotels and restaurants than in the working population at large. Furthermore, among women a significantly elevated risk was found for injuries in the lower extremities, injuries in the upper extremities and head injuries, and among men a high risk was found for head injuries and a low risk for ruptures in ligaments and muscles. The trend assessments did not detect any significant changes in SHRs over time. Employment in the Danish hotel and restaurant industry is associated with an elevated hospitalization risk due to many diseases, which may be related to occupation and lifestyle. In line with the official policy of reducing inequality in health, focus should be placed on the health problems in this group.

  1. RESTAURANT and CAFETERIA SERVICES: ARRANGEMENTS for MAY 1st, 2003

    2003-01-01

    1. Restaurants As Thursday, May 1st, is an official CERN holiday, restaurants no. 2 (DSR : Bldg. 504 - Meyrin) and no. 3 (Avenance : Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed as from Wednesday, April 30 at 18h00. They will reopen on Friday, May 2nd at 6h30 (rest. no. 2) and at 7h00 (rest. no. 3). On May 1st, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 1 (COOP : Bldg. 501 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. 2. Newspaper stand The newspaper kiosque run by restaurant no. 1 in building 501 will be closed. 3. Decentralised services No decentralised services (satellite cafétérias etc.) will operate on May 1st, but will resume their normal activites on Friday, May 2nd, except for those dependent on restaurant no. 3 (Prévessin site) which will not reopen until Monday, May 5, 2003.

  2. A risk-based restaurant inspection system in Los Angeles County.

    Buchholz, U; Run, G; Kool, J L; Fielding, J; Mascola, L

    2002-02-01

    The majority of local health departments perform routine restaurant inspections. In Los Angeles County (LAC), California, approximately $10 million/year is spent on restaurant inspections. However, data are limited as to whether or not certain characteristics of restaurants make them more likely to be associated with foodborne incident reports. We used data from the LAC Environmental Health Management Information System (EHMIS), which records the results of all routine restaurant inspections as well as data regarding all consumer-generated foodborne incidents that led to a special restaurant inspection by a sanitarian (investigated foodborne incidents [IFBIs]). We analyzed a cohort of 10,267 restaurants inspected from 1 July 1997 to 15 November 1997. We defined a "case restaurant" as any restaurant with a routine inspection from 1 July 1997 to 15 November 1997 and a subsequent IFBI from 1 July 1997 to 30 June 1998. Noncase restaurants did not have an IFBI from I July 1997 to 30 June 1998. We looked for specific characteristics of restaurants that might be associated with the restaurant subsequently having an IFBI, including the size of restaurant (assessed by number of seats), any previous IFBIs, the overall inspection score, and a set of 38 violation codes. We identified 158 case restaurants and 10,109 noncase restaurants. In univariate analysis, middle-sized restaurants (61 to 150 seats; n = 1,681) were 2.8 times (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.0 to 4.0) and large restaurants (>150 seats; n = 621) were 4.6 times (95% CI = 3.0 to 7.0) more likely than small restaurants (restaurants. In addition, the likelihood of a restaurant becoming a case restaurant increased as the number of IFBIs in the prior year increased (chi2 for linear trend, P value = 0.0005). Other factors significantly associated with the occurrence of an IFBI included a lower overall inspection score, the incorrect storage of food, the reuse of food, the lack of employee hand washing, the lack of

  3. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  4. An analysis of online reviews of upscale Iberian restaurants

    L. Pacheco

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM has gained importance with the emergence of new online tools and the hospitality sector is at the core of this phenomenon. In this study, we use a data set of client reviews for Michelin starred restaurants located in Portugal and Spain to analyze the reviews in terms of overall satisfaction and four specific attributes. By employing statistical tests and regression analysis we find that the “food” and “service” attributes show a greater correlation with overall satisfaction than other criteria, and those attributes are common across restaurant segments and countries. These results have implications for the restaurant industry, highlighting the most important determinants of overall satisfaction. Some areas would benefit from small improvements and investments, which could make a difference in terms of rating and might bring a competitive advantage.

  5. Restaurants and hotels expenditure in Polish households of the elderly

    Piekut Marlena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The age of household members is an important factor for expenditures. The aim of the study is to investigate the level of expenditure on restaurants and hotels incurred in Polish households of the elderly in 2004-2013 and to identify the factors affecting such expenditures. The source of information used in the study was the household budget survey of the Central Statistical Office of Poland. The main methods used in this study were variance analysis and regression analysis. Restaurants and hotels expenditure increases every year together with their share in total household expenditure. The most important factors affecting the restaurants and hotels spending in Polish households of the elderly are: income per capita and the level of education of the head of the family. The study on consumption determinants at different groups leads to better understanding of consumer behavior circumstances and thereby ensuring a good quality of life for the people of the elderly.

  6. Restaurant closure for the Jeûne genevois

    2007-01-01

    Restaurant 1 will be closed on Thursday 6th September (Jeûne Genevois) as well as Friday 7th, Saturday 8th and Sunday 9th September for technical reasons. During this time, Restaurant 2 will be open at the following times: –\tThursday 6th September: 9:00 – 20:00 –\tFriday 7th September: 8:00 – 20:00 –\tSaturday 8th and Sunday 9th September: 9:00–20:00 Hot meals will be served on all 4 days from 12:00 to 14:00 and from 18:00 to 19:30. For more information please see http://cern.ch/restaurant2 Thank you for your understanding.

  7. Identifying modes of large whispering-gallery mode resonators from the spectrum and emission pattern.

    Schunk, Gerhard; Fürst, Josef U; Förtsch, Michael; Strekalov, Dmitry V; Vogl, Ulrich; Sedlmeir, Florian; Schwefel, Harald G L; Leuchs, Gerd; Marquardt, Christoph

    2014-12-15

    Identifying the mode numbers in whispering-gallery mode resonators (WGMRs) is important for tailoring them to experimental needs. Here we report on a novel experimental mode analysis technique based on the combination of frequency analysis and far-field imaging for high mode numbers of large WGMRs. The radial mode numbers q and the angular mode numbers p = ℓ-m are identified and labeled via far-field imaging. The polar mode numbers ℓ are determined unambiguously by fitting the frequency differences between individual whispering gallery modes (WGMs). This allows for the accurate determination of the geometry and the refractive index at different temperatures of the WGMR. For future applications in classical and quantum optics, this mode analysis enables one to control the narrow-band phase-matching conditions in nonlinear processes such as second-harmonic generation or parametric down-conversion.

  8. Preparation of the PRACLAY demonstration and confirmation experiments: construction of the PRACLAY gallery

    Bastiaens, W.

    2009-01-01

    The PRACLAY demonstration and confirmation experiments contribute to the Belgian research, development and demonstration programme to assess the safety and feasibility of geological disposal of radioactive waste in Boom Clay. Within this programme, the large scale PRACLAY heater experiment aims to verify that Boom Clay is suitable to host heat emitting radioactive waste. A 35 m long section of an experimental gallery in the underground research facility HADES (at 225 m depth) will be heated up to 95 degrees Celsius during ten years. The heater experiment focuses on the response of the host rock to the thermal load. The figure below shows the experimental lay-out. In 2007, an important milestone was reached with the realisation of the PRACLAY gallery (45 m long, external diameter 2.5 m)

  9. ‘Historiography and the retracing of Latin American art history’: The Academy of San Carlos and Mexican Art History by Ray Hernández-Durán, Politics, History, and Art in Nineteenth-Century Mexico, London and New York: Routledge, 2017

    Claudia Mattos Avolese

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Academy of San Carlos and Mexican Art History presents an account of the cultural and political circumstances that led to the installation of the first gallery of colonial art at the Academy of San Carlos in mid-nineteenth century Mexico City, and to the associated publication of the first art historical account of colonial Mexico. The author proposes that these two endeavors relate closely to the ambitions of the Mexican conservative elite to create a Mexican corporate identity based on the colonial past. Ray Hernández-Durán also argues that the gallery and the associated book can be seen as the starting point for the construction of the field of Latin American art history as we know it today.

  10. Accuracy of Stated Energy Contents of Restaurant Foods

    Urban, Lorien E.; McCrory, Megan A.; Dallal, Gerard E.; Das, Sai Krupa; Saltzman, Edward; Weber, Judith L.; Roberts, Susan B.

    2015-01-01

    Context National recommendations for the prevention and treatment of obesity emphasize reducing energy intake. Foods purchased in restaurants provide approximately 35% of the daily energy intake in US individuals but the accuracy of the energy contents listed for these foods is unknown. Objective To examine the accuracy of stated energy contents of foods purchased in restaurants. Design and Setting A validated bomb calorimetry technique was used to measure dietary energy in food from 42 restaurants, comprising 269 total food items and 242 unique foods. The restaurants and foods were randomly selected from quick-serve and sit-down restaurants in Massachusetts, Arkansas, and Indiana between January and June 2010. Main Outcome Measure The difference between restaurant-stated and laboratory-measured energy contents, which were corrected for standard metabolizable energy conversion factors. Results The absolute stated energy contents were not significantly different from the absolute measured energy contents overall (difference of 10 kcal/portion; 95% confidence interval [CI], −15 to 34 kcal/portion; P=.52); however, the stated energy contents of individual foods were variable relative to the measured energy contents. Of the 269 food items, 50 (19%) contained measured energy contents of at least 100 kcal/portion more than the stated energy contents. Of the 10% of foods with the highest excess energy in the initial sampling, 13 of 17 were available for a second sampling. In the first analysis, these foods contained average measured energy contents of 289 kcal/portion (95% CI, 186 to 392 kcal/portion) more than the stated energy contents; in the second analysis, these foods contained average measured energy contents of 258 kcal/portion (95% CI, 154 to 361 kcal/portion) more than the stated energy contents (Prestaurant foods were accurate overall. However, there was substantial inaccuracy for some individual foods, with understated energy contents for those with lower

  11. Feasibility of Workplace Health Promotion for Restaurant Workers, Seattle, 2012.

    Allen, Claire L; Hammerback, Kristen; Harris, Jeffrey R; Hannon, Peggy A; Parrish, Amanda T

    2015-10-08

    Restaurant workers are a large population at high risk for tobacco use, physical inactivity, and influenza. They are difficult to reach with health care interventions and may be more accessible through workplaces, yet few studies have explored the feasibility of workplace health promotion in this population. This study sought to identify barriers and facilitators to promotion of tobacco cessation, physical activity, and influenza vaccination in restaurants. Moderators conducted 7 focus groups, 3 with restaurant owners and managers, 2 with English-speaking workers, and 2 with Spanish-speaking workers. All groups were recorded, and recordings were transcribed and uploaded to qualitative-analysis software. Two researchers coded each transcript independently and analyzed codes and quotations for common themes. Seventy people from the restaurant industry participated. Barriers to workplace health promotion included smoking-break customs, little interest in physical activity outside of work, and misinformation about influenza vaccinations. Facilitators included creating and enforcing equitable break policies and offering free, on-site influenza vaccinations. Spanish-speakers were particularly amenable to vaccination, despite their perceptions of low levels of management support for health promotion overall. Owners required a strong business case to consider investing in long-term prevention for their employees. Tobacco cessation and influenza vaccinations are opportunities for health promotion among restaurant workers, whereas physical activity interventions face greater challenges. Promotion of equitable breaks, limited smoking-break policies, and free, on-site influenza vaccinations could improve health for restaurant workers, who often do not have health insurance. Workplace interventions may be particularly important for Hispanic workers who have additional access barriers.

  12. Consumers’ estimation of calorie content at fast food restaurants: cross sectional observational study

    Block, Jason Perry; Condon, Suzanne K; Kleinman, Ken Paul; Mullen, Jewel; Linakis, Stephanie; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl Lynn; Gillman, Matthew William

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate estimation of calorie (energy) content of meals from fast food restaurants in adults, adolescents, and school age children. Design: Cross sectional study of repeated visits to fast food restaurant chains. Setting: 89 fast food restaurants in four cities in New England, United States: McDonald’s, Burger King, Subway, Wendy’s, KFC, Dunkin’ Donuts. Participants: 1877 adults and 330 school age children visiting restaurants at dinnertime (evening meal) in 2010 and 2011; 1...

  13. Identification of Site Selection Factors in the U.S. Franchise Restaurant Industry: An Exploratory Study

    Park, Kunsoon

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and rank the importance of the site selection factors that influence the U.S. franchise restaurant industry as well as rank the confidence level of the experts. To identify the site selection factors, this study sought assistance and support from restaurant professionals. The Delphi technique was used to elicit the opinions of a panel of experts regarding the site selection factors. The panel was composed of restaurant professionals of restaurant c...

  14. Consumer satisfaction and dissatisfaction of upscale restaurant dining :a two dimensional approach

    Sun, Lou-Hon

    1994-01-01

    Dining out is one of the most popular leisure activities in developed countries. A review of the studies on consumer satisfaction and dissatisfaction (CS/D) in restaurant dining indicates that the majority of restaurant management literature deals with the product/service dimension of restaurant dining and that the leisure dimension of restaurant dining has not been explored. This study was approached with a desire to combine the knowledge from leisure, tourism, marketing, and service managem...

  15. House Restaurant at The Cliff House Sample Tasting Dinner Menu 2017

    House Restaurant at the Cliff House

    2017-01-01

    Our award winning, Michelin star restaurant at The Cliff House Hotel, Ireland, brings foodies from all over the world to this seaside village in West Waterford. Both our main House Restaurant as well as our easy, unpretentious bar food honour the great Irish produce of Waterford, Cork and the Irish Sea. House Restaurant operates for dinner Wednesday - Saturday inclusive in Winter and Tuesday - Saturday inclusive in Summer, opening Sunday nights on bank holiday weekends. Bar Restaurant is o...

  16. Location-based social networking media for restaurant promotion and food review using mobile application

    Luhur H.S.; Widjaja N.D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is focusing on the development of a mobile application for searching restaurants and promotions with location based and social networking features. The main function of the application is to search restaurant information. Other functions are also available in this application such as add restaurant, add promotion, add photo, add food review, and other features including social networking features. The restaurant and promotion searching application will be developed under Android pl...

  17. Natural regeneration in several environments of the Capetinga gallery forest at Agua Limpa Farm (DF

    Jeanine Maria Felfili

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The Capetinga gallery forest is located at Agua Limpa Farm, in the Federal District, Brazil. The floristic compositionand structure of the natural regeneration at the edges and in the interior of the gallery forest at the watershed of the Capetinga stream was studied to detect floristic and structural patterns related to the forest environments. Thirty (5x5m plots were placed in each environment to sample saplings, individuals from 1,0m high with diameter at the steam base under 5,0cm. Within these plots, (2x2m sub-plots were allocated to sample seedlings, individuals lower than 1,0m height. The sampled plots were distant to the stream bank to minimize the humidity effect. Shannon & Wiener diversity index varied from 2,86 (seedlings at the edges to 3,51 (saplings at the interior and it was higher in the interior for both categories. Sørensen s similarity index varied from 0.474 for seedlings (comparingedges with interior to 0.735 (seedlings and saplings at the edges. Czekanowski indices were low and reflected the high differentiationin structure from plot to plot in the same gallery forest. TWINSPAN classification suggested two distinct communities for saplings forboth conditions, formed by species accordingly to their requirements for light and water. No differentiation was detected for seedlingsbetween the environments indicating a low response of plants at an early stage to the environmental conditions within the forest. TheCapetinga gallery forest suffered disturbances by fire and the small variations in species composition and vegetation structurebetween environments suggests that most of the natural regeneration is tolerant to light.

  18. Silica hollow bottle resonators for use as whispering gallery mode based chemical sensors

    Stoian, Razvan-Ionut; Bui, Khoa V.; Rosenberger, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    A simple three-step method for making silica hollow bottle resonators (HBRs) was developed. This procedure is advantageous because it uses commercially available materials, is cost effective, and is easy to implement. Additionally, the use of these HBRs as whispering gallery mode based chemical sensors is demonstrated by preliminary absorption sensing results in the near infrared (1580-1660 nm) using a trace gas (CH4) in air at atmospheric pressure and a dye (SDA2072) in methanol solution.

  19. Silica hollow bottle resonators for use as whispering gallery mode based chemical sensors

    Stoian, Razvan-Ionut; Bui, Khoa V; Rosenberger, A T

    2015-01-01

    A simple three-step method for making silica hollow bottle resonators (HBRs) was developed. This procedure is advantageous because it uses commercially available materials, is cost effective, and is easy to implement. Additionally, the use of these HBRs as whispering gallery mode based chemical sensors is demonstrated by preliminary absorption sensing results in the near infrared (1580–1660 nm) using a trace gas (CH 4 ) in air at atmospheric pressure and a dye (SDA2072) in methanol solution. (paper)

  20. All-polymer photonic sensing platform based on whispering-gallery mode microgoblet lasers

    Wienhold, T.; Kraemmer, S.; Wondimu, S.F.; Siegle, T.; Bog, U.; Weinzierl, U.; Schmidt, S.; Becker, H.; Kalt, H.; Mappes, T.; Koeber, S.; Koos, C.

    2015-01-01

    We present an all-polymer photonic sensing platform based on whispering-gallery mode microgoblet lasers integrated into a microfluidic chip. The chip is entirely made from polymers, enabling the use of the devices as low-cost disposables. The microgoblet cavities feature quality factors exceeding 105 and are fabricated from poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) using spin-coating, mask-based optical lithography, wet chemical etching, and thermal reflow. In contrast to silica-based microtoroid reso...

  1. Art Engineering and Kinetic Art

    Barış Yılmaz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Performing an art, either by painting or by sculpturing, requires to be interdisciplinary. When an artist creates his/her work of art, the process he/she realizes is supported by different engineering disciplines. Therefore, especially modern artists need to understand engineering science and this results in transforming artists into engineers. Opportunities provided by technology and science enable artists to expand his/her vision and to improve his/her works. Especially kinetic art has become an approach that combines art with engineering. Kinetic art, which is nourished with varied disciplines, is an excellent example to prove that art is interdisciplinary and to show the relationship between artist/art and engineering.

  2. Improvement of business performance in restaurants using innovation strategies

    Gagić Snježana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovation is an important aspect of contemporary business. Rapid change in guests' preferences and expectations significantly affect the restaurant industry. Meeting the diverse hospitality needs implies making innovative programs in all processes such as technical, technological as well as service oriented. Hospitality industry enters into the process of accelerated changes of modern equipment, updated technology, business strategies and hospitality management. The paper will discuss innovative offer design, molecular gastronomy, modern food presentation technique as well as authentic culinary products offer. By introducing such innovations, restaurants create the image of organisations following current trends as well as responding to the market requirements.

  3. Work on the extension of Restaurant No. 1

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    The work on the extension of Restaurant No. 1 will start on 12 April 2010. The section of the terrace currently available will be closed from this date onwards and the south terrace (see drawing) will gradually be made available in its place. Worksite for the extension of Restaurant No. 1.  Closure of current terrace on 2 April. Opening of south terrace on 12 April. Opening of second area of terrace at the end of April. Opening of third area of terrace in May.

  4. The Effect of Fast Food Restaurants on Obesity

    Currie, Janet; DellaVigna, Stefano; Moretti, Enrico; Pathania, Vikram

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the health consequences of changes in the supply of fast food using the exact geographical location of fast food restaurants. Specifically, we ask how the supply of fast food affects the obesity rates of 3 million school children and the weight gain of over 1 million pregnant women. We find that among 9th grade children, a fast food restaurant within a tenth of a mile of a school is associated with at least a 5.2 percent increase in obesity rates. There is no discernable effect...

  5. Opening times for CERN restaurants over the Easter weekend

    2014-01-01

    Restaurants No. 1 and No. 3 will be closed from Friday 18 April to Monday 21 April 2014 inclusive.   Restaurant No. 2 will be open from 7.00 a.m. to 3.00 p.m. on Friday 18 April (catering on the ground floor). It will be closed from Saturday 19 April to Monday 21 April 2014 inclusive.   The snack point at Building 40 will be open from 8.00 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. on Friday 18, Saturday 19, Sunday 20 and Monday 21 April 2014.

  6. CERN restaurant opening times during the Easter weekend

    FP Department

    2012-01-01

    Restaurants 1 and 3 will be closed from Friday 6 April to Monday 9 April 2012 inclusive. Restaurant 2 will be open from 8.30 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. on Friday 6 April 2012 and from 9.00 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. on Saturday 7 April, Sunday 8 April and Monday 9 April 2012. Hot meals will be served from 11.30 a.m. to 1.30 p.m. and from 6.00 p.m. to 7.30 p.m.

  7. CERN restaurant opening times during the Easter weekend

    FP Department

    2011-01-01

    Restaurants No. 1 (NOVAE) and No. 3 (AVENANCE) will be closed from Friday 22 April to Monday 25 April 2011 inclusive. Restaurant No. 2 (DSR) will be open from 8.30 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. on Friday 22 April 2011 and from 9.00 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. on Saturday 23 April, Sunday 24 April and Monday 25 April 2011. Hot meals will be served from 11.30 a.m. to 1.30 p.m. and from 6.00 p.m. to 7.30 p.m.  

  8. CERN restaurant opening times during the Easter weekend

    2013-01-01

    Restaurants No. 1 and No. 3 will be closed from Friday 29 March to Monday 1 April 2013 inclusive. Restaurant No. 2 will be open from 7.00 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. on Friday 29 March. It will be closed from Saturday 30 March to Monday 1 April 2013 inclusive. Building 40 will be open from 8.30 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. on Friday 29, Saturday 30, Sunday 31 March and Monday 1 April 2013.

  9. Dalla parola all'immagine: il linguaggio della critica d'arte: Per la traduzione di una "traduzione"

    De Martin, Maria Pia

    1994-01-01

    Negli ultimi decenni i musei e le gallerie d'arte di tutta Europa hanno visto crescere continuamente l'afflusso dei visitatori: basti pensare alle grandi mostre degli ultimi anni e alle interminabili code per accedervi (per esempio Kandinsky a Parigi e a Milano nel 1985). Laddove, in passato, la fruizione delle opere d'arte era limitata ad una stretta cerchia di persone, esse sembrano aver risvegliato oggi l'interesse del grande pubblico. Insieme all'interesse generale cres...

  10. Installation Art

    Petersen, Anne Ring

    Despite its large and growing popularity – to say nothing of its near-ubiquity in the world’s art scenes and international exhibitions of contemporary art –installation art remains a form whose artistic vocabulary and conceptual basis have rarely been subjected to thorough critical examination....... In Installation Art: Between Image and Stage, Anne Ring Petersen aims to change that. She begins by exploring how installation art developed into an interdisciplinary genre in the 1960s, and how its intertwining of the visual and the performative has acted as a catalyst for the generation of new artistic...... phenomena. It investigates how it became one of today’s most widely used art forms, increasingly expanding into consumer, popular and urban cultures, where installation’s often spectacular appearance ensures that it meets contemporary demands for sense-provoking and immersive cultural experiences. The main...

  11. Installation Art

    Petersen, Anne Ring

    . In Installation Art: Between Image and Stage, Anne Ring Petersen aims to change that. She begins by exploring how installation art developed into an interdisciplinary genre in the 1960s, and how its intertwining of the visual and the performative has acted as a catalyst for the generation of new artistic......Despite its large and growing popularity – to say nothing of its near-ubiquity in the world’s art scenes and international exhibitions of contemporary art –installation art remains a form whose artistic vocabulary and conceptual basis have rarely been subjected to thorough critical examination...... phenomena. It investigates how it became one of today’s most widely used art forms, increasingly expanding into consumer, popular and urban cultures, where installation’s often spectacular appearance ensures that it meets contemporary demands for sense-provoking and immersive cultural experiences. The main...

  12. 75 FR 67978 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Restaurant Menu...

    2010-11-04

    ...] Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Restaurant Menu Labeling... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Restaurant Menu Labeling: Registration for Small... restaurants and similar retail food establishments (SRFE) with 20 or more locations, as well as operators of...

  13. Sisters in Restaurant Success: A history of The Maramor, Mary Love's Tea Room

    Jan Whitaker

    2017-01-01

    In 1920, Mary Love opened The Maramor, a tea room style restaurant in Columbus, Ohio that quickly become recognized as one of the country's fine restaurants. Her career is intertwined with the rise of home economics college programs, helping women gain a new-born confidence that was used to dominate the restaurant and catering industry.

  14. Sisters in Restaurant Success: A history of The Maramor, Mary Love's Tea Room

    Jan Whitaker

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In 1920, Mary Love opened The Maramor, a tea room style restaurant in Columbus, Ohio that quickly become recognized as one of the country's fine restaurants. Her career is intertwined with the rise of home economics college programs, helping women gain a new-born confidence that was used to dominate the restaurant and catering industry.

  15. The effect of restaurant attributes on customers' expectations and experiences in formal full service restaurants in Port Elizabeth, South Africa

    O Mhlanga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of restaurant attributes on customers’ expectations and experiences in formal full service restaurants. The attributes included in this research were food, service and ambience as independent variables and expectations and experiences as dependent variables. The aims were to: (a assess restaurant attributes that are important for customers’ expectations and experiences, (b to determine which restaurant attributes had a significant relationship with customers’ expectations and experiences. The questionnaire was based on Markovic, Raspor and Markovic’s (2010 research. In order to meet the surveys’ goals, correlation coefficient and regression analysis were conducted. The results of correlation coefficient reveal that all three restaurant attributes had a significant correlation (p<0.05 with expectations. The strongest correlation with expectations was service (r=0.76. Customers’ experiences showed that all the attributes had a weak to moderate (r≤0.5 positive correlation with customers’ experiences. The strongest correlation with experiences was food (r=0.54. The first regression model showed that all three dining attributes were significantly related (p<0.05 to customers’ expectations. The level of service (t=10.73 was rated as the most important attribute for expectations. The second regression model showed that all three dining attributes were significantly related (p<0.05 to experiences. The second model indicated that respondents rated food (t=7.51 as the most important attribute for experience. The results reveal that although good food is an essential component for customers’ experiences, however, the level of service plays a pivotal role for customers’ expectations in formal full service restaurants.

  16. Cooking smoke and respiratory symptoms of restaurant workers in Thailand.

    Juntarawijit, Chudchawal; Juntarawijit, Yuwayong

    2017-02-17

    Restaurant workers are at risk from exposure to toxic compounds from burning of fuel and fumes from cooking. However, the literature is almost silent on the issue. What discussion that can be found in the literature focuses on the potential effects from biomass smoke exposure in the home kitchen, and does not address the problem as occurring in the workplace, particularly in restaurants. This was a cross-sectional survey of 224 worker from 142 food restaurants in the Tha Pho sub-district of Phitsanulok, a province in Thailand. The standard questionnaire from the British Medical Research Council was used to collect data on chronic respiratory symptoms, including cough, phlegm, dyspnea, severe dyspnea, stuffy nose in the participating workers. Data on their health symptoms experienced in the past 30 days was also asked. A constructed questionnaire was used to collect exposure data, including type of job, time in the kitchen, the frequency of frying food, tears while cooking (TWC), the type of restaurant, fuel used for cooking, the size and location of the kitchen, and the exhaust system and ventilation. The prevalence of the symptoms was compared with those obtained from 395 controls, who were neighbors of the participants who do not work in a restaurant. In comparison to the control group, the restaurant workers had twice or more the prevalence on most of the chronic health symptoms. Men had a higher risk for "dyspnea", "stuffy nose" and "wheeze" while women had higher risk of "cough". A Rate Ratio (RR) of susceptibility was established, which ranged from 1.4 up to 9.9. The minimum RR was for women with "severe dyspnea" (RR of 1.4, 95%CI 0.8, 2.5) while the men showed the maximum RR of 9.9 (95%CI 4.5-22.0) for "wheeze". Possible risk factors identified were job description, job period, size of restaurant, kitchen location, type of cooking oil, hours of stay in the kitchen area, number of fry dishes prepared, frequency of occurrence of TWC, and additional cooking at

  17. De la restauration à l’exposition : à la recherche de sens et de cohérence.

    Roland May

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cet article s'intéresse à la distance existant entre une opération de restauration et sa présentation au grand public. Il s'appuie sur une étude de cas, la restauration d’une toile de Michel Serre, peintre actif en Provence aux XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles. Dans le temps imparti pour cette restauration se sont enchaînées études et interventions, mettant en œuvre de nombreux acteurs – restaurateurs, conservateurs, historiens d’art, photographes et scientifiques du patrimoine – dont les échanges étaient orientés vers la réalisation de l’intervention. Passer de ce "faire" au "faire connaître" de l’exposition nécessite des étapes de reconstruction / agrégation analytiques, qui ne sont pas sans rappeler les enquêtes policières : les indices au départ disjoints convergent pour construire des liens nouvellement mis en perspective dans l’exposition.This article focuses on the gap existing between the restoration of a painting and its presentation to the general public. The case study is a painting by Michel Serre, an artist working in Provence in the 17th-18th centuries. During the alloted time for restoration, studies and interventions of numerous actors –conservators, curators, art historians, photographers and conservation scientists – have been focusing on the achievement of the restoration. Translating this "doing" into a "making of" for the exhibition implies reconstruction / analytical aggregation steps, which echo mystery investigation : clues, at the beginning appart, converge towards building links and new standpoints presented in the exhibition.

  18. Ground beef handling and cooking practices in restaurants in eight States.

    Bogard, April K; Fuller, Candace C; Radke, Vincent; Selman, Carol A; Smith, Kirk E

    2013-12-01

    Eating in table-service restaurants has been implicated as a risk factor for Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection. To explore this association and learn about the prevalence of risky ground beef preparation practices in restaurants, the Environmental Health Specialists Network (EHS-Net) assessed ground beef handling policies and practices in restaurants in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Minnesota, New York, Oregon, and Tennessee. Eligible restaurants prepared and served hamburgers. EHS-Net specialists interviewed a restaurant employee with authority over the kitchen (defined as the manager) using a standard questionnaire about food safety policies, hamburger preparation policies, and use of irradiated ground beef. Interviews were followed by observations of ground beef preparation. Data from 385 restaurants were analyzed: 67% of the restaurants were independently owned and 33% were chain restaurants; 75% of the restaurants were sit down, 19% were quick service or fast food, and 6% were cafeteria or buffet restaurants. Eighty-one percent of restaurants reported determining doneness of hamburgers by one or more subjective measures, and 49% reported that they never measure the final cook temperatures of hamburgers. At least two risky ground beef handling practices were observed in 53% of restaurants. Only 1% of restaurants reported purchasing irradiated ground beef, and 29% were unfamiliar with irradiated ground beef. Differences in risky ground beef handling policies and practices were noted for type of restaurant ownership (independently owned versus chain) and type of food service style (sit down versus quick service or fast food). This study revealed the pervasiveness of risky ground beef handling policies and practices in restaurants and the need for educational campaigns targeting food workers and managers. These results highlight the importance of continued efforts to reduce the prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 in ground beef.

  19. Ultrasonic sounding and monitoring of the excavation damaged zone in a soft supported gallery

    Balland, Cyrille; Souley, Mountaka; Morel, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Under high in situ stresses and high anisotropic stress ratios, the excavation of underground openings generally causes the creation of a disturbed (EdZ: Excavation disturbed Zone) and/or damaged (EDZ: Excavation Damaged Zone) zone, resulting from the initiation and growth of cracks and fractures and by a redistribution and rearrangement of the initial stresses. Due to the modifications of mechanical and hydro-mechanical properties in the EdZ/EDZ, the latter constitute a potential risk for the efficiency of the geologic and/or engineered barriers. To estimate the performance of a site of radioactive waste storage, it is essential to know the geometry, the extensions of the EdZ/EDZ, the density of cracks, their connectivity and the variations of permeability which can result from it. In particular, their extension depends on numerous factors among which the nature of the rock, the pre-existent fractures and their reactivation, the initial stress field (magnitudes and/or rate of anisotropy), the time, the geometry and the techniques of excavations etc.. In addition, the evolution of EdZ/EDZ properties in the medium term is little or poorly known, particularly under the influence of environmental conditions such as the re-confining by near field rock creep in contact with a rigid structural support or the evolution of hydric conditions (desaturation and re-saturation). Ultrasonic experimentation under the OHZ experiment has been implemented to characterize the EDZ extension and its evolution in time according to the structural support type (soft or rigid) and the environmental conditions present in the laboratory. This study consists of two experimental components: (1) the prior auscultation of the sole and face of the gallery by ultrasonic transmission tomography, (2) the monitoring the EDZ and the analysis of measurable changes in the propagation of ultrasonic waves in the medium term. Mechanical modelling of the

  20. Shadow art

    Mitra, Niloy J.; Pauly, Mark

    2009-01-01

    "To them, I said, the truth would be literally nothing but the shadows of the images." - Plato, The Republic Shadow art is a unique form of sculptural art where the 2D shadows cast by a 3D sculpture are essential for the artistic effect. We

  1. Art Markets

    P.A. Arora (Payal); F.R.R. Vermeylen (Filip)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe advent of digitization has had a profound impact on the art market and its institutions. In this chapter, we focus on the market for visual arts as it finds its expression in (among other) paintings, prints, drawings, photographs, sculpture and the like. These artistic disciplines

  2. Art Rocks!

    Chapin, Erika

    2008-01-01

    Though people may like different types of music, everyone likes music. In middle school, music and art are of key importance for students to express and define what kind of person they are. In this article, the author presents an art project where students are asked to create their own guitars. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  3. Indigenous Art

    Hu, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Linda Lomahaftewa, a noted painter, has taught at much bigger places than the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA). But Lomahaftewa, who is Hopi-Choctaw, and others on the faculty of IAIA are intensely devoted to the mission of this small but unique school. IAIA--the nation's only four-year fine arts institution devoted to American Indian and…

  4. Bye Bye Cafeteria, Hello Restaurant-Style Dining.

    Milshtein, Amy

    1999-01-01

    Examines how the university cafeteria is being transformed into restaurant-style dining to attract and retain sophisticated student customers. Harvard's and Seattle Pacific University's dining facilities are briefly highlighted. Concluding comments address planning tips for converting the old cafeteria into a better dining experience. (GR)

  5. SMOKING / NON-SMOKING IN THE CERN RESTAURANTS AND CAFETERIAS

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee, tel. 77551

    2001-01-01

    As you may remember, all CERN buildings and cars are considered to be non-smoking areas with a few exceptions (Safety Instruction no. 46). The ban on smoking applies in particular to all public areas, such as restaurants and cafétérias. Smoking is therefore prohibited in all parts of the free-flow and the dining rooms. As for the cafétérias, they are divided into well-defined non-smoking and smoking areas, the latter being clearly indicated as such, i.e : Cafétéria of Restaurant no. 1 : at the back of the cafétéria (on the outside terrace side) opposite the Users' Office and the offices of the Staff Association; Cafétéria of Restaurant no. 2 : the full length of the cafétéria on the wineyard side, except for the room next to the entrance to the building, furnished with red arm-chairs; Cafétéria of Restaurant no. 3 : between the bar and the row of artificial ...

  6. Reducing heavy alcohol consumption in young restaurant workers.

    Broome, Kirk M; Bennett, Joel B

    2011-01-01

    Restaurant employees often have high rates of heavy drinking and problems with alcohol. This study evaluates reductions in drinking and associated problems at work, in connection with a new program for prevention and early intervention. The program, called Team Resilience, is designed for young restaurant workers. A cluster-randomized trial design was used, with 28 stores from a national casual-dining restaurant chain and 235 of their employees (54% male, 46% female). Fourteen stores received the Team Resilience training workshop, consisting of three 2-hour sessions held on 3 consecutive days. Sessions included group discussion, role-play and practice activities, and a learning game. Workers in trained stores reported significantly greater decreases in recurring heavy drinking (i.e., having five or more drinks on the same occasion, on 5 or more days in the past month) and work-related problems with alcohol than workers in control stores. In the intervention group, the odds of recurring heavy drinking declined by about one half and the number of work-related problem areas declined by one third following training. In addition, drinking behaviors and problems were tied to age and were most common among employees in their middle 20s. Findings support Team Resilience as an effective intervention for reducing drinking and associated problems among young restaurant workers, a population with substantial needs.

  7. Critical Success Factors for Franchised Restaurants Entering the Kenyan Market

    Lucy Gikonyo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In today’s globalized world, businesses look to expand to have a global presence. Restaurant businesses have expanded internationally using franchising. This study sought to determine the critical success factors (CSFs of a franchised restaurant system entering the Kenyan market from the franchisors’ perspective. It sought to establish how franchisors define, identify, and evaluate success. This study provides a theoretical framework that helps to understand the background of why organizations seek to expand using franchising method and consequently the CSFs of franchised restaurants entering the Kenyan market. The study used qualitative methodology with the use of in-depth interviews for collecting data. The results yielded CSFs from the franchisors’ perspective. As revealed by the study, the CSFs include brand power/concept, competitive environment, government policies, distance management, cultural appeal, excellent selection of franchisees, good site/location selection, good relationship with the franchisees, and proper contract management. These findings can be used by restaurant franchises that seek to establish successful businesses in the Kenyan market and other similar regional markets. The Africa franchise partners may also find some useful information from this article as they seek to set up the Franchise Association of Kenya. Other franchise businesses may also benefit from some aspects of the study.

  8. Accommodation, Cafes and Restaurants. Industry Training Monograph No. 8.

    Dumbrell, Tom

    Australia's accommodation, cafes, and restaurants industry represents more than half of the nation's total tourism and hospitality employment. It accounts for roughly 4.5% of all jobs in Australia (400,000 workers). Since 1987, the number of jobs in the sector has risen from about 257,000 to about 372,000. Approximately 57% of employees are…

  9. Innovations in the restaurant industry: An exploratory study

    Ivkov Milan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper tends to identify managers' current innovation activities and attitudes, and also perceptions of what might become future trends and the prospective course in the restaurant industry. Additionally, this paper analyses linkage between sociodemographic profile of managers and a type of innovation they prefer/apply. Full service casual dining restaurant managers from three different countries were interviewed in order to examine their attitudes towards innovations, and to reveal their perceptions of future trends. ANOVA was used to reveal differences between managers' attitudes towards the area of innovation. The results of qualitative study highlight five areas of innovation that could help managers create value based service and increase competitiveness. It is found that age, education level and experience of the restaurant managers affect the innovation type they apply. Additionally, this paper is the first to examine the linkage between socio-demographic profile of restaurant managers and a type of innovation they apply. It offers useful guidelines for hospitality managers.

  10. Monitoring sodium in commercially processed foods from stores and restaurants

    Most of the sodium we eat comes from commercially processed foods from stores and restaurants. Sodium reduction in these foods is a key component of several recent public health efforts. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) of USDA, CDC and FDA have launched a collaborative program to monitor sodium ...

  11. Mechanism of Food Ordering in A Restaurant Using Android Technology

    Aulia, Rachmat; Zakir, Ahmad; Dafitri, Haida; Siregar, Dodi; Hasdiana

    2017-12-01

    A Restaurant is a gathering place for many people to taste the favorite foods are in there. The restaurant which visited many people sure will increase the attraction of them to visit it. Of course, the owner will get more benefit. However, what happens when a restaurant is famous still uses a service without technology, such as making orders using pens and paper, inspects the food stocks manually, and delivering orders to the kitchen using manpower, and more. Therefore, it designed a system that can accelerate the ordering and processing food in the restaurant. This system replaces the use of pen and paper with digital devices such as tablets/smartphones based on Android. Not only that, order data can be sent through a wireless network which connects tablets/smartphones with the kitchen's computer. It can be read by kitcheners and showed directly on the LCD screen. By the application is expected to reduce the level of error in the processing of the consumer's order.

  12. Solar heating for a restaurant--North Little Rock, Arkansas

    1981-01-01

    Hot water consumption of large building affects solar-energy system design. Continual demand for hot water at restaurant makes storage less important than at other sites. Storage capacity of system installed in December 1979 equals estimated daily hot-water requirement. Report describes equipment specifications and modifications to existing building heating and hot water systems.

  13. Facebook usage by local restaurants: A large scale survey

    Drs Erik Hekman; Marieke Welledonker-Kuijer

    2012-01-01

    Social media are rapidly becoming a viable way of service marketing and customer engagement in the hospitality industry. Facebook, for instance, allows restaurants to publish information, multimedia content and engage with their customers e.g., to answer questions or learn about their preferences.

  14. Outdoor ultrafine particle concentrations in front of fast food restaurants

    Vert, Cristina; Meliefste, Kees; Hoek, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) have been associated with negative effects on human health. Emissions from motor vehicles are the principal source of UFPs in urban air. A study in Vancouver suggested that UFP concentrations were related to density of fast food restaurants near the monitoring sites. A

  15. Calorie changes in large chain restaurants from 2008 to 2015.

    Bleich, Sara N; Wolfson, Julia A; Jarlenski, Marian P

    2017-07-01

    No prior studies examining changes in the calorie content of chain restaurants have included national data before and after passage of federal menu labeling legislation, required by the 2010 Affordable Care Act. This paper describes trends in calories available in large U.S. chain restaurants in 2008 and 2012 to 2015 using data were obtained from the MenuStat project (2012 to 2015) and from the Center for Science in the Public Interest (2008). This analysis included 44 of the 100 largest U.S. restaurants which are available in all years of the data (2008 and 2012-2015) (N=19,391 items). Generalized linear models were used to examine 1) per-item calorie changes from 2008 to 2015 among items on the menu in all years and 2) mean calories in new items in 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015 compared to items on the menu in 2008 only. We found that Among items common to the menu in all years, overall calories declined from 327kcal in 2008 to 318kcal in 2015 (p-value for trend=0.03). No differences in mean calories among menu items newly introduced in 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015 relative to items only on the menu in 2008 were found. These results suggest that the federal menu labeling mandate (to be implemented in May 2017) appears to be influencing restaurant behavior towards lower average calories for menu items. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Restaurant smoking sections in South Africa and the perceived ...

    from the tobacco industry and the Federated Hospitality Association of South Africa .... with franchise managers in January 2017 that aimed to document the current ... CI 11.8 - 16.7) as fast-food places (or quick-service restaurants). Distribution ...

  17. Preventing intentional food contamination: a survey to assess restaurant preparedness.

    Xirasagar, Sudha; Kanwat, C P; Qu, Haiyan; Smith, Lillian U; Patterson, Nathaniel J; Shewchuk, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    In the age of preparedness, public health agencies are concerned with intentional acts of food contamination in restaurants, in addition to food safety. Food safety consists of applying standard norms of practice and infrastructure, which, if violated, cause food-borne illness. In contrast, food defense requires an institutionalized mindset of informed alertness to unusual variations from the norms, combined with preemptive practices best suited to each restaurant. Therefore, while food safety lends itself to regulation to ensure standard practices, food defense is best served by advisory guidelines for autonomous application, preserving the restaurant industry's core values of hospitality and customer service. To address this challenge, public health agencies need survey tools that can yield action-relevant data on the knowledge and practice gaps in food defense preparedness and on educational messages and support services to be developed for maximum impact potential. This article presents a mail survey instrument, developed using qualitative research to ensure content and face validity. Instrument development involved drafting the survey on the basis of expert consultations, validating its content by using focus groups (representing all restaurant categories and geographic regions), and ensuring face validity through cognitive interviews. The resulting survey remains sensitive to the hospitality industry while encompassing all vulnerable points.

  18. Social media behavior of local restaurants and their customers.

    Drs Erik Hekman; Marieke Welle Donker Kuijer

    2013-01-01

    In this study we analyze a large dataset of Facebook activities of local restaurants in Amsterdam, Houston, London and New York. Doing so gives broad insights in their Facebook usage and the communication patterns between them and their costumers. The dataset is quite rich and the presented

  19. The Minimum Wage, Restaurant Prices, and Labor Market Structure

    Aaronson, Daniel; French, Eric; MacDonald, James

    2008-01-01

    Using store-level and aggregated Consumer Price Index data, we show that restaurant prices rise in response to minimum wage increases under several sources of identifying variation. We introduce a general model of employment determination that implies minimum wage hikes cause prices to rise in competitive labor markets but potentially fall in…

  20. Knowledge-based model of competition in restaurant industry: a qualitative study about culinary competence, creativity, and innovation in five full-service restaurants in Jakarta

    NAPITUPULU JOSHUA H.; ASTUTI ENDANG SITI; HAMID DJAMHUR; RAHARDJO KUSDI

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to have an in-depth description in the form of the analysis of culinary competence, creativity and innovation that develops knowledge-based model of competence in full-service restaurant business. Studies on restaurant generally focused on customers more particularly customer’s satisfaction and loyalty, and very few studies discussed internal competitive factors in restaurant business. The study aims at filling out the research gap, using knowledge-based approach t...

  1. Sodium monitoring in commercially processed and restaurant foods.

    Ahuja, Jaspreet K C; Pehrsson, Pamela R; Haytowitz, David B; Wasswa-Kintu, Shirley; Nickle, Melissa; Showell, Bethany; Thomas, Robin; Roseland, Janet; Williams, Juhi; Khan, Mona; Nguyen, Quynhanh; Hoy, Kathy; Martin, Carrie; Rhodes, Donna; Moshfegh, Alanna; Gillespie, Cathleen; Gunn, Janelle; Merritt, Robert; Cogswell, Mary

    2015-03-01

    Most sodium in the US diet comes from commercially processed and restaurant foods. Sodium reduction in these foods is key to several recent public health efforts. The objective was to provide an overview of a program led by the USDA, in partnership with other government agencies, to monitor sodium contents in commercially processed and restaurant foods in the United States. We also present comparisons of nutrients generated under the program to older data. We track ∼125 commercially processed and restaurant food items ("sentinel foods") annually using information from food manufacturers and periodically by nationwide sampling and laboratory analyses. In addition, we monitor >1100 other commercially processed and restaurant food items, termed "priority-2 foods" (P2Fs) biennially by using information from food manufacturers. These foods serve as indicators for assessing changes in the sodium content of commercially processed and restaurant foods in the United States. We sampled all sentinel foods nationwide and reviewed all P2Fs in 2010-2013 to determine baseline sodium concentrations. We updated sodium values for 73 sentinel foods and 551 P2Fs in the USDA's National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (releases 23-26). Sodium values changed by at least 10% for 43 of the sentinel foods, which, for 31 foods, including commonly consumed foods such as bread, tomato catsup, and potato chips, the newer sodium values were lower. Changes in the concentrations of related nutrients (total and saturated fat, total sugar, potassium, or dietary fiber) that were recommended by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans for reduced or increased consumption accompanied sodium reduction. The results of sodium reduction efforts, based on resampling of the sentinel foods or re-review of P2Fs, will become available beginning in 2015. This monitoring program tracks sodium reduction efforts, improves food composition databases, and strengthens national nutrition monitoring. © 2015

  2. Inspection Frequency, Sociodemographic Factors, and Food Safety Violations in Chain and Nonchain Restaurants, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2013-2014.

    Leinwand, Sarah E; Glanz, Karen; Keenan, Brendan T; Branas, Charles C

    We explored how restaurant inspection frequency and restaurant neighborhood sociodemographic characteristics are related to food safety inspection outcomes in chain and nonchain restaurants to better understand external factors that may influence inspection outcomes. We categorized the results of restaurant inspections in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 2013 and 2014 by restaurant type (chain or nonchain), inspection frequency (1, 2, or ≥3 per 2-year study period), and violation type (total number of violations, foodborne-illness risk factor violation, or good retail practice violation). We collected 2013 US Census block group sociodemographic data for each restaurant neighborhood. We used nested mixed-effects regression analyses to determine the association between restaurant inspection frequency and inspection violations, as well as between inspection violations and restaurant neighborhood sociodemographic variables, stratified by restaurant type. Compared with nonchain restaurants, chain restaurants had significantly fewer total violations per inspection (mean [SD]: 6.5 [4.6] vs 9.6 [6.8] violations, P chain restaurants. For nonchain restaurants, a higher proportion of black residents in a restaurant neighborhood was associated with 0.6 ( P food safety inspection frequency, based on whether or not restaurants are part of chains, could reduce the frequency of violations, particularly in restaurants with the most violations.

  3. Coffee, Cake & Culture: Evaluation of an art for health programme for older people in the community.

    Roe, Brenda; McCormick, Sheila; Lucas, Terri; Gallagher, Wendy; Winn, Andrea; Elkin, Sophie

    2016-07-01

    Arts for health initiatives and networks are being developed in a number of countries and an international literature is emerging on the evidence of their benefits to people's health, wellbeing and quality of life. Engagement in cultural and creative arts by older people can increase their morale and self-confidence and provides opportunities for social connection. Museums and galleries are increasingly required to justify their expenditure, reach and impact and some are working in partnership with local councils, hospitals, schools and communities to improve access to their collections. There is a body of literature emerging that describes such initiatives but empirical evidence of their benefits is less developed. This article reports an evaluation of an art for health initiative - Coffee, Cake & Culture organised and delivered by Whitworth Art Gallery and Manchester Museum in 2012 for older people living in a care home and a supported living facility. The study has identified the benefits and impacts of the arts for health programme and its feasibility for older people, with or without diagnosed memory loss - dementia, living in a care home or supported living facility and their care staff. The findings demonstrate there were benefits to the older people and their care staff in terms of wellbeing, social engagement, learning, social inclusion and creativity. These benefits were immediate and continued in the short term on their return home. The majority of older people and care staff had not previously been to the art gallery or museum and the programme encouraged creative arts and cultural appreciation which promoted social inclusion, wellbeing and quality of life. The programme is feasible and important lessons were identified for future planning. Further research involving partnerships of researchers, arts for health curators, artists, care staff, older people and their families is warranted. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Restaurants as Learning Organizations: A Multiple-Site Case Study of U.S. Non-Chain Restaurants

    Boccia, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the construct of the learning organization in the restaurant industry. Descriptive accounts of learning were gleaned from face-to-face interviews, focus groups, observations, document analysis, and data from the Dimensions of the Learning Organization Questionnaire (DLOQ) from 52 participants employed in three US…

  5. Lessons learned about art-based approaches for disseminating knowledge.

    Bruce, Anne; Makaroff, Kara L Schick; Sheilds, Laurene; Beuthin, Rosanne; Molzahn, Anita; Shermak, Sheryl

    2013-01-01

    To present a case example of using an arts-based approach and the development of an art exhibit to disseminate research findings from a narrative research study. Once a study has been completed, the final step of dissemination of findings is crucial. In this paper, we explore the benefits of bringing nursing research into public spaces using an arts-based approach. Findings from a qualitative narrative study exploring experiences of living with life-threatening illnesses. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 32 participants living with cancer, chronic renal disease, or HIV/AIDS. Participants were invited to share a symbol representing their experience of living with life-threatening illness and the meaning it held for them. The exhibit conveyed experiences of how people story and re-story their lives when living with chronic kidney disease, cancer or HIV. Photographic images of symbolic representations of study participants' experiences and poetic narratives from their stories were exhibited in a public art gallery. The theoretical underpinning of arts-based approaches and the lessons learned in creating an art exhibit from research findings are explored. Creative art forms for research and disseminating knowledge offer new ways of understanding and knowing that are under-used in nursing. Arts-based approaches make visible patients' experiences that are often left unarticulated or hidden. Creative dissemination approaches such as art exhibits can promote insight and new ways of knowing that communicate nursing research to both public and professional audiences.

  6. Arts Entrepreneurship

    Gartner, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Contribution to the opinion series “Perspectives” on arts entrepreneurship; how arts entrepreneurship is situated in relation to other disciplines or fields; what problems we are grappling with as scholars, practitioners, teachers, and artists; and what are the research questions we are attempting...... to answer individually or as a field. Under the headline “Perspectives on Arts Entrepreneurship, part 2”, are responses from: William B. Gartner, Professor of Entrepreneurship at Copenhagen Business School and California Lutheran University; Joseph Roberts, Director of the Coleman Fellows Program, Associate...

  7. Arte inolvidable

    Iván Moratilla Pérez; Esther Gallego García; Francisco Javier Moreno Martínez

    2018-01-01

    La humanidad y el arte forman un matrimonio indisoluble, no es posible concebir la una sin el otro. Incluso antes de fabricar el primer instrumento musical, la humanidad ya cantaba; antes de emplear un lienzo, pintó sobre la pared de una cueva. Las manifestaciones creativas se dan invariablemente “en la riqueza y en la pobreza”, pero también “en la salud y en la enfermedad”. En este artículo introducimos al lector a la temática del arte y la demencia, destacando la capacidad creativa de los p...

  8. Earth's Climate: Informing and Invoking Change Through Three Streams of Art and Science

    Brey, J. A.; Waller, J. L.; DeMuynck, E.; Weglarz, T. C.

    2017-12-01

    When art and science exhibitions "Layers: Places in Peril" and `small problems, BIG TROUBLE" premiered, gallery visitors were drawn into the show through a series of features including the size, color and dramatic narrative of the paintings and by their own sentiments for the depicted cities, places and topics of each show. Inside the gallery, people read accompanying essays based on the geoscience, physics, biology and chemistry related to each of the depicted subjects. The result: hearts and minds engaged. Since the art and text dialogues were consciously and carefully crafted to have broad appeal to those without formal backgrounds in art and science, and to people of a range of ages, visitors did not feel they were preached to but rather, that they were a part of a conversation. This approach of producing art and science exhibitions for a wide diversity of gallery visitors and students, reaches a different audience than in discipline-specific classrooms or professional conferences and can inspire people to know and take action on a number of issues, including those related to climate change. As long-time educators of Art and Science, we are fully aware of the importance of those emotional connections in learning and we embraced that approach in our first two shows. Working on a third exhibition, we wish to expand on those deep connections for long-reaching reactions from gallery visitors. Entitled "River Bookends: Headwaters, Delta and the Volume of Stories In Between", our focus is on the multi-disciplinary stories of selected world rivers of the past, present and future. Presented concurrently in a gallery and a planetarium and weaving elements of art, science, music, dance, poetry, technology and interactive opportunities that engage memory and initiate problem solving through the exhibition experience, we stress both the art and science of rivers, their complexity, power and vulnerability to factors including climate change. Through these multisensory

  9. Out to eat: the emergence and evolution of the restaurant in nineteenth-century New York City.

    Lobel, Cindy R

    2010-01-01

    Unheard of in the eighteenth century, restaurants became an integral part of New York City's public culture in the antebellum period. This article examines the emergence and development of New York's restaurant sector in the nineteenth century, focusing on three aspects in particular: the close ties between urbanization and the rise of New York's restaurants, the role restaurants played in enforcing the city's class structure and gender mores, and the role of restaurants in shaping the public culture of the growing metropolis.

  10. Finding of key factors in creating small business system’s success : The case study in Thai restaurants in Sweden

    Maleekaew, Chiraluck; Sudthamnong, Sirinun

    2007-01-01

    Research Questions: Which factors are the actual impacts for the success of Thai restaurant in Sweden? Aims of Research: To investigate the key factors that may cause the success within a restaurant. The success of the restaurant in this research is a restaurant that has positive financial result, revenue more than cost. Positive financial result shows that they manage the quality of the restaurant effectively. Methodology: This thesis studies and analyzes the variables and factors in process...

  11. Art & Alchemy

    Partly because of alchemy's dismissal from the Parnassus of rational sciences, the interplay between this esoteric knowledge and the visual arts is still a surprisingly neglected research area. This collection of articles covering the time span from the Late Middle Ages to the twentieth century...... intends, however, to challenge the current neglect. Areas on which its twelve authors cast new light include alchemical gender symbolism in Renaissance, Mannerist and modernist art, alchemical ideas of transformation in Italian fifteenth-century landscape imagery, Netherlandish seventeenth......-century portrayals of alchemists, and alchemy's tortured status as a forerunner of photography. Art and Alchemy indicates that alchemy indeed has several connections with art by examining some of the pictorial and literary books that disseminated alchemical symbols and ideas, delving into images, which in one way...

  12. Critical Arts

    both formal and informal) in culture and social theory. CRITICAL ARTS aims to challenge and ... Book Review: Brian McNair, An Introduction to Political Communication (3rd edition), London: Routledge, 2003, ISBN 0415307082, 272pp. Phil Joffe ...

  13. DISCOURSES ABOUT URBAN ART IN RIO DE JANEIRO: THE LEGITIMATION OF GRAFFITI IN THE STREETS AND GALLERIES

    ADRIANA MEDEIROS FERREIRA DA SILVA

    2012-01-01

    Este trabalho procura refletir sobre o crescimento e a consolidação do grafite no Rio de Janeiro. Uma das expressões da cultura hip-hop, o grafite surgiu nos Estados Unidos, na década de 1970. No início eram apenas assinaturas, que depois evoluíram para desenhos elaborados. São Paulo foi a primeira cidade brasileira onde este tipo de escrita urbana se desenvolveu nos anos 1980 e 1990. Mas no Rio, a atividade de pintar muros chegou mais tarde e somente se firmou nos anos 2000...

  14. 76 FR 68101 - Safety Zone; Art Gallery Party St. Pete 2011 Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, FL

    2011-11-03

    ... questions on this temporary final rule, call or email Marine Science Technician First Class Nolan L. Ammons, Sector St. Petersburg Prevention Department, Coast Guard; telephone (813) 228-2191, email Nolan.L.Ammons...

  15. Thermal simulation of drift emplacement. Geotechnical and geophysical investigations in and around backfilled galleries

    Schneefub, J.U.; Gommlich, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    The concept for the direct disposal of spent fuel in rock salt foresees the emplacement of large waste canisters on the floor of a disposal gallery. Subsequent to emplacement the drift is backfilled with salt grit. In a demonstration test six cylindrical containments are to be emplaced within distances of 3 m from each other in two parallel galleries of 14 m 2 , separated by a pillar of 10 m thickness. They will be heated up by a power output of approx. 1 kW/m to 200 degree C surface temperature by electrical heaters. The thermal and mechanical response of the salt rock and the backfilling to the artificial heating is to be investigated as follows: (1) measurement of the temperature field at the contained surface, in the backfill and in the rock salt; (2) deformation measurements of the salt rock around the heated drifts; (3) measurements of tunnel convergence in heated and unheated sections; (4) compaction measurements of the backfilling in heated and unheated areas; (5) measurement of rock stresses in areas very close to the galleries; and (6) pressure measurements in the backfilling, between backfilling and rock, and between backfilling and containers. The rock burst monitoring system of the Asse salt mine will be expanded to this special field of the mine to detect seismic events due to thermomechanical effects. Another seismoacoustic system will be installed to observe the compaction of the backfilling. This system must be calibrated for the relation between the density and velocities of seismic waves. It is planned to monitor the density by gamma-gamma log measurements. The changes in overall density during the entire experiment will be observed by gravimeter measurements of high precision

  16. Electrical resistivity tomography survey for delineating uncharted mine galleries in West Bengal, India

    Maillol, J.M.; Sen, N.

    1999-01-01

    The history of subsidence, fires, flooding and other kinds of environmental hazards related to shallow coal workings in India goes back to colonial times some 300 years ago. As coal production accelerated in modern times, so did the environmental and socio-economic drawbacks related to exploitation. In the mid-1980s, a hydropneumatic sand-stowing method was developed to fill in abandoned galleries but their exact location had to be known. Unfortunately, most of these old workings are uncharted and consequently large tracts of land cannot be stabilized. A research program making use of integrated surface, borehole and cross-hole geophysical methods was undertaken over a five-year span to try to solve this problem. Surface geophysical methods, being cheaper and faster than their cross- and downhole counterparts, were used to cover larger areas on an exploratory basis, while cross-hole methods were employed to locate more accurately one or a network of galleries to be perforated by drillhole(s) and used as a conduit for sand stowing. The authors report the results of one of the cross-hole geophysical methods: electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). A pole-dipole configuration is used and both cross-hole and surface-borehole methodologies are tested. Forward modelling and inversion of synthetic data making use of downhole and surface physical and geometrical parameters are presented first. This phase is followed by the inversion of real data. It is concluded that ERT is not applicable for the detection of dry voids, but is effective in a waterlogged environment which is estimated to represent 85--90% of the cases. In waterlogged galleries, ERT is applicable in both cross-hole and surface-downhole modes, the latter allowing a larger surface coverage at low cost. ERT is thus a reliable geophysical tool to image water-filled voids and an adequate technique to address environmental and geotechnical problems

  17. Unforgettable art

    Iván Moratilla Pérez; Esther Gallego García; Francisco Javier Moreno Martínez

    2018-01-01

    Humanity and Art make an indissoluble marriage, it is impossible to comprehend one without the other. Even before producing the first musical instrument, humanity already sang; before using a canvas, humans painted on the walls of a cave. Creative manifestations invariably take place in “poverty and wealth”, but also in “sickness and health”. In this article we introduce the reader to the subject of art and dementia, highlighting the creative potential of patients, and including examples of e...

  18. Art School

    Lucas, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Art School is a body of research that focuses on the pedagogical environment and the conditions of creative thinking & material making. The outputs are films that embed reflexivity in their concept, process and form, further contextualised through International talks, events and curated screenings about Art School and the nature of artist’s process and pedagogy. The underlying research questions also address the significance of artist’s processes within the contemporary political and cultur...

  19. Whispering Gallery Mode Based Optical Fiber Sensor for Measuring Concentration of Salt Solution

    Chia-Chin Chiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An optical fiber solution-concentration sensor based on whispering gallery mode (WGM is proposed in this paper. The WGM solution-concentration sensors were used to measure salt solutions, in which the concentrations ranged from 1% to 25% and the wavelength drifted from the left to the right. The experimental results showed an average sensitivity of approximately 0.372 nm/% and an R2 linearity of 0.8835. The proposed WGM sensors are of low cost, feasible for mass production, and durable for solution-concentration sensing.

  20. Controlled assembly of organic whispering-gallery-mode microlasers as highly sensitive chemical vapor sensors.

    Gao, Miaomiao; Wei, Cong; Lin, Xianqing; Liu, Yuan; Hu, Fengqin; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2017-03-09

    We demonstrate the fabrication of organic high Q active whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators from π-conjugated polymer by a controlled emulsion-solvent-evaporation method, which can simultaneously provide optical gain and act as an effective resonant cavity. By measuring the shift of their lasing modes on exposure to organic vapor, we successfully monitored the slight concentration variation in the chemical gas. These microlaser sensors demonstrated high detection sensitivity and good signal repeatability under continuous chemical gas treatments. The results offer an effective strategy to design miniaturized optical sensors.

  1. More efficient second harmonic generation of whispering gallery modes by selective out-coupling

    Trainor, Luke S.; Sedlmeir, Florian; Peuntinger, Christian; Schwefel, Harald G. L.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate second harmonic generation (SHG) in an $x$-cut congruent lithium niobate (LN) whispering gallery mode resonator. We first show theoretically that independent control of the coupling of the pump and signal modes is optimal for high conversion rates. A scheme based on our earlier work in Ref. [1] is then implemented experimentally to verify this. Thereby we are able to improve on the efficiency of SHG by more than an order of magnitude by selectively out-coupling using a LN prism...

  2. Whispering gallery modes in two-photon fluorescence from spherical DCM dye microresonators

    Mamonov, Evgeniy A.; Maydykovskiy, Anton I.; Mitetelo, Nikolai V.; Venkatakrishnarao, Dasari; Chandrasekar, Rajadurai; Murzina, Tatyana V.

    2018-03-01

    Organic microstructures are well known for their resonator properties, which bring about whispering gallery mode (WGM) excitation. Here we report on experimental evidence of the WGM in the two-photon fluorescence (TPF) of DCM dye microspheres made using the self-assembly method. The WGM excitation accompanying the overall TPF in the spectral range from 530\\div640 nm demonstrated a quality factor of approximately 102 for spheres that were several microns in diameter. The power dependence of the TPF intensity proved the second order nature of the interaction process involved.

  3. Rapid 3D µ-printing of polymer optical whispering-gallery mode resonators.

    Wu, Jushuai; Guo, Xin; Zhang, A Ping; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2015-11-16

    A novel microfabrication method for rapid printing of polymer optical whispering-gallery mode (WGM) resonators is presented. A 3D micro-printing technology based on high-speed optical spatial modulator (SLM) and high-power UV light source is developed to fabricate suspended-disk WGM resonator array using SU-8 photoresist. The optical spectral responses of the fabricated polymer WGM resonators were measured with a biconically tapered optical fiber. Experimental results reveal that the demonstrated method is very flexible and time-saving for rapid fabrication of complex polymer WGM resonators.

  4. Victorian era esthetic and restorative dentistry: an advertising trade card gallery.

    Croll, Theodore P; Swanson, Ben Z

    2006-01-01

    A chief means of print advertising in the Victorian era was the "trade card." Innumerable products, companies, and services were highlighted on colorful chromolithographic trade cards, and these became desirable collectible objects which were pasted into scrapbooks and enjoyed by many families. Dentistry- and oral health-related subjects were often depicted on Victorian trade cards, and esthetic and restorative dentistry themes were featured. This review describes the history of advertising trade cards and offers a photographic gallery of dentistry-related cards of the era.

  5. High resolution terahertz spectroscopy of a whispering gallery mode bubble resonator using Hilbert analysis.

    Vogt, Dominik Walter; Leonhardt, Rainer

    2017-07-10

    We report on data processing for continuous wave (CW) terahertz (THz) spectroscopy measurements based on a Hilbert spectral analysis to achieve MHz resolution. As an example we investigate the spectral properties of a whispering gallery mode (WGM) THz bubble resonator at critical coupling. The experimental verification clearly demonstrates the significant advantages in relative frequency resolution and required acquisition time of the proposed method over the traditional data analysis. An effective frequency resolution, only limited by the precision and stability of the laser beat signal, can be achieved without complex extensions to a standard commercially available CW THz spectrometer.

  6. Ultra-high Q terahertz whispering-gallery modes in a silicon resonator

    Vogt, Dominik Walter; Leonhardt, Rainer

    2018-05-01

    We report on the first experimental demonstration of terahertz (THz) whispering-gallery modes (WGMs) with an ultra-high quality factor of 1.5 × 104 at 0.62 THz. The WGMs are observed in a high resistivity float zone silicon spherical resonator coupled to a sub-wavelength silica waveguide. A detailed analysis of the coherent continuous wave THz spectroscopy measurements combined with a numerical model based on Mie-Debye-Aden-Kerker theory allows us to unambiguously identify the observed higher order radial THz WGMs.

  7. Wavelength shift in a whispering gallery microdisk due to bacterial sensing: A theoretical approach

    Hala Ghali

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Whispering gallery mode microcavities have recently been studied as a means to achieve real-time label-free detection of biological targets such as virus particles, specific DNA sequences, or proteins. Binding of a biomolecule to the surface of a microresonator will increase its path length, leading to a shift in the resonance frequency according to the reactive sensing principle. In this paper, we develop a theoretical expression that will link the reactive shift to the bacteria and microdisk parameters and help quantify the number of bacteria that bind to the surface of a 200μm-diameter silica microdisk. Keywords: Optical microdisk, Wavelength shift, Bacterial sensing

  8. License - Togo Picture Gallery | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Full Text Available List Contact us Togo Picture Gallery License License to Use This Database Last updated : 2017/05/16 You may use this database...ecifies the license terms regarding the use of this database and the requirements you must follow in using this database.... The license for this database is specified in the Creative Commons ...Attribution 4.0 International . If you use data from this database, please be sure attribute this database a...e Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International is found here . With regard to this database

  9. Towards A Colorimetric Digital Image Archive For The Visual Arts

    Martinez, Kirk; Hamber, Anthony

    1989-04-01

    The aim of this project is to produce a high-resolution, colorimetric and permanent digital archive of images taken directly from works of art. The proposed system is designed for use in education, research, galleries and museums. Tentative user requirements are examined with particular reference to resolution, image access and colorimetry. Existing technology and projects are considered. Some 3000x3000 pel images of paintings are used to illustrate the interrelationship between dimensions of the original, its inherent detail, scan resolution and display.

  10. Guerilla Science: Outreach at music and art festival

    Rosin, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Guerilla Science a non-profit science education organization that, since 2007, has brought live events to unconventional venues for science, such as music festivals, art galleries, banquets, department stores and theaters. Guerilla Science sets science free by taking it out of the lab and into the traditional domains of the arts. By producing events that mix science with art, music and play, they create unique opportunities for adult audiences to experience science in unorthodox ways, such as interactive events, games, live experiments, demonstrations and performances by academics, artists, musicians, actors, and professional science communicators. Much of Guerilla Science's work has focused on astrophysical and terrestrial plasmas, and this presentation will provide an overview of Guerilla Science's work in this area. Guerilla Science has produced over twenty events, receiving international media coverage, and directly reached over fifteen thousand members of the public.

  11. NASA Science Engagement Through "Sky Art"

    Bethea, K. L.; Damadeo, K.

    2013-12-01

    Sky Art is a NASA-funded online community where the public can share in the beauty of nature and the science behind it. At the center of Sky Art is a gallery of amateur sky photos submitted by users that are related to NASA Earth science mission research areas. Through their submissions, amateur photographers from around the world are engaged in the process of making observations, or taking pictures, of the sky just like many NASA science instruments. By submitting their pictures and engaging in the online community discussions and interactions with NASA scientists, users make the connection between the beauty of nature and atmospheric science. Sky Art is a gateway for interaction and information aimed at drawing excitement and interest in atmospheric phenomena including sunrises, sunsets, moonrises, moonsets, and aerosols, each of which correlates to a NASA science mission. Educating the public on atmospheric science topics in an informal way is a central goal of Sky Art. NASA science is included in the community through interaction from scientists, NASA images, and blog posts on science concepts derived from the images. Additionally, the website connects educators through the formal education pathway where science concepts are taught through activities and lessons that align with national learning standards. Sky Art was conceived as part of the Education and Public Outreach program of the SAGE III on ISS mission. There are currently three other NASA mission involved with Sky Art: CALIPSO, GPM, and CLARREO. This paper will discuss the process of developing the Sky Art online website, the challenges of growing a community of users, as well as the use of social media and mobile applications in science outreach and education.

  12. Guess who's not coming to dinner? Evaluating online restaurant reservations for disease surveillance.

    Nsoesie, Elaine O; Buckeridge, David L; Brownstein, John S

    2014-01-22

    Alternative data sources are used increasingly to augment traditional public health surveillance systems. Examples include over-the-counter medication sales and school absenteeism. We sought to determine if an increase in restaurant table availabilities was associated with an increase in disease incidence, specifically influenza-like illness (ILI). Restaurant table availability was monitored using OpenTable, an online restaurant table reservation site. A daily search was performed for restaurants with available tables for 2 at the hour and at half past the hour for 22 distinct times: between 11:00 am-3:30 pm for lunch and between 6:00-11:30 PM for dinner. In the United States, we examined table availability for restaurants in Boston, Atlanta, Baltimore, and Miami. For Mexico, we studied table availabilities in Cancun, Mexico City, Puebla, Monterrey, and Guadalajara. Time series of restaurant use was compared with Google Flu Trends and ILI at the state and national levels for the United States and Mexico using the cross-correlation function. Differences in restaurant use were observed across sampling times and regions. We also noted similarities in time series trends between data on influenza activity and restaurant use. In some settings, significant correlations greater than 70% were noted between data on restaurant use and ILI trends. This study introduces and demonstrates the potential value of restaurant use data for event surveillance.

  13. Assessing the Consumer Food Environment in Restaurants by Neighbourhood Distress Level across Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

    Wang, Jin; Engler-Stringer, Rachel; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2016-03-01

    To assess the consumer food environment in restaurants in Saskatoon, using the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey for Restaurants (NEMS-R), to examine differences by neighbourhood distress level and to reflect on the need for further refinement of the assessment of restaurant consumer food environments. Neighbourhoods were classified as low, middle, or high distress level based on the socioeconomic indicators (income, employment, and education) in the Material Deprivation Index. Differences in restaurant consumer food environments, indicated by mean NEMS-R total and sub-scores, were examined by various restaurant categories and by varying neighbourhood distress levels. Chain coffee shops and pita and sandwich restaurants had higher NEMS-R totals and "Healthy Entrées" sub-scores; however, burger and chicken restaurants and pizza restaurants had more barriers to healthful eating. Although restaurants in lower distress level neighbourhoods generally rated healthier (higher NEMS-R scores), only a few measures (such as "Facilitators" and "Barriers") significantly differed by neighbourhood distress level. The findings highlight the importance of developing interventions to improve restaurant consumer food environments, especially in neighbourhoods with higher distress levels. The results suggest that reliable measures of the consumer food environment could be developed beginning with what can be measured by NEMS-R.

  14. Interdisciplinary Learning Through the Teaching of Science and Art

    Illingworth, Samuel; Verran, Joanna; Griffiths, Dave; Carpenter, Annie

    2017-04-01

    Science and Art are two disciplines that are usually treated as mutually exclusive entities, and yet which have much to offer each other in terms of process, experimentation and analysis. The field of SciArt (or ArtSci) is a relatively new one, in which scientists and artists work together to create information and demonstrations that are neither the science of art nor the art of science but are instead interdisciplinary investigations that utilise the unique strengths and overlapping commonalities of both fields. As well as the products and processes that are created via such collaboration, the introduction of artists and scientists to one another is an exceptionally valuable prospect which can have a significant impact on the working practices of both sets of collaborators. To further develop this field and these opportunities for collaboration, it is necessary to introduce scientists and artists to the potential of working together at an early point in their careers, ideally when they are still in tertiary education. Manchester Metropolitan University has been involved in several art and science programmes that involve science and art undergraduate and postgraduate students working together to create performances, experiments and demonstrations. This includes the UK's first dedicated SciArt course, residential field trips, and exhibiting at an internationally- renowned gallery. Here we present the outcomes of this work, discussing the development of these schemes and presenting future opportunities for early career scientists and artists to collaborate further.

  15. Juicebox Gallery

    2012 and 2014 IDRC Research Awardee Ahmed K. Rashid

  16. Plant waste materials from restaurants as the adsorbents for dyes

    Pavlović Marija D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has demonstrated the valorization of inexpensive and readily available restaurant waste containing most consumed food and beverage residues as adsorbents for methylene blue dye. Coffee, tea, lettuce and citrus waste have been utilized without any pre-treatment, thus the adsorption capacities and dye removal efficiency were determined. Coffee waste showed highest adsorbent capacity, followed by tea, lettuce and citrus waste. The dye removal was more effective as dye concentration increases from 5 up to 60 mg/L. The favorable results obtained for lettuce waste have been especially encouraged, as this material has not been commonly employed for sorption purposes. Equilibrium data fitted very well in a Freundlich isotherm model, whereas pseudo-second-order kinetic model describes the process behavior. Restaurant waste performed rapid dye removal at no cost, so it can be adopted and widely used in industries for contaminated water treatment.

  17. Restaurant Menu Labeling Policy: Review of Evidence and Controversies

    VanEpps, Eric M.; Roberto, Christina A.; Park, Sara; Economos, Christina D.; Bleich, Sara N.

    2016-01-01

    In response to high rates of obesity in the USA, several American cities, counties, and states have passed laws requiring restaurant chains to post labels identifying the energy content of items on menus, and nationwide implementation of menu labeling is expected in late 2016. In this review, we identify and summarize the results of 16 studies that have assessed the impact of real-world numeric calorie posting. We also discuss several controversies surrounding the US Food and Drug Administration's implementation of federally mandated menu labeling. Overall, the evidence regarding menu labeling is mixed, showing that labels may reduce the energy content of food purchased in some contexts, but have little effect in other contexts. However, more data on a range of ong-term consumption habits and restaurant responses is needed to fully understand the impact menu labeling laws will have on the US population's diet. PMID:26877095

  18. An Injury Prevention Strategy for Teen Restaurant Workers

    Ward, Julie A.; de Castro, A. B.; Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun; Linker, Darren; Hildahl, Lyle; Miller, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of youth employment, workplace hazards, and characteristics unique to adolescents contribute to a relatively high incidence of injuries among teens in the restaurant industry. This article discusses the ProSafety model of injury prevention among teen restaurant workers. Through integration with an existing career and technical education program, the ProSafety project seeks to prevent occupational injuries among the teen worker population through classroom safety education and internship skills reinforcement. ProSafety is the product of an innovative collaboration with occupational health nurses, business professionals, educators, and government. Its approach is derived from Social Cognitive Theory, is consistent with key values and strategies of occupational health nurses, and provides lessons for practitioners seeking to reduce occupational injuries in food service or among other populations of adolescent workers. PMID:20180503

  19. Refurbishment and extension of the terrace of Restaurant No.1

    2009-01-01

    Work to refurbish and extend part of the terrace of Restaurant No.1 started in the first week of October and should last about two months. This is just a small part of the wide-ranging site infrastructure consolidation programme that began in April 2009. The new terrace, covering a surface area of 1770 m2 (compared with 1650 m2 today), is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2010 and will run all the way around the Restaurant No.1 extension. Work on the latter will affect part of Building 501 during the period from April to October 2010. The new dining room will seat some 275 additional customers (see picture). Part of the Cedars car-park will remain closed until some time in December to provide site access for trucks transporting construction materials, plant, etc. CERN Bulletin

  20. Contemporary Romanian Art in the United States1

    Altman Dana

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the recent international interest in contemporary Romanian art and its growth in market share, with a focus on the United States. The theme is followed thorough in numerous museum exhibitions, increased collector following, art fair presence, gallery representation and auction activity initially in Europe and the United States. The phenomenon is discussed both in the context of the larger international movement conducive to the contemporary art price bubble, and in that of the local socio-economic changes. My chief interest lies in the factors leading up to the entry of post 1989 Romanian art in the global arena as a manifestation of market forces in the field. The analysis follows its grass roots local emergence through non-profit institutions, individual artists, small publications, low budget galleries, as well as the lack of contribution (with few notable exceptions of state institutions, while pointing out the national context of increasing deregulation of social support systems resulting in lack of focus on cultural manifestations. The conclusion is that the recent ascent of contemporary Romanian art (and coincidentally, the award winning contemporary Romanian cinematography is a fortuitous convergence of various factors, among which, increased international mobility and sharing. At the same time, it is also the result of the evolution of various individual artists that pursued a form of art rooted in Romanian artistic tradition but with a focus on the symbolic figurative. The result is a personal semiotics of raising the mundane to extraordinary levels that reconfigured the anxiety of entering a new system into an unmistakable and lasting visual language.