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Sample records for responsive map kinase-like

  1. Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

    2011-03-24

    It is increasingly realized that human exposure either to an acute low dose or multiple chronic low doses of low LET radiation has the potential to cause different types of cancer. Therefore, the central theme of research for DOE and NASA is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways responsible for the cellular response to low dose radiation which would not only improve the accuracy of estimating health risks but also help in the development of predictive assays for low dose radiation risks associated with tissue degeneration and cancer. The working hypothesis for this proposal is that the cellular mechanisms in terms of DNA damage signaling, repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation are different for low and high doses of low LET radiation and that the mode of action of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases (PIKK: ATM, ATR and DNA-PK) determines the dose dependent cellular responses. The hypothesis will be tested at two levels: (I) Evaluation of the role of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in cellular response to low and high doses of low LET radiation in simple in vitro human cell systems and (II) Determination of radiation responses in complex cell microenvironments such as human EpiDerm tissue constructs. Cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation will be assessed from the view points of DNA damage signaling, DNA double strand break repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation by analyzing the activities (i.e. post-translational modifications and kinetics of protein-protein interactions) of the key target proteins for PI-3 kinase like kinases both at the intra-cellular and molecular levels. The proteins chosen for this proposal are placed under three categories: (I) sensors/initiators include ATM ser1981, ATR, 53BP1, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, MRE11, Rad50 and Nbs1; (II) signal transducers include Chk1, Chk2, FANCD2 and SMC1; and (III) effectors include p53, CDC25A and CDC25C. The primary goal of this proposal is to elucidate the

  2. Wall-associated kinase-like polypeptide mediates nutritional status perception and response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenbiao; Karr, Stephen

    2014-02-11

    The disclosure relates to methods for modulating plant growth and organogenesis using dominant-negative receptor-like kinases. The disclosure further provides a method for increasing plant yield relative to corresponding wild type plants comprising modulating the expression in a plant of a nucleic acid encoding a Wall-Associated Kinase-like 14 polypeptide or a homolog thereof, and selecting for plants having increased yield or growth on a nutrient deficient substrate.

  3. Germinal center kinase-like kinase (GLK/MAP4K3 expression is increased in adult-onset Still's disease and may act as an activity marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Der-Yuan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germinal center kinase-like kinase (GLK, also termed MAP4K3, a member of the MAP4K family, may regulate gene transcription, apoptosis and immune inflammation in response to extracellular signals. The enhanced expression of GLK has been shown to correspond with disease severity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. We investigated the role of GLK in the pathogenesis of adult-onset Still's disease, which shares some similar clinical characteristics with systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods The frequencies of circulating GLK-expressing T-cells in 24 patients with active adult-onset Still's disease and 12 healthy controls were determined by flow cytometry analysis. The expression levels of GLK proteins and transcripts were evaluated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by immunoblotting and quantitative PCR. Serum levels of T helper (Th17-related cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α, were measured by ELISA. Results Significantly higher median frequencies of circulating GLK-expressing T-cells were observed in patients with adult-onset Still's disease (31.85% than in healthy volunteers (8.93%, P P P P P Conclusions Elevated expression levels of GLK and their positive correlation with disease activity in patients with adult-onset Still's disease indicate that GLK may be involved in the pathogenesis and act as a novel activity biomarker of this disease.

  4. Structural Evolution of the Protein Kinase-Like Superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The protein kinase family is large and important, but it is only one family in a larger superfamily of homologous kinases that phosphorylate a variety of substrates and play important roles in all three superkingdoms of life. We used a carefully constructed structural alignment of selected kinases as the basis for a study of the structural evolution of the protein kinase-like superfamily. The comparison of structures revealed a "universal core" domain consisting only of regions required for ATP binding and the phosphotransfer reaction. Remarkably, even within the universal core some kinase structures display notable changes, while still retaining essential activity. Hence, the protein kinase-like superfamily has undergone substantial structural and sequence revision over long evolutionary timescales. We constructed a phylogenetic tree for the superfamily using a novel approach that allowed for the combination of sequence and structure information into a unified quantitative analysis. When considered against the backdrop of species distribution and other metrics, our tree provides a compelling scenario for the development of the various kinase families from a shared common ancestor. We propose that most of the so-called "atypical kinases" are not intermittently derived from protein kinases, but rather diverged early in evolution to form a distinct phyletic group. Within the atypical kinases, the aminoglycoside and choline kinase families appear to share the closest relationship. These two families in turn appear to be the most closely related to the protein kinase family. In addition, our analysis suggests that the actin-fragmin kinase, an atypical protein kinase, is more closely related to the phosphoinositide-3 kinase family than to the protein kinase family. The two most divergent families, alpha-kinases and phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKs, appear to have distinct evolutionary histories. While the PIPKs probably have an

  5. Mapping 'Social Responsibility' in Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, Cecilie; Horst, Maja

    2014-01-01

    aims to exclude the social from the scientific production in order to make it objective and thereby responsible; the Reflexivity rationality, which sees it as science's responsibility to let itself be guided by problems in society in choice of research focus and methods; the Contribution rationality......, which insists that responsible science should live up to public demands for innovation and democracy; and the Integration rationality, which advocates that science should be co-constructed with societal actors in order to be socially responsible. While each rationality is distinct, the article argues......This article employs the Foucauldian notion of ‘political rationality’ to map discussions and ideals about the responsibility of science toward society. By constructing and analyzing an archive of 263 journal papers, four political rationalities were identified: the Demarcation rationality, which...

  6. Mapping "Social Responsibility" in Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horst, Maja; Glerup, Cecilie

    The paper investigates the discourse on social responsibility in science as it appears in academic journals. Through database searches a collection of more than 300 papers have been analysed in order to map their answers to the following three questions: - What is the central problem that threatens...... of social responsibility of science imply different forms of governance of and within science. The paper employs a Foucaldian discourse analysis to understand how a particular conceptualisation of responsibility implies a political rationality, i.e. a particular form of governance of science. The analysis...... responsibility in science? - What are the central aspects of science or its relation to society that need to be regulated or changed? - What kinds of solutions are imagined and how are these solutions supposed to be put into place? On this basis the paper explores how different interpretations of the notion...

  7. Rapid Response Flood Water Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Policelli, Fritz; Brakenridge, G. R.; Coplin, A.; Bunnell, M.; Wu, L.; Habib, Shahid; Farah, H.

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of operation of the MODIS instrument on the NASA Terra satellite at the end of 1999, an exceptionally useful sensor and public data stream have been available for many applications including the rapid and precise characterization of terrestrial surface water changes. One practical application of such capability is the near-real time mapping of river flood inundation. We have developed a surface water mapping methodology based on using only bands 1 (620-672 nm) and 2 (841-890 nm). These are the two bands at 250 m, and the use of only these bands maximizes the resulting map detail. In this regard, most water bodies are strong absorbers of incoming solar radiation at the band 2 wavelength: it could be used alone, via a thresholding procedure, to separate water (dark, low radiance or reflectance pixels) from land (much brighter pixels) (1, 2). Some previous water mapping procedures have in fact used such single band data from this and other sensors that include similar wavelength channels. Adding the second channel of data (band 1), however, allows a band ratio approach which permits sediment-laden water, often relatively light at band 2 wavelengths, to still be discriminated, and, as well, provides some removal of error by reducing the number of cloud shadow pixels that would otherwise be misclassified as water.

  8. A physicochemical descriptor-based scoring scheme for effective and rapid filtering of kinase-like chemical space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The current chemical space of known small molecules is estimated to exceed 1060 structures. Though the largest physical compound repositories contain only a few tens of millions of unique compounds, virtual screening of databases of this size is still difficult. In recent years, the application of physicochemical descriptor-based profiling, such as Lipinski's rule-of-five for drug-likeness and Oprea's criteria of lead-likeness, as early stage filters in drug discovery has gained widespread acceptance. In the current study, we outline a kinase-likeness scoring function based on known kinase inhibitors. Results The method employs a collection of 22,615 known kinase inhibitors from the ChEMBL database. A kinase-likeness score is computed using statistical analysis of nine key physicochemical descriptors for these inhibitors. Based on this score, the kinase-likeness of four publicly and commercially available databases, i.e., National Cancer Institute database (NCI), the Natural Products database (NPD), the National Institute of Health's Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR), and the World Drug Index (WDI) database, is analyzed. Three of these databases, i.e., NCI, NPD, and MLSMR are frequently used in the virtual screening of kinase inhibitors, while the fourth WDI database is for comparison since it covers a wide range of known chemical space. Based on the kinase-likeness score, a kinase-focused library is also developed and tested against three different kinase targets selected from three different branches of the human kinome tree. Conclusions Our proposed methodology is one of the first that explores how the narrow chemical space of kinase inhibitors and its relevant physicochemical information can be utilized to build kinase-focused libraries and prioritize pre-existing compound databases for screening. We have shown that focused libraries generated by filtering compounds using the kinase-likeness score have, on average, better docking

  9. Response variance in functional maps: neural darwinism revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Takahashi

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which functional maps and map plasticity contribute to cortical computation remain controversial. Recent studies have revisited the theory of neural Darwinism to interpret the learning-induced map plasticity and neuronal heterogeneity observed in the cortex. Here, we hypothesize that the Darwinian principle provides a substrate to explain the relationship between neuron heterogeneity and cortical functional maps. We demonstrate in the rat auditory cortex that the degree of response variance is closely correlated with the size of its representational area. Further, we show that the response variance within a given population is altered through training. These results suggest that larger representational areas may help to accommodate heterogeneous populations of neurons. Thus, functional maps and map plasticity are likely to play essential roles in Darwinian computation, serving as effective, but not absolutely necessary, structures to generate diverse response properties within a neural population.

  10. Response variance in functional maps: neural darwinism revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yokota, Ryo; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which functional maps and map plasticity contribute to cortical computation remain controversial. Recent studies have revisited the theory of neural Darwinism to interpret the learning-induced map plasticity and neuronal heterogeneity observed in the cortex. Here, we hypothesize that the Darwinian principle provides a substrate to explain the relationship between neuron heterogeneity and cortical functional maps. We demonstrate in the rat auditory cortex that the degree of response variance is closely correlated with the size of its representational area. Further, we show that the response variance within a given population is altered through training. These results suggest that larger representational areas may help to accommodate heterogeneous populations of neurons. Thus, functional maps and map plasticity are likely to play essential roles in Darwinian computation, serving as effective, but not absolutely necessary, structures to generate diverse response properties within a neural population.

  11. Space Mapping With Adaptive Response Correction for Microwave Design Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koziel, S.; Bandler, J.W.; Madsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    at which the term was calculated, as in the surrogate model optimization process. In this paper, an adaptive response correction scheme is presented to work in conjunction with space-mapping optimization algorithms. This technique is designed to alleviate the difficulties of the standard output space......Output space mapping is a technique introduced to enhance the robustness of the space-mapping optimization process in case the space-mapped coarse model cannot provide sufficient matching with the fine model. The technique often works very well; however, in some cases it fails. Especially...... mapping by adaptive adjustment of the response correction term according to the changes of the space-mapped coarse model response. Examples indicate the robustness of our approach....

  12. The arabidopsis wall associated kinase-like 10 gene encodes a functional guanylyl cyclase and is co-expressed with pathogen defense related genes

    KAUST Repository

    Meier, Stuart

    2010-01-26

    Background: Second messengers have a key role in linking environmental stimuli to physiological responses. One such messenger, guanosine 3?,5?-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), has long been known to be an essential signaling molecule in many different physiological processes in higher plants, including biotic stress responses. To date, however, the guanylyl cyclase (GC) enzymes that catalyze the formation of cGMP from GTP have largely remained elusive in higher plants. Principal Findings: We have identified an Arabidopsis receptor type wall associated kinase-like molecule (AtWAKL10) as a candidate GC and provide experimental evidence to show that the intracellular domain of AtWAKL10431-700 can generate cGMP in vitro. Further, we also demonstrate that the molecule has kinase activity indicating that AtWAKL10 is a twin-domain catalytic protein. A co-expression and stimulus-specific expression analysis revealed that AtWAKL10 is consistently coexpressed with well characterized pathogen defense related genes and along with these genes is induced early and sharply in response to a range of pathogens and their elicitors. Conclusions: We demonstrate that AtWAKL10 is a twin-domain, kinase-GC signaling molecule that may function in biotic stress responses that are critically dependent on the second messenger cGMP. © 2010 Meier et al.

  13. Disaster Response for Effective Mapping and Wayfinding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunawan, L.T.

    2013-01-01

    The research focuses on guiding the affected population towards a safe location in a disaster area by utilizing their self-help capacity with prevalent mobile technology. In contrast to the traditional centralized information management systems for disaster response, this research proposes a decen-

  14. Functional Relations Modulate the Responsiveness to Affordances Despite the Impact of Conflicting Stimulus–Response Mappings

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Vastano; Martin Finn; Dermot Barnes-Holmes

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated how conflicting stimulus–response mappings influenced affordance processing given a manipulation of the functional relations. Participants performed a task involving consistent–inconsistent stimulus–response mappings: Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP). They were instructed to confirm or to deny a relation between words and tool-objects (consistent blocks) or to provide non-conventional responses (inconsistent blocks). The relations between stimuli could fu...

  15. Functional relations modulate the responsiveness to affordances despite the impact of conflicting stimulus-response mappings

    OpenAIRE

    Vastano, Roberta; Finn, Martin; Barnes-Holmes, Patrick Michael Dermot

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated how conflicting stimulus-response mappings influenced affordance processing given a manipulation of the functional relations. Participants performed a task involving consistent-inconsistent stimulus-response mappings: Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP). They were instructed to confirm or to deny a relation between words and tool-objects (consistent blocks) or to provide non-conventional responses (inconsistent blocks). The relations between stimuli could fu...

  16. A novel protein kinase-like domain in a selenoprotein, widespread in the tree of life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Dudkiewicz

    Full Text Available Selenoproteins serve important functions in many organisms, usually providing essential oxidoreductase enzymatic activity, often for defense against toxic xenobiotic substances. Most eukaryotic genomes possess a small number of these proteins, usually not more than 20. Selenoproteins belong to various structural classes, often related to oxidoreductase function, yet a few of them are completely uncharacterised.Here, the structural and functional prediction for the uncharacterised selenoprotein O (SELO is presented. Using bioinformatics tools, we predict that SELO protein adopts a three-dimensional fold similar to protein kinases. Furthermore, we argue that despite the lack of conservation of the "classic" catalytic aspartate residue of the archetypical His-Arg-Asp motif, SELO kinases might have retained catalytic phosphotransferase activity, albeit with an atypical active site. Lastly, the role of the selenocysteine residue is considered and the possibility of an oxidoreductase-regulated kinase function for SELO is discussed.The novel kinase prediction is discussed in the context of functional data on SELO orthologues in model organisms, FMP40 a.k.a.YPL222W (yeast, and ydiU (bacteria. Expression data from bacteria and yeast suggest a role in oxidative stress response. Analysis of genomic neighbourhoods of SELO homologues in the three domains of life points toward a role in regulation of ABC transport, in oxidative stress response, or in basic metabolism regulation. Among bacteria possessing SELO homologues, there is a significant over-representation of aquatic organisms, also of aerobic ones. The selenocysteine residue in SELO proteins occurs only in few members of this protein family, including proteins from Metazoa, and few small eukaryotes (Ostreococcus, stramenopiles. It is also demonstrated that enterobacterial mchC proteins involved in maturation of bactericidal antibiotics, microcins, form a distant subfamily of the SELO proteins.The new

  17. Carotid baroreceptor stimulation blood pressure response mapped in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy (C-Map study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansal, Nikhil; Clair, Daniel G; Jaye, Deborah A; Scheiner, Avram

    2016-12-01

    Continuous stimulation of the carotid baroreceptors has been shown to evoke a sustained systolic blood pressure (SBP) reduction in hypertensive subjects. This study conducted a detailed mapping of the SBP and heart rate response to electrical stimulus at different locations in the carotid sinus region in patients undergoing a carotid endarterectomy (CEA). The Carotid Sinus Autonomic Response Mapping (C-Map) Study is a multicenter, prospective, non-randomized, acute feasibility study conducted in 10 hypertensive subjects undergoing CEA. Electrode pairs were placed in multiple locations in the region of the carotid sinus for acute stimulation, and the tests were repeated after plaque removal and vessel repair. The configuration that elicited the largest pressure reduction in 8 of 10 patients was with the electrodes arranged longitudinally along the medial (in relation to the bifurcation) wall of the internal carotid artery (ICA) near the bifurcation (11.2±8.1mmHg, pEndarterectomy surgery did not affect maximal acute stimulation response but improved baroreflex sensitivity acutely. Acute extravascular baroreceptor stimulation (BRS) mapping demonstrated that blood pressure reductions are dependent on electrode location and orientation. In most subjects, the largest SBP reductions were elicited in the region of the medial wall of the ICA. This area can be targeted for future BRS lead design and implant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Stat3 activates the receptor tyrosine kinase like orphan receptor-1 gene in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The receptor tyrosine kinase like orphan receptor (ROR-1 gene is overexpressed in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Because Stat3 is constitutively activated in CLL and sequence analysis revealed that the ROR1 promoter harbors gamma-interferon activation sequence-like elements typically activated by Stat3, we hypothesized that Stat3 activates ROR1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Because IL-6 induced Stat3 phosphorylation and upregulated Ror1 protein levels in MM1 cells, we used these cells as a model. We transfected MM1 cells with truncated ROR1 promoter luciferase reporter constructs and found that IL-6 induced luciferase activity of ROR1-195 and upstream constructs. Co-transfection with Stat3 siRNA reduced the IL-6-induced luciferase activity, suggesting that IL-6 induced luciferase activity by activating Stat3. EMSA and the ChIP assay confirmed that Stat3 binds ROR1, and EMSA studies identified two Stat3 binding sites. In CLL cells, EMSA and ChIP studies determined that phosphorylated Stat3 bound to the ROR1 promoter at those two ROR1 promoter sites, and ChIP analysis showed that Stat3 co-immunoprecipitated DNA of STAT3, ROR1, and several Stat3-regulated genes. Finally, like STAT3-siRNA in MM1 cells, STAT3-shRNA downregulated STAT3, ROR1, and STAT3-regulated genes and Stat3 and Ror1 protein levels in CLL cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that constitutively activated Stat3 binds to the ROR1 promoter and activates ROR1 in CLL cells.

  19. Mapping long-term wetland response to climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q.; Gallant, A.; Rover, J.

    2016-12-01

    Wetlands provide unique feeding and breeding habitat for numerous waterfowl species. The distribution of wetlands has been considerably changed due to agricultural land conversion and hydrologic modification. Climate change may further impact wetlands through altered moisture regimes. This study characterized long-term variation in wetland conditions by using dense time series from all available Landsat data from 1985 to 2014. We extracted harmonic frequencies from 30 years to two years to delineate the long-term variation in all seven Landsat bands. A cluster analysis and unsupervised classification then enabled us to map different classes of wetland response. We demonstrated the method in the Prairie Pothole Region in North Dakota.

  20. Functional Relations Modulate the Responsiveness to Affordances Despite the Impact of Conflicting Stimulus–Response Mappings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Vastano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated how conflicting stimulus–response mappings influenced affordance processing given a manipulation of the functional relations. Participants performed a task involving consistent–inconsistent stimulus–response mappings: Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP. They were instructed to confirm or to deny a relation between words and tool-objects (consistent blocks or to provide non-conventional responses (inconsistent blocks. The relations between stimuli could functionally match (e.g., Kitchen – Spatula or not (e.g., Kitchen – Hammer, as well as the spatial relations (e.g., a match or a mismatch between participants’ hand response and the tool-object orientation. The results showed faster reaction times (RTs when functional relations between stimuli matched both in consistent and inconsistent blocks. Differences in RTs and accuracy between consistent and inconsistent blocks were only found when the functional relation between stimuli matched. No modulation of the performance was observed for mismatching functional relations and spatial relations between blocks. These results support the hypothesis that the responsiveness to affordances is strongly modulated by matching functional relations, despite the impact of conflicting stimulus–response mappings.

  1. Functional Relations Modulate the Responsiveness to Affordances Despite the Impact of Conflicting Stimulus-Response Mappings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastano, Roberta; Finn, Martin; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated how conflicting stimulus-response mappings influenced affordance processing given a manipulation of the functional relations. Participants performed a task involving consistent-inconsistent stimulus-response mappings: Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP). They were instructed to confirm or to deny a relation between words and tool-objects (consistent blocks) or to provide non-conventional responses (inconsistent blocks). The relations between stimuli could functionally match (e.g., Kitchen - Spatula) or not (e.g., Kitchen - Hammer), as well as the spatial relations (e.g., a match or a mismatch between participants' hand response and the tool-object orientation). The results showed faster reaction times (RTs) when functional relations between stimuli matched both in consistent and inconsistent blocks. Differences in RTs and accuracy between consistent and inconsistent blocks were only found when the functional relation between stimuli matched. No modulation of the performance was observed for mismatching functional relations and spatial relations between blocks. These results support the hypothesis that the responsiveness to affordances is strongly modulated by matching functional relations, despite the impact of conflicting stimulus-response mappings.

  2. Functional Relations Modulate the Responsiveness to Affordances Despite the Impact of Conflicting Stimulus–Response Mappings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastano, Roberta; Finn, Martin; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated how conflicting stimulus–response mappings influenced affordance processing given a manipulation of the functional relations. Participants performed a task involving consistent–inconsistent stimulus–response mappings: Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP). They were instructed to confirm or to deny a relation between words and tool-objects (consistent blocks) or to provide non-conventional responses (inconsistent blocks). The relations between stimuli could functionally match (e.g., Kitchen – Spatula) or not (e.g., Kitchen – Hammer), as well as the spatial relations (e.g., a match or a mismatch between participants’ hand response and the tool-object orientation). The results showed faster reaction times (RTs) when functional relations between stimuli matched both in consistent and inconsistent blocks. Differences in RTs and accuracy between consistent and inconsistent blocks were only found when the functional relation between stimuli matched. No modulation of the performance was observed for mismatching functional relations and spatial relations between blocks. These results support the hypothesis that the responsiveness to affordances is strongly modulated by matching functional relations, despite the impact of conflicting stimulus–response mappings. PMID:29163319

  3. Semiautomated Workflow for Clinically Streamlined Glioma Parametric Response Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Lauren; Ross, Brian D; Galbán, Craig J; Luker, Gary D; Galbán, Stefanie; Zhao, Binsheng; Guo, Xiaotao; Chenevert, Thomas L; Hoff, Benjamin A

    2016-12-01

    Management of glioblastoma multiforme remains a challenging problem despite recent advances in targeted therapies. Timely assessment of therapeutic agents is hindered by the lack of standard quantitative imaging protocols for determining targeted response. Clinical response assessment for brain tumors is determined by volumetric changes assessed at 10 weeks post-treatment initiation. Further, current clinical criteria fail to use advanced quantitative imaging approaches, such as diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging. Development of the parametric response mapping (PRM) applied to diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging has provided a sensitive and early biomarker of successful cytotoxic therapy in brain tumors while maintaining a spatial context within the tumor. Although PRM provides an earlier readout than volumetry and sometimes greater sensitivity compared with traditional whole-tumor diffusion statistics, it is not routinely used for patient management; an automated and standardized software for performing the analysis and for the generation of a clinical report document is required for this. We present a semiautomated and seamless workflow for image coregistration, segmentation, and PRM classification of glioblastoma multiforme diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans. The software solution can be integrated using local hardware or performed remotely in the cloud while providing connectivity to existing picture archive and communication systems. This is an important step toward implementing PRM analysis of solid tumors in routine clinical practice.

  4. A geostatistical approach to mapping site response spectral amplifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, E.M.; Baise, L.G.; Kayen, R.E.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanaka, H.

    2010-01-01

    If quantitative estimates of the seismic properties do not exist at a location of interest then the site response spectral amplifications must be estimated from data collected at other locations. Currently, the most common approach employs correlations of site class with maps of surficial geology. Analogously, correlations of site class with topographic slope can be employed where the surficial geology is unknown. Our goal is to identify and validate a method to estimate site response with greater spatial resolution and accuracy for regions where additional effort is warranted. This method consists of three components: region-specific data collection, a spatial model for interpolating seismic properties, and a theoretical method for computing spectral amplifications from the interpolated seismic properties. We consider three spatial interpolation schemes: correlations with surficial geology, termed the geologic trend (GT), ordinary kriging (OK), and kriging with a trend (KT). We estimate the spectral amplifications from seismic properties using the square root of impedance method, thereby linking the frequency-dependent spectral amplifications to the depth-dependent seismic properties. Thus, the range of periods for which this method is applicable is limited by the depth of exploration. A dense survey of near-surface S-wave slowness (Ss) throughout Kobe, Japan shows that the geostatistical methods give more accurate estimates of Ss than the topographic slope and GT methods, and the OK and KT methods perform equally well. We prefer the KT model because it can be seamlessly integrated with geologic maps that cover larger regions. Empirical spectral amplifications show that the region-specific data achieve more accurate estimates of observed median short-period amplifications than the topographic slope method. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Identification of casein kinase 1, casein kinase 2, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase-like activities in Trypanosoma evansi

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    José Manuel Galán-Caridad

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi contains protein kinases capable of phosphorylating endogenous substrates with apparent molecular masses in the range between 20 and 205 kDa. The major phosphopolypeptide band, pp55, was predominantly localized in the particulate fraction. Anti-alpha and anti-beta tubulin monoclonal antibodies recognized pp55 by Western blot analyses, suggesting that this band corresponds to phosphorylated tubulin. Inhibition experiments in the presence of emodin, heparin, and 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate indicated that the parasite tubulin kinase was a casein kinase 2 (CK2-like activity. GTP, which can be utilized instead of ATP by CK2, stimulated rather than inactivated the phosphorylation of tubulin in the parasite homogenate and particulate fraction. However, GTP inhibited the cytosolic CK2 responsible for phosphorylating soluble tubulin and other soluble substrates. Casein and two selective peptide substrates, P1 (RRKDLHDDEEDEAMSITA for casein kinase (CK1 and P2 (RRRADDSDDDDD for CK2, were recognized as substrates in T. evansi. While the enzymes present in the soluble fraction predominantly phosphorylated P1, P2 was preferentially labeled in the particulate fractions. These results demonstrated the existence of CK1-like and CK2-like activities primarily located in the parasite cytosolic and membranous fractions, respectively. Histone II-A and kemptide (LRRASVA also behaved as suitable substrates, implying the existence of other Ser/Thr kinases in T. evansi. Cyclic AMP only increased the phosphorylation of histone II-A and kemptide in the cytosol, demonstrating the existence of soluble cAMP-dependent protein kinase-like activities in T. evansi. However, no endogenous substrates for this enzyme were identified in this fraction. Further evidences were obtained by using PKI (6-22, a reported inhibitor of the catalytic subunit of mammalian cAMP-dependent protein kinases, which specifically hindered the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of histone II

  6. Geological mapping goes 3-D in response to societal needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorleifson, H.; Berg, R.C.; Russell, H.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The transition to 3-D mapping has been made possible by technological advances in digital cartography, GIS, data storage, analysis, and visualization. Despite various challenges, technological advancements facilitated a gradual transition from 2-D maps to 2.5-D draped maps to 3-D geological mapping, supported by digital spatial and relational databases that can be interrogated horizontally or vertically and viewed interactively. Challenges associated with data collection, human resources, and information management are daunting due to their resource and training requirements. The exchange of strategies at the workshops has highlighted the use of basin analysis to develop a process-based predictive knowledge framework that facilitates data integration. Three-dimensional geological information meets a public demand that fills in the blanks left by conventional 2-D mapping. Two-dimensional mapping will, however, remain the standard method for extensive areas of complex geology, particularly where deformed igneous and metamorphic rocks defy attempts at 3-D depiction.

  7. Creating a conceptual hydrological soil response map for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-03

    Mar 3, 2014 ... The soil water regime is a defining ecosystem service, directly influencing vegetation and animal distribution. Therefore ... These observations were used to determine soil distribution rules, from which the soil map was created in SoLIM. The map was .... Determining characteristics. CHSRU. Sodic site.

  8. Asbestos Model Accreditation Plan (MAP) Enforcement Response Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Asbestos Model Accreditation Plan (MAP) (40 CFR 763 Subpart E Appendix C) mandates safety training for those who do asbestos removal work, and implements the additional training requirements mandated by Congress

  9. Dissection of DNA damage responses using multiconditional genetic interaction maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guénolé, Aude

    2013-01-01

    To protect the genome, cells have evolved a diverse set of pathways designed to sense, signal, and repair multiple types of DNA damage. To assess the degree of coordination and crosstalk among these pathways, we systematically mapped changes in the cell's genetic network across a panel of different

  10. Parametric response maps of perfusion MRI may identify recurrent glioblastomas responsive to bevacizumab and irinotecan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Aquino

    Full Text Available Perfusion weighted imaging (PWI can be used to measure key aspects of tumor vascularity in vivo and recent studies suggest that perfusion imaging may be useful in the early assessment of response to angiogenesis inhibitors. Aim of this work is to compare Parametric Response Maps (PRMs with the Region Of Interest (ROI approach in the analysis of tumor changes induced by bevacizumab and irinotecan in recurrent glioblastomas (rGBM, and to evaluate if changes in tumor blood volume measured by perfusion MRI may predict clinical outcome.42 rGBM patients with KPS ≥ 50 were treated until progression, as defined by MRI with RANO criteria. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV variation after 8 weeks of treatment was calculated through semi-automatic ROI placement in the same anatomic region as in baseline. Alternatively, rCBV variations with respect to baseline were calculated into the evolving tumor region using a voxel-by-voxel difference. PRMs were created showing where rCBV significantly increased, decreased or remained unchanged.An increased blood volume in PRM (PRMCBV+ higher than 18% (first quartile after 8 weeks of treatment was associated with increased progression free survival (PFS; 24 versus 13 weeks, p = 0.045 and overall survival (OS; 38 versus 25 weeks, p = 0.016. After 8 weeks of treatment ROI analysis showed that mean rCBV remained elevated in non responsive patients (4.8 ± 0.9 versus 5.1 ± 1.2, p = 0.38, whereas decreased in responsive patients (4.2 ± 1.3 versus 3.8 ± 1.6 p = 0.04, and re-increased progressively when patients approached tumor progression.Our data suggest that PRMs can provide an early marker of response to antiangiogenic treatment and warrant further confirmation in a larger cohort of GBM patients.

  11. Proteomic Mapping of the Immune Response to Gluten in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0293 TITLE: Proteomic Mapping of the Immune Response to Gluten in Children with Autism PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Sep 2014 – 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Proteomic Mapping of the Immune Response to Gluten in Children with Autism 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and defects in GI function in the context of autism . Our newly published data indicate that children with autism exhibit

  12. Mapping a multidimensional emotion in response to television commercials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jon D; Klahr, Nelson J; Shen, Feng; Villegas, Jorge; Wright, Paul; He, Guojun; Liu, Yijun

    2009-03-01

    Unlike previous emotional studies using functional neuroimaging that have focused on either locating discrete emotions in the brain or linking emotional response to an external behavior, this study investigated brain regions in order to validate a three-dimensional construct--namely pleasure, arousal, and dominance (PAD) of emotion induced by marketing communication. Emotional responses to five television commercials were measured with Advertisement Self-Assessment Manikins (AdSAM) for PAD and with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify corresponding patterns of brain activation. We found significant differences in the AdSAM scores on the pleasure and arousal rating scales among the stimuli. Using the AdSAM response as a model for the fMRI image analysis, we showed bilateral activations in the inferior frontal gyri and middle temporal gyri associated with the difference on the pleasure dimension, and activations in the right superior temporal gyrus and right middle frontal gyrus associated with the difference on the arousal dimension. These findings suggest a dimensional approach of constructing emotional changes in the brain and provide a better understanding of human behavior in response to advertising stimuli.

  13. Variants in doublecortin- and calmodulin kinase like 1, a gene up-regulated by BDNF, are associated with memory and general cognitive abilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Le Hellard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human memory and general cognitive abilities are complex functions of high heritability and wide variability in the population. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays an important role in mammalian memory formation. METHODOLOGY / PRINCIPAL FINDING: Based on the identification of genes markedly up-regulated during BDNF-induced synaptic consolidation in the hippocampus, we selected genetic variants that were tested in three independent samples, from Norway and Scotland, of adult individuals examined for cognitive abilities. In all samples, we show that markers in the doublecortin- and calmodulin kinase like 1 (DCLK1 gene, are significantly associated with general cognition (IQ scores and verbal memory function, resisting multiple testing. DCLK1 is a complex gene with multiple transcripts which vary in expression and function. We show that the short variants are all up-regulated after BDNF treatment in the rat hippocampus, and that they are expressed in the adult human brain (mostly in cortices and hippocampus. We demonstrate that several of the associated variants are located in potential alternative promoter- and cis-regulatory elements of the gene and that they affect BDNF-mediated expression of short DCLK1 transcripts in a reporter system. CONCLUSION: These data present DCLK1 as a functionally pertinent gene involved in human memory and cognitive functions.

  14. Mapping the Obama administration's response to the Arab Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Céu de Pinho Ferreira Pinto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available When the Arab Spring broke out, the United States was in a quandary over how to handle the crisis in its attempt to balance its moral obligations and ideals without undercutting its strategic interests and those of its close allies. Flaws in US diplomatic approach have contributed to one of the most serious foreign policy crisis for a US administration to date with consequential upheaval and erosion of the US-built balance of power. The reactions and policy responses of the Obama administration highlight the difficulties in grasping with the new reality in the Middle East and in enunciating a policy platform that could combine American interests and values.

  15. Sleeping Beauty Transposition of Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting Receptor Tyrosine Kinase-Like Orphan Receptor-1 (ROR1 into Diverse Memory T-Cell Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew C Deniger

    Full Text Available T cells modified with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs targeting CD19 demonstrated clinical activity against some B-cell malignancies. However, this is often accompanied by a loss of normal CD19+ B cells and humoral immunity. Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor-1 (ROR1 is expressed on sub-populations of B-cell malignancies and solid tumors, but not by healthy B cells or normal post-partum tissues. Thus, adoptive transfer of T cells specific for ROR1 has potential to eliminate tumor cells and spare healthy tissues. To test this hypothesis, we developed CARs targeting ROR1 in order to generate T cells specific for malignant cells. Two Sleeping Beauty transposons were constructed with 2nd generation ROR1-specific CARs signaling through CD3ζ and either CD28 (designated ROR1RCD28 or CD137 (designated ROR1RCD137 and were introduced into T cells. We selected for T cells expressing CAR through co-culture with γ-irradiated activating and propagating cells (AaPC, which co-expressed ROR1 and co-stimulatory molecules. Numeric expansion over one month of co-culture on AaPC in presence of soluble interleukin (IL-2 and IL-21 occurred and resulted in a diverse memory phenotype of CAR+ T cells as measured by non-enzymatic digital array (NanoString and multi-panel flow cytometry. Such T cells produced interferon-γ and had specific cytotoxic activity against ROR1+ tumors. Moreover, such cells could eliminate ROR1+ tumor xenografts, especially T cells expressing ROR1RCD137. Clinical trials will investigate the ability of ROR1-specific CAR+ T cells to specifically eliminate tumor cells while maintaining normal B-cell repertoire.

  16. Sleeping Beauty Transposition of Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting Receptor Tyrosine Kinase-Like Orphan Receptor-1 (ROR1) into Diverse Memory T-Cell Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniger, Drew C; Yu, Jianqiang; Huls, M Helen; Figliola, Matthew J; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra N; Widhopf, George F; Hurton, Lenka V; Thokala, Radhika; Singh, Harjeet; Olivares, Simon; Champlin, Richard E; Wierda, William G; Kipps, Thomas J; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2015-01-01

    T cells modified with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 demonstrated clinical activity against some B-cell malignancies. However, this is often accompanied by a loss of normal CD19+ B cells and humoral immunity. Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor-1 (ROR1) is expressed on sub-populations of B-cell malignancies and solid tumors, but not by healthy B cells or normal post-partum tissues. Thus, adoptive transfer of T cells specific for ROR1 has potential to eliminate tumor cells and spare healthy tissues. To test this hypothesis, we developed CARs targeting ROR1 in order to generate T cells specific for malignant cells. Two Sleeping Beauty transposons were constructed with 2nd generation ROR1-specific CARs signaling through CD3ζ and either CD28 (designated ROR1RCD28) or CD137 (designated ROR1RCD137) and were introduced into T cells. We selected for T cells expressing CAR through co-culture with γ-irradiated activating and propagating cells (AaPC), which co-expressed ROR1 and co-stimulatory molecules. Numeric expansion over one month of co-culture on AaPC in presence of soluble interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21 occurred and resulted in a diverse memory phenotype of CAR+ T cells as measured by non-enzymatic digital array (NanoString) and multi-panel flow cytometry. Such T cells produced interferon-γ and had specific cytotoxic activity against ROR1+ tumors. Moreover, such cells could eliminate ROR1+ tumor xenografts, especially T cells expressing ROR1RCD137. Clinical trials will investigate the ability of ROR1-specific CAR+ T cells to specifically eliminate tumor cells while maintaining normal B-cell repertoire.

  17. Adaptation of the MapMan ontology to biotic stress responses: application in solanaceous species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stitt Mark

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The results of transcriptome microarray analysis are usually presented as a list of differentially expressed genes. As these lists can be long, it is hard to interpret the desired experimental treatment effect on the physiology of analysed tissue, e.g. via selected metabolic or other pathways. For some organisms, gene ontologies and data visualization software have been implemented to overcome this problem, whereas for others, software adaptation is yet to be done. Results We present the classification of tentative potato contigs from the potato gene index (StGI available from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI into the MapMan ontology to enable the application of the MapMan family of tools to potato microarrays. Special attention has been focused on mapping genes that could not be annotated based on similarity to Arabidopsis genes alone, thus possibly representing genes unique for potato. 97 such genes were classified into functional BINs (i.e. functional classes after manual annotation. A new pathway, focusing on biotic stress responses, has been added and can be used for all other organisms for which mappings have been done. The BIN representation on the potato 10 k cDNA microarray, in comparison with all putative potato gene sequences, has been tested. The functionality of the prepared potato mapping was validated with experimental data on plant response to viral infection. In total 43,408 unigenes were mapped into 35 corresponding BINs. Conclusion The potato mappings can be used to visualize up-to-date, publicly available, expressed sequence tags (ESTs and other sequences from GenBank, in combination with metabolic pathways. Further expert work on potato annotations will be needed with the ongoing EST and genome sequencing of potato. The current MapMan application for potato is directly applicable for analysis of data obtained on potato 10 k cDNA microarray by TIGR (The Institute for Genomic Research but can also be used

  18. The MAP kinase substrate MKS1 is a regulator of plant defense responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasson, Erik; Jenkins, Thomas; Brodersen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) functions as a regulator of pathogen defense responses, because it is required for both repression of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent resistance and for activation of jasmonate (JA)-dependent defense gene expression. To understand MPK4 signaling mechanisms, we used...

  19. Fire scar mapping for disaster response in KwaZulu-Natal South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the potential of the new Landsat 8 multispectral imagery in rapidly mapping fire scars to aid disaster management response teams in emergency efforts. Maximum likelihood and iso cluster algorithms where used to classify burnt and unburnt areas in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The Landsat 8 sensor ...

  20. How rice Glycogen Synthase Kinase-like 5 (OsGSK5) integrates salinity stress response to source-sink adaptation: a proposed model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thitisaksakul, Maysaya; Dong, Shaoyun; Beckles, Diane M

    2017-11-13

    We have previously shown that overexpression of GSK3-like kinase 5 in rice (OsGSK5) was associated with higher starch accumulation and better growth under severe salinity stress. Short-term (14)CO2 feeding experiments suggested that OsGSK5 promoted higher flux to starch accumulation in the roots under this condition and that this mechanism may help to underscore the better growth characteristics observed. Here, we expand upon this hypothesis and consider (i) how OsGSK5 action could fit into a signaling model that integrates salinity stress to changes in starch metabolism, and (ii) how this would facilitate whole plant physiological adaptions in source-to-sink partitioning. We also discuss additional functions of OsGSK5, necessary to support this adaptive mechanism.

  1. Integrating multibeam backscatter angular response, mosaic and bathymetry data for benthic habitat mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozaimi Che Hasan

    Full Text Available Multibeam echosounders (MBES are increasingly becoming the tool of choice for marine habitat mapping applications. In turn, the rapid expansion of habitat mapping studies has resulted in a need for automated classification techniques to efficiently map benthic habitats, assess confidence in model outputs, and evaluate the importance of variables driving the patterns observed. The benthic habitat characterisation process often involves the analysis of MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic or angular response with observation data providing ground truth. However, studies that make use of the full range of MBES outputs within a single classification process are limited. We present an approach that integrates backscatter angular response with MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic and their derivatives in a classification process using a Random Forests (RF machine-learning algorithm to predict the distribution of benthic biological habitats. This approach includes a method of deriving statistical features from backscatter angular response curves created from MBES data collated within homogeneous regions of a backscatter mosaic. Using the RF algorithm we assess the relative importance of each variable in order to optimise the classification process and simplify models applied. The results showed that the inclusion of the angular response features in the classification process improved the accuracy of the final habitat maps from 88.5% to 93.6%. The RF algorithm identified bathymetry and the angular response mean as the two most important predictors. However, the highest classification rates were only obtained after incorporating additional features derived from bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic. The angular response features were found to be more important to the classification process compared to the backscatter mosaic features. This analysis indicates that integrating angular response information with bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic, along with

  2. Combining electromagnetic navigation and 3-D mapping to reduce fluoroscopy time and achieve optimal CRT response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbero, Umberto; Budano, Carlo; Golzio, Pier Giorgio; Castagno, Davide; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2017-10-04

    Implantation of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices can be challenging, time consuming, and associated with high-dose X-Ray exposure. We present the technique in which an electromagnetic navigation system (MediGuideTM, St. Jude Medical) and an electro-anatomical three-dimensional mapping system (EnSite NavX, St Jude Medical) are usefully combined for implanting ICD-CRT devices with strong reduction of X-ray exposure, and for targeting the most delayed regions in the activation maps avoiding scars for optimal CRT response. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. HapMap SNP Scanner: an online program to mine SNPs responsible for cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, T; Hikita, J; Bleakley, M; Hirosawa, T; Sato-Otsubo, A; Torikai, H; Hamajima, T; Nannya, Y; Demachi-Okamura, A; Maruya, E; Saji, H; Yamamoto, Y; Takahashi, T; Emi, N; Morishima, Y; Kodera, Y; Kuzushima, K; Riddell, S R; Ogawa, S; Akatsuka, Y

    2012-08-01

    Minor histocompatibility (H) antigens are targets of graft-vs-host disease and graft-vs-tumor responses after human leukocyte antigen matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Recently, we reported a strategy for genetic mapping of linkage disequilibrium blocks that encoded novel minor H antigens using the large dataset from the International HapMap Project combined with conventional immunologic assays to assess recognition of HapMap B-lymphoid cell line by minor H antigen-specific T cells. In this study, we have constructed and provide an online interactive program and demonstrate its utility for searching for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) responsible for minor H antigen generation. The website is available as 'HapMap SNP Scanner', and can incorporate T-cell recognition and other data with genotyping datasets from CEU, JPT, CHB, and YRI to provide a list of candidate SNPs that correlate with observed phenotypes. This method should substantially facilitate discovery of novel SNPs responsible for minor H antigens and be applicable for assaying of other specific cell phenotypes (e.g. drug sensitivity) to identify individuals who may benefit from SNP-based customized therapies. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Log-polar mapping-based scale space tracking with adaptive target response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Wen, Gongjian; Kuai, Yangliu; Zhang, Ximing

    2017-05-01

    Correlation filter-based tracking has exhibited impressive robustness and accuracy in recent years. Standard correlation filter-based trackers are restricted to translation estimation and equipped with fixed target response. These trackers produce an inferior performance when encountered with a significant scale variation or appearance change. We propose a log-polar mapping-based scale space tracker with an adaptive target response. This tracker transforms the scale variation of the target in the Cartesian space into a shift along the logarithmic axis in the log-polar space. A one-dimensional scale correlation filter is learned online to estimate the shift along the logarithmic axis. With the log-polar representation, scale estimation is achieved accurately without a multiresolution pyramid. To achieve an adaptive target response, a variance of the Gaussian function is computed from the response map and updated online with a learning rate parameter. Our log-polar mapping-based scale correlation filter and adaptive target response can be combined with any correlation filter-based trackers. In addition, the scale correlation filter can be extended to a two-dimensional correlation filter to achieve joint estimation of the scale variation and in-plane rotation. Experiments performed on an OTB50 benchmark demonstrate that our tracker achieves superior performance against state-of-the-art trackers.

  5. Temperature response of the neuronal cytoskeleton mapped via atomic force and fluorescence microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Spedden, Elise; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal cells change their growth properties in response to external physical stimuli such as variations in external temperature, stiffness of the growth substrate, or topographical guidance cues. Detailed knowledge of the mechanisms that control these biomechanical responses is necessary for understanding the basic principles that underlie neuronal growth and regeneration. Here, we present elasticity maps of living cortical neurons (embryonic rat) as a function of temperature, and correlate these maps to the locations of internal structural components of the cytoskeleton. Neurons display a significant increase in the average elastic modulus upon a decrease in ambient temperature from 37{\\deg}C to 25{\\deg}C. We demonstrate that the dominant mechanism by which the elasticity of the neurons changes in response to temperature is the stiffening of the actin components of the cytoskeleton induced by myosin II. We also report a reversible shift in the location and composition of the high-stiffness areas of the neu...

  6. Mapping brain response to pain in fibromyalgia patients using temporal analysis of FMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Pujol

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nociceptive stimuli may evoke brain responses longer than the stimulus duration often partially detected by conventional neuroimaging. Fibromyalgia patients typically complain of severe pain from gentle stimuli. We aimed to characterize brain response to painful pressure in fibromyalgia patients by generating activation maps adjusted for the duration of brain responses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-seven women (mean age: 47.8 years were assessed with fMRI. The sample included nine fibromyalgia patients and nine healthy subjects who received 4 kg/cm(2 of pressure on the thumb. Nine additional control subjects received 6.8 kg/cm(2 to match the patients for the severity of perceived pain. Independent Component Analysis characterized the temporal dynamics of the actual brain response to pressure. Statistical parametric maps were estimated using the obtained time courses. Brain response to pressure (18 seconds consistently exceeded the stimulus application (9 seconds in somatosensory regions in all groups. fMRI maps following such temporal dynamics showed a complete pain network response (sensory-motor cortices, operculo-insula, cingulate cortex, and basal ganglia to 4 kg/cm(2 of pressure in fibromyalgia patients. In healthy subjects, response to this low intensity pressure involved mainly somatosensory cortices. When matched for perceived pain (6.8 kg/cm(2, control subjects showed also comprehensive activation of pain-related regions, but fibromyalgia patients showed significantly larger activation in the anterior insula-basal ganglia complex and the cingulate cortex. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that data-driven fMRI assessments may complement conventional neuroimaging for characterizing pain responses and that enhancement of brain activation in fibromyalgia patients may be particularly relevant in emotion-related regions.

  7. ShakeMap implementation for Pyrenees in France-Spain border: regional adaptation and earthquake rapid response process.

    OpenAIRE

    Bertil, Didier; Roviró, Jordi; Antonio Jara, Jose; Susagna, Teresa; Nus, Eduard; Goula, Xavier; Colas, Bastien; Dumont, Guillaume; Cabañas, Luis; Anton, Resurección; Calvet, Marie

    2012-01-01

    International audience; The USGS-ShakeMap package is used with a regional adaptation to provide automatic shake maps in rapid response for Pyrenean earthquakes. The Near Real Time system relies on servers designed for data exchange between transborder organizations involved in the Sispyr project. First maps will be provide as soon as possible after the shock, and updated with observed macroseismic intensities on the following hours. Regional Predictive Equations Tapia (2006) and Goula et al. ...

  8. Experimental infection of New Zealand Merino sheep with a suspension of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) strain Telford: Kinetics of the immune response, histopathology and Map culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukkipati, Venkata S R; Ridler, Anne L; Thompson, Keith G; Buddle, Bryce M; Hedgespeth, Barry A; Price-Carter, Marian; Begg, Douglas J; Whittington, Richard J; Gicquel, Brigitte; Murray, Alan

    2016-11-15

    A long-term study was undertaken to monitor immune responses, faecal cultures and clinical disease in sheep experimentally infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) strain Telford. New Zealand Merino lambs (N=56) were challenged with three oral doses of Map suspension. The lambs were weighed and faecal and blood samples obtained at different time-points. At 63 weeks post-challenge, surviving sheep were euthanised and samples of liver, ileo-caecal valve and mesenteric lymph node were collected for histopathology and Map culture. High IFN-γ and antibody responses were evident as early as 8 weeks post-C1 which persisted until the end of the trial. Approximately 92% of the sheep shed Map in faeces at 36 weeks post-challenge, with the prevalence decreasing to around 40% at the end of the trial. Thirteen sheep progressively lost weight and were euthanised between weeks 32 and 58 post-challenge. Nearly 58% of surviving sheep exhibited histo-pathological lesions in at least one of the three tissues sampled, while 42% showed acid-fast bacilli in at least one tissue. A positive Map culture in at least one tissue was obtained from approximately 85% of sheep. These results indicate that the three doses of Map challenge were highly effective in establishing Johne's disease in NZ Merino lambs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dealing with maps: the identification of intellectual responsibilities and the application of relator codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Domingues

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of information about those responsible for the intellectual content of work is one of the most complicated tasks in the bibliographic description of cartographic material. There are particular characteristics that make it difficult to apply some general rules laid down by technical cataloguing manuals for recording this information. The classic situation typified by the monographs — "an author and an editor" or "multiple authors and an editor" — differs from the large quantity of cartographic resources which have various contributors, with distinct functions, who contribute to the production of the resource. Field work, compilation of information and its standardization or homogenization, drawing, engraving or printing are some of the tasks often recorded on the maps associated with different individuals or organizations. In such cases, the problem is to select the person who should be considered as the principal author, determining with this choice the main entry of the record, and who should be chosen as co-authors or secondary authors. It is often difficult to know whether or not the functions performed by each one, or even by only one individual, deserve the epithet of "author" of the map.In cartographic material a great variety of situations and many aspects can be taken into account, which allows evaluating the different solutions to problems that complicate documental treatment. Therefore, maps, loose or forming homogeneous groups, the nature of represented information, the time and institutional context in which they are produced and published, as well as whether they are printed or digital or manuscripts, influence the procedure for giving the authorial statement.Modern maps (produced using digital tools, although they confront librarians with problems about the determination of access points, may be easier to treat than those created prior to the nineteenth century. However, this is not a rule: old maps are not always

  10. Graded-threshold parametric response maps: towards a strategy for adaptive dose painting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lausch, A.; Jensen, N.; Chen, J.; Lee, T. Y.; Lock, M.; Wong, E.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To modify the single-threshold parametric response map (ST-PRM) method for predicting treatment outcomes in order to facilitate its use for guidance of adaptive dose painting in intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods: Multiple graded thresholds were used to extend the ST-PRM method (Nat. Med. 2009;15(5):572-576) such that the full functional change distribution within tumours could be represented with respect to multiple confidence interval estimates for functional changes in similar healthy tissue. The ST-PRM and graded-threshold PRM (GT-PRM) methods were applied to functional imaging scans of 5 patients treated for hepatocellular carcinoma. Pre and post-radiotherapy arterial blood flow maps (ABF) were generated from CT-perfusion scans of each patient. ABF maps were rigidly registered based on aligning tumour centres of mass. ST-PRM and GT-PRM analyses were then performed on overlapping tumour regions within the registered ABF maps. Main findings: The ST-PRMs contained many disconnected clusters of voxels classified as having a significant change in function. While this may be useful to predict treatment response, it may pose challenges for identifying boost volumes or for informing dose-painting by numbers strategies. The GT-PRMs included all of the same information as ST-PRMs but also visualized the full tumour functional change distribution. Heterogeneous clusters in the ST-PRMs often became more connected in the GT-PRMs by voxels with similar functional changes. Conclusions: GT-PRMs provided additional information which helped to visualize relationships between significant functional changes identified by ST-PRMs. This may enhance ST-PRM utility for guiding adaptive dose painting.

  11. Lower Colorado River Geographic Response Plan Restricted Web Mapping Service, Region 9, 2012, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This map service is comprised of data related to Geographic Response Plans (GRPs) for the Lower Colorado River. Data layers were contributed by various stakeholders...

  12. Nisqually - Early Detection Rapid Response, Monitoring and Mapping of High Priority Invasive Species with Nisqually NWRC Weed Warriors 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project will continue a successful program of early detection and rapid response, monitoring and mapping of invasive species on Nisqually NWRC by Weed Warrior...

  13. Nisqually - Early Detection Rapid Response, Monitoring and Mapping of High Priority Invasive Species with Nisqually NWRC Weed Warriors 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project continues a successful program of early detection and rapid response, monitoring and mapping of invasive species on Nisqually NWRC (NNWRC) by Weed...

  14. Nisqually - Early Detection Rapid Response, Monitoring and Mapping of High Priority Invasives with Refuge Weed Warriors 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project plan was to initiate a program for early detection and response, monitoring and mapping of invasive species on Grays Harbor NWR and continued current...

  15. Sustained responses for pitch and vowels map to similar sites in human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutschalk, Alexander; Uppenkamp, Stefan

    2011-06-01

    Several studies have shown enhancement of auditory evoked sustained responses for periodic over non-periodic sounds and for vowels over non-vowels. Here, we directly compared pitch and vowels using synthesized speech with a "damped" amplitude modulation. These stimuli were parametrically varied to yield four classes of matched stimuli: (1) periodic vowels (2) non-periodic vowels, (3) periodic non-vowels, and (4) non-periodic non-vowels. 12 listeners were studied with combined MEG and EEG. Sustained responses were reliably enhanced for vowels and periodicity. Dipole source analysis revealed that a vowel contrast (vowel-non-vowel) and the periodicity-pitch contrast (periodic-non-periodic) mapped to the same site in antero-lateral Heschl's gyrus. In contrast, the non-periodic, non-vowel condition mapped to a more medial and posterior site. The sustained enhancement for vowels was significantly more prominent when the vowel identity was varied, compared to a condition where only one vowel was repeated, indicating selective adaptation of the response. These results render it unlikely that there are spatially distinct fields for vowel and pitch processing in the auditory cortex. However, the common processing of vowels and pitch raises the possibility that there is an early speech-specific field in Heschl's gyrus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Apparent diffusion coefficient parametric response mapping MRI for follow-up of glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ra Gyoung [Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seo-gu, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho Sung; Hong, Gil Sun; Kim, Sang Joon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Songpa-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yoon [Bundang Jesaeng Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    To determine the diagnostic superiority of parametric response mapping of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCPR) for predicting glioblastoma treatment response, compared to single time point measurement. Fifty post-treatment glioblastoma patients were enrolled. ADCPR was calculated from serial apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps acquired before and at the time of first detection of an enlarged contrast-enhancing lesion on voxel-by-voxel basis. The percentage-decrease in ADCPR and tenth percentile histogram cutoff value of ADC (ADC10) were compared at subsequent 3-month and 1-year follow-ups. The percentage-decrease in ADCPR was significantly higher in the progression group (mean = 33.2-38.3 %) than in the stable-response group (mean = 9.7 %) at 3 months follow-up (corrected p < 0.001 for both readers). ADCPR significantly improved area under the receiver operating characteristic curve from 0.67 to 0.88 (corrected p = 0.037) and from 0.70 to 0.92 (corrected p = 0.020) for both readers, respectively, compared to ADC10 at 3-month follow-up, but did not significantly improve at 1-year follow-up. The inter-reader agreement was higher for ADCPR than ADC10 (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.93 versus 0.86). Voxel-based ADCPR appears to be a superior imaging biomarker than ADC, particularly for predicting early tumour progression in patients with glioblastoma. (orig.)

  17. Mapping genetic variants associated with beta-adrenergic responses in inbred mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micha Hersch

    Full Text Available β-blockers and β-agonists are primarily used to treat cardiovascular diseases. Inter-individual variability in response to both drug classes is well recognized, yet the identity and relative contribution of the genetic players involved are poorly understood. This work is the first genome-wide association study (GWAS addressing the values and susceptibility of cardiovascular-related traits to a selective β(1-blocker, Atenolol (ate, and a β-agonist, Isoproterenol (iso. The phenotypic dataset consisted of 27 highly heritable traits, each measured across 22 inbred mouse strains and four pharmacological conditions. The genotypic panel comprised 79922 informative SNPs of the mouse HapMap resource. Associations were mapped by Efficient Mixed Model Association (EMMA, a method that corrects for the population structure and genetic relatedness of the various strains. A total of 205 separate genome-wide scans were analyzed. The most significant hits include three candidate loci related to cardiac and body weight, three loci for electrocardiographic (ECG values, two loci for the susceptibility of atrial weight index to iso, four loci for the susceptibility of systolic blood pressure (SBP to perturbations of the β-adrenergic system, and one locus for the responsiveness of QTc (p<10(-8. An additional 60 loci were suggestive for one or the other of the 27 traits, while 46 others were suggestive for one or the other drug effects (p<10(-6. Most hits tagged unexpected regions, yet at least two loci for the susceptibility of SBP to β-adrenergic drugs pointed at members of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Loci for cardiac-related traits were preferentially enriched in genes expressed in the heart, while 23% of the testable loci were replicated with datasets of the Mouse Phenome Database (MPD. Altogether these data and validation tests indicate that the mapped loci are relevant to the traits and responses studied.

  18. Collaborative Open Source Geospatial Tools and Maps Supporting the Response Planning to Disastrous Earthquake Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina James

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The latest improvements in geo-informatics offer new opportunities in a wide range of territorial and environmental applications. In this general framework, a relevant issue is represented by earthquake early warning and emergency management. This research work presents the investigation and development of a simple and innovative geospatial methodology and related collaborative open source geospatial tools for predicting and mapping the vulnerability to seismic hazard in order to support the response planning to disastrous events. The proposed geospatial methodology and tools have been integrated into an open source collaborative GIS system, designed and developed as an integrated component of an earthquake early warning and emergency management system.

  19. UAV Deployment Exercise for Mapping Purposes: Evaluation of Emergency Response Applications

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    Piero Boccardo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Exploiting the decrease of costs related to UAV technology, the humanitarian community started piloting the use of similar systems in humanitarian crises several years ago in different application fields, i.e., disaster mapping and information gathering, community capacity building, logistics and even transportation of goods. Part of the author’s group, composed of researchers in the field of applied geomatics, has been piloting the use of UAVs since 2006, with a specific focus on disaster management application. In the framework of such activities, a UAV deployment exercise was jointly organized with the Regional Civil Protection authority, mainly aimed at assessing the operational procedures to deploy UAVs for mapping purposes and the usability of the acquired data in an emergency response context. In the paper the technical features of the UAV platforms will be described, comparing the main advantages/disadvantages of fixed-wing versus rotor platforms. The main phases of the adopted operational procedure will be discussed and assessed especially in terms of time required to carry out each step, highlighting potential bottlenecks and in view of the national regulation framework, which is rapidly evolving. Different methodologies for the processing of the acquired data will be described and discussed, evaluating the fitness for emergency response applications.

  20. UAV Deployment Exercise for Mapping Purposes: Evaluation of Emergency Response Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardo, Piero; Chiabrando, Filiberto; Dutto, Furio; Tonolo, Fabio Giulio; Lingua, Andrea

    2015-07-02

    Exploiting the decrease of costs related to UAV technology, the humanitarian community started piloting the use of similar systems in humanitarian crises several years ago in different application fields, i.e., disaster mapping and information gathering, community capacity building, logistics and even transportation of goods. Part of the author's group, composed of researchers in the field of applied geomatics, has been piloting the use of UAVs since 2006, with a specific focus on disaster management application. In the framework of such activities, a UAV deployment exercise was jointly organized with the Regional Civil Protection authority, mainly aimed at assessing the operational procedures to deploy UAVs for mapping purposes and the usability of the acquired data in an emergency response context. In the paper the technical features of the UAV platforms will be described, comparing the main advantages/disadvantages of fixed-wing versus rotor platforms. The main phases of the adopted operational procedure will be discussed and assessed especially in terms of time required to carry out each step, highlighting potential bottlenecks and in view of the national regulation framework, which is rapidly evolving. Different methodologies for the processing of the acquired data will be described and discussed, evaluating the fitness for emergency response applications.

  1. The Propositional Logic of Mapping Transnational American Studies—A Response to “‘Deep Maps’: A Brief for Digital Palimpsest Mapping Projects”

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    Karen Elizabeth Bishop

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This response to Shelley Fisher Fishkin's “‘Deep Maps’: A Brief for Digital Palimpsest Mapping Projects” explicates the layers of complex interconnected practices that Fishkin’s paradigm of Deep Maps instates. Bishop notes that Fishkin’s trope of palimpsests “depends on a scholarly methodology that privileges the transnational as a structure, a means, and a dynamic site of excavation for intellectual inquiry” and “provides for new forms of collaborative writing and new reading practices” in which scholars, students, and even members of the general public can build geo-archives together. Fishkin’s Deep Maps project, Bishop concludes, foregrounds a construction of place in a “self-reflective placial exercise” that accepts “other national literatures and histories [with] . . . their own ways of understanding and engaging with the transnational.”

  2. A hybrid model for mapping simplified seismic response via a GIS-metamodel approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grelle, G.; Bonito, L.; Revellino, P.; Guerriero, L.; Guadagno, F. M.

    2014-07-01

    In earthquake-prone areas, site seismic response due to lithostratigraphic sequence plays a key role in seismic hazard assessment. A hybrid model, consisting of GIS and metamodel (model of model) procedures, was introduced aimed at estimating the 1-D spatial seismic site response in accordance with spatial variability of sediment parameters. Inputs and outputs are provided and processed by means of an appropriate GIS model, named GIS Cubic Model (GCM). This consists of a block-layered parametric structure aimed at resolving a predicted metamodel by means of pixel to pixel vertical computing. The metamodel, opportunely calibrated, is able to emulate the classic shape of the spectral acceleration response in relation to the main physical parameters that characterize the spectrum itself. Therefore, via the GCM structure and the metamodel, the hybrid model provides maps of normalized acceleration response spectra. The hybrid model was applied and tested on the built-up area of the San Giorgio del Sannio village, located in a high-risk seismic zone of southern Italy. Efficiency tests showed a good correspondence between the spectral values resulting from the proposed approach and the 1-D physical computational models. Supported by lithology and geophysical data and corresponding accurate interpretation regarding modelling, the hybrid model can be an efficient tool in assessing urban planning seismic hazard/risk.

  3. Mapping the sequence of brain events in response to disgusting food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Jesus; Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; Coronas, Ramón; Esteba-Castillo, Susanna; Rigla, Mercedes; Martínez-Vilavella, Gerard; Deus, Joan; Novell, Ramón; Caixàs, Assumpta

    2018-01-01

    Warning signals indicating that a food is potentially dangerous may evoke a response that is not limited to the feeling of disgust. We investigated the sequence of brain events in response to visual representations of disgusting food using a dynamic image analysis. Functional MRI was acquired in 30 healthy subjects while they were watching a movie showing disgusting food scenes interspersed with the scenes of appetizing food. Imaging analysis included the identification of the global brain response and the generation of frame-by-frame activation maps at the temporal resolution of 2 s. Robust activations were identified in brain structures conventionally associated with the experience of disgust, but our analysis also captured a variety of other brain elements showing distinct temporal evolutions. The earliest events included transient changes in the orbitofrontal cortex and visual areas, followed by a more durable engagement of the periaqueductal gray, a pivotal element in the mediation of responses to threat. A subsequent core phase was characterized by the activation of subcortical and cortical structures directly concerned not only with the emotional dimension of disgust (e.g., amygdala-hippocampus, insula), but also with the regulation of food intake (e.g., hypothalamus). In a later phase, neural excitement extended to broad cortical areas, the thalamus and cerebellum, and finally to the default mode network that signaled the progressive termination of the evoked response. The response to disgusting food representations is not limited to the emotional domain of disgust, and may sequentially involve a variety of broadly distributed brain networks. Hum Brain Mapp 39:369-380, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Bayesian Mapping Reveals That Attention Boosts Neural Responses to Predicted and Unpredicted Stimuli.

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    Garrido, Marta I; Rowe, Elise G; Halász, Veronika; Mattingley, Jason B

    2017-04-10

    Predictive coding posits that the human brain continually monitors the environment for regularities and detects inconsistencies. It is unclear, however, what effect attention has on expectation processes, as there have been relatively few studies and the results of these have yielded contradictory findings. Here, we employed Bayesian model comparison to adjudicate between 2 alternative computational models. The "Opposition" model states that attention boosts neural responses equally to predicted and unpredicted stimuli, whereas the "Interaction" model assumes that attentional boosting of neural signals depends on the level of predictability. We designed a novel, audiospatial attention task that orthogonally manipulated attention and prediction by playing oddball sequences in either the attended or unattended ear. We observed sensory prediction error responses, with electroencephalography, across all attentional manipulations. Crucially, posterior probability maps revealed that, overall, the Opposition model better explained scalp and source data, suggesting that attention boosts responses to predicted and unpredicted stimuli equally. Furthermore, Dynamic Causal Modeling showed that these Opposition effects were expressed in plastic changes within the mismatch negativity network. Our findings provide empirical evidence for a computational model of the opposing interplay of attention and expectation in the brain. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Mapping the Speech Code: Cortical Responses Linking the Perception and Production of Vowels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerman, William L; Meyer, Antje S; McQueen, James M

    2017-01-01

    The acoustic realization of speech is constrained by the physical mechanisms by which it is produced. Yet for speech perception, the degree to which listeners utilize experience derived from speech production has long been debated. In the present study, we examined how sensorimotor adaptation during production may affect perception, and how this relationship may be reflected in early vs. late electrophysiological responses. Participants first performed a baseline speech production task, followed by a vowel categorization task during which EEG responses were recorded. In a subsequent speech production task, half the participants received shifted auditory feedback, leading most to alter their articulations. This was followed by a second, post-training vowel categorization task. We compared changes in vowel production to both behavioral and electrophysiological changes in vowel perception. No differences in phonetic categorization were observed between groups receiving altered or unaltered feedback. However, exploratory analyses revealed correlations between vocal motor behavior and phonetic categorization. EEG analyses revealed correlations between vocal motor behavior and cortical responses in both early and late time windows. These results suggest that participants' recent production behavior influenced subsequent vowel perception. We suggest that the change in perception can be best characterized as a mapping of acoustics onto articulation.

  6. SiSeRHMap v1.0: a simulator for mapped seismic response using a hybrid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grelle, Gerardo; Bonito, Laura; Lampasi, Alessandro; Revellino, Paola; Guerriero, Luigi; Sappa, Giuseppe; Guadagno, Francesco Maria

    2016-04-01

    The SiSeRHMap (simulator for mapped seismic response using a hybrid model) is a computerized methodology capable of elaborating prediction maps of seismic response in terms of acceleration spectra. It was realized on the basis of a hybrid model which combines different approaches and models in a new and non-conventional way. These approaches and models are organized in a code architecture composed of five interdependent modules. A GIS (geographic information system) cubic model (GCM), which is a layered computational structure based on the concept of lithodynamic units and zones, aims at reproducing a parameterized layered subsoil model. A meta-modelling process confers a hybrid nature to the methodology. In this process, the one-dimensional (1-D) linear equivalent analysis produces acceleration response spectra for a specified number of site profiles using one or more input motions. The shear wave velocity-thickness profiles, defined as trainers, are randomly selected in each zone. Subsequently, a numerical adaptive simulation model (Emul-spectra) is optimized on the above trainer acceleration response spectra by means of a dedicated evolutionary algorithm (EA) and the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) as the final optimizer. In the final step, the GCM maps executor module produces a serial map set of a stratigraphic seismic response at different periods, grid solving the calibrated Emul-spectra model. In addition, the spectra topographic amplification is also computed by means of a 3-D validated numerical prediction model. This model is built to match the results of the numerical simulations related to isolate reliefs using GIS morphometric data. In this way, different sets of seismic response maps are developed on which maps of design acceleration response spectra are also defined by means of an enveloping technique.

  7. Collaborative damage mapping for emergency response: the role of Cognitive Systems Engineering

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    Kerle, N.; Hoffman, R. R.

    2013-01-01

    Remote sensing is increasingly used to assess disaster damage, traditionally by professional image analysts. A recent alternative is crowdsourcing by volunteers experienced in remote sensing, using internet-based mapping portals. We identify a range of problems in current approaches, including how volunteers can best be instructed for the task, ensuring that instructions are accurately understood and translate into valid results, or how the mapping scheme must be adapted for different map user needs. The volunteers, the mapping organizers, and the map users all perform complex cognitive tasks, yet little is known about the actual information needs of the users. We also identify problematic assumptions about the capabilities of the volunteers, principally related to the ability to perform the mapping, and to understand mapping instructions unambiguously. We propose that any robust scheme for collaborative damage mapping must rely on Cognitive Systems Engineering and its principal method, Cognitive Task Analysis (CTA), to understand the information and decision requirements of the map and image users, and how the volunteers can be optimally instructed and their mapping contributions merged into suitable map products. We recommend an iterative approach involving map users, remote sensing specialists, cognitive systems engineers and instructional designers, as well as experimental psychologists.

  8. Mapping of hormones and cortisol responses in patients after Lyme neuroborreliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernerudh Jan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent symptoms after treatment for neuroborreliosis are common for reasons mainly unknown. These symptoms are often unspecific and could be caused by dysfunctions in endocrine systems, an issue that has not been previously addressed systematically. We therefore mapped hormone levels in patients with previous confirmed Lyme neuroborreliosis of different outcomes and compared them with a healthy control group. Methods Twenty patients of a retrospective cohort of patients treated for definite Lyme neuroborreliosis were recruited 2.3 to 3.7 years (median 2.7 after diagnosis, together with 23 healthy controls. Lyme neuroborreliosis patients were stratified into two groups according to a symptom/sign score. All participants underwent anthropometric and physiological investigation as well as an extensive biochemical endocrine investigation including a short high-dose adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation (Synacthen® test. In addition to hormonal status, we also examined electrolytes, 25-hydroxy-vitamin D and interleukin-6. Results Eight patients (40% had pronounced symptoms 2-3 years after treatment. This group had a higher cortisol response to synacthen as compared with both controls and the Lyme neuroborreliosis patients without remaining symptoms (p Conclusions Apart from a positive association between the occurrence of long-lasting complaints after Lyme neuroborreliosis and cortisol response to synacthen, no corticotropic insufficiency or other serious hormonal dysfunction was found to be associated with remaining symptoms after treatment for Lyme neuroborreliosis.

  9. Late Phase of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response Pathway Is Regulated by Hog1 MAP Kinase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicknell, Alicia A.; Tourtellotte, Joel; Niwa, Maho

    2010-01-01

    When unfolded proteins accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causing ER stress, the unfolded protein response (UPR) responds rapidly to induce a transcriptional program that functions to alleviate the stress. However, under extreme conditions, when UPR activation is not sufficient to alleviate ER stress, the stress may persist long term. Very little is known about how the cell responds to persistent ER stress that is not resolved by the immediate activation of the UPR. We show that Hog1 MAP kinase becomes phosphorylated during the late stage of ER stress and helps the ER regain homeostasis. Although Hog1 is well known to function in osmotic stress and cell wall integrity pathways, we show that the activation mechanism for Hog1 during ER stress is distinct from both of these pathways. During late stage ER stress, upon phosphorylation, Hog1 translocates into the nucleus and regulates gene expression. Subsequently, Hog1 returns to the cytoplasm, where its phosphorylation levels remain high. From its cytoplasmic location, Hog1 contributes to the activation of autophagy by enhancing the stability of Atg8, a critical autophagy protein. Thus, Hog1 coordinates a multifaceted response to persistent ER stress. PMID:20382742

  10. Spatial representation and cognitive modulation of response variability in the lateral intraparietal area priority map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Annegret L; Goldberg, Michael E; Krishna, B Suresh

    2013-10-09

    The lateral intraparietal area (LIP) in the macaque contains a priority-based representation of the visual scene. We previously showed that the mean spike rate of LIP neurons is strongly influenced by spatially wide-ranging surround suppression in a manner that effectively sharpens the priority map. Reducing response variability can also improve the precision of LIP's priority map. We show that when a monkey plans a visually guided delayed saccade with an intervening distractor, variability (measured by the Fano factor) decreases both for neurons representing the saccade goal and for neurons representing the broad spatial surround. The reduction in Fano factor is maximal for neurons representing the saccade goal and steadily decreases for neurons representing more distant locations. LIP Fano factor changes are behaviorally significant: increasing expected reward leads to lower variability for the LIP representation of both the target and distractor locations, and trials with shorter latency saccades are associated with lower Fano factors in neurons representing the surround. Thus, the LIP Fano factor reflects both stimulus and behavioral engagement. Quantitative modeling shows that the interaction between mean spike count and target-receptive field (RF) distance in the surround during the predistractor epoch is multiplicative: the Fano factor increases more steeply with mean spike count further away from the RF. A negative-binomial model for LIP spike counts captures these findings quantitatively, suggests underlying mechanisms based on trial-by-trial variations in mean spike rate or burst-firing patterns, and potentially provides a principled framework to account simultaneously for the previously observed unsystematic relationships between spike rate and variability in different brain areas.

  11. How to include the variability of TMS responses in simulations: a speech mapping case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geeter, N.; Lioumis, P.; Laakso, A.; Crevecoeur, G.; Dupré, L.

    2016-11-01

    When delivered over a specific cortical site, TMS can temporarily disrupt the ongoing process in that area. This allows mapping of speech-related areas for preoperative evaluation purposes. We numerically explore the observed variability of TMS responses during a speech mapping experiment performed with a neuronavigation system. We selected four cases with very small perturbations in coil position and orientation. In one case (E) a naming error occurred, while in the other cases (NEA, B, C) the subject appointed the images as smoothly as without TMS. A realistic anisotropic head model was constructed of the subject from T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI. The induced electric field distributions were computed, associated to the coil parameters retrieved from the neuronavigation system. Finally, the membrane potentials along relevant white matter fibre tracts, extracted from DTI-based tractography, were computed using a compartmental cable equation. While only minor differences could be noticed between the induced electric field distributions of the four cases, computing the corresponding membrane potentials revealed different subsets of tracts were activated. A single tract was activated for all coil positions. Another tract was only triggered for case E. NEA induced action potentials in 13 tracts, while NEB stimulated 11 tracts and NEC one. The calculated results are certainly sensitive to the coil specifications, demonstrating the observed variability in this study. However, even though a tract connecting Broca’s with Wernicke’s area is only triggered for the error case, further research is needed on other study cases and on refining the neural model with synapses and network connections. Case- and subject-specific modelling that includes both electromagnetic fields and neuronal activity enables demonstration of the variability in TMS experiments and can capture the interaction with complex neural networks.

  12. Seismic Hazard Maps for Seattle, Washington, Incorporating 3D Sedimentary Basin Effects, Nonlinear Site Response, and Rupture Directivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Arthur D.; Stephenson, William J.; Carver, David L.; Williams, Robert A.; Odum, Jack K.; Rhea, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This report presents probabilistic seismic hazard maps for Seattle, Washington, based on over 500 3D simulations of ground motions from scenario earthquakes. These maps include 3D sedimentary basin effects and rupture directivity. Nonlinear site response for soft-soil sites of fill and alluvium was also applied in the maps. The report describes the methodology for incorporating source and site dependent amplification factors into a probabilistic seismic hazard calculation. 3D simulations were conducted for the various earthquake sources that can affect Seattle: Seattle fault zone, Cascadia subduction zone, South Whidbey Island fault, and background shallow and deep earthquakes. The maps presented in this document used essentially the same set of faults and distributed-earthquake sources as in the 2002 national seismic hazard maps. The 3D velocity model utilized in the simulations was validated by modeling the amplitudes and waveforms of observed seismograms from five earthquakes in the region, including the 2001 M6.8 Nisqually earthquake. The probabilistic seismic hazard maps presented here depict 1 Hz response spectral accelerations with 10%, 5%, and 2% probabilities of exceedance in 50 years. The maps are based on determinations of seismic hazard for 7236 sites with a spacing of 280 m. The maps show that the most hazardous locations for this frequency band (around 1 Hz) are soft-soil sites (fill and alluvium) within the Seattle basin and along the inferred trace of the frontal fault of the Seattle fault zone. The next highest hazard is typically found for soft-soil sites in the Duwamish Valley south of the Seattle basin. In general, stiff-soil sites in the Seattle basin exhibit higher hazard than stiff-soil sites outside the basin. Sites with shallow bedrock outside the Seattle basin have the lowest estimated hazard for this frequency band.

  13. Map Showing Seacliff Response to Climatic and Seismic Events, Seabright Beach, Santa Cruz County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Richmond, Bruce M.; D'Iorio, Mimi M.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction The coastal cliffs along much of the central California coast are actively retreating. Large storms and periodic earthquakes are responsible for most of the documented sea cliff slope failures. Long-term average erosion rates calculated for this section of coast do not provide the spatial or temporal data resolution necessary to identify the processes responsible for retreat of the sea cliffs where episodic retreat threatens homes and community infrastructure. Research suggests that more erosion occurs along the California coast over a short time scale, during periods of severe storms or seismic activity, than occurs during decades of normal weather or seismic quiescence. This is the third map in a series of maps prepared to document the processes of short-term sea cliff retreat through the identification of slope failure styles, spatial variability of failures, and temporal variation in retreat amounts in an area that has been identified as an erosion hotspot. This map presents sea cliff failure and retreat data from the Seabright Beach section, California, which is located on the east side of Santa Cruz along the northern Monterey Bay coast. The data presented in this map series provide high-resolution spatial and temporal information on the location, amount, and processes of sea cliff retreat in Santa Cruz, California. These data show the response of the sea cliffs to both large magnitude earthquakes and severe climatic events such as El Ni?os; this information may prove useful in predicting the future response of the cliffs to events of similar magnitude. The map data can also be incorporated into Global Information System (GIS) for use by researchers and community planners. During this study we developed a method for investigating short-term processes of sea cliff evolution using rectified photographic stereo models. This method allows us to document the linear extent of cliff failures, the spatial and temporal relationship between failures, and

  14. Epigenomic mapping and effect sizes of noncoding variants associated with psychotropic drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Gerald A; Allyn-Feuer, Ari; Athey, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    To provide insight into potential regulatory mechanisms of gene expression underlying addiction, analgesia, psychotropic drug response and adverse drug events, genome-wide association studies searching for variants associated with these phenotypes has been undertaken with limited success. We undertook analysis of these results with the aim of applying epigenetic knowledge to aid variant discovery and interpretation. We applied conditional imputation to results from 26 genome-wide association studies and three candidate gene-association studies. The analysis workflow included data from chromatin conformation capture, chromatin state annotation, DNase I hypersensitivity, hypomethylation, anatomical localization and biochronicity. We also made use of chromatin state data from the epigenome roadmap, transcription factor-binding data, spatial maps from published Hi-C datasets and 'guilt by association' methods. We identified 31 pharmacoepigenomic SNPs from a total of 2024 variants in linkage disequilibrium with lead SNPs, of which only 6% were coding variants. Interrogation of chromatin state using our workflow and the epigenome roadmap showed agreement on 34 of 35 tissue assignments to regulatory elements including enhancers and promoters. Loop boundary domains were inferred by association with CTCF (CCCTC-binding factor) and cohesin, suggesting proximity to topologically associating domain boundaries and enhancer clusters. Spatial interactions between enhancer-promoter pairs detected both known and previously unknown mechanisms. Addiction and analgesia SNPs were common in relevant populations and exhibited large effect sizes, whereas a SNP located in the promoter of the SLC1A2 gene exhibited a moderate effect size for lithium response in bipolar disorder in patients of European ancestry. SNPs associated with drug-induced organ injury were rare but exhibited the largest effect sizes, consistent with the published literature. This work demonstrates that an in silico

  15. EPA Updates Flint Response Website with Interactive Map, Chlorine Sampling Results

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    FLINT, MICH. -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is releasing preliminary water quality data about chlorine levels in Flint's drinking water, as well as an interactive map of sampling results in Flint. The map includes data from initial chlorine te

  16. Two-to-one colour-response mapping and the presence of semantic conflict in the Stroop task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil eHasshim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of recent studies have utilised the two-to-one mapping paradigm in the Stroop task. In this paradigm, the word red might be presented in blue when both red and blue share the same response key (same-response trials. This manipulation has been used to show the separate contributions of (within semantic category conflict and response conflict to Stroop interference. Such results evidencing semantic category conflict are incompatible with models of the Stroop task that are based on response conflict only. However, the nature of the same-response trials is unclear since they are also likely to involve response facilitation given that both dimensions of the stimulus provide evidence towards the same response key. In this study we explored this possibility by comparing them with three other trial types. We report strong (Bayesian evidence for no statistical difference between same-response and non-colour word neutral trials, faster responses to same-response trials than to non-response set incongruent trials, and no differences between same-response vs. congruent trials when contingency is controlled. Our results suggest that when RT is the dependent variable, same-response trials are not different from neutral trials indicating that they cannot be used reliably to determine the presence or absence of semantic category conflict. In light of these results, the interpretation of a series of recent studies might have to be reassessed.

  17. Multichannel time domain fNIRS mapping of cortical activation and superficial systemic responses during neuromuscular electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, R.; Muthalib, M.; Zucchelli, L.; Perrey, S.; Contini, D.; Caffini, M.; Spinelli, L.; Kerr, G.; Torricelli, A.

    2013-06-01

    We recorded maps of cortical and systemic hemodynamic responses (oxy-hemoglobin, O2Hb and deoxy-hemoglobin, HHb) during incremental neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) of the right forearm in nine subjects by a 32- channel time domain fNIRS (TD-fNIRS) instrument. Statistical parametric maps (SPM) relative to the different current stimulations (under and over the maximal tolerated intensity-MTI) versus the 10%MTI were generated. Exploiting the temporal information contained in the TD-fNIRS signal it was possible to create different maps referring to the deeper (cortical activations) and the more superficial (systemic changes) head layers. The increasing of the stimulation current on the right forearm muscle produced a significantly larger bilateral sensorimotor and prefrontal cortical activations (i.e. increase in the O2Hb and decrease in HHb) than the systemic changes. Physiological parameters (heart rate, breathing rate and skin conductance) were also monitored.

  18. Principal component analysis of the CT density histogram to generate parametric response maps of COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, N.; Capaldi, D. P. I.; Pike, D.; McCormack, D. G.; Cunningham, I. A.; Parraga, G.

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary x-ray computed tomography (CT) may be used to characterize emphysema and airways disease in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). One analysis approach - parametric response mapping (PMR) utilizes registered inspiratory and expiratory CT image volumes and CT-density-histogram thresholds, but there is no consensus regarding the threshold values used, or their clinical meaning. Principal-component-analysis (PCA) of the CT density histogram can be exploited to quantify emphysema using data-driven CT-density-histogram thresholds. Thus, the objective of this proof-of-concept demonstration was to develop a PRM approach using PCA-derived thresholds in COPD patients and ex-smokers without airflow limitation. Methods: Fifteen COPD ex-smokers and 5 normal ex-smokers were evaluated. Thoracic CT images were also acquired at full inspiration and full expiration and these images were non-rigidly co-registered. PCA was performed for the CT density histograms, from which the components with the highest eigenvalues greater than one were summed. Since the values of the principal component curve correlate directly with the variability in the sample, the maximum and minimum points on the curve were used as threshold values for the PCA-adjusted PRM technique. Results: A significant correlation was determined between conventional and PCA-adjusted PRM with 3He MRI apparent diffusion coefficient (p<0.001), with CT RA950 (p<0.0001), as well as with 3He MRI ventilation defect percent, a measurement of both small airways disease (p=0.049 and p=0.06, respectively) and emphysema (p=0.02). Conclusions: PRM generated using PCA thresholds of the CT density histogram showed significant correlations with CT and 3He MRI measurements of emphysema, but not airways disease.

  19. Near-Surface Geophysical Mapping of the Hydrological Response to an Intense Rainfall Event at the Field Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, G.; Vanderlinden, K.; Giraldez, J. V.; Espejo, A. J.; Muriel, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    Soil moisture plays an important role in a wide variety of biogeochemical fluxes in the soil-plant-atmosphere system and governs the (eco)hydrological response of a catchment to an external forcing such as rainfall. Near-surface electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors that measure the soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) provide a fast and non-invasive means for characterizing this response at the field or catchment scale through high-resolution time-lapse mapping. Here we show how ECa maps, obtained before and after an intense rainfall event of 125 mm h-1, elucidate differences in soil moisture patterns and hydrologic response of an experimental field as a consequence of differed soil management. The dryland field (Vertisol) was located in SW Spain and cropped with a typical wheat-sunflower-legume rotation. Both, near-surface and subsurface ECa (ECas and ECad, respectively), were measured using the EM38-DD EMI sensor in a mobile configuration. Raw ECa measurements and Mean Relative Differences (MRD) provided information on soil moisture patterns while time-lapse maps were used to evaluate the hydrologic response of the field. ECa maps of the field, measured before and after the rainfall event showed similar patterns. The field depressions where most of water and sediments accumulated had the highest ECa and MRD values. The SE-oriented soil, which was deeper and more exposed to sun and wind, showed the lowest ECa and MRD. The largest differences raised in the central part of the field where a high ECa and MRD area appeared after the rainfall event as a consequence of the smaller soil depth and a possible subsurface flux concentration. Time-lapse maps of both ECa and MRD were also similar. The direct drill plots showed higher increments of ECa and MRD as a result of the smaller runoff production. Time-lapse ECa increments showed a bimodal distribution differentiating clearly the direct drill from the conventional and minimum tillage plots. However this kind

  20. Students' Response to the Questionnaire about the Usefulness of Concept Maps for Problem-Based Learning and the Forms of Concept Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bong Jin; Kim, Seok Kon

    2009-03-01

    Concept maps have been studied and used in diverse ways in scientific fields. This study aimed to investigate the usefulness and limitations of using concept maps during problem-based learning (PBL) in Year 3 medical students. After each PBL module, we gathered concept maps from each pair of students and questionnaires about the usefulness and limitations of concept maps, and analyzed them. There were two types of concept maps, with some modifications. The students felt that concept maps provided overall understanding, analysis, and reorganization of problem cases. But, they also criticized shortage of disciplines related to drawing skills and rationales for each type of map. A strong need for expert maps and feedback for students resulted. For optimal use of concept maps, we recommend that the committee implements a plan to teach drawing skills, explains rationales for each type of map, and gives feedback to students.

  1. Identification of genes involved in a water stress response in timothy and mapping of orthologous loci in perennial ryegrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonavičienė, Kristina; Studer, Bruno; Asp, Torben

    2012-01-01

    In order to characterize the response of selected grasses to water stress, relative water content (RWC) in leaves and quantum efficiency of photosystem 2 (Fv/Fm) were measured in Phleum pratense L., P. bertolonii DC. and P. phleoides H. Karst. during 6 d of water stress. The results indicated...... differential responses to water stress among the three Phleum species with higher water deficit sensitivity of P. pratense and P. bertolonii than that of P. phleoides. The cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technique was applied to identify differentially expressed genes responding...... to water stress in P. pratense. Cloned and sequenced differentially expressed fragments (DEFs) were used for primer design in order to identify orthologous genes in Lolium perenne L. Twelve genes orthologous to P. pratense DEFs were mapped in the L. perenne mapping population VrnA based on a high...

  2. Auditory middle latency responses differ in right- and left-handed subjects: an evaluation through topographic brain mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebbi, Mehrnaz; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Alborzi, Marzieh Sharifian; Najafi-Koopaie, Mojtaba; Farahani, Ehsan Darestani; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the association of handedness with auditory middle latency responses (AMLRs) using topographic brain mapping by comparing amplitudes and latencies in frontocentral and hemispheric regions of interest (ROIs). The study included 44 healthy subjects with normal hearing (22 left handed and 22 right handed). AMLRs were recorded from 29 scalp electrodes in response to binaural 4-kHz tone bursts. Frontocentral ROI comparisons revealed that Pa and Pb amplitudes were significantly larger in the left-handed than the right-handed group. Topographic brain maps showed different distributions in AMLR components between the two groups. In hemispheric comparisons, Pa amplitude differed significantly across groups. A left-hemisphere emphasis of Pa was found in the right-handed group but not in the left-handed group. This study provides evidence that handedness is associated with AMLR components in frontocentral and hemispheric ROI. Handedness should be considered an essential factor in the clinical or experimental use of AMLRs.

  3. Native T1 and T2 mapping by CMR in lupus myocarditis: Disease recognition and response to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojar, Rocio; Foote, Lucy; Sangle, Shirish; Marber, Mike; Mayr, Manuel; Carr-White, Gerry; D'Cruz, David; Nagel, Eike; Puntmann, Valentina O

    2016-11-01

    Lupus myocarditis is likely more common than recognized clinically due to non-specific symptoms and lack of reliable non-invasive diagnostic tests. We investigated the role of native T1 and T2 in recognition of active myocardial inflammatory involvement in patients with systemic lupus erythematous (SLE). 76 patients with clinically suspected lupus myocarditis (14 males, age: 44±16years) underwent quantitative tissue characterization with native T1 and T2 mapping. Normotensive healthy subjects taking no medication served as controls (n=46). Follow-up CMR studies were performed in a total of 35 subjects of which 14 patients received intensified anti-inflammatory treatment, as guided by SLE disease activity. Compared to controls SLE patients had higher inflammatory markers, LV mass, native T1 and T2 values, and reduced longitudinal strain (pT1 and T2 were significantly higher (pT1, whereas 51 (71%) met diagnostic criteria for acute myocarditis. Follow-up CMRs revealed significantly greater reduction in native T1 and T2 values in patients with intensified anti-inflammatory treatment (pT1 and T2 were significant predictors of treatment response. Native T1 and T2 mapping support recognition of lupus myocarditis and reflect the response to anti-inflammatory treatment. Native T1 and T2 mapping may support an effective, noninvasive, radiation- and gadolinium contrast-free screening method for lupus myocarditis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Collaborative damage mapping for emergency response : the role of Cognitive Systems Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerle, N.; Hoffman, R.R.

    2013-01-01

    Remote sensing is increasingly used to assess disaster damage, traditionally by professional image analysts. A recent alternative is crowdsourcing by volunteers experienced in remote sensing, using internet-based mapping portals. We identify a range of problems in current approaches, including how

  5. Disproportionate distribution of field potentials across the toad's tectal visual map in response to diffuse light ON and OFF stimulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwippert, W W; Beneke, T W; Ewert, J P

    1996-01-01

    In toads Bufo marinus and Bufo bufo spinosus, field potentials (FPs) were recorded from the surface of the optic tectum at different sites of the visual map in response to a sudden diffuse darkening (OFF) and lightening (ON) of the visual field of the contralateral eye. The OFF and ON responses were differently pronounced or even failed to occur. The latency of the former was significantly less than the one of the latter. FP amplitudes of the OFF and ON responses were strongest in the representation of a horizonto-superior anterio-lateral portion of the visual field and weakest toward the posterior field of vision. This phenomenon suggests various interpretations for subsequent experiments.

  6. A cellular expression map of the Arabidopsis AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR gene family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademacher, E.H.; Moller, B.K.; Lokerse, A.S.; Llavata Peris, C.I.; Berg, van den W.A.M.; Weijers, D.

    2011-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin triggers a wide range of developmental and growth responses throughout a plant’s life. Most well-known auxin responses involve changes in gene expression that are mediated by a short pathway involving an auxin-receptor/ubiquitin-ligase, DNA-binding auxin response factor (ARF)

  7. Mapping Variation in Cellular and Transcriptional Response to 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia N Kariuki

    Full Text Available The active hormonal form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D is an important modulator of the immune system, inhibiting cellular proliferation and regulating transcription of immune response genes. In order to characterize the genetic basis of variation in the immunomodulatory effects of 1,25D, we mapped quantitative traits of 1,25D response at both the cellular and the transcriptional level. We carried out a genome-wide association scan of percent inhibition of cell proliferation (Imax induced by 1,25D treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 88 healthy African-American individuals. Two genome-wide significant variants were identified: rs1893662 in a gene desert on chromosome 18 (p = 2.32 x 10-8 and rs6451692 on chromosome 5 (p = 2.55 x 10-8, which may influence the anti-proliferative activity of 1,25D by regulating the expression of nearby genes such as the chemokine gene, CCL28, and the translation initiation gene, PAIP1. We also identified 8 expression quantitative trait loci at a FDR<0.10 for transcriptional response to 1,25D treatment, which include the transcriptional regulator ets variant 3-like (ETV3L and EH-domain containing 4 (EHD4. In addition, we identified response eQTLs in vitamin D receptor binding sites near genes differentially expressed in response to 1,25D, such as FERM Domain Containing 6 (FRMD6, which plays a critical role in regulating both cell proliferation and apoptosis. Combining information from the GWAS of Imax and the response eQTL mapping enabled identification of putative Imax-associated candidate genes such as PAIP1 and the transcriptional repressor gene ZNF649. Overall, the variants identified in this study are strong candidates for immune traits and diseases linked to vitamin D, such as multiple sclerosis.

  8. Quantitative Chemical-Genetic Interaction Map Connects Gene Alterations to Drug Responses | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a recent Cancer Discovery report, CTD2 researchers at the University of California in San Francisco developed a new quantitative chemical-genetic interaction mapping approach to evaluate drug sensitivity or resistance in isogenic cell lines. Performing a high-throughput screen with isogenic cell lines allowed the researchers to explore the impact of a panel of emerging and established drugs on cells overexpressing a single cancer-associated gene in isolation.

  9. A generalized parametric response mapping method for analysis of multi-parametric imaging: A feasibility study with application to glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lausch, Anthony; Yeung, Timothy Pok-Chi; Chen, Jeff; Law, Elton; Wang, Yong; Urbini, Benedetta; Donelli, Filippo; Manco, Luigi; Fainardi, Enrico; Lee, Ting-Yim; Wong, Eugene

    2017-11-01

    Parametric response map (PRM) analysis of functional imaging has been shown to be an effective tool for early prediction of cancer treatment outcomes and may also be well-suited toward guiding personalized adaptive radiotherapy (RT) strategies such as sub-volume boosting. However, the PRM method was primarily designed for analysis of longitudinally acquired pairs of single-parameter image data. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of a generalized parametric response map analysis framework, which enables analysis of multi-parametric data while maintaining the key advantages of the original PRM method. MRI-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps acquired at 1 and 3-months post-RT for 19 patients with high-grade glioma were used to demonstrate the algorithm. Images were first co-registered and then standardized using normal tissue image intensity values. Tumor voxels were then plotted in a four-dimensional Cartesian space with coordinate values equal to a voxel's image intensity in each of the image volumes and an origin defined as the multi-parametric mean of normal tissue image intensity values. Voxel positions were orthogonally projected onto a line defined by the origin and a pre-determined response vector. The voxels are subsequently classified as positive, negative or nil, according to whether projected positions along the response vector exceeded a threshold distance from the origin. The response vector was selected by identifying the direction in which the standard deviation of tumor image intensity values was maximally different between responding and non-responding patients within a training dataset. Voxel classifications were visualized via familiar three-class response maps and then the fraction of tumor voxels associated with each of the classes was investigated for predictive utility analogous to the original PRM method. Independent PRM and MPRM analyses of the contrast

  10. Mapping three-dimensional near-field responses with reconstruction scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haomin; Wang, Le; Jakob, Devon S.; Xu, Xiaoji G.

    2017-05-01

    Scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) enables mapping of nanoscale field distributions in two dimensions. However, the standard s-SNOM technique lacks direct resolving ability along the vertical direction, therefore unable to provide full three-dimensional near-field responses. Here, we develop a reconstruction technique that enables s-SNOM to collect a three-dimensional response cube of near-field interaction. The technique also allows a new operational mode of s-SNOM based on the characteristic decay range of near-field interactions. As a demonstration, the bound near-field at the sides of a polaritonic boron nitride nanotube is revealed through the collection of the near-field response cube. The graphene boundary and discontinuities are revealed by the near-field decay range mapping. The reconstruction s-SNOM technique extends the capability of s-SNOM and is generally applicable for a wide range of nanoscale characterizations that are suitable for s-SNOM, such as characterizations of plasmonic and polaritonic nanostructures.

  11. Training signaling pathway maps to biochemical data with constrained fuzzy logic: quantitative analysis of liver cell responses to inflammatory stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody K Morris

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Predictive understanding of cell signaling network operation based on general prior knowledge but consistent with empirical data in a specific environmental context is a current challenge in computational biology. Recent work has demonstrated that Boolean logic can be used to create context-specific network models by training proteomic pathway maps to dedicated biochemical data; however, the Boolean formalism is restricted to characterizing protein species as either fully active or inactive. To advance beyond this limitation, we propose a novel form of fuzzy logic sufficiently flexible to model quantitative data but also sufficiently simple to efficiently construct models by training pathway maps on dedicated experimental measurements. Our new approach, termed constrained fuzzy logic (cFL, converts a prior knowledge network (obtained from literature or interactome databases into a computable model that describes graded values of protein activation across multiple pathways. We train a cFL-converted network to experimental data describing hepatocytic protein activation by inflammatory cytokines and demonstrate the application of the resultant trained models for three important purposes: (a generating experimentally testable biological hypotheses concerning pathway crosstalk, (b establishing capability for quantitative prediction of protein activity, and (c prediction and understanding of the cytokine release phenotypic response. Our methodology systematically and quantitatively trains a protein pathway map summarizing curated literature to context-specific biochemical data. This process generates a computable model yielding successful prediction of new test data and offering biological insight into complex datasets that are difficult to fully analyze by intuition alone.

  12. Training signaling pathway maps to biochemical data with constrained fuzzy logic: quantitative analysis of liver cell responses to inflammatory stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Melody K; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Clarke, David C; Sorger, Peter K; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2011-03-01

    Predictive understanding of cell signaling network operation based on general prior knowledge but consistent with empirical data in a specific environmental context is a current challenge in computational biology. Recent work has demonstrated that Boolean logic can be used to create context-specific network models by training proteomic pathway maps to dedicated biochemical data; however, the Boolean formalism is restricted to characterizing protein species as either fully active or inactive. To advance beyond this limitation, we propose a novel form of fuzzy logic sufficiently flexible to model quantitative data but also sufficiently simple to efficiently construct models by training pathway maps on dedicated experimental measurements. Our new approach, termed constrained fuzzy logic (cFL), converts a prior knowledge network (obtained from literature or interactome databases) into a computable model that describes graded values of protein activation across multiple pathways. We train a cFL-converted network to experimental data describing hepatocytic protein activation by inflammatory cytokines and demonstrate the application of the resultant trained models for three important purposes: (a) generating experimentally testable biological hypotheses concerning pathway crosstalk, (b) establishing capability for quantitative prediction of protein activity, and (c) prediction and understanding of the cytokine release phenotypic response. Our methodology systematically and quantitatively trains a protein pathway map summarizing curated literature to context-specific biochemical data. This process generates a computable model yielding successful prediction of new test data and offering biological insight into complex datasets that are difficult to fully analyze by intuition alone.

  13. From Pixels to Response Maps: Discriminative Image Filtering for Face Alignment in the Wild

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asthana, Akshay; Asthana, Ashish; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Tzimiropoulos, Georgios; Cheng, Shiyang; Pantic, Maja

    2015-01-01

    We propose a face alignment framework that relies on the texture model generated by the responses of discriminatively trained part-based filters. Unlike standard texture models built from pixel intensities or responses generated by generic filters (e.g. Gabor), our framework has two important

  14. The Arabidopsis MAP kinase kinase 7: A crosstalk point between Auxin signaling and defense responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant-pathogen interaction induces a complex host response that coordinates various signaling pathways through multiple signal molecules. Besides the well-documented signal molecules salicylic acid (SA), ethylene and jasmonic acid, auxin is emerging as an important player in this response. We recent...

  15. DoOR 2.0 - Comprehensive Mapping of Drosophila melanogaster Odorant Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, Daniel; Galizia, C. Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Odors elicit complex patterns of activated olfactory sensory neurons. Knowing the complete olfactome, i.e. the responses in all sensory neurons for all relevant odorants, is desirable to understand olfactory coding. The DoOR project combines all available Drosophila odorant response data into a single consensus response matrix. Since its first release many studies were published: receptors were deorphanized and several response profiles were expanded. In this study, we add unpublished data to the odor-response profiles for four odorant receptors (Or10a, Or42b, Or47b, Or56a). We deorphanize Or69a, showing a broad response spectrum with the best ligands including 3-hydroxyhexanoate, alpha-terpineol, 3-octanol and linalool. We include all of these datasets into DoOR, provide a comprehensive update of both code and data, and new tools for data analyses and visualizations. The DoOR project has a web interface for quick queries (http://neuro.uni.kn/DoOR), and a downloadable, open source toolbox written in R, including all processed and original datasets. DoOR now gives reliable odorant-responses for nearly all Drosophila olfactory responding units, listing 693 odorants, for a total of 7381 data points.

  16. Dose-response studies with co-dergocrine mesylate under hypoxia utilizing EEG mapping and psychometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletu, B; Grünberger, J; Linzmayer, L; Anderer, P

    1992-01-01

    In a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, human brain function and mental performance were studied under two different degrees of hypoxia after administration of two different doses (6 mg and 9 mg) of co-dergocrine mesylate (CDM) utilizing blood gas analysis, EEG mapping and psychometry. Hypoxic hypoxidosis (i.e. impairment of cerebral metabolism due to hypoxia) was experimentally induced by a fixed gas combination of 9.8% oxygen (O2) and 90.2% nitrogen (N2) (found in 6000 m altitude), and of 8.6% O2, 91.4% N2 (found in 7000 m altitude), which was inhaled for 23 min under normobaric conditions by 18 healthy volunteers. They received randomized after an adaptation session placebo, 6 mg and 9 mg co-dergocrine mesylate (CDM). Evaluation of blood gases, brain mapping and psychometry was carried out at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 h after oral drug administration. Blood gas analysis demonstrated a drop in PO2 to 42 and 32 mm Hg 23 min after inhalation of the 9.8% and 8.6% gas mixture, respectively, PCO2 decreased to 32 and 31 mm Hg, pH increased to 7.46 and 7.47 and base excess increased to 0.50 and 0.90 nmol/l, respectively. EEG mapping demonstrated an increase in delta and decrease of alpha power and a slowing of the centroid over almost the whole brain. 6 mg and slightly less so 9 mg CDM attenuated this deterioration of vigilance (i.e. dynamic state of the neuronal network determining adaptive behavior). At the behavioral level, moderate hypoxia induced a deterioration of noopsychic performance, which was mitigated by 6 mg, but not by 9 mg CDM. A deepening of the hypoxia resulted in a loss of these brain protective effects of both doses. Decrement of the thymopsyche increased after both doses in the moderate hypoxic condition, while under marked hypoxia 6 mg CDM attenuated and 9 mg aggravated this deterioration. Time-wise, brain protective effects reached the level of statistical difference between the 2nd and the 6th hour. Somatic complaints like feeling dazed, giddiness and

  17. Integrating multibeam backscatter angular response, mosaic and bathymetry data for benthic habitat mapping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Che Hasan, Rozaimi; Ierodiaconou, Daniel; Laurenson, Laurie; Schimel, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    ..., and evaluate the importance of variables driving the patterns observed. The benthic habitat characterisation process often involves the analysis of MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic or angular response with observation data providing ground truth...

  18. A Disaster Response and Management Competency Mapping of Community Nurses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu; Liu, Ling; Huang, Wen-Quan; Yang, Ya-Na; Deng, Jie; Yin, Chun-Hong; Ren, Hui; Wang, Xian-Yuan

    2013-09-01

    It is widely accepted in many parts of the world thatcommunity nurses are of vital importance in various phases of disaster response and management. In China, however, it is not clear whether the Chinese community nurses are able to assume disaster-related duties due to the lack of a systematic assessment. A pre-designed and well-tested questionnaire was employed to evaluate the competency in disaster response and management among 205 valid registered Chinese community nurses between September and October 2009. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS Version 13.0 using one way ANOVA, Least Significant Difference (LSD) and multiple stepwise regression analysis. This group of Chinese community nurses scored at an intermediate level of competency (a score of 3.68 (SD 0.48) out of a perfect score of 5) in disaster response and management, suggesting that they have the basic ability to participate in disaster-related nursing. Four factors, namely, Experiences in Disaster Relief, Participation in Disaster Training, the Age and Duration in Job, were identified to be the predominant factors contributing significantly to the integrated competency in disaster response and management of an individual. Most of the Chinese community nurses have basic qualifications and competencies to undertake the responsibilities of disaster response and management. However, more targeted disaster training including virtual-reality based drills should be provided in order to improve their competency.

  19. Mapping the Human Memory B Cell and Serum Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Dengue Virus Serotype 4 Infection and Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivarthi, Usha K; Kose, Nurgun; Sapparapu, Gopal; Widman, Douglas; Gallichotte, Emily; Pfaff, Jennifer M; Doranz, Benjamin J; Weiskopf, Daniela; Sette, Alessandro; Durbin, Anna P; Whitehead, Steve S; Baric, Ralph; Crowe, James E; de Silva, Aravinda M

    2017-03-01

    The four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes are mosquito-borne flaviviruses responsible for dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. People exposed to DENV develop antibodies (Abs) that strongly neutralize the serotype responsible for infection. Historically, infection with DENV serotype 4 (DENV4) has been less common and less studied than infections with the other three serotypes. However, DENV4 has been responsible for recent large and sustained epidemics in Asia and Latin America. The neutralizing antibody responses and the epitopes targeted against DENV4 have not been characterized in human infection. In this study, we mapped and characterized epitopes on DENV4 recognized by neutralizing antibodies in people previously exposed to DENV4 infections or to a live attenuated DENV4 vaccine. To study the fine specificity of DENV4 neutralizing human antibodies, B cells from two people exposed to DENV4 were immortalized and screened to identify DENV-specific clones. Two human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that neutralized DENV4 were isolated, and their epitopes were finely mapped using recombinant viruses and alanine scan mutation array techniques. Both antibodies bound to quaternary structure epitopes near the hinge region between envelope protein domain I (EDI) and EDII. In parallel, to characterize the serum neutralizing antibody responses, convalescence-phase serum samples from people previously exposed to primary DENV4 natural infections or a monovalent DENV4 vaccine were analyzed. Natural infection and vaccination also induced serum-neutralizing antibodies that targeted similar epitope domains at the EDI/II hinge region. These studies defined a target of neutralizing antigenic site on DENV4 targeted by human antibodies following natural infection or vaccination. IMPORTANCE The four serotypes of dengue virus are the causative agents of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. People exposed to primary DENV infections develop long-term neutralizing antibody responses

  20. Mapping the anther culture response genes in maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, V H; Rocheford, T R; Widholm, J M

    1995-10-01

    In order to map the genes conditioning the induction of embryos during our anther culture process, we evaluated F2 plants from three different crosses for their anther culture ability and also performed RFLP analysis on these plants. The results showed that six chromosomal regions appear to be associated with the ability to induce embryo-like structures from maize microspores. These regions are located on chromosomes 1 (two regions), 3, 5, 7, and 8. Some of these chromosomes are identical to those found in previous studies and we have localized the regions more precisely. Notably, all chromosome regions identified, except one, are near viviparous mutant loci. Since the viviparous mutations are known to involve the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA), these results suggest that ABA or its antagonist, gibberellic acid (GA3), might somehow be related to anther culture ability. We also propose some combinations of probes to screen for anther culture ability in the three genotypes studied.

  1. Novel fine-scale aerial mapping approach quantifies grassland weed cover dynamics and response to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmstrom, Carolyn M; Butterfield, H Scott; Planck, Laura; Long, Christopher W; Eviner, Valerie T

    2017-01-01

    Invasive weeds threaten the biodiversity and forage productivity of grasslands worldwide. However, management of these weeds is constrained by the practical difficulty of detecting small-scale infestations across large landscapes and by limits in understanding of landscape-scale invasion dynamics, including mechanisms that enable patches to expand, contract, or remain stable. While high-end hyperspectral remote sensing systems can effectively map vegetation cover, these systems are currently too costly and limited in availability for most land managers. We demonstrate application of a more accessible and cost-effective remote sensing approach, based on simple aerial imagery, for quantifying weed cover dynamics over time. In California annual grasslands, the target communities of interest include invasive weedy grasses (Aegilops triuncialis and Elymus caput-medusae) and desirable forage grass species (primarily Avena spp. and Bromus spp.). Detecting invasion of annual grasses into an annual-dominated community is particularly challenging, but we were able to consistently characterize these two communities based on their phenological differences in peak growth and senescence using maximum likelihood supervised classification of imagery acquired twice per year (in mid- and end-of season). This approach permitted us to map weed-dominated cover at a 1-m scale (correctly detecting 93% of weed patches across the landscape) and to evaluate weed cover change over time. We found that weed cover was more pervasive and persistent in management units that had no significant grazing for several years than in those that were grazed, whereas forage cover was more abundant and stable in the grazed units. This application demonstrates the power of this method for assessing fine-scale vegetation transitions across heterogeneous landscapes. It thus provides means for small-scale early detection of invasive species and for testing fundamental questions about landscape dynamics.

  2. Parametric response mapping of contrast-enhanced biphasic CT for evaluating tumour viability of hepatocellular carcinoma after TACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinrichs, Jan B.; Shin, Hoen-Oh; Kaercher, Daniel; Hasdemir, Davut; Kaireit, Till; Lutat, Carolin; Meyer, Bernhard C.; Wacker, Frank K.; Rodt, Thomas [Hannover Medical School, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hannover (Germany); Murray, Tim [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Vogel, Arndt [Hannover Medical School, Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology, Hannover (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    To determine the feasibility and role of parametric response mapping (PRM) for quantitative assessment of regional contrast-enhancement patterns in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Biphasic CT of 19 patients receiving repetitive conventional transarterial chemoembolisation (cTACE) for intermediate stage HCC were retrospectively analysed at baseline and follow-up at 3, 6, and 9 months. Voxel-based registration of arterial and porto-venous phases, with segmentation of the largest target lesion was performed. Frequency distribution plots of density-pairs of segmented voxels were generated. To differentiate necrotic, hypervascular and non-hypervascular tumour, and lipiodol/calcification, thresholds of 30, 100, and 300 HU were applied. Changes in density frequency plots over time were analysed and compared to response and assessment criteria (WHO, RECIST, EASL, mRECIST) and survival. PRM was feasible in all cases. Tumour volumes and hypervascular/non-hypervascular volume ratio showed significant longitudinal decrease (p < 0.05). Hypervascular volume at baseline was inversely correlated to survival (R = -0.57, p = 0.005). The only predictive parameter following cTACE to show significant survival difference was the change of the viable/non-viable ratio (p = 0.044), whereas common response assessment criteria showed no significant difference in survival. PRM allows a quantitative and more precise assessment of regional tumour vascularisation patterns and may be helpful for TACE treatment planning and response assessment. (orig.)

  3. Parametric response mapping of dynamic CT for predicting intrahepatic recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after conventional transcatheter arterial chemoembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Joon; Kim, Hyung Sik [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Department of Radiology, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jonghoon [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Electronic Electrical and Computer Engineering, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jongbum [Yonsei University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-min [Hanyang University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyunjin [Sungkyunwkan University, School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The aim of our study was to determine the diagnostic value of a novel image analysis method called parametric response mapping (PRM) for prediction of intrahepatic recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with conventional transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). This retrospective study was approved by the IRB. We recruited 55 HCC patients who achieved complete remission (CR) after TACE and received longitudinal multiphasic liver computed tomography (CT). The patients fell into two groups: the recurrent tumour group (n = 29) and the non-recurrent tumour group (n = 26). We applied the PRM analysis to see if this technique could distinguish between the two groups. The results of the PRM analysis were incorporated into a prediction algorithm. We retrospectively removed data from the last time point and attempted to predict the response to therapy of the removed data. The PRM analysis was able to distinguish between the non-recurrent and recurrent groups successfully. The prediction algorithm detected response to therapy with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.76, while the manual approach had AUC 0.64. Adopting PRM analysis can potentially distinguish between recurrent and non-recurrent HCCs and allow for prediction of response to therapy after TACE. (orig.)

  4. Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs): mapping a research agenda that incorporates an organizational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Carrie A; Lindhorst, Taryn; Tajima, Emiko A

    2015-04-01

    Multidisciplinary coordinated Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs) are a growing model of providing health, legal, and emotional support services to victims of sexual assault. This article conceptualizes SARTs from an organizational perspective and explores three approaches to researching SARTs that have the potential of increasing our understanding of the benefits and challenges of multidisciplinary service delivery. These approaches attend to several levels of organizational behavior, including the organizational response to external legitimacy pressures, the inter-organizational networks of victim services, and the negotiation of power and disciplinary boundaries. Possible applications to organizational research on SARTs are explored. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. The i-Map: A Process-Centered Response to Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, Kim; Peacock, Alan

    2006-01-01

    In recent years there has been a marked change in our cultural relationship with information which has implications for our teaching and learning practices. Current concerns about the identification of, and responses to, plagiarism are grounded in that process of change. In this paper we take the position that it is better to address and respond…

  6. Aberrant Activation of p38 MAP Kinase-Dependent Innate Immune Responses Is Toxic to Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheesman, Hilary K; Feinbaum, Rhonda L; Thekkiniath, Jose; Dowen, Robert H; Conery, Annie L; Pukkila-Worley, Read

    2016-01-27

    Inappropriate activation of innate immune responses in intestinal epithelial cells underlies the pathophysiology of inflammatory disorders of the intestine. Here we examine the physiological effects of immune hyperactivation in the intestine of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We previously identified an immunostimulatory xenobiotic that protects C. elegans from bacterial infection by inducing immune effector expression via the conserved p38 MAP kinase pathway, but was toxic to nematodes developing in the absence of pathogen. To investigate a possible connection between the toxicity and immunostimulatory properties of this xenobiotic, we conducted a forward genetic screen for C. elegans mutants that are resistant to the deleterious effects of the compound, and identified five toxicity suppressors. These strains contained hypomorphic mutations in each of the known components of the p38 MAP kinase cassette (tir-1, nsy-1, sek-1, and pmk-1), demonstrating that hyperstimulation of the p38 MAPK pathway is toxic to animals. To explore mechanisms of immune pathway regulation in C. elegans, we conducted another genetic screen for dominant activators of the p38 MAPK pathway, and identified a single allele that had a gain-of-function (gf) mutation in nsy-1, the MAP kinase kinase kinase that acts upstream of p38 MAPK pmk-1. The nsy-1(gf) allele caused hyperinduction of p38 MAPK PMK-1-dependent immune effectors, had greater levels of phosphorylated p38 MAPK, and was more resistant to killing by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared to wild-type controls. In addition, the nsy-1(gf) mutation was toxic to developing animals. Together, these data suggest that the activity of the MAPKKK NSY-1 is tightly regulated as part of a physiological mechanism to control p38 MAPK-mediated innate immune hyperactivation, and ensure cellular homeostasis in C. elegans. Copyright © 2016 Cheesman et al.

  7. A gene responsible for profound congenital nonsyndromal recessive deafness maps to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, T.B.; Liang, Y.; Asher, J.H. Jr. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal recessive deafness is the most common form of human hereditary hearing loss. Two percent of the 2,185 residents of Bengkala, Bali, Indonesia have profound congenital neurosensory nonsyndromal hereditary deafness due to a fully penetrant autosomal recessive mutation (NARD1). Families, identified through children with profound congenital deafness having hearing parents, give the expected 25% deaf progeny when corrected for ascertainment bias. Congenitally deaf individuals from Bengkala show no response to pure tone audiological examination. Obligate heterozygotes for autosomal recessive deafness in Bengkala have normal or borderline normal hearing. A chromosomal location for NARD1 was assigned directly using a linkage strategy that combines allele-frequency dependent homozygosity mapping (AHM) followed by an analysis of historical recombinants to position NARD1 relative to flanking markers. Thirteen deaf Bengkala villagers of hearing parents were typed initially for 148 STRPs distributed across the human genome and a cluster of tightly linked 17p markers with a significantly higher number of homozygotes than expected under Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium were identified. NARD1 maps closest to STRPs for D17S261 (Mfd41) and D17S805 (AFM234ta1) that are 3.2 cM apart. Recombinant genotypes for the flanking markers, D17S122 (VAW409) and D17S783 (AFM026vh7), in individuals homozygous for NARD1 place NARD1 in a 5.3 cM interval of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 17 on a refined 17p-17q12 genetic map.

  8. Mapping the AAV capsid host antibody response towards the development of second generation gene delivery vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shan eTseng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recombinant Adeno-associated virus (rAAV gene delivery system is entering a crucial and exciting phase with the promise of more than 20 years of intense research now realized in a number of successful human clinical trials. However, as a natural host to AAV infection, anti-AAV antibodies are prevalent in the human population. For example, ~70% of human sera samples are positive for AAV serotype 2 (AAV2. Furthermore, low levels of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies in the circulation are detrimental to the efficacy of corrective therapeutic AAV gene delivery. A key component to overcoming this obstacle is the identification of regions of the AAV capsid that participate in interactions with host immunity, especially neutralizing antibodies, to be modified for neutralization escape. Three main approaches have been utilized to map antigenic epitopes on AAV capsids. The first is directed evolution in which AAV variants are selected in the presence of monoclonal antibodies or pooled human sera. This results in AAV variants with mutations on important neutralizing epitopes. The second is epitope searching, achieved by peptide scanning, peptide insertion or site-directed mutagenesis. The third, a structure biology-based approach, utilizes cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of AAV capsids complexed to fragment antibodies, which are generated from monoclonal antibodies, to directly visualize the epitopes. In this review, the contribution of these three approaches to the current knowledge of AAV epitopes and success in their use to create second generation vectors will be discussed.

  9. Mapping the AAV Capsid Host Antibody Response toward the Development of Second Generation Gene Delivery Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yu-Shan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2014-01-01

    The recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) gene delivery system is entering a crucial and exciting phase with the promise of more than 20 years of intense research now realized in a number of successful human clinical trials. However, as a natural host to AAV infection, anti-AAV antibodies are prevalent in the human population. For example, ~70% of human sera samples are positive for AAV serotype 2 (AAV2). Furthermore, low levels of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies in the circulation are detrimental to the efficacy of corrective therapeutic AAV gene delivery. A key component to overcoming this obstacle is the identification of regions of the AAV capsid that participate in interactions with host immunity, especially neutralizing antibodies, to be modified for neutralization escape. Three main approaches have been utilized to map antigenic epitopes on AAV capsids. The first is directed evolution in which AAV variants are selected in the presence of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) or pooled human sera. This results in AAV variants with mutations on important neutralizing epitopes. The second is epitope searching, achieved by peptide scanning, peptide insertion, or site-directed mutagenesis. The third, a structure biology-based approach, utilizes cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of AAV capsids complexed to fragment antibodies, which are generated from MAbs, to directly visualize the epitopes. In this review, the contribution of these three approaches to the current knowledge of AAV epitopes and success in their use to create second generation vectors will be discussed.

  10. A time-resolved molecular map of the macrophage response to VSV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Richard K; Vladimer, Gregory I; Snijder, Berend; Müller, André C; Rebsamen, Manuele; Bigenzahn, Johannes W; Moskovskich, Anna; Sabler, Monika; Stefanovic, Adrijana; Scorzoni, Stefania; Brückner, Manuela; Penz, Thomas; Cleary, Ciara; Kralovics, Robert; Colinge, Jacques; Bennett, Keiryn L; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Studying the relationship between virus infection and cellular response is paradigmatic for our understanding of how perturbation changes biological systems. Immune response, in this context is a complex yet evolutionarily adapted and robust cellular change, and is experimentally amenable to molecular analysis. To visualize the full cellular response to virus infection, we performed temporal transcriptomics, proteomics, and phosphoproteomics analysis of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-infected mouse macrophages. This enabled the understanding of how infection-induced changes in host gene and protein expression are coordinated with post-translational modifications by cells in time to best measure and control the infection process. The vast and complex molecular changes measured could be decomposed in a limited number of clusters within each category (transcripts, proteins, and protein phosphorylation) each with own kinetic parameter and characteristic pathways/processes, suggesting multiple regulatory options in the overall sensing and homeostatic program. Altogether, the data underscored a prevalent executive function to phosphorylation. Resolution of the molecular events affecting the RIG-I pathway, central to viral recognition, reveals that phosphorylation of the key innate immunity adaptor mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS) on S328/S330 is necessary for activation of type-I interferon and nuclear factor κ B (NFκB) pathways. To further understand the hierarchical relationships, we analyzed kinase-substrate relationships and found RAF1 and, to a lesser extent, ARAF to be inhibiting VSV replication and necessary for NFκB activation, and AKT2, but not AKT1, to be supporting VSV replication. Integrated analysis using the omics data revealed co-regulation of transmembrane transporters including SLC7A11, which was subsequently validated as a host factor in the VSV replication. The data sets are predicted to greatly empower future studies on the

  11. BRIC-17 Mapping Spaceflight-Induced Hypoxic Signaling and Response in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilroy, Simon; Choi, Won-Gyu; Swanson, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Goals of this work are: (1) Define global changes in gene expression patterns in Arabidopsis plants grown in microgravity using whole genome microarrays (2) Compare to mutants resistant to low oxygen challenge using whole genome microarrays Also measuring root and shoot size Outcomes from this research are: (1) Provide fundamental information on plant responses to the stresses inherent in spaceflight (2) Potential for informing on genetic strategies to engineer plants for optimal growth in space

  12. Mapping piezoelectric response in nanomaterials using a dedicated non-destructive scanning probe technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calahorra, Yonatan; Smith, Michael; Datta, Anuja; Benisty, Hadas; Kar-Narayan, Sohini

    2017-12-14

    There has been tremendous interest in piezoelectricity at the nanoscale, for example in nanowires and nanofibers where piezoelectric properties may be enhanced or controllably tuned, thus necessitating robust characterization techniques of piezoelectric response in nanomaterials. Piezo-response force microscopy (PFM) is a well-established scanning probe technique routinely used to image piezoelectric/ferroelectric domains in thin films, however, its applicability to nanoscale objects is limited due to the requirement for physical contact with an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip that may cause dislocation or damage, particularly to soft materials, during scanning. Here we report a non-destructive PFM (ND-PFM) technique wherein the tip is oscillated into "discontinuous" contact during scanning, while applying an AC bias between tip and sample and extracting the piezoelectric response for each contact point by monitoring the resulting localized deformation at the AC frequency. ND-PFM is successfully applied to soft polymeric (poly-l-lactic acid) nanowires, as well as hard ceramic (barium zirconate titanate-barium calcium titanate) nanowires, both previously inaccessible by conventional PFM. Our ND-PFM technique is versatile and compatible with commercial AFMs, and can be used to correlate piezoelectric properties of nanomaterials with their microstructural features thus overcoming key characterisation challenges in the field.

  13. Mapping the central neurocircuitry that integrates the cardiovascular response to exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnayake, Shanika D; Green, Alexander L; Paterson, David J

    2012-01-01

    There are abundant animal data attempting to identify the neural circuitry involved in cardiovascular control. Translating this research into humans has been made possible using functional neurosurgery during which deep brain stimulating electrodes are implanted into various brain nuclei for the treatment of chronic pain and movement disorders. This not only allows stimulation of the human brain, but also presents the opportunity to record neural activity from various brain regions. This symposium review highlights key experiments from the past decade that have endeavoured to identify the neurocircuitry responsible for integrating the cardiovascular response to exercise in humans. Two areas of particular interest are highlighted: the periaqueductal grey and the subthalamic nucleus. Our studies have shown that the periaqueductal grey (particularly the dorsal column) is a key part of the neurocircuitry involved in mediating autonomic changes adapted to ongoing behaviours. Emerging evidence also suggests that the subthalamic nucleus is not only involved in the control of movement, but also in the mediation of cardiovascular responses. Although these sites are unlikely to be the 'command' areas themselves, we have demonstrated that the two nuclei have the properties of being key integrating sites between the feedback signals from exercising muscle and the feedforward signals from higher cortical centres.

  14. Relocation due to Climate Change: Mapping the Divergent Responses of the Governments of Tuvalu and Kiribati

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, K. E.; Hemstock, S.; Smith, R.; Holland, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change will continue to impact Pacific Island livelihoods in diverse and complex ways. At the 2009 Copenhagen Conference of Parties to discuss the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, Pacific governments argued for the need to limit warming to 1.5°C. A growing body of literature demonstrates that warming beyond this 2°C threshold is likely and will result in numerous negative impacts on socio-ecological systems across the world, particularly for low-lying coastal communities (Parry et al, 2009; Smith et al, 2009). These communities will need to manage, if possible,a series of interconnected impacts, such as declining freshwater and food security and diminishing land availability, as a result of sea level rise and increasing extreme weather events (Adger and Barnett, 2009). Discussions concerning climate change as a trigger for relocation for low-lying Pacific nations have been contentious, and are fuelled by emotion and varying degrees of sensitivity. As Hayward-Jones (2010: 2) lamented: 'What is at stake over the next decade is not a sinking island but the very viability of life on this fragile atoll state. The land mass of Tuvalu will still exist in 2020 but it may be unable to support the population'. While this debate has historical roots, and indeed the phenomenon of relocation due to localised environmental degradation is not something new in the Pacific, it remains a significant contemporary issue. Scholars have argued that a 'successful mix of strategies' is required to develop culturally-appropriate solutions to this concern about the need for low-lying coastal communities in the Pacific to relocate (Bedford and Bedford, 2010: 93). As such, this paper assesses how the national governments of two low-lying nations in the Pacific - Tuvalu and Kiribati - are mapping out very different long-term strategies to respond to climate change impacts and concerns about the possibility of relocation. The governments of Tuvalu and Kiribati

  15. FISH mapping of six genes responsible for development of the nervous and skeletal systems on donkey (Equus asinus) chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugno-Poniewierska, Monika; Pawlina, Klaudia; Dardzińska, Aneta; Zabek, Tomasz; Słota, Ewa; Klukowka-Rötzler, Jolanta

    2010-06-01

    The results obtained in the present study made it possible to place selected markers responsible for development of the nervous and skeletal systems on the physical map of the donkey genome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to localize genes such as GDF5 (15q13), FRZB (4q23.1), TWIST (1q31), PAX6 (20q25), SALL1 (24q15) and SHH (1q35) on donkey chromosomes. The identification of their localization confirmed previously proposed homologies using ZOO-FISH technique, except for FRZB and SALL1 genes. This suggests that they were affected by rearrangements that changed their localization compared to horse, and in the case of the SALL1 gene also compared to human.

  16. Parametric response mapping of contrast-enhanced biphasic CT for evaluating tumour viability of hepatocellular carcinoma after TACE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Jan B; Shin, Hoen-Oh; Kaercher, Daniel; Hasdemir, Davut; Murray, Tim; Kaireit, Till; Lutat, Carolin; Vogel, Arndt; Meyer, Bernhard C; Wacker, Frank K; Rodt, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    To determine the feasibility and role of parametric response mapping (PRM) for quantitative assessment of regional contrast-enhancement patterns in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Biphasic CT of 19 patients receiving repetitive conventional transarterial chemoembolisation (cTACE) for intermediate stage HCC were retrospectively analysed at baseline and follow-up at 3, 6, and 9 months. Voxel-based registration of arterial and porto-venous phases, with segmentation of the largest target lesion was performed. Frequency distribution plots of density-pairs of segmented voxels were generated. To differentiate necrotic, hypervascular and non-hypervascular tumour, and lipiodol/calcification, thresholds of 30, 100, and 300 HU were applied. Changes in density frequency plots over time were analysed and compared to response and assessment criteria (WHO, RECIST, EASL, mRECIST) and survival. PRM was feasible in all cases. Tumour volumes and hypervascular/non-hypervascular volume ratio showed significant longitudinal decrease (p < 0.05). Hypervascular volume at baseline was inversely correlated to survival (R = -0.57, p = 0.005). The only predictive parameter following cTACE to show significant survival difference was the change of the viable/non-viable ratio (p = 0.044), whereas common response assessment criteria showed no significant difference in survival. PRM allows a quantitative and more precise assessment of regional tumour vascularisation patterns and may be helpful for TACE treatment planning and response assessment. • PRM allows more precise assessment of tumour vascularisation compared to conventional evaluation • PRM is beneficial for cTACE treatment planning and response assessment • PRM allows a quantitative assessment of regional contrast enhancement patterns.

  17. Mapping Polyclonal HIV-1 Antibody Responses via Next-Generation Neutralization Fingerprinting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A Doria-Rose

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational neutralization fingerprinting, NFP, is an efficient and accurate method for predicting the epitope specificities of polyclonal antibody responses to HIV-1 infection. Here, we present next-generation NFP algorithms that substantially improve prediction accuracy for individual donors and enable serologic analysis for entire cohorts. Specifically, we developed algorithms for: (a selection of optimized virus neutralization panels for NFP analysis, (b estimation of NFP prediction confidence for each serum sample, and (c identification of sera with potentially novel epitope specificities. At the individual donor level, the next-generation NFP algorithms particularly improved the ability to detect multiple epitope specificities in a sample, as confirmed both for computationally simulated polyclonal sera and for samples from HIV-infected donors. Specifically, the next-generation NFP algorithms detected multiple specificities in twice as many samples of simulated sera. Further, unlike the first-generation NFP, the new algorithms were able to detect both of the previously confirmed antibody specificities, VRC01-like and PG9-like, in donor CHAVI 0219. At the cohort level, analysis of ~150 broadly neutralizing HIV-infected donor samples suggested a potential connection between clade of infection and types of elicited epitope specificities. Most notably, while 10E8-like antibodies were observed in infections from different clades, an enrichment of such antibodies was predicted for clade B samples. Ultimately, such large-scale analyses of antibody responses to HIV-1 infection can help guide the design of epitope-specific vaccines that are tailored to take into account the prevalence of infecting clades within a specific geographic region. Overall, the next-generation NFP technology will be an important tool for the analysis of broadly neutralizing polyclonal antibody responses against HIV-1.

  18. Stimulus-response mappings shape inhibition processes: a combined EEG-fMRI study of contextual stopping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina F Lavallee

    Full Text Available Humans are rarely faced with one simple task, but are typically confronted with complex stimulus constellations and varying stimulus-relevance in a given situation. Through modifying the prototypical stop-signal task and by combined recording and analysis of electroencephalography (EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we studied the effects of stimulus relevance for the generation of a response or its inhibition. Stimulus response mappings were modified by contextual cues, indicating which of two different stimuli following a go stimulus was relevant for stopping. Overall, response inhibition, that is comparing successful stopping to a stop-signal against go-signal related processes, was associated with increased activity in right inferior and left midfrontal regions, as well as increased EEG delta and theta power; however, stimulus-response conditions in which the most infrequent stop-signal was relevant for inhibition, were associated with decreased activity in regions typically involved in response inhibition, as well as decreased activity in the delta and theta bands as compared to conditions wherein the relevant stop-signal frequency was higher. Behaviorally, this (aforementioned condition, which demanded inhibition only from the most infrequent stimulus, was also associated with reduced reaction times and lower error rates. This pattern of results does not align with typical stimulus frequency-driven findings and suggests interplay between task relevance and stimulus frequency of the stop-signal. Moreover, with a multimodal EEG-fMRI analysis, we demonstrated significant parameterization for response inhibition with delta, theta and beta time-frequency values, which may be interpreted as reflecting conflict monitoring, evaluative and/or motor processes as suggested by previous work (Huster et al., 2013; Aron, 2011. Further multimodal results suggest a possible neurophysiological and behavioral benefit under conditions

  19. Oncogene addiction: pathways of therapeutic response, resistance, and road maps toward a cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliarini, Raymond; Shao, Wenlin; Sellers, William R

    2015-03-01

    A key goal of cancer therapeutics is to selectively target the genetic lesions that initiate and maintain cancer cell proliferation and survival. While most cancers harbor multiple oncogenic mutations, a wealth of preclinical and clinical data supports that many cancers are sensitive to inhibition of single oncogenes, a concept referred to as 'oncogene addiction'. Herein, we describe the clinical evidence supporting oncogene addiction and discuss common mechanistic themes emerging from the response and acquired resistance to oncogene-targeted therapies. Finally, we suggest several opportunities toward exploiting oncogene addiction to achieve curative cancer therapies. © 2015 Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research.

  20. Genetic and Targeted eQTL Mapping Reveals Strong Candidate Genes Modulating the Stress Response During Chicken Domestication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Fallahsharoudi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The stress response has been largely modified in all domesticated animals, offering a strong tool for genetic mapping. In chickens, ancestral Red Junglefowl react stronger both in terms of physiology and behavior to a brief restraint stress than domesticated White Leghorn, demonstrating modified functions of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA axis. We mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL underlying variations in stress-induced hormone levels using 232 birds from the 12th generation of an advanced intercross between White Leghorn and Red Junglefowl, genotyped for 739 genetic markers. Plasma levels of corticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, and pregnenolone (PREG were measured using LC-MS/MS in all genotyped birds. Transcription levels of the candidate genes were measured in the adrenal glands or hypothalamus of 88 out of the 232 birds used for hormone assessment. Genes were targeted for expression analysis when they were located in a hormone QTL region and were differentially expressed in the pure breed birds. One genome-wide significant QTL on chromosome 5 and two suggestive QTL together explained 20% of the variance in corticosterone response. Two significant QTL for aldosterone on chromosome 2 and 5 (explaining 19% of the variance, and one QTL for DHEA on chromosome 4 (explaining 5% of the variance, were detected. Orthologous DNA regions to the significant corticosterone QTL have been previously associated with the physiological stress response in other species but, to our knowledge, the underlying gene(s have not been identified. SERPINA10 had an expression QTL (eQTL colocalized with the corticosterone QTL on chromosome 5 and PDE1C had an eQTL colocalized with the aldosterone QTL on chromosome 2. Furthermore, in both cases, the expression levels of the genes were correlated with the plasma levels of the hormones. Hence, both these genes are strong putative candidates for the domestication-induced modifications of the stress

  1. Mapping quantitative trait loci for innate immune response in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, M J; Cinar, M U; Grosse-Brinkhaus, C; Tesfaye, D; Tholen, E; Juengst, H; Looft, C; Wimmers, K; Phatsara, C; Schellander, K

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for the serum levels of cytokines and Toll-like receptors as traits related to innate immunity in pig. For this purpose, serum concentration of interleukin 2 (IL2), interleukin 10 (IL10), interferon-gamma (IFNG), Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) were measured in blood samples obtained from F(2) piglets (n = 334) of a Duroc × Piétrain resource population (DUPI) after Mycoplasma hypopneumoniae (Mh), tetanus toxoid (TT) and Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) vaccination at 6, 9 and 15 weeks of age. Animals were genotyped at 82 genetic markers covering all autosomes. QTL analysis was performed under the line cross F(2) model using QTL Express and 33 single QTL were detected on almost all porcine autosomes. Among the single QTL, eight, twelve and thirteen QTL were identified for innate immune traits in response to Mh, TT and PRRSV vaccine, respectively. Besides single QTL, six QTL were identified by a two-QTL model, of which two for TLR9_TT were in coupling phase and one for IL10_PRRSV was in repulsion phase. All QTL were significant at 5% chromosome-wide level including one and seven at 5% genome- and 1% chromosome-wide level significance. All innate immune traits are influenced by multiple chromosomal regions implying multiple gene action. Some of the identified QTL coincided with previously reported QTL for immune response and disease resistance, and the newly identified QTL are potentially involved in the immune function. The immune traits were also influenced by environmental factors like year of birth, age, parity and litter size. The results of this work shed new light on the genetic background of innate immune response and these findings will be helpful to identify candidate genes in these QTL regions related to immune competence and disease resistance in pigs. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Treatment Response Assessment in IDH-Mutant Glioma Patients by Noninvasive 3D Functional Spectroscopic Mapping of 2-Hydroxyglutarate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronesi, Ovidiu C; Loebel, Franziska; Bogner, Wolfgang; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Iafrate, A John; Dietrich, Jorg; Batchelor, Tracy T; Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Kaelin, William G; Chi, Andrew S; Rosen, Bruce R; Cahill, Daniel P

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of objective response rates are critical to evaluate new glioma therapies. The hallmark metabolic alteration in gliomas with mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is the overproduction of oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), which plays a key role in malignant transformation. 2HG represents an ideal biomarker to probe treatment response in IDH-mutant glioma patients, and we hypothesized a decrease in 2HG levels would be measureable by in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) as a result of antitumor therapy. We report a prospective longitudinal imaging study performed in 25 IDH-mutant glioma patients receiving adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy. A newly developed 3D MRS imaging was used to noninvasively image 2HG. Paired Student t test was used to compare pre- and posttreatment tumor 2HG values. Test-retest measurements were performed to determine the threshold for 2HG functional spectroscopic maps (fSM). Univariate and multivariate regression were performed to correlate 2HG changes with Karnofsky performance score (KPS). We found that mean 2HG (2HG/Cre) levels decreased significantly (median = 48.1%; 95% confidence interval = 27.3%-56.5%;P= 0.007) in the posttreatment scan. The volume of decreased 2HG correlates (R(2)= 0.88,P= 0.002) with clinical status evaluated by KPS. We demonstrate that dynamic measurements of 2HG are feasible by 3D fSM, and the decrease of 2HG levels can monitor treatment response in patients with IDH-mutant gliomas. Our results indicate that quantitative in vivo 2HG imaging may be used for precision medicine and early response assessment in clinical trials of therapies targeting IDH-mutant gliomas. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Mapping of electrophysiological response to transcranial infrared laser stimulation on the human brain in vivo measured by electroencephalography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinlong; Reddy, Divya Dhandapani; Gonzalez-Lima, F.; Liu, Hanli

    2017-02-01

    Transcranial infrared laser stimulation (TILS) is a non-destructive and non-thermal photobiomodulation therapy or process on the human brain; TILS uses infrared light from lasers or LEDs and has gained increased recognition for its beneficial effects on a variety of neurological and psychological conditions. While the mechanism of TILS has been assumed to stem from cytochrome-c-oxidase (CCO), which is the last enzyme in the electron transportation chain and is the primary photoacceptor, no literature is found to report electrophysiological response to TILS. In this study, a 64-channel electroencephalography (EEG) system was employed to monitor electrophysiological activities from 15 healthy human participants before, during and after TILS. A placebo experimental protocol was also applied for rigorous comparison. After recording a 3-minute baseline, we applied a 1064-nm laser with a power of 3.5W on the right forehead of each human participant for 8 minutes, followed by a 5-minute recovery period. In 64-channel EEG data analysis, we utilized several methods (root mean square, principal component analysis followed by independent component analysis, permutation conditional mutual information, and time-frequency wavelet analysis) to reveal differences in electrophysiological response to TILS between the stimulated versus placebo group. The analyzed results were further investigated using general linear model and paired t-test to reveal statistically meaningful responses induced by TILS. Moreover, this study will provide spatial mapping of human electrophysiological and possibly neural network responses to TILS for first time, indicating the potential of EEG to be an effective method for monitoring neurological improvement induced by TILS.

  4. Relating changes in synoptic circulation to the surface rainfall response using self-organising maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennard, Christopher; Hegerl, Gabriele

    2015-02-01

    The climate of a particular region is governed by factors that may be remote, such as the El Nino Southern Oscillation or local, such as topography. However, the daily weather characteristics of a region are controlled by the synoptic-scale atmospheric state. Therefore changes in the type, frequency, duration or intensity of particular synoptic states over a region would result in changes to the local weather and long-term climatology of the region. The relationship between synoptic-scale circulation and the rainfall response is examined for a 31-year period at two stations in different rainfall regimes in South Africa. Dominant rain-bearing synoptic circulations are identified for austral winter and summer as mid-latitude cyclones and convective systems respectively whereas no circulations are dominantly associated with spring and autumn rainfall. Over the 31-year period a statistically significant increase in the frequency of characteristic summer circulation modes is observed during summer, winter and spring. During autumn a statistically significant shift towards characteristically winter circulation modes is evident. Seasonal rainfall trends computed at each station corroborate those of the circulation data. Extreme rainfall is associated with particular circulation modes and trends in both circulation and station data show an earlier occurrence of extreme rainfall during the rainy season.

  5. Mapping the Far Right: Geomedia in an Educational Response to Right-Wing Extremism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jekel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Across Europe, and probably the world, messages of the extreme right surface with increasing and alarming regularity in both public and virtual space. Within the virtual space, geomedia are increasingly used in nationalist propaganda, a trend which is embedded in a wider development in public discourse, election results, and policies. In Austria and Germany, particular sensibilities due to the responsibility for the Holocaust have developed, leading to various specific education initiatives that address this part of history. This paper presents an activist learning environment using geomedia to deconstruct right-wing extremist discourses, and has been tested used in university settings in Salzburg and Vienna. Using a combination of Instagram and geospatial technologies not visible to learners, results of reflection and learning processes are analyzed qualitatively across two slightly different enactments of the learning environment. Experiences suggest an encouraging potential of geomedia use in critical learning processes, as long as the technology is hidden from learners, forming an incentive, support, and contextualization of the learning process.

  6. The Role of Citizen Science in Risk Mitigation and Disaster Response: A Case Study of 2015 Nepalese Earthquake Using OpenStreetMap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, C.; Byrne, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Citizen science includes networks of ordinary people acting as sensors, observing and recording information for science. OpenStreetMap is one such sensor network which empowers citizens to collaboratively produce a global picture from free geographic information. The success of this open source software is extended by the development of freely used open databases for the user community. Participating citizens do not require a high level of skill. Final results are processed by professionals following quality assurance protocols before map information is released. OpenStreetMap is not only the cheapest source of timely maps in many cases but also often the only source. This is particularly true in developing countries. Emergency responses to the recent earthquake in Nepal illustrates the value for rapidly updated geographical information. This includes emergency management, damage assessment, post-disaster response, and future risk mitigation. Local disaster conditions (landslides, road closings, bridge failures, etc.) were documented for local aid workers by citizen scientists working remotely. Satellites and drones provide digital imagery of the disaster zone and OpenStreetMap participants shared the data from locations around the globe. For the Nepal earthquake, OpenStreetMap provided a team of volunteers on the ground through their Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) which contribute data to the disaster response through smartphones and laptops. This, combined with global citizen science efforts, provided immediate geographically useful maps to assist aid workers, including the Red Cross and Canadian DART Team, and the Nepalese government. As of August 2014, almost 1.7 million users provided over 2.5 billion edits to the OpenStreetMap map database. Due to the increased usage of smartphones, GPS-enabled devices, and the growing participation in citizen science projects, data gathering is proving an effective way to contribute as a global citizen. This paper

  7. Genes Influencing Resistance to Coccidioides immitis and the Interleukin-10 Response Map to Chromosomes 4 and 6 in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierer, Joshua; Walls, Lorraine; Wright, Fred; Kirkland, Theo N.

    1999-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal infection that is endemic in the southwestern United States. Infection is more severe in blacks and Filipinos, which suggests that there is a genetic basis for susceptibility to this infection in humans. We found that there is also a difference in resistance to Coccidioides immitis infection among inbred mouse strains: B6 mice are susceptible, while DBA/2 mice are resistant (T. N. Kirkland and J. Fierer, Infect. Immun. 40:912–916, 1983). In this paper we report the results of our efforts to map the genes responsible for resistance to this infection in mice. Mice were infected by intraperitoneal inoculation, and 15 days later the numbers of viable fungi in their lungs and spleens were enumerated. We also determined the amounts of interleukin-10 mRNA made in the infected lungs. These three phenotypes were mapped as quantitative traits by using the 26 available lines of recombinant inbred mice derived from a cross between B6 and DBA/2 mice. The best associations were those between the regions near the Lv locus on chromosome 4 and the Tnfr1 locus on chromosome 6. We then infected backcross mice [(B6 × DBA/2) × B6] and confirmed these associations; 14 of 16 (87%) mice that were heterozygous at both Lv and Tnfr1 were resistant to infection, whereas only 4 of 16 (25%) mice that were homozygous B6 at both loci were resistant. These are the first genetic loci to be associated with susceptibility to C. immitis, but there may be additional genes involved in murine resistance to this infection. PMID:10338499

  8. Dynamic modulation of an orientation preference map by GABA responsible for age-related cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Ai; Hasegawa, Jun; Hoshino, Osamu

    2012-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that cognitive declines in old (healthy) animals could arise from depression of intracortical inhibition, for which a decreased ability to produce GABA during senescence might be responsible. By simulating a neural network model of a primary visual cortical (V1) area, we investigated whether and how a lack of GABA affects cognitive performance of the network: detection of the orientation of a visual bar-stimulus. The network was composed of pyramidal (P) cells and GABAergic interneurons such as small (S) and large (L) basket cells. Intrasynaptic GABA-release from presynaptic S or L cells contributed to reducing ongoing-spontaneous (background) neuronal activity in a different manner. Namely, the former exerted feedback (S-to-P) inhibition and reduced the frequency (firing rate) of action potentials evoked in P cells. The latter reduced the number of saliently firing P cells through lateral (L-to-P) inhibition. Non-vesicular GABA-release, presumably from glia and/or neurons, into the extracellular space reduced the both, activating extrasynaptic GABAa receptors and providing P cells with tonic inhibitory currents. By this combinatorial, spatiotemporal inhibitory mechanism, the background activity as noise was significantly reduced, compared to the stimulus-evoked activity as signal, thereby improving signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Interestingly, GABA-spillover from the intrasynaptic cleft into the extracellular space was effective for improving orientation selectivity (orientation bias), especially when distractors interfered with detecting the bar-stimulus. These simulation results may provide some insight into how the depression of intracortical inhibition due to a reduction in GABA content in the brain leads to age-related cognitive decline.

  9. MAP kinase-signaling controls nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in response to DNA damage and oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Chakraborti, Shankhamala [Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Glas, Rickard, E-mail: rickard.glas@ki.se [Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of TPPII occurs in response to different DNA damage inducers. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of TPPII is linked to ROS and anti-oxidant enzyme levels. {yields} MAPKs control nuclear accumulation of TPPII. {yields} Inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII decreases DNA damage-induced {gamma}-H2AX expression. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a continuous hazard in eukaroytic cells by their ability to cause damage to biomolecules, in particular to DNA. Previous data indicated that the cytosolic serine peptidase tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) translocates into the nucleus of most tumor cell lines in response to {gamma}-irradiation and ROS production; an event that promoted p53 expression as well as caspase-activation. We here observed that nuclear translocation of TPPII was dependent on signaling by MAP kinases, including p38MAPK. Further, this was caused by several types of DNA-damaging drugs, a DNA cross-linker (cisplatinum), an inhibitor of topoisomerase II (etoposide), and to some extent also by nucleoside-analogues (5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea). In the minority of tumor cell lines where TPPII was not translocated into the nucleus in response to DNA damage we observed reduced intracellular ROS levels, and the expression levels of redox defense systems were increased. Further, treatment with the ROS-inducer {gamma}-hexa-chloro-cyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH, lindane), an inhibitor of GAP junctions, restored nuclear translocation of TPPII in these cell lines upon {gamma}-irradiation. Moreover, blocking nuclear translocation of TPPII in etoposide-treated cells, by using a peptide-derived inhibitor (Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH), attenuated expression of {gamma}-H2AX in {gamma}-irradiated melanoma cells. Our results indicated a role for TPPII in MAPK-dependent DNA damage signaling.

  10. Comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant epitopes in the West Nile virus nonstructural protein 1 recognized by avian antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encheng Sun

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that primarily infects birds but occasionally infects humans and horses. Certain species of birds, including crows, house sparrows, geese, blue jays and ravens, are considered highly susceptible hosts to WNV. The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 of WNV can elicit protective immune responses, including NS1-reactive antibodies, during infection of animals. The antigenicity of NS1 suggests that NS1-reactive antibodies could provide a basis for serological diagnostic reagents. To further define serological reagents for diagnostic use, the antigenic sites in NS1 that are targeted by host immune responses need to be identified and the potential diagnostic value of individual antigenic sites also needs to be defined. The present study describes comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes in the WNV NS1 using avian WNV NS1 antisera. We screened antisera from chickens, ducks and geese immunized with purified NS1 for reactivity against 35 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire WNV NS1. This study identified twelve, nine and six peptide epitopes recognized by chicken, duck and goose antibody responses, respectively. Three epitopes (NS1-3, 14 and 24 were recognized by antibodies elicited by immunization in all three avian species tested. We also found that NS1-3 and 24 were WNV-specific epitopes, whereas the NS1-14 epitope was conserved among the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV serocomplex viruses based on the reactivity of avian WNV NS1 antisera against polypeptides derived from the NS1 sequences of viruses of the JEV serocomplex. Further analysis showed that the three common polypeptide epitopes were not recognized by antibodies in Avian Influenza Virus (AIV, Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV, Duck Plague Virus (DPV and Goose Parvovirus (GPV antisera. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study have potential applications in differential diagnostic approaches and

  11. Comparative mapping, genomic structure, and expression analysis of eight pseudo-response regulator genes in Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin A; Kim, Jung Sun; Hong, Joon Ki; Lee, Yeon-Hee; Choi, Beom-Soon; Seol, Young-Joo; Jeon, Chang Hoo

    2012-05-01

    Circadian clocks regulate plant growth and development in response to environmental factors. In this function, clocks influence the adaptation of species to changes in location or climate. Circadian-clock genes have been subject of intense study in models such as Arabidopsis thaliana but the results may not necessarily reflect clock functions in species with polyploid genomes, such as Brassica species, that include multiple copies of clock-related genes. The triplicate genome of Brassica rapa retains high sequence-level co-linearity with Arabidopsis genomes. In B. rapa we had previously identified five orthologs of the five known Arabidopsis pseudo-response regulator (PRR) genes that are key regulators of the circadian clock in this species. Three of these B. rapa genes, BrPRR1, BrPPR5, and BrPPR7, are present in two copies each in the B. rapa genome, for a total of eight B. rapa PRR (BrPRR) orthologs. We have now determined sequences and expression characteristics of the eight BrPRR genes and mapped their positions in the B. rapa genome. Although both members of each paralogous pair exhibited the same expression pattern, some variation in their gene structures was apparent. The BrPRR genes are tightly linked to several flowering genes. The knowledge about genome location, copy number variation and structural diversity of these B. rapa clock genes will improve our understanding of clock-related functions in this important crop. This will facilitate the development of Brassica crops for optimal growth in new environments and under changing conditions.

  12. A Solanum lycopersicum × Solanum pimpinellifolium Linkage Map of Tomato Displaying Genomic Locations of R-Genes, RGAs, and Candidate Resistance/Defense-Response ESTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arun; Zhang, Liping; Niño-Liu, David; Ashrafi, Hamid; Foolad, Majid R.

    2008-01-01

    We have identified an accession (LA2093) within the tomato wild species Solanum pimpinellifolium with many desirable characteristics, including biotic and abiotic stress tolerance and good fruit quality. To utilize the full genetic potential of LA2093 in tomato breeding, we have developed a linkage map based on an F2 population of a cross between LA2093 and a tomato breeding line, using 115 RFLP, 94 EST, and 41 RGA markers. The map spanned 1002.4 cM of the 12 tomato chromosomes with an average marker distance of 4.0 cM. The length of the map and linear order of the markers were in good agreement with the published maps of tomato. The ESTs were chosen based on their sequence similarities with known resistance or defense-response genes, signal-transduction factors, transcriptional regulators, and genes encoding pathogenesis-related proteins. Locations of several ESTs and RGAs coincided with locations of several known tomato resistance genes and quantitative resistance loci (QRLs), suggesting that candidate-gene approach may be effective in identifying and mapping new R genes. This map will be useful for marker-assisted exploitation of desirable traits in LA2093 and other S. pimpinellifolium accessions, and possibly for utilization of genetic variation within S. lycopersicum. PMID:19223983

  13. Mapping out Map Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferjan Ormeling

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Discussing the requirements for map data quality, map users and their library/archives environment, the paper focuses on the metadata the user would need for a correct and efficient interpretation of the map data. For such a correct interpretation, knowledge of the rules and guidelines according to which the topographers/cartographers work (such as the kind of data categories to be collected, and the degree to which these rules and guidelines were indeed followed are essential. This is not only valid for the old maps stored in our libraries and archives, but perhaps even more so for the new digital files as the format in which we now have to access our geospatial data. As this would be too much to ask from map librarians/curators, some sort of web 2.0 environment is sought where comments about data quality, completeness and up-to-dateness from knowledgeable map users regarding the specific maps or map series studied can be collected and tagged to scanned versions of these maps on the web. In order not to be subject to the same disadvantages as Wikipedia, where the ‘communis opinio’ rather than scholarship, seems to be decisive, some checking by map curators of this tagged map use information would still be needed. Cooperation between map curators and the International Cartographic Association ( ICA map and spatial data use commission to this end is suggested.

  14. Improving mapping for Ebola response through mobilising a local community with self-owned smartphones: Tonkolili District, Sierra Leone, January 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nic Lochlainn, Laura M; Gayton, Ivan; Theocharopoulos, Georgios; Edwards, Robin; Danis, Kostas; Kremer, Ronald; Kleijer, Karline; Tejan, Sumaila M; Sankoh, Mohamed; Jimissa, Augustin; Greig, Jane; Caleo, Grazia

    2018-01-01

    During the 2014-16 Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak, the Magburaka Ebola Management Centre (EMC) operated by Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Tonkolili District, Sierra Leone, identified that available district maps lacked up-to-date village information to facilitate timely implementation of EVD control strategies. In January 2015, we undertook a survey in chiefdoms within the MSF EMC catchment area to collect mapping and village data. We explore the feasibility and cost to mobilise a local community for this survey, describe validation against existing mapping sources and use of the data to prioritise areas for interventions, and lessons learned. We recruited local people with self-owned Android smartphones installed with open-source survey software (OpenDataKit (ODK)) and open-source navigation software (OpenStreetMap Automated Navigation Directions (OsmAnd)). Surveyors were paired with local motorbike drivers to travel to eligible villages. The collected mapping data were validated by checking for duplication and comparing the village names against a pre-existing village name and location list using a geographic distance and text string-matching algorithm. The survey teams gained sufficient familiarity with the ODK and OsmAnd software within 1-2 hours. Nine chiefdoms in Tonkolili District and three in Bombali District were surveyed within two weeks. Following de-duplication, the surveyors collected data from 891 villages with an estimated 127,021 households. The overall survey cost was €3,395; €3.80 per village surveyed. The MSF GIS team (MSF-OCG) created improved maps for the MSF Magburaka EMC team which were used to support surveillance, investigation of suspect EVD cases, hygiene-kit distribution and EVD survivor support. We shared the mapping data with OpenStreetMap, the local Ministry of Health and Sanitation and Sierra Leone District and National Ebola Response Centres. Involving local community and using accessible technology allowed rapid

  15. Involvement of MAP3K8 and miR-17-5p in poor virologic response to interferon-based combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihito Tsubota

    Full Text Available Despite advances in chronic hepatitis C treatment, a proportion of patients respond poorly to treatment. This study aimed to explore hepatic mRNA and microRNA signatures involved in hepatitis C treatment resistance. Global hepatic mRNA and microRNA expression profiles were compared using microarray data between treatment responses. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction validated the gene signatures from 130 patients who were infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1b and treated with pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin combination therapy. The correlation between mRNA and microRNA was evaluated using in silico analysis and in vitro siRNA and microRNA inhibition/overexpression experiments. Multivariate regression analysis identified that the independent variables IL28B SNP rs8099917, hsa-miR-122-5p, hsa-miR-17-5p, and MAP3K8 were significantly associated with a poor virologic response. MAP3K8 and miR-17-5p expression were inversely correlated with treatment response. Furthermore, miR-17-5p repressed HCV production by targeting MAP3K8. Collectively, the data suggest that several molecules and the inverse correlation between mRNA and microRNA contributed to a host genetic refractory hepatitis C treatment response.

  16. Towards a Poststructuralist Perspective on the Making and the Power of Maps. A Response to Ball and Petsimeris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Michel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper takes the recent article "Mapping Urban Social Divisions" by BALL and PETSIMERIS, published in FQS, as a starting point for discussing the role of maps for visualizing knowledge and as an object of research in the social sciences. The paper draws on the theoretical approach of "critical cartography" which changed the conception of maps and the practice of mapmaking since the early 1990s. Critical cartography is deeply informed by a poststructuralist critique of knowledge and truth. Maps, no longer conceptualized as graphical images of reality where the only concern is the quality of the data, are powerful actors in the social construction of reality. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1003281

  17. Responsibility and Task Structuring as the Basic Attributes of Learning Styles and Their Relation Towards Consistency and the Quality of Hierarchy of a Learner’s Mind Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duchovičová Jana

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on the identification of the relationship between the learning style and mental representation of curriculum content. The research problem identifies the relationship between the learning style factors - responsibility and task structuring and the selected categories of curriculum content representation - consistency and the quality of hierarchy identified through mind mapping. For the purposes of the research, we used the LSI Questionnaire by R. Dunn, K. Dunn and G. E. Price, a mind mapping test and chi-square statistics were used for the evaluation of research findings. The research sample consisted of 115 respondents. By means of analysis, we found out that a learning style in the observed factors of responsibility and task structuring does not influence students’ mental representation of the curriculum content.

  18. Hyper-temporal remote sensing for digital soil mapping: Characterizing soil-vegetation response to climatic variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indices derived from remotely-sensed imagery are commonly used to predict soil properties with digital soil mapping (DSM) techniques. The use of images from single dates or a small number of dates is most common for DSM; however, selection of the appropriate images is complicated by temporal variabi...

  19. Mapping a major QTL responsible for dwarf architecture in Brassica napus using a single-nucleotide polymorphism marker approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yankun; Chen, Wenjing; Chu, Pu; Wan, Shubei; Yang, Mao; Wang, Mingming; Guan, Rongzhan

    2016-08-18

    Key genes related to plant type traits have played very important roles in the "green revolution" by increasing lodging resistance and elevating the harvest indices of crop cultivars. Although there have been numerous achievements in the development of dwarfism and plant type in Brassica napus breeding, exploring new materials conferring oilseed rape with efficient plant types that provide higher yields is still of significance in breeding, as well as in elucidating the mechanisms underlying plant development. Here, we report a new dwarf architecture with down-curved leaf mutant (Bndwf/dcl1) isolated from an ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS)-mutagenized B. napus line, together with its inheritance and gene mapping, and pleiotropic effects of the mapped locus on plant-type traits. We constructed a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) map using a backcross population derived from the Bndwf/dcl1 mutant and the canola cultivar 'zhongshuang11' ('ZS11') and mapped the dwarf architecture with the down-curved leaf dominant locus, BnDWF/DCL1, in a 6.58-cM interval between SNP marker bins M46180 and M49962 on the linkage group (LG) C05 of B. napus. Further mapping with other materials derived from Bndwf/dcl1 narrowed the interval harbouring BnDWF/DCL1 to 175 kb in length and this interval contained 16 annotated genes. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mappings with the backcross population for plant type traits, including plant height, branching height, main raceme length and average branching interval, indicated that the mapped QTLs for plant type traits were located at the same position as the BnDWF/DCL1 locus. This study suggests that the BnDWF/DCL1 locus is a major pleiotropic locus/QTL in B. napus, which may reduce plant height, alter plant type traits and change leaf shape, and thus may lead to compact plant architecture. Accordingly, this locus may have substantial breeding potential for increasing planting density.

  20. The cream dilution gene, responsible for the palomino and buckskin coat colours, maps to horse chromosome 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, M M; Ruth, L S; Millon, L V; Penedo, M C; Murray, J D; Bowling, A T

    2001-12-01

    The colour locus historically referred to as C in the horse is linked to microsatellites markers on horse chromosome 21. Preliminary results demonstrated linkage of Ccr, thought to be the cream dilution variant of the C locus, to HTG10. An analysis of horse chromosome 21 using additional families confirmed and established a group of markers linked to Ccr. This work also improved the resolution of previously reported linkage maps for this chromosome. Linkage analysis unambiguously produced the map order: SGCV16-(19.1 cM)-HTG10-(3.8 cM)-LEX60/COR73-(1.3 cM)-COR68-(4.5 cM)- Ccr-(11.9 cM)-LEX31. Comparative and synteny data suggested that the horse C locus is not tyrosinase (TYR).

  1. Response to comment on "Using geospatial mapping to design HIV elimination strategies for sub-Saharan Africa".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Justin T; Coburn, Brian J; Blower, Sally

    2017-08-02

    Detailed geospatial mapping of a generalized HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa shows that implementing the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) 90-90-90 strategy could potentially exacerbate urban-rural health care disparities. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  2. Left Ventricular Lead Placement Targeted at the Latest Activated Site Guided by Electrophysiological Mapping in Coronary Sinus Branches Improves Response to Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yanchun; Yu, Haibo; Zhou, Weiwei; Xu, Guoqing; Sun, Y I; Liu, Rong; Wang, Zulu; Han, Yaling

    2015-12-01

    Electrophysiological mapping (EPM) in coronary sinus (CS) branches is feasible for guiding LV lead placement to the optimal, latest activated site at cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) procedures. However, whether this procedure optimizes the response to CRT has not been demonstrated. This study was to evaluate effects of targeting LV lead at the latest activated site guided by EPM during CRT. Seventy-six consecutive patients with advanced heart failure who were referred for CRT were divided into mapping (MG) and control groups (CG). In MG, the LV lead, also used as a mapping bipolar electrode, was placed at the latest activated site determined by EPM in CS branches. In CG, conventional CRT procedure was performed. Patients were followed for 6 months after CRT. Baseline characteristics were comparable between the 2 groups. In MG (n = 29), EPM was successfully performed in 85 of 91 CS branches during CRT. A LV lead was successfully placed at the latest activated site guided by EPM in 27 (93.1%) patients. Compared with CG (n = 47), MG had a significantly higher rate (86.2% vs. 63.8%, P = 0.039) of response (>15% reduction in LV end-systolic volume) to CRT, a higher percentage of patients with clinical improvement of ≥2 NYHA functional classes (72.4% vs. 44.7%, P = 0.032), and a shorter QRS duration (P = 0.004). LV lead placed at the latest activated site guided by EPM resulted in a significantly greater CRT response, and a shorter QRS duration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Projective mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlholm, Christian; Brockhoff, Per B.; Bredie, Wender Laurentius Petrus

    2012-01-01

    instructions and influence heavily the product placements and the descriptive vocabulary (Dehlholm et.al., 2012b). The type of assessors performing the method influences results with an extra aspect in Projective Mapping compared to more analytical tests, as the given spontaneous perceptions are much dependent...... the applied framework, semantic restrictions, the choice of type of assessors and the validation of product separations. The applied framework concerns the response surface as presented to the assessor in different shapes, e.g. rectangular, square or round. Semantic restrictions are a part of the assessor...

  4. Advantages to Geoscience and Disaster Response from QuakeSim Implementation of Interferometric Radar Maps in a GIS Database System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jay; Donnellan, Andrea; Glasscoe, Margaret; Fox, Geoffrey; Wang, Jun; Pierce, Marlon; Ma, Yu

    2015-08-01

    High-resolution maps of earth surface deformation are available in public archives for scientific interpretation, but are primarily available as bulky downloads on the internet. The NASA uninhabited aerial vehicle synthetic aperture radar (UAVSAR) archive of airborne radar interferograms delivers very high resolution images (approximately seven meter pixels) making remote handling of the files that much more pressing. Data exploration requiring data selection and exploratory analysis has been tedious. QuakeSim has implemented an archive of UAVSAR data in a web service and browser system based on GeoServer (http://geoserver.org). This supports a variety of services that supply consistent maps, raster image data and geographic information systems (GIS) objects including standard earthquake faults. Browsing the database is supported by initially displaying GIS-referenced thumbnail images of the radar displacement maps. Access is also provided to image metadata and links for full file downloads. One of the most widely used features is the QuakeSim line-of-sight profile tool, which calculates the radar-observed displacement (from an unwrapped interferogram product) along a line specified through a web browser. Displacement values along a profile are updated to a plot on the screen as the user interactively redefines the endpoints of the line and the sampling density. The profile and also a plot of the ground height are available as CSV (text) files for further examination, without any need to download the full radar file. Additional tools allow the user to select a polygon overlapping the radar displacement image, specify a downsampling rate and extract a modest sized grid of observations for display or for inversion, for example, the QuakeSim simplex inversion tool which estimates a consistent fault geometry and slip model.

  5. Rapid Response to a Typhoon-Induced Flood with an SAR-Derived Map of Inundated Areas: Case Study and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Wei Chung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the successful case of a rapid response to a flash flood in I-Lan County of Taiwan with a map of inundated areas derived from COSMO-SkyMed 1 radar satellite imagery within 24 hours. The flood was caused by the intensive precipitation brought by Typhoon Soulik in July 2013. Based on the ensemble forecasts of trajectory, an urgent request of spaceborne SAR imagery was made 24 hours before Typhoon Soulik made landfall. Two COSMO-SkyMed images were successfully acquired when the center of Typhoon Soulik had just crossed the northern part of Taiwan. The standard level-1b product (radiometric-corrected, geometric-calibrated and orthorectified image was generated by using the off-the-shelf SARscape software. Following the same approach used with the Expert Landslide and Shadow Area Delineating System, the regional threshold of each tile image was determined to delineate still water surface and quasi-inundated areas in a fully-automatic manner. The results were overlaid on a digital elevation model, and the same tile was visually compared to an optical image taken by Formosat-2 before this event. With this ancillary information, the inundated areas were accurately and quickly identified. The SAR-derived map of inundated areas was published on a web-based platform powered by Google Earth within 24 hours, with the aim of supporting the decision-making process of disaster prevention and mitigation. A detailed validation was made afterwards by comparing the map with in situ data of the water levels at 17 stations. The results demonstrate the feasibility of rapidly responding to a typhoon-induced flood with a spaceborne SAR-derived map of inundated areas. A standard operating procedure was derived from this work and followed by the Water Hazard Mitigation Center of the Water Resources Agency, Taiwan, in subsequent typhoon seasons, such as Typhoon Trami (August, 2013 and Typhoon Soudelor (August, 2015.

  6. Cognitive maps

    OpenAIRE

    Kitchin, Rob

    2001-01-01

    A cognitive map is a representative expression of an individual's cognitive map knowledge, where cognitive map knowledge is an individual's knowledge about the spatial and environmental relations of geographic space. For example, a sketch map drawn to show the route between two locations is a cognitive map — a representative expression of the drawer's knowledge of the route between the two locations. This map can be analyzed using classification schemes or quantitatively using spatial statist...

  7. Type IV secretion-dependent activation of host MAP kinases induces an increased proinflammatory cytokine response to Legionella pneumophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunny Shin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The immune system must discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic microbes in order to initiate an appropriate response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs detect microbial components common to both pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria, whereas Nod-like receptors (NLRs sense microbial components introduced into the host cytosol by the specialized secretion systems or pore-forming toxins of bacterial pathogens. The host signaling pathways that respond to bacterial secretion systems remain poorly understood. Infection with the pathogen Legionella pneumophila, which utilizes a type IV secretion system (T4SS, induced an increased proinflammatory cytokine response compared to avirulent bacteria in which the T4SS was inactivated. This enhanced response involved NF-kappaB activation by TLR signaling as well as Nod1 and Nod2 detection of type IV secretion. Furthermore, a TLR- and RIP2-independent pathway leading to p38 and SAPK/JNK MAPK activation was found to play an equally important role in the host response to virulent L. pneumophila. Activation of this MAPK pathway was T4SS-dependent and coordinated with TLR signaling to mount a robust proinflammatory cytokine response to virulent L. pneumophila. These findings define a previously uncharacterized host response to bacterial type IV secretion that activates MAPK signaling and demonstrate that coincident detection of multiple bacterial components enables immune discrimination between virulent and avirulent bacteria.

  8. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent responses via EDS1 and PAD4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Klaus Peter; Petersen, Morten; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis MPK4 has been implicated in plant defense regulation because mpk4 knockout plants exhibit constitutive activation of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defenses, but fail to induce jasmonic acid (JA) defense marker genes in response to JA. We show here that mpk4 mutants are also defective...

  9. SNP discovery and development of genetic markers for mapping immune response genes in common carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in immune response genes have been reported as markers for susceptibility to infectious diseases in human and livestock. A disease caused by cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is highly contagious and virulent in common carp (Cyprinus carpio). With the aim to de...

  10. Concept Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Explains concept mapping as a heuristic device that is helpful in visualizing the relationships between and among ideas. Highlights include how to begin a map; brainstorming; map applications, including document or information summaries and writing composition; and mind mapping to strengthen note-taking. (LRW)

  11. Polarized Raman anisotropic response of collagen in tendon: towards 3D orientation mapping of collagen in tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Galvis

    Full Text Available In this study, polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS was used to characterize the anisotropic response of the amide I band of collagen as a basis for evaluating three-dimensional collagen fibril orientation in tissues. Firstly, the response was investigated theoretically by applying classical Raman theory to collagen-like peptide crystal structures. The theoretical methodology was then tested experimentally, by measuring amide I intensity anisotropy in rat tail as a function of the orientation of the incident laser polarization. For the theoretical study, several collagen-like triple-helical peptide crystal structures obtained from the Protein Data Bank were rotated "in plane" and "out of plane" to evaluate the role of molecular orientation on the intensity of the amide I band. Collagen-like peptides exhibit a sinusoidal anisotropic response when rotated "in plane" with respect to the polarized incident laser. Maximal intensity was obtained when the polarization of the incident light is perpendicular to the molecule and minimal when parallel. In the case of "out of plane" rotation of the molecular structure a decreased anisotropic response was observed, becoming completely isotropic when the structure was perpendicular to the plane of observation. The theoretical Raman response of collagen was compared to that of alpha helical protein fragments. In contrast to collagen, alpha helices have a maximal signal when incident light is parallel to the molecule and minimal when perpendicular. For out-of-plane molecular orientations alpha-helix structures display a decreased average intensity. Results obtained from experiments on rat tail tendon are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions, thus demonstrating the high potential of PRS for experimental evaluation of the three-dimensional orientation of collagen fibers in biological tissues.

  12. Gene Expression Profiling Soybean Stem Tissue Early Response to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and In Silico Mapping in Relation to Resistance Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernarda Calla

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available White mold, caused by (Lib. de Bary, can be a serious disease of crops grown under cool, moist environments. In many plants, such as soybean [ (L. Merr.], complete genetic resistance does not exist. To identify possible genes involved in defense against this pathogen, and to determine possible physiological changes that occur during infection, a microarray screen was conducted using stem tissue to evaluate changes in gene expression between partially resistant and susceptible soybean genotypes at 8 and 14 hours post inoculation. RNA from 15 day-old inoculated plants was labeled and hybridized to soybean cDNA microarrays. ANOVA identified 1270 significant genes from the comparison between time points and 105 genes from the comparison between genotypes. Selected genes were classified into functional categories. The analyses identified changes in cell-wall composition and signaling pathways, as well as suggesting a role for anthocyanin and anthocyanidin synthesis in the defense against . In-silico mapping of both the differentially expressed transcripts and of public markers associated with partial resistance to white mold, provided evidence of several differentially expressed genes being closely positioned to white mold resistance markers, with the two most promising genes encoding a PR-5 and anthocyanidin synthase.

  13. Atomic Force Microscopy Mechanical Mapping of Micropatterned Cells Shows Adhesion Geometry-Dependent Mechanical Response on Local and Global Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigato, Annafrancesca; Rico, Felix; Eghiaian, Frédéric; Piel, Mathieu; Scheuring, Simon

    2015-06-23

    In multicellular organisms, cell shape and organization are dictated by cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix adhesion interactions. Adhesion complexes crosstalk with the cytoskeleton enabling cells to sense their mechanical environment. Unfortunately, most of cell biology studies, and cell mechanics studies in particular, are conducted on cultured cells adhering to a hard, homogeneous, and unconstrained substrate with nonspecific adhesion sites, thus far from physiological and reproducible conditions. Here, we grew cells on three different fibronectin patterns with identical overall dimensions but different geometries (▽, T, and Y), and investigated their topography and mechanics by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The obtained mechanical maps were reproducible for cells grown on patterns of the same geometry, revealing pattern-specific subcellular differences. We found that local Young's moduli variations are related to the cell adhesion geometry. Additionally, we detected local changes of cell mechanical properties induced by cytoskeletal drugs. We thus provide a method to quantitatively and systematically investigate cell mechanics and their variations, and present further evidence for a tight relation between cell adhesion and mechanics.

  14. Mapping of a gene responsible for the difference in amylopectin structure between japonica-type and indica-type rice varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, T; Yano, M; Satoh, H; Shomura, A; Nakamura, Y

    2002-01-01

    The present investigation revealed that the alk and gel(t) genes, which cause the differences between a japonica rice variety Nipponbare and an indica rice variety Kasalath in terms of the disintegration of endosperm starch granules in alkali solution and their gelatinisation in a 4 M urea solution, respectively, cosegregated in backcross inbred lines derived from a cross between the two varieties. The segregation pattern of the profile for amylopectin chain-length, which was distinguished by enrichment in short chains of DPphysico-chemical properties of starch granules, and the gene was designated as acl(t). Gene-mapping analysis showed that the starch synthase IIa ( SSIIa) gene is located at the alk locus on chromosome 6 in the rice genome. These results lead us to the possibility that different alleles of the SSIIa gene are responsible for differences in amylopectin structure between the two varieties, in that SSIIa plays a distinct role in the elongation of short chains within clusters (A+B(1) chains) of amylopectin. It is proposed that the activity of SSIIa in japonica rice is reduced in amount or functional capacity relative to the activity of this enzyme in indica rice. This, in turn, would explain why starch from japonica rice has a lower gelatinisation temperature than starch from indica rice and is more susceptible to disintegration in alkali or urea. The evidence for this hypothesis is that the alk(t), gel(t), acl(t) and SSIIa genes all map to the same locus.

  15. Concept Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Schwendimann, Beat Adrian

    2014-01-01

    A concept map is a node-link diagram showing the semantic relationships among concepts. The technique for constructing concept maps is called "concept mapping". A concept map consists of nodes, arrows as linking lines, and linking phrases that describe the relationship between nodes. Two nodes connected with a labeled arrow are called a proposition. Concept maps are versatile graphic organizers that can represent many different forms of relationships between concepts. The relationship between...

  16. Generalized Smooth Transition Map Between Tent and Logistic Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Wafaa S.; Fahmy, Hossam A. H.; Rezk, Ahmed A.; Radwan, Ahmed G.

    There is a continuous demand on novel chaotic generators to be employed in various modeling and pseudo-random number generation applications. This paper proposes a new chaotic map which is a general form for one-dimensional discrete-time maps employing the power function with the tent and logistic maps as special cases. The proposed map uses extra parameters to provide responses that fit multiple applications for which conventional maps were not enough. The proposed generalization covers also maps whose iterative relations are not based on polynomials, i.e. with fractional powers. We introduce a framework for analyzing the proposed map mathematically and predicting its behavior for various combinations of its parameters. In addition, we present and explain the transition map which results in intermediate responses as the parameters vary from their values corresponding to tent map to those corresponding to logistic map case. We study the properties of the proposed map including graph of the map equation, general bifurcation diagram and its key-points, output sequences, and maximum Lyapunov exponent. We present further explorations such as effects of scaling, system response with respect to the new parameters, and operating ranges other than transition region. Finally, a stream cipher system based on the generalized transition map validates its utility for image encryption applications. The system allows the construction of more efficient encryption keys which enhances its sensitivity and other cryptographic properties.

  17. Constitutive Activity of the Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 3 Confers Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae and Drives Robust Immune Responses

    KAUST Repository

    Lang, Julien

    2017-08-02

    Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) are known to be important mediators of plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In a recent report, we enlarged the understanding of the Arabidopsis thaliana MPK3 functions showing that the expression of a constitutively active (CA) form of the protein led to auto-immune phenotypes. CA-MPK3 plants are dwarf and display defense responses that are characterized by the accumulation of salicylic acid and phytoalexins as well as by the upregulation of several defense genes. Consistently with these data, we present here results demonstrating that, compared to wild type controls, CA-MPK3 plants are more resistant to the hemibiotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae DC3000. Based on our previous work, we also discuss the mechanisms of robust plant immunity controlled by sustained MPK3 activity, focusing especially on the roles of disease resistance proteins.

  18. Constitutively active Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 3 triggers defense responses involving salicylic acid and SUMM2 resistance protein

    KAUST Repository

    Genot, Baptiste

    2017-04-12

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are important regulators of plant immunity. Most of the knowledge about the function of these pathways is derived from loss-of-function approaches. Using a gain-of-function approach, we investigated the responses controlled by a constitutively active (CA) MPK3 in Arabidopsis thaliana. CA-MPK3 plants are dwarfed and display a massive de-repression of defense genes associated with spontaneous cell death as well as accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), phytoalexins and the stress-related hormones ethylene and salicylic acid (SA). Remarkably CA-MPK3/sid2 and CA-MPK3/ein2-50 lines which are impaired in SA synthesis and ethylene signaling, respectively, retain most of the CA-MPK3-associated phenotypes, indicating that constitutive activity of MPK3 can bypass SA and ethylene signaling to activate defense responses. A comparative analysis of the molecular phenotypes of CA-MPK3 and mpk4 autoimmunity suggested convergence between the MPK3 and MPK4-guarding modules. In support of this model, CA-MPK3 crosses with summ1 and summ2, two known suppressors of mpk4, resulted in a partial reversion of the CA-MPK3 phenotypes. Overall, our data unravel a novel mechanism by which the MAPK signaling network contributes to a robust defense response system.

  19. Application of a dense genetic map for assessment of genomic responses to selection and inbreeding in Heliothis virescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, M L; Paa, S; Baltzegar, J; Gould, F

    2016-08-01

    Adaptation of pest species to laboratory conditions and selection for resistance to toxins in the laboratory are expected to cause inbreeding and genetic bottlenecks that reduce genetic variation. Heliothis virescens, a major cotton pest, has been colonized in the laboratory many times, and a few laboratory colonies have been selected for Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) resistance. We developed 350-bp double-digest restriction-site associated DNA-sequencing (ddRAD-seq) molecular markers to examine and compare changes in genetic variation associated with laboratory adaptation, artificial selection and inbreeding in this nonmodel insect species. We found that allelic and nucleotide diversity declined dramatically in laboratory-reared H. virescens as compared with field-collected populations. The declines were primarily a result of the loss of low frequency alleles present in field-collected H. virescens. A further, albeit modest decline in genetic diversity was observed in a Bt-selected population. The greatest decline was seen in H. virescens that were sib-mated for 10 generations, in which more than 80% of loci were fixed for a single allele. To determine which regions of the genome were resistant to fixation in our sib-mated line, we generated a dense intraspecific linkage map containing three PCR-based and 659 ddRAD-seq markers. Markers that retained polymorphism were observed in small clusters spread over multiple linkage groups, but this clustering was not statistically significant. Overall, we have confirmed and extended the general expectations for reduced genetic diversity in laboratory colonies, provided tools for further genomic analyses and produced highly homozygous genomic DNA for future whole genome sequencing of H. virescens. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  20. Epitope mapping of Ebola virus dominant and subdominant glycoprotein epitopes facilitates construction of an epitope-based DNA vaccine able to focus the antibody response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Daniel A J; Dupuy, Lesley C; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Palacios, Gustavo; Back, Jaap W; Shimanovskaya, Katya; Chaudhury, Sidhartha; Ripoll, Daniel R; Wallqvist, Anders; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2017-07-12

    We performed epitope mapping studies on the major surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus (EBOV) using Chemically Linked Peptides on Scaffolds (CLIPS), which form linear and potential conformational epitopes. This method identified monoclonal antibody epitopes and predicted additional epitopes recognized by antibodies in polyclonal sera from animals experimentally vaccinated against or infected with EBOV. Using the information obtained along with structural modeling to predict epitope accessibility, we then constructed two DNA vaccines encoding immunodominant and subdominant epitopes predicted to be accessible on EBOV GP. Although a construct designed to produce a membrane-bound oligopeptide was poorly immunogenic, a construct generating a secreted oligopeptide elicited strong antibody responses in mice. When this construct was administered as a boost to a DNA vaccine expressing the complete EBOV GP gene, the resultant antibody response was focused largely toward the less immunodominant epitopes in the oligopeptide. Taken together, the results of this work suggest a utility for this method for immune focusing of antibody responses elicited by vaccination.

  1. Mapping and Role of the CD8+ T Cell Response During Primary Zika Virus Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elong Ngono, Annie; Vizcarra, Edward A; Tang, William W; Sheets, Nicholas; Joo, Yunichel; Kim, Kenneth; Gorman, Matthew J; Diamond, Michael S; Shresta, Sujan

    2017-01-11

    CD8+ T cells may play a dual role in protection against and pathogenesis of flaviviruses, including Zika virus (ZIKV). We evaluated the CD8+ T cell response in ZIKV-infected LysMCre+IFNARfl/fl C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice lacking the type I interferon receptor in a subset of myeloid cells. In total, 26 and 15 CD8+ T cell-reactive peptides for ZIKV African (MR766) and Asian (FSS13025) lineage strains, respectively, were identified and validated. CD8+ T cells from infected mice were polyfunctional and mediated cytotoxicity. Adoptive transfer of ZIKV-immune CD8+ T cells reduced viral burdens, whereas their depletion led to higher tissue burdens, and CD8-/- mice displayed higher mortality with ZIKV infection. Collectively, these results demonstrate that CD8+ T cells protect against ZIKV infection. Further, this study provides a T cell competent mouse model for investigating ZIKV-specific T cell responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Parametric Response Mapping of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient as an Imaging Biomarker to Distinguish Pseudoprogression from True Tumor Progression in Peptide-Based Vaccine Therapy for Pediatric Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceschin, R; Kurland, B F; Abberbock, S R; Ellingson, B M; Okada, H; Jakacki, R I; Pollack, I F; Panigrahy, A

    2015-11-01

    Immune response to cancer therapy may result in pseudoprogression, which can only be identified retrospectively and may disrupt an effective therapy. This study assesses whether serial parametric response mapping (a voxel-by-voxel method of image analysis also known as functional diffusion mapping) analysis of ADC measurements following peptide-based vaccination may help prospectively distinguish progression from pseudoprogression in pediatric patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas. From 2009 to 2012, 21 children, 4-18 years of age, with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas were enrolled in a serial peptide-based vaccination protocol following radiation therapy. DWI was acquired before immunotherapy and at 6-week intervals during vaccine treatment. Pseudoprogression was identified retrospectively on the basis of clinical and radiographic findings, excluding DWI. Parametric response mapping was used to analyze 96 scans, comparing ADC measures at multiple time points (from the first vaccine to up to 12 weeks after the vaccine was halted) with prevaccine baseline values. Log-transformed fractional increased ADC, fractional decreased ADC, and parametric response mapping ratio (fractional increased ADC/fractional decreased ADC) were compared between patients with and without pseudoprogression, by using generalized estimating equations with inverse weighting by cluster size. Median survival was 13.1 months from diagnosis (range, 6.4-24.9 months). Four of 21 children (19%) were assessed as experiencing pseudoprogression. Patients with pseudoprogression had higher fitted average log-transformed parametric response mapping ratios (P = .01) and fractional decreased ADCs (P = .0004), compared with patients without pseudoprogression. Serial parametric response mapping of ADC, performed at multiple time points of therapy, may distinguish pseudoprogression from true progression in patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas treated with peptide-based vaccination.

  3. CEPH maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, H M

    1992-06-01

    There are CEPH genetic maps on each homologous human chromosome pair. Genotypes for these maps have been generated in 88 laboratories that receive DNA from a reference panel of large nuclear pedigrees/families supplied by the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain. These maps serve as useful tools for the localization of both disease genes and other genes of interest.

  4. Bidirectional Regulation of the Cyclic-AMP Response Element Binding Protein Encodes Spatial Map Alignment in Prism-Adapting Barn Owls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Grant S; DeBello, William M

    2012-01-01

    The barn owl midbrain contains mutually aligned maps of auditory and visual space. Throughout life, map alignment is maintained through the actions of an instructive signal that encodes the magnitude of auditory-visual mismatch. The intracellular signaling pathways activated by this signal are unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) provides a cell-specific readout of instructive information. Owls were fitted with prismatic or control spectacles and provided rich auditory-visual experience - hunting live mice. CREB activation was analyzed within 30 minutes of hunting using phosphorylation state-specific (pCREB) and CREB antibodies, confocal imaging and immunofluorescence measurements at individual cell nuclei. In control owls or prism-adapted owls, which experience small instructive signals, the frequency distributions of pCREB/CREB values obtained for cell nuclei within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX) were unimodal. In contrast, in owls adapting to prisms or re-adapting to normal conditions, the distributions were bimodal: certain cells had received a signal that positively regulated CREB, and by extension, transcription of CREB-dependent genes, while others a signal that negatively regulated it. These changes were restricted to the sub-region of the inferior colliculus that received optically displaced input, the rostral ICX, and not evident in the caudal ICX or central nucleus. Finally, the topographic pattern of CREB regulation was patchy, not continuous, as expected from the actions of a topographically precise signal encoding discrete events. These results support a model in which the magnitude of CREB activation within individual cells provides a readout of the instructive signal that guides plasticity and learning. PMID:18829948

  5. Functional screening of willow alleles in Arabidopsis combined with QTL mapping in willow (Salix) identifies SxMAX4 as a coppicing response gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Jemma; Ward, Sally P; Hanley, Steven J; Leyser, Ottoline; Karp, Angela

    2014-05-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) are important biomass crops due to their ability to grow rapidly with low fertilizer inputs and ease of cultivation in short-rotation coppice cycles. They are relatively undomesticated and highly diverse, but functional testing to identify useful allelic variation is time-consuming in trees and transformation is not yet possible in willow. Arabidopsis is heralded as a model plant from which knowledge can be transferred to advance the improvement of less tractable species. Here, knowledge and methodologies from Arabidopsis were successfully used to identify a gene influencing stem number in coppiced willows, a complex trait of key biological and industrial relevance. The strigolactone-related More AXillary growth (MAX) genes were considered candidates due to their role in shoot branching. We previously demonstrated that willow and Arabidopsis show similar response to strigolactone and that transformation rescue of Arabidopsis max mutants with willow genes could be used to detect allelic differences. Here, this approach was used to screen 45 SxMAX1, SxMAX2, SxMAX3 and SxMAX4 alleles cloned from 15 parents of 11 mapping populations varying in shoot-branching traits. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies were locus dependent, ranging from 29.2 to 74.3 polymorphic sites per kb. SxMAX alleles were 98%-99% conserved at the amino acid level, but different protein products varying in their ability to rescue Arabidopsis max mutants were identified. One poor rescuing allele, SxMAX4D, segregated in a willow mapping population where its presence was associated with increased shoot resprouting after coppicing and colocated with a QTL for this trait. © 2014 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Mapping of the brain hemodynamic responses to sensorimotor stimulation in a rodent model: A BOLD fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussida, Salem; Traoré, Amidou S; Durif, Franck

    2017-01-01

    Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent functional MRI (BOLD fMRI) during electrical paw stimulation has been widely used in studies aimed at the understanding of the somatosensory network in rats. However, despite the well-established anatomical connections between cortical and subcortical structures of the sensorimotor system, most of these functional studies have been concentrated on the cortical effects of sensory electrical stimulation. BOLD fMRI study of the integration of a sensorimotor input across the sensorimotor network requires an appropriate methodology to elicit functional activation in cortical and subcortical areas owing to the regional differences in both neuronal and vascular architectures between these brain regions. Here, using a combination of low level anesthesia, long pulse duration of the electrical stimulation along with improved spatial and temporal signal to noise ratios, we provide a functional description of the main cortical and subcortical structures of the sensorimotor rat brain. With this calibrated fMRI protocol, unilateral non-noxious sensorimotor electrical hindpaw stimulation resulted in robust positive activations in the contralateral sensorimotor cortex and bilaterally in the sensorimotor thalamus nuclei, whereas negative activations were observed bilaterally in the dorsolateral caudate-putamen. These results demonstrate that, once the experimental setup allowing necessary spatial and temporal signal to noise ratios is reached, hemodynamic changes related to neuronal activity, as preserved by the combination of a soft anesthesia with a soft muscle relaxation, can be measured within the sensorimotor network. Moreover, the observed responses suggest that increasing pulse duration of the electrical stimulus adds a proprioceptive component to the sensory input that activates sensorimotor network in the brain, and that these activation patterns are similar to those induced by digits paw's movements. These findings may find application in

  7. Mapping of the brain hemodynamic responses to sensorimotor stimulation in a rodent model: A BOLD fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Boussida

    Full Text Available Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent functional MRI (BOLD fMRI during electrical paw stimulation has been widely used in studies aimed at the understanding of the somatosensory network in rats. However, despite the well-established anatomical connections between cortical and subcortical structures of the sensorimotor system, most of these functional studies have been concentrated on the cortical effects of sensory electrical stimulation. BOLD fMRI study of the integration of a sensorimotor input across the sensorimotor network requires an appropriate methodology to elicit functional activation in cortical and subcortical areas owing to the regional differences in both neuronal and vascular architectures between these brain regions. Here, using a combination of low level anesthesia, long pulse duration of the electrical stimulation along with improved spatial and temporal signal to noise ratios, we provide a functional description of the main cortical and subcortical structures of the sensorimotor rat brain. With this calibrated fMRI protocol, unilateral non-noxious sensorimotor electrical hindpaw stimulation resulted in robust positive activations in the contralateral sensorimotor cortex and bilaterally in the sensorimotor thalamus nuclei, whereas negative activations were observed bilaterally in the dorsolateral caudate-putamen. These results demonstrate that, once the experimental setup allowing necessary spatial and temporal signal to noise ratios is reached, hemodynamic changes related to neuronal activity, as preserved by the combination of a soft anesthesia with a soft muscle relaxation, can be measured within the sensorimotor network. Moreover, the observed responses suggest that increasing pulse duration of the electrical stimulus adds a proprioceptive component to the sensory input that activates sensorimotor network in the brain, and that these activation patterns are similar to those induced by digits paw's movements. These findings may

  8. Topographic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) produced its first topographic map in 1879, the same year it was established. Today, more than 100 years and millions of map copies later, topographic mapping is still a central activity for the USGS. The topographic map remains an indispensable tool for government, science, industry, and leisure. Much has changed since early topographers traveled the unsettled West and carefully plotted the first USGS maps by hand. Advances in survey techniques, instrumentation, and design and printing technologies, as well as the use of aerial photography and satellite data, have dramatically improved mapping coverage, accuracy, and efficiency. Yet cartography, the art and science of mapping, may never before have undergone change more profound than today.

  9. Developmental broadening of inhibitory sensory maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Kathleen B; Ung, Kevin; Froudarakis, Emmanouil; Huang, Longwen; Herman, Isabella; Addison, Angela P; Ortiz-Guzman, Joshua; Cordiner, Keith; Saggau, Peter; Tolias, Andreas S; Arenkiel, Benjamin R

    2017-01-01

    Sensory maps are created by networks of neuronal responses that vary with their anatomical position, such that representations of the external world are systematically and topographically organized in the brain. Current understanding from studying excitatory maps is that maps are sculpted and refined throughout development and/or through sensory experience. Investigating the mouse olfactory bulb, where ongoing neurogenesis continually supplies new inhibitory granule cells into existing circuitry, we isolated the development of sensory maps formed by inhibitory networks. Using in vivo calcium imaging of odor responses, we compared functional responses of both maturing and established granule cells. We found that, in contrast to the refinement observed for excitatory maps, inhibitory sensory maps became broader with maturation. However, like excitatory maps, inhibitory sensory maps are sensitive to experience. These data describe the development of an inhibitory sensory map as a network, highlighting the differences from previously described excitatory maps. PMID:28024159

  10. Developmental broadening of inhibitory sensory maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Kathleen B; Ung, Kevin; Froudarakis, Emmanouil; Huang, Longwen; Herman, Isabella; Addison, Angela P; Ortiz-Guzman, Joshua; Cordiner, Keith; Saggau, Peter; Tolias, Andreas S; Arenkiel, Benjamin R

    2017-02-01

    Sensory maps are created by networks of neuronal responses that vary with their anatomical position, such that representations of the external world are systematically and topographically organized in the brain. Current understanding from studying excitatory maps is that maps are sculpted and refined throughout development and/or through sensory experience. Investigating the mouse olfactory bulb, where ongoing neurogenesis continually supplies new inhibitory granule cells into existing circuitry, we isolated the development of sensory maps formed by inhibitory networks. Using in vivo calcium imaging of odor responses, we compared functional responses of both maturing and established granule cells. We found that, in contrast to the refinement observed for excitatory maps, inhibitory sensory maps became broader with maturation. However, like excitatory maps, inhibitory sensory maps are sensitive to experience. These data describe the development of an inhibitory sensory map as a network, highlighting the differences from previously described excitatory maps.

  11. High-density genetic map and identification of QTLs for responses to temperature and salinity stresses in the model brown alga Ectocarpus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avia, Komlan; Coelho, Susana M.; Montecinos, Gabriel J.; Cormier, Alexandre; Lerck, Fiona; Mauger, Stéphane; Faugeron, Sylvain; Valero, Myriam; Cock, J. Mark; Boudry, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Deciphering the genetic architecture of adaptation of brown algae to environmental stresses such as temperature and salinity is of evolutionary as well as of practical interest. The filamentous brown alga Ectocarpus sp. is a model for the brown algae and its genome has been sequenced. As sessile organisms, brown algae need to be capable of resisting the various abiotic stressors that act in the intertidal zone (e.g. osmotic pressure, temperature, salinity, UV radiation) and previous studies have shown that an important proportion of the expressed genes is regulated in response to hyposaline, hypersaline or oxidative stress conditions. Using the double digest RAD sequencing method, we constructed a dense genetic map with 3,588 SNP markers and identified 39 QTLs for growth-related traits and their plasticity under different temperature and salinity conditions (tolerance to high temperature and low salinity). GO enrichment tests within QTL intervals highlighted membrane transport processes such as ion transporters. Our study represents a significant step towards deciphering the genetic basis of adaptation of Ectocarpus sp. to stress conditions and provides a substantial resource to the increasing list of tools generated for the species. PMID:28256542

  12. How entorhinal grid cells may learn multiple spatial scales from a dorsoventral gradient of cell response rates in a self-organizing map.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Grossberg

    Full Text Available Place cells in the hippocampus of higher mammals are critical for spatial navigation. Recent modeling clarifies how this may be achieved by how grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC input to place cells. Grid cells exhibit hexagonal grid firing patterns across space in multiple spatial scales along the MEC dorsoventral axis. Signals from grid cells of multiple scales combine adaptively to activate place cells that represent much larger spaces than grid cells. But how do grid cells learn to fire at multiple positions that form a hexagonal grid, and with spatial scales that increase along the dorsoventral axis? In vitro recordings of medial entorhinal layer II stellate cells have revealed subthreshold membrane potential oscillations (MPOs whose temporal periods, and time constants of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs, both increase along this axis. Slower (faster subthreshold MPOs and slower (faster EPSPs correlate with larger (smaller grid spacings and field widths. A self-organizing map neural model explains how the anatomical gradient of grid spatial scales can be learned by cells that respond more slowly along the gradient to their inputs from stripe cells of multiple scales, which perform linear velocity path integration. The model cells also exhibit MPO frequencies that covary with their response rates. The gradient in intrinsic rhythmicity is thus not compelling evidence for oscillatory interference as a mechanism of grid cell firing. A response rate gradient combined with input stripe cells that have normalized receptive fields can reproduce all known spatial and temporal properties of grid cells along the MEC dorsoventral axis. This spatial gradient mechanism is homologous to a gradient mechanism for temporal learning in the lateral entorhinal cortex and its hippocampal projections. Spatial and temporal representations may hereby arise from homologous mechanisms, thereby embodying a mechanistic "neural relativity" that

  13. How entorhinal grid cells may learn multiple spatial scales from a dorsoventral gradient of cell response rates in a self-organizing map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossberg, Stephen; Pilly, Praveen K

    2012-01-01

    Place cells in the hippocampus of higher mammals are critical for spatial navigation. Recent modeling clarifies how this may be achieved by how grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) input to place cells. Grid cells exhibit hexagonal grid firing patterns across space in multiple spatial scales along the MEC dorsoventral axis. Signals from grid cells of multiple scales combine adaptively to activate place cells that represent much larger spaces than grid cells. But how do grid cells learn to fire at multiple positions that form a hexagonal grid, and with spatial scales that increase along the dorsoventral axis? In vitro recordings of medial entorhinal layer II stellate cells have revealed subthreshold membrane potential oscillations (MPOs) whose temporal periods, and time constants of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), both increase along this axis. Slower (faster) subthreshold MPOs and slower (faster) EPSPs correlate with larger (smaller) grid spacings and field widths. A self-organizing map neural model explains how the anatomical gradient of grid spatial scales can be learned by cells that respond more slowly along the gradient to their inputs from stripe cells of multiple scales, which perform linear velocity path integration. The model cells also exhibit MPO frequencies that covary with their response rates. The gradient in intrinsic rhythmicity is thus not compelling evidence for oscillatory interference as a mechanism of grid cell firing. A response rate gradient combined with input stripe cells that have normalized receptive fields can reproduce all known spatial and temporal properties of grid cells along the MEC dorsoventral axis. This spatial gradient mechanism is homologous to a gradient mechanism for temporal learning in the lateral entorhinal cortex and its hippocampal projections. Spatial and temporal representations may hereby arise from homologous mechanisms, thereby embodying a mechanistic "neural relativity" that may clarify how

  14. Question Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Josh

    2012-01-01

    After accepting the principal position at Farmersville (TX) Junior High, the author decided to increase instructional rigor through question mapping because of the success he saw using this instructional practice at his prior campus. Teachers are the number one influence on student achievement (Marzano, 2003), so question mapping provides a…

  15. Causal mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2006-01-01

    The lecture note explains how to use the causal mapping method as well as the theoretical framework aoosciated to the method......The lecture note explains how to use the causal mapping method as well as the theoretical framework aoosciated to the method...

  16. 31P NMR 2D Mapping of Creatine Kinase Forward Flux Rate in Hearts with Postinfarction Left Ventricular Remodeling in Response to Cell Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Gao

    Full Text Available Utilizing a fast 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS 2-dimensional chemical shift imaging (2D-CSI method, this study examined the heterogeneity of creatine kinase (CK forward flux rate of hearts with postinfarction left ventricular (LV remodeling. Immunosuppressed Yorkshire pigs were assigned to 4 groups: 1 A sham-operated normal group (SHAM, n = 6; 2 A 60 minutes distal left anterior descending coronary artery ligation and reperfusion (MI, n = 6; 3 Open patch group; ligation injury plus open fibrin patch over the site of injury (Patch, n = 6; and 4 Cell group, hiPSCs-cardiomyocytes, -endothelial cells, and -smooth muscle cells (2 million, each were injected into the injured myocardium pass through a fibrin patch (Cell+Patch, n = 5. At 4 weeks, the creatine phosphate (PCr/ATP ratio, CK forward flux rate (Flux PCr→ATP, and k constant of CK forward flux rate (kPCr→ATP were severely decreased at border zone myocardium (BZ adjacent to MI. Cell treatment results in significantly increase of PCr/ATP ratio and improve the value of kPCr→ATP and Flux PCr→ATP in BZ myocardium. Moreover, the BZ myocardial CK total activity and protein expression of CK mitochondria isozyme and CK myocardial isozyme were significantly reduced, but recovered in response to cell treatment. Thus, cell therapy results in improvement of BZ bioenergetic abnormality in hearts with postinfarction LV remodeling, which is accompanied by significantly improvements in BZ CK activity and CK isozyme expression. The fast 2D 31P MR CSI mapping can reliably measure the heterogeneity of bioenergetics in hearts with post infarction LV remodeling.

  17. Laser-scanning astrocyte mapping reveals increased glutamate-responsive domain size and disrupted maturation of glutamate uptake following neonatal cortical freeze-lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortiz eArmbruster

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytic uptake of glutamate shapes extracellular neurotransmitter dynamics, receptor activation, and synaptogenesis. During development, glutamate transport becomes more robust. How neonatal brain insult affects the functional maturation of glutamate transport remains unanswered. Neonatal brain insult can lead to developmental delays, cognitive losses, and epilepsy; the disruption of glutamate transport is known to cause changes in synaptogenesis, receptor activation, and seizure. Using the neonatal freeze-lesion (FL model, we have investigated how insult affects the maturation of astrocytic glutamate transport. As lesioning occurs on the day of birth, a time when astrocytes are still functionally immature, this model is ideal for identifying changes in astrocyte maturation following insult. Reactive astrocytosis, astrocyte proliferation, and in vitro hyperexcitability are known to occur in this model. To probe astrocyte glutamate transport with better spatial precision we have developed a novel technique, Laser Scanning Astrocyte Mapping (LSAM, which combines glutamate transport current (TC recording from astrocytes with laser scanning glutamate photolysis. LSAM allows us to identify the area from which a single astrocyte can transport glutamate and to quantify spatial heterogeneity in the rate of glutamate clearance kinetics within that domain. Using LSAM, we report that cortical astrocytes have an increased glutamate-responsive area following FL and that TCs have faster decay times in distal, as compared to proximal processes. Furthermore, the developmental shift from GLAST- to GLT-1-dominated clearance is disrupted following FL. These findings introduce a novel method to probe astrocyte glutamate uptake and show that neonatal cortical FL disrupts the functional maturation of cortical astrocytes.

  18. The HIV-1 gp120/V3 modifies the response of uninfected CD4 T cells to antigen presentation: mapping of the specific transcriptional signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spandidos Demetrios A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The asymptomatic phase of HIV-1 infection is characterized by a progressive depletion of uninfected peripheral effector/memory CD4+ T cells that subsequently leads to immune dysfunction and AIDS symptoms. We have previously demonstrated that the presence of specific gp120/V3 peptides during antigen presentation can modify the activation of normal T-cells leading to altered immune function. The aim of the present study was to map the specific transcriptional profile invoked by an HIV-1/V3 epitope in uninfected T cells during antigen presentation. Methods We exposed primary human peripheral blood monocytes to V3 lipopeptides using a liposome delivery system followed by a superantigen-mediated antigen presentation system. We then evaluated the changes in the T-cell transcriptional profile using oligonucleotide microarrays and performed Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA and DAVID analysis. The results were validated using realtime PCR, FACS, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Results Our results revealed that the most highly modulated transcripts could almost entirely be categorized as related to the cell cycle or transcriptional regulation. The most statistically significant enriched categories and networks identified by IPA were associated with cell cycle, gene expression, immune response, infection mechanisms, cellular growth, proliferation and antigen presentation. Canonical pathways involved in energy and cell cycle regulation, and in the co-activation of T cells were also enriched. Conclusions Taken together, these results document a distinct transcriptional profile invoked by the HIV-1/V3 epitope. These data could be invaluable to determine the underlying mechanism by which HIV-1 epitopes interfere with uninfected CD4+ T-cell function causing hyper proliferation and AICD.

  19. Brain maps and parallel computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M E; Bower, J M

    1990-10-01

    It is well known that neural responses in many brain regions are organized in characteristic spatial patterns referred to as brain maps. It is likely that these patterns in some way reflect aspects of the neural computations being performed, but to date there are no general guiding principles for relating the structure of a brain map to the properties of the associated computation. In the field of parallel computing, maps similar to brain maps arise when computations are distributed across the multiple processors of a parallel computer. In this case, the relationship between maps and computations is well understood and general principles for optimally mapping computations onto parallel computers have been developed. In this paper we discuss how these principles may help illuminate the relationship between maps and computations in the nervous system.

  20. Quantitative evaluation of CT-perfusion map as indicator of tumor response to transarterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation in HCC patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ippolito, Davide, E-mail: davide.atena@tiscalinet.it [School of Medicine, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza, MB (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, H. S. Gerardo Monza, Via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza, MB (Italy); Fior, Davide; Bonaffini, Pietro Andrea; Capraro, Cristina [School of Medicine, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza, MB (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, H. S. Gerardo Monza, Via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza, MB (Italy); Leni, Davide; Corso, Rocco [Department of Interventional Radiology, H. S. Gerardo Monza, Via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza, MB (Italy); Sironi, Sandro [School of Medicine, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza, MB (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, H. S. Gerardo Monza, Via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza, MB (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We examine perfusion values in two different categories of treated HCC patients. • Perfusion parameters are not influenced by TACE or RFA treatments. • CT-p represents a non-invasive diagnostic technique able to assess treatment response. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess if radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) may influence the evaluation of perfusion parameters obtained with CT-perfusion (CT-p) in HCC treated patients. Materials and methods: Thirty-three consecutive cirrhotic patients with biopsy-proven diagnosis of HCC lesions and candidates to TACE or RFA were included. The CT-p study of hepatic parenchyma and of treated lesions was performed about 1 month after treatment on 16 multidetector CT after injection of 50 mL of non ionic contrast agent (350 mg I/mL) at a flow rate of 6 mL/s acquiring 40 dynamic scans. A dedicated perfusion software which generated a quantitative map of arterial and portal perfusion by means of colour scale was employed.The following perfusion parameters were assessed before and after RFA or TACE treatment: hepatic perfusion (HP), arterial perfusion (AP), blood volume (BV), time to peak (TTP), hepatic perfusion index (HPI). Results: A complete treatment was obtained in 16 cases and incomplete treatment in the 17 remaining cases. The perfusion data of completely treated lesions were: HP 10.2 ± 6.3; AP 10.4 ± 7; BV 4.05 ± 4.8; TTP 38.9 ± 4.2; HPI 9.9 ± 9.2, whereas in partially treated lesions were: HP 43.2 ± 15.1 mL/s/100 g; AP 38.7 ± 8.8 mL/min; BV 20.7 ± 9.5 mL/100 mg; TTP 24 ± 3.7 s; HPI 61.7 ± 7.5%. In adjacent cirrhotic parenchyma, the parameters of all evaluated patients were: HP 13.2 ± 4; AP 12.3 ± 3.4; BV 11.8 ± 2.8; TTP 43.9 ± 2.9; and HPI 17.1 ± 9.8. A significant difference (P < 0.001) was found for all parameters between residual viable tumor tissue (P < 0.001) compared to successfully treated lesion due to the presence of residual arterial vascular

  1. BOLD Imaging in Awake Wild-Type and Mu-Opioid Receptor Knock-Out Mice Reveals On-Target Activation Maps in Response to Oxycodone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Moore

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD imaging in awake mice was used to identify differences in brain activity between wild-type, and Mu (µ opioid receptor knock-outs (MuKO in response to oxycodone (OXY. Using a segmented, annotated MRI mouse atlas and computational analysis, patterns of integrated positive and negative BOLD activity were identified across 122 brain areas. The pattern of positive BOLD showed enhanced activation across the brain in WT mice within 15 min of intraperitoneal administration of 2.5 mg of OXY. BOLD activation was detected in 72 regions out of 122, and was most prominent in areas of high µ opioid receptor density (thalamus, ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra, caudate putamen, basal amygdala and hypothalamus, and focus on pain circuits indicated strong activation in major pain processing centers (central amygdala, solitary tract, parabrachial area, insular cortex, gigantocellularis area, ventral thalamus primary sensory cortex and prelimbic cortex. Importantly, the OXY-induced positive BOLD was eliminated in MuKO mice in most regions, with few exceptions (some cerebellar nuclei, CA3 of the hippocampus, medial amygdala and preoptic areas. This result indicates that most effects of OXY on positive BOLD are mediated by the µ opioid receptor (on-target effects. OXY also caused an increase in negative BOLD in WT mice in few regions (16 out of 122 and, unlike the positive BOLD response the negative BOLD was only partially eliminated in the MuKO mice (cerebellum, and in some case intensified (hippocampus. Negative BOLD analysis therefore shows activation and deactivation events in the absence of the µ receptor for some areas where receptor expression is normally extremely low or absent (off-target effects. Together, our approach permits establishing opioid-induced BOLD activation maps in awake mice. In addition, comparison of WT and MuKO mutant mice reveals both on-target and off-target activation events, and set an OXY

  2. Participatory Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    2016-01-01

    practice. In particular, mapping environmental damage, endangered species, and human-made disasters has become one focal point for environmental knowledge production. This type of digital map has been highlighted as a processual turn in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism......, it can be seen as an interactive and iterative process of mapping complex and fragile ecological developments. This article looks at computer-assisted cartography as part of environmental knowledge production. It uses InfoAmazonia, the data-journalism platform on Amazon rainforests, as an example...

  3. CALS Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collin, Ib; Nielsen, Povl Holm; Larsen, Michael Holm

    1998-01-01

    To enhance the industrial applications of CALS, CALS Center Danmark has developed a cost efficient and transparent assessment, CALS Mapping, to uncover the potential of CALS - primarily dedicated to small and medium sized enterprises. The idea behind CALS Mapping is that the CALS State...... of the enterprise is compared with a Reference Enterprise Model (REM). The REM is a CALS idealised enterprise providing full product support throughout the extended enterprise and containing different manufacturing aspects, e.g. component industry, process industry, and one-piece production. This CALS idealised...... enterprise is, when applied in a given organisation modified with respect to the industry regarded, hence irrelevant measure parameters are eliminated to avoid redundancy. This assessment of CALS Mapping, quantify the CALS potential of an organisation with the purpose of providing decision support to the top...

  4. Cognitive maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minder, Bettina; Laursen, Linda Nhu; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2014-01-01

    . Conceptual clustering is used to analyse and order information according to concepts or variables from within the data. The cognitive maps identified are validated through the comments of some of the same experts. The study presents three cognitive maps and respective world-views explaining how the design...... and innovation field are related and under which dimensions they differ. The paper draws preliminary conclusions on the implications of the different world- views on the innovation process. With the growing importance of the design approach in innovation e.g. design thinking, a clear conception...

  5. Participatory maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    towards a new political ecology. This type of digital cartographies has been highlighted as the ‘processual turn’ in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism it can be seen as an interactive and iterative process of mapping complex and fragile ecological developments. This paper...... looks at computer-assisted cartography as part of environmental knowledge production. It uses InfoAmazonia, the databased platform on Amazon rainforests, as an example of affective geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. Amazonia...

  6. Epitope mapping of Ebola virus dominant and subdominant glycoprotein epitopes facilitates construction of an epitope-based DNA vaccine able to focus the antibody response in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    Epitope mapping of Ebola virus dominant and subdominant glycoprotein epitopes facilitates construction of an epitope-based DNA vaccine able to focus... vaccinated against or infected with EBOV. Using the information obtained along with structural modeling to predict epitope accessibility, we then...constructed two DNA vaccines encoding immunodominant and subdominant epitopes predicted to be accessible on EBOV GP. Although a construct designed to

  7. MAPPING INNOVATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    trends as globalization. Three niches (Lean Construction, BIM and System Deliveries) are subject to a detailed analysis showing partly incompatible rationales and various degrees of innovation potential. The paper further discusses how existing policymaking operates in a number of tensions one being......, the innovation map can act as a medium in which policymakers, interest organization and companies can develop and coordinate future innovation activities....

  8. Meal mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim; Kügler, Jens; Olsen, Nina Veflen

    2013-01-01

    probabilities are subjected to multiple correspondence analysis and mapped into low-dimensional space. In a third step, the principal coordinates representing meal centres and side components in the correspondence analysis solution are subjected to cluster analysis to identify distinct groups of compatible...

  9. Mapping filmmaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilje, Øystein; Frølunde, Lisbeth; Lindstrand, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    This chapter concerns mapping patterns in regards to how young filmmakers (age 15 – 20) in the Scandinavian countries learn about filmmaking. To uncover the patterns, we present portraits of four young filmmakers who participated in the Scandinavian research project Making a filmmaker. The focus...

  10. Affective Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    of digital cartographies has been highlighted as the ‘processual turn’ in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism it can be seen as an interactive and iterative process of mapping complex and fragile ecological developments. This paper looks at computer-assisted cartography as part...

  11. Statistical methods in physical mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, David O. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    One of the great success stories of modern molecular genetics has been the ability of biologists to isolate and characterize the genes responsible for serious inherited diseases like fragile X syndrome, cystic fibrosis and myotonic muscular dystrophy. This dissertation concentrates on constructing high-resolution physical maps. It demonstrates how probabilistic modeling and statistical analysis can aid molecular geneticists in the tasks of planning, execution, and evaluation of physical maps of chromosomes and large chromosomal regions. The dissertation is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the field of physical mapping, describing the role of physical mapping in gene isolation and ill past efforts at mapping chromosomal regions. The next two chapters review and extend known results on predicting progress in large mapping projects. Such predictions help project planners decide between various approaches and tactics for mapping large regions of the human genome. Chapter 2 shows how probability models have been used in the past to predict progress in mapping projects. Chapter 3 presents new results, based on stationary point process theory, for progress measures for mapping projects based on directed mapping strategies. Chapter 4 describes in detail the construction of all initial high-resolution physical map for human chromosome 19. This chapter introduces the probability and statistical models involved in map construction in the context of a large, ongoing physical mapping project. Chapter 5 concentrates on one such model, the trinomial model. This chapter contains new results on the large-sample behavior of this model, including distributional results, asymptotic moments, and detection error rates. In addition, it contains an optimality result concerning experimental procedures based on the trinomial model. The last chapter explores unsolved problems and describes future work.

  12. Transboundary geophysical mapping of geological elements and salinity distribution critical for the assessment of future sea water intrusion in response to sea level rise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jørgensen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical techniques are increasingly being used as tools for characterising the subsurface, and they are generally required to develop subsurface models that properly delineate the distribution of aquifers and aquitards, salt/freshwater interfaces, and geological structures that affect groundwater flow. In a study area covering 730 km2 across the border between Germany and Denmark, a combination of an airborne electromagnetic survey (performed with the SkyTEM system, a high-resolution seismic survey and borehole logging has been used in an integrated mapping of important geological, physical and chemical features of the subsurface. The spacing between flight lines is 200–250 m which gives a total of about 3200 line km. About 38 km of seismic lines have been collected. Faults bordering a graben structure, buried tunnel valleys, glaciotectonic thrust complexes, marine clay units, and sand aquifers are all examples of geological structures mapped by the geophysical data that control groundwater flow and to some extent hydrochemistry. Additionally, the data provide an excellent picture of the salinity distribution in the area and thus provide important information on the salt/freshwater boundary and the chemical status of groundwater. Although the westernmost part of the study area along the North Sea coast is saturated with saline water and the TEM data therefore are strongly influenced by the increased electrical conductivity there, buried valleys and other geological elements are still revealed. The mapped salinity distribution indicates preferential flow paths through and along specific geological structures within the area. The effects of a future sea level rise on the groundwater system and groundwater chemistry are discussed with special emphasis on the importance of knowing the existence, distribution and geometry of the mapped geological elements, and their control on the groundwater salinity distribution is assessed.

  13. MAPPING INNOVATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    By adopting a theoretical framework from strategic niche management research (SNM) this paper presents an analysis of the innovation system of the Danish Construction industry. The analysis shows a multifaceted landscape of innovation around an existing regime, built around existing ways of working...... and developed over generations. The regime is challenged from various niches and the socio-technical landscape through trends as globalization. Three niches (Lean Construction, BIM and System Deliveries) are subject to a detailed analysis showing partly incompatible rationales and various degrees of innovation...... potential. The paper further discusses how existing policymaking operates in a number of tensions one being between government and governance. Based on the concepts from SNM the paper introduces an innovation map in order to support the development of meta-governance policymaking. By mapping some...

  14. Comparison of MAPIE versus MAP in patients with a poor response to preoperative chemotherapy for newly diagnosed high-grade osteosarcoma (EURAMOS-1): an open-label, international, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, Neyssa M; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Bielack, Stefan S; Bernstein, Mark; Jovic, Gordana; Krailo, Mark D; Hook, Jane M; Arndt, Carola; van den Berg, Henk; Brennan, Bernadette; Brichard, Bénédicte; Brown, Ken L B; Butterfass-Bahloul, Trude; Calaminus, Gabriele; Daldrup-Link, Heike E; Eriksson, Mikael; Gebhardt, Mark C; Gelderblom, Hans; Gerss, Joachim; Goldsby, Robert; Goorin, Allen; Gorlick, Richard; Grier, Holcombe E; Hale, Juliet P; Hall, Kirsten Sundby; Hardes, Jendrik; Hawkins, Douglas S; Helmke, Knut; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Isakoff, Michael S; Janeway, Katherine A; Jürgens, Heribert; Kager, Leo; Kühne, Thomas; Lau, Ching C; Leavey, Patrick J; Lessnick, Stephen L; Mascarenhas, Leo; Meyers, Paul A; Mottl, Hubert; Nathrath, Michaela; Papai, Zsuzsanna; Randall, R Lor; Reichardt, Peter; Renard, Marleen; Safwat, Akmal Ahmed; Schwartz, Cindy L; Stevens, Michael C G; Strauss, Sandra J; Teot, Lisa; Werner, Mathias; Sydes, Matthew R; Whelan, Jeremy S

    2016-10-01

    We designed the EURAMOS-1 trial to investigate whether intensified postoperative chemotherapy for patients whose tumour showed a poor response to preoperative chemotherapy (≥10% viable tumour) improved event-free survival in patients with high-grade osteosarcoma. EURAMOS-1 was an open-label, international, phase 3 randomised, controlled trial. Consenting patients with newly diagnosed, resectable, high-grade osteosarcoma aged 40 years or younger were eligible for randomisation. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either postoperative cisplatin, doxorubicin, and methotrexate (MAP) or MAP plus ifosfamide and etoposide (MAPIE) using concealed permuted blocks with three stratification factors: trial group; location of tumour (proximal femur or proximal humerus vs other limb vs axial skeleton); and presence of metastases (no vs yes or possible). The MAP regimen consisted of cisplatin 120 mg/m(2), doxorubicin 37·5 mg/m(2) per day on days 1 and 2 (on weeks 1 and 6) followed 3 weeks later by high-dose methotrexate 12 g/m(2) over 4 h. The MAPIE regimen consisted of MAP as a base regimen, with the addition of high-dose ifosfamide (14 g/m(2)) at 2·8 g/m(2) per day with equidose mesna uroprotection, followed by etoposide 100 mg/m(2) per day over 1 h on days 1-5. The primary outcome measure was event-free survival measured in the intention-to-treat population. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00134030. Between April 14, 2005, and June 30, 2011, 2260 patients were registered from 325 sites in 17 countries. 618 patients with poor response were randomly assigned; 310 to receive MAP and 308 to receive MAPIE. Median follow-up was 62·1 months (IQR 46·6-76·6); 62·3 months (IQR 46·9-77·1) for the MAP group and 61·1 months (IQR 46·5-75·3) for the MAPIE group. 307 event-free survival events were reported (153 in the MAP group vs 154 in the MAPIE group). 193 deaths were reported (101 in the MAP group vs 92 in the MAPIE group). Event

  15. NOAA Coastal Mapping Remote Sensing Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Remote Sensing Division is responsible for providing data to support the Coastal Mapping Program, Emergency Response efforts, and the Aeronautical Survey Program...

  16. What Characteristics Confer Proteins the Ability to Induce Allergic Responses? IgE Epitope Mapping and Comparison of the Structure of Soybean 2S Albumins and Ara h 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngshin Han

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ara h 2, a peanut 2S albumin, is associated with severe allergic reactions, but a homologous protein, soybean 2S albumin, is not recognized as an important allergen. Structural difference between these proteins might explain this clinical discrepancy. Therefore, we mapped sequential epitopes and compared the structure of Ara h 2, Soy Al 1, and Soy Al 3 (Gly m 8 to confirm whether structural differences account for the discrepancy in clinical responses to these two proteins. Commercially synthesized peptides covering the full length of Ara h 2 and two soybean 2S albumins were analyzed by peptide microarray. Sera from 10 patients with peanut and soybean allergies and seven non-atopic controls were examined. The majority of epitopes in Ara h 2 identified by microarray are consistent with those identified previously. Several regions in the 2S albumins are weakly recognized by individual sera from different patients. A comparison of allergenic epitopes on peanut and soybean proteins suggests that loop-helix type secondary structures and some amino acids with a large side chain including lone electron pair, such as arginine, glutamine, and tyrosine, makes the peptides highly recognizable by the immune system. By utilizing the peptide microarray assay, we mapped IgE epitopes of Ara h 2 and two soybean 2S albumins. The use of peptide microarray mapping and analysis of the epitope characteristics may provide critical information to access the allergenicity of food proteins.

  17. MAP KINASE PHOSPHATASE1 and PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE1 Are Repressors of Salicylic Acid Synthesis and SNC1-Mediated Responses in Arabidopsis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sebastian Bartels; Jeffrey C. Anderson; Manna A. González Besteiro; Alessandro Carreri; Heribert Hirt; Antony Buchala; Jean-Pierre Métraux; Scott C. Peck; Roman Ulm

    2009-01-01

    ...) accession results in growth defects and constitutive biotic defense responses, including elevated levels of salicylic acid, camalexin, PR gene expression, and resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae...

  18. Reasoning Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Falcão, Renato Pinto de Queiroz

    2003-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro Tecnológico. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Engenharia de Produção. Esta dissertação apresenta uma ferramenta de apoio à decisão, baseada na Metodologia Multicritérios de Apoio à Decisão - MCDA, através do desenvolvimento de um software denominado Reasoning Maps. O software permite, de maneira integrada, a construção de mapas cognitivos, suas diversas análises topológicas e o cadastramento e análise de alternativas. Abor...

  19. autoimage: Multiple Heat Maps for Projected Coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Joshua P

    2017-01-01

    Heat maps are commonly used to display the spatial distribution of a response observed on a two-dimensional grid. The autoimage package provides convenient functions for constructing multiple heat maps in unified, seamless way, particularly when working with projected coordinates. The autoimage package natively supports: 1. automatic inclusion of a color scale with the plotted image, 2. construction of heat maps for responses observed on regular or irregular grids, as well as non-gridded data, 3. construction of a matrix of heat maps with a common color scale, 4. construction of a matrix of heat maps with individual color scales, 5. projecting coordinates before plotting, 6. easily adding geographic borders, points, and other features to the heat maps. After comparing the autoimage package's capabilities for constructing heat maps to those of existing tools, a carefully selected set of examples is used to highlight the capabilities of the autoimage package.

  20. Mapping Mars' northern plains: origins, evolution and response to climate change - a new overview of recent ice-related landforms in Acidalia Planitia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauber, Ernst; Orgel, Csilla; van Gasselt, Stephan; Reiss, Dennis; Johnsson, Andreas; Ramsdale, Jason; Balme, Matthew; Conway, Susan; Costard, Francois; Gallagher, Colman; Kereszturi, Akos; Platz, Thomas; Séjourné, Antoine; Skinner, James; Swirad, Zuzanna; Łosiak, Anna

    2015-04-01

    An International Space Science Institute (ISSI) team project has been convened to study the northern plains of Mars. It uses a geomorphological grid-mapping approach to compare ice-related landforms across N-S traverses in the three main basins of the northern plains: Acidalia, Arcadia, and Utopia Planitiae. The main science questions are (i) the distribution of ice-related landforms in the northern plains and their relation to distinct latitude bands or different geological units, (ii) the relationship between the latitude dependent mantle (LDM) and landforms indicative of ground ice, and (iii) the distributions and associations of recent landforms indicative of thaw of ice or snow. We mapped individual landforms across the Acidalia Planitia that may have been formed in association with ice or water in an attempt to determine their extent and identify possible spatial relationships and genetic links between them. Our list includes mantling deposits, small-scale polygons, gullies, viscous flow features, thumbprint terrain (TPT), giant polygons and large pitted mounds (LPM). Our resulting maps show the distribution of specific landforms (no data - absence - presence - dominance) in grid cells with a size of ~20 × 20 km, but allows also for some ambiguity (possible). Preliminary results show that the mantling deposits are ubiquitous and occur basically everywhere between ~43°N and almost the margin of the north polar cap. As their surface may appear smooth if intact, their texture can be difficult to detect at CTX scale. Gullies were observed within a limited latitude range between ~32°N and ~54°N. They predominantly occur in Acidalia and Acidalia Colles, although gullies were found in several impact craters. Small-scale polygons occur between ~60°N to ~70°N in agreement with previous studies. They are predominantly oriented in orthogonal networks in crater interiors, depressions and on plains. Viscous flow features are present only in higher-relief areas of

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin activates NRF2-ARE-mediated transcriptional response via the ROS-EGFR-PI3K-AKT/MEK-ERK MAP kinase signaling in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Duan, Chaohui; Kuang, Zhizhou; Hao, Yonghua; Jeffries, Jayme L; Lau, Gee W

    2013-01-01

    The redox-active pyocyanin (PCN) secreted by the respiratory pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and causes oxidative stress to pulmonary epithelial cells. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) confers protection against ROS-mediated cell death by inducing the expression of detoxifying enzymes and proteins via its binding to the cis-acting antioxidant response element (ARE). However, a clear relationship between NRF2 and PCN-mediated oxidative stress has not been established experimentally. In this study, we investigated the induction of NRF2-ARE response by PCN in the pulmonary epithelial cells. We analyzed the effect of PCN on NRF2 expression and nuclear translocation in cultured human airway epithelial cells, and in a mouse model of chronic PCN exposure. NRF2-dependent transcription of antioxidative enzymes was also assessed. Furthermore, we used inhibitors to examine the involvement of EGFR and its downstream signaling components that mediate NRF2-ARE-activation in response to PCN. PCN enhances the nuclear NRF2 accumulation and activates the transcription of ARE-mediated antioxidant genes. Furthermore, PCN activates NRF2 by inducing the EGFR-phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway and its main downstream effectors, AKT and MEK1/2-ERK1/2 MAP kinases. Inhibition of the EGFR-PI3K signaling markedly attenuates PCN-stimulated NRF2 accumulation in the nucleus. We demonstrate for the first time that PCN-mediated oxidative stress activates the EGFR-PI3K-AKT/MEK1/2-ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling pathway, leading to nuclear NRF2 translocation and ARE responsiveness in pulmonary epithelial cells.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin activates NRF2-ARE-mediated transcriptional response via the ROS-EGFR-PI3K-AKT/MEK-ERK MAP kinase signaling in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xu

    Full Text Available The redox-active pyocyanin (PCN secreted by the respiratory pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa generates reactive oxygen species (ROS and causes oxidative stress to pulmonary epithelial cells. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (NRF2 confers protection against ROS-mediated cell death by inducing the expression of detoxifying enzymes and proteins via its binding to the cis-acting antioxidant response element (ARE. However, a clear relationship between NRF2 and PCN-mediated oxidative stress has not been established experimentally. In this study, we investigated the induction of NRF2-ARE response by PCN in the pulmonary epithelial cells. We analyzed the effect of PCN on NRF2 expression and nuclear translocation in cultured human airway epithelial cells, and in a mouse model of chronic PCN exposure. NRF2-dependent transcription of antioxidative enzymes was also assessed. Furthermore, we used inhibitors to examine the involvement of EGFR and its downstream signaling components that mediate NRF2-ARE-activation in response to PCN. PCN enhances the nuclear NRF2 accumulation and activates the transcription of ARE-mediated antioxidant genes. Furthermore, PCN activates NRF2 by inducing the EGFR-phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K signaling pathway and its main downstream effectors, AKT and MEK1/2-ERK1/2 MAP kinases. Inhibition of the EGFR-PI3K signaling markedly attenuates PCN-stimulated NRF2 accumulation in the nucleus. We demonstrate for the first time that PCN-mediated oxidative stress activates the EGFR-PI3K-AKT/MEK1/2-ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling pathway, leading to nuclear NRF2 translocation and ARE responsiveness in pulmonary epithelial cells.

  3. Mapping of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed M. Arafat

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Land cover map of North Sinai was produced based on the FAO-Land Cover Classification System (LCCS of 2004. The standard FAO classification scheme provides a standardized system of classification that can be used to analyze spatial and temporal land cover variability in the study area. This approach also has the advantage of facilitating the integration of Sinai land cover mapping products to be included with the regional and global land cover datasets. The total study area is covering a total area of 20,310.4 km2 (203,104 hectare. The landscape classification was based on SPOT4 data acquired in 2011 using combined multispectral bands of 20 m spatial resolution. Geographic Information System (GIS was used to manipulate the attributed layers of classification in order to reach the maximum possible accuracy. GIS was also used to include all necessary information. The identified vegetative land cover classes of the study area are irrigated herbaceous crops, irrigated tree crops and rain fed tree crops. The non-vegetated land covers in the study area include bare rock, bare soils (stony, very stony and salt crusts, loose and shifting sands and sand dunes. The water bodies were classified as artificial perennial water bodies (fish ponds and irrigated canals and natural perennial water bodies as lakes (standing. The artificial surfaces include linear and non-linear features.

  4. 25 CFR 150.9 - Land status maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Land status maps. 150.9 Section 150.9 Indians BUREAU OF... status maps. The Land Titles and Records Offices shall prepare and maintain maps of all reservations and... service responsibilities. Base maps shall be prepared from plats of official survey made by the General...

  5. Coil response inversion for very early time modelling of helicopter-borne time-domain electromagnetic data and mapping of near-surface geological layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schamper, Cyril Noel Clarence; Auken, Esben; Sørensen, Kurt Ingvard K.I.

    2014-01-01

    current is abruptly turned off in a large transmitter loop causing a secondary electromagnetic field to be generated by the eddy currents induced in the ground. Often, however, there is still a residual primary field generated by remaining slowly decaying currents in the transmitter loop. The decay...... disturbs or biases the earth response data at the very early times. These biased data must be culled, or some specific processing must be applied in order to compensate or remove the residual primary field. As the bias response can be attributed to decaying currents with its time constantly controlled...... deformation of the carrier frame will introduce a small coil response. Here we present an approach for subtracting the coil response from the data by measuring it at high altitudes and then including an extra shift factor into the inversion scheme. The scheme is successfully applied to data from the Sky...

  6. Adaptive Immunity against Leishmania Nucleoside Hydrolase Maps Its C-Terminal Domain as the Target of the CD4+ T Cell-Driven Protective Response

    OpenAIRE

    Dirlei Nico; Carla Claser; Borja-Cabrera, Gulnara P.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Marcos Palatnik; Irene da Silva Soares; Mauricio Martins Rodrigues; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2010-01-01

    Nucleoside hydrolases (NHs) show homology among parasite protozoa, fungi and bacteria. They are vital protagonists in the establishment of early infection and, therefore, are excellent candidates for the pathogen recognition by adaptive immune responses. Immune protection against NHs would prevent disease at the early infection of several pathogens. We have identified the domain of the NH of L. donovani (NH36) responsible for its immunogenicity and protective efficacy against murine visceral ...

  7. Brain Region-Specific Expression of Genes Mapped within Quantitative Trait Loci for Behavioral Responsiveness to Acute Stress in Fisher 344 and Wistar Kyoto Male Rats (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-11

    s) that contribute to differences in multiple behavioral response phenotypes between the F344 and WKY rat strains. To test this hypothesis, first we...Eva E. Redei1* 5 6 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern 7 University, Chicago, IL, USA 8...with sequence variation(s) that contribute to differences in multiple behavioral 27 response phenotypes between the F344 and WKY rat strains. To

  8. Fine-scale linkage mapping reveals a small set of candidate genes influencing honey bee grooming behavior in response to Varroa mites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel E Arechavaleta-Velasco

    Full Text Available Populations of honey bees in North America have been experiencing high annual colony mortality for 15-20 years. Many apicultural researchers believe that introduced parasites called Varroa mites (V. destructor are the most important factor in colony deaths. One important resistance mechanism that limits mite population growth in colonies is the ability of some lines of honey bees to groom mites from their bodies. To search for genes influencing this trait, we used an Illumina Bead Station genotyping array to determine the genotypes of several hundred worker bees at over a thousand single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a family that was apparently segregating for alleles influencing this behavior. Linkage analyses provided a genetic map with 1,313 markers anchored to genome sequence. Genotypes were analyzed for association with grooming behavior, measured as the time that individual bees took to initiate grooming after mites were placed on their thoraces. Quantitative-trait-locus interval mapping identified a single chromosomal region that was significant at the chromosome-wide level (p<0.05 on chromosome 5 with a LOD score of 2.72. The 95% confidence interval for quantitative trait locus location contained only 27 genes (honey bee official gene annotation set 2 including Atlastin, Ataxin and Neurexin-1 (AmNrx1, which have potential neurodevelopmental and behavioral effects. Atlastin and Ataxin homologs are associated with neurological diseases in humans. AmNrx1 codes for a presynaptic protein with many alternatively spliced isoforms. Neurexin-1 influences the growth, maintenance and maturation of synapses in the brain, as well as the type of receptors most prominent within synapses. Neurexin-1 has also been associated with autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia in humans, and self-grooming behavior in mice.

  9. Mapping Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carruth, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Resilience theory is a growing discipline with great relevance for the discipline of planning, particularly in fields like energy planning that face great uncertainty and rapidly transforming contexts. Building on the work of the Stockholm Resilience Centre, this paper begins by outlining...... the relationship between resilience and energy planning, suggesting that planning in, and with, time is a core necessity in this domain. It then reviews four examples of graphically mapping with time, highlighting some of the key challenges, before tentatively proposing a graphical language to be employed...... by planners when aiming to construct resilient energy plans. It concludes that a graphical language has the potential to be a significant tool, flexibly facilitating cross-disciplinary communication and decision-making, while emphasising that its role is to support imaginative, resilient planning rather than...

  10. Global mapping of binding sites for Nrf2 identifies novel targets in cell survival response through ChIP-Seq profiling and network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Deepti; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Singh, Anju; Srivastava, Siddhartha; Arenillas, David; Happel, Christine; Shyr, Casper; Wakabayashi, Nobunao; Kensler, Thomas W; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Biswal, Shyam

    2010-09-01

    The Nrf2 (nuclear factor E2 p45-related factor 2) transcription factor responds to diverse oxidative and electrophilic environmental stresses by circumventing repression by Keap1, translocating to the nucleus, and activating cytoprotective genes. Nrf2 responses provide protection against chemical carcinogenesis, chronic inflammation, neurodegeneration, emphysema, asthma and sepsis in murine models. Nrf2 regulates the expression of a plethora of genes that detoxify oxidants and electrophiles and repair or remove damaged macromolecules, such as through proteasomal processing. However, many direct targets of Nrf2 remain undefined. Here, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) with either constitutive nuclear accumulation (Keap1(-/-)) or depletion (Nrf2(-/-)) of Nrf2 were utilized to perform chromatin-immunoprecipitation with parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and global transcription profiling. This unique Nrf2 ChIP-Seq dataset is highly enriched for Nrf2-binding motifs. Integrating ChIP-Seq and microarray analyses, we identified 645 basal and 654 inducible direct targets of Nrf2, with 244 genes at the intersection. Modulated pathways in stress response and cell proliferation distinguish the inducible and basal programs. Results were confirmed in an in vivo stress model of cigarette smoke-exposed mice. This study reveals global circuitry of the Nrf2 stress response emphasizing Nrf2 as a central node in cell survival response.

  11. Mitogen activated protein kinase 6 and MAP kinase phosphatase 1 are involved in the response of Arabidopsis roots to L-glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bucio, Jesús Salvador; Raya-González, Javier; Ravelo-Ortega, Gustavo; Ruiz-Herrera, León Francisco; Ramos-Vega, Maricela; León, Patricia; López-Bucio, José; Guevara-García, Ángel Arturo

    2018-01-17

    The function and components of L-glutamate signaling pathways in plants have just begun to be elucidated. Here, using a combination of genetic and biochemical strategies, we demonstrated that a MAPK module is involved in the control of root developmental responses to this amino acid. Root system architecture plays an essential role in plant adaptation to biotic and abiotic factors via adjusting signal transduction and gene expression. L-Glutamate (L-Glu), an amino acid with neurotransmitter functions in animals, inhibits root growth, but the underlying genetic mechanisms are poorly understood. Through a combination of genetic analysis, in-gel kinase assays, detailed cell elongation and division measurements and confocal analysis of expression of auxin, quiescent center and stem cell niche related genes, the critical roles of L-Glu in primary root growth acting through the mitogen-activated protein kinase 6 (MPK6) and the dual specificity serine-threonine-tyrosine phosphatase MKP1 could be revealed. In-gel phosphorylation assays revealed a rapid and dose-dependent induction of MPK6 and MPK3 activities in wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings in response to L-Glu. Mutations in MPK6 or MKP1 reduced or increased root cell division and elongation in response to L-Glu, possibly modulating auxin transport and/or response, but in a PLETHORA1 and 2 independent manner. Our data highlight MPK6 and MKP1 as components of an L-Glu pathway linking the auxin response, and cell division for primary root growth.

  12. Seismic hazard maps for Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Arthur; Harmsen, Stephen; Mueller, Charles; Calais, Eric; Haase, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    We have produced probabilistic seismic hazard maps of Haiti for peak ground acceleration and response spectral accelerations that include the hazard from the major crustal faults, subduction zones, and background earthquakes. The hazard from the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden, Septentrional, and Matheux-Neiba fault zones was estimated using fault slip rates determined from GPS measurements. The hazard from the subduction zones along the northern and southeastern coasts of Hispaniola was calculated from slip rates derived from GPS data and the overall plate motion. Hazard maps were made for a firm-rock site condition and for a grid of shallow shear-wave velocities estimated from topographic slope. The maps show substantial hazard throughout Haiti, with the highest hazard in Haiti along the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden and Septentrional fault zones. The Matheux-Neiba Fault exhibits high hazard in the maps for 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years, although its slip rate is poorly constrained.

  13. Mapping the Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-19

    Computer Mapping in Geoecology , The Harvard Library of Computer Graphics, 1979 Mapping Collection, Vol. 5, pp 11-27. 5. Robinson, A.H. (1974) A New Map...Use of Synagraphic Computer Mapping in Geoecology , The Harvard Library of Computer Graphics, 1979 Mapping Collection, Vol. 5, pp 11-27. 5. Robinson, A

  14. Human Mind Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  15. An MRI Method To Map Tumor Hypoxia Using Red Blood Cells Loaded with a pO2-Responsive Gd-Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, Enza; Ferrauto, Giuseppe; Gianolio, Eliana; Lanzardo, Stefania; Carrera, Carla; Fedeli, Franco; Aime, Silvio

    2015-08-25

    Hypoxia is a typical hallmark of many solid tumors and often leads to therapy resistance and the development of a more aggressive cancer phenotype. Oxygen content in tissues has been evaluated using numerous different methods for several imaging modalities, but none has yet reached the required standard of spatial and temporal resolution. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) appears to be the technique of choice and several pO2-responsive probes have been designed for it over the years. In vivo translation is often hampered in Gd-relaxation agents as it is not possible to separate effects that arise from changes in local concentration from those associated with responsive properties. A novel procedure for the MRI based assessment of hypoxia is reported herein. The method relies on the combined use of Gd-DOTP- and Gd-HPDO3A-labeled red blood cells (RBCs) where the first probe acts as a vascular oxygenation-responsive agent, while the second reports the local labeled RBC concentration in a transplanted breast tumor mouse model. The MRI assessment of oxygenation state has been validated by photoacoustic imaging and ex vivo immunofluorescence. The method refines tumor staging in preclinical models and makes possible an accurate monitoring of the relationship between oxygenation and tumor growth.

  16. Fine mapping of S37, a locus responsible for pollen and embryo sac sterility in hybrids between Oryza sativa L. and O. glaberrima Steud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yumin; Zhao, Zhigang; Ma, Hongyang; Bian, Xiaofeng; Yu, Yang; Yu, Xiaowen; Chen, Haiyuan; Liu, Linglong; Zhang, Wenwei; Jiang, Ling; Zhou, Jiawu; Tao, Dayun; Wan, Jianmin

    2015-11-01

    Hybrid sterility locus S37 between Oryza glaberrima and Oryza sativa results in both pollen and embryo sac sterility. Interspecific crossing between African cultivated rice Oryza glaberrima and Oryza sativa cultivars is hindered by hybrid sterility. To dissect the mechanism of interspecific hybrid sterility, we developed a near-isogenic line (NIL)-S37 using Dianjingyou1 (DJY1) as the recipient parent and an African cultivated rice variety as the donor parent. Empty pollen and embryo sac sterility were observed in F1 hybrids between DJY1 and NIL-S37. Cytological analyses showed that pollen abortion in the F1 hybrids occurred at the late binucleate stage due to a failure of starch accumulation in pollen grains. In addition, partial abortion of the embryo sac in the F1 hybrid was observed during function megaspore developing into mature embryo sac. Molecular analysis revealed that the semi-sterility was largely caused by the abortion of male and female gametophytes carrying the S37 allele from DJY1. A population of 25,600 plants derived from the hybrid DJY1/NIL-S37 was developed to fine map S37. Based on the physical location of molecular markers, S37 locus was finally delimited to a region of 205 kb on the short arm of chromosome 1 in terms of reference sequences of cv. Nipponbare. Interestingly, an about 97-kb DNA segment was deleted in the NIL-S37 based on BAC clone information of O. glaberrima. Fifty-four open reading frames (ORF) were predicted in this 205-kb region of DJY1, whereas only 31 ORFs were in that of NIL-S37. These results are valuable for cloning of S37 gene and further breaking reproductive isolation between Oryza glaberrima and Oryza sativa cultivars, as well as marker-assisted transferring of the corresponding neutral allele in rice breeding programs.

  17. Adaptive immunity against Leishmania nucleoside hydrolase maps its c-terminal domain as the target of the CD4+ T cell-driven protective response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nico, Dirlei; Claser, Carla; Borja-Cabrera, Gulnara P; Travassos, Luiz R; Palatnik, Marcos; Soares, Irene da Silva; Rodrigues, Mauricio Martins; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B

    2010-11-09

    Nucleoside hydrolases (NHs) show homology among parasite protozoa, fungi and bacteria. They are vital protagonists in the establishment of early infection and, therefore, are excellent candidates for the pathogen recognition by adaptive immune responses. Immune protection against NHs would prevent disease at the early infection of several pathogens. We have identified the domain of the NH of L. donovani (NH36) responsible for its immunogenicity and protective efficacy against murine visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Using recombinant generated peptides covering the whole NH36 sequence and saponin we demonstrate that protection against L. chagasi is related to its C-terminal domain (amino-acids 199-314) and is mediated mainly by a CD4+ T cell driven response with a lower contribution of CD8+ T cells. Immunization with this peptide exceeds in 36.73±12.33% the protective response induced by the cognate NH36 protein. Increases in IgM, IgG2a, IgG1 and IgG2b antibodies, CD4+ T cell proportions, IFN-γ secretion, ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and percents of antibody binding inhibition by synthetic predicted epitopes were detected in F3 vaccinated mice. The increases in DTH and in ratios of TNFα/IL-10 CD4+ producing cells were however the strong correlates of protection which was confirmed by in vivo depletion with monoclonal antibodies, algorithm predicted CD4 and CD8 epitopes and a pronounced decrease in parasite load (90.5-88.23%; p = 0.011) that was long-lasting. No decrease in parasite load was detected after vaccination with the N-domain of NH36, in spite of the induction of IFN-γ/IL-10 expression by CD4+ T cells after challenge. Both peptides reduced the size of footpad lesions, but only the C-domain reduced the parasite load of mice challenged with L. amazonensis. The identification of the target of the immune response to NH36 represents a basis for the rationale development of a bivalent vaccine against leishmaniasis and for multivalent

  18. Adaptive immunity against Leishmania nucleoside hydrolase maps its c-terminal domain as the target of the CD4+ T cell-driven protective response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirlei Nico

    Full Text Available Nucleoside hydrolases (NHs show homology among parasite protozoa, fungi and bacteria. They are vital protagonists in the establishment of early infection and, therefore, are excellent candidates for the pathogen recognition by adaptive immune responses. Immune protection against NHs would prevent disease at the early infection of several pathogens. We have identified the domain of the NH of L. donovani (NH36 responsible for its immunogenicity and protective efficacy against murine visceral leishmaniasis (VL. Using recombinant generated peptides covering the whole NH36 sequence and saponin we demonstrate that protection against L. chagasi is related to its C-terminal domain (amino-acids 199-314 and is mediated mainly by a CD4+ T cell driven response with a lower contribution of CD8+ T cells. Immunization with this peptide exceeds in 36.73±12.33% the protective response induced by the cognate NH36 protein. Increases in IgM, IgG2a, IgG1 and IgG2b antibodies, CD4+ T cell proportions, IFN-γ secretion, ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and percents of antibody binding inhibition by synthetic predicted epitopes were detected in F3 vaccinated mice. The increases in DTH and in ratios of TNFα/IL-10 CD4+ producing cells were however the strong correlates of protection which was confirmed by in vivo depletion with monoclonal antibodies, algorithm predicted CD4 and CD8 epitopes and a pronounced decrease in parasite load (90.5-88.23%; p = 0.011 that was long-lasting. No decrease in parasite load was detected after vaccination with the N-domain of NH36, in spite of the induction of IFN-γ/IL-10 expression by CD4+ T cells after challenge. Both peptides reduced the size of footpad lesions, but only the C-domain reduced the parasite load of mice challenged with L. amazonensis. The identification of the target of the immune response to NH36 represents a basis for the rationale development of a bivalent vaccine against leishmaniasis and

  19. Network visualization for outbreak response: Mapping the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) chains of transmission in N'Zérékoré, Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, C; Bah, H; Fatoumata, B; Rodier, G; Diallo, B; Koné, M; Giese, C; Conde, L; Malano, E; Mollet, T; Jansa, J; Coulombier, D; Sudre, B

    2017-03-01

    During the 2014-2015 Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak in N'Zérékoré, Forested Guinea, modes of transmission remained unexamined for a number of new cases. We used network visualization to investigate EVD transmission chains (TC) in seven sub-prefectures of N'Zérékoré in order to adapt outbreak response. Between August 2014 and February 2015, the EVD outbreak response team including the World Health Organization (WHO) and local health authorities routinely collected information among new cases regarding hospital visits, cases within a household, participation in burials, as well as dates of symptom onset, serial intervals (SI) and exposure to EVD. SI's were defined as the interval between symptom onset in an index case and symptom onset in a secondary case infected by that index case. Cases who reported hospital visits, contact with a case in the household or participating in burials were attributed to these exposures. We identified seven TC (two urban and five rural) gathering characteristics of 109 probable/confirmed cases. Overall, 61% (66 cases, SI range: 7-20 days) were household related, 32% (35 cases, SI range 8-30 days) were household or burial related and 7% (8 cases, SI range: 4-20 days) were hospital-related. In the urban chains (18 cases, SI range: 7-20 days), 12 cases were household related and 6 cases were hospital related, none where household or burial related. In the rural chains (84 cases, SI range: 7-30 days), 60% (50 cases) were household related, 1% (1 case) was hospital related and 39% (34 cases) were household or burial related. No cases reported multiple exposures. Network visualization during field response is crucial in enhancing local control strategies, refining outbreak response and aiding rapid response teams in insuring psychosocial and socio-economic recovery. Urban settings need to focus on reducing hospital EVD transmission whereas rural settings should focus on raising awareness of transmission within a household and

  20. Concept Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Laura K.; Brownson, Ross C.; Kelly, Cheryl; Ivey, Melissa K.; Leviton, Laura C.

    2016-01-01

    Background From 2003 to 2008, 25 cross-sector, multidisciplinary community partnerships funded through the Active Living by Design (ALbD) national program designed, planned, and implemented policy and environmental changes, with complementary programs and promotions. This paper describes the use of concept-mapping methods to gain insights into promising active living intervention strategies based on the collective experience of community representatives implementing ALbD initiatives. Methods Using Concept Systems software, community representatives (n=43) anonymously generated actions and changes in their communities to support active living (183 original statements, 79 condensed statements). Next, respondents (n=26, from 23 partnerships) sorted the 79 statements into self-created categories, or active living intervention approaches. Respondents then rated statements based on their perceptions of the most important strategies for creating community changes (n=25, from 22 partnerships) and increasing community rates of physical activity (n=23, from 20 partnerships). Cluster analysis and multidimensional scaling were used to describe data patterns. Results ALbD community partnerships identified three active living intervention approaches with the greatest perceived importance to create community change and increase population levels of physical activity: changes to the built and natural environment, partnership and collaboration efforts, and land-use and transportation policies. The relative importance of intervention approaches varied according to subgroups of partnerships working with different populations. Conclusions Decision makers, practitioners, and community residents can incorporate what has been learned from the 25 community partnerships to prioritize active living policy, physical project, promotional, and programmatic strategies for work in different populations and settings. PMID:23079266

  1. ShakeMap

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — ShakeMap is a product of the USGS Earthquake Hazards Program in conjunction with the regional seismic networks. ShakeMaps provide near-real-time maps of ground...

  2. Mapping differential cellular protein response of mouse alveolar epithelial cells to multi-walled carbon nanotubes as a function of atomic layer deposition coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Gina M; Taylor, Alexia J; Hussain, Salik; Dandley, Erinn C; Griffith, Emily H; Garantziotis, Stavros; Parsons, Gregory N; Bonner, James C; Bereman, Michael S

    2017-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a prototypical engineered nanomaterial, have been increasingly manufactured for a variety of novel applications over the past two decades. However, since CNTs possess fiber-like shape and cause pulmonary fibrosis in rodents, there is concern that mass production of CNTs will lead to occupational exposure and associated pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study was to use contemporary proteomics to investigate the mechanisms of cellular response in E10 mouse alveolar epithelial cells in vitro after exposure to multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) that were functionalized by atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is a method used to generate highly uniform and conformal nanoscale thin-film coatings of metals to enhance novel conductive properties of CNTs. We hypothesized that specific types of metal oxide coatings applied to the surface of MWCNTs by ALD would determine distinct proteomic profiles in mouse alveolar epithelial cells in vitro that could be used to predict oxidative stress and pulmonary inflammation. Uncoated (U)-MWCNTs were functionalized by ALD with zinc oxide (ZnO) to yield Z-MWCNTs or aluminum oxide (Al2O3) to yield A-MWCNTs. Significant differential protein expression was found in the following critical pathways: mTOR/eIF4/p70S6K signaling and Nrf-2 mediated oxidative stress response increased following exposure to Z-MWCNTs, interleukin-1 signaling increased following U-MWCNT exposure, and inhibition of angiogenesis by thrombospondin-1, oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial dysfunction increased following A-MWCNT exposure. This study demonstrates that specific types of metal oxide thin film coatings applied by ALD produce distinct cellular and biochemical responses related to lung inflammation and fibrosis compared to uncoated MWCNT exposure in vitro.

  3. Lozi-like maps

    OpenAIRE

    Misiurewicz, Michal; Štimac, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    We define a broad class of piecewise smooth plane homeomorphisms which have properties similar to the properties of Lozi maps, including the existence of a hyperbolic attractor. We call those maps Lozi-like. For those maps one can apply our previous results on kneading theory for Lozi maps. We show a strong numerical evidence that there exist Lozi-like maps that have kneading sequences different than those of Lozi maps.

  4. Mapping Mutations on Phylogenies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of recent methodologies developed for mapping mutations on phylogenies. Mapping of mutations, or character changes in general, using the maximum parsimony principle has been one of the most powerful tools in phylogenetics, and it has been used in a variety...... uncertainty in the mapping. Recently developed probabilistic methods can incorporate statistical uncertainty in the character mappings. In these methods, focus is on a probability distribution of mutational mappings instead of a single estimate of the mutational mapping....

  5. Validation of a novel mapping system and utility for mapping complex atrial tachycardias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarbakhsh, S; Hunter, R J; Dhillon, G; Ullah, W; Keating, E; Providencia, R; Chow, A; Earley, M J; Schilling, R J

    2018-01-24

    This study sought to validate a novel wavefront mapping system utilizing whole-chamber basket catheters (CARTOFINDER, Biosense Webster). The system was validated in terms of (1) mapping atrial-paced beats and (2) mapping complex wavefront patterns in atrial tachycardia (AT). Patients undergoing catheter ablation for AT and persistent AF were included. A 64-pole-basket catheter was used to acquire unipolar signals that were processed by CARTOFINDER mapping system to generate dynamic wavefront propagation maps. The left atrium was paced from four sites to demonstrate focal activation. ATs were mapped with the mechanism confirmed by conventional mapping, entrainment, and response to ablation. Twenty-two patients were included in the study (16 with AT and 6 with AF initially who terminated to AT during ablation). In total, 172 maps were created with the mapping system. It correctly identified atrial-pacing sites in all paced maps. It accurately mapped 9 focal/microreentrant and 18 macroreentrant ATs both in the left and right atrium. A third and fourth observer independently identified the sites of atrial pacing and the AT mechanism from the CARTOFINDER maps, while being blinded to the conventional activation maps. This novel mapping system was effectively validated by mapping focal activation patterns from atrial-paced beats. The system was also effective in mapping complex wavefront patterns in a range of ATs in patients with scarred atria. The system may therefore be of practical use in the mapping and ablation of AT and could have potential for mapping wavefront activations in AF. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The National Map: from geography to mapping and back again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmelis, John A.; DeMulder, Mark L.; Ogrosky, Charles E.; Van Driel, J. Nicholas; Ryan, Barbara J.

    2003-01-01

    When the means of production for national base mapping were capital intensive, required large production facilities, and had ill-defined markets, Federal Government mapping agencies were the primary providers of the spatial data needed for economic development, environmental management, and national defense. With desktop geographic information systems now ubiquitous, source data available as a commodity from private industry, and the realization that many complex problems faced by society need far more and different kinds of spatial data for their solutions, national mapping organizations must realign their business strategies to meet growing demand and anticipate the needs of a rapidly changing geographic information environment. The National Map of the United States builds on a sound historic foundation of describing and monitoring the land surface and adds a focused effort to produce improved understanding, modeling, and prediction of land-surface change. These added dimensions bring to bear a broader spectrum of geographic science to address extant and emerging issues. Within the overarching construct of The National Map, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is making a transition from data collector to guarantor of national data completeness; from producing paper maps to supporting an online, seamless, integrated database; and from simply describing the Nation’s landscape to linking these descriptions with increased scientific understanding. Implementing the full spectrum of geographic science addresses a myriad of public policy issues, including land and natural resource management, recreation, urban growth, human health, and emergency planning, response, and recovery. Neither these issues nor the science and technologies needed to deal with them are static. A robust research agenda is needed to understand these changes and realize The National Map vision. Initial successes have been achieved. These accomplishments demonstrate the utility of

  7. Wildland-urban interface maps vary with purpose and context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, S.I.; Wilmer, B.; Hammer, R.B.; Aplet, G.H.; Hawbaker, T.J.; Miller, C.; Radeloff, V.C.

    2009-01-01

    Maps of the wildland-urban interface (WUI) are both policy tools and powerful visual images. Although the growing number of WUI maps serve similar purposes, this article indicates that WUI maps derived from the same data sets can differ in important ways related to their original intended application. We discuss the use of ancillary data in modifying census data to improve WUI maps and offer a cautionary note about this practice. A comparison of two WUI mapping approaches suggests that no single map is "best" because users' needs vary. The analysts who create maps are responsible for ensuring that users understand their purpose, data, and methods; map users are responsible for paying attention to these features and using each map accordingly. These considerations should apply to any analysis but are especially important to analyses of the WUI on which policy decisions will be made.

  8. Molecular genetic responses to lysergic acid diethylamide include transcriptional activation of MAP kinase phosphatase-1, C/EBP-beta and ILAD-1, a novel gene with homology to arrestins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Charles D; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2004-08-01

    We recently demonstrated that the potent hallucinogenic drug lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) dynamically influences the expression of a small collection of genes within the mammalian prefrontal cortex. Towards generating a greater understanding of the molecular genetic effects of hallucinogens and how they may relate to alterations in behavior, we have identified and characterized expression patterns of a new collection of three genes increased in expression by acute LSD administration. These genes were identified through additional screens of Affymetrix DNA microarrays and examined in experiments to assess dose-response, time course and the receptor mediating the expression changes. The first induced gene, C/EBP-beta, is a transcription factor. The second gene, MKP-1, suggests that LSD activates the MAP (mitogen activated protein) kinase pathway. The third gene, ILAD-1, demonstrates sequence similarity to the arrestins. The increase in expression of each gene was partially mediated through LSD interactions at 5-HT2A (serotonin) receptors. There is evidence of alternative splicing at the ILAD-1 locus. Furthermore, data suggests that various splice isoforms of ILAD-1 respond differently at the transcriptional level to LSD. The genes thus far found to be responsive to LSD are beginning to give a more complete picture of the complex intracellular events initiated by hallucinogens.

  9. Identification and functional analysis of dual-specificity MAP kinase phosphatase 6 gene (dusp6) in response to immune challenges in Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuo; Peng, Weijiao; Hao, Gaixiang; Li, Jiafang; Geng, Xuyun; Sun, Jinsheng

    2017-01-01

    Dual-specificity phosphatase 6 (Dusp6) is a member of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatases that play crucial roles in regulating MAPK signaling and immune response. The immunological relevance of Dusp6 in fish, however, remains largely uncharacterized. In the present study, a full-length Japanese flounder dusp6 cDNA ortholog, termed PoDusp6, was identified and characterized from Paralichthys olivaceus. The deduced PoDusp6 protein is comprised of 383 amino acids with a conserved N-terminal regulatory rhodanese homology domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that PoDusp6 protein is mainly localized in cytoplasm. Sequence analysis indicates that PoDusp6 is highly conserved (>70% identity) throughout the evolution from teleost to mammals. In unstimulated conditions, PoDusp6 mRNA was present in all examined tissues and showed the highest expression in Japanese flounder head kidney macrophages (HKMs). Immune challenge experiments revealed that the expression of PoDusp6 was down-regulated at the early stage after LPS and poly(I:C) stimulations but significantly up-regulated at the later stage in the HKMs. The similar expression pattern was also observed in the Japanese flounder immune-related tissues including head kidney, gill and spleen upon bacterial challenge with Edwardsiella tarda. Overexpression of PoDusp6 in Japanese flounder FG-9307 cells led to a significant down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine genes IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma, and antiviral gene Mx. Interestingly, inhibition of Dusp6 activity also down-regulated the LPS-induced IL-beta gene expression but did not affected on the LPS-induced IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha expression in the HKMs. Our findings suggest that the expression of PoDusp6 is modulated by immune stimuli and PoDusp6 may act as an essential modulator in fish inflammatory response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bites of Lists - mapping and filtering sublists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Kurt

    The idea of applying map and filter functions on consecutive sublists instead of on individual list elements is discussed and developed in this paper. A non-empty, consecutive sublist is called a bite. Both map and filter functions accept a function parameter - a bite function - which...... is responsible for returning a prefix bite of a list. We develop families of bite functions via a collection of higher-order bite generators. On top of the bite generators, a number of bite mapping and bite filtering functions are introduced. We illustrate the usefulness of bite mapping and filtering via...

  11. How to Write Home: (UnMapping the Politics of Place and Authorial Responsibility with Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Palmer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Arundhati Roy’s 1997 Man Booker Prize-winning novel, The God of Small Things, was harshly criticised by Indian and international scholars alike for misrepresenting the cultural landscape of 1970s Kerala and greater India. Such criticisms deny Roy’s authority to represent Indian culture, and her right to speak of or accurately represent her birthplace. This essay draws from Roy’s first and only novel as a case study of place-based writing and its reception, then asks: can a responsibility to place or home ever be met in the genre of autoethnographic fiction? The first section of this essay surveys criticisms of Roy’s Kerala and reveals how transgressive place-based fiction can magnify negative stereotypes of a given culture. The second section investigates literature as a material artefact of place with value to sociology and cultural studies more broadly, thus situating the author as a social actor. Throughout, I reflect on my own autoethnographic writing practice, and devise questions about my personal onus to represent a fictionalised home that has the potential to (reshape Southeast Queensland in the cultural imagination.

  12. Homozygosity mapping identifies the Crumbs homologue 1 (Crb1) gene as responsible for a recessive syndrome of retinitis pigmentosa and nanophthalmos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenteno, Juan Carlos; Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; Ayala-Ramirez, Raul; Villanueva-Mendoza, Cristina

    2011-05-01

    The association of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and microphthalmia has been reported in a number of familial and isolated cases. Here, the results of genetic analysis in a familial case of early RP associated with nanophthalmos are described. Two affected sibs were ascertained from an endogamous population in Mexico. A genome-wide linkage analysis was performed by means of an Affymetrix 250K microarray. Five large regions of homozygosity were demonstrated. The largest interval comprised 15.08 Mb at chromosome 1q31-32.1 and contained the Crumbs homologue-1, CRB1, a gene responsible for a number of recessive retinal dystrophies. Nucleotide sequence analysis demonstrated a c.1125C>G transversion in CRB1 exon 5, predicting a novel p.Tyr375X variant. To our knowledge this is the first instance in which a CRB1 mutation has been associated with early RP and nanophthalmos. Our results suggest a role for CRB1 in promoting axial growth of the eye. Clinical analysis of additional subjects with retinal dystrophies due to CRB1 mutations will help to identify if the high hyperopia, a frequently observed trait in these subjects, could be related to decreased eye axial length (nanophthalmos). Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Mapping the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Grace

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made ceramic heart maps. The impetus for this project came from reading "My Map Book" by Sara Fanelli. This book is a collection of quirky, hand-drawn and collaged maps that diagram a child's world. There are maps of her stomach, her day, her family, and her heart, among others. The…

  14. Dietary turmeric modulates DMBA-induced p21ras, MAP kinases and AP-1/NF-kappaB pathway to alter cellular responses during hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rachana; Ingle, Arvind; Maru, Girish

    2008-11-01

    The chemopreventive efficacy of turmeric has been established in experimental systems. However, its mechanism(s) of action are not fully elucidated in vivo. The present study investigates the mechanism of turmeric-mediated chemoprevention in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis at 2, 4, 6, 10 and 12 weeks. Dietary turmeric (1%) led to decrease in DMBA-induced tumor burden and multiplicity, and enhanced the latency period in parallel, to its modulatory effects on oncogene products and various cellular responses during HBP tumorigenesis. DMBA-induced expression of ras oncogene product, p21 and downstream target, the mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly decreased by turmeric during HBP carcinogenesis. Turmeric also diminished the DMBA-induced mRNA expression of proto-oncogenes (c-jun, c-fos) and NF-kappaB, leading to decreased protein levels and in further attenuation of DMBA-induced AP-1/NF-kappaB DNA-binding in the buccal pouch nuclear extracts. Besides, buccal pouch of hamsters receiving turmeric diet showed significant alterations in DMBA-induced effects: (a) decrease in cell proliferation (diminished PCNA and Bcl2 expression), (b) enhanced apoptosis (increased expression of Bax, caspase-3 and apoptotic index), (c) decrease in inflammation (levels of Cox-2, the downstream target of AP-1/NF-kappaB, and PGE2) and (d) aberrant expression of differentiation markers, the cytokeratins (1, 5, 8, and 18). Together, the protective effects of dietary turmeric converge on augmenting apoptosis of the initiated cells and decreasing cell proliferation in DMBA-treated animals, which in turn, is reflected in decreased tumor burden, multiplicity and enhanced latency period. Some of these biomarkers are likely to be helpful in monitoring clinical trials and evaluating drug effect measurements.

  15. USGS Map Indices Overlay Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Map Indices service from The National Map (TNM) consists of 1x1 Degree, 30x60 Minute (100K), 15 Minute (63K), 7.5 Minute (24K), and 3.75 Minute grid...

  16. Applicability of vulnerability maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, L.J.; Gosk, E. (Geological Survey of Denmark, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    A number of aspects to vulnerability maps are discussed: the vulnerability concept, mapping purposes, possible users, and applicability of vulnerability maps. Problems associated with general-type vulnerability mapping, including large-scale maps, universal pollutant, and universal pollution scenario are also discussed. An alternative approach to vulnerability assessment - specific vulnerability mapping for limited areas, specific pollutant, and predefined pollution scenario - is suggested. A simplification of the vulnerability concept is proposed in order to make vulnerability mapping more objective and by this means more comparable. An extension of the vulnerability concept to the rest of the hydrogeological cycle (lakes, rivers, and the sea) is proposed. Some recommendations regarding future activities are given.

  17. 7. Annex II: Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Aeberli, Annina

    2012-01-01

    Map 1: States of South Sudan UN OCHA (2012) Republic of South Sudan – States, as of 15 July 2012, Reliefweb http://reliefweb.int/map/south-sudan-republic/republic-south-sudan-states-15-july-2012-reference-map, accessed 31 July 2012. Map 2: Counties of South Sudan UN OCHA (2012) Republic of South Sudan – Counties, as of 16 July 2012, Reliefweb http://reliefweb.int/map/south-sudan-republic/republic-south-sudan-counties-16-july-2012-reference-map, accessed 31 July 2012. Map 3: Eastern Equato...

  18. Google Maps: You Are Here

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Librarians use online mapping services such as Google Maps, MapQuest, Yahoo Maps, and others to check traffic conditions, find local businesses, and provide directions. However, few libraries are using one of Google Maps most outstanding applications, My Maps, for the creation of enhanced and interactive multimedia maps. My Maps is a simple and…

  19. Mapping earthworm communities in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutgers, Michiel; Orgiazzi, Alberto; Gardi, Ciro

    Existing data sets on earthworm communities in Europe were collected, harmonized, modelled and depicted on a soil biodiversity map of Europe. Digital Soil Mapping was applied using multiple regressions relating relatively low density earthworm community data to soil characteristics, land use......, vegetation and climate factors (covariables) with a greater spatial resolution. Statistically significant relationships were used to build habitat-response models for constructing earthworm maps with abundance, species richness, and diversity data. While a good number of environmental predictors were...... significant in our multiple regressions, geographical factors alone seem to be less relevant than climatic factors. Despite differing sampling protocols, land use and geological history were the most relevant factors determining the demography and diversity of the earthworms across Europe. Case studies from...

  20. Vaccination with map specific peptides reduces map burden in tissues of infected goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melvang, Heidi Mikkelsen; Hassan, Sufia Butt; Thakur, Aneesh

    As an alternative to protein-based vaccines, we investigated the effect of post-exposure vaccination with Map specific peptides in a goat model aiming at developing a Map vaccine that will neither interfere with diagnosis of paratuberculosis nor bovine tuberculosis. Peptides were initially select...... in the unvaccinated control group seroconverted in ID Screen® ELISA at last sampling prior to euthanasia. These results indicate that a subunit vaccine against Map can induce a protective immune response against paratuberculosis in goats....

  1. Expanding Thurston maps

    CERN Document Server

    Bonk, Mario

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the study of the dynamics of expanding Thurston maps under iteration. A Thurston map is a branched covering map on a two-dimensional topological sphere such that each critical point of the map has a finite orbit under iteration. It is called expanding if, roughly speaking, preimages of a fine open cover of the underlying sphere under iterates of the map become finer and finer as the order of the iterate increases. Every expanding Thurston map gives rise to a fractal space, called its visual sphere. Many dynamical properties of the map are encoded in the geometry of this visual sphere. For example, an expanding Thurston map is topologically conjugate to a rational map if and only if its visual sphere is quasisymmetrically equivalent to the Riemann sphere. This relation between dynamics and fractal geometry is the main focus for the investigations in this work.

  2. Reading music modifies spatial mapping in pianists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Lauren; Walsh, Vincent; Frith, Uta

    2004-02-01

    We used a novel musical Stroop task to demonstrate that musical notation is automatically processed in trained pianists. Numbers were superimposed onto musical notes, and participants played five-note sequences by mapping from numbers to fingers instead of from notes to fingers. Pianists' reaction times were significantly affected by the congruence of the note/number pairing. Nonmusicians were unaffected. In a nonmusical analogue of the task, pianists and nonmusicians showed a qualitative difference on performance of a vertical-to-horizontal stimulus-response mapping task. Pianists were faster when stimuli specifying a leftward response were presented in vertically lower locations and stimuli specifying a rightward response were presented in vertically higher locations. Nonmusicians showed the reverse pattern. No group differences were found on a task that required horizontal-to-horizontal mappings. We suggest that, as a result of learning to read and play keyboard music, pianists acquire vertical-to-horizontal visuomotor mappings that generalize outside the musical context.

  3. Sensitivity mapping of the German North Sea Coast II. Data update and development of an operational model for precaution measures of oil spill response; Sensititivaetsraster Deutsche Nordseekueste II. Aktualisierung und Erstellung eines operationellen Modells zur Vorsorgeplanung bei der Oelbekaempfung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernem, K.H. van; Doerffer, R.; Heymann, K.; Kleeberg, U.; Krasemann, H.; Schiller, H. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kuestenforschung; Grohnert, A.; Reichert, J. [IfaB - Institut fuer Angewandte Biologie Freiburg/Niederelbe (Germany); Reichert, M. [ARCADIS, Rostock (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The Wadden Sea is an area of tidal flats and salt marshes extending between the North Sea coasts of Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands. It has enormous value as a cleansing site for North Sea water, as a nursery for young fish and as a feeding ground for many bird species. Due to the proximity of important shipping routes and harbours, this region is especially threatened by oil spills. Thus, for oil spill response and precaution measures, a sensitivity study of the entire intertidal area was badly needed in order to assess and minimize the potential ecological and economical damage. Based on comprehensive field surveys and in close cooperation with the Central Command for Maritime Emergencies, an automated expert-model for the german part of Wadden Sea areas was developed at the Institute for Coastal Research (GKSS-Research Centre). As an operational model it will serve as important instrument for decision making processes, precautionary measures and the further design of oil spill response strategies. Since it is not possible to protect the entire German North Sea coast equally at all levels, oil spill contingency planning requires a more detailed classification. For this reason, individual soft bottom habitats, communities and stocks of saltmarshes, macrofauna, waterfowl and estuarine biotop types were evaluated and classified according to their vulnerability to oil pollution. Hence, the fieldwork for habitat mapping during 2003-2006 was a central part of the study. For this part, the experiences and results obtained from the previous GKSS-project ''Thematic mapping and sensitivity study of Intertidal flats'' during the years 1987-1992 served as an valuable basis. For example, the documentation of changes during these periods of observation provides information on stability features of the ecosystems. During the first project nearly 5000 locations were processed and characterised using about 70 parameters for each site. The in-situ mapping

  4. Mapping in the cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    This engaging text provides a solid introduction to mapmaking in the era of cloud computing. It takes students through both the concepts and technology of modern cartography, geographic information systems (GIS), and Web-based mapping. Conceptual chapters delve into the meaning of maps and how they are developed, covering such topics as map layers, GIS tools, mobile mapping, and map animation. Methods chapters take a learn-by-doing approach to help students master application programming interfaces and build other technical skills for creating maps and making them available on the Internet. Th

  5. Mapping with Drupal

    CERN Document Server

    Palazzolo, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Build beautiful interactive maps on your Drupal website, and tell engaging visual stories with your data. This concise guide shows you how to create custom geographical maps from top to bottom, using Drupal 7 tools and out-of-the-box modules. You'll learn how mapping works in Drupal, with examples on how to use intuitive interfaces to map local events, businesses, groups, and other custom data. Although building maps with Drupal can be tricky, this book helps you navigate the system's complexities for creating sophisticated maps that match your site design. Get the knowledge and tools you ne

  6. Bayesian estimation of sensitivity and specificity of a commercial serum/milk ELISA against the Mycobacterium avium subsp. Paratuberculosis (MAP) antibody response for each lactation stage in Greek dairy sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelidou, Elisavet; Kostoulas, Polychronis; Leontides, Leonidas

    2016-02-01

    A total of 854 paired milk and blood samples were collected from ewes of a Greek flock and used to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of a commercial ELISA for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) specific antibodies in each stage of lactation. We implemented Bayesian mixture models to derive the distributions of the test response for the healthy and the infected ewes. In the colostrum period, early, mid and late lactation stage the median values of the area under the curves (AUC) were 0.61 (95% credible interval: 0.50; 0.84), 0.61 (0.51;0.84), 0.65 (0.51;0.91), 0.65(0.51;0.89) for the serum ELISA and and 0.60 (0.50; 0.84), 0.61 (0.50; 0.84), 0.67(0.51; 0.91), 0.66(0.50; 0.90) for the milk ELISA, respectively. Both serum and milk ELISA had low to average overall discriminatory ability as measured by the area under the curves and comparable sensitivities and specificities at the recommended cutoffs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The close linkage between the elasticity modulus measured by real-time mapping shear wave elastography and the presence of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with a sustained virological response to interferon for chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Yasuharu; Taira, Jun-Ichi; Okada, Mayumi; Ando, Mayumi; Sano, Takatomo; Miyata, Yuhki; Sugimoto, Katsutoshi; Nakamura, Ikuo; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2015-07-01

    Some patients develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after sustained virological response (SVR) to interferon therapy for chronic hepatitis C (CH-C). The aim of this study was to examine the linkage between liver elasticity and the presence/absence of HCC in patients after SVR. We enrolled 42 patients who underwent real-time mapping shear wave elastography (SWE) after SVR to interferon therapy for CH-C. Of the 42 patients, six had HCC and 36 did not. We retrospectively compared the elasticity modulus and other clinical parameters between patients with and without HCC. Elasticity modulus measured by SWE, age, and serum albumin was significantly different between patients with and without HCC. Age, Fibrosis-4 index, serum gamma-globulin, total protein, and albumin levels were significantly correlated with the elasticity modulus. Areas under receiver operating characteristic curves of elasticity modulus, gamma-globulin, and age for the presence of HCC were 0.963, 0.888, and 0.778, respectively. In patients with an elasticity modulus ≥6.5 kPa, both sensitivity and specificity for the presence of HCC were 83.3 %. The study demonstrated the close linkage between the elasticity modulus measured by SWE and the presence of HCC in patients after SVR.

  8. Sensitivity mapping for oil spill response at the estuaries of the rivers Eider, Elbe, Weser and Ems; Sensitivitaetskartierung zur Oelbekaempfung an den Unterlaeufen von Eider, Elbe, Weser und Ems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernem, K.H. van; Krasemann, H. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kuestenforschung; Fleischmann, J.; Krueger, D.; Luebbe, T.P.

    2007-07-01

    During this project the estuaries of the rivers Eider, Elbe, Weser and Ems, meeting the North Sea, were evaluated with respect to their vulnerability against oil accidents. Thus a corresponding intention concerning the ''Wadden Sea'' at the German North Sea Coast could be proceeded and completed (GKSS 2007/2). The assessment of different watersides shall provide decision support for oil spill response. Only comparatively near-natural areas of river banks were incorporated, with the basic evaluation of their importance for nature conservation as well as their oil spill sensitivity. Socioeconomic characteristics have not been evaluated, but some important properties are depicted on charts by symbols. The data used for the evaluation process cover the types of biotopes, tidal flats, nesting/non-nesting birds, rare plants as well as fishes, morphological conditions of watersides and official area-categories (i.e. protected natural area). Riverine and intertidal areas are fundamentally differentiated. With respect to seasonal aspects, the evaluation was established for three different times of the year. The result of the evaluation process is the classification of the individual watersides into 4 classes of priority (for oil spill response) and 8 classes of sensitivity. The priorityclasses are depicted by colours and the sensitivity-classes by numbers on sea-charts as topographic background (scale 1:25.000). The evaluation results are delayed on printed as well as GIS-based maps, connected to a data base. The amount of very sensitive areas is higher in the estuaries of the rivers Elbe and Eider compared to Ems and Weser and shows the highest values at all rivers during spring. The evaluation procedure is automated to a large extend by use of linked tables and a decision tree of if/then-functions. The underlying structure provides for a reliable transformation of new data into the corresponding evaluation during updating processes. (orig.)

  9. Comparative deletion mapping at 1p31.3-p32.2 implies NFIA responsible for intellectual disability coupled with macrocephaly and the presence of several other genes for syndromic intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonne, Jonathan D J; Shen, Yiping; Kong, Il-Keun; Diamond, Michael P; Layman, Lawrence C; Kim, Hyung-Goo

    2016-01-01

    While chromosome 1 is the largest chromosome in the human genome, less than two dozen cases of interstitial microdeletions in the short arm have been documented. More than half of the 1p microdeletion cases were reported in the pre-microarray era and as a result, the proximal and distal boundaries containing the exact number of genes involved in the microdeletions have not been clearly defined. We revisited a previous case of a 10-year old female patient with a 1p32.1p32.3 microdeletion displaying syndromic intellectual disability. We performed microarray analysis as well as qPCR to define the proximal and distal deletion breakpoints and revised the karyotype from 1p32.1p32.3 to 1p31.3p32.2. The deleted chromosomal region contains at least 35 genes including NFIA. Comparative deletion mapping shows that this region can be dissected into five chromosomal segments containing at least six candidate genes (DAB1, HOOK1, NFIA, DOCK7, DNAJC6, and PDE4B) most likely responsible for syndromic intellectual disability, which was corroborated by their reduced transcript levels in RT-qPCR. Importantly, one patient with an intragenic microdeletion within NFIA and an additional patient with a balanced translocation disrupting NFIA display intellectual disability coupled with macrocephaly. We propose NFIA is responsible for intellectual disability coupled with macrocephaly, and microdeletions at 1p31.3p32.2 constitute a contiguous gene syndrome with several genes contributing to syndromic intellectual disability.

  10. Evaluation of Techniques Used to Estimate Cortical Feature Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katta, Nalin; Chen, Thomas L.; Watkins, Paul V.; Barbour, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    Functional properties of neurons are often distributed nonrandomly within a cortical area and form topographic maps that reveal insights into neuronal organization and interconnection. Some functional maps, such as in visual cortex, are fairly straightforward to discern with a variety of techniques, while other maps, such as in auditory cortex, have resisted easy characterization. In order to determine appropriate protocols for establishing accurate functional maps in auditory cortex, artificial topographic maps were probed under various conditions, and the accuracy of estimates formed from the actual maps was quantified. Under these conditions, low-complexity maps such as sound frequency can be estimated accurately with as few as 25 total samples (e.g., electrode penetrations or imaging pixels) if neural responses are averaged together. More samples are required to achieve the highest estimation accuracy for higher complexity maps, and averaging improves map estimate accuracy even more than increasing sampling density. Undersampling without averaging can result in misleading map estimates, while undersampling with averaging can lead to the false conclusion of no map when one actually exists. Uniform sample spacing only slightly improves map estimation over nonuniform sample spacing typical of serial electrode penetrations. Tessellation plots commonly used to visualize maps estimated using nonuniform sampling are always inferior to linearly interpolated estimates, although differences are slight at higher sampling densities. Within primary auditory cortex, then, multiunit sampling with at least 100 samples would likely result in reasonable feature map estimates for all but the highest complexity maps and the highest variability that might be expected. PMID:21889537

  11. Contextualising Archaeological Information Through Interactive Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Johnson

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Many web sites use maps delivered as non-interactive images. With the development of web-enabled mapping, new methods of presenting and contextualising archaeological and historical data are becoming available. However, most current examples are static views of contemporary framework data or specific time slices, and do not provide interactivity relating to the time dimension, which is so important to archaeology and related disciplines. In this article I look at some of the advantages of time-enabled interactive mapping and map animation in providing educational experiences to museum visitors and the web-browsing public. These will be illustrated through three example applications of the TimeMap methodology developed at the University of Sydney Archaeological Computing Laboratory: 1. the Sydney TimeMap kiosk at the Museum of Sydney; 2. an embedded Java mapping applet developed for MacquarieNet, a major Australian online educational encyclopaedia; and 3. the metadata clearinghouse mapping applet developed for the Electronic Cultural Atlas Initiative, Berkeley. In each of these examples, a wide range of resources are delivered through a time-enabled map interface which accesses live database data rather than pre-structured curated presentations of data. This flexibility brings its own challenges in providing intuitive pathways and appropriate levels of detail in response to free-ranging user enquiries. The paper outlines some of the approaches I have adopted to resolve these issues.

  12. Altruistic behavior: mapping responses in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filkowski, Megan M; Cochran, R Nick; Haas, Brian W

    2016-01-01

    Altruism is an important social construct related to human relationships and the way many interpersonal and economic decisions are made. Recent progress in social neuroscience research shows that altruism is associated with a specific pattern of brain activity. The tendency to engage in altruistic behaviors is associated with greater activity within limbic regions such as the nucleus accumbens and anterior cingulate cortex in addition to cortical regions such as the medial prefrontal cortex and temporoparietal junction. Here, we review existing theoretical models of altruism as well as recent empirical neuroimaging research demonstrating how altruism is processed within the brain. This review not only highlights the progress in neuroscience research on altruism but also shows that there exist several open questions that remain unexplored. PMID:28580317

  13. NAIP Status Maps Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — NAIP Status Maps Gallery. These maps illustrate what aerial imagery collection is planned, whats been collected, when it is available and how it is available. These...

  14. Recovery Action Mapping Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Recovery Action Mapping Tool is a web map that allows users to visually interact with and query actions that were developed to recover species listed under the...

  15. Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Office of Minority Health has designed an interactive map, the Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool, to identify areas of disparities between subgroups of...

  16. MapBook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Beginning with the systematic mapping of the lunar surface more than three decades ago, this database contains over 1600 maps of the planets and satellites of the...

  17. Letter of Map Revision

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  18. RadMap

    Science.gov (United States)

    RadMap is an interactive desktop tool featuring a nationwide geographic information systems (GIS) map of long-term radiation monitoring locations across the United States with access to key information about the monitor and the area surrounding it.

  19. NGS Survey Control Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGS Survey Control Map provides a map of the US which allows you to find and display geodetic survey control points stored in the database of the National...

  20. Obesity Prevalence Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Prevent Obesity Early Care and Education State Indicator Report Salad Bars to School Healthy Food Service ... Statistics Adult Obesity Facts Childhood Obesity Facts Data, Trends and Maps Adult Obesity Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & ...

  1. Active Fire Mapping Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Active Fire Mapping Program Current Large Incidents (Home) New Large Incidents Fire Detection Maps MODIS Satellite Imagery VIIRS Satellite Imagery Fire Detection GIS Data Fire Data in Google Earth ...

  2. Branched polynomial covering maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    1999-01-01

    A Weierstrass polynomial with multiple roots in certain points leads to a branched covering map. With this as the guiding example, we formally define and study the notion of a branched polynomial covering map. We shall prove that many finite covering maps are polynomial outside a discrete branch...... set. Particular studies are made of branched polynomial covering maps arising from Riemann surfaces and from knots in the 3-sphere....

  3. Branched polynomial covering maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2002-01-01

    A Weierstrass polynomial with multiple roots in certain points leads to a branched covering map. With this as the guiding example, we formally define and study the notion of a branched polynomial covering map. We shall prove that many finite covering maps are polynomial outside a discrete branch...... set. Particular studies are made of branched polynomial covering maps arising from Riemann surfaces and from knots in the 3-sphere. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  4. Using maps in genealogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1999-01-01

    Maps are one of many sources you may need to complete a family tree. In genealogical research, maps can provide clues to where our ancestors may have lived and where to look for written records about them. Beginners should master basic genealogical research techniques before starting to use topographic maps.

  5. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Fogh Olsen, Ole; Sporring, Jon

    2007-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  6. On parabolic external maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomonaco, Luna; Petersen, Carsten Lunde; Shen, Weixiao

    2017-01-01

    We prove that any C1+BV degree d ≥ 2 circle covering h having all periodic orbits weakly expanding, is conjugate by a C1+BV diffeomorphism to a metrically expanding map. We use this to connect the space of parabolic external maps (coming from the theory of parabolic-like maps) to metrically...

  7. Mapping landscape corridors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Vogt; Kurt H. Riitters; Marcin Iwanowski; Christine Estreguil; Jacek Kozak; Pierre Soille

    2007-01-01

    Corridors are important geographic features for biological conservation and biodiversity assessment. The identification and mapping of corridors is usually based on visual interpretations of movement patterns (functional corridors) or habitat maps (structural corridors). We present a method for automated corridor mapping with morphological image processing, and...

  8. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Olsen, Ole Fogh; Sporring, Jon

    2006-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  9. Geography Education Through Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Demiralp

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Geography studies the relationship between human and the earth and pay attention to space, place and environment. In its simplest definition, maps are language and communication tools in transferring knowledge of an area in the science of geography which studies the space. Thus teaching and teaching how to use maps is quite important. This is not valid just for all matters of geography education; they can be used at any point, level, age or grade in teaching. This is because map reading involves transferring a piece of information by coding it on a platform and the users to read and interpret the information by encoding it according to their needs. Thus, we can say that teaching maps and teaching how to use maps is the transformation or translation of a piece of knowledge from life, with the appropriate language. In order for this kind of teaching and learning to be accomplished it is a must that the map maker and the map user to know the common language of maps, which is map language, and for them to know qualities, types and limitations of maps. To gain this kind of knowledge, students must see every type of map from the simplest to the most complicated and study and analyse them, as well as get to know their different usages.

  10. Minimalism through intraoperative functional mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, M S

    1996-01-01

    Intraoperative stimulation mapping may be used to avoid unnecessary risk to functional regions subserving language and sensori-motor pathways. Based on the data presented here, language localization is variable in the entire population, with only certainty existing for the inferior frontal region responsible for motor speech. Anatomical landmarks such as the anterior temporal tip for temporal lobe language sites and the posterior aspect of the lateral sphenoid wing for the frontal lobe language zones are unreliable in avoiding postoperative aphasias. Thus, individual mapping to identify essential language sites has the greatest likelihood of avoiding permanent deficits in naming, reading, and motor speech. In a similar approach, motor and sensory pathways from the cortex and underlying white matter may be reliably stimulated and mapped in both awake and asleep patients. Although these techniques require an additional operative time and equipment nominally priced, the result is often gratifying, as postoperative morbidity has been greatly reduced in the process of incorporating these surgical strategies. The patients quality of life is improved in terms of seizure control, with or without antiepileptic drugs. This avoids having to perform a second costly operative procedure, which is routinely done when extraoperative stimulation and recording is done via subdural grids. In addition, an aggressive tumor resection at the initial operation lengthens the time to tumor recurrence and often obviates the need for a subsequent reoperation. Thus, intraoperative functional mapping may be best alluded to as a surgical technique that results in "minimalism in the long term".

  11. Mapping a region of hepatitis C virus E2 that is responsible for escape from neutralizing antibodies and a core CD81-binding region that does not tolerate neutralization escape mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Zhen-Yong; Saha, Anasuya; Xia, Jinming; Wang, Yong; Lau, Patrick; Krey, Thomas; Rey, Felix A; Foung, Steven K H

    2011-10-01

    Understanding the interaction between broadly neutralizing antibodies and their epitopes provides a basis for the rational design of a preventive hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine. CBH-2, HC-11, and HC-1 are representatives of antibodies to overlapping epitopes on E2 that mediate neutralization by blocking virus binding to CD81. To obtain insights into escape mechanisms, infectious cell culture virus, 2a HCVcc, was propagated under increasing concentrations of a neutralizing antibody to isolate escape mutants. Three escape patterns were observed with these antibodies. First, CBH-2 escape mutants that contained mutations at D431G or A439E, which did not compromise viral fitness, were isolated. Second, under the selective pressure of HC-11, escape mutations progressed from a single L438F substitution at a low antibody concentration to double substitutions, L438F and N434D or L438F and T435A, at higher antibody concentrations. Escape from HC-11 was associated with a loss of viral fitness. An HCV pseudoparticle (HCVpp) containing the L438F mutation bound to CD81 half as efficiently as did wild-type (wt) HCVpp. Third, for HC-1, the antibody at a critical concentration completely suppressed viral replication and generated no escape mutants. Epitope mapping revealed contact residues for CBH-2 and HC-11 in two regions of the E2 glycoprotein, amino acids (aa) 425 to 443 and aa 529 to 535. Interestingly, contact residues for HC-1 were identified only in the region encompassing aa 529 to 535 and not in aa 425 to 443. Taken together, these findings point to a region of variability, aa 425 to 443, that is responsible primarily for viral escape from neutralization, with or without compromising viral fitness. Moreover, the region aa 529 to 535 is a core CD81 binding region that does not tolerate neutralization escape mutations.

  12. ShakeMaps during the Emilia sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Valentino Lauciani; Licia Faenza; Alberto Michelini

    2012-01-01

    ShakeMap is a software package that can be used to generate maps of ground shaking for various peak ground motion (PGM) parameters, including peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity, and spectral acceleration response at 0.3 s, 1.0 s and 3.0 s, and instrumentally derived intensities. ShakeMap has been implemented in Italy at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV; National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology) since 2006 (http://shakemap.rm.ingv.it), with the...

  13. Space mapping optimization algorithms for engineering design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koziel, Slawomir; Bandler, John W.; Madsen, Kaj

    2006-01-01

    A simple, efficient optimization algorithm based on space mapping (SM) is presented. It utilizes input SM to reduce the misalignment between the coarse and fine models of the optimized object over a region of interest, and output space mapping (OSM) to ensure matching of response and first......-order derivatives between the mapped coarse model and the fine model at the current iteration point. We also consider an enhanced version in which the input SM coefficients are frequency dependent. The performance of our new algorithms is comparable with the recently published SMIS algorithm when applied...

  14. $2^n-$rational maps

    OpenAIRE

    Kassotakis, Pavlos; Nieszporski, Maciej; Damianou, Pantelis

    2015-01-01

    We present a natural extension of the notion of nondegenerate rational maps (quadrirational maps) to arbitrary dimensions. We refer to these maps as $2^n-$rational maps. In this note we construct a rich family of $2^n-$rational maps. These maps by construction are involutions and highly symmetric in the sense that the maps and their companion maps have the same functional form.

  15. On palaeogeographic map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-Zhao Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The palaeogeographic map is a graphic representation of physical geographical characteristics in geological history periods and human history periods. It is the most important result of palaeogeographic study. The author, as the Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Palaeogeography, Chinese Edition and English Edition, aimed at the problems of the articles submitted to and published in the Journal of Palaeogeography in recent years and the relevant papers and books of others, and integrated with his practice of palaeogeographic study and mapping, wrote this paper. The content mainly includes the data of palaeogeographic mapping, the problems of palaeogeographic mapping method, the “Single factor analysis and multifactor comprehensive mapping method —— Methodology of quantitative lithofacies palaeogeography”, i.e., the “4 steps mapping method”, the nomenclature of each palaeogeographic unit in palaeogeographic map, the explanation of each palaeogeographic unit in palaeogeographic map, the explanation of significance of palaeogeographic map and palaeogeographic article, the evaluative standards of palaeogeographic map and palaeogeographic article, and the self-evaluation. Criticisms and corrections are welcome.

  16. Principles of Electroanatomic Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Bhakta

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiologic testing and radiofrequency ablation have evolved as curative measures for a variety of rhythm disturbances. As experience in this field has grown, ablation is progressively being used to address more complex rhythm disturbances. Paralleling this trend are technological advancements to facilitate these efforts, including electroanatomic mapping (EAM. At present, several different EAM systems utilizing various technologies are available to facilitate mapping and ablation. Use of these systems has been shown to reduce fluoroscopic exposure and radiation dose, with less significant effects on procedural duration and success rates. Among the data provided by EAM are chamber reconstruction, tagging of important anatomic landmarks and ablation lesions, display of diagnostic and mapping catheters without using fluoroscopy, activation mapping, and voltage (or scar mapping. Several EAM systems have specialized features, such as enhanced ability to map non-sustained or hemodynamically unstable arrhythmias, ability to display diagnostic as well as mapping catheter positions, and wide compatibility with a variety of catheters. Each EAM system has its strengths and weaknesses, and the system chosen must depend upon what data is required for procedural success (activation mapping, substrate mapping, cardiac geometry, the anticipated arrhythmia, the compatibility of the system with adjunctive tools (i.e. diagnostic and ablation catheters, and the operator's familiarity with the selected system. While EAM can offer significant assistance during an EP procedure, their incorrect or inappropriate application can substantially hamper mapping efforts and procedural success, and should not replace careful interpretation of data and strict adherence to electrophysiologic principles.

  17. Of maps and myths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, J.E.; Mooneyhan, D.W. [Univ. Space Research Assoc, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-05-01

    For many areas of both the developed and developing world, the spatially accurate data required to effectively support environmental planning, resources management, and public policy decision making do not exist. There are a variety of reasons for this lack of map data. Mapping is neither easy nor cheap. Issues of both national security and national sovereignty are involved. There is a need to reinvigorate and expand our mapping programs to make them national in focus but global in scope. It is also essential that a civil agency be given a load role in global mapping. There is a need to work to break down the barriers that inhibit the open flow of map information that does exist, garner the resources required to fill in where there are gaps, and support efforts to increase funding for research in mapping and spatial analysis. All this must be done if we are to improve our understanding of our rapidly changing world. 20 refs.

  18. Map Projection Transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedjeljko Frančula

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Map Projection Transitions is a very successful web application about map projections. The web page (http://www.jasondavies.com/maps/transition pre­sents a world map with graticule and country borders in the oblique Aitoff projection, with the South Pole. The map is not static, but animated. The South Pole moves toward the bottom and Earth rotates around its poles. The animation lasts five seconds, after which the projection changes and movement continues for five seconds, after which the projection changes again. Names of projections appear in a separate window. There are a total of 56 projections. The South Pole eventually becomes invisible and the North Pole appears at the top. Various parts of Earth appear in the center of the map by rotating around the poles.

  19. A comparison of Gridded Quantile Mapping vs. Station Based Downscaling Approaches on Potential Hydrochemical Responses of Forested Watersheds to Climate Change Using a Dynamic Biogeochemical Model (PnET-BGC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmokhtarian, A.; Driscoll, C. T.; Campbell, J. L.; Hayhoe, K.

    2012-12-01

    Dynamic hydrochemical models are useful tools to understand and predict the interactive effects of climate change, atmospheric CO2, and atmospheric deposition on the hydrology and water quality of forested watersheds. Although application of these models for climate projections necessitates the use of climatic variables simulated by atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) to determine inputs to drive model projections. Due to the coarse resolution of AOGCMs, outputs need to be downscaled to bridge the gap between coarse spatial resolution and higher resolution required for hydrochemical models. This research compares two different statistical downscaling approaches; Gridded Quantile Mapping (BCSD) and Station-based Daily Asynchronous Regression, and their effects on potential biogeochemical responses of forested watershed. In this study, we used the biogeochemical model, PnET-BGC, to assess, compare and contrast the effects of these two downscaling approaches on potential future changes in temperature, precipitation, solar radiation and atmospheric CO2 and their effects in projections of pools, concentrations, and fluxes of major elements at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, U.S. Future emissions scenarios were developed from monthly output from three AOGCMs (HadCM3, GFDL, PCM) in conjunction with potential lower and upper bounds of projected atmospheric CO2 (550 and 970 ppm by 2099, respectively). The climate projections from both downscaling approaches indicate that over the 21st century, average air temperature will increase with simultaneous increases in annual average precipitation. The modeling results from both downscaling approaches suggest that climate change is projected to cause substantial temporal shifts in hydrologic and hydrochemistry patterns. The choice of downscaling approach had a major impact on the streamflow simulations, which was directly related to the ability of the downscaling approach to mimic observed

  20. Advances in Reverberation Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Kaspi, Shai

    2007-01-01

    This contribution briefly reviews the reverberation mapping technique which leads to determination of black hole masses. I focus on the emerging relation between the broad-line region size and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity, and on an overview of recent results of reverberation mapping studies which are starting to cover the full AGN luminosity range. Preliminary results and time lag determination from a reverberation mapping program of high-luminosity quasars are also presented.

  1. Classification of Lipschitz mappings

    CERN Document Server

    Piasecki, Lukasz

    2013-01-01

    The Lipschitz Condition Nonlinear spectral radius Uniformly lipschitzian mappings Basic Facts on Banach Spaces Convexity The operator norm Dual spaces, reexivity, the weak, and weak* topologiesMean Lipschitz Condition Nonexpansive and mean nonexpansive mappings in Banach spaces General case On the Lipschitz Constants for Iterates of Mean Lipschitzian Mappings A bound for Lipschitz constants of iterates A bound for the constant k∞(T)Moving averages in Bana

  2. Similarity transformations of MAPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Allan T.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the notion of similar Markovian Arrival Processes (MAPs and show that the event stationary point processes related to two similar MAPs are stochastically equivalent. This holds true for the time stationary point processes too. We show that several well known stochastical equivalences as e.g. that between the H 2 renewal process and the Interrupted Poisson Process (IPP can be expressed by the similarity transformations of MAPs. In the appendix the valid region of similarity transformations for two-state MAPs is characterized.

  3. Multi-moment maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swann, Andrew Francis; Madsen, Thomas Bruun

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a notion of moment map adapted to actions of Lie groups that preserve a closed three-form. We show existence of our multi-moment maps in many circumstances, including mild topological assumptions on the underlying manifold. Such maps are also shown to exist for all groups whose second...... and third Lie algebra Betti numbers are zero. We show that these form a special class of solvable Lie groups and provide a structural characterisation. We provide many examples of multi-moment maps for different geometries and use them to describe manifolds with holonomy contained in G(2) preserved by a two...

  4. Landslide susceptibility map: from research to application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Federica; Reichenbach, Paola; Ardizzone, Francesca; Rossi, Mauro; Felicioni, Giulia; Antonini, Guendalina

    2014-05-01

    Susceptibility map is an important and essential tool in environmental planning, to evaluate landslide hazard and risk and for a correct and responsible management of the territory. Landslide susceptibility is the likelihood of a landslide occurring in an area on the basis of local terrain conditions. Can be expressed as the probability that any given region will be affected by landslides, i.e. an estimate of "where" landslides are likely to occur. In this work we present two examples of landslide susceptibility map prepared for the Umbria Region and for the Perugia Municipality. These two maps were realized following official request from the Regional and Municipal government to the Research Institute for the Hydrogeological Protection (CNR-IRPI). The susceptibility map prepared for the Umbria Region represents the development of previous agreements focused to prepare: i) a landslide inventory map that was included in the Urban Territorial Planning (PUT) and ii) a series of maps for the Regional Plan for Multi-risk Prevention. The activities carried out for the Umbria Region were focused to define and apply methods and techniques for landslide susceptibility zonation. Susceptibility maps were prepared exploiting a multivariate statistical model (linear discriminant analysis) for the five Civil Protection Alert Zones defined in the regional territory. The five resulting maps were tested and validated using the spatial distribution of recent landslide events that occurred in the region. The susceptibility map for the Perugia Municipality was prepared to be integrated as one of the cartographic product in the Municipal development plan (PRG - Piano Regolatore Generale) as required by the existing legislation. At strategic level, one of the main objectives of the PRG, is to establish a framework of knowledge and legal aspects for the management of geo-hydrological risk. At national level most of the susceptibility maps prepared for the PRG, were and still are obtained

  5. Suppression of inflammatory and infection responses in lung macrophages by eucalyptus oil and its constituent 1,8-cineole: Role of pattern recognition receptors TREM-1 and NLRP3, the MAP kinase regulator MKP-1, and NFκB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niket Yadav

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus oil (EO used in traditional medicine continues to prove useful for aroma therapy in respiratory ailments; however, there is a paucity of information on its mechanism of action and active components. In this direction, we investigated EO and its dominant constituent 1,8-cineole (eucalyptol using the murine lung alveolar macrophage (AM cell line MH-S. In an LPS-induced AM inflammation model, pre-treatment with EO significantly reduced (P ≤0.01or 0.05 the pro-inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1 (α and β, and NO, albeit at a variable rate and extent; 1,8-cineole diminished IL-1 and IL-6. In a mycobacterial-infection AM model, EO pre-treatment or post-treatment significantly enhanced (P ≤0.01 the phagocytic activity and pathogen clearance. 1,8-cineole also significantly enhanced the pathogen clearance though the phagocytic activity was not significantly altered. EO or 1,8-cineole pre-treatment attenuated LPS-induced inflammatory signaling pathways at various levels accompanied by diminished inflammatory response. Among the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs involved in LPS signaling, the TREM pathway surface receptor (TREM-1 was significantly downregulated. Importantly, the pre-treatments significantly downregulated (P ≤0.01 the intracellular PRR receptor NLRP3 of the inflammasome, which is consistent with the decrease in IL-1β secretion. Of the shared downstream signaling cascade for these PRR pathways, there was significant attenuation of phosphorylation of the transcription factor NF-κB and p38 (but increased phosphorylation of the other two MAP kinases, ERK1/2 and JNK1/2. 1,8-cineole showed a similar general trend except for an opposite effect on NF-κB and JNK1/2. In this context, either pre-treatment caused a significant downregulation of MKP-1 phosphatase, a negative regulator of MAPKs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory activity of EO and 1,8-cineole is modulated via selective downregulation

  6. Suppression of inflammatory and infection responses in lung macrophages by eucalyptus oil and its constituent 1,8-cineole: Role of pattern recognition receptors TREM-1 and NLRP3, the MAP kinase regulator MKP-1, and NFκB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Niket; Chandra, Harish

    2017-01-01

    Eucalyptus oil (EO) used in traditional medicine continues to prove useful for aroma therapy in respiratory ailments; however, there is a paucity of information on its mechanism of action and active components. In this direction, we investigated EO and its dominant constituent 1,8-cineole (eucalyptol) using the murine lung alveolar macrophage (AM) cell line MH-S. In an LPS-induced AM inflammation model, pre-treatment with EO significantly reduced (P ≤0.01or 0.05) the pro-inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1 (α and β), and NO, albeit at a variable rate and extent; 1,8-cineole diminished IL-1 and IL-6. In a mycobacterial-infection AM model, EO pre-treatment or post-treatment significantly enhanced (P ≤0.01) the phagocytic activity and pathogen clearance. 1,8-cineole also significantly enhanced the pathogen clearance though the phagocytic activity was not significantly altered. EO or 1,8-cineole pre-treatment attenuated LPS-induced inflammatory signaling pathways at various levels accompanied by diminished inflammatory response. Among the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) involved in LPS signaling, the TREM pathway surface receptor (TREM-1) was significantly downregulated. Importantly, the pre-treatments significantly downregulated (P ≤0.01) the intracellular PRR receptor NLRP3 of the inflammasome, which is consistent with the decrease in IL-1β secretion. Of the shared downstream signaling cascade for these PRR pathways, there was significant attenuation of phosphorylation of the transcription factor NF-κB and p38 (but increased phosphorylation of the other two MAP kinases, ERK1/2 and JNK1/2). 1,8-cineole showed a similar general trend except for an opposite effect on NF-κB and JNK1/2. In this context, either pre-treatment caused a significant downregulation of MKP-1 phosphatase, a negative regulator of MAPKs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory activity of EO and 1,8-cineole is modulated via selective downregulation of the

  7. ShakeMaps during the Emilia sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentino Lauciani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ShakeMap is a software package that can be used to generate maps of ground shaking for various peak ground motion (PGM parameters, including peak ground acceleration (PGA, peak ground velocity, and spectral acceleration response at 0.3 s, 1.0 s and 3.0 s, and instrumentally derived intensities. ShakeMap has been implemented in Italy at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV; National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology since 2006 (http://shakemap.rm.ingv.it, with the primary aim being to help the Dipartimento della Protezione Civile (DPC; Civil Protection Department civil defense agency in the definition of rapid and accurate information on where earthquake damage is located, to correctly direct rescue teams and to organize emergency responses. Based on the ShakeMap software package [Wald et al. 1999, Worden et al. 2010], which was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS, the INGV is constructing shake maps for Ml ≥3.0, with the adoption of a fully automatic procedure based on manually revised locations and magnitudes [Michelini et al. 2008]. The focus of this study is the description of the progressive generation of these shake maps for the sequence that struck the Emilia-Romagna Region in May 2012. […

  8. Experimental charge density from electron microscopic maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jimin

    2017-08-01

    The charge density (CD) distribution of an atom is the difference per unit volume between the positive charge of its nucleus and the distribution of the negative charges carried by the electrons that are associated with it. The CDs of the atoms in macromolecules are responsible for their electrostatic potential (ESP) distributions, which can now be visualized using cryo-electron microscopy at high resolution. CD maps can be recovered from experimental ESP density maps using the negative Laplacian operation. CD maps are easier to interpret than ESP maps because they are less sensitive to long-range electrostatic effects. An ESP-to-CD conversion involves multiplication of amplitudes of structure factors as Fourier transforms of these maps in reciprocal space by 1/d2 , where d is the resolution of reflections. In principle, it should be possible to determine the charges carried by the individual atoms in macromolecules by comparing experimental CD maps with experimental ESP maps. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  9. Imaging retinotopic maps in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandell, Brian A.; Winawer, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    A quarter-century ago visual neuroscientists had little information about the number and organization of retinotopic maps in human visual cortex. The advent of functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a non-invasive, spatially-resolved technique for measuring brain activity, provided a wealth of data about human retinotopic maps. Just as there are differences amongst nonhuman primate maps, the human maps have their own unique properties. Many human maps can be measured reliably in individual subjects during experimental sessions lasting less than an hour. The efficiency of the measurements and the relatively large amplitude of functional MRI signals in visual cortex make it possible to develop quantitative models of functional responses within specific maps in individual subjects. During this last quarter century, there has also been significant progress in measuring properties of the human brain at a range of length and time scales, including white matter pathways, macroscopic properties of gray and white matter, and cellular and molecular tissue properties. We hope the next twenty-five years will see a great deal of work that aims to integrate these data by modeling the network of visual signals. We don’t know what such theories will look like, but the characterization of human retinotopic maps from the last twenty-five years is likely to be an important part of future ideas about visual computations. PMID:20692278

  10. MAP OF NASCA GEOGLYPHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hanzalová

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Czech Technical University in Prague in the cooperation with the University of Applied Sciences in Dresden (Germany work on the Nasca Project. The cooperation started in 2004 and much work has been done since then. All work is connected with Nasca lines in southern Peru. The Nasca project started in 1995 and its main target is documentation and conservation of the Nasca lines. Most of the project results are presented as WebGIS application via Internet. In the face of the impending destruction of the soil drawings, it is possible to preserve this world cultural heritage for the posterity at least in a digital form. Creating of Nasca lines map is very useful. The map is in a digital form and it is also available as a paper map. The map contains planimetric component of the map, map lettering and altimetry. Thematic folder in this map is a vector layer of the geoglyphs in Nasca/Peru. Basis for planimetry are georeferenced satellite images, altimetry is created from digital elevation model. This map was created in ArcGis software.

  11. Maps of metric spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Buliga, Marius

    2011-01-01

    This is a pedagogical introduction covering maps of metric spaces, Gromov-Hausdorff distance and its "physical" meaning, and dilation structures as a convenient simplification of an exhaustive database of maps of a metric space into another. See arXiv:1103.6007 for the context.

  12. Mapping Hrad Vallis, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Hamilton, C. W.

    2017-06-01

    Our 1:175K-scale geologic map is almost done! And we've found inflated lava flows and multiple episodes of aqueous discharge interspersed with volcanic eruptions. But we should also look beyond this area, as these units extend beyond the map area.

  13. Statistical air quality mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassteele, van de J.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis handles statistical mapping of air quality data. Policy makers require more and more detailed air quality information to take measures to improve air quality. Besides, researchers need detailed air quality information to assess health effects. Accurate and spatially highly resolved maps

  14. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Sporring, Jon; Fogh Olsen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    . To address this problem, we introduce a photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way, we preserve important illumination features, while...

  15. Sao Paulo Map Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, G. Robert

    1985-01-01

    Describes geographical, subject, and chronological aspects of 25 cartographic collections housed in university, public, special, state, and semi-state libraries in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Three size categories of map holdings (more than 10,000, 1,000-10,000, less than 1,000) are distinguished. A list of 27 Sao Paulo institutions housing map collections…

  16. Simplifying Massive Contour Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arge, Lars; Deleuran, Lasse Kosetski; Mølhave, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple, efficient and practical algorithm for constructing and subsequently simplifying contour maps from massive high-resolution DEMs, under some practically realistic assumptions on the DEM and contours.......We present a simple, efficient and practical algorithm for constructing and subsequently simplifying contour maps from massive high-resolution DEMs, under some practically realistic assumptions on the DEM and contours....

  17. A fruit quality gene map of Prunus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bliss Fredrick A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prunus fruit development, growth, ripening, and senescence includes major biochemical and sensory changes in texture, color, and flavor. The genetic dissection of these complex processes has important applications in crop improvement, to facilitate maximizing and maintaining stone fruit quality from production and processing through to marketing and consumption. Here we present an integrated fruit quality gene map of Prunus containing 133 genes putatively involved in the determination of fruit texture, pigmentation, flavor, and chilling injury resistance. Results A genetic linkage map of 211 markers was constructed for an intraspecific peach (Prunus persica progeny population, Pop-DG, derived from a canning peach cultivar 'Dr. Davis' and a fresh market cultivar 'Georgia Belle'. The Pop-DG map covered 818 cM of the peach genome and included three morphological markers, 11 ripening candidate genes, 13 cold-responsive genes, 21 novel EST-SSRs from the ChillPeach database, 58 previously reported SSRs, 40 RAFs, 23 SRAPs, 14 IMAs, and 28 accessory markers from candidate gene amplification. The Pop-DG map was co-linear with the Prunus reference T × E map, with 39 SSR markers in common to align the maps. A further 158 markers were bin-mapped to the reference map: 59 ripening candidate genes, 50 cold-responsive genes, and 50 novel EST-SSRs from ChillPeach, with deduced locations in Pop-DG via comparative mapping. Several candidate genes and EST-SSRs co-located with previously reported major trait loci and quantitative trait loci for chilling injury symptoms in Pop-DG. Conclusion The candidate gene approach combined with bin-mapping and availability of a community-recognized reference genetic map provides an efficient means of locating genes of interest in a target genome. We highlight the co-localization of fruit quality candidate genes with previously reported fruit quality QTLs. The fruit quality gene map developed here is a

  18. A fruit quality gene map of Prunus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Prunus fruit development, growth, ripening, and senescence includes major biochemical and sensory changes in texture, color, and flavor. The genetic dissection of these complex processes has important applications in crop improvement, to facilitate maximizing and maintaining stone fruit quality from production and processing through to marketing and consumption. Here we present an integrated fruit quality gene map of Prunus containing 133 genes putatively involved in the determination of fruit texture, pigmentation, flavor, and chilling injury resistance. Results A genetic linkage map of 211 markers was constructed for an intraspecific peach (Prunus persica) progeny population, Pop-DG, derived from a canning peach cultivar 'Dr. Davis' and a fresh market cultivar 'Georgia Belle'. The Pop-DG map covered 818 cM of the peach genome and included three morphological markers, 11 ripening candidate genes, 13 cold-responsive genes, 21 novel EST-SSRs from the ChillPeach database, 58 previously reported SSRs, 40 RAFs, 23 SRAPs, 14 IMAs, and 28 accessory markers from candidate gene amplification. The Pop-DG map was co-linear with the Prunus reference T × E map, with 39 SSR markers in common to align the maps. A further 158 markers were bin-mapped to the reference map: 59 ripening candidate genes, 50 cold-responsive genes, and 50 novel EST-SSRs from ChillPeach, with deduced locations in Pop-DG via comparative mapping. Several candidate genes and EST-SSRs co-located with previously reported major trait loci and quantitative trait loci for chilling injury symptoms in Pop-DG. Conclusion The candidate gene approach combined with bin-mapping and availability of a community-recognized reference genetic map provides an efficient means of locating genes of interest in a target genome. We highlight the co-localization of fruit quality candidate genes with previously reported fruit quality QTLs. The fruit quality gene map developed here is a valuable tool for dissecting the

  19. Genome Mapping in Plant Comparative Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Lindsay; Sharp, Aaron R; Evans, Carrie R; Udall, Joshua A

    2016-09-01

    Genome mapping produces fingerprints of DNA sequences to construct a physical map of the whole genome. It provides contiguous, long-range information that complements and, in some cases, replaces sequencing data. Recent advances in genome-mapping technology will better allow researchers to detect large (>1kbp) structural variations between plant genomes. Some molecular and informatics complications need to be overcome for this novel technology to achieve its full utility. This technology will be useful for understanding phenotype responses due to DNA rearrangements and will yield insights into genome evolution, particularly in polyploids. In this review, we outline recent advances in genome-mapping technology, including the processes required for data collection and analysis, and applications in plant comparative genomics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Water development projects map

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new map showing major water development projects across the United States has been published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The map shows the location, size, and ownership of approximately 2800 of the nation's major multipurpose and flood control dams and virtually all of the reservoir storage and flood control capacity of the country. Other features illustrated on the map include U.S. Bureau of Reclamation surface water irrigation projects; watershed protection projects of the U.S. Soil Conservation Service; hydroelectric power facilities, including both federal plants and nonfederal plants leased by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers navigation and flood damage reduction projects; and the federal systems of wild and scenic rivers. The map also delineates major rivers and the 21 USGS water resources region boundaries so that users of the map can locate development projects with respect to drainage basins.

  1. Geologic map of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Skinner, James A.; Dohm, James M.; Irwin, Rossman P.; Kolb, Eric J.; Fortezzo, Corey M.; Platz, Thomas; Michael, Gregory G.; Hare, Trent M.

    2014-01-01

    This global geologic map of Mars, which records the distribution of geologic units and landforms on the planet's surface through time, is based on unprecedented variety, quality, and quantity of remotely sensed data acquired since the Viking Orbiters. These data have provided morphologic, topographic, spectral, thermophysical, radar sounding, and other observations for integration, analysis, and interpretation in support of geologic mapping. In particular, the precise topographic mapping now available has enabled consistent morphologic portrayal of the surface for global mapping (whereas previously used visual-range image bases were less effective, because they combined morphologic and albedo information and, locally, atmospheric haze). Also, thermal infrared image bases used for this map tended to be less affected by atmospheric haze and thus are reliable for analysis of surface morphology and texture at even higher resolution than the topographic products.

  2. Mapping Unknown Knowns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diogo de Andrade Silva, Elisa; Lanng, Ditte Bendix; Wind, Simon

    Mapping is often known as the entangled method of recognizing, representing and examining the existing physical conditions of a design site. Therefore, it becomes an evocative requirement to urban designers’ work in order to develop design proposals (Corner 1999). In this paper, we focus on mapping......, such as quantitative flows, materials, solid structures and others, offer themselves relatively easy to be analysed and mapped. But these transit infrastructures are an important part of people’s daily life for more that their efficient transport purposes. In these nodes and corridors, embodied mobile experiences...... representative dimensions of travellers’ embodied ‘dwelling-in-motion’ (Urry, 2007) and experiences. The paper foregrounds a ‘Mapping-in-Motion’ graphic example, an experimental urban design student assignment aiming to map some of the less representative dimensions of journeys between A and B in Berlin...

  3. The projective heat map

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Richard Evan

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces a simple dynamical model for a planar heat map that is invariant under projective transformations. The map is defined by iterating a polygon map, where one starts with a finite planar N-gon and produces a new N-gon by a prescribed geometric construction. One of the appeals of the topic of this book is the simplicity of the construction that yet leads to deep and far reaching mathematics. To construct the projective heat map, the author modifies the classical affine invariant midpoint map, which takes a polygon to a new polygon whose vertices are the midpoints of the original. The author provides useful background which makes this book accessible to a beginning graduate student or advanced undergraduate as well as researchers approaching this subject from other fields of specialty. The book includes many illustrations, and there is also a companion computer program.

  4. Bodily maps of emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Glerean, Enrico; Hari, Riitta; Hietanen, Jari K.

    2014-01-01

    Emotions are often felt in the body, and somatosensory feedback has been proposed to trigger conscious emotional experiences. Here we reveal maps of bodily sensations associated with different emotions using a unique topographical self-report method. In five experiments, participants (n = 701) were shown two silhouettes of bodies alongside emotional words, stories, movies, or facial expressions. They were asked to color the bodily regions whose activity they felt increasing or decreasing while viewing each stimulus. Different emotions were consistently associated with statistically separable bodily sensation maps across experiments. These maps were concordant across West European and East Asian samples. Statistical classifiers distinguished emotion-specific activation maps accurately, confirming independence of topographies across emotions. We propose that emotions are represented in the somatosensory system as culturally universal categorical somatotopic maps. Perception of these emotion-triggered bodily changes may play a key role in generating consciously felt emotions. PMID:24379370

  5. Mental Mapping: A Classroom Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Les

    1978-01-01

    Examines potential uses of mental maps in the classroom by reviewing research efforts, providing an example of the differences between mental maps of two student groups, and suggesting how to use mental maps in the geography curriculum. Mental mapping (or cognitive mapping) refers to individuals' processes of collecting, storing, and retrieving…

  6. nowCOAST's Map Service for Political Map Overlays

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST map service provides map overlays depicting the boundaries of U.S. states, territories, counties and townships/county subdivisions,...

  7. nowCOAST's Map Service for Transportation Map Overlays

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST map service provides maps depicting the locations of major world airport runways, major U.S. seaports, and latitude/longitude grid...

  8. New Tsunami Inundation Maps for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberopoulou, Aggeliki; Borrero, Jose; Uslu, Burak; Kanoglu, Utku; Synolakis, Costas

    2010-05-01

    California is the first US State to complete its tsunami inundation mapping. A new generation of tsunami inundation maps is now available for 17 coastal counties.. The new maps offer improved coverage for many areas, they are based on the most recent descriptions of potential tsunami farfield and nearfield sources and use the best available bathymetric and topographic data for modelling. The need for new tsunami maps for California became clear since Synolakis et al (1998) described how inundation projections derived with inundation models that fully calculate the wave evolution over dry land can be as high as twice the values predicted with earlier threshold models, for tsunamis originating from tectonic source. Since the 1998 Papua New Guinea tsunami when the hazard from offshore submarine landslides was better understood (Bardet et al, 2003), the State of California funded the development of the first generation of maps, based on local tectonic and landslide sources. Most of the hazard was dominated by offshore landslides, whose return period remains unknown but is believed to be higher than 1000 years for any given locale, at least in Southern California. The new generation of maps incorporates local and distant scenarios. The partnership between the Tsunami Research Center at USC, the California Emergency Management Agency and the California Seismic Safety Commission let the State to be the first among all US States to complete the maps. (Exceptions include the offshore islands and Newport Beach, where higher resolution maps are under way). The maps were produced with the lowest cost per mile of coastline, per resident or per map than all other States, because of the seamless integration of the USC and NOAA databases and the use of the MOST model. They are a significant improvement over earlier map generations. As part of a continuous improvement in response, mitigation and planning and community education, the California inundation maps can contribute in

  9. Cognitive maps and attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, Oliver; Nadel, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive map theory suggested that exploring an environment and attending to a stimulus should lead to its integration into an allocentric environmental representation. We here report that directed attention in the form of exploration serves to gather information needed to determine an optimal spatial strategy, given task demands and characteristics of the environment. Attended environmental features may integrate into spatial representations if they meet the requirements of the optimal spatial strategy: when learning involves a cognitive mapping strategy, cues with high codability (e.g., concrete objects) will be incorporated into a map, but cues with low codability (e.g., abstract paintings) will not. However, instructions encouraging map learning can lead to the incorporation of cues with low codability. On the other hand, if spatial learning is not map-based, abstract cues can and will be used to encode locations. Since exploration appears to determine what strategy to apply and whether or not to encode a cue, recognition memory for environmental features is independent of whether or not a cue is part of a spatial representation. In fact, when abstract cues were used in a way that was not map-based, or when they were not used for spatial navigation at all, they were nevertheless recognized as familiar. Thus, the relation between exploratory activity on the one hand and spatial strategy and memory on the other appears more complex than initially suggested by cognitive map theory.

  10. Color on emergency mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lili; Qi, Qingwen; Zhang, An

    2007-06-01

    There are so many emergency issues in our daily life. Such as typhoons, tsunamis, earthquake, fires, floods, epidemics, etc. These emergencies made people lose their lives and their belongings. Every day, every hour, even every minute people probably face the emergency, so how to handle it and how to decrease its hurt are the matters people care most. If we can map it exactly before or after the emergencies; it will be helpful to the emergency researchers and people who live in the emergency place. So , through the emergency map, before emergency is occurring we can predict the situation, such as when and where the emergency will be happen; where people can refuge, etc. After disaster, we can also easily assess the lost, discuss the cause and make the lost less. The primary effect of mapping is offering information to the people who care about the emergency and the researcher who want to study it. Mapping allows the viewers to get a spatial sense of hazard. It can also provide the clues to study the relationship of the phenomenon in emergency. Color, as the basic element of the map, it can simplify and clarify the phenomenon. Color can also affects the general perceptibility of the map, and elicits subjective reactions to the map. It is to say, structure, readability, and the reader's psychological reactions can be affected by the use of color.

  11. Languages of Unimodal Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huimin

    The following sections are included: * Unimodal Maps * Definition and Terminology * Logistic Map and Tent Map * Simple Models with Complicated Dynamics * Symbolic Dynamics * A Brief History * Itinerary and Kneading Sequence * An Order Relation of Sequences * Conditions of being Itinerary * Definition of Languages * Admissible Sequences * The Languages ℒ(KS) * Each Word is "Real" * ℒ(KS) are Dynamical Languages * Some Facts of Strings for a Given Kneading Sequence * Prefix-Suffixes with respect to Kneading Sequence * Conditions for x ∈ ℒ(KS) * ℒ(KS) when KS contains c * Two Lemmas about Dual Strings * Periodic Sequences and Periodic Orbits * Periodic Sequences which are Itineraries * Complexity of Windows

  12. Crowdsourcing The National Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Elizabeth; Craun, Kari J.; Korris, Erin M.; Brostuen, David A.; Moore, Laurence R.

    2015-01-01

    Using crowdsourcing techniques, the US Geological Survey’s (USGS) Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) project known as “The National Map Corps (TNMCorps)” encourages citizen scientists to collect and edit data about man-made structures in an effort to provide accurate and authoritative map data for the USGS National Geospatial Program’s web-based The National Map. VGI is not new to the USGS, but past efforts have been hampered by available technologies. Building on lessons learned, TNMCorps volunteers are successfully editing 10 different structure types in all 50 states as well as Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.

  13. DOT Official County Highway Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The County Highway Map theme is a scanned and rectified version of the original MnDOT County Highway Map Series. The cultural features on some of these maps may be...

  14. Tools for mapping ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Ignacio; Adamescu, Mihai; Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Cazacu, Constantin; Klug, Hermann; Nedkov, Stoyan; Burkhard, Benjamin; Maes, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Mapping tools have evolved impressively in recent decades. From early computerised mapping techniques to current cloud-based mapping approaches, we have witnessed a technological evolution that has facilitated the democratisation of Geographic Information

  15. Northern Hemisphere Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Daily Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Part I consists of plotted and analyzed daily maps of sea-level and 500-mb maps for 0300, 0400, 1200, 1230, 1300, and 1500...

  16. NOS Bathymetric Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection of bathymetric contour maps which represent the seafloor topography includes over 400 individual titles and covers US offshore areas including Hawaii...

  17. MetaMap

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MetaMap is a highly configurable application developed by the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications at the National Library of Medicine (NLM) to...

  18. Programming with Hierarchical Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørbæk, Peter

    This report desribes the hierarchical maps used as a central data structure in the Corundum framework. We describe its most prominent features, ague for its usefulness and briefly describe some of the software prototypes implemented using the technology....

  19. Daily Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Several different government offices have published the Daily weather maps over its history. The publication has also gone by different names over time. The U.S....

  20. Minidoka - Invasive Species Mapping

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Locate and map, via the use of GPS, Rush skeletonweed on the refuge. Located areas then entered into GIS to allow refuge staff to pin point locations and treat this...

  1. PDS Planetary Maps API

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are developing a set of NASA Extensions to the Google Maps API—and soon to other frameworks such as OpenLayers as well—that will make these platforms more useful...

  2. Mapping cultural ecosystem services:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paracchini, Maria Luisa; Zulian, Grazia; Kopperoinen, Leena

    2014-01-01

    Research on ecosystem services mapping and valuing has increased significantly in recent years. However, compared to provisioning and regulating services, cultural ecosystem services have not yet been fully integrated into operational frameworks. One reason for this is that transdisciplinarity...

  3. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING, Bandera, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  4. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING, Atascosa, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  5. Survey on Ontology Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junwu

    To create a sharable semantic space in which the terms from different domain ontology or knowledge system, Ontology mapping become a hot research point in Semantic Web Community. In this paper, motivated factors of ontology mapping research are given firstly, and then 5 dominating theories and methods, such as information accessing technology, machine learning, linguistics, structure graph and similarity, are illustrated according their technology class. Before we analyses the new requirements and takes a long view, the contributions of these theories and methods are summarized in details. At last, this paper suggest to design a group of semantic connector with the ability of migration learning for OWL-2 extended with constrains and the ontology mapping theory of axiom, so as to provide a new methodology for ontology mapping.

  6. Marketplace Enrollment Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The maps show the distribution of consumers in a state who enrolled in marketplace plans through federally facilitated, partnership, and supported state-based...

  7. Air Data - Concentration Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Make a map of daily concentrations over several days. The daily air quality can be displayed in terms of the Air Quality Index or in concentration ranges for certain PM species like organic carbon, nitrates, and sulfates.

  8. USGS map quadrangles

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS map quandrangle boundaries with names and unique identifiers for the 1:24,000 (7.5 minute) quadrangles. Additional attributes provide unique identifiers and...

  9. TOXMAP®: Environmental Health Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — TOXMAP® is a Geographic Information System (GIS) that uses maps of the United States and Canada to help users visually explore data primarily from the EPA's Toxics...

  10. Haz-Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Haz-Map is an occupational health database designed for health and safety professionals and for consumers seeking information about the adverse effects of workplace...

  11. The CPD Maps System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CPD Maps includes data on the locations of existing CDBG, HOME, public housing and other HUD-funded community assets, so that users can view past investments...

  12. Public Waters Inventory Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This theme is a scanned and rectified version of the Minnesota DNR - Division of Waters "Public Waters Inventory" (PWI) maps. DNR Waters utilizes a small scale...

  13. The Gambier Mapping, Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Grammaticos, B; Lafortune, S

    1998-01-01

    We examine critically the Gambier equation and show that it is the generic linearisable equation containing, as reductions, all the second-order equations which are integrable through linearisation. We then introduce the general discrete form of this equation, the Gambier mapping, and present conditions for its integrability. Finally, we obtain the reductions of the Gambier mapping, identify their integrable forms and compute their continuous limits.

  14. MAPS Image Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    SUMMARY MICRO-ADAPTIVE PICTURE SEQUENCING (MAPS) is a digital image data compression technique which originated at Control Data Corporation and underwent...w w Figure 1-3. Test Imagery Set 6 L.( The MAPS process is clearly sensitive to contrast but not to the Mean gray scale in the image . Thus, all images ...BUFFERED WORD TRANSFER RATES image processing Typical computa- tional functions which can be solved e DUAL 16-BIT INTERNAL DATA BUS SYSTEM with this

  15. Equine trait mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Lisa S.

    2012-01-01

    Assigning function to genes is essential for a better understanding of biological systems. To date, approximately half of the genes in the vertebrate genome have known function. Domestic animals are a rich source for trait mapping and in this thesis we have mapped three distinct equine phenotypes. The result provides increased knowledge regarding gene function and importantly, practical implications for horse welfare. In paper I and IV, we confirm that Equine Multiple Congenita...

  16. The National Map product and services directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    As one of the cornerstones of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Geospatial Program (NGP), The National Map is a collaborative effort among the USGS and other Federal, state, and local partners to improve and deliver topographic information for the Nation. It has many uses ranging from recreation to scientific analysis to emergency response. The National Map is easily accessible for display on the Web, as products, and as downloadable data. The geographic information available from The National Map includes orthoimagery (aerial photographs), elevation, geographic names, hydrography, boundaries, transportation, structures, and land cover. Other types of geographic information can be added to create specific types of maps. Of major importance, The National Map currently is being transformed to better serve the geospatial community. The USGS National Geospatial Program Office (NGPO) was established to provide leadership for placing geographic knowledge at the fingertips of the Nation. The office supports The National Map, Geospatial One-Stop (GOS), National Atlas of the United States®, and the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC). This integrated portfolio of geospatial information and data supports the essential components of delivering the National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI) and capitalizing on the power of place.

  17. The National Map - Orthoimagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauck, James; Brown, Kim; Carswell, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Orthorectified digital aerial photographs and satellite images of 1-meter (m) pixel resolution or finer make up the orthoimagery component of The National Map. The process of orthorectification removes feature displacements and scale variations caused by terrain relief and sensor geometry. The result is a combination of the image characteristics of an aerial photograph or satellite image and the geometric qualities of a map. These attributes allow users to: *Measure distance *Calculate areas *Determine shapes of features *Calculate directions *Determine accurate coordinates *Determine land cover and use *Perform change detection *Update maps The standard digital orthoimage is a 1-m or finer resolution, natural color or color infra-red product. Most are now produced as GeoTIFFs and accompanied by a Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC)-compliant metadata file. The primary source for 1-m data is the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) leaf-on imagery. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) utilizes NAIP imagery as the image layer on its 'Digital- Map' - a new generation of USGS topographic maps (http://nationalmap.gov/digital_map). However, many Federal, State, and local governments and organizations require finer resolutions to meet a myriad of needs. Most of these images are leaf-off, natural-color products at resolutions of 1-foot (ft) or finer.

  18. Geologic Mapping of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingst, R. A.; Mest, S. C.; Berman, D. C.; Garry, W. B.; Williams, D. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Jaumann, R.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Frigeri, A.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We report on a preliminary global geologic map of Vesta, based on data from the Dawn spacecraft's High- Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and informed by Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) data. This map is part of an iterative mapping effort; the geologic map has been refined with each improvement in resolution. Vesta has a heavily-cratered surface, with large craters evident in numerous locations. The south pole is dominated by an impact structure identified before Dawn's arrival. Two large impact structures have been resolved: the younger, larger Rheasilvia structure, and the older, more degraded Veneneia structure. The surface is also characterized by a system of deep, globe-girdling equatorial troughs and ridges, as well as an older system of troughs and ridges to the north. Troughs and ridges are also evident cutting across, and spiraling arcuately from, the Rheasilvia central mound. However, no volcanic features have been unequivocally identified. Vesta can be divided very broadly into three terrains: heavily-cratered terrain; ridge-and-trough terrain (equatorial and northern); and terrain associated with the Rheasilvia crater. Localized features include bright and dark material and ejecta (some defined specifically by color); lobate deposits; and mass-wasting materials. No obvious volcanic features are evident. Stratigraphy of Vesta's geologic units suggests a history in which formation of a primary crust was followed by the formation of impact craters, including Veneneia and the associated Saturnalia Fossae unit. Formation of Rheasilvia followed, along with associated structural deformation that shaped the Divalia Fossae ridge-and-trough unit at the equator. Subsequent impacts and mass wasting events subdued impact craters, rims and portions of ridge-and-trough sets, and formed slumps and landslides, especially within crater floors and along crater rims and scarps. Subsequent to the formation of Rheasilvia, discontinuous low-albedo deposits formed or were

  19. Statistical Distance For Chaotic Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Johal, R S

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this letter is to define a distance on the underlying phase space of a chaotic map, based on natural invariant density of the map. It is observed that for logistic map this distance is equivalent to Wootters' statistical distance. This distance becomes the Euclidean distance for a map with constant invariant density.

  20. Space mapping and defect correction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Echeverría, D.; Hemker, P.W.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we show that space-mapping optimization can be understood in the framework of defect correction. Then, space-mapping algorithms can be seen as special cases of defect correction iteration. In order to analyze the properties of space mapping and the space-mapping function, we introduce

  1. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  2. Mapping of panda plumage color locus on the microsatellite linkage map of the Japanese quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizutani Makoto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Panda (s is an autosomal recessive mutation, which displays overall white plumage color with spots of wild-type plumage in the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica. In a previous study, the s locus was included in the same linkage group as serum albumin (Alb and vitamin-D binding protein (GC which are mapped on chicken (Gallus gallus chromosome 4 (GGA4. In this study, we mapped the s locus on the microsatellite linkage map of the Japanese quail by linkage analysis. Results Segregation data on the s locus were obtained from three-generation families (n = 106. Two microsatellite markers derived from the Japanese quail chromosome 4 (CJA04 and three microsatellite markers derived from GGA4 were genotyped in the three-generation families. We mapped the s locus between GUJ0026 and ABR0544 on CJA04. By comparative mapping with chicken, this locus was mapped between 10.0 Mb and 14.5 Mb region on GGA4. In this region, the endothelin receptor B subtype 2 gene (EDNRB2, an avian-specific paralog of the mammalian endothelin receptor B gene (EDNRB, is located. Because EDNRB is responsible for aganglionic megacolon and spot coat color in mouse, rat and equine, EDNRB2 is suggested to be a candidate gene for the s locus. Conclusion The s locus and the five microsatellite markers were mapped on CJA04 of the Japanese quail. EDNRB2 was suggested to be a candidate gene for the s locus.

  3. Introduction to "Mapping Vietnameseness"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hue-Tam Ho Tai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vietnam and China are currently engaged in a map war, with each country using ancient maps to buttress its claims to territorial sovereignty over some uninhabited islands in the South China Sea (in Chinese terminology, also known as the Eastern Sea (in Vietnamese. But what do maps in fact represent? What is meant by “territory”? How are territorial limits conceived? These questions were raised in a May 2015 workshop inspired by Thongchai Winichakul’s Siam Mapped: A History of the Geo-Body of a Nation (1994, a groundbreaking book that traces the transformation of Thai geographical consciousness as a result of Siam’s encounter with Western powers in the nineteenth century. While many of Thongchai’s insights apply to the Vietnamese case, as the first of the three articles included in this special issue of Cross-Currents shows, some of the 2015 workshop participants’ conclusions departed from his, especially regarding the formation of a Vietnamese geographical consciousness before the colonial period.[i] This is true of the other two papers, which focus specifically on the construction of borders and the associated production of maps in the nineteenth century before French colonial conquest... Notes 1 Thanks are due to the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Change in Gottingen, Germany, for its gracious hosting and generous funding of the conference, together with the Asia Center of Harvard University.

  4. Iconicity as structure mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmorey, Karen

    2014-09-19

    Linguistic and psycholinguistic evidence is presented to support the use of structure-mapping theory as a framework for understanding effects of iconicity on sign language grammar and processing. The existence of structured mappings between phonological form and semantic mental representations has been shown to explain the nature of metaphor and pronominal anaphora in sign languages. With respect to processing, it is argued that psycholinguistic effects of iconicity may only be observed when the task specifically taps into such structured mappings. In addition, language acquisition effects may only be observed when the relevant cognitive abilities are in place (e.g. the ability to make structural comparisons) and when the relevant conceptual knowledge has been acquired (i.e. information key to processing the iconic mapping). Finally, it is suggested that iconicity is better understood as a structured mapping between two mental representations than as a link between linguistic form and human experience. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Mapping sequences by parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guziolowski Carito

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: We present the N-map method, a pairwise and asymmetrical approach which allows us to compare sequences by taking into account evolutionary events that produce shuffled, reversed or repeated elements. Basically, the optimal N-map of a sequence s over a sequence t is the best way of partitioning the first sequence into N parts and placing them, possibly complementary reversed, over the second sequence in order to maximize the sum of their gapless alignment scores. Results: We introduce an algorithm computing an optimal N-map with time complexity O (|s| × |t| × N using O (|s| × |t| × N memory space. Among all the numbers of parts taken in a reasonable range, we select the value N for which the optimal N-map has the most significant score. To evaluate this significance, we study the empirical distributions of the scores of optimal N-maps and show that they can be approximated by normal distributions with a reasonable accuracy. We test the functionality of the approach over random sequences on which we apply artificial evolutionary events. Practical Application: The method is illustrated with four case studies of pairs of sequences involving non-standard evolutionary events.

  6. Web Interactive Campus Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marylene S. Eder

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interactive campus map is a web based application that can be accessed through a web browser. With the Google Map Application Programming Interface availability of the overlay function has been taken advantage to create custom map functionalities. Collection of building points were gathered for routing and to create polygons which serves as a representation of each building. The previous campus map provides a static visual representation of the campus. It uses legends building name and its corresponding building number in providing information. Due to its limited capabilities it became a realization to the researchers to create an interactive campus map.Storing data about the building room and staff information and university events and campus guide are among the primary features that this study has to offer. Interactive Web-based Campus Information System is intended in providing a Campus Information System.It is open to constant updates user-friendly for both trained and untrained users and capable of responding to all needs of users and carrying out analyses. Based on the data gathered through questionnaires researchers analyzed the results of the test survey and proved that the system is user friendly deliver information to users and the important features that the students expect.

  7. Sri Lanka Malaria Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Hoek Wim

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a relatively good national case reporting system in Sri Lanka, detailed maps of malaria distribution have not been publicly available. Methods In this study, monthly records over the period 1995 – 2000 of microscopically confirmed malaria parasite positive blood film readings, at sub-district spatial resolution, were used to produce maps of malaria distribution across the island. Also, annual malaria trends at district resolution were displayed for the period 1995 – 2002. Results The maps show that Plasmodium vivax malaria incidence has a marked variation in distribution over the island. The incidence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria follows a similar spatial pattern but is generally much lower than that of P. vivax. In the north, malaria shows one seasonal peak in the beginning of the year, whereas towards the south a second peak around June is more pronounced. Conclusion This paper provides the first publicly available maps of both P. vivax and P. falciparum malaria incidence distribution on the island of Sri Lanka at sub-district resolution, which may be useful to health professionals, travellers and travel medicine professionals in their assessment of malaria risk in Sri Lanka. As incidence of malaria changes over time, regular updates of these maps are necessary.

  8. Decomposition Bounds for Marginal MAP

    OpenAIRE

    PING, WEI; Liu,Qiang; Ihler, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Marginal MAP inference involves making MAP predictions in systems defined with latent variables or missing information. It is significantly more difficult than pure marginalization and MAP tasks, for which a large class of efficient and convergent variational algorithms, such as dual decomposition, exist. In this work, we generalize dual decomposition to a generic power sum inference task, which includes marginal MAP, along with pure marginalization and MAP, as special cases. Our method is ba...

  9. Map display design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aretz, Anthony J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a cognitive model of a pilot's navigation task and describes an experiment comparing a visual momentum map display to the traditional track-up and north-up approaches. The data show the advantage to a track-up map is its congruence with the ego-centered forward view; however, the development of survey knowledge is hindered by the inconsistency of the rotating display. The stable alignment of a north-up map aids the acquisition of survey knowledge, but there is a cost associated with the mental rotation of the display to a track-up alignment for ego-centered tasks. The results also show that visual momentum can be used to reduce the mental rotation costs of a north-up display.

  10. Extending rational maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gaven J.

    We investigate when a rational endomorphism of the Riemann sphere overline{C} extends to a mapping of the upper half-space {H3 which is rational with respect to some measurable conformal structure. Such an extension has the property that it and all its iterates have uniformly bounded distortion. Such maps are called uniformly quasiregular. We show that, in the space of rational mappings of degree d , such an extension is possible in the structurally stable component where there is a single (attracting) component of the Fatou set and the Julia set is a Cantor set. We show that generally outside of this set no such extension is possible. In particular, polynomials can never admit such an extension.

  11. Web GIS in practice III: creating a simple interactive map of England's Strategic Health Authorities using Google Maps API, Google Earth KML, and MSN Virtual Earth Map Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Maged N Kamel

    2005-09-21

    This eye-opener article aims at introducing the health GIS community to the emerging online consumer geoinformatics services from Google and Microsoft (MSN), and their potential utility in creating custom online interactive health maps. Using the programmable interfaces provided by Google and MSN, we created three interactive demonstrator maps of England's Strategic Health Authorities. These can be browsed online at http://www.healthcybermap.org/GoogleMapsAPI/ - Google Maps API (Application Programming Interface) version, http://www.healthcybermap.org/GoogleEarthKML/ - Google Earth KML (Keyhole Markup Language) version, and http://www.healthcybermap.org/MSNVirtualEarth/ - MSN Virtual Earth Map Control version. Google and MSN's worldwide distribution of "free" geospatial tools, imagery, and maps is to be commended as a significant step towards the ultimate "wikification" of maps and GIS. A discussion is provided of these emerging online mapping trends, their expected future implications and development directions, and associated individual privacy, national security and copyrights issues. Although ESRI have announced their planned response to Google (and MSN), it remains to be seen how their envisaged plans will materialize and compare to the offerings from Google and MSN, and also how Google and MSN mapping tools will further evolve in the near future.

  12. Web GIS in practice III: creating a simple interactive map of England's Strategic Health Authorities using Google Maps API, Google Earth KML, and MSN Virtual Earth Map Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulos Maged

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This eye-opener article aims at introducing the health GIS community to the emerging online consumer geoinformatics services from Google and Microsoft (MSN, and their potential utility in creating custom online interactive health maps. Using the programmable interfaces provided by Google and MSN, we created three interactive demonstrator maps of England's Strategic Health Authorities. These can be browsed online at http://www.healthcybermap.org/GoogleMapsAPI/ – Google Maps API (Application Programming Interface version, http://www.healthcybermap.org/GoogleEarthKML/ – Google Earth KML (Keyhole Markup Language version, and http://www.healthcybermap.org/MSNVirtualEarth/ – MSN Virtual Earth Map Control version. Google and MSN's worldwide distribution of "free" geospatial tools, imagery, and maps is to be commended as a significant step towards the ultimate "wikification" of maps and GIS. A discussion is provided of these emerging online mapping trends, their expected future implications and development directions, and associated individual privacy, national security and copyrights issues. Although ESRI have announced their planned response to Google (and MSN, it remains to be seen how their envisaged plans will materialize and compare to the offerings from Google and MSN, and also how Google and MSN mapping tools will further evolve in the near future.

  13. Declarative and Scalable Selection for Map Visualizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kefaloukos, Pimin Konstantin Balic

    supports the PostgreSQL dialect of SQL. The prototype implementation is a compiler that translates CVL into SQL and stored procedures. (c) TileHeat is a framework and basic algorithm for partial materialization of hot tile sets for scalable map distribution. The framework predicts future map workloads......, there are indications that the method is scalable for databases that contain millions of records, especially if the target language of the compiler is substituted by a cluster-ready variant of SQL. While several realistic use cases for maps have been implemented in CVL, additional non-geographic data visualization uses...... goal. The results for Tileheat show that the prediction method offers a substantial improvement over the current method used by the Danish Geodata Agency. Thus, a large amount of computations can potentially be saved by this public institution, who is responsible for the distribution of government...

  14. Burn Severity Mapping in Australia 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, R.; Clark, J.; Lecker, J.

    2012-07-01

    In 2009, the Victoria Department of Sustainability and Environment estimated approximately 430,000 hectares of Victoria Australia were burned by numerous bushfires. Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) teams from the United States were deployed to Victoria to assist local fire managers. The U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center (USGS/EROS) and U.S. Forest Service Remote Sensing Applications Center (USFS/RSAC) aided the support effort by providing satellite-derived "soil burn severity " maps for over 280,000 burned hectares. In the United States, BAER teams are assembled to make rapid assessments of burned lands to identify potential hazards to public health and property. An early step in the assessment process is the creation of a soil burn severity map used to identify hazard areas and prioritize treatment locations. These maps are developed primarily using Landsat satellite imagery and the differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) algorithm.

  15. BURN SEVERITY MAPPING IN AUSTRALIA 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. McKinley

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, the Victoria Department of Sustainability and Environment estimated approximately 430,000 hectares of Victoria Australia were burned by numerous bushfires. Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER teams from the United States were deployed to Victoria to assist local fire managers. The U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center (USGS/EROS and U.S. Forest Service Remote Sensing Applications Center (USFS/RSAC aided the support effort by providing satellite-derived "soil burn severity " maps for over 280,000 burned hectares. In the United States, BAER teams are assembled to make rapid assessments of burned lands to identify potential hazards to public health and property. An early step in the assessment process is the creation of a soil burn severity map used to identify hazard areas and prioritize treatment locations. These maps are developed primarily using Landsat satellite imagery and the differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR algorithm.

  16. Burn severity mapping in Australia 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Randy; Clark, J.; Lecker, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, the Victoria Department of Sustainability and Environment estimated approximately 430,000 hectares of Victoria Australia were burned by numerous bushfires. Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) teams from the United States were deployed to Victoria to assist local fire managers. The U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center (USGS/EROS) and U.S. Forest Service Remote Sensing Applications Center (USFS/RSAC) aided the support effort by providing satellite-derived "soil burn severity " maps for over 280,000 burned hectares. In the United States, BAER teams are assembled to make rapid assessments of burned lands to identify potential hazards to public health and property. An early step in the assessment process is the creation of a soil burn severity map used to identify hazard areas and prioritize treatment locations. These maps are developed primarily using Landsat satellite imagery and the differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) algorithm.

  17. Mapping the Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goerres, Achim; Vanhuysse, Pieter

    2012-01-01

    Whereas the call for a political science based study of older people and ageing is not new (Cutler 1977; Heclo 1988), relatively little unified progress has been made so far. This chapter maps the field of generational politics and introduces our edited volume "Ageing Populations in Post-Industri......Whereas the call for a political science based study of older people and ageing is not new (Cutler 1977; Heclo 1988), relatively little unified progress has been made so far. This chapter maps the field of generational politics and introduces our edited volume "Ageing Populations in Post...

  18. Mapping Deviant Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    research field but it is afflicted by a notable problem, viz. the lack of a consensus as to which countries are actually instances of deviant democracy. The present article attempts to solve this problem by carrying out a comprehensive mapping of deviant democracies. First, I review the existing literature...... to provide an overview of the cases most often identified as deviant democracies. Second, I use a large-N analysis to systematically map deviant democracies. The analysis includes 159 countries covering the time period 1993–2008. The analysis points to 12 cases that merits further attention, viz...

  19. Mapping the gendered city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almahmood, Mohammed Abdulrahman M; Scharnhorst, Eric; Carstensen, Trine Agervig

    2017-01-01

    Peninsula, where socio-cultural values and restrictions regulate men and women’s use and access to public spaces. The methodology used is a combination of movement tracking data using GPS technology and map-based workshops where participants can reflect on their walking behaviour and spatial preferences....... The results of mapping where the respondents walk show a city consisting of gender-specific walkscapes. Indoor environments, such as shopping malls, function as ‘urban shelters’ for women, so they use such spaces for walking. On the other hand, young men mainly walk in urban streets, which provide greater...

  20. Learning Bing maps API

    CERN Document Server

    Sinani, Artan

    2013-01-01

    This is a practical, hands-on guide with illustrative examples, which will help you explore the vast universe of Bing maps.If you are a developer who wants to learn how to exploit the numerous features of Bing Maps then this book is ideal for you. It can also be useful for more experienced developers who wish to explore other areas of the APIs. It is assumed that you have some knowledge of JavaScript, HTML, and CSS. For some chapters a working knowledge of .Net and Visual Studio is also needed.

  1. Graphene Conductance Uniformity Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Bøggild, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a combination of micro four-point probe (M4PP) and non-contact terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) measurements for centimeter scale quantitative mapping of the sheet conductance of large area chemical vapor deposited graphene films. Dual configuration M4PP measurements......, demonstrated on graphene for the first time, provide valuable statistical insight into the influence of microscale defects on the conductance, while THz-TDS has potential as a fast, non-contact metrology method for mapping of the spatially averaged nanoscopic conductance on wafer-scale graphene with scan times......, dominating the microscale conductance of the investigated graphene film....

  2. Volcanic Hazard Maps; the results and progress made by the IAVCEI Hazard Map working group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Eliza; Lindsay, Jan; Wright, Heather

    2017-04-01

    The IAVCEI Commission on Volcanic Hazards and Risk set up a working group on Hazard Maps in 2014. Since then, the group has led or co-organised three major workshops, and organized two thematic conference sessions. In particular we have initiated a series of workshops, named the "State of the Hazard Map" which we plan to continue (the first was held at COV8 (State of the Hazard Map 1) and second at COV9 (State of the Hazard Map 2) and the third will be held at IAVCEI General Assembly in Portland. The broad aim of these activities is to work towards an IAVCEI-endorsed considerations or guidelines document for volcanic hazard map generation. The workshops have brought together people from around the world working on volcanic hazard maps, and have had four primary objectives: 1) to review (and collect further data on) the diverse variety of methods and rationales currently used to develop maps; 2) to openly discuss approaches and experiences regarding how hazard maps are interpreted and used by different groups; 3) to discuss and prepare the IAVCEI Guidelines document; and lastly, 4) Discuss options for finalizing, publishing and disseminating the Guidelines document (e.g. wiki, report, open-source publication). This presentation will provide an update of the results and outcomes of those initiatives. This includes brief outcomes of the reviews undertaken, a survey that has been constructed in order to gather additional data, the planned structure for the guidelines documents and a summary of the key findings to date. The majority of the participants of these activities so far have come from volcano observatories or geological surveys, as these institutions commonly have primary responsibility for making operational hazard map. It is important however that others in the scientific community that work on quantification of volcanic hazard contribute to these guidelines. We therefore invite interested parties to become involved.

  3. Mapping the Views of Adolescent Health Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewan, Lindsay A; McLinden, Daniel; Biro, Frank; DeJonckheere, Melissa; Vaughn, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Health research that includes youth and family stakeholders increases the contextual relevance of findings, which can benefit both the researchers and stakeholders involved. The goal of this study was to identify youth and family adolescent health priorities and to explore strategies to address these concerns. Stakeholders identified important adolescent health concerns, perceptions of which were then explored using concept mapping. Concept mapping is a mixed-method participatory research approach that invites input from various stakeholders. In response to prompts, stakeholders suggested ways to address the identified health conditions. Adolescent participants then sorted the statements into groups based on content similarity and rated the statements for importance and feasibility. Multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis were then applied to create the concept maps. Stakeholders identified sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and obesity as the health conditions they considered most important. The concept map for STIs identified 7 clusters: General sex education, support and empowerment, testing and treatment, community involvement and awareness, prevention and protection, parental involvement in sex education, and media. The obesity concept map portrayed 8 clusters: Healthy food choices, obesity education, support systems, clinical and community involvement, community support for exercise, physical activity, nutrition support, and nutrition education. Ratings were generally higher for importance than for feasibility. The concept maps demonstrate stakeholder-driven ideas about approaches to target STIs and obesity in this context. Strategies at multiple social ecological levels were emphasized. The concept maps can be used to generate discussion regarding these topics and to identify interventions. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. 49 CFR 1152.13 - Amendment of the system diagram map or narrative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Amendment of the system diagram map or narrative... map or narrative. (a) Each carrier shall be responsible for maintaining the continuing accuracy of its system diagram map and the accompanying line descriptions or narrative. Amendments may be filed at any...

  5. Outcome mapping for health system integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsasis, Peter; Evans, Jenna M; Forrest, David; Jones, Richard Keith

    2013-01-01

    Health systems around the world are implementing integrated care strategies to improve quality, reduce or maintain costs, and improve the patient experience. Yet few practical tools exist to aid leaders and managers in building the prerequisites to integrated care, namely a shared vision, clear roles and responsibilities, and a common understanding of how the vision will be realized. Outcome mapping may facilitate stakeholder alignment on the vision, roles, and processes of integrated care delivery via participative and focused dialogue among diverse stakeholders on desired outcomes and enabling actions. In this paper, we describe an outcome-mapping exercise we conducted at a Local Health Integration Network in Ontario, Canada, using consensus development conferences. Our preliminary findings suggest that outcome mapping may help stakeholders make sense of a complex system and foster collaborative capital, a resource that can support information sharing, trust, and coordinated change toward integration across organizational and professional boundaries. Drawing from the theoretical perspectives of complex adaptive systems and collaborative capital, we also outline recommendations for future outcome-mapping exercises. In particular, we emphasize the potential for outcome mapping to be used as a tool not only for identifying and linking strategic outcomes and actions, but also for studying the boundaries, gaps, and ties that characterize social networks across the continuum of care.

  6. Historical Topographic Map Collection bookmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishburn, Kristin A.; Allord, Gregory J.

    2017-06-29

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program is scanning published USGS 1:250,000-scale and larger topographic maps printed between 1884, the inception of the topographic mapping program, and 2006. The goal of this project, which began publishing the historical scanned maps in 2011, is to provide a digital repository of USGS topographic maps, available to the public at no cost. For more than 125 years, USGS topographic maps have accurately portrayed the complex geography of the Nation. The USGS is the Nation’s largest producer of printed topographic maps, and prior to 2006, USGS topographic maps were created using traditional cartographic methods and printed using a lithographic printing process. As the USGS continues the release of a new generation of topographic maps (US Topo) in electronic form, the topographic map remains an indispensable tool for government, science, industry, land management planning, and leisure.

  7. Bike Map Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — Chapel Hill Bike Map Lines from KMZ file.This data came from the wiki comment board for the public, not an “official map” showing the Town of Chapel Hill's plans or...

  8. Jamaica on Early Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richason, Benjamin F., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Columbus sighted Jamaica during his second voyage and was marooned there for more than a year during his fourth. The succession of early maps of Jamaica betrays its slow development and its unimportance to early colonizers. Modern tourism is the elusive "gold" which the Spanish fortune hunters did not find. (CS)

  9. Mapping Joint Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawski, Carl

    The flow diagrams in this document provide cognitive maps to aid in synthesizing diverse areas of knowledge in a special brand of field theory. A model is presented which highlights the domains of structural functionalism (with concepts of cultural, personal and societal systems) and symbolic interactionism (with the concepts of self, sentiments…

  10. Body Mole Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    DETECT Skin Cancer: Body Mole Map Follow these instructions regularly for a thorough skin-exam: 1. Learn what to look for 2. Examine ... taking note of all the spots on your body, from moles to freckles to age spots. Skin ...

  11. Maps between Grassmann manifolds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parameswaran Sankaran Institute of Mathematical Sciences Chennai, India sankaran@imsc.res.in Indian Academy of Sciences Platinum Jubilee Meeting Hyderabad

    Maps between Grassmann manifolds. Parameswaran Sankaran. Institute of Mathematical Sciences. Chennai, India sankaran@imsc.res.in. Indian Academy of Sciences. Platinum Jubilee Meeting. Hyderabad. 2nd July, 2009. Parameswaran Sankaran Institute of Mathematical Sciences Chennai, India sankaran@imsc.res.in.

  12. Customized hazard maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    Finding out about the historic occurrence of six different types of natural hazards in any region in the United States recently became a little easier.A Project Impact initiative of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and ESRI—a leading provider of Geographic Information System (GIS) software and a Project Impact partner—offers the public customized online hazard maps.

  13. Maps and navigation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, A

    1922-01-01

    Different maps and scales are discussed with particular emphasis on their use in aviation. The author makes the observation that current navigation methods are slow and dangerous and should be replaced by scientific methods of navigation based on loxodromy and the use of the compass.

  14. European Psychology Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANA SCHÖN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID compiled an extensive list of European psycho-logical organizations, comprised of university departments, research institutions, professional associa-tions and publishing houses. The list is available on the ZPID website, together with a web mapping applet that indicates the exact geographical location of the organizations.

  15. International Haplotype Mapping Project

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    blocks thai allow efficient use of the gnome sequence for association studies. In order to realize the objective of creating a functional haplotype map that would be useful for most, if not all of the world's population, the. International ЫарМар Consortium was formed in. July 2001 and the project initiated in October 2002l0.

  16. Mapping of nitrogen risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blicher-Mathiesen, Gitte; Andersen, Hans Estrup; Carstensen, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    risk mapping part of the tool, we combined a modelled root zone N leaching with a catchment-specific N reduction factor which in combination determines the N load to the marine recipient. N leaching was calculated using detailed information of agricultural management from national databases as well...

  17. Mapping eParticipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jeremy; Sanford, Clive Carlton

    2007-01-01

    Participation. We develop a definitional schema that suggests different ways of understanding an emerging socio-technical research area and use this schema to map the research contributions identified. This allows us make an initial sketch of the scientific character of the area and its central concerns, theories...

  18. eMAPS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    Starting with the 2005 performance appraisal and advancement exercise (MAPS), the paper version of the annual appraisal report has been replaced by an electronic EDH version - eMAPS (see Weekly Bulletin 48/2004). As announced in Weekly Bulletin 2/2005, information sessions to explain the features of eMAPS using EDH have been arranged as follows: 18 January 2005: Main Auditorium (500-1-001) from 14:00 to 15:30. 20 January 2005: AB Auditorium II (864-1-D02) from 14:00 to 15:30. 24 January 2005: AT Auditorium (30-7-018) from 10:00 to 11:30. The changeover to an electronic appraisal report is designed to reduce the administrative workload involving, e.g. photocopying, tracing and filing paper copies, while allowing staff members and their hierarchy access to the report form at the appropriate times. There is no change in the procedure for the annual interview and the advancement exercise, though Administrative Circular No 26 (Rev. 5) has been updated to take account of the introduction of eMAPS. The content...

  19. Ramachandran and his Map

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 10. Ramachandran and his Map. C Ramakrishnan. General Article Volume 6 Issue 10 October 2001 pp 48-56. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/10/0048-0056. Author Affiliations.

  20. Mapping the Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus-Rødje, Nina

    2012-01-01

    As the utilization of various e-voting technologies has notably increased in the past few years, so has the amount of publications on experiences with these technologies. This article, will, therefore map the literature while highlighting some of the important topics discussed within the field of e...

  1. 2004 Alaska Lidar Mapping

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data sets are generated using the OPTECH ALTM 70 kHz LIDAR system mounted onboard AeroMap's twin-engine Cessna 320 aircraft. Classified data sets such as this...

  2. The Proteogenomic Mapping Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandass Yoginder S

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput mass spectrometry (MS proteomics data is increasingly being used to complement traditional structural genome annotation methods. To keep pace with the high speed of experimental data generation and to aid in structural genome annotation, experimentally observed peptides need to be mapped back to their source genome location quickly and exactly. Previously, the tools to do this have been limited to custom scripts designed by individual research groups to analyze their own data, are generally not widely available, and do not scale well with large eukaryotic genomes. Results The Proteogenomic Mapping Tool includes a Java implementation of the Aho-Corasick string searching algorithm which takes as input standardized file types and rapidly searches experimentally observed peptides against a given genome translated in all 6 reading frames for exact matches. The Java implementation allows the application to scale well with larger eukaryotic genomes while providing cross-platform functionality. Conclusions The Proteogenomic Mapping Tool provides a standalone application for mapping peptides back to their source genome on a number of operating system platforms with standard desktop computer hardware and executes very rapidly for a variety of datasets. Allowing the selection of different genetic codes for different organisms allows researchers to easily customize the tool to their own research interests and is recommended for anyone working to structurally annotate genomes using MS derived proteomics data.

  3. Extending Lipschitz mappings continuously

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopecká, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2012), s. 167-177 ISSN 1425-6908 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Lipschitz mapping * Hilbert space * extension Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jaa.2012.18.issue-2/jaa-2012-0011/jaa-2012-0011. xml

  4. Mapping the Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, S. D.

    1999-06-01

    Galaxies congregate into clusters, clusters amass into superclusters and so on - at every observed scale, as astronomers build maps of the sky, they find matter organized into clumps. Yet taken as a whole, the texture of the universe is smooth, in keeping with theory. A new "music of the spheres" may explain how ordered structures emerged from the original smooth chaos.

  5. CMB Map Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bobin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the cosmological microwave background is of utmost importance for cosmology. However, its estimation from full-sky surveys such as WMAP or more recently Planck is challenging: CMB maps are generally estimated via the application of some source separation techniques which never prevent the final map from being contaminated with noise and foreground residuals. These spurious contaminations whether noise or foreground residuals are well known to be a plague for most cosmologically relevant tests or evaluations; this includes CMB lensing reconstruction or non-Gaussian signatures search. Noise reduction is generally performed by applying a simple Wiener filter in spherical harmonics; however, this does not account for the non-stationarity of the noise. Foreground contamination is usually tackled by masking the most intense residuals detected in the map, which makes CMB evaluation harder to perform. In this paper, we introduce a novel noise reduction framework coined LIW-Filtering for Linear Iterative Wavelet Filtering which is able to account for the noise spatial variability thanks to a wavelet-based modeling while keeping the highly desired linearity of the Wiener filter. We further show that the same filtering technique can effectively perform foreground contamination reduction thus providing a globally cleaner CMB map. Numerical results on simulated Planck data are provided.

  6. Copenhagen Sonic Experience Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzfeldt, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    In the wake of present European interest for mapping urban noise, it seems increasingly relevant to investigate the multiple ways in which sound intersects with the everyday experiences of urban citizens. Focusing on the polluting effects of infrastructural noise, the EU-initiated project of asse...

  7. Bisimulation and open maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joyal, André; Nielsen, Mogens; Winskel, Glynn

    1993-01-01

    ), and Goltz and van Glabeek (1989). A tie-up with open maps in a (pre)topos brings to light a promising new model, presheaves on categories of pomsets, into which the usual category of labeled event structures embeds fully and faithfully. As an indication of its promise, this new presheaf model has refinement...

  8. Bisimulation from Open Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joyal, André; Nielsen, Mogens; Winskel, Glynn

    1996-01-01

    and van Glabeek and Goltz. A tie-up with open maps in a (pre)topos, as they appear in the work of Joyal and Moerdijk, brings to light a new model, presheaves on categories of pomsets, into which the usual category of labelled event structures embeds fully and faithfully. As an indication of its promise...

  9. Comparative wear mapping techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcock, J.; Sørensen, Ole Toft; Jensen, S.

    1996-01-01

    Pin-on-disc tests of tungsten carbide pins against silicon carbide discs were performed and wear rate, mechanism and friction maps constructed. Correlations were observed between the wear mode and the friction of the pin-disc interface, and between the qualitative incidence of disruptive wear mec...

  10. Comparative wear mapping techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcock, J.; Sørensen, Ole Toft; Jensen, S.

    1996-01-01

    Pin surfaces were analysed by laser profilometry. Two roughness parameters, R(a) and the fractal dimension, were investigated as a first step towards methods of quantitative wear mechanism mapping. Both parameters were analysed for their relationship to the severity and prevalence of a mechanism....

  11. Enridged Contour Maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, Jarke J. van; Telea, Alexandru

    2001-01-01

    The visualization of scalar functions of two variables is a classic and ubiquitous application. We present a new method to visualize such data. The method is based on a non-linear mapping of the function to a height field, followed by visualization as a shaded mountain landscape. The method is easy

  12. Genetic algorithm eclipse mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Halevin, A. V.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we analyse capabilities of eclipse mapping technique, based on genetic algorithm optimization. To model of accretion disk we used the "fire-flies" conception. This model allows us to reconstruct the distribution of radiating medium in the disk using less number of free parameters than in other methods. Test models show that we can achieve good approximation without optimizing techniques.

  13. Personal Food System Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsey, David; Dover, Sally

    2014-01-01

    Personal food system mapping is a practical means to engage community participants and educators in individualized and shared learning about food systems, decisions, and behaviors. Moreover, it is a useful approach for introducing the food system concept, which is somewhat abstract. We developed the approach to capture diversity of personal food…

  14. AIHEC Timeline and Map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribal College Journal, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Plots the history of American Indian Education on a timeline beginning with the Lakota and Cheyenne defeat of Custer at the Battle of Little Big Horn. Marks 1968 charter of Dine College (Arizona) and continues to the upcoming celebration of the 30th anniversary of the American Indian Higher Education Consortium in 2003. Contains map of United…

  15. Photogrammetry and Digital Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Poul

    1998-01-01

    Technical tour to Lithuania, Poland and Estonia for 13 technical staff and managers of State Land Service, HQ, Latvia. Focus on technical aspects and management of geographical data for map production and administration. Visits to state and local government organisations and newly established pri...

  16. Mapping Global Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    The demand to cultivate global citizenship is frequently invoked as central to colleges' and universities' internationalization efforts. However, the term "global citizenship" remains undertheorized in the context of U.S. higher education. This article maps and engages three common global citizenship positions--entrepreneurial, liberal…

  17. GlobalSoilMap for Soil Organic Carbon Mapping and as a Basis for Global Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arrouays, D.; Minasny, B.; McBratney, A.; Grundy, Mike; McKenzie, Neil; Thompson, James; Gimona, Alessandro; Hong, Suk Young; Smith, Scott; Hartemink, A.E.; Chen, Songchao; Martin, Manuel P.; Mulder, V.L.; Richer-de-Forges, A.C.; Odeh, Inakwu; Padarian, José; Lelyk, Glenn; Poggio, Laura; Savin, Igor; Stolbovoy, Vladimir; Leenaars, J.G.B.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.; Montanarella, Luca; Panagos, P.; Hempel, Jon

    2017-01-01

    The demand for information on functional soil properties is high and has increased over time. This is especially true for soil organic carbon (SOC) in the framework of food security and climate change. The GlobalSoilMap consortium was established in response to such a soaring demand for

  18. Mapping Future Education and Training: Group Concept Mapping Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoyanov, Slavi; Hoogveld, Bert; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Stoyanov, S., Hoogveld, A. W. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2010). Mapping Future Education and Training: Group Concept Mapping Study. Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands; EU Forlic project.

  19. USGS Imagery Only Base Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS Imagery Only is a tile cache base map of orthoimagery in The National Map visible to the 1:18,000 scale. Orthoimagery data are typically high resolution images...

  20. Map Manager QTX, cross-platform software for genetic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manly, K F; Cudmore, R H; Meer, J M

    2001-12-01

    Map Manager QTX (QTX) is software for analysis of genetic mapping experiments in experimental plants and animals. It includes functions for mapping both Mendelian and quantitative trait loci. QTX is an enhanced version of Map Manager QT, rewritten with the aid of cross-platform libraries (XVT, Boulder Software Foundry, Inc.), which allow it to be compiled for multiple computer platforms. It currently is distributed for Microsoft Windows and Mac OS and is available at http://mapmgr.roswellpark.org/mmQTX.html.

  1. MULTIMEDIA CARTOGRAPHY: MAPS WITH SOUND DESIGN AND SOUND MAPS

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Medvedev

    2013-01-01

     Today,sound maps is not so popular like other and not so interested for social oriented projects. Basically only these typesof thematic maps are use sound like the way of representation: political, zoogeographical, vegetation, ethnographic isthe most meeting application of sound registration to maps. In this article a new way of presenting the terrain with sound that is designed for interactive maps with audio support for disabled people is described. The method is based on a comparison betw...

  2. An atlas of ShakeMaps for selected global earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Trevor I.; Wald, David J.; Hotovec, Alicia J.; Lin, Kuo-Wan; Earle, Paul S.; Marano, Kristin D.

    2008-01-01

    An atlas of maps of peak ground motions and intensity 'ShakeMaps' has been developed for almost 5,000 recent and historical global earthquakes. These maps are produced using established ShakeMap methodology (Wald and others, 1999c; Wald and others, 2005) and constraints from macroseismic intensity data, instrumental ground motions, regional topographically-based site amplifications, and published earthquake-rupture models. Applying the ShakeMap methodology allows a consistent approach to combine point observations with ground-motion predictions to produce descriptions of peak ground motions and intensity for each event. We also calculate an estimated ground-motion uncertainty grid for each earthquake. The Atlas of ShakeMaps provides a consistent and quantitative description of the distribution and intensity of shaking for recent global earthquakes (1973-2007) as well as selected historic events. As such, the Atlas was developed specifically for calibrating global earthquake loss estimation methodologies to be used in the U.S. Geological Survey Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) Project. PAGER will employ these loss models to rapidly estimate the impact of global earthquakes as part of the USGS National Earthquake Information Center's earthquake-response protocol. The development of the Atlas of ShakeMaps has also led to several key improvements to the Global ShakeMap system. The key upgrades include: addition of uncertainties in the ground motion mapping, introduction of modern ground-motion prediction equations, improved estimates of global seismic-site conditions (VS30), and improved definition of stable continental region polygons. Finally, we have merged all of the ShakeMaps in the Atlas to provide a global perspective of earthquake ground shaking for the past 35 years, allowing comparison with probabilistic hazard maps. The online Atlas and supporting databases can be found at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/shakemap/atlas.php/.

  3. Construction of microsatellite-based linkage map and mapping of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Gossypium tomentosum, a wild tetraploid cotton species with AD genomes, possesses genes conferring strong fibers and high heat tolerance. ... We detected 420 common loci (186 in the At subgenome and 234 in Dt) between the HT map and the map of TM-1 (G. hirsutum) and Hai 7124 (G. barbadense; HB map).

  4. MapEdit: solution to continuous raster map creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rančić, Dejan; Djordjevi-Kajan, Slobodanka

    2003-03-01

    The paper describes MapEdit, MS Windows TM software for georeferencing and rectification of scanned paper maps. The software produces continuous raster maps which can be used as background in geographical information systems. Process of continuous raster map creation using MapEdit "mosaicking" function is also described as well as the georeferencing and rectification algorithms which are used in MapEdit. Our approach for georeferencing and rectification using four control points and two linear transformations for each scanned map part, together with nearest neighbor resampling method, represents low cost—high speed solution that produce continuous raster maps with satisfactory quality for many purposes (±1 pixel). Quality assessment of several continuous raster maps at different scales that have been created using our software and methodology, has been undertaken and results are presented in the paper. For the quality control of the produced raster maps we referred to three wide adopted standards: US Standard for Digital Cartographic Data, National Standard for Spatial Data Accuracy and US National Map Accuracy Standard. The results obtained during the quality assessment process are given in the paper and show that our maps meat all three standards.

  5. Mapping Ontario’s Wind Turbines: Challenges and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Christidis

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite rapid and vast development of wind turbines across the Canadian province of Ontario, there is no map available indicating the location of each wind turbine. A map of this nature is crucial for health and environmental risk research and has many applications in other fields. Research examining health and wind turbines is limited by the available maps showing the nearest community to a wind farm as opposed to each unique wind turbine. Data from provincial-level organizations, developers, and municipalities were collected using government development approval documents, planning documents, and data given directly from municipalities and developers. Wind turbines were mapped using Google Earth, coordinate lists, shapefiles, and translating data from other maps. In total, 1,420 wind turbines were mapped from 56 wind farms. The limitations of each data source and mapping method are discussed. There are numerous challenges in creating a map of this nature, for example incorrect inclusion of wind farms and inaccuracies in wind turbine locations. The resultant map is the first of its kind to be discussed in the literature, can be used for a variety of health and environmental risk studies to assess dose-response, wind turbine density, visibility, and to create sound and vibration models.

  6. Mapping earthworm communities in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; Orgiazzi, A.; Gardi, C.; Römbke, J.; Jansch, S.; Keith, A.; Neilson, R.; Boag, B.; Schmidt, O.; Murchie, A.K.; Blackshaw, R.P.; Pérès, G.; Cluzeau, D.; Guernion, M.; Briones, M.J.I.; Rodeiro, J.; Pineiro, R.; Diaz Cosin, D.J.; Sousa, J.P.; Suhadolc, M.; Kos, I.; Krogh, P.H.; Faber, J.H.; Mulder, C.; Bogte, J.J.; Wijnen, van H.J.; Schouten, A.J.; Zwart, de D.

    2016-01-01

    Existing data sets on earthworm communities in Europe were collected, harmonized, collated, modelled and depicted on a soil biodiversity map. Digital Soil Mapping was applied using multiple regressions relating relatively low density earthworm community data to soil characteristics, land use,

  7. Knowledge Map of Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nenonen, Suvi; Jensen, Per Anker; Lindahl, Göran

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This paper aims to draft a knowledge map of the fragmented and multidisciplinary research of and relevant to FM. Facilities management knowledge map is a tool for presenting what relevant data and knowledge, a.k.a. knowledge, resides in different disciplines. Knowledge mapping is a step...... in creating an inventory of knowledge (i.e. the knowledge base) and developing/improving the processes of knowledge sharing in research, education and practice. Theory Knowledge mapping is discussed in terms of knowledge management. The research is connected to knowledge mapping in the facilities management...... profession, research and education. The knowledge map aims to contrast perspectives on how to map interdisciplinary research. Design/methodology/approach The Knowledge map is based on classification of 83 articles, including volume 2013 of Facilities (40 articles) and of Journal of Facilities Management (21...

  8. NEPR Benthic Habitat Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This benthic habitat map was created from a semi-automated habitat mapping process, using a combination of bathymetry, satellite imagery, aerial imagery and...

  9. -commuting maps and invariant approximations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhoades BE

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We obtain common fixed point results for generalized -nonexpansive -commuting maps. As applications, various best approximation results for this class of maps are derived in the setup of certain metrizable topological vector spaces.

  10. NEPR Geographic Zone Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geographic zone map was created by interpreting satellite and aerial imagery, seafloor topography (bathymetry model), and the new NEPR Benthic Habitat Map...

  11. North America Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Maps contains a surface analysis comprised of plotted weather station observations, isobars indicating low and high-pressure...

  12. RadMap Installation Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    RadMap is an interactive desktop tool featuring a nationwide geographic information systems (GIS) map of long-term radiation monitoring locations across the United States with access to key information about the monitor and the area surrounding it.

  13. Braden River - Aerial Topographic Mapping

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the ortho & LIDAR mapping of the Braden River area, FL. The mapping consists of LIDAR data collection, contour generation, and...

  14. Map projections cartographic information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Grafarend, Erik W; Syffus, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a timely review of map projections including sphere, ellipsoid, rotational surfaces, and geodetic datum transformations. Coverage includes computer vision, and remote sensing space projective mappings in photogrammetry.

  15. Map projections cartographic information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Grafarend, Erik W

    2006-01-01

    In the context of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) the book offers a timely review of map projections (sphere, ellipsoid, rotational surfaces) and geodetic datum transformations. For the needs of photogrammetry, computer vision, and remote sensing space projective mappings are reviewed.

  16. Maps for electron clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubaldo Iriso

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The electron cloud effect has been studied by means of detailed simulation codes that typically track the particles' evolution under the influence of the corresponding electromagnetic forces and fields. In this paper we show that, for the RHIC case, the electron cloud can be treated from an abstract point of view as a bunch to bunch evolution using simple maps. Secondly, we show how this treatment yields a useful conclusion, which is otherwise difficult to obtain: for a fixed number of bunches and total beam current in RHIC, it is possible to determine the best way to distribute the bunch pattern around the ring to minimize the electron cloud formation. This application is an example of how maps become a useful tool for exploring the electron cloud evolution in parameter space.

  17. Graphene mobility mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2015-01-01

    Carrier mobility and chemical doping level are essential figures of merit for graphene, and large-scale characterization of these properties and their uniformity is a prerequisite for commercialization of graphene for electronics and electrodes. However, existing mapping techniques cannot directly...... assess these vital parameters in a non-destructive way. By deconvoluting carrier mobility and density from non-contact terahertz spectroscopic measurements of conductance in graphene samples with terahertz-transparent backgates, we are able to present maps of the spatial variation of both quantities over...... graphene indicates dominance by charged scatterers. Unexpectedly, significant variations in mobility rather than doping are the cause of large conductance inhomogeneities, highlighting the importance of statistical approaches when assessing large-area graphene transport properties....

  18. Using KML for Thematic Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Sandvik, Bjorn

    2008-01-01

    The use of geobrowsers has increased considerably over the last few years. Thematic mapping has a long history in cartography, but the new geobrowsers (like Google Maps and Earth) tend not to focus on this aspect of geographical information representation. This paper examines how Keyhole Markup Language (KML) can be used for thematic mapping. KML is not targeted towards thematic mapping, but it is possible to use KML elements in ways that were probably not intended. Current possibilities for ...

  19. Quadratic maps without asymptotic measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofbauer, Franz; Keller, Gerhard

    1990-02-01

    An interval map is said to have an asymptotic measure if the time averages of the iterates of Lebesgue measure converge weakly. We construct quadratic maps which have no asymptotic measure. We also find examples of quadratic maps which have an asymptotic measure with very unexpected properties, e.g. a map with the point mass on an unstable fix point as asymptotic measure. The key to our construction is a new characterization of kneading sequences.

  20. Automatic generation of tourist maps

    OpenAIRE

    Grabler, Floraine; Agrawala, Maneesh; Sumner, Robert W.; Pauly, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Tourist maps are essential resources for visitors to an unfamiliar city because they visually highlight landmarks and other points of interest. Yet, hand-designed maps are static representations that cannot adapt to the needs and tastes of the individual tourist. In this paper we present an automated system for designing tourist maps that selects and highlights the information that is most important to tourists. Our system determines the salience of map elements using bottom-up vision-based i...

  1. Mapping the EEZ

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    De, S.; Shashikumar, K.

    . But increasing demand for fuels, metals, and construction materials has in many instances outstripped the production Resources of Indian EEZ A. Living Resources and their use iron, silver, cobalt and gold), 1. Different type of fishes phosphorites 2... sufficient density of data and with artifacts that result from contouring dense data. Thus, a detailed bathymetric mapping of our EEZ is of immediate necessity and with sophisticated state-of-the-art technologies like Multibeam echo sounder...

  2. Mapping Homophobia in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Flood, Michael Gaston; Flood, Michael; Flood, C.; Hamilton, Clive

    2008-01-01

    One-third of the Australian population believe that 'homosexuality is immoral', and this belief is spread in distinct ways across the nation. Using data from a survey of nearly 25,000 Australians, we can 'map' homophobia in Australia. Homophobic attitudes are worst in country areas of Queensland and Tasmania. Men are far more likely than women to feel that homosexuality does not have moral legitimacy, and this gender gap in attitudes persists across age, socioeconomic, educational, and region...

  3. Mapping the Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus-Rødje, Nina

    2012-01-01

    As the utilization of various e-voting technologies has notably increased in the past few years, so has the amount of publications on experiences with these technologies. This article, will, therefore map the literature while highlighting some of the important topics discussed within the field of......-voting. Particular attention will be paid to non-technical dimensions, including socio-cultural, organizational and political dimensions of these implementations....

  4. Old maps online: enabling global access to historical mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Southall, Humphrey; Pridal, P.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last thirty years, map libraries worldwide have scanned some hundreds of thousands of historical maps from their collections, and most are viewable online via the world-wide web. However, maps remain difficult to access because they are individually hard to find: a user needing a map of a given location needs to know which library or libraries to search, and library search interfaces generally require knowledge of map titles: there has been no “Google for old maps”. We review previou...

  5. Refinement of Cadastral Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Berková

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The amended cadastral ordinance takes effect from 1.7. 2009. Until this date the only cadastral maps for which two listsof coordinates for detailed survey points were filed were digitalized cadastral maps in stable cadastre coordinate systems. The entry intoforce of the amended ordinance has introduced the obligation to file these lists in all forms of cadastral maps. We have one file withcoordinates of image and a second one with coordinates of position. The accuracy of the detailed survey points is defined by a qualitycode. The quality code is indicated in only one of the lists: either that of the image coordinates or that of the positional coordinates.The type of quality code depends on the willingness of property owners to sign a substantiating declaration of consent regardingthe demarcation of a boundary line or the refinement of a boundary line. An integral part of the substantiating declaration is a surveysketch. The paper deals with survey sketch variants with regard to the amended ordinance.

  6. Mapping in inertial frames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arunasalam, V.

    1989-05-01

    World space mapping in inertial frames is used to examine the Lorentz covariance of symmetry operations. It is found that the Galilean invariant concepts of simultaneity (S), parity (P), and time reversal symmetry (T) are not Lorentz covariant concepts for inertial observers. That is, just as the concept of simultaneity has no significance independent of the Lorentz inertial frame, likewise so are the concepts of parity and time reversal. However, the world parity (W) (i.e., the space-time reversal symmetry (P-T)) is a truly Lorentz covariant concept. Indeed, it is shown that only those mapping matrices M that commute with the Lorentz transformation matrix L (i.e., (M,L) = 0) are the ones that correspond to manifestly Lorentz covariant operations. This result is in accordance with the spirit of the world space Mach's principle. Since the Lorentz transformation is an orthogonal transformation while the Galilean transformation is not an orthogonal transformation, the formal relativistic space-time mapping theory used here does not have a corresponding non-relativistic counterpart. 12 refs.

  7. Iterative framework radiation hybrid mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building comprehensive radiation hybrid maps for large sets of markers is a computationally expensive process, since the basic mapping problem is equivalent to the traveling salesman problem. The mapping problem is also susceptible to noise, and as a result, it is often beneficial to remove markers ...

  8. Using Playground Maps for Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, A. Vonnie

    2016-01-01

    Many schools now decorate their outside hard surface areas with maps. These maps provide color and excitement to a playground and are a terrific teaching tool for geography. But these maps can easily be integrated into physical education as well to promote both physical activity as well as knowledge of geography. The purpose of this article is to…

  9. Try This: Collaborative Mind Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    In this "Try This" article, students learn about collaborative mind mapping. A mind map is a type of graphic organizer that allows for short ideas to be written and linked to related ideas on a "map." A central idea is placed in the middle of the paper with related ideas connected to the central idea as well as to other ideas.…

  10. Journey Mapping the User Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Sue; Granath, Kim; Alger, Adrienne

    2017-01-01

    This journey-mapping pilot study was designed to determine whether journey mapping is an effective method to enhance the student experience of using the library by assessing our services from their point of view. Journey mapping plots a process or service to produce a visual representation of a library transaction--from the point at which the…

  11. Make Your Own Mashup Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucking, Robert A.; Christmann, Edwin P.; Whiting, Mervyn J.

    2008-01-01

    "Mashup" is a new technology term used to describe a web application that combines data or technology from several different sources. You can apply this concept in your classroom by having students create their own mashup maps. Google Maps provides you with the simple tools, map databases, and online help you'll need to quickly master this…

  12. Map reading, navigating from maps, and the medial temporal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgolites, Zhisen J; Kim, Soyun; Hopkins, Ramona O; Squire, Larry R

    2016-12-13

    We administered map-reading tasks in which participants navigated an array of marks on the floor by following paths on hand-held maps that made up to nine turns. The burden on memory was minimal because the map was always available. Nevertheless, because the map was held in a fixed position in relation to the body, spatial computations were continually needed to transform map coordinates into geographical coordinates as participants followed the maps. Patients with lesions limited to the hippocampus (n = 5) performed similar to controls at all path lengths (experiment 1). They were also intact at executing single moves to an adjacent location, even when trials began by facing in a direction that put the map coordinates and geographical coordinates into conflict (experiment 2). By contrast, one patient with large medial temporal lobe (MTL) lesions performed poorly overall in experiment 1 and poorly in experiment 2 when trials began by facing in the direction that placed the map coordinates and geographical coordinates in maximal conflict. Directly after testing, all patients were impaired at remembering factual details about the task. The findings suggest that the hippocampus is not needed to carry out the spatial computations needed for map reading and navigating from maps. The impairment in map reading associated with large MTL lesions may depend on damage in or near the parahippocampal cortex.

  13. Building maps from maps in primary visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauhaus, Ian; Nielsen, Kristina J

    2014-02-01

    Neurons in the visual system respond to more complex and holistic features at each new stage of processing. Often, these features are organized into continuous maps. Could there be a fundamental link between continuous maps and functional hierarchies? Here, we review recent studies regarding V1 maps providing some of the most noteworthy advances in our understanding of how and why maps exist. In particular, we focus on the common theme that some maps are inherited from the input of parallel pathways, which are then intimately linked to the emergence of new functional properties and their corresponding maps. These results on V1 maps may prove to be a unifying framework for hierarchical representations in the visual cortex. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Geologic map of Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David A.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Crown, David A.; Yff, Jessica A.; Jaeger, Windy L.; Schenk, Paul M.; Geissler, Paul E.; Becker, Tammy L.

    2011-01-01

    Io, discovered by Galileo Galilei on January 7–13, 1610, is the innermost of the four Galilean satellites of the planet Jupiter (Galilei, 1610). It is the most volcanically active object in the Solar System, as recognized by observations from six National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) spacecraft: Voyager 1 (March 1979), Voyager 2 (July 1979), Hubble Space Telescope (1990–present), Galileo (1996–2001), Cassini (December 2000), and New Horizons (February 2007). The lack of impact craters on Io in any spacecraft images at any resolution attests to the high resurfacing rate (1 cm/yr) and the dominant role of active volcanism in shaping its surface. High-temperature hot spots detected by the Galileo Solid-State Imager (SSI), Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS), and Photopolarimeter-Radiometer (PPR) usually correlate with darkest materials on the surface, suggesting active volcanism. The Voyager flybys obtained complete coverage of Io's subjovian hemisphere at 500 m/pixel to 2 km/pixel, and most of the rest of the satellite at 5–20 km/pixel. Repeated Galileo flybys obtained complementary coverage of Io's antijovian hemisphere at 5 m/pixel to 1.4 km/pixel. Thus, the Voyager and Galileo data sets were merged to enable the characterization of the whole surface of the satellite at a consistent resolution. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) produced a set of four global mosaics of Io in visible wavelengths at a spatial resolution of 1 km/pixel, released in February 2006, which we have used as base maps for this new global geologic map. Much has been learned about Io's volcanism, tectonics, degradation, and interior since the Voyager flybys, primarily during and following the Galileo Mission at Jupiter (December 1995–September 2003), and the results have been summarized in books published after the end of the Galileo Mission. Our mapping incorporates this new understanding to assist in map unit definition and to provide a global synthesis

  15. Comparison of MAPIE versus MAP in patients with a poor response to preoperative chemotherapy for newly diagnosed high-grade osteosarcoma (EURAMOS-1): an open-label, international, randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marina, Neyssa M.; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Bielack, Stefan S.; Bernstein, Mark; Jovic, Gordana; Krailo, Mark D.; Hook, Jane M.; Arndt, Carola; van den Berg, Henk; Brennan, Bernadette; Brichard, Bénédicte; Brown, Ken L. B.; Butterfass-Bahloul, Trude; Calaminus, Gabriele; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.; Eriksson, Mikael; Gebhardt, Mark C.; Gelderblom, Hans; Gerss, Joachim; Goldsby, Robert; Goorin, Allen; Gorlick, Richard; Grier, Holcombe E.; Hale, Juliet P.; Hall, Kirsten Sundby; Hardes, Jendrik; Hawkins, Douglas S.; Helmke, Knut; Hogendoorn, Pancras C. W.; Isakoff, Michael S.; Janeway, Katherine A.; Jürgens, Heribert; Kager, Leo; Kühne, Thomas; Lau, Ching C.; Leavey, Patrick J.; Lessnick, Stephen L.; Mascarenhas, Leo; Meyers, Paul A.; Mottl, Hubert; Nathrath, Michaela; Papai, Zsuzsanna; Randall, R. Lor; Reichardt, Peter; Renard, Marleen; Safwat, Akmal Ahmed; Schwartz, Cindy L.; Stevens, Michael C. G.; Strauss, Sandra J.; Teot, Lisa; Werner, Mathias; Sydes, Matthew R.; Whelan, Jeremy S.

    2016-01-01

    We designed the EURAMOS-1 trial to investigate whether intensified postoperative chemotherapy for patients whose tumour showed a poor response to preoperative chemotherapy (≥10% viable tumour) improved event-free survival in patients with high-grade osteosarcoma. EURAMOS-1 was an open-label,

  16. Modeling mechanisms of susceptibility in vitro: Differential activation of the MAP kinase ERK, but not p38, mediates variability and adaptation in the pro-inflammatory response to ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone is a ubiquitous ambient air pollutant that causes pulmonary inflammation upon exposure. The ozone-induced inflammatory response varies by orders of magnitude and the range of variation in “healthy” individuals extends beyond that of “susceptible” po...

  17. Timed bisimulation and open maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hune, Thomas; Nielsen, Mogens

    1998-01-01

    Open maps have been used for defining bisimulations for a range of models, but none of these have modelled real-time. We define a category of timed transition systems, and use the general framework of open maps to obtain a notion of bisimulation. We show this to be equivalent to the standard notion...... of timed bisimulation. Thus the abstract results from the theory of open maps apply, e.g. the existence of canonical models and characteristic logics. Here, we provide an alternative proof of decidability of bisimulation for finite timed transition systems in terms of open maps, and illustrate the use...... of open maps in presenting bisimulations....

  18. Image processing for optical mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Prabu; Gupta, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Optical Mapping is an established single-molecule, whole-genome analysis system, which has been used to gain a comprehensive understanding of genomic structure and to study structural variation of complex genomes. A critical component of Optical Mapping system is the image processing module, which extracts single molecule restriction maps from image datasets of immobilized, restriction digested and fluorescently stained large DNA molecules. In this review, we describe robust and efficient image processing techniques to process these massive datasets and extract accurate restriction maps in the presence of noise, ambiguity and confounding artifacts. We also highlight a few applications of the Optical Mapping system.

  19. Evaluation of MAP-specific peptides following vaccination of goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lybeck, Kari; Sjurseth, Siri K.; Melvang, Heidi Mikkelsen

    peptides. IFN-γ responses in healthy goats after the first vaccination were low, but testing of T cell lines from MAP-infected goats identified peptides inducing strong proliferative responses. Peptides for a second vaccination were selected by combining results from this study with a parallel cattle study......Our aim is to develop a subunit MAP vaccine not interfering with the diagnosis of paratuberculosis or bovine tuberculosis. This study’s objective was to evaluate MAP-specific peptides defined by in silico analysis. Peptides were picked by 1) comparing MAP genomes to that of other mycobacterium...... species or 2) selected based on “experience”. Peptides predicted to bind bovine MHC II by in silico analysis were included in further studies, resulting in two panels 1) genome-based and 2) selected. Initially, two groups of 15 healthy goats were vaccinated with one of the two panels (50 µg/peptide in CAF...

  20. Radiation Source Mapping with Bayesian Inverse Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hykes, Joshua Michael

    We present a method to map the spectral and spatial distributions of radioactive sources using a small number of detectors. Locating and identifying radioactive materials is important for border monitoring, accounting for special nuclear material in processing facilities, and in clean-up operations. Most methods to analyze these problems make restrictive assumptions about the distribution of the source. In contrast, the source-mapping method presented here allows an arbitrary three-dimensional distribution in space and a flexible group and gamma peak distribution in energy. To apply the method, the system's geometry and materials must be known. A probabilistic Bayesian approach is used to solve the resulting inverse problem (IP) since the system of equations is ill-posed. The probabilistic approach also provides estimates of the confidence in the final source map prediction. A set of adjoint flux, discrete ordinates solutions, obtained in this work by the Denovo code, are required to efficiently compute detector responses from a candidate source distribution. These adjoint fluxes are then used to form the linear model to map the state space to the response space. The test for the method is simultaneously locating a set of 137Cs and 60Co gamma sources in an empty room. This test problem is solved using synthetic measurements generated by a Monte Carlo (MCNP) model and using experimental measurements that we collected for this purpose. With the synthetic data, the predicted source distributions identified the locations of the sources to within tens of centimeters, in a room with an approximately four-by-four meter floor plan. Most of the predicted source intensities were within a factor of ten of their true value. The chi-square value of the predicted source was within a factor of five from the expected value based on the number of measurements employed. With a favorable uniform initial guess, the predicted source map was nearly identical to the true distribution

  1. Teaching and assessing mind maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Wright

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of literacy interventions in higher education is to develop students’ competencies so they could cope with the literacy demands of their academic studies. One such competency is mind mapping. The literature provides strong arguments that mind mapping provides students with valuable organisational and heuristic tools and offers guidelines on how to draw mind maps. The issue of assessing mind maps is, however, generally absent. This paper explores the characteristics of effective mind maps, their benefits and importance at all levels of education, as well as the issue of whether or not they should be assessed. It seems that too little attention has been paid to the value of mind mapping in higher education; and that the assessment of mind maps requires further debate by those with an interest in creative teaching at tertiary level.

  2. Simultaneous Nanoscale Surface Charge and Topographical Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David; Al Botros, Rehab; Momotenko, Dmitry; Kinnear, Sophie L; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-07-28

    Nanopipettes are playing an increasingly prominent role in nanoscience, for sizing, sequencing, delivery, detection, and mapping interfacial properties. Herein, the question of how to best resolve topography and surface charge effects when using a nanopipette as a probe for mapping in scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is addressed. It is shown that, when a bias modulated (BM) SICM scheme is used, it is possible to map the topography faithfully, while also allowing surface charge to be estimated. This is achieved by applying zero net bias between the electrode in the SICM tip and the one in bulk solution for topographical mapping, with just a small harmonic perturbation of the potential to create an AC current for tip positioning. Then, a net bias is applied, whereupon the ion conductance current becomes sensitive to surface charge. Practically this is optimally implemented in a hopping-cyclic voltammetry mode where the probe is approached at zero net bias at a series of pixels across the surface to reach a defined separation, and then a triangular potential waveform is applied and the current response is recorded. Underpinned with theoretical analysis, including finite element modeling of the DC and AC components of the ionic current flowing through the nanopipette tip, the powerful capabilities of this approach are demonstrated with the probing of interfacial acid-base equilibria and high resolution imaging of surface charge heterogeneities, simultaneously with topography, on modified substrates.

  3. YouGenMap: a web platform for dynamic multi-comparative mapping and visualization of genetic maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith Batesole; Kokulapalan Wimalanathan; Lin Liu; Fan Zhang; Craig S. Echt; Chun Liang

    2014-01-01

    Comparative genetic maps are used in examination of genome organization, detection of conserved gene order, and exploration of marker order variations. YouGenMap is an open-source web tool that offers dynamic comparative mapping capability of users' own genetic mapping between 2 or more map sets. Users' genetic map data and optional gene annotations are...

  4. Online Exhibits & Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douma, M.

    2009-12-01

    Presenting the complexity of geosciences to the public via the Internet poses a number of challenges. For example, utilizing various - and sometimes redundant - Web 2.0 tools can quickly devour limited time. Do you tweet? Do you write press releases? Do you create an exhibit or concept map? The presentation will provide participants with a context for utilizing Web 2.0 tools by briefly highlighting methods of online scientific communication across several dimensions. It will address issues of: * breadth and depth (e.g. from narrow topics to well-rounded views), * presentation methods (e.g. from text to multimedia, from momentary to enduring), * sources and audiences (e.g. for experts or for the public, content developed by producers to that developed by users), * content display (e.g. from linear to non-linear, from instructive to entertaining), * barriers to entry (e.g. from an incumbent advantage to neophyte accessible, from amateur to professional), * cost and reach (e.g. from cheap to expensive), and * impact (e.g. the amount learned, from anonymity to brand awareness). Against this backdrop, the presentation will provide an overview of two methods of online information dissemination, exhibits and concept maps, using the WebExhibits online museum (www.webexhibits.org) and SpicyNodes information visualization tool (www.spicynodes.org) as examples, with tips on how geoscientists can use either to communicate their science. Richly interactive online exhibits can serve to engage a large audience, appeal to visitors with multiple learning styles, prompt exploration and discovery, and present a topic’s breadth and depth. WebExhibits, which was among the first online museums, delivers interactive information, virtual experiments, and hands-on activities to the public. While large, multidisciplinary exhibits on topics like “Color Vision and Art” or “Calendars Through the Ages” require teams of scholars, user interface experts, professional writers and editors

  5. Online maps with APIs and webservices

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    With the Internet now the primary method of accessing maps, this volume examines developments in the world of online map delivery, focusing in particular on application programmer interfaces such as the Google Maps API, and their utility in thematic mapping.

  6. Animal behaviour: geomagnetic map used in sea-turtle navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Kenneth J; Lohmann, Catherine M F; Ehrhart, Llewellyn M; Bagley, Dean A; Swing, Timothy

    2004-04-29

    Migratory animals capable of navigating to a specific destination, and of compensating for an artificial displacement into unfamiliar territory, are thought to have a compass for maintaining their direction of travel and a map sense that enables them to know their location relative to their destination. Compasses are based on environmental cues such as the stars, the Sun, skylight polarization and magnetism, but little is known about the sensory mechanism responsible for the map sense. Here we show that the green sea-turtle (Chelonia mydas) has a map that is at least partly based on geomagnetic cues.

  7. A seismic probability map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. MUNUERA

    1964-06-01

    Full Text Available The material included in former two papers (SB and EF
    which summs 3307 shocks corresponding to 2360 years, up to I960, was
    reduced to a 50 years period by means the weight obtained for each epoch.
    The weitliing factor is the ratio 50 and the amount of years for every epoch.
    The frequency has been referred over basis VII of the international
    seismic scale of intensity, for all cases in which the earthquakes are equal or
    greater than VI and up to IX. The sum of products: frequency and parameters
    previously exposed, is the probable frequency expected for the 50
    years period.
    On each active small square, we have made the corresponding computation
    and so we have drawn the Map No 1, in percentage. The epicenters with
    intensity since X to XI are plotted in the Map No 2, in order to present a
    complementary information.
    A table shows the return periods obtained for all data (VII to XI,
    and after checking them with other computed from the first up to last shock,
    a list includes the probable approximate return periods estimated for the area.
    The solution, we suggest, is an appropriated form to express the seismic
    contingent phenomenon and it improves the conventional maps showing
    the equal intensity curves corresponding to the maximal values of given side.

  8. Schema matching and mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Bellahsene, Zohra; Rahm, Erhard

    2011-01-01

    Requiring heterogeneous information systems to cooperate and communicate has now become crucial, especially in application areas like e-business, Web-based mash-ups and the life sciences. Such cooperating systems have to automatically and efficiently match, exchange, transform and integrate large data sets from different sources and of different structure in order to enable seamless data exchange and transformation. The book edited by Bellahsene, Bonifati and Rahm provides an overview of the ways in which the schema and ontology matching and mapping tools have addressed the above requirements

  9. [HapMap project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2009-06-01

    Haplotype map is the basis of SNP association studies in two aspects. One is to understand how SNPs are organized on chromosomes, thereby helping researchers to select tag SNPs to be examined. The other is to explore the presence of "hidden SNP" by haplotype analyses that is really associated with the disease. Although it is very difficult to forecast the future of SNP studies, the final and ideal methodology should be high--throughput whole genome sequencing with low price. At such stage, data mining technique will be very important since huge amount of genotype data should be handled and analyzed.

  10. Variable Sampling Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey, S.; Aronstein, David L.; Dean, Bruce H.; Lyon, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of an optical system (for example, a telescope) is limited by the misalignments and manufacturing imperfections of the optical elements in the system. The impact of these misalignments and imperfections can be quantified by the phase variations imparted on light traveling through the system. Phase retrieval is a methodology for determining these variations. Phase retrieval uses images taken with the optical system and using a light source of known shape and characteristics. Unlike interferometric methods, which require an optical reference for comparison, and unlike Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors that require special optical hardware at the optical system's exit pupil, phase retrieval is an in situ, image-based method for determining the phase variations of light at the system s exit pupil. Phase retrieval can be used both as an optical metrology tool (during fabrication of optical surfaces and assembly of optical systems) and as a sensor used in active, closed-loop control of an optical system, to optimize performance. One class of phase-retrieval algorithms is the iterative transform algorithm (ITA). ITAs estimate the phase variations by iteratively enforcing known constraints in the exit pupil and at the detector, determined from modeled or measured data. The Variable Sampling Mapping (VSM) technique is a new method for enforcing these constraints in ITAs. VSM is an open framework for addressing a wide range of issues that have previously been considered detrimental to high-accuracy phase retrieval, including undersampled images, broadband illumination, images taken at or near best focus, chromatic aberrations, jitter or vibration of the optical system or detector, and dead or noisy detector pixels. The VSM is a model-to-data mapping procedure. In VSM, fully sampled electric fields at multiple wavelengths are modeled inside the phase-retrieval algorithm, and then these fields are mapped to intensities on the light detector, using the properties

  11. Searching with iterated maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elser, V.; Rankenburg, I.; Thibault, P.

    2007-01-01

    In many problems that require extensive searching, the solution can be described as satisfying two competing constraints, where satisfying each independently does not pose a challenge. As an alternative to tree-based and stochastic searching, for these problems we propose using an iterated map built from the projections to the two constraint sets. Algorithms of this kind have been the method of choice in a large variety of signal-processing applications; we show here that the scope of these algorithms is surprisingly broad, with applications as diverse as protein folding and Sudoku. PMID:17202267

  12. Journal of Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedjeljko Frančula

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Journal of Maps (JoM (http://www.journalofmaps.com počeo je izlaziti 2005. godine isključivo kao elektronički časopis. Izdavač je School of Earth Sciences and Geography, Kingston University, UK. Budući da ne izlazi u tiskanom izdanju, časopis nema uobičajene sveske. Svescima se, ipak, mogu smatrati članci srodne tematike koji se objavljuju tri puta godišnje – u travnju, kolovozu i prosincu.

  13. HI Surface brightness mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pen, Ue-Li; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Peterson, Jeff; Bandura, Kevin

    2008-04-01

    We propose to scan the 2dF survey field with Parkes multibeam in driftscan mode to make a map to cross correlate with galaxy redshifts. This allows a statistical detection of HI large scale structure out to z=0.15. In this cross correlation, the HI in ALL galaxies contributes, not only the bright ones, which significantly boosts the sensitivity. The proposed 40 hours on the fields result in a forecasted 20 sigma detection. The survey volume is 10 million cubic megaparsec, which contain 10^15 solar masses of hydrogen.

  14. 21 cm Intensity Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Aleksan, Roy; Ansari, Reza; Bandura, Kevin; Bond, Dick; Bunton, John; Carlson, Kermit; Chang, Tzu-Ching; DeJongh, Fritz; Dobbs, Matt; Dodelson, Scott; Darhmaoui, Hassane; Gnedin, Nick; Halpern, Mark; Hogan, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Using the 21 cm line, observed all-sky and across the redshift range from 0 to 5, the large scale structure of the Universe can be mapped in three dimensions. This can be accomplished by studying specific intensity with resolution ~ 10 Mpc, rather than via the usual galaxy redshift survey. The data set can be analyzed to determine Baryon Acoustic Oscillation wavelengths, in order to address the question: 'What is the nature of Dark Energy?' In addition, the study of Large Scale Structure acro...

  15. mapDamage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ginolhac, Aurélien; Rasmussen, Morten; Gilbert, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Ancient DNA extracts consist of a mixture of contaminant DNA molecules, most often originating from environmental microbes, and endogenous fragments exhibiting substantial levels of DNA damage. The latter introduce specific nucleotide misincorporations and DNA fragmentation signatures in sequencing...... in embedded R script in order to detect typical patterns of genuine ancient DNA sequences. Availability and implementation: The Perl script mapDamage is freely available with documentation and example files at http://geogenetics.ku.dk/all_literature/mapdamage/. The script requires prior installation...

  16. Between Maps and Territories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmboe, Rasmus; Stricker, Jan Høgh

    2016-01-01

    This audio paper departs from an artwork made by Andreas Führer called The Map is Not The Territory D’Or; a score for a soundwalk in the town of Roskilde, Denmark. The basic sound materials used in the audio paper are 1) an interview in Danish with the artist, 2) a voice over of a theoretical text...... in English, and 3) recordings from performances of the piece, including walking, breathing exercises, and the sounds of ventilation systems and other environmental sound. By mingling these different materials, and by using ‘map’ and ‘territory’ as metaphors, the paper complicates issues of representation...

  17. Mapping Wind Energy Controversies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Anders Kristian

    As part the Wind2050 project funded by the Danish Council for Strategic Research we have mapped controversies on wind energy as they unfold online. Specifically we have collected two purpose built datasets, a web corpus containing information from 758 wind energy websites in 6 different countries......, and a smaller social media corpus containing information from 14 Danish wind energy pages on Facebook. These datasets have been analyzed to answer questions like: How do wind proponents and opponents organize online? Who are the central actors? And what are their matters of concern? The purpose of this report...

  18. From Google Maps to Google Models (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. V.

    2010-12-01

    Why hasn’t integrated modelling taken off? To its advocates, it is self-evidently the best and arguably the only tool available for understanding and predicting the likely response of the environment to events and policies. Legislation requires managers to ensure that their plans are sustainable. How, other than by modelling the interacting processes involved, can the option with the greatest benefits be identified? Integrated modelling (IM) is seen to have huge potential. In science, IM is used to extend and encapsulate our understanding of the whole earth system. Such models are beginning to be incorporated in operational decision support systems and used to seek sustainable solutions to society’s problems, but only on a limited scale. Commercial take up is negligible yet the opportunities would appear limitless. The need is there; the potential is there, so what is inhibiting IM’s take up? What must be done to reap the rewards of the R & D to date? To answer the question, it useful to look back at the developments which have seen paper maps evolve into Google Maps and the systems that now surround it; facilities available not just to experts and governments but to anyone with a an iphone and an internet connection. The initial objective was to automate the process of drawing lines on paper, though it was quickly realised that digitising maps was the key to unlocking the information they held. However, it took thousands of PhD and MSc projects before a computer could generate a map comparable to that produced by a cartographer and many more before it was possible to extract reliable useful information from maps. It also required advances in IT and a change of mindset from one focused on paper map production to one focused on information delivery. To move from digital maps to Google Maps required the availability of data on a world scale, the resources to bring them together, the development of remote sensing, satellite navigation and communications

  19. REST-MapReduce: An Integrated Interface but Differentiated Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Hyuk Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the fast deployment of cloud computing, MapReduce architectures are becoming the major technologies for mobile cloud computing. The concept of MapReduce was first introduced as a novel programming model and implementation for a large set of computing devices. In this research, we propose a novel concept of REST-MapReduce, enabling users to use only the REST interface without using the MapReduce architecture. This approach provides a higher level of abstraction by integration of the two types of access interface, REST API and MapReduce. The motivation of this research stems from the slower response time for accessing simple RDBMS on Hadoop than direct access to RDMBS. This is because there is overhead to job scheduling, initiating, starting, tracking, and management during MapReduce-based parallel execution. Therefore, we provide a good performance for REST Open API service and for MapReduce, respectively. This is very useful for constructing REST Open API services on Hadoop hosting services, for example, Amazon AWS (Macdonald, 2005 or IBM Smart Cloud. For evaluating performance of our REST-MapReduce framework, we conducted experiments with Jersey REST web server and Hadoop. Experimental result shows that our approach outperforms conventional approaches.

  20. A phenomenographic case study: Concept maps from the perspectives of middle school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglam, Yilmaz

    The objective of this study was to investigate the experiences of middle school students when concept maps were used as a learning tool. Twenty-nine students' written responses, concept maps and videotapes were analyzed. Out of 29 students, thirteen students were interviewed using a semi-structured and open-ended interview protocol. The students' initial written responses provided us with the students' initial reactions to concept maps. The videotapes captured the students' behavior, and interpersonal interactions. The interviews probed students': (1) knowledge about drawing concept maps, (2) perception of the meaning and usefulness of concept maps, and (3) attitudes towards concept maps. The results indicated that the students viewed concept maps as useful tools in learning science. They believed that concept maps organized and summarized the information, which thereby helped them understand the topic easily. They also believed that concept maps had some cognitive benefits. However, the students viewed concept maps as hard to construct because it was difficult for the students to think of related concepts. The students' initial written responses, interviews and videotapes indicated that the students seemed to see both positive and negative aspects of concept maps. Some students' had more positive and some had more negative attitudes.

  1. Knowledge Maps for E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hwa; Segev, Aviv

    2012-01-01

    Maps such as concept maps and knowledge maps are often used as learning materials. These maps have nodes and links, nodes as key concepts and links as relationships between key concepts. From a map, the user can recognize the important concepts and the relationships between them. To build concept or knowledge maps, domain experts are needed.…

  2. 18 CFR 154.106 - Map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....106 Map. (a) The map must show the general geographic location of the company's principal pipeline... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Map. 154.106 Section... on a single map. In addition, a separate map should be provided for each zone. (b) (c) The map must...

  3. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  4. Mapping a Better Vintage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Vineyards such as those located in California's Napa Valley tend to be subdivided into relatively large fields or blocks that often encompass heterogeneous physical conditions. Since growers typically treat the entire block as a single minimum management unit for cultivation and harvest, mapping and monitoring the variability within a block is a concern. Over the last decade, an increasing number of vineyard managers have utilized digital remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) to visualize the variability within their blocks. With computer software designed to overlay remotely sensed imagery with environmental and agronomic geographic data on a map, GIS helps growers recognize and explain patterns that might not have been obvious otherwise. GIS can also serve as a valuable archiving mechanism for future reference. To further develop the use of image technology and GIS for vineyard management support, NASA's Earth Science Enterprise partnered with the U.S. wine and commercial remote sensing industries for a project known as the Viticultural Integration of NASA Technologies for Assessment of the Grapevine Environment (VINTAGE). With project investigators from NASA's Ames Research Center, the California State University at Monterey Bay, and the University of Montana, several prototype products have been developed to support agricultural decisions concerning canopy management and irrigation practice. One key VINTAGE aspect involved the evaluation of satellite and airborne multispectral imagery for delineation of sub-block management zones within a vineyard.

  5. ANNUAL INTERVIEWS (MAPS)

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The calendar for the 2002/2003 annual interview programme is confirmed as normally from 15 November 2002 to 15 February 2002 as foreseen in Administrative Circular N° 26 (rev. 2). However, where it is preferred to be as close as possible to 12 months since the last interview, supervisors and staff concerned may agree to the interview taking place up to 15 March 2003. This may also be necessary due to the roles of different supervisors resulting from the particular situations of divisional re-restructurings and detachments this year. The report form template is as last year available on the HR Division Website. A banner on the internal homepage leads directly to the page with the form. In collaboration with AS Division, the MAPS form including the personal data for the first page can be generated via the Human Resources Toolkit (HRT) application. For this exercise each staff member can now generate his/her own MAPS form. Information about how to do this is available here. Human Resources Division Tel. ...

  6. Defect mapping system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-04-11

    Apparatus for detecting and mapping defects in the surfaces of polycrystalline materials in a manner that distinguishes dislocation pits from grain boundaries includes a laser for illuminating a wide spot on the surface of the material, a light integrating sphere with apertures for capturing light scattered by etched dislocation pits in an intermediate range away from specular reflection while allowing light scattered by etched grain boundaries in a near range from specular reflection to pass through, and optical detection devices for detecting and measuring intensities of the respective intermediate scattered light and near specular scattered light. A center blocking aperture or filter can be used to screen out specular reflected light, which would be reflected by nondefect portions of the polycrystalline material surface. An X-Y translation stage for mounting the polycrystalline material and signal processing and computer equipment accommodate rastor mapping, recording, and displaying of respective dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A special etch procedure is included, which prepares the polycrystalline material surface to produce distinguishable intermediate and near specular light scattering in patterns that have statistical relevance to the dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. 20 figures.

  7. Graphene mobility mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buron, Jonas D; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Jepsen, Peter U; Petersen, Dirch H; Caridad, José M; Jessen, Bjarke S; Booth, Timothy J; Bøggild, Peter

    2015-07-24

    Carrier mobility and chemical doping level are essential figures of merit for graphene, and large-scale characterization of these properties and their uniformity is a prerequisite for commercialization of graphene for electronics and electrodes. However, existing mapping techniques cannot directly assess these vital parameters in a non-destructive way. By deconvoluting carrier mobility and density from non-contact terahertz spectroscopic measurements of conductance in graphene samples with terahertz-transparent backgates, we are able to present maps of the spatial variation of both quantities over large areas. The demonstrated non-contact approach provides a drastically more efficient alternative to measurements in contacted devices, with potential for aggressive scaling towards wafers/minute. The observed linear relation between conductance and carrier density in chemical vapour deposition graphene indicates dominance by charged scatterers. Unexpectedly, significant variations in mobility rather than doping are the cause of large conductance inhomogeneities, highlighting the importance of statistical approaches when assessing large-area graphene transport properties.

  8. LAN MAP: An Innovative Airborne Light at Night Mapping Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craine, Eric R.; Craine, B. L.; Craine, E. M.; Craine, P. R.

    2013-01-01

    Widespread installation of inefficient and misdirected artificial light at night (LAN) has led to increasing concerns about light pollution and its impact, not only on astronomical facilities but larger communities as well. Light pollution impacts scientific research, environmental ecosystems, human health, and quality of life. In recent years, the public policy response to light pollution has included formulation of government codes to regulate lighting design and installation. Various environmental groups now include light pollution among their rallying themes to protest both specific and general developments. The latter efforts are often conducted in the absence of any quantitative data and are frequently charged by emotion rather than reason. To bring some scientific objectivity, and quantitative data, to these discussions, we have developed a suite of tools for simultaneous photometric measurements and temporal monitoring of both local communities and the sky overhead. We have also developed novel protocols for the use of these tools, including a triad of airborne, ground mobile, and ground static photometric surveys. We present a summary of these tools and protocols, with special emphasis on the airborne systems, and discuss baseline and follow-up measurements of LAN environments in the vicinity of numerous observatories in Arizona, the home of the initial LAN MAP surveys.

  9. Global mapping of protein phosphorylation events identifies Ste20, Sch9 and the cell-cycle regulatory kinases Cdc28/Pho85 as mediators of fatty acid starvation responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pultz, Dennis; Bennetzen, Martin V; Rødkær, Steven Vestergaard

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis, degradation, and metabolism of fatty acids are strictly coordinated to meet the nutritional and energetic needs of cells and organisms. In the absence of exogenous fatty acids, proliferation and growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on endogenous synthesis of fatty acids......, which is catalysed by fatty acid synthase. In the present study, we have used quantitative proteomics to examine the cellular response to inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have identified approximately 2000 phosphorylation sites of which more than 400 have been...

  10. An assessment of the effects of navigation maps on drivers' mental workloads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chin-Jung; Lin, Chia-Hsyang; Hsu, Shang-Hwa

    2014-06-01

    This study compares the mental workloads and subjective feelings of drivers navigating different road patterns using different formats of electronic and paper maps. The results show drivers experience lower mental workloads when using 2D electronic maps compared to 3D electronic maps. Significant differences in galvanic skin responses were observed for navigation map formats with different road intersection patterns. The low- and high-frequency components of heart rate variability showed significant differences between map formats for regular road intersections, but no significant differences between map formats for irregular road intersections. Statistically significant effects on subjective feelings were found between different map formats and road intersection patterns. The wider implications of the study results for the design and use of navigation map interfaces are discussed.

  11. Updated Colombian Seismic Hazard Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraso, J.; Arcila, M.; Romero, J.; Dimate, C.; Bermúdez, M. L.; Alvarado, C.

    2013-05-01

    The Colombian seismic hazard map used by the National Building Code (NSR-98) in effect until 2009 was developed in 1996. Since then, the National Seismological Network of Colombia has improved in both coverage and technology providing fifteen years of additional seismic records. These improvements have allowed a better understanding of the regional geology and tectonics which in addition to the seismic activity in Colombia with destructive effects has motivated the interest and the need to develop a new seismic hazard assessment in this country. Taking advantage of new instrumental information sources such as new broad band stations of the National Seismological Network, new historical seismicity data, standardized global databases availability, and in general, of advances in models and techniques, a new Colombian seismic hazard map was developed. A PSHA model was applied. The use of the PSHA model is because it incorporates the effects of all seismic sources that may affect a particular site solving the uncertainties caused by the parameters and assumptions defined in this kind of studies. First, the seismic sources geometry and a complete and homogeneous seismic catalog were defined; the parameters of seismic rate of each one of the seismic sources occurrence were calculated establishing a national seismotectonic model. Several of attenuation-distance relationships were selected depending on the type of seismicity considered. The seismic hazard was estimated using the CRISIS2007 software created by the Engineering Institute of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México -UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico). A uniformly spaced grid each 0.1° was used to calculate the peak ground acceleration (PGA) and response spectral values at 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 and 3.0 seconds with return periods of 75, 225, 475, 975 and 2475 years. For each site, a uniform hazard spectrum and exceedance rate curves were calculated. With the results, it is

  12. Hydrochromic Approaches to Mapping Human Sweat Pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong-Hoon; Park, Bum Jun; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-06-21

    Hydrochromic materials, which undergo changes in their light absorption and/or emission properties in response to water, have been extensively investigated as humidity sensors. Recent advances in the design of these materials have led to novel applications, including monitoring the water content of organic solvents, water-jet-based rewritable printing on paper, and hydrochromic mapping of human sweat pores. Our interest in this area has focused on the design of hydrochromic materials for human sweat pore mapping. We recognized that materials appropriate for this purpose must have balanced sensitivities to water. Specifically, while they should not undergo light absorption and/or emission transitions under ambient moisture conditions, the materials must have sufficiently high hydrochromic sensitivities that they display responses to water secreted from human sweat pores. In this Account, we describe investigations that we have carried out to develop hydrochromic substances that are suitable for human sweat pore mapping. Polydiacetylenes (PDAs) have been extensively investigated as sensor matrices because of their stimulus-responsive color change property. We found that incorporation of headgroups composed of hygroscopic ions such as cesium or rubidium and carboxylate counterions enables PDAs to undergo a blue-to-red colorimetric transition as well as a fluorescence turn-on response to water. Very intriguingly, the small quantities of water secreted from human sweat pores were found to be sufficient to trigger fluorescence turn-on responses of the hydrochromic PDAs, allowing precise mapping of human sweat pores. Since the hygroscopic ion-containing PDAs developed in the initial stage display a colorimetric transition under ambient conditions that exist during humid summer periods, a new system was designed. A PDA containing an imidazolium ion was found to be stable under all ambient conditions and showed temperature-dependent hydrochromism corresponding to a

  13. SK-N-MC cell death occurs by distinct molecular mechanisms in response to hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anions: involvements of JAK2-STAT3, JNK, and p38 MAP kinases pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehi, Maryam; Yazdanparast, Razieh

    2013-07-01

    Oxidative stress plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Nerve cells are incessantly exposed to environmental stresses leading to overproduction of some harmful species like reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS including hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion are potent inducers of various signaling pathways encompassing MAPKs and JAK-STAT pathways. In the current study, we scrutinized the effects of hydrogen peroxide and/or menadione (superoxide anion generator) on JNK/p38-MAPKs and JAK2-STAT3 pathways to elucidate the mechanism(s) by which each oxidant modulated the above-mentioned pathways leading to SK-N-MC cell death. Our results delineated that hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion radical induced distinct responses as we showed that STAT3 and p38 were activated in response to hydrogen peroxide, but not superoxide anion radicals indicating the specificity in ROS-induced signaling pathways activations and behaviors. We also observed that menadione induced JNK-dependent p53 expression and apoptotic death in SK-N-MC cells while H2O2-induced JNK activation was p53 independent. Thus, we declare that ROS type has a key role in selective instigation of JNK/p38-MAPKs and JAK2-STAT3 pathways in SK-N-MC cells. Identifying these differential behaviors and mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion functions illuminates the possible therapeutic targets in the prevention or treatment of ROS-induced neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Outcome mapping for health system integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsasis P

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Peter Tsasis,1 Jenna M Evans,2 David Forrest,3 Richard Keith Jones4 1School of Health Policy and Management, Faculty of Health, York University, Toronto, Canada; 2Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada; 3Global Vision Consulting Ltd, Victoria, Canada; 4R Keith Jones and Associates, Victoria, Canada Abstract: Health systems around the world are implementing integrated care strategies to improve quality, reduce or maintain costs, and improve the patient experience. Yet few practical tools exist to aid leaders and managers in building the prerequisites to integrated care, namely a shared vision, clear roles and responsibilities, and a common understanding of how the vision will be realized. Outcome mapping may facilitate stakeholder alignment on the vision, roles, and processes of integrated care delivery via participative and focused dialogue among diverse stakeholders on desired outcomes and enabling actions. In this paper, we describe an outcome-mapping exercise we conducted at a Local Health Integration Network in Ontario, Canada, using consensus development conferences. Our preliminary findings suggest that outcome mapping may help stakeholders make sense of a complex system and foster collaborative capital, a resource that can support information sharing, trust, and coordinated change toward integration across organizational and professional boundaries. Drawing from the theoretical perspectives of complex adaptive systems and collaborative capital, we also outline recommendations for future outcome-mapping exercises. In particular, we emphasize the potential for outcome mapping to be used as a tool not only for identifying and linking strategic outcomes and actions, but also for studying the boundaries, gaps, and ties that characterize social networks across the continuum of care. Keywords: integrated care, integrated delivery systems, complex adaptive systems, social capital

  15. Visualizing Dynamic Data with Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashima, Daisuke; Kobourov, Stephen G; Hu, Yifan

    2012-09-01

    Maps offer a familiar way to present geographic data (continents, countries), and additional information (topography, geology), can be displayed with the help of contours and heat-map overlays. In this paper, we consider visualizing large-scale dynamic relational data by taking advantage of the geographic map metaphor. We describe a map-based visualization system which uses animation to convey dynamics in large data sets, and which aims to preserve the viewer's mental map while also offering readable views at all times. Our system is fully functional and has been used to visualize user traffic on the Internet radio station last.fm, as well as TV-viewing patterns from an IPTV service. All map images in this paper are available in high-resolution at [1] as are several movies illustrating the dynamic visualization.

  16. Quantum Programs as Kleisli Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Westerbaan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Furber and Jacobs have shown in their study of quantum computation that the category of commutative C*-algebras and PU-maps (positive linear maps which preserve the unit is isomorphic to the Kleisli category of a comonad on the category of commutative C*-algebras with MIU-maps (linear maps which preserve multiplication, involution and unit. [Furber and Jacobs, 2013] In this paper, we prove a non-commutative variant of this result: the category of C*-algebras and PU-maps is isomorphic to the Kleisli category of a comonad on the subcategory of MIU-maps. A variation on this result has been used to construct a model of Selinger and Valiron's quantum lambda calculus using von Neumann algebras. [Cho and Westerbaan, 2016

  17. Metaflammatory responses during obesity: Pathomechanism and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Monalisa; Agrawal, Shruti; Agrawal, Aruna; Dubey, G P

    2016-01-01

    Obesity induced inflammation acts as a reflex produced due to altered metabolic homeostasis in accordance to the nutrient overload on the metabolic cells. It involves up-regulation of the genes encoding for cytokines, chemokines and other inflammatory mediators through activated transcription factors - nuclear factor-kB, activator protein-1, nuclear factor of activated T cells and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. These execute macromolecular innate immune cell sensor - inflammasome to activate caspase-1 pathway resulting in proteolytic maturation. Secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6, CRP, IL-1β, etc. from the M1 macrophages of white adipose tissue is increased, whereas there occurs a steep decline in the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines like IL-10, IL-Ra, adiponectin. Not only the adipose tissue, but also the immune cells, liver, brain, muscles and pancreas suffers from the inflammatory insult during obese condition and are exaggeratedly affected. The inflammatory kinases like JNK and IKK apart from inhibiting insulin action and glucose uptake, down-regulate transcriptional process resulting in increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Macrophage-like Kupffer cells initiate the inflammatory process in the liver preceding the inflammatory signals produced by the white adipose tissue which may further lead to hepatic-necro-inflammation. The muscle-fibre is affected by the cytokines and therefore results in decreased glycogen synthesis. The triggered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis further affects the expression of inflammatory cytokines thus altering insulin homeostasis and initiating glucose intolerance. Anti-inflammatory treatment so as to curb the severity of inflammatory responses includes administration of synthetic drugs to target the actual inflammatory molecules and various therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2015 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier

  18. Defensive repertoire of Drosophila larvae in response to toxic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trienens, Monika; Kraaijeveld, Ken; Wertheim, Bregje

    2017-10-01

    Chemical warfare including insecticidal secondary metabolites is a well-known strategy for environmental microbes to monopolize a food source. Insects in turn have evolved behavioural and physiological defences to eradicate or neutralize the harmful microorganisms. We studied the defensive repertoire of insects in this interference competition by combining behavioural and developmental assays with whole-transcriptome time-series analysis. Confrontation with the toxic filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans severely reduced the survival of Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Nonetheless, the larvae did not behaviourally avoid the fungus, but aggregated at it. Confrontation with fungi strongly affected larval gene expression, including many genes involved in detoxification (e.g., CYP, GST and UGT genes) and the formation of the insect cuticle (e.g., Tweedle genes). The most strongly upregulated genes were several members of the insect-specific gene family Osiris, and CHK-kinase-like domains were over-represented. Immune responses were not activated, reflecting the competitive rather than pathogenic nature of the antagonistic interaction. While internal microbes are widely acknowledged as important, our study emphasizes the underappreciated role of environmental microbes as fierce competitors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Imagining Geographies, Mapping Identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Graves

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The ambition of this issue of Portal is to reach across the methodological boundaries of history, politics, literature and geography to apply their complementary perspectives to the study of identity and its relation to space and place, an aim that involves attempting to identify the many different ways the notoriously slippery concepts of identity and geography may intersect. For this issue we have selected articles that cast a fresh perspective on two areas where identity and geography intersect: the construction of identity through the imaginative recreation of place in literature: Mapping Literary Spaces; and the study of the shifting relationships of centre and periphery, exclusion and inclusion in urban settings and geopolitical confrontations: Social and Political Peripheries. Gerard Toal has written that geography is not a noun but a verb: it does not describe what space is but studies what we do with space, imaginatively and politically. The articles in this issue illustrate the exercise of the literary and political imagination and the role of materiality and memory in the creation of geographic representation. They show too a new awareness of the centrality of space in the constitution of identities, and the need for a new geocritical reading of its discourse, as the interrelations of place and community are played out on the many scales of social and political life, from the local to the global.   The special issue is organised thus: Introduction Matthew Graves (Aix-Marseille University & Liz Rechniewski (Sydney University: “Imagining Geographies, Mapping Identities.” I. Mapping Literary Spaces - Isabelle Avila (University of Paris XIII, "Les Cartes de l'Afrique au XIXe siècle et Joseph Conrad : Perceptions d'une Révolution Cartographique." - Daniela Rogobete (University of Craiova, "Global vs Glocal: Dimensions of the post-1981 Indian English Novel." II. Social and Political Peripheries - Elizabeth Rechniewski (Sydney

  20. The Circumpolar Arctic vegetation map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Donald A.; Raynolds, Martha K.; Daniels, F.J.A.; Einarsson, E.; Elvebakk, A.; Gould, W.A.; Katenin, A.E.; Kholod, S.S.; Markon, C.J.; Melnikov, E.S.; Moskalenko, N.G.; Talbot, S. S.; Yurtsev, B.A.; Bliss, L.C.; Edlund, S.A.; Zoltai, S.C.; Wilhelm, M.; Bay, C.; Gudjonsson, G.; Ananjeva, G.V.; Drozdov, D.S.; Konchenko, L.A.; Korostelev, Y.V.; Ponomareva, O.E.; Matveyeva, N.V.; Safranova, I.N.; Shelkunova, R.; Polezhaev, A.N.; Johansen, B.E.; Maier, H.A.; Murray, D.F.; Fleming, Michael D.; Trahan, N.G.; Charron, T.M.; Lauritzen, S.M.; Vairin, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    Question: What are the major vegetation units in the Arctic, what is their composition, and how are they distributed among major bioclimate subzones and countries? Location: The Arctic tundra region, north of the tree line. Methods: A photo-interpretive approach was used to delineate the vegetation onto an Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) base image. Mapping experts within nine Arctic regions prepared draft maps using geographic information technology (ArcInfo) of their portion of the Arctic, and these were later synthesized to make the final map. Area analysis of the map was done according to bioclimate subzones, and country. The integrated mapping procedures resulted in other maps of vegetation, topography, soils, landscapes, lake cover, substrate pH, and above-ground biomass. Results: The final map was published at 1:7 500 000 scale map. Within the Arctic (total area = 7.11 x 106 km 2), about 5.05 ?? 106 km2 is vegetated. The remainder is ice covered. The map legend generally portrays the zonal vegetation within each map polygon. About 26% of the vegetated area is erect shrublands, 18% peaty graminoid tundras, 13% mountain complexes, 12% barrens, 11% mineral graminoid tundras, 11% prostrate-shrub tundras, and 7% wetlands. Canada has by far the most terrain in the High Arctic mostly associated with abundant barren types and prostrate dwarf-shrub tundra, whereas Russia has the largest area in the Low Arctic, predominantly low-shrub tundra. Conclusions: The CAVM is the first vegetation map of an entire global biome at a comparable resolution. The consistent treatment of the vegetation across the circumpolar Arctic, abundant ancillary material, and digital database should promote the application to numerous land-use, and climate-change applications and will make updating the map relatively easy. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  1. Variational Algorithms for Marginal MAP

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Q; Ihler, A

    2013-01-01

    The marginal maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimation problem, which calculates the mode of the marginal posterior distribution of a subset of variables with the remaining variables marginalized, is an important inference problem in many models, such as those with hidden variables or uncertain parameters. Unfortunately, marginal MAP can be NP-hard even on trees, and has attracted less attention in the literature compared to the joint MAP (maximization) and marginalization problems. W...

  2. MAP Client: Pipelines Made Easy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ju

    2014-01-01

    The Musculoskeletal Atlas Project Client (MAP Client) is a cross-platform framework for managing workflows. A workflow consists of a number of connected workflow steps. The MAP Client framework is a plugin-based application where the plugins are workflow steps. The MAP Client framework has a number of tools for creating, managing and sharing workflows, workflow steps and the outputs generated from the workflow steps. It is an application written in Python and based on Qt, the cross-platfor...

  3. General Galilei Covariant Gaussian Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarri, Giulio; Toroš, Marko; Bassi, Angelo

    2017-09-01

    We characterize general non-Markovian Gaussian maps which are covariant under Galilean transformations. In particular, we consider translational and Galilean covariant maps and show that they reduce to the known Holevo result in the Markovian limit. We apply the results to discuss measures of macroscopicity based on classicalization maps, specifically addressing dissipation, Galilean covariance and non-Markovianity. We further suggest a possible generalization of the macroscopicity measure defined by Nimmrichter and Hornberger [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 16 (2013)].

  4. Information technology road map 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-09-15

    This book introduces information technology road map 2015 with presentation, process, plan and conclusion of it. It also has introduction of IT road map by field : information technology road map 2015 on the next-generation of semiconductor, display, light emitting diode and light industry, home network and home electronic appliances, digital TV and broadcasting, radio technology, satellite communications, mobile communication for the next-generation, BcN field, software, computer for the next-generation and security of knowledge information.

  5. Seismic hazard map of the western hemisphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Tanner

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Vulnerability to natural disasters increases with urbanization and development of associated support systems (reservoirs, power plants, etc.. Catastrophic earthquakes account for 60% of worldwide casualties associated with natural disasters. Economic damage from earthquakes is increasing, even in technologically advanced countries with some level of seismic zonation, as shown by the 1989 Loma Prieta, CA ($ 6 billion, 1994 Northridge, CA ($ 25 billion, and 1995 Kobe, Japan (> $ 100 billion earthquakes. The growth of megacities in seismically active regions around the world often includes the construction of seismically unsafe buildings and infrastructures, due to an insufficient knowledge of existing seismic hazard. Minimization of the loss of life, property damage, and social and economic disruption due to earthquakes depends on reliable estimates of seismic hazard. National, state, and local governments, decision makers, engineers, planners, emergency response organizations, builders, universities, and the general public require seismic hazard estimates for land use planning, improved building design and construction (including adoption of building construction codes, emergency response preparedness plans, economic forecasts, housing and employment decisions, and many more types of risk mitigation. The seismic hazard map of the Americas is the concatenation of various national and regional maps, involving a suite of approaches. The combined maps and documentation provide a useful global seismic hazard framework and serve as a resource for any national or regional agency for further detailed studies applicable to their needs. This seismic hazard map depicts Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA with a 10% chance of exceedance in 50 years for the western hemisphere. PGA, a short-period ground motion parameter that is proportional to force, is the most commonly mapped ground motion parameter because current building codes that include seismic provisions

  6. Seismic hazard map of the western hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedlock, K.M.; Tanner, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    Vulnerability to natural disasters increases with urbanization and development of associated support systems (reservoirs, power plants, etc.). Catastrophic earthquakes account for 60% of worldwide casualties associated with natural disasters. Economic damage from earthquakes is increasing, even in technologically advanced countries with some level of seismic zonation, as shown by the 1989 Loma Prieta, CA ($6 billion), 1994 Northridge, CA ($ 25 billion), and 1995 Kobe, Japan (> $ 100 billion) earthquakes. The growth of megacities in seismically active regions around the world often includes the construction of seismically unsafe buildings and infrastructures, due to an insufficient knowledge of existing seismic hazard. Minimization of the loss of life, property damage, and social and economic disruption due to earthquakes depends on reliable estimates of seismic hazard. National, state, and local governments, decision makers, engineers, planners, emergency response organizations, builders, universities, and the general public require seismic hazard estimates for land use planning, improved building design and construction (including adoption of building construction codes), emergency response preparedness plans, economic forecasts, housing and employment decisions, and many more types of risk mitigation. The seismic hazard map of the Americas is the concatenation of various national and regional maps, involving a suite of approaches. The combined maps and documentation provide a useful global seismic hazard framework and serve as a resource for any national or regional agency for further detailed studies applicable to their needs. This seismic hazard map depicts Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) with a 10% chance of exceedance in 50 years for the western hemisphere. PGA, a short-period ground motion parameter that is proportional to force, is the most commonly mapped ground motion parameter because current building codes that include seismic provisions specify the

  7. Comparison of MAPIE versus MAP in patients with a poor response to preoperative chemotherapy for newly diagnosed high-grade osteosarcoma (EURAMOSan open-label, international, randomised controlled trial-1): an open-label, international, randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marina, Neyssa M; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Bielack, Stefan S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We designed the EURAMOS-1 trial to investigate whether intensified postoperative chemotherapy for patients whose tumour showed a poor response to preoperative chemotherapy (≥10% viable tumour) improved event-free survival in patients with high-grade osteosarcoma. METHODS: EURAMOS-1...... was an open-label, international, phase 3 randomised, controlled trial. Consenting patients with newly diagnosed, resectable, high-grade osteosarcoma aged 40 years or younger were eligible for randomisation. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either postoperative cisplatin, doxorubicin...... uroprotection, followed by etoposide 100 mg/m2 per day over 1 h on days 1-5. The primary outcome measure was event-free survival measured in the intention-to-treat population. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00134030. FINDINGS: Between April 14, 2005, and June 30, 2011, 2260 patients...

  8. Mapping infectious disease hospital surge threats to lessons learnt in Singapore: a systems analysis and development of a framework to inform how to DECIDE on planning and response strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shweta R; Coker, Richard; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J-M; Leo, Yee Sin; Chow, Angela; Lim, Poh Lian; Tan, Qinghui; Chen, Mark I-Cheng; Hildon, Zoe Jane-Lara

    2017-09-04

    Hospital usage and service demand during an Infectious Disease (ID) outbreak can tax the health system in different ways. Herein we conceptualize hospital surge elements, and lessons learnt from such events, to help build appropriately matched responses to future ID surge threats. We used the Interpretive Descriptive qualitative approach. Interviews (n = 35) were conducted with governance and public health specialists; hospital based staff; and General Practitioners. Key policy literature in tandem with the interview data were used to iteratively generate a Hospital ID Surge framework. We anchored our narrative account within this framework, which is used to structure our analysis. A spectrum of surge threats from combinations of capacity (for crowding) and capability (for treatment complexity) demands were identified. Starting with the Pyramid scenario, or an influx of high screening rates flooding Emergency Departments, alongside fewer and manageable admissions; the Reverse-Pyramid occurs when few cases are screened and admitted but those that are, are complex; during a 'Black' scenario, the system is overburdened by both crowding and complexity. The Singapore hospital system is highly adapted to crowding, functioning remarkably well at constant near-full capacity in Peacetime and resilient to Endemic surges. We catalogue 26 strategies from lessons learnt relating to staffing, space, supplies and systems, crystalizing institutional memory. The DECIDE model advocates linking these strategies to types of surge threats and offers a step-by-step guide for coordinating outbreak planning and response. Lack of a shared definition and decision making of surge threats had rendered the procedures somewhat duplicative. This burden was paradoxically exacerbated by a health system that highly prizes planning and forward thinking, but worked largely in silo until an ID crisis hit. Many such lessons can be put into play to further strengthen our current hospital governance

  9. Statistical mapping of count survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, J. Andrew; Link, W.A.; Sauer, J.R.; Scott, J. Michael; Heglund, Patricia J.; Morrison, Michael L.; Haufler, Jonathan B.; Wall, William A.

    2002-01-01

    We apply a Poisson mixed model to the problem of mapping (or predicting) bird relative abundance from counts collected from the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS). The model expresses the logarithm of the Poisson mean as a sum of a fixed term (which may depend on habitat variables) and a random effect which accounts for remaining unexplained variation. The random effect is assumed to be spatially correlated, thus providing a more general model than the traditional Poisson regression approach. Consequently, the model is capable of improved prediction when data are autocorrelated. Moreover, formulation of the mapping problem in terms of a statistical model facilitates a wide variety of inference problems which are cumbersome or even impossible using standard methods of mapping. For example, assessment of prediction uncertainty, including the formal comparison of predictions at different locations, or through time, using the model-based prediction variance is straightforward under the Poisson model (not so with many nominally model-free methods). Also, ecologists may generally be interested in quantifying the response of a species to particular habitat covariates or other landscape attributes. Proper accounting for the uncertainty in these estimated effects is crucially dependent on specification of a meaningful statistical model. Finally, the model may be used to aid in sampling design, by modifying the existing sampling plan in a manner which minimizes some variance-based criterion. Model fitting under this model is carried out using a simulation technique known as Markov Chain Monte Carlo. Application of the model is illustrated using Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) counts from Pennsylvania BBS routes. We produce both a model-based map depicting relative abundance, and the corresponding map of prediction uncertainty. We briefly address the issue of spatial sampling design under this model. Finally, we close with some discussion of mapping in relation to

  10. Generating Multi-Destination Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junsong; Fan, Jiepeng; Luo, Zhenshan

    2017-08-01

    Multi-destination maps are a kind of navigation maps aimed to guide visitors to multiple destinations within a region, which can be of great help to urban visitors. However, they have not been developed in the current online map service. To address this issue, we introduce a novel layout model designed especially for generating multi-destination maps, which considers the global and local layout of a multi-destination map. We model the layout problem as a graph drawing that satisfies a set of hard and soft constraints. In the global layout phase, we balance the scale factor between ROIs. In the local layout phase, we make all edges have good visibility and optimize the map layout to preserve the relative length and angle of roads. We also propose a perturbation-based optimization method to find an optimal layout in the complex solution space. The multi-destination maps generated by our system are potential feasible on the modern mobile devices and our result can show an overview and a detail view of the whole map at the same time. In addition, we perform a user study to evaluate the effectiveness of our method, and the results prove that the multi-destination maps achieve our goals well.

  11. VECTOR MAPS IN MOBILE ROBOTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ales Jelinek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to provide a brief overview of vector map techniques used in mobile robotics and to present current state of the research in this field at the Brno University of Technology. Vector maps are described as a part of the simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM problem in the environment without artificial landmarks or global navigation system. The paper describes algorithms from data acquisition to map building but particular emphasis is put on segmentation, line extraction and scan matching algorithms. All significant algorithms are illustrated with experimental results.

  12. Introduction: Hazard mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Rex L.; Miyagi, Toyohiko; Lee, Saro; Trofymchuk, Oleksandr M

    2014-01-01

    Twenty papers were accepted into the session on landslide hazard mapping for oral presentation. The papers presented susceptibility and hazard analysis based on approaches ranging from field-based assessments to statistically based models to assessments that combined hydromechanical and probabilistic components. Many of the studies have taken advantage of increasing availability of remotely sensed data and nearly all relied on Geographic Information Systems to organize and analyze spatial data. The studies used a range of methods for assessing performance and validating hazard and susceptibility models. A few of the studies presented in this session also included some element of landslide risk assessment. This collection of papers clearly demonstrates that a wide range of approaches can lead to useful assessments of landslide susceptibility and hazard.

  13. 21-cm Intensity Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Aleksan, Roy; Ansari, Réza; Bandura, Kevin; Bond, Dick; Bunton, John; Carlson, Kermit; Chang, Tzu-Ching; DeJongh, Fritz; Dobbs, Matt; Dodelson, Scott; Darhmaoui, Hassane; Gnedin, Nick; Halpern, Mark; Hogan, Craig; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Legrouri, Ahmed; Loeb, Avi; Loudiyi, Khalid; Magneville, Christophe; Marriner, John; McGinnis, David P.; McWilliams, Bruce; Moniez, Marc; Palanque-Delabruille, Nathalie; Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Pen, Ue-Li; Rich, Jim; Scarpine, Vic; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sigurdson, Kris; Seljak, Uros; Stebbins, Albert; Steffen, Jason H.; Stoughton, Chris; Timbie, Peter T.; Vallinotto, Alberto; Teche, Christophe

    Using the 21 cm line, observed all-sky and across the redshift range from 0 to 5, the large scale structure of the Universe can be mapped in three dimensions. This can be accomplished by studying specific intensity with resolution ~ 10 Mpc, rather than via the usual galaxy redshift survey. The data set can be analyzed to determine Baryon Acoustic Oscillation wavelengths, in order to address the question: 'What is the nature of Dark Energy?' In addition, the study of Large Scale Structure across this range addresses the questions: 'How does Gravity effect very large objects?' and 'What is the composition our Universe?' The same data set can be used to search for and catalog time variable and transient radio sources.

  14. Visually-driven maps in area 3b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Esther; Haggard, Patrick; Villringer, Arno; Pleger, Burkhard; Sereno, Martin I

    2018-01-04

    Sensory perception relies on the precise neuronal encoding of modality-specific environmental features in primary sensory cortices. Some studies have reported the penetration of signals from other modalities even into early sensory areas. So far, no comprehensive account of maps induced by "foreign sources" exists. We addressed this question using surface-based topographic mapping techniques applied to ultra-high resolution fMRI neuroimaging data, measured in female participants. We show that fine-grained finger maps in human primary somatosensory cortex, area 3b, are somatotopically activated not only during tactile mechanical stimulation, but also when viewing the same fingers being touched. Visually-induced maps were weak in amplitude, but overlapped with the stronger tactile maps tangential to the cortical sheet when finger touches were observed in both first- and third-person perspectives. However, visually-induced maps did not overlap tactile maps when the observed fingers were only approached by an object but not actually touched. Our data provide evidence that "foreign source maps" in early sensory cortices are present in the healthy human brain, that their arrangement is precise, and that their induction is feature-selective. The computations required to generate such specific responses suggest that counterflow (feedback) processing may be much more spatially specific than has been often assumed.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTUsing ultra-high field fMRI, we provide empirical evidence that viewing touches activates topographically aligned single finger maps in human primary somatosensory cortical area 3b. This shows that "foreign source maps" in early sensory cortices are topographic, precise, and feature-selective in healthy human participants with intact sensory pathways. Copyright © 2018 the authors.

  15. Technical note Flood map development by coupling satellite maps ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flood maps are important for local authorities in designing mitigation plans to minimise damage and loss due to flooding. In recent years, flood events in the Sarawak River Basin, Malaysia have caused damage to property, loss of life and disruption of productive activities. Currently, the available flood map for Sarawak River ...

  16. The Gauss map on a class of interval translation mappings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, H; Troubetzkoy, S

    2003-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a class of interval translation map on three intervals. We show that in this class the typical ITM is of finite type (reduce to an interval exchange transformation) and that the complement contains a Cantor set. We relate our maps to substitution subshifts. Results on

  17. The Future of the Map Library and Map Librarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N. Moore

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Interest in maps and cartography is on the rise, partly spurred by new technologies such as Google Earth and Google Maps. But the new users, welcome as they are, do bring new challenges in terms of ease of use and speed of delivery. Therefore, LIBER's Groupe des Cartothécaires devoted its biennial conference to state-of-the-art technologies and concepts such as new retrieval techniques, Web 2.0 content, links with geospatial databases and FRBRisation to investigate their potential for and impact on map libraries and map librarians — whilst concluding that the particular expertise of a map librarian is as indispensable as ever. John Moore, the Group's Secretary, reports on the conference.

  18. Polder maps: improving OMIT maps by excluding bulk solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Afonine, Pavel V; Moriarty, Nigel W; Poon, Billy K; Sobolev, Oleg V; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Adams, Paul D

    2017-02-01

    The crystallographic maps that are routinely used during the structure-solution workflow are almost always model-biased because model information is used for their calculation. As these maps are also used to validate the atomic models that result from model building and refinement, this constitutes an immediate problem: anything added to the model will manifest itself in the map and thus hinder the validation. OMIT maps are a common tool to verify the presence of atoms in the model. The simplest way to compute an OMIT map is to exclude the atoms in question from the structure, update the corresponding structure factors and compute a residual map. It is then expected that if these atoms are present in the crystal structure, the electron density for the omitted atoms will be seen as positive features in this map. This, however, is complicated by the flat bulk-solvent model which is almost universally used in modern crystallographic refinement programs. This model postulates constant electron density at any voxel of the unit-cell volume that is not occupied by the atomic model. Consequently, if the density arising from the omitted atoms is weak then the bulk-solvent model may obscure it further. A possible solution to this problem is to prevent bulk solvent from entering the selected OMIT regions, which may improve the interpretative power of residual maps. This approach is called a polder (OMIT) map. Polder OMIT maps can be particularly useful for displaying weak densities of ligands, solvent molecules, side chains, alternative conformations and residues both in terminal regions and in loops. The tools described in this manuscript have been implemented and are available in PHENIX.

  19. Space Mapping and Defect Correction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Echeverria (David); D.J.P. Lahaye (Domenico); P.W. Hemker (Piet); W.H.A. Schilders (Wil); H.A. van der Vorst (Henk); J. Rommes

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIn this chapter we present the principles of the space-mapping iteration techniques for the efficient solution of optimization problems. We also show how space-mapping optimization can be understood in the framework of defect correction. We observe the difference between the solution

  20. Space mapping and defect correction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Echeverría, D.; Lahaye, D.; Hemker, P.W.; Schilders, W.H.A.; van der Vorst, H.A.; Rommes, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter we present the principles of the space-mapping iteration techniques for the efficient solution of optimization problems. We also show how space-mapping optimization can be understood in the framework of defect correction. We observe the difference between the solution of the