WorldWideScience

Sample records for response requirement effects

  1. Effects of Differing Response-Force Requirements on Food-Maintained Responding in C57BL/6J Mice

    Zarcone, Troy J.; Chen, Rong; Fowler, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of force requirements on response effort was examined using inbred C57BL/6J mice trained to press a disk with their snout. Lateral peak forces greater than 2 g were defined as responses (i.e., all responses above the measurement threshold). Different, higher force requirements were used to define criterion responses (a subclass of all…

  2. Learned helplessness: effects of response requirement and interval between treatment and testing.

    Hunziker, M H L; Dos Santos, C V

    2007-11-01

    Three experiments investigated learned helplessness in rats manipulating response requirements, shock duration, and intervals between treatment and testing. In Experiment 1, rats previously exposed to uncontrollable or no shocks were tested under one of four different contingencies of negative reinforcement: FR 1 or FR 2 escape contingency for running, and FR1 escape contingency for jumping (differing for the maximum shock duration of 10s or 30s). The results showed that the uncontrollable shocks produced a clear operant learning deficit (learned helplessness effect) only when the animals were tested under the jumping FR 1 escape contingency with 10-s max shock duration. Experiment 2 isolated of the effects of uncontrollability from shock exposure per se and showed that the escape deficit observed using the FR 1 escape jumping response (10-s shock duration) was produced by the uncontrollability of shock. Experiment 3 showed that using the FR 1 jumping escape contingency in the test, the learned helplessness effect was observed one, 14 or 28 days after treatment. These results suggest that running may not be an appropriate test for learned helplessness, and that many diverging results found in the literature might be accounted for by the confounding effects of respondent and operant contingencies present when running is required of rats.

  3. Effect of perioperative administration of dexketoprofen on opioid requirements and inflammatory response following elective hip arthroplasty.

    Iohom, G

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, the safety and analgesic efficacy of perioperative dexketoprofen were evaluated. METHODS: Thirty ASA I or II patients undergoing elective hip arthroplasty were randomized to one of two groups. One group (D) received dexketoprofen 25 mg tds for 24 h before and 48 h after surgery; the second group (P) received placebo tablets at equivalent times. Hyperbaric 0.5% bupivacaine (17.5 mg if greater than 70 kg and 15 mg if less than 70 kg) and preservative-free morphine (0.6 mg) were administered intrathecally. Postoperatively, PCA was provided (bolus morphine sulphate 1 mg; lockout 5 min; no continuous infusion). RESULTS: The two groups were similar in terms of age, gender, weight, height, ASA class, duration of operation, and level of sensory block on arrival to the recovery room. Groups were also similar in terms of blood loss, transfusion requirements, ventilatory frequency, and haemodynamic variables. According to visual analogue pain scores patients in group D experienced less pain at 15 h (P=0.02) postoperatively. Cumulative morphine consumption was also less in group D compared with group P at 6 (0.06 (0.2) vs 0.85 (1.4) mg, P=0.04) and 48 h postoperatively (10.1 (8) vs 26.2 (20) mg, P<0.01). Plasma interleukin 6 concentrations increased postoperatively to a significantly lesser extent in group D than in group P (P=0.02). Nausea and vomiting were less (P<0.01) in group D compared with group P at 18 h postoperatively. Sedation scores were less (P=0.03) in group D. CONCLUSIONS: Perioperative administration of dexketoprofen 25 mg 8 hourly markedly improves analgesia and decreases opioid requirements (and associated adverse effects) following hip arthroplasty. It appears that this regimen decreases the postoperative pro-inflammatory response.

  4. CaMKII effects on inotropic but not lusitropic force frequency responses require phospholamban

    Wu, Yiming; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Lee, Eun-Jeong; Hidalgo, Carlos; Yang, Jinying; Gao, Zhan; Li, Jingdong; Wehrens, Xander; Granzier, Henk; Anderson, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    Increasing heart rate enhances cardiac contractility (force frequency relationship, FFR) and accelerates cardiac relaxation (frequency-dependent acceleration of relaxation, FDAR). The positive FFR together with FDAR promotes rapid filling and ejection of blood from the left ventricle (LV) at higher heart rates. Recent studies indicate that the multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is involved in regulating FFR and FDAR. We used isolated perfused mouse hearts to study the mechanisms of FFR and FDAR in different genetic models, including transgenic myocardial CaMKII inhibition (AC3-I) and phosphalamban knockout (PLN−/−). When the rate was increased from 360 beats/min to 630 beats/min in wild type mouse hearts, the LV developed pressure (LVDP) and the maximum rate of increase in pressure (dP/dt max) increased by 37.6 ± 4.7% and 77.0 ± 8.1%, respectively. However, hearts from AC3-I littermates showed no increase of LVDP and a relatively modest (20.4 ± 3.9 %) increase in dP/dt max. PLN−/− hearts had a negative FFR, and myocardial AC3-I expression did not change the FFR in PLN−/− mice. PLN−/− mouse hearts did not exhibit FDAR, while PLN−/−mice with myocardial AC3-I expression showed further frequency dependent reductions in cardiac relaxation, suggesting CaMKII targets in addition to PLN were critical to myocardial relaxation. We incubated a constitutively active form of CaMKII with chemically-skinned myocardium and found that several myofilament proteins were phosphorylated by CaMKII. However, CaMKII did not affect myofilament calcium sensitivity. Our study shows that CaMKII plays an important role in modulating FFR and FDAR in murine hearts and suggest that PLN is a critical target for CaMKII effects on FFR, while CaMKII effects on FDAR partially require PLN-alternative targets. PMID:22796260

  5. 15 CFR 806.4 - Response required.

    2010-01-01

    ... ECONOMIC ANALYSIS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE DIRECT INVESTMENT SURVEYS § 806.4 Response required. Reports, as... certifying in writing to the fact that the person has no direct investments within the purview of the Act or... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Response required. 806.4 Section 806.4...

  6. Retinoic Acid Signaling in B Cells Is Required for the Generation of an Effective T-Independent Immune Response.

    Marks, Ellen; Ortiz, Carla; Pantazi, Eirini; Bailey, Charlotte S; Lord, Graham M; Waldschmidt, Thomas J; Noelle, Randolph J; Elgueta, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) plays an important role in the balance of inflammation and tolerance in T cells. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that RA facilitates IgA isotype switching in B cells in vivo . However, it is unclear whether RA has a direct effect on T-independent B cell responses in vivo . To address this question, we generated a mouse model where RA signaling is specifically silenced in the B cell lineage. This was achieved through the overexpression of a dominant negative receptor α for RA (dnRARα) in the B cell lineage. In this model, we found a dramatic reduction in marginal zone (MZ) B cells and accumulation of transitional 2 B cells in the spleen. We also observed a reduction in B1 B cells in the peritoneum with a defect in the T-independent B cell response against 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl. This was not a result of inhibited development of B cells in the bone marrow, but likely the result of both defective expression of S1P 1 in MZ B cells and a defect in the development of MZ and B1 B cells. This suggests that RARα expression in B cells is important for B cell frequency in the MZ and peritoneum, which is crucial for the generation of T-independent humoral responses.

  7. Retinoic Acid Signaling in B Cells Is Required for the Generation of an Effective T-Independent Immune Response

    Marks, Ellen; Ortiz, Carla; Pantazi, Eirini; Bailey, Charlotte S.; Lord, Graham M.; Waldschmidt, Thomas J.; Noelle, Randolph J.; Elgueta, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) plays an important role in the balance of inflammation and tolerance in T cells. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that RA facilitates IgA isotype switching in B cells in vivo. However, it is unclear whether RA has a direct effect on T-independent B cell responses in vivo. To address this question, we generated a mouse model where RA signaling is specifically silenced in the B cell lineage. This was achieved through the overexpression of a dominant negative receptor α for RA (dnRARα) in the B cell lineage. In this model, we found a dramatic reduction in marginal zone (MZ) B cells and accumulation of transitional 2 B cells in the spleen. We also observed a reduction in B1 B cells in the peritoneum with a defect in the T-independent B cell response against 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl. This was not a result of inhibited development of B cells in the bone marrow, but likely the result of both defective expression of S1P1 in MZ B cells and a defect in the development of MZ and B1 B cells. This suggests that RARα expression in B cells is important for B cell frequency in the MZ and peritoneum, which is crucial for the generation of T-independent humoral responses. PMID:28066447

  8. Responsibilities in the Usability Requirements Elicitation Process

    Marianella Aveledo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Like any other software system quality attribute, usability places requirements on software components. In particular, it has been demonstrated that certain usability features have a direct impact throughout the software process. This paper details an approach that looks at how to deal with certain usability features in the early software development stages. In particular, we consider usability features as functional usability requirements using patterns that have been termed usability patterns to elicit requirements. Additionally, we clearly establish the responsibilities of all the players at the usability requirements elicitation stage.

  9. Quantifying requirements volatility effects

    Kulk, G.P.; Verhoef, C.

    2008-01-01

    In an organization operating in the bancassurance sector we identified a low-risk IT subportfolio of 84 IT projects comprising together 16,500 function points, each project varying in size and duration, for which we were able to quantify its requirements volatility. This representative portfolio

  10. Spatial data requirements for emergency response

    Walker, H.

    1985-01-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) provides real-time assessments of the consequences resulting from an atmospheric radioactive material. In support of this operation, a system has been created which integrates numerical models, data acquisition systems, data analysis techniques, and professional staff. Components of this system rely to large degree on spatial data of various kinds. Of particular importance is the rapid generation of digital terrain models for any area in the continental U.S. The digital terrain models are used as input to atmospheric models and serve to familiarize assessors to new areas by presenting the terrain surface as a graphical image. In addition, base map data (roads, rivers, political boundaries) must also be supplied as an overlay to ARAC graphical products. A terrain data base and an associated acquisition system have been developed that provide the required terrain data within ten minutes. This terrain data base was derived from the Defense Mapping Ageny's planar data. A digital base map data base is currently being developed from the U.S. Geographical Survey's 1:2,000,000 Digital Line Graph data as well as their Geographic Names Information System. This base map data base improves ARAC's response to its mapping needs anywhere in the continental U.S

  11. Cathepsins are required for Toll-like receptor 9 responses

    Matsumoto, Fumi; Saitoh, Shin-ichiroh; Fukui, Ryutaroh; Kobayashi, Toshihiko; Tanimura, Natsuko; Konno, Kazunori; Kusumoto, Yutaka; Akashi-Takamura, Sachiko; Miyake, Kensuke

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) recognize a variety of microbial products and activate defense responses. Pathogen sensing by TLR2/4 requires accessory molecules, whereas little is known about a molecule required for DNA recognition by TLR9. After endocytosis of microbes, microbial DNA is exposed and recognized by TLR9 in lysosomes. We here show that cathepsins, lysosomal cysteine proteases, are required for TLR9 responses. A cell line Ba/F3 was found to be defective in TLR9 responses despite enforced TLR9 expression. Functional cloning with Ba/F3 identified cathepsin B/L as a molecule required for TLR9 responses. The protease activity was essential for the complementing effect. TLR9 responses were also conferred by cathepsin S or F, but not by cathepsin H. TLR9-dependent B cell proliferation and CD86 upregulation were apparently downregulated by cathepsin B/L inhibitors. Cathepsin B inhibitor downregulated interaction of CpG-B with TLR9 in 293T cells. These results suggest roles for cathepsins in DNA recognition by TLR9

  12. Employer Requirements to Work during Emergency Responses: Key Ethics Considerations.

    Rutkow, Lainie; Taylor, Holly A; Powell, Tia

    2017-03-01

    Local health departments and their employees are at the forefront of emergency preparedness and response. Yet, recent studies have found that some local public health workers are unwilling to report to work in a variety of disaster scenarios. This can greatly compromise a response, as many local health departments need "all hands on deck" to effectively meet increased demands. To address these concerns, local health departments have employed varied policy strategies to ensure that employees do report to work. After describing different approaches taken by local health departments throughout the United States, we briefly identify and explore key ethics considerations that arise for local health departments when employees are required to report to work for emergency responses. We then discuss how these ethics considerations may inform local health department practices intended to promote a robust emergency response.

  13. Some Qualitative Requirements for Testing of Nuclear Emergency Response Robots

    Eom, Heungseop; Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Youngsoo; Jeong, Kyungmin

    2014-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is carrying out the project 'Development of Core Technology for Remote Response in Nuclear Emergency Situation', and as a part of the project, we are studying the reliability and performance requirements of nuclear emergency response robots. In this paper, we described some qualitative requirements for testing of nuclear emergency response robots which are different to general emergency response robots. We briefly introduced test requirements of general emergency response robots and described some qualitative aspects of test requirements for nuclear emergency response robots. When considering an immature field-robot technology and variety of nuclear emergency situations, it seems hard to establish quantitative test requirements of these robots at this time. However, based on studies of nuclear severe accidents and the experience of Fukushima NPP accident, we can expect some test requirements including quantitative ones for nuclear emergency response robots

  14. Effective operational oil spill response planning

    Meyers, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    An operational Contingency Plan is one of the single most important aspects of effective oil spill response operations. It is a spill control game plan. A thorough contingency plan provides a set of guidelines that can be used to help direct all phases of spill response activities. More than simple a compilation of lists and rosters, the contingency plan reflects strategic and philosophical elements of spill response that help to ensure a viable response to any spill incident. Facilities and oil carrying vessels should have well maintained contingency plans with these features. This paper describes the requirement for effective oil spill response pans and the training required to exercise them

  15. Responsibility for the Violation of Ecological Safety Requirements

    Selivanovskaya, J. I.; Gilmutdinova, I.

    2018-01-01

    The article deals with the problems of responsibility for the violation of ecological safety requirements from the point of view of sustainable development of the state. Such types of responsibility as property, disciplinary, financial, administrative and criminal responsibility in the area are analysed. Suggestions on the improvement of legislation are put forward. Among other things it is suggested to introduce criminal sanctions against legal bodies (enterprises) for ecological crimes with punishments in the form of fines, suspension or discontinuation of activities.

  16. Glucosinolate metabolites required for an Arabidopsis innate immune response.

    Clay, Nicole K; Adio, Adewale M; Denoux, Carine; Jander, Georg; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2009-01-02

    The perception of pathogen or microbe-associated molecular pattern molecules by plants triggers a basal defense response analogous to animal innate immunity and is defined partly by the deposition of the glucan polymer callose at the cell wall at the site of pathogen contact. Transcriptional and metabolic profiling in Arabidopsis mutants, coupled with the monitoring of pathogen-triggered callose deposition, have identified major roles in pathogen response for the plant hormone ethylene and the secondary metabolite 4-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate. Two genes, PEN2 and PEN3, are also necessary for resistance to pathogens and are required for both callose deposition and glucosinolate activation, suggesting that the pathogen-triggered callose response is required for resistance to microbial pathogens. Our study shows that well-studied plant metabolites, previously identified as important in avoiding damage by herbivores, are also required as a component of the plant defense response against microbial pathogens.

  17. Glucosinolate Metabolites Required for an Arabidopsis Innate Immune Response*

    Clay, Nicole K.; Adio, Adewale M.; Denoux, Carine; Jander, Georg; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The perception of pathogen or microbe-associated molecular pattern molecules by plants triggers a basal defense response analogous to animal innate immunity, and is defined in part by the deposition of the glucan polymer callose at the cell wall at the site of pathogen contact. Transcriptional and metabolic profiling in Arabidopsis mutants, coupled with the monitoring of pathogen triggered callose deposition, have identified major roles in pathogen response for the plant hormone ethylene and the secondary metabolite 4-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate. Two genes, PEN2 and PEN3, are also necessary for resistance to pathogens and are required for both callose deposition and glucosinolate activation, suggesting that the pathogen triggered callose response is required for resistance to microbial pathogens. Our study shows that well-studied plant metabolites, previously identified as important in avoiding damage by herbivores, are also required as a component of the plant defense response against microbial pathogens. PMID:19095898

  18. Oil spills - effects and response

    Dicks, B.M.; White, I.C.

    1992-01-01

    The incidence of oil spills from offshore industry operates on the United Kingdom continental shelf is reported for the period 1979 to 1988. The properties of North Sea crude oils which determine their fate and effects when spilled onto the surface of the sea are summarized. Examples of oil impacts on specific North Sea habitats and communities are used to illustrate the effect of oil spills and the economic impact on human activities such as recreation, industry and fishing are considered. Since most oil spills will dissipate through natural processes if they remain at sea long enough, the most appropriate response to a spill from a platform in the middle of the sea is often aerial surveillance to monitor the movement and dissipation of the oil. However, if an active response is required, containment and collection of the oil or chemical dispersion are the two main options. In coastal waters, it will be necessary to focus protection efforts on selected sensitive areas of coastline. Once the oil is ashore there are still occasions when the best course of actions is to do nothing as clean-up operations may do more harm than good. If oil removal is feasible and necessary, the methods which are most effective are usually straightforward and require no sophisticated technology. Contingency planning is an essential preparation for all operations to deal with oil spills. (UK)

  19. Exotic mosquito threats require strategic surveillance and response planning.

    Webb, Cameron E; Doggett, Stephen L

    2016-12-14

    Mosquito-borne diseases caused by endemic pathogens such as Ross River, Barmah Forest and Murray Valley encephalitis viruses are an annual concern in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. More than a dozen mosquito species have been implicated in the transmission of these pathogens, with each mosquito occupying a specialised ecological niche that influences their habitat associations, host feeding preferences and the environmental drivers of their abundance. The NSW Arbovirus Surveillance and Mosquito Monitoring Program provides an early warning system for potential outbreaks of mosquito-borne disease by tracking annual activity of these mosquitoes and their associated pathogens. Although the program will effectively track changes in local mosquito populations that may increase with a changing climate, urbanisation and wetland rehabilitation, it will be less effective with current surveillance methodologies at detecting or monitoring changes in exotic mosquito threats, where different surveillance strategies need to be used. Exotic container-inhabiting mosquitoes such as Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus pose a threat to NSW because they are nuisance-biting pests and vectors of pathogens such as dengue, chikungunya and Zika viruses. International movement of humans and their belongings have spread these mosquitoes to many regions of the world. In recent years, these two mosquitoes have been detected by the Australian Government Department of Agriculture and Water Resources at local airports and seaports. To target the detection of these exotic mosquitoes, new trapping technologies and networks of surveillance locations are required. Additionally, incursions of these mosquitoes into urban areas of the state will require strategic responses to minimise substantial public health and economic burdens to local communities.

  20. Effective healthcare teams require effective team members: defining teamwork competencies

    Leggat Sandra G

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although effective teamwork has been consistently identified as a requirement for enhanced clinical outcomes in the provision of healthcare, there is limited knowledge of what makes health professionals effective team members, and even less information on how to develop skills for teamwork. This study identified critical teamwork competencies for health service managers. Methods Members of a state branch of the professional association of Australian health service managers participated in a teamwork survey. Results The 37% response rate enabled identification of a management teamwork competency set comprising leadership, knowledge of organizational goals and strategies and organizational commitment, respect for others, commitment to working collaboratively and to achieving a quality outcome. Conclusion Although not part of the research question the data suggested that the competencies for effective teamwork are perceived to be different for management and clinical teams, and there are differences in the perceptions of effective teamwork competencies between male and female health service managers. This study adds to the growing evidence that the focus on individual skill development and individual accountability and achievement that results from existing models of health professional training, and which is continually reinforced by human resource management practices within healthcare systems, is not consistent with the competencies required for effective teamwork.

  1. Clarification of TMI action plan requirements. Requirements for emergency response capability

    1983-01-01

    This document, Supplement 1 to NUREG-0737, is a letter from D. G. Eisenhut, Director of the Division of Licensing, NRR, to licensees of operating power reactors, applicants for operating licenses, and holders of construction permits forwarding post-TMI requirements for emergency response capability which have been approved for implementation. On October 30, 1980, the NRC staff issued NUREG-0737, which incorporated into one document all TMI-related items approved for implementation by the Commission at that time. In this NRC report, additional clarification is provided regarding Safety Parameter Display Systems, Detailed Control Room Design Reviews, Regulatory Guide 1.97 (Revision 2) - Application to Emergency Response Facilities, Upgrade of Emergency Operating Procedures, Emergency Response Facilities, and Meteorological Data

  2. Design Requirements for Designing Responsive Modular Manufacturing Systems

    Jørgensen, Steffen; Madsen, Ole; Nielsen, Kjeld

    2011-01-01

    Customers demand the newest technologies, newest designs, the ability to customise, high quality, and all this at a low cost. These are trends which challenge the traditional way of operating manufacturing companies, especially in regard to product development and manufacturing. Research...... the needed flexibility and responsiveness, but such systems are not yet fully achieved. From related theory it is known that achieving modular benefits depend on the modular architecture; a modular architecture which must be developed according to the customer needs. This makes production needs a design...... requirement in order to achieve responsiveness and other benefits of modular manufacturing systems (MMS). Due to the complex and interrelated nature of a production system and its surroundings these production needs are complex to identify. This paper presents an analysis framework for identification...

  3. Requirement of trained first responders and national level preparedness for prevention and response to radiological terrorism

    Sharma, R.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we have identified the educational needs for response to radiological emergency in India with major thrust on training. The paper has also enumerated the available educational and training infrastructure, the human resources, as well as the important stake holders for development of sustainable education and training programme. The training of emergency response personnel will help in quick decision making, planning and effective response during such emergencies. Medical Emergency management requires planning by hospitals which includes up-gradation of earmarked hospitals, development of mobile hospitals and mobile medical teams supported by communication backups and adequate medical logistics for radiological emergency. Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) is a nodal agency for advising authorities for any nuclear/radiological emergency in public domain. DAE through the various ERCs have already developed technical expertise, systems, software and methodology for quick impact assessment which may be required for the implementation of countermeasures if required following any nuclear disaster/radiological emergency

  4. The unfolded protein response is required for dendrite morphogenesis

    Wei, Xing; Howell, Audrey S; Dong, Xintong; Taylor, Caitlin A; Cooper, Roshni C; Zhang, Jianqi; Zou, Wei; Sherwood, David R; Shen, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Precise patterning of dendritic fields is essential for the formation and function of neuronal circuits. During development, dendrites acquire their morphology by exuberant branching. How neurons cope with the increased load of protein production required for this rapid growth is poorly understood. Here we show that the physiological unfolded protein response (UPR) is induced in the highly branched Caenorhabditis elegans sensory neuron PVD during dendrite morphogenesis. Perturbation of the IRE1 arm of the UPR pathway causes loss of dendritic branches, a phenotype that can be rescued by overexpression of the ER chaperone HSP-4 (a homolog of mammalian BiP/ grp78). Surprisingly, a single transmembrane leucine-rich repeat protein, DMA-1, plays a major role in the induction of the UPR and the dendritic phenotype in the UPR mutants. These findings reveal a significant role for the physiological UPR in the maintenance of ER homeostasis during morphogenesis of large dendritic arbors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06963.001 PMID:26052671

  5. Army Materiel Requirements Documents: Qualitative Analysis of Efficiency and Effectiveness

    2013-06-01

    focuses on the program’s time to execute their mission based off the MRDs/MCDs. We measure efficiency based on two BPP initiatives: (1) Build...definitions of each BPP initiative during our interviews. A poor rating indicates the requirement documents did not sufficiently support the program...in terms of efficiency and effectiveness according to BPP initiatives. For efficiency, we assign a qualitative measure based on SME responses across

  6. 49 CFR 194.107 - General response plan requirements.

    2010-10-01

    ...'s clear understanding of the function of the Federal response structure, including procedures to... organization's role and the Federal On Scene Coordinator's role in pollution response; (ii) Establish... mitigation procedures, (iv) The name, address, and telephone number of the oil spill response organization...

  7. Justification of response time testing requirements for pressure and differential pressure sensors

    Weiss, J.M.; Mayo, C.; Swisher, V.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on response time testing (RTT) requirements that were imposed on pressure, differential pressure sensors as a conservative approach to insure that assumptions in the plant safety analyses were met. The purpose of this project has been to identify the need for response time testing using the bases identified in IEEE Standard 338. A combination of plant data analyses, failure modes, and effects analyses (FMEAs) was performed. Eighteen currently qualified sensor models were utilized. The results of these analyses indicate that there are only two failure modes that affect response time, not sensor output concurrently. For these failure modes, appropriate plant actions and testing techniques were identified. Safety system RTT requirements were established by IEEE Standard 338-1975. Criteria for the Periodic Testing of Class IE Power, Protection Systems, presuming the need existed for this testing. This standard established guidelines for periodic testing to verify that loop response times of installed nuclear safety-related equipment were within the limits presumed by the design basis plant transient, accident analyses. The requirements covered all passive, active components in an instrument loop, including sensors. Individual components could be tested either in groups or separately to determine the overall loop response time

  8. Preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency. Safety requirements

    2004-01-01

    industrial, agricultural, medical, research and teaching applications. Facilities using radiation or radioactive material. And satellites and radiothermal generators using radiation sources or reactors. The requirements also cover emergencies arising from radiation sources of an unknown or untraceable origin. The requirements apply to actions in preparedness and response for emergencies involving hazards associated with ionizing radiation only. The requirements do not apply to preparedness or response for emergencies involving hazards associated with non-ionizing radiation such as microwave, ultraviolet or infrared radiation. The IAEA has issued Safety Fundamentals publications relating to nuclear installations and to radioactive waste management. In addition, the IAEA has issued Safety Series and Safety Standards Series publications that have established requirements relating to emergency preparedness for the safe use of radiation sources, the transport of radioactive material, legal and governmental infrastructure, the design and operation of nuclear power plants, and the design and operation of research reactors. This Safety Requirements publication incorporates, elaborates on, augments and structures all the requirements for emergency preparedness and response established in these previously issued safety standards. To this effect some requirements established in these other safety standards have been incorporated as quotations in this publication (revised text is shown in square brackets and omissions are indicated by ellipses). In other cases footnotes state where related requirements have been established

  9. Requirements for critical thinking support in crisis response

    Ven, J.G.M. van de; Schraagen, J.M.C.

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to describe the research done during the past four years in the Combined Systems Project. The aim of this project was to use innovative techniques to improve the decision-making process in crisis response organizations. The focus was on building situation awareness

  10. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Requirements Document

    Sharry, J A

    2016-10-04

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head James Colson. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only addresses emergency response.

  11. 77 FR 11995 - Passenger Vessel Operator Financial Responsibility Requirements for Non-Performance of...

    2012-02-28

    ... Vessel Operator Financial Responsibility Requirements for Non-Performance of Transportation AGENCY..., 2011, the Commission issued its Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) to update its financial... cost of financial responsibility coverage because of the use of alternative coverage options. However...

  12. 33 CFR 155.1045 - Response plan requirements for vessels carrying oil as a secondary cargo.

    2010-07-01

    ... PREVENTION REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS Tank Vessel Response Plans for Oil § 155.1045 Response plan requirements... actions. (4) The organizational structure that will be used to manage the response actions. This structure... with government agencies; (v) Spill response operations; (vi) Planning; (vii) Logistics support; and...

  13. Extension agents' technical knowledge requirements for effective ...

    Technical knowledge requirements of extension agents were investigated in this study. Data for the study was collected with the aid of structured questionnaire administered to the 78 respondents. It was found that respondents were mainly males, were married, were in the middle age category, had BSc/HND, made ...

  14. Requirements for effective functional breast imaging

    Weinberg, I.N.; Zawarzin, V.; Adler, L.P.; Pani, R.; DeVincentis, G.; Khalkhali, I.; Vargas, H.; Venegas, R.; Kim, S.C.; Bakale, G.; Levine, E.; Perrier, N.; Freimanis, R.I.; Lesko, N.M.; Newman, D.P.; Geisinger, K.R.; Berg, W.A.; Masood, S.

    2003-01-01

    Most nuclear medicine physicists were trained on devices aimed at functional neuroimaging. The clinical goals of brain-centered devices differ dramatically from the parameters needed to be useful in the breast clinic. We will discuss similarities and differences that impact on design considerations, and describe our latest generation of positron emission mammography and intraoperative products. - Source of physiologic contrast: Clinical neuroimaging depends on flow agents to detect the presence of breaks in the blood-brain barrier. Breast flow agents are nonspecific, and may miss preinvasive lesions. - Resolution: Brain cancers are generally diagnosed at late stages, so resolution is not so critical. Detecting early breast cancers, and specifying margins for surgery requires 3 mm spatial resolution or better. - Prevalence: Primary brain cancer is uncommon, and lesions mimicking brain cancer are rare. Primary breast cancer is common, and benign lesions are even more common, so specificity and biopsy capability are very important. - Anatomic references: Brain structure is standard, while breast structure is highly variable, requiring immobilization/compression for physiologic imaging and biopsy. - Surgery: Complete cancer resections for brain are very rare, but are possible for breast with appropriate imaging guidance, implying the need for rapid and reliable imaging. To summarize, the breast clinic needs a rapid and highly sensitive method of assessing breast physiology, compatible with biopsy and surgery. Positron emission mammography devices, in handheld and X-ray platform based configurations, are ideal for this mission

  15. Sites Requiring Facility Response Plans, Geographic NAD83, EPA (2006) [facility_response_plan_sites_la_EPA_2007

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — Locations of facilities in Louisiana requiring Oil Pollution Act (OPA) Facility Response Plans (FRP). The dataset was provided by the Region 6 OSCARS program....

  16. 24 CFR 1000.20 - Is an Indian tribe required to assume environmental review responsibilities?

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Is an Indian tribe required to assume environmental review responsibilities? 1000.20 Section 1000.20 Housing and Urban Development... § 1000.20 Is an Indian tribe required to assume environmental review responsibilities? (a) No. It is an...

  17. Dosimetric precision requirements and quantities for characterizing the response of tumors and normal tissues

    Brahme, A [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics

    1996-08-01

    Based on simple radiobiological models the effect of the distribution of absorbed dose in therapy beams on the radiation response of tumor and normal tissue volumes are investigated. Under the assumption that the dose variation in the treated volume is small it is shown that the response of the tissue to radiation is determined mainly by the mean dose to the tumor or normal tissue volume in question. Quantitative expressions are also given for the increased probability of normal tissue complications and the decreased probability of tumor control as a function of increasing dose variations around the mean dose level to these tissues. When the dose variations are large the minimum tumor dose (to cm{sup 3} size volumes) will generally be better related to tumor control and the highest dose to significant portions of normal tissue correlates best to complications. In order not to lose more than one out of 20 curable patients (95% of highest possible treatment outcome) the required accuracy in the dose distribution delivered to the target volume should be 2.5% (1{sigma}) for a mean dose response gradient {gamma} in the range 2 - 3. For more steeply responding tumors and normal tissues even stricter requirements may be desirable. (author). 15 refs, 6 figs.

  18. 49 CFR 568.7 - Requirements for manufacturers who assume legal responsibility for a vehicle.

    2010-10-01

    ... MANUFACTURED IN TWO OR MORE STAGES § 568.7 Requirements for manufacturers who assume legal responsibility for a vehicle. (a) If an incomplete vehicle manufacturer assumes legal responsibility for all duties and... 49 CFR 567.5(f). (b) If an intermediate manufacturer of a vehicle assumes legal responsibility for...

  19. Bacterial Nitric Oxide Synthase Is Required for the Staphylococcus aureus Response to Heme Stress.

    Surdel, Matthew C; Dutter, Brendan F; Sulikowski, Gary A; Skaar, Eric P

    2016-08-12

    Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Within the vertebrate host, S. aureus requires heme as a nutrient iron source and as a cofactor for multiple cellular processes. Although required for pathogenesis, excess heme is toxic. S. aureus employs a two-component system, the heme sensor system (HssRS), to sense and protect against heme toxicity. Upon activation, HssRS induces the expression of the heme-regulated transporter (HrtAB), an efflux pump that alleviates heme toxicity. The ability to sense and respond to heme is critical for the pathogenesis of numerous Gram-positive organisms, yet the mechanism of heme sensing remains unknown. Compound '3981 was identified in a high-throughput screen as an activator of staphylococcal HssRS that triggers HssRS independently of heme accumulation. '3981 is toxic to S. aureus; however, derivatives of '3981 were synthesized that lack toxicity while retaining HssRS activation, enabling the interrogation of the heme stress response without confounding toxic effects of the parent molecule. Using '3981 derivatives as probes of the heme stress response, numerous genes required for '3981-induced activation of HssRS were uncovered. Specifically, multiple genes involved in the production of nitric oxide were identified, including the gene encoding bacterial nitric oxide synthase (bNOS). bNOS protects S. aureus from oxidative stress imposed by heme. Taken together, this work identifies bNOS as crucial for the S. aureus heme stress response, providing evidence that nitric oxide synthesis and heme sensing are intertwined.

  20. Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. General Safety Requirements (Chinese Edition)

    2016-01-01

    This publication, jointly sponsored by the FAO, IAEA, ICAO, ILO, IMO, INTERPOL, OECD/NEA, PAHO, CTBTO, UNEP, OCHA, WHO and WMO, is the new edition establishing the requirements for preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency which takes into account the latest experience and developments in the area. It supersedes the previous edition of the Safety Requirements for emergency preparedness and response, Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2, which was published in 2002. This publication establishes the requirements for ensuring an adequate level of preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency, irrespective of its cause. These Safety Requirements are intended to be used by governments, emergency response organizations, other authorities at the local, regional and national levels, operating organizations and the regulatory body as well as by relevant international organizations at the international level.

  1. Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. General Safety Requirements (Arabic Edition)

    2016-01-01

    This publication, jointly sponsored by the FAO, IAEA, ICAO, ILO, IMO, INTERPOL, OECD/NEA, PAHO, CTBTO, UNEP, OCHA, WHO and WMO, is the new edition establishing the requirements for preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency which takes into account the latest experience and developments in the area. It supersedes the previous edition of the Safety Requirements for emergency preparedness and response, Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2, which was published in 2002. This publication establishes the requirements for ensuring an adequate level of preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency, irrespective of its cause. These Safety Requirements are intended to be used by governments, emergency response organizations, other authorities at the local, regional and national levels, operating organizations and the regulatory body as well as by relevant international organizations at the international level.

  2. Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. General Safety Requirements (Russian Edition)

    2016-01-01

    This publication, jointly sponsored by the FAO, IAEA, ICAO, ILO, IMO, INTERPOL, OECD/NEA, PAHO, CTBTO, UNEP, OCHA, WHO and WMO, is the new edition establishing the requirements for preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency which takes into account the latest experience and developments in the area. It supersedes the previous edition of the Safety Requirements for emergency preparedness and response, Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2, which was published in 2002. This publication establishes the requirements for ensuring an adequate level of preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency, irrespective of its cause. These Safety Requirements are intended to be used by governments, emergency response organizations, other authorities at the local, regional and national levels, operating organizations and the regulatory body as well as by relevant international organizations at the international level.

  3. Effective Teaching Methods in Higher Education: Requirements and Barriers.

    Shirani Bidabadi, Nahid; Nasr Isfahani, Ahmmadreza; Rouhollahi, Amir; Khalili, Roya

    2016-10-01

    Teaching is one of the main components in educational planning which is a key factor in conducting educational plans. Despite the importance of good teaching, the outcomes are far from ideal. The present qualitative study aimed to investigate effective teaching in higher education in Iran based on the experiences of best professors in the country and the best local professors of Isfahan University of Technology. This qualitative content analysis study was conducted through purposeful sampling. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten faculty members (3 of them from the best professors in the country and 7 from the best local professors). Content analysis was performed by MAXQDA software. The codes, categories and themes were explored through an inductive process that began from semantic units or direct quotations to general themes. According to the results of this study, the best teaching approach is the mixed method (student-centered together with teacher-centered) plus educational planning and previous readiness. But whenever the teachers can teach using this method confront with some barriers and requirements; some of these requirements are prerequisite in professors' behavior and some of these are prerequisite in professors' outlook. Also, there are some major barriers, some of which are associated with the professors' operation and others are related to laws and regulations. Implications of these findings for teachers' preparation in education are discussed. In the present study, it was illustrated that a good teaching method helps the students to question their preconceptions, and motivates them to learn, by putting them in a situation in which they come to see themselves as the authors of answers, as the agents of responsibility for change. But training through this method has some barriers and requirements. To have an effective teaching; the faculty members of the universities should be awarded of these barriers and requirements as a way to

  4. Effective teaching methods in higher education: requirements and barriers

    NAHID SHIRANI BIDABADI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Teaching is one of the main components in educational planning which is a key factor in conducting educational plans. Despite the importance of good teaching, the outcomes are far from ideal. The present qualitative study aimed to investigate effective teaching in higher education in Iran based on the experiences of best professors in the country and the best local professors of Isfahan University of Technology. Methods: This qualitative content analysis study was conducted through purposeful sampling. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten faculty members (3 of them from the best professors in the country and 7 from the best local professors. Content analysis was performed by MAXQDA software. The codes, categories and themes were explored through an inductive process that began from semantic units or direct quotations to general themes. Results: According to the results of this study, the best teaching approach is the mixed method (student-centered together with teacher-centered plus educational planning and previous readiness. But whenever the teachers can teach using this method confront with some barriers and requirements; some of these requirements are prerequisite in professors’ behavior and some of these are prerequisite in professors’ outlook. Also, there are some major barriers, some of which are associated with the professors’ operation and others are related to laws and regulations. Implications of these findings for teachers’ preparation in education are discussed. Conclusion: In the present study, it was illustrated that a good teaching method helps the students to question their preconceptions, and motivates them to learn, by putting them in a situation in which they come to see themselves as the authors of answers, as the agents of responsibility for change. But training through this method has some barriers and requirements. To have an effective teaching; the faculty members of the universities

  5. Response Expectancy and the Placebo Effect.

    Kirsch, Irving

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, I review basic tenets of response expectancy theory (Kirsch, 1985), beginning with the important distinction between response expectancies and stimulus expectancies. Although both can affect experience, the effects of response expectancies are stronger and more resistant to extinction than those of stimulus expectancies. Further, response expectancies are especially important to understanding placebo effects. The response expectancy framework is consistent with and has been amplified by the Bayesian model of predictive coding. Clinical implications of these phenomena are exemplified. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Poliovirus intrahost evolution is required to overcome tissue-specific innate immune responses.

    Xiao, Yinghong; Dolan, Patrick Timothy; Goldstein, Elizabeth Faul; Li, Min; Farkov, Mikhail; Brodsky, Leonid; Andino, Raul

    2017-08-29

    RNA viruses, such as poliovirus, have a great evolutionary capacity, allowing them to quickly adapt and overcome challenges encountered during infection. Here we show that poliovirus infection in immune-competent mice requires adaptation to tissue-specific innate immune microenvironments. The ability of the virus to establish robust infection and virulence correlates with its evolutionary capacity. We further identify a region in the multi-functional poliovirus protein 2B as a hotspot for the accumulation of minor alleles that facilitate a more effective suppression of the interferon response. We propose that population genetic dynamics enables poliovirus spread between tissues through optimization of the genetic composition of low frequency variants, which together cooperate to circumvent tissue-specific challenges. Thus, intrahost virus evolution determines pathogenesis, allowing a dynamic regulation of viral functions required to overcome barriers to infection.RNA viruses, such as polioviruses, have a great evolutionary capacity and can adapt quickly during infection. Here, the authors show that poliovirus infection in mice requires adaptation to innate immune microenvironments encountered in different tissues.

  7. 44 CFR 19.125 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-10-01

    ... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Introduction § 19.125 Effect of other requirements. (a... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effect of other requirements. 19.125 Section 19.125 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY...

  8. The characterization and geographical distribution of the genes responsible for vernalization requirement in Chinese bread wheat.

    Sun, Qing-Ming; Zhou, Rong-Hua; Gao, Li-Feng; Zhao, Guang-Yao; Jia, Ji-Zeng

    2009-04-01

    The frequency and distribution of the major vernalization requirement genes and their effects on growth habits were studied. Of the 551 bread wheat genotypes tested, seven allelic combinations of the three Vrn-1 genes were found to be responsible for the spring habit, three for the facultative habit and one for the winter habit. The three Vrn-1 genes behaved additively with the dominant allele of Vrn-A1 exerting the strongest effect. The allele combinations of the facultative genotypes and the discovery of spring genotypes with "winter" allele of Vrn-1 implied the presence of as yet unidentified alleles/genes for vernalization response. The dominant alleles of the three Vrn-1 genes were found in all ten ecological regions where wheat is cultivated in China, with Vrn-D1 as the most common allele in nine and Vrn-A1 in one. The combination of vrn-A1vrn-B1Vrn-D1 was the predominant genotype in seven of the regions. Compared with landraces, improved varieties contain a higher proportion of the spring type. This was attributed by a higher frequency of the dominant Vrn-A1 and Vrn-B1 alleles in the latter. Correlations between Vrn-1 allelic constitutions and heading date, spike length, plant type as well as cold tolerance were established.

  9. Response efficiency during functional communication training: effects of effort on response allocation.

    Richman, D M; Wacker, D P; Winborn, L

    2001-01-01

    An analogue functional analysis revealed that the problem behavior of a young child with developmental delays was maintained by positive reinforcement. A concurrent-schedule procedure was then used to vary the amount of effort required to emit mands. Results suggested that response effort can be an important variable when developing effective functional communication training programs.

  10. Is a Responsive Default Mode Network Required for Successful Working Memory Task Performance?

    Čeko, Marta; Gracely, John L.; Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Seminowicz, David A.; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2015-01-01

    In studies of cognitive processing using tasks with externally directed attention, regions showing increased (external-task-positive) and decreased or “negative” [default-mode network (DMN)] fMRI responses during task performance are dynamically responsive to increasing task difficulty. Responsiveness (modulation of fMRI signal by increasing load) has been linked directly to successful cognitive task performance in external-task-positive regions but not in DMN regions. To investigate whether a responsive DMN is required for successful cognitive performance, we compared healthy human subjects (n = 23) with individuals shown to have decreased DMN engagement (chronic pain patients, n = 28). Subjects performed a multilevel working-memory task (N-back) during fMRI. If a responsive DMN is required for successful performance, patients having reduced DMN responsiveness should show worsened performance; if performance is not reduced, their brains should show compensatory activation in external-task-positive regions or elsewhere. All subjects showed decreased accuracy and increased reaction times with increasing task level, with no significant group differences on either measure at any level. Patients had significantly reduced negative fMRI response (deactivation) of DMN regions (posterior cingulate/precuneus, medial prefrontal cortex). Controls showed expected modulation of DMN deactivation with increasing task difficulty. Patients showed significantly reduced modulation of DMN deactivation by task difficulty, despite their successful task performance. We found no evidence of compensatory neural recruitment in external-task-positive regions or elsewhere. Individual responsiveness of the external-task-positive ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, but not of DMN regions, correlated with task accuracy. These findings suggest that a responsive DMN may not be required for successful cognitive performance; a responsive external-task-positive network may be sufficient

  11. Is a Responsive Default Mode Network Required for Successful Working Memory Task Performance?

    Čeko, Marta; Gracely, John L; Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Seminowicz, David A; Schweinhardt, Petra; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2015-08-19

    In studies of cognitive processing using tasks with externally directed attention, regions showing increased (external-task-positive) and decreased or "negative" [default-mode network (DMN)] fMRI responses during task performance are dynamically responsive to increasing task difficulty. Responsiveness (modulation of fMRI signal by increasing load) has been linked directly to successful cognitive task performance in external-task-positive regions but not in DMN regions. To investigate whether a responsive DMN is required for successful cognitive performance, we compared healthy human subjects (n = 23) with individuals shown to have decreased DMN engagement (chronic pain patients, n = 28). Subjects performed a multilevel working-memory task (N-back) during fMRI. If a responsive DMN is required for successful performance, patients having reduced DMN responsiveness should show worsened performance; if performance is not reduced, their brains should show compensatory activation in external-task-positive regions or elsewhere. All subjects showed decreased accuracy and increased reaction times with increasing task level, with no significant group differences on either measure at any level. Patients had significantly reduced negative fMRI response (deactivation) of DMN regions (posterior cingulate/precuneus, medial prefrontal cortex). Controls showed expected modulation of DMN deactivation with increasing task difficulty. Patients showed significantly reduced modulation of DMN deactivation by task difficulty, despite their successful task performance. We found no evidence of compensatory neural recruitment in external-task-positive regions or elsewhere. Individual responsiveness of the external-task-positive ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, but not of DMN regions, correlated with task accuracy. These findings suggest that a responsive DMN may not be required for successful cognitive performance; a responsive external-task-positive network may be sufficient. We studied the

  12. Training requirements and responsibilities for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    Vega, H.G.; French, S.B.; Rick, D.L.

    1992-09-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is scheduled to conduct intrusive (hydropunch screening tests, bore hole installation, soil sampling, etc.) and nonintrusive (geophysical surveys) studies at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). These studies and activities will be limited to specific locations at the RWMC. The duration of these activities will vary, but most tasks are not expected to exceed 90 days. The BWID personnel requested that the Waste Management Operational Support Group establish the training requirements and training responsibilities for BWID personnel and BWID subcontractor personnel. This document specifies these training requirements and responsibilities. While the responsibilities of BWID and the RWMC are, in general, defined in the interface agreement, the training elements are based on regulatory requirements, DOE orders, DOE-ID guidance, state law, and the nature of the work to be performed

  13. Medical response to effects of ionising radiation

    Crosbie, W.A.; Gittus, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on 'Medical Response to Effects of Ionising Radiation' in 1989 in the form of nineteen papers published as a book. Topics discussed include radiation accidents at nuclear facilities, the medical management of radiation casualties, the responsibilities, plans and resources for coping with a nuclear accident and finally the long term effects of radiation, including leukaemia epidemiology studies. All papers were selected and indexed separately. (UK)

  14. Production of ABA responses requires both the nuclear and cytoplasmic functional involvement of PYR1

    Park, EunJoo; Kim, Tae-Houn

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) enhances stress tolerant responses in plants against unfavorable environmental conditions. In Arabidopsis, ABA promotes interactions between PYR/PYL/RCARs and PP2C, thereby allowing SnRK2s to phosphorylate downstream components required for the regulation of gene expression or for gating ion channels. Because PYR1 is known to localize to nucleus and cytoplasm it is a question whether nuclear or cytoplasmic PYR1 confer different functions to the ABA signaling pathway, as has been previously shown for regulatory proteins. In order to answer this question, transgenic lines expressing nuclear PYR1 were generated in an ABA insensitive mutant background. Enforced nuclear expression of PYR1 was examined by confocal microscopy and western blot analysis. Physiological analyses of the transgenic lines demonstrated that nuclear PYR1 is sufficient to generate ABA responses, such as, the inhibition of seed germination, root growth inhibition, the induction of gene expression, and stomatal closing movement. However, for the full recovery of ABA responses in the mutant background cytoplasmic PYR1 was required. The study suggests both nuclear and cytoplasmic PYR1 participate in the control of ABA signal transduction. - Highlights: • Nuclear and cytoplasmic functions of PYR1 were studied in the mutant which lacked majority of ABA responses. • Nuclear PYR1 reconstituted partially the ABA responses during seed germination, root growth, and guard cell movement. • Both the nuclear and cytoplasmic functions of PYR1 were required for the full generation of ABA responses.

  15. 41 CFR 101-4.125 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-07-01

    ... EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Introduction § 101-4.125 Effect of... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Effect of other requirements. 101-4.125 Section 101-4.125 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...

  16. Response Requirement and Nature of Interpolated Stories in Retroactive Inhibition in Prose.

    Van Mondfrans, Adrian P.; And Others

    Retroactive inhibition, a loss of memory due to learning other materials between recall and exposure to the original materials, was investigated in relation to prose. Two variables were manipulated in the study: similarity of interpolated stories (dissimilar or similar), and the response requirements (completion-recall or multiple-choice). The 190…

  17. 20 CFR 662.230 - What are the responsibilities of the required One-Stop partners?

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the responsibilities of the required One-Stop partners? 662.230 Section 662.230 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION... operating costs of the system will be funded, and methods for referrals (WIA sec. 121(c)); (d) Participate...

  18. 78 FR 12132 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Reporting Requirements on Responsible...

    2013-02-21

    ... Requirements on Responsible Investment in Burma. OMB Control Number: None. Type of Request: New Collection... through the commission of human rights abuses and pervasive public corruption. In Executive Order 13619 of... potential adverse human rights, worker rights, anti-corruption, environmental, or other impacts resulting...

  19. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This revision of the LLNL Fire Protection Baseline Needs Assessment (BNA) was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by Martin Gresho, Sandia/CA Fire Marshal. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only address emergency response. The original LLNL BNA was created on April 23, 1997 as a means of collecting all requirements concerning emergency response capabilities at LLNL (including response to emergencies at Sandia/CA) into one BNA document. The original BNA documented the basis for emergency response, emergency personnel staffing, and emergency response equipment over the years. The BNA has been updated and reissued five times since in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004. A significant format change was performed in the 2004 update of the BNA in that it was 'zero based.' Starting with the requirement documents, the 2004 BNA evaluated the requirements, and determined minimum needs without regard to previous evaluations. This 2010 update maintains the same basic format and requirements as the 2004 BNA. In this 2010 BNA, as in the previous BNA, the document has been intentionally divided into two separate documents - the needs assessment (1) and the compliance assessment (2). The needs assessment will be referred to as the BNA and the compliance assessment will be referred to as the BNA Compliance Assessment. The primary driver for separation is that the needs assessment identifies the detailed applicable regulations (primarily NFPA Standards) for emergency response capabilities based on the hazards present at LLNL and Sandia/CA and the geographical location of the facilities. The needs assessment also identifies areas where the modification of the requirements in the applicable NFPA standards is appropriate, due to the improved fire protection

  20. Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (Spanish Edition)

    2014-01-01

    The IAEA technical cooperation project Strengthening Medical Physics in Radiation Medicine was approved by the IAEA Board of Governors for the period 2009-2013 with the aim of ensuring the safe and effective diagnosis and treatment of patients. The IAEA, together with the World Health Organization and stakeholders from numerous medical physics professional societies worldwide, including the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP), the European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the Latin American Medical Physics Association, the Asia-Oceania Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics, the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology, the European Commission and the International Radiation Protection Association, as well as regional counterparts from Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America, met in Vienna in May 2009 to plan and coordinate the new project. A shortage of clinically qualified medical physicists (CQMPs), insufficient education and training (especially properly organized and coordinated clinical training), and lack of professional recognition were identified as the main problems to be addressed under this project. This publication was developed under the project framework in response to these findings. It aims, first, at defining appropriately and unequivocally the roles and responsibilities of a CQMP in specialties of medical physics related to the use of ionizing radiation, such as radiation therapy, nuclear medicine, and diagnostic and interventional radiology. Important, non-ionizing radiation imaging specialties, such as magnetic resonance and ultrasound, are also considered for completeness. On the basis of these tasks, this book provides recommended minimum requirements for the academic education and clinical training of CQMPs, including recommendations for their accreditation, certification and registration, along with continuing professional development

  1. Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists

    2013-01-01

    The IAEA technical cooperation project Strengthening Medical Physics in Radiation Medicine was approved by the IAEA Board of Governors for the period 2009-2013 with the aim of ensuring the safe and effective diagnosis and treatment of patients. The IAEA, together with the World Health Organization and stakeholders from numerous medical physics professional societies worldwide, including the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP), the European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the Latin American Medical Physics Association, the Asia-Oceania Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics, the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology, the European Commission and the International Radiation Protection Association, as well as regional counterparts from Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America, met in Vienna in May 2009 to plan and coordinate the new project. A shortage of clinically qualified medical physicists (CQMPs), insufficient education and training (especially properly organized and coordinated clinical training), and lack of professional recognition were identified as the main problems to be addressed under this project. This publication was developed under the project framework in response to these findings. It aims, first, at defining appropriately and unequivocally the roles and responsibilities of a CQMP in specialties of medical physics related to the use of ionizing radiation, such as radiation therapy, nuclear medicine, and diagnostic and interventional radiology. Important, non-ionizing radiation imaging specialties, such as magnetic resonance and ultrasound, are also considered for completeness. On the basis of these tasks, this book provides recommended minimum requirements for the academic education and clinical training of CQMPs, including recommendations for their accreditation, certification and registration, along with continuing professional development

  2. Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    The IAEA technical cooperation project Strengthening Medical Physics in Radiation Medicine was approved by the IAEA Board of Governors for the period 2009-2013 with the aim of ensuring the safe and effective diagnosis and treatment of patients. The IAEA, together with the World Health Organization and stakeholders from numerous medical physics professional societies worldwide, including the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP), the European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the Latin American Medical Physics Association, the Asia-Oceania Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics, the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology, the European Commission and the International Radiation Protection Association, as well as regional counterparts from Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America, met in Vienna in May 2009 to plan and coordinate the new project. A shortage of clinically qualified medical physicists (CQMPs), insufficient education and training (especially properly organized and coordinated clinical training), and lack of professional recognition were identified as the main problems to be addressed under this project. This publication was developed under the project framework in response to these findings. It aims, first, at defining appropriately and unequivocally the roles and responsibilities of a CQMP in specialties of medical physics related to the use of ionizing radiation, such as radiation therapy, nuclear medicine, and diagnostic and interventional radiology. Important, non-ionizing radiation imaging specialties, such as magnetic resonance and ultrasound, are also considered for completeness. On the basis of these tasks, this book provides recommended minimum requirements for the academic education and clinical training of CQMPs, including recommendations for their accreditation, certification and registration, along with continuing professional development

  3. Heavy components coupling effect on building response spectra generation

    Liu, T.H.; Johnson, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    This study investigates the dynamic coupling effect on the floor response spectra between the heavy components and the Reactor Interior (R/I) building in a PWR. The following cases were studied: (I) simplified models of one and two lump mass models representing building and heavy components, and (II) actual plant building and heavy component models. Response spectra are developed at building nodes for all models, using time-history analysis methods. Comparisons of response spectra from various models are made to observe the coupling effects. In some cases, this study found that the coupling would reduce the response spectra values in certain frequency regions even if the coupling is not required according to the above criteria. (orig./HP)

  4. A free response test of interpersonal effectiveness.

    Getter, H; Nowinski, J K

    1981-06-01

    Development of the Interpersonal Problem Solving Assessment Technique (IPSAT), College form, is described. Guided by Rotter's Social Learning Theory, problem-solving, and assertiveness research, a semi-structured free response format was designed to assess components of interpersonal effectiveness, The instrument yields patterns of self-reported behaviors in six classes of problematic social situations. A detailed manual enabled reliable scoring of the following response categories: Effectiveness, avoidance, appropriateness, dependency and solution productivity. Scores were not materially affected by sex, verbal ability, or social desirability response sets. Correlations with the College Self-Expression Scale, the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule and the Lanyon Psychological Screening Inventory provided initial evidence of validity. Comparison of mean IPSAT scores of 23 psychotherapy clients with those of 78 normative subjects showed that clients report less interpersonal effectiveness and more avoidance than controls. Implications for utility of the IPSAT are discussed.

  5. Organizational responses to accountability requirements: Do we get what we expect?

    Gray, Carolyn Steele; Berta, Whitney; Deber, Raisa; Lum, Janet

    In health care, accountability is being championed as a promising approach to meeting the dual imperatives of improving care quality while managing constrained budgets. Few studies focus on public sector organizations' responsiveness to government imperatives for accountability. We applied and adapted a theory of organizational responsiveness to community care agencies operating in Ontario, Canada, asking the question: What is the array of realized organizational responses to government-imposed accountability requirements among community agencies that receive public funds to provide home and community care? A sequential complementary mixed methods approach was used. It gathered data through a survey of 114 home and community care organizations in Ontario and interviews with 20 key informants representing 13 home and community care agencies and four government agencies. It generated findings using a parallel mixed analysis technique. In addition to responses predicted by the theory, we found that organizations engage in active, as well as passive, forms of compliance; we refer to this response as internal modification in which internal policies, practices, and/or procedures are changed to meet accountability requirements. We also found that environmental factors, such as the presence of an association representing organizational interests, can influence bargaining tactics. Our study helps us to better understand the range of likely responses to accountability requirements and is a first step toward encouraging the development of accountability frameworks that favor positive outcomes for organizations and those holding them to account. Tailoring agreements to organizational environments, aligning perceived compliance with behaviors that encourage improved performance, and allowing for flexibility in accountability arrangements are suggested strategies to support beneficial outcomes.

  6. PAMP-induced defense responses in potato require both salicylic acid and jasmonic acid.

    Halim, Vincentius A; Altmann, Simone; Ellinger, Dorothea; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Miersch, Otto; Scheel, Dierk; Rosahl, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-induced defense responses in potato (Solanum tuberosum), the role of the signaling compounds salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) was analyzed. Pep-13, a PAMP from Phytophthora, induces the accumulation of SA, JA and hydrogen peroxide, as well as the activation of defense genes and hypersensitive-like cell death. We have previously shown that SA is required for Pep-13-induced defense responses. To assess the importance of JA, RNA interference constructs targeted at the JA biosynthetic genes, allene oxide cyclase and 12-oxophytodienoic acid reductase, were expressed in transgenic potato plants. In addition, expression of the F-box protein COI1 was reduced by RNA interference. Plants expressing the RNA interference constructs failed to accumulate the respective transcripts in response to wounding or Pep-13 treatment, neither did they contain significant amounts of JA after elicitation. In response to infiltration of Pep-13, the transgenic plants exhibited a highly reduced accumulation of reactive oxygen species as well as reduced hypersensitive cell death. The ability of the JA-deficient plants to accumulate SA suggests that SA accumulation is independent or upstream of JA accumulation. These data show that PAMP responses in potato require both SA and JA and that, in contrast to Arabidopsis, these compounds act in the same signal transduction pathway. Despite their inability to fully respond to PAMP treatment, the transgenic RNA interference plants are not altered in their basal defense against Phytophthora infestans.

  7. Foraging plasticity of breeding Northern Rockhopper Penguins, Eudyptes moseleyi, in response to changing energy requirements

    Booth, Jenny Marie

    2018-04-02

    During the breeding season, seabirds must balance the changing demands of self- and off-spring provisioning with the constraints imposed by central-place foraging. Recently, it was shown that Northern Rockhopper Penguins at Tristan da Cunha in the South Atlantic Ocean switch diet from lower to higher trophic level prey throughout their breeding cycle. Here, we investigated if this switch is reflected in their foraging behaviour, using time-depth recorders to study the diving behaviour of 27 guard and 10 crèche birds during the breeding season 2010 at Tristan da Cunha and obtaining complementary stomach contents of 20 birds. While no significant effects of breeding stage were detected on any foraging trip or dive parameters, stage/prey had a significant effect on feeding dive parameters, with dive duration, bottom time, and maximum depth explaining the majority of the dissimilarity amongst categories. We verified the previously shown dietary shift from zooplankton and cephalopods during the guard stage to a higher-energy fish-based diet during the crèche stage, which was reflected in a change in dive behaviour from shorter, shallower to longer, deeper dives. This prey switching behaviour may reflect preferential selection to account for the increased physiological needs of chicks or simply mirror changes in local prey abundance. Nonetheless, we show that Northern Rockhopper Penguins demonstrate behavioural plasticity as a response to their changing energy requirements, which is a critical trait when living in a spatio-temporally heterogeneous environment. This ability is likely to be particularly important under extrinsic constraints such as long-term environmental change.

  8. Effectiveness of Blog Response Strategies to Minimize Crisis Effects

    Tomsic, Louis P.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effects of four post-crisis responses on five different variables using a blog tool. The four post-crisis responses are information only, compensation, apology, and sympathy. The five dependent variables are reputation, anger (negative emotion), negative word-of-mouth, account acceptance and state of the publics based on…

  9. Requirements for effective use of CFD in aerospace design

    Raj, Pradeep

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a perspective on the requirements that Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technology must meet for its effective use in aerospace design. General observations are made on current aerospace design practices and deficiencies are noted that must be rectified for the U.S. aerospace industry to maintain its leadership position in the global marketplace. In order to rectify deficiencies, industry is transitioning to an integrated product and process development (IPPD) environment and design processes are undergoing radical changes. The role of CFD in producing data that design teams need to support flight vehicle development is briefly discussed. An overview of the current state of the art in CFD is given to provide an assessment of strengths and weaknesses of the variety of methods currently available, or under development, to produce aerodynamic data. Effectiveness requirements are examined from a customer/supplier view point with design team as customer and CFD practitioner as supplier. Partnership between the design team and CFD team is identified as an essential requirement for effective use of CFD. Rapid turnaround, reliable accuracy, and affordability are offered as three key requirements that CFD community must address if CFD is to play its rightful role in supporting the IPPD design environment needed to produce high quality yet affordable designs.

  10. Oil spill emergency response: Fulfilling regulatory requirements on the Grand Banks

    Horvath, C.L.

    1991-01-01

    Offshore well licensing under Canadian regulations requires the operator to conduct a practice exercise of oil spill countermeasures and emergency response procedures at least yearly, once the drilling program starts. The relevant parts of the Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Drilling Regulations are summarized and the objectives and benefits of the practice exercises are reviewed. In addition to ensuring regulatory compliance, the exercises also provide the opportunity to test operational procedures, to provide in-house training, and improve response efficiency by regular repetition of the exercise. Exercises in communications during a spill incident in the offshore and in deployment of offshore spill response equipment conducted by Petro-Canada in Newfoundland are described. Problems identified during the exercises are noted

  11. Effects of Using Requirements Catalogs on Effectiveness and Productivity of Requirements Specification in a Software Project Management Course

    Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Carrillo-de-Gea, Juan Manuel; Meca, Joaquín Vidal; Ros, Joaquín Nicolás; Toval, Ambrosio; Idri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of two educational experiments carried out to determine whether the process of specifying requirements (catalog-based reuse as opposed to conventional specification) has an impact on effectiveness and productivity in co-located and distributed software development environments. The participants in the experiments…

  12. The omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid is required for normal alcohol response behaviors in C. elegans.

    Richard C Raabe

    Full Text Available Alcohol addiction is a widespread societal problem, for which there are few treatments. There are significant genetic and environmental influences on abuse liability, and understanding these factors will be important for the identification of susceptible individuals and the development of effective pharmacotherapies. In humans, the level of response to alcohol is strongly predictive of subsequent alcohol abuse. Level of response is a combination of counteracting responses to alcohol, the level of sensitivity to the drug and the degree to which tolerance develops during the drug exposure, called acute functional tolerance. We use the simple and well-characterized nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans to model the acute behavioral effects of ethanol to identify genetic and environmental factors that influence level of response to ethanol. Given the strong molecular conservation between the neurobiological machinery of worms and humans, cellular-level effects of ethanol are likely to be conserved. Increasingly, variation in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid levels has been implicated in complex neurobiological phenotypes in humans, and we recently found that fatty acid levels modify ethanol responses in worms. Here, we report that 1 eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is required for the development of acute functional tolerance, 2 dietary supplementation of eicosapentaenoic acid is sufficient for acute tolerance, and 3 dietary eicosapentaenoic acid can alter the wild-type response to ethanol. These results suggest that genetic variation influencing long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid levels may be important abuse liability loci, and that dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may be an important environmental modulator of the behavioral response to ethanol.

  13. Effect of survey mode on response patterns

    Christensen, Anne Illemann; Ekholm, Ola; Glümer, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    .7%). Marital status, ethnic background and highest completed education were associated with non-response in both modes. Furthermore, sex and age were associated with non-response in the self-administered mode. No significant mode effects were observed for indicators related to use of health services......BACKGROUND: While face-to-face interviews are considered the gold standard of survey modes, self-administered questionnaires are often preferred for cost and convenience. This article examines response patterns in two general population health surveys carried out by face-to-face interview and self......-administered questionnaire, respectively. METHOD: Data derives from a health interview survey in the Region of Southern Denmark (face-to-face interview) and The Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2010 (self-administered questionnaire). Identical questions were used in both surveys. Data on all individuals were obtained from...

  14. 29 CFR 36.125 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-07-01

    ...; sections 704 and 855 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 295m, 298b-2); Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (29 U.S.C. 206); and any other Act of Congress or Federal regulation. (b) Effect of State or local law or other requirements. The...

  15. 10 CFR 1042.125 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-01-01

    ...; sections 704 and 855 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 295m, 298b-2); Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (29 U.S.C. 206); and any other Act of Congress or Federal regulation. (b) Effect of State or local law or other requirements. The...

  16. Cost effectiveness of adopted quality requirements in hospital laboratories.

    Hamza, Alneil; Ahmed-Abakur, Eltayib; Abugroun, Elsir; Bakhit, Siham; Holi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed in quasi-experiment to assess adoption of the essential clauses of particular clinical laboratory quality management requirements based on international organization for standardization (ISO 15189) in hospital laboratories and to evaluate the cost effectiveness of compliance to ISO 15189. The quality management intervention based on ISO 15189 was conceded through three phases; pre - intervention phase, Intervention phase and Post-intervention phase. In pre-intervention phase the compliance to ISO 15189 was 49% for study group vs. 47% for control group with P value 0.48, while the post intervention results displayed 54% vs. 79% for study group and control group respectively in compliance to ISO 15189 and statistically significant difference (P value 0.00) with effect size (Cohen's d) of (0.00) in pre-intervention phase and (0.99) in post - intervention phase. The annual average cost per-test for the study group and control group was 1.80 ± 0.25 vs. 1.97 ± 0.39, respectively with P value 0.39 whereas the post-intervention results showed that the annual average total costs per-test for study group and control group was 1.57 ± 0.23 vs 2.08 ± 0.38, P value 0.019 respectively, with cost-effectiveness ratio of (0.88) in pre -intervention phase and (0.52) in post-intervention phase. The planned adoption of quality management requirements (QMS) in clinical laboratories had great effect to increase the compliance percent with quality management system requirement, raise the average total cost effectiveness, and improve the analytical process capability of the testing procedure.

  17. THE GENDER DIFFERENCES EFFECTS ON CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSR

    LILIANA NICOLETA SIMIONESCU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR refers to company's activities through which they need to contribute to the society well-being. Companies which are socially responsible operate their business in such way stakeholders requirements are a meet as well as ethical, legal, economical and philanthropic expectations toward the society where companies operates. Moreover, businesses decisions and strategies should take into consideration and should act with more responsibility to shareholders, customers, employees, and suppliers. Company's responsibility is more than just legal and economic responsibility. Companies including CSR into their business strategies increase their competitiveness alongside other benefits. Regardless of the heated debates which have been taking place between academics, researchers, scholars, and corporate executives, CSR concept remains open to a range of definitions As well as understanding. This paper aim is to theoretically investigate how differences in gender effect on corporate social responsibility activities with impact on companies’ performance in developing countries. In order to achieve the paper aim, following the literature on CSR and research background, comprehensive research framework was developed. Despite the fact that CSR have been debated on many topics, the gender differences effects on CSR in developing countries is scarce. To fill in this gap, this paper developed a conceptual research framework that enhance the literature on CSR as regard the differences linking male and female’s orientation toward CSR activities.

  18. Counterproductive Consequences of a Conservative Ideology: Medicaid Expansion and Personal Responsibility Requirements.

    Baker, Allison M; Hunt, Linda M

    2016-07-01

    Medicaid expansion, a key part of the Affordable Care Act, has been opposed by conservative politicians despite its fiscal and public health benefits. In response, some Republican-led states have expanded Medicaid with new reforms, including requirements for cost sharing and behavioral incentives, that promote conservative political values tied to an ideology of personal responsibility. We examine this trend using Michigan's Medicaid expansion as a case example. We explore the origins, evidence base, and possible consequences of these reforms. We argue that these reforms prioritize ideology over sound public health knowledge, deflecting attention away from the social, economic, and structural factors that influence the health of the poor, and may ultimately contribute to counterproductive public health and fiscal outcomes.

  19. Effectiveness of Counter-Trafficking Response in Albania

    Meçe Merita H.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Human trafficking is a new phenomenon of Albanian post-socialist society which significantly increased during the difficult years of its transformation from centralized state-led economy to market economy. Both economic and political instability contributed to its size, nature and multiple dynamics. Drawing on a rights-based approach to human trafficking, this paper examines the effectiveness of the counter-trafficking response of the Albanian government with a special emphasis on prevention, protection and prosecution. Using secondary data and reviewing various country strategic documents, it highlights a range of weaknesses and challenges which have hindered its effectiveness over years. It concludes that successful and effective counter-trafficking response requires well rounded and coordinated gender sensitive, victim-centred, holistic and human rights-based efforts. Combined with adequate law enforcement, they will sustainably tackle the full spectrum of this problem.

  20. Kruppel-like factor 15 is required for the cardiac adaptive response to fasting.

    Sugi, Keiki; Hsieh, Paishiun N; Ilkayeva, Olga; Shelkay, Shamanthika; Moroney, Bridget; Baadh, Palvir; Haynes, Browning; Pophal, Megan; Fan, Liyan; Newgard, Christopher B; Prosdocimo, Domenick A; Jain, Mukesh K

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac metabolism is highly adaptive in response to changes in substrate availability, as occur during fasting. This metabolic flexibility is essential to the maintenance of contractile function and is under the control of a group of select transcriptional regulators, notably the nuclear receptor family of factors member PPARα. However, the diversity of physiologic and pathologic states through which the heart must sustain function suggests the possible existence of additional transcriptional regulators that play a role in matching cardiac metabolism to energetic demand. Here we show that cardiac KLF15 is required for the normal cardiac response to fasting. Specifically, we find that cardiac function is impaired upon fasting in systemic and cardiac specific Klf15-null mice. Further, cardiac specific Klf15-null mice display a fasting-dependent accumulation of long chain acylcarnitine species along with a decrease in expression of the carnitine translocase Slc25a20. Treatment with a diet high in short chain fatty acids relieves the KLF15-dependent long chain acylcarnitine accumulation and impaired cardiac function in response to fasting. Our observations establish KLF15 as a critical mediator of the cardiac adaptive response to fasting through its regulation of myocardial lipid utilization.

  1. Lessons learned from the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident and responses in NRA regulatory requirements

    Fuketa, Toyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The author would like to present significant lessons learned from the TEPCO’s Fukushima Dai-ichi accident and responses in regulatory requirements developed by the Nuclear Regulation Authority for power-producing light water reactors. The presentation will cover prevention of structures, systems and components failures, measures to prevent common cause failures, prevention of core damage, mitigation of severe accidents, emergency preparedness, continuous improvement of safety, use of probabilistic risk assessment, and post-accident regulation on the Fukushima Dai-ichi. (author)

  2. Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (Russian Edition)

    2014-01-01

    This publication addresses the shortfall of well trained and clinically qualified medical physicists working in radiation medicine. The roles, responsibilities and clinical training requirements of medical physicists have not always been well defined or well understood by health care professionals, health authorities and regulatory agencies. To fill this gap, this publication provides recommendations for the academic education and clinical training of clinically qualified medical physicists, including recommendations for their accreditation certification and registration, along with continuous professional development. The goal is to establish criteria that support the harmonization of education and clinical training worldwide

  3. LRRC10 is required to maintain cardiac function in response to pressure overload.

    Brody, Matthew J; Feng, Li; Grimes, Adrian C; Hacker, Timothy A; Olson, Timothy M; Kamp, Timothy J; Balijepalli, Ravi C; Lee, Youngsook

    2016-01-15

    We previously reported that the cardiomyocyte-specific leucine-rich repeat containing protein (LRRC)10 has critical functions in the mammalian heart. In the present study, we tested the role of LRRC10 in the response of the heart to biomechanical stress by performing transverse aortic constriction on Lrrc10-null (Lrrc10(-/-)) mice. Mild pressure overload induced severe cardiac dysfunction and ventricular dilation in Lrrc10(-/-) mice compared with control mice. In addition to dilation and cardiomyopathy, Lrrc10(-/-) mice showed a pronounced increase in heart weight with pressure overload stimulation and a more dramatic loss of cardiac ventricular performance, collectively suggesting that the absence of LRRC10 renders the heart more disease prone with greater hypertrophy and structural remodeling, although rates of cardiac fibrosis and myocyte dropout were not different from control mice. Lrrc10(-/-) cardiomyocytes also exhibited reduced contractility in response to β-adrenergic stimulation, consistent with loss of cardiac ventricular performance after pressure overload. We have previously shown that LRRC10 interacts with actin in the heart. Here, we show that His(150) of LRRC10 was required for an interaction with actin, and this interaction was reduced after pressure overload, suggesting an integral role for LRRC10 in the response of the heart to mechanical stress. Importantly, these experiments demonstrated that LRRC10 is required to maintain cardiac performance in response to pressure overload and suggest that dysregulated expression or mutation of LRRC10 may greatly sensitize human patients to more severe cardiac disease in conditions such as chronic hypertension or aortic stenosis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Effects of spent nuclear fuel aging on disposal requirements

    McKee, R.W.; Johnson, K.I.; Huber, H.D.; Bierschbach, M.C.

    1991-10-01

    This paper describes results of a study to analyze the waste management systems effects of extended spent fuel aging on spent fuel disposal requirements. The analysis considers additional spent fuel aging up to a maximum of 50 years relative to the currently planned 2010 repository startup in the United States. As part of the analysis, an equal energy disposition (EED) methodology was developed for determining allowable waste emplacement densities and waste container loading in a geologic repository. Results of this analysis indicate that substantial benefits of spent fuel aging will already have been achieved by a repository startup in 2010 (spent fuel average age will be 28 years). Even so, further significant aging benefits, in terms of reduced emplacement areas and mining requirements and reduced number of waste containers, will continue to accrue for at least another 50 years when the average spent fuel age would be 78 years, if the repository startup is further delayed

  5. Ecological effectiveness as an essential quality requirement of innovational construction

    Mkrtchyan Tamara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it seems to be very essential to develop national construction industry by implementation of innovative technologies. As an object of innovational construction «Smart house» or «green building» demonstrates the latest advances in ecological building materials, energy-saving structures and lean-technologies. According to the concept of TQM «green building» has tube compatible with environmental protection, environment sustainability and ecological effectiveness requirements. «Green certification» includes these terms into the National environment sustainability rating system. The main goal of this research work was to review and compare theoretical models and concepts of effectiveness and analyze their applicability to determine the term ecological effectiveness as the main Quality Score.

  6. Evaluation of the effect of torsemide on warfarin dosage requirements.

    Lai, Sophia; Momper, Jeremiah D; Yam, Felix K

    2017-08-01

    Background According to drug interaction databases, torsemide may potentiate the effects of warfarin. Evidence for this drug-drug interaction, however, is conflicting and the clinical significance is unknown. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of torsemide initiation on warfarin dosage requirements. Setting This study was conducted at the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System in San Diego, California. Method A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Veterans Affairs data from patients who were converted from bumetanide to torsemide between March 2014 and July 2014. Patients were also prescribed and taking warfarin during the observation period. Warfarin dosage requirements were evaluated to determine if any changes occurred within the first 3 months of starting torsemide. Main outcome measure The primary outcome was the average weekly warfarin dose before and after torsemide initiation. Results Eighteen patients met study inclusion criteria. The weekly warfarin dose before and after initiation of torsemide was not significantly different (34 ± 15 and 34 ± 13 mg, p > 0.05). Of those eighteen patients, only two experienced elevations in INR that required a decrease in warfarin dosage after torsemide initiation. Between those two patients, dosage reductions ranged from 5.3 to 18%. Conclusion These results indicated that most patients did not require any warfarin dosage adjustments after torsemide was initiated. The potential for interaction, however, still exists. While empiric warfarin dosage adjustments are not recommended when initiating torsemide, increased monitoring is warranted to minimize the risk of adverse effects.

  7. Effects of Caffeine on Auditory Brainstem Response

    Saleheh Soleimanian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Blocking of the adenosine receptor in central nervous system by caffeine can lead to increasing the level of neurotransmitters like glutamate. As the adenosine receptors are present in almost all brain areas like central auditory pathway, it seems caffeine can change conduction in this way. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on latency and amplitude of auditory brainstem response(ABR.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study 43 normal 18-25 years old male students were participated. The subjects consumed 0, 2 and 3 mg/kg BW caffeine in three different sessions. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded before and 30 minute after caffeine consumption. The results were analyzed by Friedman and Wilcoxone test to assess the effects of caffeine on auditory brainstem response.Results: Compared to control group the latencies of waves III,V and I-V interpeak interval of the cases decreased significantly after 2 and 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption. Wave I latency significantly decreased after 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption(p<0.01. Conclusion: Increasing of the glutamate level resulted from the adenosine receptor blocking brings about changes in conduction in the central auditory pathway.

  8. Cocktail effects on biomarker responses in fish

    Celander, Malin C., E-mail: malin.celander@zool.gu.se [University of Gothenburg, Department of Zoology, Box 463, SE-405 30 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2011-10-15

    One of today's greatest challenges in environmental toxicology is to understand effects of mixture toxicity, commonly referred to as cocktail effects, in humans and in wildlife. Biomarker responses in fish are routinely used to assess exposure of anthropogenic chemicals in the aquatic environment. However, little is known about how cocktail effects affect these biomarker responses. For this reason, there is an obvious risk for misinterpretation of biomarker-data and this can have profound negative effects on stakeholder's decisions and actions, as well as on legislations and remediation-plans initiated in order to reduce exposure to certain chemicals. Besides, chemical safety-levels are traditionally based on experiences from lab-studies with single chemicals, which is unfortunate as a chemical can be more toxic when it is mixed with other chemicals, because of the cocktail effect. This review focuses on pharmacokinetic interactions between different classes of pollutants on detoxification mechanisms and how that affects two commonly used biomarkers in the aquatic environment: (1) induction of cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) that is mediated via activation of the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR), used to assess exposure to aromatic hydrocarbons; (2) induction of vitellogenin (VTG) that is mediated via activation of the estrogen receptor (ER), used to assess exposure to estrogenic chemicals. These responses can be either directly or indirectly affected by the presence of other classes of pollutants as a result of cocktail effects. For example, chemicals that inhibit the function of key metabolic enzymes and transporter pumps that are involved in elimination of AhR- and ER agonists, can result in bioaccumulation of aromatic hydrocarbons and estrogenic chemicals resulting in increased biomarker responses. This cocktail effect can lead to overestimation of the actual exposure pressure. On the contrary, induction of expression of key metabolic enzymes and transporter

  9. 21 CFR 822.24 - What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket...

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.24 Section 822.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... SURVEILLANCE Responsibilities of Manufacturers § 822.24 What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I...

  10. The effect of requirements prioritization on avionics system conceptual design

    Lorentz, John

    project schedule, resulting in greater success during system deployment and operational testing. This dissertation will discuss the data and findings from participant studies, present a literature review of systems engineering and design processes, and test the hypothesis that the prioritization process had no effect on stakeholder sentiment related to the conceptual design. In addition, the "Requirements Rationalization" process will be discussed in detail. Avionics, like many other systems, has transitioned from a discrete electronics engineering, hard engineering discipline to incorporate software engineering as a core process of the technology development cycle. As with other software-based systems, avionics now has significant soft system attributes that must be considered in the design process. The boundless opportunities that exist in software design demand prioritization to focus effort onto the critical functions that the software must provide. This has been a well documented and understood phenomenon in the software development community for many years. This dissertation will attempt to link the effect of software integrated avionics to the benefits of prioritization of requirements in the problem space and demonstrate the sociological and technical benefits of early prioritization practices.

  11. Climate Change Effects on Agriculture: Economic Responses to Biophysical Shocks

    Nelson, Gerald C.; Valin, Hugo; Sands, Ronald D.; Havlik, Petr; Ahammad, Helal; Deryng, Delphine; Elliott, Joshua; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Heyhoe, Edwina

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural production is sensitive to weather and thus directly affected by climate change. Plausible estimates of these climate change impacts require combined use of climate, crop, and economic models. Results from previous studies vary substantially due to differences in models, scenarios, and data. This paper is part of a collective effort to systematically integrate these three types of models. We focus on the economic component of the assessment, investigating how nine global economic models of agriculture represent endogenous responses to seven standardized climate change scenarios produced by two climate and five crop models. These responses include adjustments in yields, area, consumption, and international trade. We apply biophysical shocks derived from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's representative concentration pathway with end-of-century radiative forcing of 8.5 W/m(sup 2). The mean biophysical yield effect with no incremental CO2 fertilization is a 17% reduction globally by 2050 relative to a scenario with unchanging climate. Endogenous economic responses reduce yield loss to 11%, increase area of major crops by 11%, and reduce consumption by 3%. Agricultural production, cropland area, trade, and prices show the greatest degree of variability in response to climate change, and consumption the lowest. The sources of these differences include model structure and specification; in particular, model assumptions about ease of land use conversion, intensification, and trade. This study identifies where models disagree on the relative responses to climate shocks and highlights research activities needed to improve the representation of agricultural adaptation responses to climate change.

  12. Implicit misattribution of evaluative responses: contingency-unaware evaluative conditioning requires simultaneous stimulus presentations.

    Hütter, Mandy; Sweldens, Steven

    2013-08-01

    Recent research has shown that evaluative conditioning (EC) procedures can change attitudes without participants' awareness of the contingencies between conditioned and unconditioned stimuli (Hütter, Sweldens, Stahl, Unkelbach, & Klauer, 2012). We present a theoretical explanation and boundary condition for the emergence of unaware EC effects based on the implicit misattribution of evaluative responses from unconditioned to conditioned stimuli. We hypothesize that such misattribution is only possible when conditioned and unconditioned stimuli are perceived simultaneously. Therefore we manipulate the simultaneity of the stimulus presentations and apply a process dissociation procedure to distinguish contingency-aware from contingency-unaware EC effects. A multinomial model indicates that with sequential presentations, EC effects do not occur without contingency awareness. However, unaware EC effects do occur with simultaneous presentations. The findings support dual-process theories of learning. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Side channel analysis of some hash based MACs:A response to SHA-3 requirements

    The forthcoming NIST's Advanced Hash Standard (AHS) competition to select SHA-3 hash function requires that each candidate hash function submission must have at least one construction to support FIPS 198 HMAC application. As part of its evaluation, NIST is aiming to select either a candidate hash...... function which is more resistant to known side channel attacks (SCA) when plugged into HMAC, or that has an alternative MAC mode which is more resistant to known SCA than the other submitted alternatives. In response to this, we perform differential power analysis (DPA) on the possible smart card...... implementations of some of the recently proposed MAC alternatives to NMAC (a fully analyzed variant of HMAC) and HMAC algorithms and NMAC/HMAC versions of some recently proposed hash and compression function modes. We show that the recently proposed BNMAC and KMDP MAC schemes are even weaker than NMAC...

  14. Effect of intravenous esmolol on analgesic requirements in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Ritima Dhir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Perioperative beta blockers are also being advocated for modulation of acute pain and reduction of intraoperative anesthetic requirements. This study evaluated the effect of perioperative use of esmolol, an ultra short acting beta blocker, on anesthesia and modulation of post operative pain in patients of laproscopic cholecystectomy. Material and Methods: Sixty adult ASA I & II grade patients of either sex, scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia, were enrolled in the study. The patients were randomly allocated to one of the two groups E or C according to computer generated numbers. Group E- Patients who received loading dose of injection esmolol 0.5 mg/kg in 30 ml isotonic saline, before induction of anesthesia, followed by an IV infusion of esmolol 0.05 μg/kg/min till the completion of surgery and Group C- Patients who received 30 ml of isotonic saline as loading dose and continuous infusion of isotonic saline at the same rate as the esmolol group till the completion of surgery. Results: The baseline MAP at 0 minute was almost similar in both the groups. At 8th minute (time of intubation, MAP increased significantly in group C as compared to group E and remained higher than group E till the end of procedure. Intraoperatively, 16.67% of patients in group C showed somatic signs as compared to none in group E. The difference was statistically significant. 73.33% of patients in group C required additional doses of Inj.Fentanyl as compared to 6.67% in group E. Conclusions: We conclude that intravenous esmolol influences the analgesic requirements both intraoperatively as well as postoperatively by modulation of the sympathetic component of the pain i.e. heart rate and blood pressure.

  15. Status of Technical Requirements Development for Maintenance Effectiveness Management

    Ahn, Sang Kyu; Kim, Yun Il; Lee, Chang Ju; Chang, Gun Hyun

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that proper maintenance at nuclear power plant is essential to plant safety and that there is a clear link between effective maintenance and safety as it relates to such factors as the number of transients and challenges to safety systems and the associated need for operability, availability, and reliability of safety equipment. Good maintenance is also important in providing assurance that failures of non-safety related structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that could initiate, adversely affect, or mitigate a transient or an accident are also minimized. Maintenance is also important to ensure that design assumptions and margins in the original design basis are maintained and are not degraded to an unacceptable level. Therefore, good maintenance practice at nuclear power plants is of utmost importance in protecting public health and safety. This paper introduces the status of the development of regulatory technical requirements (Drafts) for utility's management of maintenance effectiveness. The process of Maintenance Effectiveness Management is shown in Figure 1

  16. Acquisition, consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction of eyelid conditioning responses require de novo protein synthesis.

    Inda, Mari Carmen; Delgado-García, José María; Carrión, Angel Manuel

    2005-02-23

    Memory, as measured by changes in an animal's behavior some time after learning, is a reflection of many processes. Here, using a trace paradigm, in mice we show that de novo protein synthesis is required for acquisition, consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction of classically conditioned eyelid responses. Two critical periods of protein synthesis have been found: the first, during training, the blocking of which impaired acquisition; and the second, lasting the first 4 h after training, the blocking of which impaired consolidation. The process of reconsolidation was sensitive to protein synthesis inhibition if anisomycin was injected before or just after the reactivation session. Furthermore, extinction was also dependent on protein synthesis, following the same temporal course as that followed during acquisition and consolidation. This last fact reinforces the idea that extinction is an active learning process rather than a passive event of forgetting. Together, these findings demonstrate that all of the different stages of memory formation involved in the classical conditioning of eyelid responses are dependent on protein synthesis.

  17. Broad CTL response is required to clear latent HIV-1 due to dominance of escape mutations

    Deng, Kai; Pertea, Mihaela; Rongvaux, Anthony; Wang, Leyao; Durand, Christine M.; Ghiaur, Gabriel; Lai, Jun; McHugh, Holly L.; Hao, Haiping; Zhang, Hao; Margolick, Joseph B.; Gurer, Cagan; Murphy, Andrew J.; Valenzuela, David M.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Deeks, Steven G.; Strowig, Till; Kumar, Priti; Siliciano, Janet D.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Flavell, Richard A.; Shan, Liang; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV-1 persists in a stable latent reservoir1, 2, primarily in resting memory CD4+ T cells3, 4. This reservoir presents a major barrier to the cure of HIV-1 infection. To purge the reservoir, pharmacological reactivation of latent HIV-1 has been proposed5 and tested both in vitro and in vivo6–8. A key remaining question is whether virus-specific immune mechanisms including cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) can clear infected cells in ART-treated patients after latency is reversed. Here we show that there is a striking all or none pattern for CTL escape mutations in HIV-1 Gag epitopes. Unless ART is started early, the vast majority (>98%) of latent viruses carry CTL escape mutations that render infected cells insensitive to CTLs directed at common epitopes. To solve this problem, we identified CTLs that could recognize epitopes from latent HIV-1 that were unmutated in every chronically infected patient tested. Upon stimulation, these CTLs eliminated target cells infected with autologous virus derived from the latent reservoir, both in vitro and in patient-derived humanized mice. The predominance of CTL-resistant viruses in the latent reservoir poses a major challenge to viral eradication. Our results demonstrate that chronically infected patients retain a broad spectrum viral-specific CTL response and that appropriate boosting of this response may be required for the elimination of the latent reservoir. PMID:25561180

  18. Trajectory Orientation: A Technology-Enabled Concept Requiring a Shift in Controller Roles and Responsibilities

    Leiden, Ken; Green, Steven

    2000-01-01

    The development of a decision support tool (DST) for the en-route domain with accurate conflict prediction time horizons of 20 minutes has introduced an interesting problem. A 20 minute time horizon for conflict prediction often results in the predicted conflict occurring one or more sectors downstream from the sector controller who "owns" (i-e., is responsible for the safe separation of aircraft) one or both of the aircraft in the conflict pair. Based on current roles and responsibilities of today's en route controllers, the upstream controller would not resolve this conflict. In most cases, the downstream controller would wait until the conflicting aircraft entered higher sector before resolving the conflict. This results in a delay of several minutes from the time when the conflict was initially predicted. This delay is inefficient from both a controller workload and user's cost of operations perspective. Trajectory orientation, a new concept for facilitating an efficient, conflict-free flight path across several sectors while conforming to metering or miles-in-trail spacing, is proposed as an alternative to today's sector-oriented method. This concept necessitates a fundamental shift in thinking about inter-sector coordination. Instead of operating independently, with the main focus on protecting their internal airspace, controllers would work cooperatively, depending on each other for well-planned, conflict-free flow of aircraft. To support the trajectory orientation concept, a long time horizon (15 to 20 minutes) for conflict prediction and resolution would most likely be a primary requirement. In addition, new tools, such as controller-pilot data link will be identified to determine their necessity and applicability for trajectory orientation. Finally, with significant controller participation from selected Air Route Traffic Control Centers, potential shifts in R-side/D-side roles and responsibilities as well as the creation of a new controller position for

  19. Accessory factors of cytoplasmic viral RNA sensors required for antiviral innate immune response

    Hiroyuki eOshiumi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferon (IFN induces many antiviral factors in host cells. RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs are cytoplasmic viral RNA sensors that trigger the signal to induce the innate immune response that includes type I IFN production. RIG-I and MDA5 are RLRs that form nucleoprotein filaments along viral double-stranded RNA, resulting in the activation of MAVS adaptor molecule. The MAVS protein forms a prion-like aggregation structure, leading to type I IFN production. RIG-I and MDA5 undergo post-translational modification. TRIM25 and Riplet ubiquitin ligases deliver a K63-linked polyubiquitin moiety to the RIG-I N-terminal caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs and C-terminal region; the polyubiquitin chain then stabilizes the two-CARD tetramer structure required for MAVS assembly. MDA5 activation is regulated by phosphorylation. RIOK3 is a protein kinase that phosphorylates the MDA5 protein in a steady state, and PP1α/γ dephosphorylate this protein, resulting in its activation. RIG-I and MDA5 require cytoplasmic RNA helicases for their efficient activation. LGP2, another RLR, is an RNA helicase involved in RLR signaling. This protein does not possess N-terminal CARDs and thus cannot trigger downstream signaling by itself. Recent studies have revealed that this protein modulates MDA5 filament formation, resulting in enhanced type I IFN production. Several other cytoplasmic RNA helicases are involved in RLR signaling. DDX3, DHX29, DHX36, and DDX60 RNA helicases have been reported to be involved in RLR-mediated type I IFN production after viral infection. However, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. Future studies are required to reveal the role of RNA helicases in the RLR signaling pathway.

  20. Skeletal muscle PGC-1a is required for maintaining an acute LPS-induced TNFa response

    Olesen, Jesper; Larsson, Signe; Iversen, Ninna

    2012-01-01

    Many lifestyle-related diseases are associated with low-grade inflammation and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor ¿ coactivator (PGC)-1a has been suggested to be protective against low-grade inflammation. However, whether these anti-inflammatory properties affect acute inflammation is not...... does not exert anti-inflammatory effects during acute inflammation. Lack of skeletal muscle PGC-1a seems however to impair the acute TNFa response, which may reflect a phenotype more susceptible to infections as also observed in type 2 diabetes patients....

  1. Respiratory Effects and Systemic Stress Response Following ...

    Previous studies have demonstrated that exposure to the pulmonary irritant ozone causes myriad systemic metabolic and pulmonary effects attributed to sympathetic and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation, which are exacerbated in metabolically impaired models. We examined respiratory and systemic effects following exposure to a sensory irritant acrolein to elucidate the systemic and pulmonary consequences in healthy and diabetic rat models. Male Wistar and Goto Kakizaki (GK) rats, a nonobese type II diabetic Wistar-derived model, were exposed by inhalation to 0, 2, or 4 ppm acrolein, 4 h/d for 1 or 2 days. Exposure at 4 ppm significantly increased pulmonary and nasal inflammation in both strains with vascular protein leakage occurring only in the nose. Acrolein exposure (4 ppm) also caused metabolic impairment by inducing hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance (GK > Wistar). Serum total cholesterol (GKs only), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (both strains), and free fatty acids (GK > Wistar) levels increased; however, no acrolein-induced changes were noted in branched-chain amino acid or insulin levels. These responses corresponded with a significant increase in corticosterone and modest but insignificant increases in adrenaline in both strains, suggesting activation of the HPA axis. Collectively, these data demonstrate that acrolein exposure has a profound effect on nasal and pulmonary inflammation, as well as glucose and lipid metabolis

  2. Identifying Requirements for Effective Human-Automation Teamwork

    Jeffrey C. Joe; John O' Hara; Heather D. Medema; Johanna H. Oxstrand

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that poorly designed human-automation collaboration, such as poorly designed communication protocols, often leads to problems for the human operators, such as: lack of vigilance, complacency, and loss of skills. These problems often lead to suboptimal system performance. To address this situation, a considerable amount of research has been conducted to improve human-automation collaboration and to make automation function better as a “team player.” Much of this research is based on an understanding of what it means to be a good team player from the perspective of a human team. However, the research is often based on a simplified view of human teams and teamwork. In this study, we sought to better understand the capabilities and limitations of automation from the standpoint of human teams. We first examined human teams to identify the principles for effective teamwork. We next reviewed the research on integrating automation agents and human agents into mixed agent teams to identify the limitations of automation agents to conform to teamwork principles. This research resulted in insights that can lead to more effective human-automation collaboration by enabling a more realistic set of requirements to be developed based on the strengths and limitations of all agents.

  3. Ecological effects assessment: requirements vs state-of-the-art

    McKenzie, D.H.; Thomas, J.M.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1981-05-01

    Concerns for environmental quality, the ecologist's understanding of ecosystems, and the ability to quantitatively sample and evaluate hypotheses have contributed to current requirements and the state-of-the-art in ecological effects assessments in refard to nuclear power plants. The current cooling system approaches, data collection programs, and ecological effects assessments reflect these contributions. Over a decade of experience provides the basis for a timely review and evaluation of current proactice. The magnitude of economic and environmental resources being committed to cooling system alternatives mandates that the decision-making process result in as many optimal choices as possible. In addition, the resources being devoted to environmental data collection and integration provide considerable motivation for providing meaningful input to the decision-making process. It is maintained that the input should be as quantitative and as free from subjective content as is reasonably possible. An alternative viewpoint suggests that the past several decades of experience be considered but a first step, and the current task to be one of designing a second step

  4. Development of full sweet, umami, and bitter taste responsiveness requires Regulator of G protein Signaling-21 (RGS21).

    Schroer, Adam B; Gross, Joshua D; Kaski, Shane W; Wix, Kim; Siderovski, David P; Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Setola, Vincent

    2018-04-26

    The mammalian tastes of sweet, umami, and bitter are initiated by activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) of the T1R and T2R families on taste receptor cells. GPCRs signal via nucleotide exchange and hydrolysis, the latter hastened by GTPase-accelerating proteins (GAPs) that include the Regulators of G protein Signaling (RGS) protein family. We previously reported that RGS21, uniquely expressed in Type II taste receptor cells, decreases the potency of bitter-stimulated T2R signaling in cultured cells, consistent with its in vitro GAP activity. However, the role of RGS21 in organismal responses to GPCR-mediated tastants was not established. Here, we characterized mice lacking the Rgs21 fifth exon. Eliminating Rgs21 expression had no effect on body mass accumulation (a measure of alimentation), fungiform papillae number and morphology, circumvallate papillae morphology, and taste bud number. Two-bottle preference tests, however, revealed that Rgs21-null mice have blunted aversion to quinine and denatonium, and blunted preference for monosodium glutamate, the sweeteners sucrose and SC45647, and (surprisingly) NaCl. Observed reductions in GPCR-mediated tastant responses upon Rgs21 loss are opposite to original expectations, given that loss of RGS21 -- a GPCR signaling negative regulator -- should lead to increased responsiveness to tastant-mediated GPCR signaling (all else being equal). Yet, reduced organismal tastant responses are consistent with observations of reduced chorda tympani nerve recordings in Rgs21-null mice. Reduced tastant-mediated responses and behaviors exhibited by adult mice lacking Rgs21 expression since birth have thus revealed an underappreciated requirement for a GPCR GAP to establish the full character of tastant signaling.

  5. SB certification handout material requirements, test methods, responsibilities, and minimum classification levels for mixture-based specification for flexible base.

    2012-10-01

    A handout with tables representing the material requirements, test methods, responsibilities, and minimum classification levels mixture-based specification for flexible base and details on aggregate and test methods employed, along with agency and co...

  6. Effect of Ceramic Scaffold Architectural Parameters on Biological Response

    Maria Isabella eGariboldi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have focused on the optimization of ceramic architectures to fulfill a variety of scaffold functional requirements and improve biological response. Conventional fabrication techniques, however, do not allow for the production of geometrically controlled, reproducible structures and often fail to allow the independent variation of individual geometric parameters. Current developments in additive manufacturing technologies suggest that 3D printing will allow a more controlled and systematic exploration of scaffold architectures. This more direct translation of design into structure requires a pipeline for design-driven optimization. A theoretical framework for systematic design and evaluation of architectural parameters on biological response is presented. Four levels of architecture are considered, namely (1 surface topography, (2 pore size and geometry, (3 porous networks and (4 macroscopic pore arrangement, including the potential for spatially varied architectures. Studies exploring the effect of various parameters within these levels are reviewed. This framework will hopefully allow uncovering of new relationships between architecture and biological response in a more systematic way, as well as inform future refinement of fabrication techniques to fulfill architectural necessities with a consideration of biological implications.

  7. Postreinforcement Pause Duration Varies within a Session and with a Variable Response Requirement but Not as a Function of Prior Revolutions

    Belke, Terry W.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the variables that influence postreinforcement pause (PRP) duration in rats when wheel running serves as the reinforcing consequence. The relationship between revolutions and PRP duration when revolutions were manipulated within a session and the effect of changing the response requirement from fixed to variable on PRP…

  8. Ventromedial hypothalamic expression of Bdnf is required to establish normal patterns of afferent GABAergic connectivity and responses to hypoglycemia

    Anna Kamitakahara

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH controls energy and glucose homeostasis through direct connections to a distributed network of nuclei in the hypothalamus, midbrain, and hindbrain. Structural changes in VMH circuit morphology have the potential to alter VMH function throughout life, however, molecular signals responsible for specifying its neural connections are not fully defined. The VMH contains a high density of neurons that express brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a potent neurodevelopmental effector known to regulate neuronal survival, growth, differentiation, and connectivity in a number of neural systems. In the current study, we examined whether BDNF impacts the afferent and efferent connections of the VMH, as well as energy homeostatic function. Methods: To determine if BDNF is required for VMH circuit formation, a transgenic mouse model was used to conditionally delete Bdnf from steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1 expressing neurons of the VMH prior to the onset of establishing neural connections with other regions. Projections of SF1 expressing neurons were visualized with a genetically targeted fluorescent label and immunofluorescence was used to measure the density of afferents to SF1 neurons in the absence of BDNF. Physiological changes in body weight and circulating blood glucose were also evaluated in the mutant mice. Results: Our findings suggest that BDNF is required to establish normal densities of GABAergic afferents onto SF1 neurons located in the ventrolateral part of the VMH. Furthermore, loss of BDNF from VMH SF1 neurons results in impaired physiological responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that BDNF is required for formation and/or maintenance of inhibitory inputs to SF1 neurons, with enduring effects on glycemic control. Author Video: Author Video Watch what authors say about their articles Keywords: Ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus

  9. 42 CFR 137.285 - Are Self-Governance Tribes required to accept Federal environmental responsibilities to enter...

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Are Self-Governance Tribes required to accept..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Nepa Process § 137.285 Are Self-Governance Tribes required to accept Federal environmental responsibilities to enter into a construction...

  10. Severe deterministic effects of external exposure and intake of radioactive material: basis for emergency response criteria

    Kutkov, V; Buglova, E; McKenna, T

    2011-01-01

    Lessons learned from responses to past events have shown that more guidance is needed for the response to radiation emergencies (in this context, a 'radiation emergency' means the same as a 'nuclear or radiological emergency') which could lead to severe deterministic effects. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) requirements for preparedness and response for a radiation emergency, inter alia, require that arrangements shall be made to prevent, to a practicable extent, severe deterministic effects and to provide the appropriate specialised treatment for these effects. These requirements apply to all exposure pathways, both internal and external, and all reasonable scenarios, to include those resulting from malicious acts (e.g. dirty bombs). This paper briefly describes the approach used to develop the basis for emergency response criteria for protective actions to prevent severe deterministic effects in the case of external exposure and intake of radioactive material.

  11. Unfolded protein response is required for Aspergillus oryzae growth under conditions inducing secretory hydrolytic enzyme production.

    Tanaka, Mizuki; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2015-12-01

    Unfolded protein response (UPR) is an intracellular signaling pathway for adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In yeast UPR, Ire1 cleaves the unconventional intron of HAC1 mRNA, and the functional Hac1 protein translated from the spliced HAC1 mRNA induces the expression of ER chaperone genes and ER-associated degradation genes for the refolding or degradation of unfolded proteins. In this study, we constructed an ireA (IRE1 ortholog) conditionally expressing strain of Aspergillus oryzae, a filamentous fungus producing a large amount of amylolytic enzymes, and examined the contribution of UPR to ER stress adaptation under physiological conditions. Repression of ireA completely blocked A. oryzae growth under conditions inducing the production of hydrolytic enzymes, such as amylases and proteases. This growth defect was restored by the introduction of unconventional intronless hacA (hacA-i). Furthermore, UPR was observed to be induced by amylolytic gene expression, and the disruption of the transcriptional activator for amylolytic genes resulted in partial growth restoration of the ireA-repressing strain. In addition, a homokaryotic ireA disruption mutant was successfully generated using the strain harboring hacA-i as a parental host. These results indicated that UPR is required for A. oryzae growth to alleviate ER stress induced by excessive production of hydrolytic enzymes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A key requirement for CD300f in innate immune responses of eosinophils in colitis.

    Moshkovits, I; Reichman, H; Karo-Atar, D; Rozenberg, P; Zigmond, E; Haberman, Y; Ben Baruch-Morgenstern, N; Lampinen, M; Carlson, M; Itan, M; Denson, L A; Varol, C; Munitz, A

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophils are traditionally studied in the context of type 2 immune responses. However, recent studies highlight key innate immune functions for eosinophils especially in colonic inflammation. Surprisingly, molecular pathways regulating innate immune activities of eosinophil are largely unknown. We have recently shown that the CD300f is highly expressed by colonic eosinophils. Nonetheless, the role of CD300f in governing innate immune eosinophil activities is ill-defined. RNA sequencing of 162 pediatric Crohn's disease patients revealed upregulation of multiple Cd300 family members, which correlated with the presence of severe ulcerations and inflammation. Increased expression of CD300 family receptors was also observed in active ulcerative colitis (UC) and in mice following induction of experimental colitis. Specifically, the expression of CD300f was dynamically regulated in monocytes and eosinophils. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-treated Cd300f -/- mice exhibit attenuated disease activity and histopathology in comparison with DSS-treated wild type (WT). Decreased disease activity in Cd300f -/- mice was accompanied with reduced inflammatory cell infiltration and nearly abolished production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Monocyte depletion and chimeric bone marrow transfer experiments revealed a cell-specific requirement for CD300f in innate immune activation of eosinophils. Collectively, we uncover a new pathway regulating innate immune activities of eosinophils, a finding with significant implications in eosinophil-associated gastrointestinal diseases.

  13. Corporate Governance Effects on Social Responsibility Disclosures

    António Dias

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study uses stakeholder theory to explore how corporate governance [CG] characteristics influence corporate social responsibility disclosure [CSRD] in the context of a global financial crisis [GFC]. Empirical data are drawn from Portugal, a country strongly affected by the GFC. Portuguese companies are characterized by high ownership concentration. The largest shareholder is often the CEO and Board Chair (a phenomenon known as CEO duality. We analyse the association between CSRD (measured by a 40-item disclosure index and CG variables (board size, CEO duality, board independence, ownership concentration and presence of an audit committee or CSR committee for 48 of the 51 listed companies in Portugal. The control variables are company size and industry type. We find that CSRD is affected positively by board size, CEO duality, company size and industry type. This accords with suggestions implicit in stakeholder theory that a larger board will represent a broader diversity of stakeholders and will promote better monitoring, more assertive stakeholder management, greater transparency, and increased levels of CSRD. Larger companies and companies close-to-consumers are associated with high levels of CSRD, ostensibly because they are more visible and subject to greater societal monitoring during a period of financial crisis. We reveal that in a country characterized by high ownership concentration, CEO duality has a positive effect on CSRD.

  14. The framing effect and skin conductance responses

    Patrick eRing

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Individuals often rely on simple heuristics when they face complex choice situations under uncertainty. Traditionally, it has been proposed that cognitive processes are the main driver to evaluate different choice options and finally to reach a decision. Growing evidence, however, highlights a strong interrelation between judgment and decision-making (JDM on the one hand, and emotional processes on the other hand. This also seems to apply to judgmental heuristics, i.e. decision-processes that are typically considered to be fast and intuitive. In this study, participants are exposed to different probabilities of receiving an unpleasant electric shock. Information about electric shock probabilities is either positively or negatively framed. Integrated skin conductance responses (ISCRs while waiting for electric shock realization are used as an indicator for participants' emotional arousal. This measure is compared to objective probabilities. I find evidence for a relation between emotional body reactions measured by ISCRs and the framing effect. Under negative frames, participants show significantly higher ISCRs while waiting for an electric shock to be delivered than under positive frames. This result might contribute to a better understanding of the psychological processes underlying JDM. Further studies are necessary to reveal the causality underlying this finding, i.e. whether emotional processes influence JDM or vice versa.

  15. The framing effect and skin conductance responses.

    Ring, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Individuals often rely on simple heuristics when they face complex choice situations under uncertainty. Traditionally, it has been proposed that cognitive processes are the main driver to evaluate different choice options and to finally reach a decision. Growing evidence, however, highlights a strong interrelation between judgment and decision-making (JDM) on the one hand, and emotional processes on the other hand. This also seems to apply to judgmental heuristics, i.e., decision processes that are typically considered to be fast and intuitive. In this study, participants are exposed to different probabilities of receiving an unpleasant electric shock. Information about electric shock probabilities is either positively or negatively framed. Integrated skin conductance responses (ISCRs) while waiting for electric shock realization are used as an indicator for participants' emotional arousal. This measure is compared to objective probabilities. I find evidence for a relation between emotional body reactions measured by ISCRs and the framing effect. Under negative frames, participants show significantly higher ISCRs while waiting for an electric shock to be delivered than under positive frames. This result might contribute to a better understanding of the psychological processes underlying JDM. Further studies are necessary to reveal the causality underlying this finding, i.e., whether emotional processes influence JDM or vice versa.

  16. Microglia are required for astroglial toll-like receptor 4 response and for optimal TLR2 and TLR3 response

    Holm, Thomas H; Draeby, Dina; Owens, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Within the central nervous system, astrocytes and microglia are the primary responders to endogenous ligands released upon injury and stress, as well as to infectious pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are implicated in recognition of both types of stimulus. Whether astrocytes respond as stron......Within the central nervous system, astrocytes and microglia are the primary responders to endogenous ligands released upon injury and stress, as well as to infectious pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are implicated in recognition of both types of stimulus. Whether astrocytes respond...... astrocytes from mixed glial cultures and measured their response to TLR agonists. Our results show that the response of astrocytes to TLR2 and TLR3 agonists is greatly enhanced by, and response to TLR4 agonists is completely dependent on, the presence of functional microglia. In the case of the TLR4 response...

  17. Development of effective emergency preparedness and response

    2012-01-01

    It has been discussed that there were many differences to international standards and the delay for prior planning implementation of unclear emergency preparedness. Therefore, it was necessary to promote the study to take the concept of the international standard to the Guide 'Emergency Preparedness for Nuclear Facilities', and to apply the Precautionary Action Zone (PAZ) etc. as the protective actions procedure. This study was started since the fiscal year 2010 to enhance the effectiveness of the protective actions, which are corresponding to these requirements based on international aspects in the nuclear disaster occurrence. And the study was conducted to introduce the emergency action level (EAL) as decision criteria and to apply urgent protective action considering PAZ, and the results from this study will be used as the basic data necessary to modify and improve the Guide. In order to fulfill the purposes described above, in fiscal year 2011, followings are executed, (1) analysis and verification for basic evacuation area such as the PAZ, (2) analysis with regard to the EAL and prototype of protective actions for public, and (3) analysis with regard to prototype of protective actions for public including evacuation plan. However, taking account of the significance of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, Japanese emergency preparedness strategy should be studied and reconstructed in logically, systematically, and with international standard, but also being based on the reflection of individual lessons from this accident. (author)

  18. IAEA emergency response network ERNET. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2002

    2003-04-01

    The Parties to the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency have undertaken to co-operate among themselves and with the IAEA in facilitating the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, and in minimizing the consequences and in protecting life, property and the environment from the effects of any radioactive releases. As part of the IAEA strategy for supporting such co-operation, the Secretariat of the IAEA is establishing a global Emergency Response Network (ERNET) of teams suitably qualified to respond rapidly, on a regional basis, to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies. This manual sets out the criteria and requirements to be met by ERNET teams. It is intended for use by institutions in Member States in developing, applying and maintaining their emergency response capabilities and in implementing quality assurance programmes within the context of ERNET. The manual is worded on the assumption that a State Competent Authority designated as the body responsible for reacting to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies which occur outside the jurisdiction of that State will be the State Contact Point for receiving requests for assistance from the IAEA under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency

  19. IAEA emergency response network ERNET. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2000

    2000-12-01

    The Parties to the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency have undertaken to co-operate among themselves and with the IAEA in facilitating the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, and in minimizing the consequences and in protecting life, property and the environment from the effects of any radioactive releases. As part of the IAEA strategy for supporting such co-operation, the Secretariat of the IAEA is establishing a global Emergency Response Network (ERNET) of teams suitably qualified to respond rapidly, on a regional basis, to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies. This manual sets out the criteria and requirements to be met by ERNET teams. It is intended for use by institutions in Member States in developing, applying and maintaining their emergency response capabilities and in implementing quality assurance programmes within the context of ERNET. The manual is worded on the assumption that a State Competent Authority designated as the body responsible for reacting to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies which occur outside the jurisdiction of that State will be the State Contact Point for receiving requests for assistance from the IAEA under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency

  20. Development of the oil spill response cost-effectiveness analytical tool

    Etkin, D.S.; Welch, J.

    2005-01-01

    Decision-making during oil spill response operations or contingency planning requires balancing the need to remove as much oil as possible from the environment with the desire to minimize the impact of response operations on the environment they are intended to protect. This paper discussed the creation of a computer tool developed to help in planning and decision-making during response operations. The Oil Spill Response Cost-Effectiveness Analytical Tool (OSRCEAT) was developed to compare the costs of response with the benefits of response in both hypothetical and actual oil spills. The computer-based analytical tool can assist responders and contingency planners in decision-making processes as well as act as a basis of discussion in the evaluation of response options. Using inputs on spill parameters, location and response options, OSRCEAT can calculate response cost, costs of environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the oil spill and response impacts. Oil damages without any response are contrasted to oil damages with response, with expected improvements. Response damages are subtracted from the difference in damages with and without response in order to derive a more accurate response benefit. An OSRCEAT user can test various response options to compare potential benefits in order to maximize response benefit. OSRCEAT is best used to compare and contrast the relative benefits and costs of various response options. 50 refs., 19 tabs., 2 figs

  1. 75 FR 37712 - Temporary Suspension of Certain Oil Spill Response Time Requirements To Support Deepwater Horizon...

    2010-06-30

    ... Purpose A major feature of the National Response System under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act... relocate response resources from current locations to the Gulf of Mexico, this rule directly assists in the urgently needed immediate relocation of nationwide oil spill response resources to the Gulf of Mexico to...

  2. Environmental and genetic preconditioning for long-term anoxia responses requires AMPK in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Bobby L LaRue

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Preconditioning environments or therapeutics, to suppress the cellular damage associated with severe oxygen deprivation, is of interest to our understanding of diseases associated with oxygen deprivation. Wildtype C. elegans exposed to anoxia enter into a state of suspended animation in which energy-requiring processes reversibly arrest. C. elegans at all developmental stages survive 24-hours of anoxia exposure however, the ability of adult hermaphrodites to survive three days of anoxia significantly decreases. Mutations in the insulin-like signaling receptor (daf-2 and LIN-12/Notch (glp-1 lead to an enhanced long-term anoxia survival phenotype.In this study we show that the combined growth environment of 25°C and a diet of HT115 E. coli will precondition adult hermaphrodites to survive long-term anoxia; many of these survivors have normal movement after anoxia treatment. Animals fed the drug metformin, which induces a dietary-restriction like state in animals and activates AMPK in mammalian cell culture, have a higher survival rate when exposed to long-term anoxia. Mutations in genes encoding components of AMPK (aak-2, aakb-1, aakb-2, aakg-2 suppress the environmentally and genetically induced long-term anoxia survival phenotype. We further determine that there is a correlation between the animals that survive long-term anoxia and increased levels of carminic acid staining, which is a fluorescent dye that incorporates in with carbohydrates such as glycogen.We conclude that small changes in growth conditions such as increased temperature and food source can influence the physiology of the animal thus affecting the responses to stress such as anoxia. Furthermore, this supports the idea that metformin should be further investigated as a therapeutic tool for treatment of oxygen-deprived tissues. Finally, the capacity for an animal to survive long bouts of severe oxygen deprivation is likely dependent on specific subunits of the heterotrimeric

  3. Prolonged antigen presentation is required for optimal CD8+ T cell responses against malaria liver stage parasites.

    Ian A Cockburn

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunization with irradiated sporozoites is currently the most effective vaccination strategy against liver stages of malaria parasites, yet the mechanisms underpinning the success of this approach are unknown. Here we show that the complete development of protective CD8+ T cell responses requires prolonged antigen presentation. Using TCR transgenic cells specific for the malaria circumsporozoite protein, a leading vaccine candidate, we found that sporozoite antigen persists for over 8 weeks after immunization--a remarkable finding since irradiated sporozoites are incapable of replication and do not differentiate beyond early liver stages. Persisting antigen was detected in lymphoid organs and depends on the presence of CD11c+ cells. Prolonged antigen presentation enhanced the magnitude of the CD8+ T cell response in a number of ways. Firstly, reducing the time primed CD8+ T cells were exposed to antigen in vivo severely reduced the final size of the developing memory population. Secondly, fully developed memory cells expanded in previously immunized mice but not when transferred to naïve animals. Finally, persisting antigen was able to prime naïve cells, including recent thymic emigrants, to become functional effector cells capable of eliminating parasites in the liver. Together these data show that the optimal development of protective CD8+ T cell immunity against malaria liver stages is dependent upon the prolonged presentation of sporozoite-derived antigen.

  4. Effects of gastric emptying on the postprandial ghrelin response

    Blom, W.A.M.; Lluch, A.; Vinoy, S.; Stafleu, A.; Berg, van den R.; Holst, J.J.; Kok, F.J.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2006-01-01

    Distension and chemosensitization of the stomach are insufficient to induce a ghrelin response, suggesting that postgastric feedback is required. This postgastric feedback may be regulated through insulin. We investigated the relation between gastric emptying rate and the postprandial ghrelin

  5. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 112 - Determination and Evaluation of Required Response Resources for Facility Response Plans

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION Pt. 112, App. E Appendix E... boundary lines defined in 46 CFR part 7, except in the Gulf of Mexico. In the Gulf of Mexico, it means the... meet the requirements for arrival on-scene in accordance with section 5.3 of this appendix. An on-water...

  6. Computer Security Incident Response Team Effectiveness: A Needs Assessment.

    Van der Kleij, Rick; Kleinhuis, Geert; Young, Heather

    2017-01-01

    Computer security incident response teams (CSIRTs) respond to a computer security incident when the need arises. Failure of these teams can have far-reaching effects for the economy and national security. CSIRTs often have to work on an ad hoc basis, in close cooperation with other teams, and in time constrained environments. It could be argued that under these working conditions CSIRTs would be likely to encounter problems. A needs assessment was done to see to which extent this argument holds true. We constructed an incident response needs model to assist in identifying areas that require improvement. We envisioned a model consisting of four assessment categories: Organization, Team, Individual and Instrumental. Central to this is the idea that both problems and needs can have an organizational, team, individual, or technical origin or a combination of these levels. To gather data we conducted a literature review. This resulted in a comprehensive list of challenges and needs that could hinder or improve, respectively, the performance of CSIRTs. Then, semi-structured in depth interviews were held with team coordinators and team members of five public and private sector Dutch CSIRTs to ground these findings in practice and to identify gaps between current and desired incident handling practices. This paper presents the findings of our needs assessment and ends with a discussion of potential solutions to problems with performance in incident response.

  7. Computer Security Incident Response Team Effectiveness: A Needs Assessment

    Rick Van der Kleij

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Computer security incident response teams (CSIRTs respond to a computer security incident when the need arises. Failure of these teams can have far-reaching effects for the economy and national security. CSIRTs often have to work on an ad hoc basis, in close cooperation with other teams, and in time constrained environments. It could be argued that under these working conditions CSIRTs would be likely to encounter problems. A needs assessment was done to see to which extent this argument holds true. We constructed an incident response needs model to assist in identifying areas that require improvement. We envisioned a model consisting of four assessment categories: Organization, Team, Individual and Instrumental. Central to this is the idea that both problems and needs can have an organizational, team, individual, or technical origin or a combination of these levels. To gather data we conducted a literature review. This resulted in a comprehensive list of challenges and needs that could hinder or improve, respectively, the performance of CSIRTs. Then, semi-structured in depth interviews were held with team coordinators and team members of five public and private sector Dutch CSIRTs to ground these findings in practice and to identify gaps between current and desired incident handling practices. This paper presents the findings of our needs assessment and ends with a discussion of potential solutions to problems with performance in incident response.

  8. Effect of long construction times on utility financial requirements

    Francis, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    It is well-known that long construction times significantly increase the cost of an individual nuclear plant. Long construction times, however, are not confined to either a single plant or a single utility. Rather, they apparently occur in almost all nuclear plants currently under construction. The total financial requirement to complete the 82 nuclear plants currently under construction was assessed. The analysis was performed assuming a construction time of ten years in one case, and six years in another. It was found that decreasing the construction time from ten to six years will reduce the financial requirements of the utility industry by $89 billion

  9. A Specific ChREBP and PPARα Cross-Talk Is Required for the Glucose-Mediated FGF21 Response

    Alison Iroz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available While the physiological benefits of the fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 hepatokine are documented in response to fasting, little information is available on Fgf21 regulation in a glucose-overload context. We report that peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα, a nuclear receptor of the fasting response, is required with the carbohydrate-sensitive transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP to balance FGF21 glucose response. Microarray analysis indicated that only a few hepatic genes respond to fasting and glucose similarly to Fgf21. Glucose-challenged Chrebp−/− mice exhibit a marked reduction in FGF21 production, a decrease that was rescued by re-expression of an active ChREBP isoform in the liver of Chrebp−/− mice. Unexpectedly, carbohydrate challenge of hepatic Pparα knockout mice also demonstrated a PPARα-dependent glucose response for Fgf21 that was associated with an increased sucrose preference. This blunted response was due to decreased Fgf21 promoter accessibility and diminished ChREBP binding onto Fgf21 carbohydrate-responsive element (ChoRE in hepatocytes lacking PPARα. Our study reports that PPARα is required for the ChREBP-induced glucose response of FGF21.

  10. Lactobacilli require physical contact to reduce staphylococcal TSST-1 secretion and vaginal epithelial inflammatory response.

    Younes, Jessica A; Reid, Gregor; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2016-06-01

    ITALIC! Staphylococcus aureusbiofilms can be found on vaginal epithelia, secreting toxins and causing inflammation. The co-vaginal species ITALIC! Lactobacilluscan alter staphylococcal-induced epithelial secretion of inflammatory cytokines and quench staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 secretion. It is hypothesized that these effects of lactobacilli require direct physical contact between lactobacilli, staphylococci and the epithelium. Indeed, lactobacilli only reduced ITALIC! S. aureus-induced inflammatory cytokine expression when allowed physical contact with vaginal epithelial cells. Furthermore, a reduction in toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 secretion only occurred when a probiotic ITALIC! Lactobacillusstrain was allowed contact, but not when being physically separated from ITALIC! S. aureus Bacterial-probe atomic force microscopy demonstrated that lactobacilli and staphylococci strongly adhere to epithelial cells, while lactobacilli adhere stronger to staphylococci than staphylococci to each other, giving lactobacilli opportunity to penetrate and reside in staphylococcal biofilms, as visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy with fluorescence ITALIC! in situhybridization probes. These results identify that physical contact and biochemical signaling by lactobacilli are intrinsically linked mechanisms that reduce virulence of ITALIC! S. aureusbiofilm. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Research on Simulation Requirements and Business Architecture of Automated Demand Response in Power Sales Side Market Liberalization

    Liu, Yiqun; Zhou, Pengcheng; Zeng, Ming; Chen, Songsong

    2018-01-01

    With the gradual reform of the electricity market, the power sale side liberalization has become the focus of attention as the key task of reform. The open power market provides a good environment for DR (Demand Response). It is of great significance to research the simulation requirements and business architecture of ADR (Automatic Demand Response) in power sale side market liberalization. Firstly, this paper analyzes the simulation requirements of ADR. Secondly, it analyzes the influence factors that the business development of ADR from five aspects after power sale side market liberalization. Finally, Based on ADR technology support system, the business architecture of ADR after power sale side market liberalization is constructed.

  12. Anti-Money Laundering Requirements – Perceived Effectiveness

    C. C. Huang; M. S. Amirrudin; N. A. Ahamad Noruddin; R. Othman

    2013-01-01

    Anti-money laundering is commonly recognized as a set of procedures, laws or regulations designed to reduce the practice of generating income through illegal actions. In Malaysia, the government and law enforcement agencies have stepped up their capacities and efforts to curb money laundering since 2001. One of these measures was the enactment of the Anti-Money Laundering Act (AMLA) in 2001. The implementation costs on anti-money laundering requirements (AMLR) can be burd...

  13. Pilot-model analysis and simulation study of effect of control task desired control response

    Adams, J. J.; Gera, J.; Jaudon, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    A pilot model analysis was performed that relates pilot control compensation, pilot aircraft system response, and aircraft response characteristics for longitudinal control. The results show that a higher aircraft short period frequency is required to achieve superior pilot aircraft system response in an altitude control task than is required in an attitude control task. These results were confirmed by a simulation study of target tracking. It was concluded that the pilot model analysis provides a theoretical basis for determining the effect of control task on pilot opinions.

  14. The Effect of Accounting Question Response Formats on Student Performance

    Jonick, Christine; Schneider, Jennifer; Boylan, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the research is to examine the effect of different response formats on student performance on introductory accounting exam questions. The study analyzes 1104 accounting students' responses to quantitative questions presented in two formats: multiple-choice and fill-in. Findings indicate that response format impacts student…

  15. Frequency of streamflow measurements required to determine forest treatment effects

    Kenneth G. Reinhart

    1964-01-01

    Most of the stream-discharge records for our experimental watersheds are taken by continuous measurements. But the question arises: are continuous measurements necessary to determine effects of forest treatments? Or could treatment effects be determined by measurement of discharge at intervals, say, once a day or once a week?

  16. Predicting the profile of nutrients available for absorption: from nutrient requirement to animal response and environmental impact

    Dijkstra, J.; Kebreab, E.; Mills, J.A.N.; Pellikaan, W.F.; López, S.; Bannink, A.; France, J.

    2007-01-01

    Current feed evaluation systems for dairy cattle aim to match nutrient requirements with nutrient intake at pre-defined production levels. These systems were not developed to address, and are not suitable to predict, the responses to dietary changes in terms of production level and product

  17. Review and assessment of package requirements (yellowcake) and emergency response to transportation accidents

    1978-10-01

    As a consequence of an accident involving a truck shipment of yellowcake, a joint NRC--DOT study was undertaken to review and assess the regulations and practices related to package integrity and to emergency response to transportation accidents involving low specific activity radioactive materials. Recommendations are made regarding the responsibilities of state and local agencies, carriers, and shippers, and the DOT and NRC regulations

  18. Dissociations of spatial congruence effects across response measures: an examination of delta plots.

    Miller, Jeff; Roüast, Nora M

    2016-09-01

    Spatial congruence ("Simon") effects on reaction time (RT) and response force (RF) were studied in two experiments requiring speeded choice responses to the color of a stimulus located irrelevantly to the left or right of fixation. In Experiment 1 with unimanual responses, both RT and incorrect-hand RF were sensitive to spatial congruence, and both showed larger Simon effects following a congruent trial than following an incongruent one. RT and incorrect-hand RF were dissociated in distributional (i.e., delta plot) analyses, however. As in previous studies, the Simon effect on RT was largest for the fastest responses and diminished as RT increased (i.e., decreasing delta plot). In contrast, Simon effects on RF did not decrease for slower responses; if anything, they increased slightly. In Experiment 2 participants made bimanual responses, allowing measurement of the spatial congruence effect for each trial. Responses were both faster and more forceful with the spatially congruent hand than with the spatially incongruent one, but neither of these effects decreased for slower responses. Overall, the results demonstrate that at least some motor-level effects of irrelevant spatial location persist for slower responses.

  19. ARE TIDAL EFFECTS RESPONSIBLE FOR EXOPLANETARY SPIN–ORBIT ALIGNMENT?

    Li, Gongjie [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, The Institute for Theory and Computation, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Winn, Joshua N., E-mail: gli@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    The obliquities of planet-hosting stars are clues about the formation of planetary systems. Previous observations led to the hypothesis that for close-in giant planets, spin–orbit alignment is enforced by tidal interactions. Here, we examine two problems with this hypothesis. First, Mazeh and coworkers recently used a new technique—based on the amplitude of starspot-induced photometric variability—to conclude that spin–orbit alignment is common even for relatively long-period planets, which would not be expected if tides were responsible. We re-examine the data and find a statistically significant correlation between photometric variability and planetary orbital period that is qualitatively consistent with tidal interactions. However it is still difficult to explain quantitatively, as it would require tides to be effective for periods as long as tens of days. Second, Rogers and Lin argued against a particular theory for tidal re-alignment by showing that initially retrograde systems would fail to be re-aligned, in contradiction with the observed prevalence of prograde systems. We investigate a simple model that overcomes this problem by taking into account the dissipation of inertial waves and the equilibrium tide, as well as magnetic braking. We identify a region of parameter space where re-alignment can be achieved, but it only works for close-in giant planets, and requires some fine tuning. Thus, while we find both problems to be more nuanced than they first appeared, the tidal model still has serious shortcomings.

  20. T-cell-independent immune responses do not require CXC ligand 13-mediated B1 cell migration.

    Colombo, Matthew J; Sun, Guizhi; Alugupalli, Kishore R

    2010-09-01

    The dynamic movement of B cells increases the probability of encountering specific antigen and facilitates cell-cell interactions required for mounting a rapid antibody response. B1a and B1b cells are enriched in the coelomic cavity, contribute to T-cell-independent (TI) antibody responses, and increase in number upon antigen exposure. B1 cell movement is largely governed by Cxc ligand 13 (Cxcl13), and mice deficient in this chemokine have a severe reduction in peritoneal B1 cells. In this study, we examined the role of Cxcl13-dependent B cell migration using Borrelia hermsii infection or intraperitoneal immunization with pneumococcal polysaccharide or 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl-acetyl (NP)-Ficoll, all of which induce robust antibody responses from B1b cells. Surprisingly, we found that antibody responses to B. hermsii or to FhbA, an antigenic target of B1b cells, and the resolution of bacteremia were indistinguishable between wild-type and Cxcl13-/- mice. Importantly, we did not observe an expansion of peritoneal B1b cell numbers in Cxcl13-/- mice. Nonetheless, mice that had resolved infection were resistant to reinfection, indicating that the peritoneal B1b cell reservoir is not required for controlling B. hermsii. Furthermore, despite a reduced peritoneal B1b compartment, immunization with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine yielded comparable antigen-specific antibody responses in wild-type and Cxcl13-/- mice and conferred protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae. Likewise, immunization with NP-Ficoll elicited similar antibody responses in wild-type and Cxcl13-/- mice. These data demonstrate that homing of B1 cells into the coelomic cavity is not a requirement for generating protective TI antibody responses, even when antigen is initially localized to this anatomical compartment.

  1. 7 CFR 15a.5 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-01-01

    ... the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); the Equal Pay Act (29 U.S.C. 206 and 206(d); and any other act of Congress or Federal regulation. (b) Effect of State or local law or other...

  2. Telematic Requirements for Emergency and Disaster Response derived from Enterprise Models

    Widya, I.A.; Vierhout, P.A.M.; Vierhout, P.A.M.; Jones, Valerie M.; Bults, Richard G.A.; van Halteren, Aart; Peuscher, J.; Konstantas, D.; Istepanian, R.S.H.; Laxminarayan, S.; Pattichis, C.S.

    2006-01-01

    One of the prime objectives in disaster response management is to achieve full control of the situation as rapidly as possible. Coordination and communication facility therefore plays an essential role in managing disasters. This chapter discusses Enterprise Models that capture the invariant

  3. Eosinophils are required to suppress Th2 responses in Peyer's patches during intestinal infection by nematodes.

    Strandmark, J; Steinfelder, S; Berek, C; Kühl, A A; Rausch, S; Hartmann, S

    2017-05-01

    Infections with enteric nematodes result in systemic type 2 helper T (Th2) responses, expansion of immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 antibodies, and eosinophilia. Eosinophils have a supportive role in mucosal Th2 induction during airway hyperreactivity. Whether eosinophils affect the local T-cell and antibody response in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue during enteric infections is unknown. We infected eosinophil-deficient ΔdblGATA-1 mice with the Th2-inducing small intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus and found that parasite fecundity was decreased in the absence of eosinophils. A lack of eosinophils resulted in significantly augmented expression of GATA-3 and IL-4 by CD4 + T cells during acute infection, a finding strictly limited to Peyer's patches (PP). The increase in IL-4-producing cells in ΔdblGATA-1 mice was particularly evident within the CXCR5 + PD-1 + T-follicular helper cell population and was associated with a switch of germinal centre B cells to IgG1 production and elevated serum IgG1 levels. In contrast, infected wild-type mice had a modest IgG1 response in the PP, whereas successfully maintaining a population of IgA + germinal center B cells. Our results suggest a novel role for eosinophils during intestinal infection whereby they restrict IL-4 responses by follicular T helper cells and IgG1 class switching in the PP to ensure maintenance of local IgA production.

  4. The Effect of Aortic Compliance on Left Ventricular Power Requirement

    Pahlevan, Niema; Gharib, Morteza

    2009-11-01

    Aortic compliance depends on both geometry and mechanical properties of the aorta. Reduction in arterial compliance has been associated with aging, smoking, and multiple cardiovascular diseases. Increased stiffness of the aorta affects the wave dynamics in the aorta by increasing both pulse pressure amplitude and wave speed. We hypothesized that decreased aortic compliance leads to an increased left ventricular power requirement for a fixed cardiac output due to altered pulse pressure and pulse wave velocity. We used a computational approach using the finite element method for solid and fluid domains coupled to each other by using the direct coupling method. A nonlinear material model was used for the solid wall. The fluid flow model was considered to be Newtonian, incompressible, and laminar. The simulation was performed for a heart rate of 75 beats per minute for six different compliances while keeping the cardiac output and the peripheral resistance constant. The results show a trend towards increased left ventricular energy expenditure per cycle with decreased compliance. The relevance of these findings to clinical observations will be discussed.

  5. 22 CFR 146.125 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-04-01

    ..., 1978 Comp., p. 264; sections 704 and 855 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 295m, 298b-2); Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (29 U.S.C. 206); and any other Act of Congress or Federal regulation. (b) Effect of State or local law or other...

  6. 28 CFR 54.125 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-07-01

    ... Order 12107, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 264; sections 704 and 855 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 295m, 298b-2); Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (29 U.S.C. 206); and any other Act of Congress or Federal regulation. (b) Effect of State or...

  7. 13 CFR 113.125 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-01-01

    ... Executive Order 12107, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 264; sections 704 and 855 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 295m, 298b-2); Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (29 U.S.C. 206); and any other Act of Congress or Federal regulation. (b) Effect of...

  8. 40 CFR 5.125 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-07-01

    ... Order 12107, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 264; sections 704 and 855 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 295m, 298b-2); Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (29 U.S.C. 206); and any other Act of Congress or Federal regulation. (b) Effect of State or...

  9. 49 CFR 25.125 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-10-01

    ..., 1978 Comp., p. 264; sections 704 and 855 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 295m, 298b-2); Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (29 U.S.C. 206); and any other Act of Congress or Federal regulation. (b) Effect of State or local law or other...

  10. 15 CFR 8a.125 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-01-01

    ... Order 12107, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 264; sections 704 and 855 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 295m, 298b-2); Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (29 U.S.C. 206); and any other Act of Congress or Federal regulation. (b) Effect of State or...

  11. 22 CFR 229.125 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-04-01

    ... Order 12107, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 264; sections 704 and 855 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 295m, 298b-2); Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (29 U.S.C. 206); and any other Act of Congress or Federal regulation. (b) Effect of State or...

  12. 31 CFR 28.125 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-07-01

    ... Executive Order 12107, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 264; sections 704 and 855 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 295m, 298b-2); Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (29 U.S.C. 206); and any other Act of Congress or Federal regulation. (b) Effect of...

  13. 6 CFR 17.125 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-01-01

    ... Executive Order 12107, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 264; sections 704 and 855 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 295m, 298b-2); Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (29 U.S.C. 206); and any other Act of Congress or Federal regulation. (b) Effect of...

  14. 43 CFR 41.125 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-10-01

    ... Order 12107, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 264; sections 704 and 855 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 295m, 298b-2); Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (29 U.S.C. 206); and any other Act of Congress or Federal regulation. (b) Effect of State or...

  15. 14 CFR 1253.125 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-01-01

    ... Executive Order 12107, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 264; sections 704 and 855 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 295m, 298b-2); Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (29 U.S.C. 206); and any other Act of Congress or Federal regulation. (b) Effect of...

  16. 45 CFR 618.125 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-10-01

    ... Executive Order 12107, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 264; sections 704 and 855 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 295m, 298b-2); Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (29 U.S.C. 206); and any other Act of Congress or Federal regulation. (b) Effect of...

  17. 18 CFR 1317.125 - Effect of other requirements.

    2010-04-01

    ... Executive Order 12107, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 264; sections 704 and 855 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 295m, 298b-2); Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (29 U.S.C. 206); and any other Act of Congress or Federal regulation. (b) Effect of...

  18. 49 CFR 37.189 - Service requirement for OTRB demand-responsive systems.

    2010-10-01

    ... normal reservation policies or to displace another passenger who has reserved a seat on the bus. The... all passengers to reserve space on the bus three months before the trip date. This requirement applies... passenger who is a wheelchair user would have to request an accessible bus at the time he or she made his...

  19. 49 CFR 178.69 - Responsibilities and requirements for manufacturers of UN pressure receptacles.

    2010-10-01

    ... in English and must include detailed descriptions of the following: (i) The organizational structure... type, and ensure that all production of UN pressure receptacles meets the applicable requirements. (1... manufacturer of the findings. (b) Design type approvals. The manufacturer must have each pressure receptacle...

  20. 33 CFR 155.4030 - Required salvage and marine firefighting services to list in response plans.

    2010-07-01

    ... providers that you have contracted to provide these services. You may list multiple resource providers for each service, but you must identify which one is your primary resource provider for each Captain of the... your VRP, adjacent to the name of the resource provider. (b) Table 155.4030(b) lists the required...

  1. Side channel analysis of some hash based MACs: A response to SHA-3 requirements

    Gauravaram, Praveen; Okeya, Katsuyuki

    2008-01-01

    The forthcoming NIST's Advanced Hash Standard (AHS) competition to select SHA-3 hash function requires that each candidate hash function submission must have at least one construction to support FIPS 198 HMAC application. As part of its evaluation, NIST is aiming to select either a candidate hash...

  2. 29 CFR 1620.17 - Jobs requiring equal responsibility in performance.

    2010-07-01

    ... the higher rate to both men and women who are called upon from time to time to assume such supervisory... rates to be paid to an employee of the opposite sex in the group who does not have an equal... either a man or a woman) is authorized and required to determine whether to accept payment for purchases...

  3. Geospatial Information is the Cornerstone of Effective Hazards Response

    Newell, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Every day there are hundreds of natural disasters world-wide. Some are dramatic, whereas others are barely noticeable. A natural disaster is commonly defined as a natural event with catastrophic consequences for living things in the vicinity. Those events include earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, landslides, tsunami, volcanoes, and wildfires. Man-made disasters are events that are caused by man either intentionally or by accident, and that directly or indirectly threaten public health and well-being. These occurrences span the spectrum from terrorist attacks to accidental oil spills. To assist in responding to natural and potential man-made disasters, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has established the Geospatial Information Response Team (GIRT) (http://www.usgs.gov/emergency/). The primary purpose of the GIRT is to ensure rapid coordination and availability of geospatial information for effective response by emergency responders, and land and resource managers, and for scientific analysis. The GIRT is responsible for establishing monitoring procedures for geospatial data acquisition, processing, and archiving; discovery, access, and delivery of data; anticipating geospatial needs; and providing relevant geospatial products and services. The GIRT is focused on supporting programs, offices, other agencies, and the public in mission response to hazards. The GIRT will leverage the USGS Geospatial Liaison Network and partnerships with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), and Northern Command (NORTHCOM) to coordinate the provisioning and deployment of USGS geospatial data, products, services, and equipment. The USGS geospatial liaisons will coordinate geospatial information sharing with State, local, and tribal governments, and ensure geospatial liaison back-up support procedures are in place. The GIRT will coordinate disposition of USGS staff in support of DHS response center activities as requested by DHS. The GIRT

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa RhlR is required to neutralize the cellular immune response in a Drosophila melanogaster oral infection model

    Limmer, Stefanie; Haller, Samantha; Drenkard, Eliana; Lee, Janice; Yu, Shen; Kocks, Christine; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Ferrandon, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    An in-depth mechanistic understanding of microbial infection necessitates a molecular dissection of host–pathogen relationships. Both Drosophila melanogaster and Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been intensively studied. Here, we analyze the infection of D. melanogaster by P. aeruginosa by using mutants in both host and pathogen. We show that orally ingested P. aeruginosa crosses the intestinal barrier and then proliferates in the hemolymph, thereby causing the infected flies to die of bacteremia. Host defenses against ingested P. aeruginosa included an immune deficiency (IMD) response in the intestinal epithelium, systemic Toll and IMD pathway responses, and a cellular immune response controlling bacteria in the hemocoel. Although the observed cellular and intestinal immune responses appeared to act throughout the course of the infection, there was a late onset of the systemic IMD and Toll responses. In this oral infection model, P. aeruginosa PA14 did not require its type III secretion system or other well-studied virulence factors such as the two-component response regulator GacA or the protease AprA for virulence. In contrast, the quorum-sensing transcription factor RhlR, but surprisingly not LasR, played a key role in counteracting the cellular immune response against PA14, possibly at an early stage when only a few bacteria are present in the hemocoel. These results illustrate the power of studying infection from the dual perspective of host and pathogen by revealing that RhlR plays a more complex role during pathogenesis than previously appreciated. PMID:21987808

  5. A CHROMATIN MODIFYING ENZYME, SDG8, IS REQUIRED FOR MORPHOLOGICAL, GENE EXPRESSION, AND EPIGENETIC RESPONSES TO MECHANICAL STIMULATION

    Christopher Ian Cazzonelli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thigmomorphogenesis is viewed as being a response process of acclimation to short repetitive bursts of mechanical stimulation or touch. The underlying molecular mechanisms that coordinate changes in how touch signals lead to long-term morphological changes are enigmatic. Touch responsive gene expression is rapid and transient, and no transcription factor or DNA regulatory motif has been reported that could confer a genome wide mechanical stimulus. We report here on a chromatin modifying enzyme, SDG8/ASHH2, which can regulate the expression of many touch responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis. SDG8 is required for the permissive expression of touch induced genes; and the loss of function of sdg8 perturbs the maximum levels of induction on selected touch gene targets. SDG8 is required to maintain permissive H3K4 trimethylation marks surrounding the Arabidopsis touch-inducible gene TOUCH 3 (TCH3, which encodes a calmodulin-like protein (CML12. The gene neighbouring was also slightly down regulated, revealing a new target for SDG8 mediated chromatin modification. Finally, sdg8 mutants show perturbed morphological response to wind-agitated mechanical stimuli, implicating an epigenetic memory-forming process in the acclimation response of thigmomorphogenesis.

  6. Developmental Effects of Incentives on Response Inhibition

    Geier, Charles F.; Luna, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory control and incentive processes underlie decision making, yet few studies have explicitly examined their interaction across development. Here, the effects of potential rewards and losses on inhibitory control in 64 adolescents (13- to 17-year-olds) and 42 young adults (18- to 29-year-olds) were examined using an incentivized antisaccade…

  7. Analgesic Effect and Immunomodulation Response on Pro ...

    ISSN: 1596-5996 (print); 1596-9827 (electronic). © Pharmacotherapy ... Methods: The extract of Scrophularia megalantha was obtained with ethanol. In order to determine ... dependence, tolerance and other side effects including ... nitric oxide production using in vitro and ex vivo models [7]. ... temperature. The plant was ...

  8. Response selection difficulty modulates the behavioral impact of rapidly learnt action effects.

    Uta eWolfensteller

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that we can pick up action effect associations when acting in a free-choice intentional mode. However, it is less clear whether and when action effect associations are learnt and actually affect behavior if we are acting in a forced-choice mode, applying a specific stimulus-response (S-R rule. In the present study, we investigated whether response selection difficulty imposed by S-R rules influences the initial rapid learning and the behavioral expression of previously learnt but weakly practiced action effect associations when those are re-activated by effect exposure. Experiment 1 showed that the rapid acquisition of action effect associations is not directly influenced by response selection difficulty. By contrast, the behavioral expression of re-activated action effect associations is prevented when actions are directly activated by highly over-learnt response cues and thus response selection difficulty is low. However, all three experiments showed that if response selection difficulty is sufficiently high during re-activation, the same action effect associations do influence behavior. Experiment 2 and 3 revealed that the effect of response selection difficulty cannot be fully reduced to giving action effects more time to prime an action, but seems to reflect competition during response selection. Finally, the present data suggest that when multiple novel rules are rapidly learnt in succession, which requires a lot of flexibility, action effect associations continue to influence behavior only if response selection difficulty is sufficiently high. Thus, response selection difficulty might modulate the impact of experiencing multiple learning episodes on action effect expression and learning, possibly via inducing different strategies.

  9. Angular glint effects generation for false naval target verisimility requirements

    Kostis, Theodoros G; Galanis, Konstantinos G; Katsikas, Sokratis K

    2009-01-01

    A stimulating problem in the generation of coherent countermeasures for high range resolution radar systems is the inclusion of angular glint effects in the preparation of the false target mask. Since angular glint is representative of extended naval targets, this inclusion increases the credibility factor of the decoy playback signal at the adversary radar-operator station. In this paper, the ability of an interferometric inverse synthetic aperture radar (InISAR) simulator to provide a proof of concept towards the clarification of this challenging task is ascertained. The solution consists of three novel vector representations of the generated data, which are proven to behave according to the laws of physics governing the glint phenomenon. The first depiction is the angular glint injection at the target which is followed by the representation of the wavefront distortion at the radar. A value-added time procession integration of the target in pure roll motion provides an expected by ISAR theory side-view image of the naval extended false target. The effectiveness of the proposed approach through verification and validation of the results by using the method of pictorial evidence is established. A final argument is raised on the usage of this software tool for actual obfuscation and deception actions for air defence at sea applications

  10. NASA's Proposed Requirements for the Global Aeronautical Network and a Summary of Responses

    Ivancic, William D.

    2005-01-01

    In October 2003, NASA embarked on the ACAST project (Advanced CNS Architectures and System Technologies) to perform research and development on selected communications, navigation, and surveillance (CNS) technologies to enhance the performance of the National Airspace System (NAS). The Networking Research Group of NASA's ACAST project, in order to ensure global interoperability and deployment, formulated their own salient list of requirements. Many of these are not necessarily of concern to the FAA, but are a concern to those who have to deploy, operate, and pay for these systems. These requirements were submitted to the world s industries, governments, and academic institutions for comments. The results of that request for comments are summarized in this paper.

  11. Modeling Requirements for Simulating the Effects of Extreme Acts of Terrorism: A White Paper

    Allen, M.; Hiebert-Dodd, K.; Marozas, D.; Paananen, O.; Pryor, R.J.; Reinert, R.K.

    1998-10-01

    This white paper presents the initial requirements for developing a new computer model for simulating the effects of extreme acts of terrorism in the United States. General characteristics of the model are proposed and the level of effort to prepare a complete written description of the model, prior to coding, is detailed. The model would simulate the decision processes and interactions of complex U. S. systems engaged in responding to and recovering from four types of terrorist incidents. The incident scenarios span the space of extreme acts of terrorism that have the potential to affect not only the impacted area, but also the entire nation. The model would be useful to decision-makers in assessing and analyzing the vulnerability of the nation's complex infrastructures, in prioritizing resources to reduce risk, and in planning strategies for immediate response and for subsequent recovery from terrorist incidents.

  12. Skills and Knowledge Requirements of the Future Labour Market - Responsibility of the Present

    Magda Zupančič

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available European economies are warning with increased intensity about the dangerous discrepancy between the skills and knowledge required by employers and the existing labour supply, which affects significantly (non-competitiveness of national economies. In the knowledge society, skills, knowledge and competences are becoming an essential condition for competitiveness on (global labour markets, a factor that has - in the time of crisis - become crucial for market survival of economic entities. In other words, for the knowledge society – the aim of the integrated Europe - it is of great importance to identify present and future requirements for skills and up-to-date knowledge. Only a holistic and systematic observation and identification of these requirements can make it possible to regulate the supply and demand situation on labour markets, as well as to increase competitiveness and bring a high degree of social cohesion. Appropriately trained workforce, comprising people of all types of qualifications and generations, pursuing life-long education, is able to adapt quicker and more successfully to the demands of today’s dynamic economic environment and (professional, industry-related and geographic mobility.

  13. Respiratory Effects and Systemic Stress Response Following ...

    Previous studies have demonstrated that exposure to ozone, a pulmonary irritant, causes myriad systemic metabolic and pulmonary effects that are attributed to neuronal and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation, which are exacerbated in metabolically-impaired models. In order to elucidate the systemic consequences and the contribution of the HPA axis in mediating metabolic and respiratory effects of acrolein, a sensory irritant, we examined pulmonary, nasal, and systemic effects in rats following exposure. Male, 10 week old Wistar and Goto Kakizaki (GK) rats, a non-obese type II diabetic Wistar-derived model, were exposed to 0, 2 or 4 ppm acrolein, 4h/day for 1 or 2 days. Acrolein exposure at 4 ppm significantly increased pulmonary and nasal damage in both strains as demonstrated by increased inspiratory and expiratory times indicating labored breathing, elevated biomarkers of injury, and neutrophilic inflammation. Overall, at both time points acrolein exposure caused noticeably more damage in the nasal passages as opposed to the lung with vascular protein leakage occurring only in the nose. Acrolein exposure (4 ppm) also led to metabolic impairment by inducing hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance (GK>Wistar) as indicated by glucose tolerance testing. In addition, serum total cholesterol (GKs only), LDL cholesterol (both strains), and free fatty acids (GK>Wistar) levels increased; however, no acrolein-induced changes were noted in branched-c

  14. THE EFFECT OF CHANGES IN RESERVE REQUIREMENTS DURING THE 1930s:

    Thomas Mayer; Thomas F. Cargill

    2004-01-01

    The differential response of cash reserves of member banks and nonmember banks not subject to the 1936-37 increase in reserve requirements is estimated to determine whether the 1937-38 recession was caused by the increase in reserve requirements. We identify 17 states that maintained constant reserve requirements from June 1934 to June 1941. While member banks increased their cash reserve ratios relative to nonmember banks, the magnitude of the adjustment is too small to have contributed to t...

  15. Ubiquitin-activating enzyme UBA1 is required for cellular response to DNA damage

    Moudrý, Pavel; Lukas, C.; Macůrek, Libor; Hanzlíková, Hana; Hodný, Zdeněk; Lukas, J.; Bartek, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 8 (2012), s. 1573-1582 ISSN 1538-4101 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/0353; GA ČR GAP301/10/1525 Grant - others:7.RP EU(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : 53BP1 * DNA damage response * UBA1 * UBA6 * ubiquitylation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.243, year: 2012

  16. Group Effects on Individual Attitudes Toward Social Responsibility.

    Secchi, Davide; Bui, Hong T M

    2018-01-01

    This study uses a quasi-experimental design to investigate what happens to individual socially responsible attitudes when they are exposed to group dynamics. Findings show that group engagement increases individual attitudes toward social responsibility. We also found that individuals with low attitudes toward social responsibility are more likely to change their opinions when group members show more positive attitudes toward social responsibility. Conversely, individuals with high attitudes do not change much, independent of group characteristics. To better analyze the effect of group dynamics, the study proposes to split social responsibility into relative and absolute components. Findings show that relative social responsibility is correlated with but different from absolute social responsibility although the latter is more susceptible than the former to group dynamics.

  17. Grammatical markers switch roles and elicit different electrophysiological responses under shallow and deep semantic requirements.

    Soshi, Takahiro; Nakajima, Heizo; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-10-01

    Static knowledge about the grammar of a natural language is represented in the cortico-subcortical system. However, the differences in dynamic verbal processing under different cognitive conditions are unclear. To clarify this, we conducted an electrophysiological experiment involving a semantic priming paradigm in which semantically congruent or incongruent word sequences (prime nouns-target verbs) were randomly presented. We examined the event-related brain potentials that occurred in response to congruent and incongruent target words that were preceded by primes with or without grammatical case markers. The two participant groups performed either the shallow (lexical judgment) or deep (direct semantic judgment) semantic tasks. We hypothesized that, irrespective of the case markers, the congruent targets would reduce centro-posterior N400 activities under the deep semantic condition, which induces selective attention to the semantic relatedness of content words. However, the same congruent targets with correct case markers would reduce lateralized negativity under the shallow semantic condition because grammatical case markers are related to automatic structural integration under semantically unattended conditions. We observed that congruent targets (e.g., 'open') that were preceded by primes with congruent case markers (e.g., 'shutter-object case') reduced lateralized negativity under the shallow semantic condition. In contrast, congruent targets, irrespective of case markers, consistently yielded N400 reductions under the deep semantic condition. To summarize, human neural verbal processing differed in response to the same grammatical markers in the same verbal expressions under semantically attended or unattended conditions.

  18. Grammatical markers switch roles and elicit different electrophysiological responses under shallow and deep semantic requirements

    Takahiro Soshi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Static knowledge about the grammar of a natural language is represented in the cortico-subcortical system. However, the differences in dynamic verbal processing under different cognitive conditions are unclear. To clarify this, we conducted an electrophysiological experiment involving a semantic priming paradigm in which semantically congruent or incongruent word sequences (prime nouns–target verbs were randomly presented. We examined the event-related brain potentials that occurred in response to congruent and incongruent target words that were preceded by primes with or without grammatical case markers. The two participant groups performed either the shallow (lexical judgment or deep (direct semantic judgment semantic tasks. We hypothesized that, irrespective of the case markers, the congruent targets would reduce centro-posterior N400 activities under the deep semantic condition, which induces selective attention to the semantic relatedness of content words. However, the same congruent targets with correct case markers would reduce lateralized negativity under the shallow semantic condition because grammatical case markers are related to automatic structural integration under semantically unattended conditions. We observed that congruent targets (e.g., ‘open' that were preceded by primes with congruent case markers (e.g., ‘shutter-object case' reduced lateralized negativity under the shallow semantic condition. In contrast, congruent targets, irrespective of case markers, consistently yielded N400 reductions under the deep semantic condition. To summarize, human neural verbal processing differed in response to the same grammatical markers in the same verbal expressions under semantically attended or unattended conditions. Keyword: Neuroscience

  19. Requirement of trained first responders and national level preparedness for prevention and response to radiological terrorism

    Sharma, R.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    The increase in the usage of radioactive sources in various fields and the present scenario of adopting various means of terrorism indicates a possible environment for malicious usage of radioactive sources. Many nations, India inclusive, have to strengthen further it's capability to deal with Nuclear/Radiological Emergencies. The probable radiological emergency scenario in public domain involves inadvertent melting of radioactive material, transport accident involving radioactive material/sources and presence of orphan sources as reported elsewhere. Explosion of Radiological Dispersal Device (RDDs) or Improvised Nuclear Devices (IND) leading to spread of radioactive contamination in public places have been identified by IAEA as probable radiological threats. The IAEA documents put lot of emphasis, at national level, on training and educational issues related with Radiological Emergencies. The agencies and institutions dealing with radioactive sources have few personnel trained in radiation protection. Experience so far indicates that public awareness is also not adequate in the field of radiological safety which may create difficulties during emergency response in public domain. The major challenges are associated with mitigation, monitoring methodology, contaminated and overexposed casualties, decontamination and media briefing. In this paper, we have identified the educational needs for response to radiological emergency in India with major thrust on training. The paper has also enumerated the available educational and training infrastructure, the human resources, as well as the important stake holders for development of sustainable education and training programme. (author)

  20. Volatile-Mediated within-Plant Signaling in Hybrid Aspen: Required for Systemic Responses.

    Li, Tao; Blande, James D

    2017-04-01

    Plant volatiles play crucial roles in signaling between plants and their associated community members, but their role in within-plant signaling remains largely unexplored, particularly under field conditions. Using a system comprising the hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x tremuloides) and the specialized herbivorous leaf beetle (Phratora laticollis) and, combining field, greenhouse and laboratory experiments, we examined whether local damage triggered systemic responses in undamaged branches that lack vascular connection to the damaged branches, and to what extent this was caused by airborne volatile signals versus internal signals. An experiment tracing dye through the vasculature of saplings revealed no downward movement of the dye from upper to lower branches, suggesting a lack of vascular connectivity among branches. However, we found under both field and laboratory conditions that herbivore feeding on upper branches elicited volatile emissions by undamaged lower branches. Greenhouse experiments manipulating air contact between damaged and undamaged branches showed that systemic induction of volatiles was almost eliminated when air contact was interrupted. Our findings clearly demonstrate that herbivore-induced volatiles overcome vascular constraints and mediate within-plant signaling. Further, we found that volatile signaling led to induction of different classes of volatiles under field and environment controlled conditions, with a weaker response observed in the field. This difference not only reflects the dose- and time-dependent nature of volatile signaling, but also points out that future studies should focus more on field observations to better understand the ecological role of volatile-mediated within-plant signaling.

  1. Exploring the representational basis of response-effect compatibility: Evidence from bilingual verbal response-effect mappings.

    Földes, Noémi; Philipp, Andrea M; Badets, Arnaud; Koch, Iring

    2018-05-01

    The ideomotor principle states that actions are represented by their anticipated sensory effects. This notion is often tested using the response-effect compatibility (REC) paradigm, where participants' responses are followed either by a compatible or incompatible response effect (e.g., an effect on the right side after a right-hand response is considered R-E compatible due to the spatial overlap, whereas an effect on the left side after the right-hand response is considered incompatible). Shorter reaction times are typically observed in the compatible condition compared to the incompatible condition (i.e., REC effect), suggesting that effect anticipation plays a role in action control. Previous evidence from verbal REC suggested that effect anticipation can be due to conceptual R-E overlap, but there was also phonological overlap (i.e., anticipated reading of a word preceded by the vocal response of saying that very word). To examine the representational basis of REC, in three experiments, we introduced a bilingual R-E mapping to exclude phonological R-E overlap (i.e., in the R-E compatible condition, the translation equivalent of the response word is presented as an effect word in a different language). Our findings show that the REC effect is obtained when presenting the effect word in the same language as the response (i.e., monolingual condition), but the compatibility effect was not found when the semantically same word is presented in a different language, suggesting no conceptually generalized REC in a bilingual setting. (232 words). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Effects of Normothermic and Hypothermic Cardiopulmonary Bypass Upon Defibrillation Energy Requirements and Transmyocardial Impedance

    Martin, David

    1993-01-01

    .... To evaluate these questions we studied the effect of controlled hypothermia upon defibrillation energy requirements and transcardiac impedance in a canine model of cardiopulmonary bypass in which 26...

  3. Integrating NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) and CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act) requirements during remedial responses at DOE facilities

    Levine, M.B.; Smith, E.D.; Sharples, F.E.; Eddlemon, G.K.

    1990-07-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.4, issued October 6, 1989, calls for integrating the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) with those of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for DOE remedial actions under CERCLA. CERCLA requires that decisions on site remediation be made through a formal process called a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS). According to the DOE order, integration is to be accomplished by conducting the NEPA and CERCLA environmental planning and review procedures concurrently. The primary instrument for integrating the processes is to be the RI/FS process, which will be supplemented as needed to meet the procedural and documentational requirements of NEPA. The final product of the integrated process will be a single, integrated set of documents; namely, an RI report and an FS-EIS that satisfy the requirements of both NEPA and CERCLA. The contents of the report include (1) an overview and comparison of the requirements of the two processes; (2) descriptions of the major tasks included in the integrated RI/FS-EIS process; (3) recommended contents for integrated RI/FS-EIS documents; and (4)a discussion of some potential problems in integrating NEPA and CERCLA that fall outisde the scope of the RI/FS-EIS process, with suggestions for resolving some of these problems. 15 refs.

  4. Integrating NEPA [National Environmental Policy Act] and CERCLA [Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act] requirements during remedial responses at DOE facilities

    Levine, M.B.; Smith, E.D.; Sharples, F.E.; Eddlemon, G.K.

    1990-07-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.4, issued October 6, 1989, calls for integrating the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) with those of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for DOE remedial actions under CERCLA. CERCLA requires that decisions on site remediation be made through a formal process called a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS). According to the DOE order, integration is to be accomplished by conducting the NEPA and CERCLA environmental planning and review procedures concurrently. The primary instrument for integrating the processes is to be the RI/FS process, which will be supplemented as needed to meet the procedural and documentational requirements of NEPA. The final product of the integrated process will be a single, integrated set of documents; namely, an RI report and an FS-EIS that satisfy the requirements of both NEPA and CERCLA. The contents of the report include (1) an overview and comparison of the requirements of the two processes; (2) descriptions of the major tasks included in the integrated RI/FS-EIS process; (3) recommended contents for integrated RI/FS-EIS documents; and (4)a discussion of some potential problems in integrating NEPA and CERCLA that fall outisde the scope of the RI/FS-EIS process, with suggestions for resolving some of these problems. 15 refs

  5. Examining the Effectiveness of Social Responsibility Courses in Higher Education

    Droms, Courtney; Stephen, Sheryl-Ann K.

    2015-01-01

    Individual and corporate social responsibility has been gaining more and more attention over the last several years. We examine the effectiveness of incorporating social responsibility courses into the curriculum in higher education, with a specific look at Butler University. In general, the results indicate that implementing this type of…

  6. The Effect of Police Response Time on Crime Detection

    Blanes i Vidal, Jordi; Kirchmaier, Tom

    preferred estimate, a 10% increase in response time leads to a 4.6 percentage points decrease in the likelihood of detection. A faster response time also decreases the number of days that it takes for the police to detect a crime, conditional on eventual detection. We find stronger effects for thefts than...

  7. 20 CFR 416.2130 - Effect of the agreement and responsibilities of States.

    2010-04-01

    ... for SSI benefits; (4) Setting up or running a State's system for requiring a person to pay part of the... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effect of the agreement and responsibilities of States. 416.2130 Section 416.2130 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL...

  8. The Effect of Police Response Time on Crime Clearance Rates

    Blanes i Vidal, Jordi; Kirchmaier, Tom

    2018-01-01

    significant effects: in our preferred estimate, a 10% increase in response time leads to a 4.7 percentage points decrease in the likelihood of clearing the crime. We find stronger effects for thefts than for violent offenses, although the effects are large for every type of crime. We find suggestive evidence...

  9. Marginal and Interaction Effects in Ordered Response Models

    Debdulal Mallick

    2009-01-01

    In discrete choice models the marginal effect of a variable of interest that is interacted with another variable differs from the marginal effect of a variable that is not interacted with any variable. The magnitude of the interaction effect is also not equal to the marginal effect of the interaction term. I present consistent estimators of both marginal and interaction effects in ordered response models. This procedure is general and can easily be extended to other discrete choice models. I ...

  10. NRC's rulemaking to require materials licensees to be financially responsible for cleanup of accidental releases

    Seeman, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    On June 7, 1985, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPRM) in the Federal Register to address funding for cleanup of accidents and unexpected decontamination by certain materials licensees. The NRC asked for public comment to help them determine whether to amend its regulations to require certain materials and fuel cycle licensees to demonstrate that they possess adequate financial means to pay for cleanup of accidental releases of radioactive materials. If licensees lack adequate financial resources and funds are to available for prompt cleanup, the consequences could be potentially significant for the public, the licencee and the federal government. The purpose of this paper is to explain the purpose and scope of the Commission's proposed regulatory action, as well as describing several accidents that made the Commission consider this action. Additionally, the paper will address other regulatory precedents. Finally, the paper will conclude by generally characterizing the public comments and items of concern raised by commenters

  11. Cell-Intrinsic Glycogen Metabolism Supports Early Glycolytic Reprogramming Required for Dendritic Cell Immune Responses.

    Thwe, Phyu M; Pelgrom, Leonard; Cooper, Rachel; Beauchamp, Saritha; Reisz, Julie A; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Everts, Bart; Amiel, Eyal

    2017-09-05

    Dendritic cell (DC) activation by Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists causes rapid glycolytic reprogramming that is required to meet the metabolic demands of their immune activation. Recent efforts in the field have identified an important role for extracellular glucose sourcing to support DC activation. However, the contributions of intracellular glucose stores to these processes have not been well characterized. We demonstrate that DCs possess intracellular glycogen stores and that cell-intrinsic glycogen metabolism supports the early effector functions of TLR-activated DCs. Inhibition of glycogenolysis significantly attenuates TLR-mediated DC maturation and impairs their ability to initiate lymphocyte activation. We further report that DCs exhibit functional compartmentalization of glucose- and glycogen-derived carbons, where these substrates preferentially contribute to distinct metabolic pathways. This work provides novel insights into nutrient homeostasis in DCs, demonstrating that differential utilization of glycogen and glucose metabolism regulates their optimal immune function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of feed forms on growth pattern, behavioural responses and ...

    Effects of feed forms on growth pattern, behavioural responses and feacal microbial load ... load and behavioural activities (eating, drinking, physical pen interaction and ... Total organism counts varied significantly (p<0.05) with pigs on T1, T2, ...

  13. A Unified Probabilistic Framework for Dose–Response Assessment of Human Health Effects

    Slob, Wout

    2015-01-01

    Background When chemical health hazards have been identified, probabilistic dose–response assessment (“hazard characterization”) quantifies uncertainty and/or variability in toxicity as a function of human exposure. Existing probabilistic approaches differ for different types of endpoints or modes-of-action, lacking a unifying framework. Objectives We developed a unified framework for probabilistic dose–response assessment. Methods We established a framework based on four principles: a) individual and population dose responses are distinct; b) dose–response relationships for all (including quantal) endpoints can be recast as relating to an underlying continuous measure of response at the individual level; c) for effects relevant to humans, “effect metrics” can be specified to define “toxicologically equivalent” sizes for this underlying individual response; and d) dose–response assessment requires making adjustments and accounting for uncertainty and variability. We then derived a step-by-step probabilistic approach for dose–response assessment of animal toxicology data similar to how nonprobabilistic reference doses are derived, illustrating the approach with example non-cancer and cancer datasets. Results Probabilistically derived exposure limits are based on estimating a “target human dose” (HDMI), which requires risk management–informed choices for the magnitude (M) of individual effect being protected against, the remaining incidence (I) of individuals with effects ≥ M in the population, and the percent confidence. In the example datasets, probabilistically derived 90% confidence intervals for HDMI values span a 40- to 60-fold range, where I = 1% of the population experiences ≥ M = 1%–10% effect sizes. Conclusions Although some implementation challenges remain, this unified probabilistic framework can provide substantially more complete and transparent characterization of chemical hazards and support better-informed risk

  14. Modification of T cell responses by stem cell mobilization requires direct signaling of the T cell by G-CSF and IL-10

    MacDonald, Kelli P.A.; Le Texier, Laetitia; Zhang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The majority of allogeneic stem cell transplants are currently undertaken using G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood stem cells. G-CSF has diverse biological effects on a broad range of cells and IL-10 is a key regulator of many of these effects. Using mixed radiation chimeras in which...... the hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic compartments were wild-type, IL-10(-/-), G-CSFR(-/-), or combinations thereof we demonstrated that the attenuation of alloreactive T cell responses after G-CSF mobilization required direct signaling of the T cell by both G-CSF and IL-10. IL-10 was generated principally by radio......-resistant tissue, and was not required to be produced by T cells. G-CSF mobilization significantly modulated the transcription profile of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, promoted their expansion in the donor and recipient and their depletion significantly increased graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In contrast...

  15. THE TRANSPARENCY IN THE REPORTING OF INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL: BETWEEN THE MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITY AND THE STAKEHOLDERS' REQUIREMENTS

    Dicu Roxana-Manuela

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The increasingly ample orientation of the companies towards the intellectual capital is based on the rediscovery of this resource with (almost unlimited potential, generating economic benefits for a company. Given its importance, the information needs of stakeholders on this line have increased. Thus, in this context, it was put the issue of reporting information related to intellectual capital and the transparency of information published by companies, given that its reporting is not currently regulated. The objective of this paper is to establish an answer to a question: Up to what limit should be made public information related to this capital, given that stakeholders want as much information, and managers only publish information that favors the company's image? In addressing this issue, the point of departure is the intellectual capital structure, most commonly found in the literature, namely human capital, structural capital and relational capital. With this structure, the paper establishes, as a first step, a series of relevant indicators relating to the three components from three different perspectives: resources, management achievements and future expectations. At first observation, the indicators are divided into two categories: financial and non-financial, the first ones targeting the company's performance in relation to the components of intellectual capital, and the latter ones having a pronounced social touch. Based on these indicators, the paper analyses whether a company is willing to publish information, particularly those with social influence, especially in the current conditions of intensely requested social responsibility. In addition to documentary research, we also consider the most important findings based on existing reporting arrangements of the companies, especially from the reports published by them, depending on different criteria, such as social engagement, financial and accounting criteria etc. Given the lack of

  16. HIF- and Non-HIF-Regulated Hypoxic Responses Require the Estrogen-Related Receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    Li, Yan; Padmanabha, Divya; Gentile, Luciana B.; Dumur, Catherine I.; Beckstead, Robert B.; Baker, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    Low-oxygen tolerance is supported by an adaptive response that includes a coordinate shift in metabolism and the activation of a transcriptional program that is driven by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. The precise contribution of HIF-1a in the adaptive response, however, has not been determined. Here, we investigate how HIF influences hypoxic adaptation throughout Drosophila melanogaster development. We find that hypoxic-induced transcriptional changes are comprised of HIF-dependent and HIF-independent pathways that are distinct and separable. We show that normoxic set-points of carbohydrate metabolites are significantly altered in sima mutants and that these animals are unable to mobilize glycogen in hypoxia. Furthermore, we find that the estrogen-related receptor (dERR), which is a global regulator of aerobic glycolysis in larvae, is required for a competent hypoxic response. dERR binds to dHIFa and participates in the HIF-dependent transcriptional program in hypoxia. In addition, dERR acts in the absence of dHIFa in hypoxia and a significant portion of HIF-independent transcriptional responses can be attributed to dERR actions, including upregulation of glycolytic transcripts. These results indicate that competent hypoxic responses arise from complex interactions between HIF-dependent and -independent mechanisms, and that dERR plays a central role in both of these programs. PMID:23382692

  17. Adopting adequate leaching requirement for practical response models of basil to salinity

    Babazadeh, Hossein; Tabrizi, Mahdi Sarai; Darvishi, Hossein Hassanpour

    2016-07-01

    Several mathematical models are being used for assessing plant response to salinity of the root zone. Objectives of this study included quantifying the yield salinity threshold value of basil plants to irrigation water salinity and investigating the possibilities of using irrigation water salinity instead of saturated extract salinity in the available mathematical models for estimating yield. To achieve the above objectives, an extensive greenhouse experiment was conducted with 13 irrigation water salinity levels, namely 1.175 dS m-1 (control treatment) and 1.8 to 10 dS m-1. The result indicated that, among these models, the modified discount model (one of the most famous root water uptake model which is based on statistics) produced more accurate results in simulating the basil yield reduction function using irrigation water salinities. Overall the statistical model of Steppuhn et al. on the modified discount model and the math-empirical model of van Genuchten and Hoffman provided the best results. In general, all of the statistical models produced very similar results and their results were better than math-empirical models. It was also concluded that if enough leaching was present, there was no significant difference between the soil salinity saturated extract models and the models using irrigation water salinity.

  18. Phencyclidine retards autoshaping at a dose which does not suppress the required response.

    Coveney, J R; Sparber, S B

    1982-06-01

    Four groups of five food-deprived hooded Long-Evans rats were injected subcutaneously with saline (vehicle) or 2, 4 or 8 mg phencyclidine (PCP) hydrochloride/kg fifteen minutes before being placed for the first time into operant chambers modified to detect exploratory behaviors. Rearing was found to be more sensitive to disruption by phencyclidine than was unconditioned level touching (a measure of floor-level exploratory activities). In an autoshaping session immediately following, the group of animals given the low dose of PCP made as many lever-touch responses as the group given saline, but consumed fewer of the food pellets delivered. In addition, none of the animals in the low-dose group showed within-session shortening of the latency to respond which was observed in four of five control animals. The two other groups given higher doses of PCP demonstrated dose-related decrements in responding as well as a reduction in food pellet consumption during the first session of autoshaping. Over the next two daily autoshaping sessions, performance improved in those groups initially suppressed. Performance converged in all group by the third autoshaping session.

  19. A rapid response air quality analysis system for use in projects having stringent quality assurance requirements

    Bowman, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to solve air quality problems which frequently occur during iterations of the baseline change process. From a schedule standpoint, it is desirable to perform this evaluation in as short a time as possible while budgetary pressures limit the size of the staff available to do the work. Without a method in place to deal with baseline change proposal requests the environment analysts may not be able to produce the analysis results in the time frame expected. Using a concept called the Rapid Response Air Quality Analysis System (RAAS), the problems of timing and cost become tractable. The system could be adapted to assess other atmospheric pathway impacts, e.g., acoustics or visibility. The air quality analysis system used to perform the EA analysis (EA) for the Salt Repository Project (part of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program), and later to evaluate the consequences of proposed baseline changes, consists of three components: Emission source data files; Emission rates contained in spreadsheets; Impact assessment model codes. The spreadsheets contain user-written codes (macros) that calculate emission rates from (1) emission source data (e.g., numbers and locations of sources, detailed operating schedules, and source specifications including horsepower, load factor, and duty cycle); (2) emission factors such as those published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and (3) control efficiencies

  20. Gamma-sarcoglycan is required for the response of archvillin to mechanical stimulation in skeletal muscle

    Spinazzola, Janelle M.; Smith, Tara C.; Liu, Min; Luna, Elizabeth J.; Barton, Elisabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of gamma-sarcoglycan (γ-SG) induces muscle degeneration and signaling defects in response to mechanical load, and its absence is common to both Duchenne and limb girdle muscular dystrophies. Growing evidence suggests that aberrant signaling contributes to the disease pathology; however, the mechanisms of γ-SG-mediated mechanical signaling are poorly understood. To uncover γ-SG signaling pathway components, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and identified the muscle-specific protein archvillin as a γ-SG and dystrophin interacting protein. Archvillin protein and message levels were significantly upregulated at the sarcolemma of murine γ-SG-null (gsg−/−) muscle but delocalized in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscle. Similar elevation of archvillin protein was observed in human quadriceps muscle lacking γ-SG. Reintroduction of γ-SG in gsg−/− muscle by rAAV injection restored archvillin levels to that of control C57 muscle. In situ eccentric contraction of tibialis anterior (TA) muscles from C57 mice caused ERK1/2 phosphorylation, nuclear activation of P-ERK1/2 and stimulus-dependent archvillin association with P-ERK1/2. In contrast, TA muscles from gsg−/− and mdx mice exhibited heightened P-ERK1/2 and increased nuclear P-ERK1/2 localization following eccentric contractions, but the archvillin–P-ERK1/2 association was completely ablated. These results position archvillin as a mechanically sensitive component of the dystrophin complex and demonstrate that signaling defects caused by loss of γ-SG occur both at the sarcolemma and in the nucleus. PMID:25605665

  1. An Analysis of the Army Service Acquisition Review Requirements and the Perceived Effectiveness on Intended Improvements

    2016-06-01

    Selection Evaluation Market Research Metrics Competition Acquisition Schedule Consolidation Recommendation As detailed in the Chapter IIB, OSD Policy...REQUIREMENTS AND THE PERCEIVED EFFECTIVENESS ON INTENDED IMPROVEMENTS June 2016 By: Roxanne Moss Michael Vukovich Megan Weidner Advisors...ANALYSIS OF THE ARMY SERVICE ACQUISITION REVIEW REQUIREMENTS AND THE PERCEIVED EFFECTIVENESS ON INTENDED IMPROVEMENTS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S

  2. Inflation Targeting and Quantitative Tightening: Effects of Reserve Requirements in Peru

    Adrián Armas; Paul Castillo; Marco Vega

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the reserve requirement measures undertaken by the Central Bank of Peru. It provides a rationale for the use of these instruments as well as empirical evidence of their effectiveness. In general, the results show that tightening reserve requirements has the desired effects on interest rates and credit levels at both banks and smaller financial institutions (cajas municipales).

  3. Effects of Stressor Controllability on Acute Stress Responses: Cardiovascular, Neuroendocrine, and Immune Responses

    磯和, 勅子; Isowa, Tokiko

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the effects of controllability over acute stressors on psychological and physiological responses intermediated by immune, cardiovascular, neuroendocrine systems. The effects of stressor controllability have been examined in animal studies based on the learned helplessness theory. However, there were few studies in human. Especially, there were remarkably few studies that examined the effects of stressor controllability on immunological system. In addition, result...

  4. Effects of corporate social responsibility on brand reputation and brand identification with children

    Pais, Madalena Sofia Sarmento de Figueiroa-Rêgo

    2012-01-01

    A Work Project, presented as part of the requirements for the Award of a Masters Degree in Management from the NOVA – School of Business and Economics This study aims to understand children‟s perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives and its effect on the brand, namely Reputation and Identification. Moreover, it analyzes if the use of Cartoons helps to increase these effects. Differences among gender, age and social class, will also be considered. 292 children fro...

  5. The Effects of Discipline Responses in Delaying Toddler Misbehavior Recurrences.

    Larzelere, Robert E.; Schneider, William N.; Larson, David B.; Pike, Patricia L.

    1996-01-01

    Compares the effectiveness of maternal punishment (time out, spanking), reasoning, and a combination of the two. Results based on mothers' (N=40) structured diaries of toddler fighting and disobedience indicate that mild punishment, combined with reasoning, is an effective discipline response to toddler misbehavior in terms of recurrence of…

  6. The Effectiveness of Reward and Punishment Contingencies on Response Inhibition

    Costantini, Arthur F.; Hoving, Kenneth L.

    1973-01-01

    The relative effectiveness of reward and punishment on the development of response inhibition was evaluated developmentally with kindergarteners and second graders. Removal of positive reinforcers was apparently more effective than reward in producing inhibiting at both age levels. Transfer of inhibition training was also evaluated. (DP)

  7. Nod2 is required for antigen-specific humoral responses against antigens orally delivered using a recombinant Lactobacillus vaccine platform.

    Sara A Bumgardner

    Full Text Available Safe and efficacious orally-delivered mucosal vaccine platforms are desperately needed to combat the plethora of mucosally transmitted pathogens. Lactobacillus spp. have emerged as attractive candidates to meet this need and are known to activate the host innate immune response in a species- and strain-specific manner. For selected bacterial isolates and mutants, we investigated the role of key innate immune pathways required for induction of innate and subsequent adaptive immune responses. Co-culture of murine macrophages with L. gasseri (strain NCK1785, L. acidophilus (strain NCFM, or NCFM-derived mutants-NCK2025 and NCK2031-elicited an M2b-like phenotype associated with TH2 skewing and immune regulatory function. For NCFM, this M2b phenotype was dependent on expression of lipoteichoic acid and S layer proteins. Through the use of macrophage genetic knockouts, we identified Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2, the cytosolic nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (NOD2 receptor, and the inflammasome-associated caspase-1 as contributors to macrophage activation, with NOD2 cooperating with caspase-1 to induce inflammasome derived interleukin (IL-1β in a pyroptosis-independent fashion. Finally, utilizing an NCFM-based mucosal vaccine platform with surface expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 Gag or membrane proximal external region (MPER, we demonstrated that NOD2 signaling is required for antigen-specific mucosal and systemic humoral responses. We show that lactobacilli differentially utilize innate immune pathways and highlight NOD2 as a key mediator of macrophage function and antigen-specific humoral responses to a Lactobacillus acidophilus mucosal vaccine platform.

  8. Requirement for Pectin Methyl Esterase and Preference for Fragmented over Native Pectins for Wall-associated Kinase-activated, EDS1/PAD4-dependent Stress Response in Arabidopsis*

    Kohorn, Bruce D.; Kohorn, Susan L.; Saba, Nicholas J.; Martinez, Victoriano Meco

    2014-01-01

    The wall-associated kinases (WAKs) have a cytoplasmic protein kinase domain that spans the plasma membrane and binds pectin in the extracellular matrix of plants. WAKs are required for cell expansion during Arabidopsis seedling development but are also an integral part of the response to pathogens and stress that present oligogalacturonides (OGs), which subsequently bind to WAKs and activate a MPK6 (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-dependent pathway. It was unclear how WAKs distinguish native pectin polymers and OGs to activate one or the other of these two pathways. A dominant allele of WAK2 constitutively activates the stress response, and we show here that the effect is dependent upon EDS1 and PAD4, transcriptional activators involved in the pathogen response. Moreover, the WAK2 dominant allele is suppressed by a null allele of a pectin methyl esterase (PME3) whose activity normally leads to cross-linking of pectins in the cell wall. Although OGs activate a transcriptional response in wild type, the response is enhanced in a pme3/pme3 null, consistent with a competition by OG and native polymers for activation of WAKs. This provides a plausible mechanism for WAKs to distinguish an expansion from a stress pathway. PMID:24855660

  9. Requirement for pectin methyl esterase and preference for fragmented over native pectins for wall-associated kinase-activated, EDS1/PAD4-dependent stress response in Arabidopsis.

    Kohorn, Bruce D; Kohorn, Susan L; Saba, Nicholas J; Martinez, Victoriano Meco

    2014-07-04

    The wall-associated kinases (WAKs) have a cytoplasmic protein kinase domain that spans the plasma membrane and binds pectin in the extracellular matrix of plants. WAKs are required for cell expansion during Arabidopsis seedling development but are also an integral part of the response to pathogens and stress that present oligogalacturonides (OGs), which subsequently bind to WAKs and activate a MPK6 (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-dependent pathway. It was unclear how WAKs distinguish native pectin polymers and OGs to activate one or the other of these two pathways. A dominant allele of WAK2 constitutively activates the stress response, and we show here that the effect is dependent upon EDS1 and PAD4, transcriptional activators involved in the pathogen response. Moreover, the WAK2 dominant allele is suppressed by a null allele of a pectin methyl esterase (PME3) whose activity normally leads to cross-linking of pectins in the cell wall. Although OGs activate a transcriptional response in wild type, the response is enhanced in a pme3/pme3 null, consistent with a competition by OG and native polymers for activation of WAKs. This provides a plausible mechanism for WAKs to distinguish an expansion from a stress pathway. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Confirmation of linear system theory prediction: Rate of change of Herrnstein's κ as a function of response-force requirement

    McDowell, J. J; Wood, Helena M.

    1985-01-01

    Four human subjects worked on all combinations of five variable-interval schedules and five reinforcer magnitudes (¢/reinforcer) in each of two phases of the experiment. In one phase the force requirement on the operandum was low (1 or 11 N) and in the other it was high (25 or 146 N). Estimates of Herrnstein's κ were obtained at each reinforcer magnitude. The results were: (1) response rate was more sensitive to changes in reinforcement rate at the high than at the low force requirement, (2) κ increased from the beginning to the end of the magnitude range for all subjects at both force requirements, (3) the reciprocal of κ was a linear function of the reciprocal of reinforcer magnitude for seven of the eight data sets, and (4) the rate of change of κ was greater at the high than at the low force requirement by an order of magnitude or more. The second and third findings confirm predictions made by linear system theory, and replicate the results of an earlier experiment (McDowell & Wood, 1984). The fourth finding confirms a further prediction of the theory and supports the theory's interpretation of conflicting data on the constancy of Herrnstein's κ. PMID:16812408

  11. Confirmation of linear system theory prediction: Rate of change of Herrnstein's kappa as a function of response-force requirement.

    McDowell, J J; Wood, H M

    1985-01-01

    Four human subjects worked on all combinations of five variable-interval schedules and five reinforcer magnitudes ( cent/reinforcer) in each of two phases of the experiment. In one phase the force requirement on the operandum was low (1 or 11 N) and in the other it was high (25 or 146 N). Estimates of Herrnstein's kappa were obtained at each reinforcer magnitude. The results were: (1) response rate was more sensitive to changes in reinforcement rate at the high than at the low force requirement, (2) kappa increased from the beginning to the end of the magnitude range for all subjects at both force requirements, (3) the reciprocal of kappa was a linear function of the reciprocal of reinforcer magnitude for seven of the eight data sets, and (4) the rate of change of kappa was greater at the high than at the low force requirement by an order of magnitude or more. The second and third findings confirm predictions made by linear system theory, and replicate the results of an earlier experiment (McDowell & Wood, 1984). The fourth finding confirms a further prediction of the theory and supports the theory's interpretation of conflicting data on the constancy of Herrnstein's kappa.

  12. An effective technique for the software requirements analysis of NPP safety-critical systems, based on software inspection, requirements traceability, and formal specification

    Koo, Seo Ryong; Seong, Poong Hyun; Yoo, Junbeom; Cha, Sung Deok; Yoo, Yeong Jae

    2005-01-01

    A thorough requirements analysis is indispensable for developing and implementing safety-critical software systems such as nuclear power plant (NPP) software systems because a single error in the requirements can generate serious software faults. However, it is very difficult to completely analyze system requirements. In this paper, an effective technique for the software requirements analysis is suggested. For requirements verification and validation (V and V) tasks, our technique uses software inspection, requirement traceability, and formal specification with structural decomposition. Software inspection and requirements traceability analysis are widely considered the most effective software V and V methods. Although formal methods are also considered an effective V and V activity, they are difficult to use properly in the nuclear fields as well as in other fields because of their mathematical nature. In this work, we propose an integrated environment (IE) approach for requirements, which is an integrated approach that enables easy inspection by combining requirement traceability and effective use of a formal method. The paper also introduces computer-aided tools for supporting IE approach for requirements. Called the nuclear software inspection support and requirements traceability (NuSISRT), the tool incorporates software inspection, requirement traceability, and formal specification capabilities. We designed the NuSISRT to partially automate software inspection and analysis of requirement traceability. In addition, for the formal specification and analysis, we used the formal requirements specification and analysis tool for nuclear engineering (NuSRS)

  13. A Unified Probabilistic Framework for Dose-Response Assessment of Human Health Effects.

    Chiu, Weihsueh A; Slob, Wout

    2015-12-01

    When chemical health hazards have been identified, probabilistic dose-response assessment ("hazard characterization") quantifies uncertainty and/or variability in toxicity as a function of human exposure. Existing probabilistic approaches differ for different types of endpoints or modes-of-action, lacking a unifying framework. We developed a unified framework for probabilistic dose-response assessment. We established a framework based on four principles: a) individual and population dose responses are distinct; b) dose-response relationships for all (including quantal) endpoints can be recast as relating to an underlying continuous measure of response at the individual level; c) for effects relevant to humans, "effect metrics" can be specified to define "toxicologically equivalent" sizes for this underlying individual response; and d) dose-response assessment requires making adjustments and accounting for uncertainty and variability. We then derived a step-by-step probabilistic approach for dose-response assessment of animal toxicology data similar to how nonprobabilistic reference doses are derived, illustrating the approach with example non-cancer and cancer datasets. Probabilistically derived exposure limits are based on estimating a "target human dose" (HDMI), which requires risk management-informed choices for the magnitude (M) of individual effect being protected against, the remaining incidence (I) of individuals with effects ≥ M in the population, and the percent confidence. In the example datasets, probabilistically derived 90% confidence intervals for HDMI values span a 40- to 60-fold range, where I = 1% of the population experiences ≥ M = 1%-10% effect sizes. Although some implementation challenges remain, this unified probabilistic framework can provide substantially more complete and transparent characterization of chemical hazards and support better-informed risk management decisions.

  14. A randomised trial and economic evaluation of the effect of response mode on response rate, response bias, and item non-response in a survey of doctors

    Witt Julia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surveys of doctors are an important data collection method in health services research. Ways to improve response rates, minimise survey response bias and item non-response, within a given budget, have not previously been addressed in the same study. The aim of this paper is to compare the effects and costs of three different modes of survey administration in a national survey of doctors. Methods A stratified random sample of 4.9% (2,702/54,160 of doctors undertaking clinical practice was drawn from a national directory of all doctors in Australia. Stratification was by four doctor types: general practitioners, specialists, specialists-in-training, and hospital non-specialists, and by six rural/remote categories. A three-arm parallel trial design with equal randomisation across arms was used. Doctors were randomly allocated to: online questionnaire (902; simultaneous mixed mode (a paper questionnaire and login details sent together (900; or, sequential mixed mode (online followed by a paper questionnaire with the reminder (900. Analysis was by intention to treat, as within each primary mode, doctors could choose either paper or online. Primary outcome measures were response rate, survey response bias, item non-response, and cost. Results The online mode had a response rate 12.95%, followed by the simultaneous mixed mode with 19.7%, and the sequential mixed mode with 20.7%. After adjusting for observed differences between the groups, the online mode had a 7 percentage point lower response rate compared to the simultaneous mixed mode, and a 7.7 percentage point lower response rate compared to sequential mixed mode. The difference in response rate between the sequential and simultaneous modes was not statistically significant. Both mixed modes showed evidence of response bias, whilst the characteristics of online respondents were similar to the population. However, the online mode had a higher rate of item non-response compared

  15. Sexual dimorphism of growth plate prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes in response to testosterone requires metabolism to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by steroid 5-alpha reductase type 1.

    Raz, P; Nasatzky, E; Boyan, B D; Ornoy, A; Schwartz, Z

    2005-05-01

    Rat costochondral growth plate chondrocytes exhibit sex-specific and cell maturation dependent responses to testosterone. Only male cells respond to testosterone, although testosterone receptors are present in both male and female cells, suggesting other mechanisms are involved. We examined the hypothesis that the sex-specific response of rat costochondral cartilage cells to testosterone requires further metabolism of the hormone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Resting zone (RC) and growth zone (GC, prehypertrophic and upper hypertrophic zones) chondrocytes from male and female Sabra strain rats exhibited sex-specific responses to testosterone and DHT: only male cells were responsive. Testosterone and DHT treatment for 24 h caused a comparable dose-dependent increase in [3H]-thymidine incorporation in quiescent preconfluent cultures of male GC cells, and a comparable increase in alkaline phosphatase specific activity in confluent cultures. RC cells responded in a differential manner to testosterone and DHT. Testosterone decreased DNA synthesis in male RC cells but DHT had no effect and alkaline phosphatase specific activity of male RC cells was unaffected by either hormone. Inhibition of steroid 5alpha-reductase activity with finasteride (1, 5, or 10 microg/ml), reduced the response of male GC cells to testosterone in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that metabolism to DHT was required. RT-PCR showed that both male and female cells expressed mRNAs for steroid 5alpha-reductase type 1 but lacked mRNAs for the type 2 form of the enzyme. Male cells also exhibited 5alpha-reductase activity but activity of this enzyme was undetectable in female cells. These observations show that sex-specific responses of rat growth zone chondrocytes to testosterone requires the further metabolism of the hormone to DHT and that the effect of DHT in the male growth plate is maturation-state dependent. Failure of female chondrocytes to respond to testosterone may reflect differences in

  16. Tunnel flexibility effect on the ground surface acceleration response

    Baziar, Mohammad Hassan; Moghadam, Masoud Rabeti; Choo, Yun Wook; Kim, Dong-Soo

    2016-09-01

    Flexibility of underground structures relative to the surrounding medium, referred to as the flexibility ratio, is an important factor that influences their dynamic interaction. This study investigates the flexibility effect of a box-shaped subway tunnel, resting directly on bedrock, on the ground surface acceleration response using a numerical model verified against dynamic centrifuge test results. A comparison of the ground surface acceleration response for tunnel models with different flexibility ratios revealed that the tunnels with different flexibility ratios influence the acceleration response at the ground surface in different ways. Tunnels with lower flexibility ratios have higher acceleration responses at short periods, whereas tunnels with higher flexibility ratios have higher acceleration responses at longer periods. The effect of the flexibility ratio on ground surface acceleration is more prominent in the high range of frequencies. Furthermore, as the flexibility ratio of the tunnel system increases, the acceleration response moves away from the free field response and shifts towards the longer periods. Therefore, the flexibility ratio of the underground tunnels influences the peak ground acceleration (PGA) at the ground surface, and may need to be considered in the seismic zonation of urban areas.

  17. State Responsibility in Peacekeeping
    The effect of responsibility on future contributions

    Nina Mileva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While the law on state responsibility is a well-developed field in international law, the potential for responsibility on the part of the state as a result of events taking place during peacekeeping missions is a fairly novel phenomenon. Internationally, claims in this field have been brought before the European Court of Human Rights and the International Court of Justice. National courts, on the other hand, have heard a total of six cases on the matter, in Belgium, the UK, and the Netherlands, all eventually apportioning responsibility to the state. This paper explores the effect that the potential for responsibility, as manifested in the outcomes of these recent cases, may have on state behaviour with respect to its future contributions to peacekeeping. The paper combines an exploration of the relevant adjudged cases with views collected from experts and academia in order to formulate three hypotheses on the effect of the potential for responsibility on future state behaviour. These hypotheses are then applied to the example of the Netherlands in the aftermath of a series of decisions finding it responsible for events taking place during its involvement in peacekeeping in Bosnia and Herzegovina in the 1990s. Due to the recent timing of the cases, the paper concludes with preliminary findings on each of the hypotheses, thereby opening the door to future research on the topic.

  18. Image-Word Pairing-Congruity Effect on Affective Responses

    Sanabria Z., Jorge C.; Cho, Youngil; Sambai, Ami; Yamanaka, Toshimasa

    The present study explores the effects of familiarity on affective responses (pleasure and arousal) to Japanese ad elements, based on the schema incongruity theory. Print ads showing natural scenes (landscapes) were used to create the stimuli (images and words). An empirical study was conducted to measure subjects' affective responses to image-word combinations that varied in terms of incongruity. The level of incongruity was based on familiarity levels, and was statistically determined by a variable called ‘pairing-congruity status’. The tested hypothesis proposed that even highly familiar image-word combinations, when combined incongruously, would elicit strong affective responses. Subjects assessed the stimuli using bipolar scales. The study was effective in tracing interactions between familiarity, pleasure and arousal, although the incongruous image-word combinations did not elicit the predicted strong effects on pleasure and arousal. The results suggest a need for further research incorporating kansei (i.e., creativity) into the process of stimuli selection.

  19. Predicting the profile of nutrients available for absorption: from nutrient requirement to animal response and environmental impact.

    Dijkstra, J; Kebreab, E; Mills, J A N; Pellikaan, W F; López, S; Bannink, A; France, J

    2007-02-01

    Current feed evaluation systems for dairy cattle aim to match nutrient requirements with nutrient intake at pre-defined production levels. These systems were not developed to address, and are not suitable to predict, the responses to dietary changes in terms of production level and product composition, excretion of nutrients to the environment, and nutrition related disorders. The change from a requirement to a response system to meet the needs of various stakeholders requires prediction of the profile of absorbed nutrients and its subsequent utilisation for various purposes. This contribution examines the challenges to predicting the profile of nutrients available for absorption in dairy cattle and provides guidelines for further improved prediction with regard to animal production responses and environmental pollution.The profile of nutrients available for absorption comprises volatile fatty acids, long-chain fatty acids, amino acids and glucose. Thus the importance of processes in the reticulo-rumen is obvious. Much research into rumen fermentation is aimed at determination of substrate degradation rates. Quantitative knowledge on rates of passage of nutrients out of the rumen is rather limited compared with that on degradation rates, and thus should be an important theme in future research. Current systems largely ignore microbial metabolic variation, and extant mechanistic models of rumen fermentation give only limited attention to explicit representation of microbial metabolic activity. Recent molecular techniques indicate that knowledge on the presence and activity of various microbial species is far from complete. Such techniques may give a wealth of information, but to include such findings in systems predicting the nutrient profile requires close collaboration between molecular scientists and mathematical modellers on interpreting and evaluating quantitative data. Protozoal metabolism is of particular interest here given the paucity of quantitative data

  20. Investigations into the bystander effect: signal versus response

    Vines, A.M.; Seymour, C.B.; Mothersill, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    The bystander effect is the general term used to describe the effects seen in cells or tissue that have never been directly irradiated, but display similar symptoms to those that have. Some of these symptoms include reduced cell survival, chromosomal aberrations, and increased apoptosis. This investigation aims to explore the signal produced by certain cell and tissue types, and the relationship this has with the subsequent response. The goal is to elucidate whether the reduction in cell survival frequently seen in response to the bystander effect is determined by the signal produced or the response of the cell type. Firstly, a matrix design experiment was set up using 3 cell lines. Each cell line was irradiated to produce ICCM (Irradiated Cell Conditioned Medium), which was in turn used to treat all cell lines in the study. Medium transfer is carried out within cell lines, (ICCM from CHO onto CHO cells) and between cell lines (ICCM from CHO onto HPV-G cells). In the second set of experiments, tissue samples from male Wister rats were used to generate ITCM (Irradiated Tissue Conditioned Medium). This medium was then tested on a cell line with an established response to the bystander effect. As an extension to these two experimental protocols, both ICCM and ITCM were used to investigate if there is calcium flux in the cells as a response to the bystander medium. This has recently been shown to be an early response to the bystander signal. Results indicate that it is the signal produced by the irradiated cells that determine the overall effect of the bystander signal, and not the response of the cells expose to it. CHO-K1 cells treated with autologous ICCM show a 16.2% drop in cell survival. However, when this cell line is treated with HPV-G ICCM, it shows a 36.5% drop in survival. HPV-G cells treated with autologous medium display a similar response to this, with a 41.1% drop in survival, though when treated with CHO-K1 ICCM, the drop in survival is 22.9%. This

  1. Rapid response teams: qualitative analysis of their effectiveness.

    Leach, Linda Searle; Mayo, Ann M

    2013-05-01

    Multidisciplinary rapid response teams focus on patients' emergent needs and manage critical situations to prevent avoidable deaths. Although research has focused primarily on outcomes, studies of the actual team effectiveness within the teams from multiple perspectives have been limited. To describe effectiveness of rapid response teams in a large teaching hospital in California that had been using such teams for 5 years. The grounded-theory method was used to discover if substantive theory might emerge from interview and/or observational data. Purposeful sampling was used to conduct in-person semistructured interviews with 17 key informants. Convenience sampling was used for the 9 observed events that involved a rapid response team. Analysis involved use of a concept or indicator model to generate empirical results from the data. Data were coded, compared, and contrasted, and, when appropriate, relationships between concepts were formed. Results Dimensions of effective team performance included the concepts of organizational culture, team structure, expertise, communication, and teamwork. Professionals involved reported that rapid response teams functioned well in managing patients at risk or in crisis; however, unique challenges were identified. Teams were loosely coupled because of the inconsistency of team members from day to day. Team members had little opportunity to develop relationships or team skills. The need for team training may be greater than that among teams that work together regularly under less time pressure to perform. Communication between team members and managing a crisis were critical aspects of an effective response team.

  2. Dissociating action-effect activation and effect-based response selection.

    Schwarz, Katharina A; Pfister, Roland; Wirth, Robert; Kunde, Wilfried

    2018-05-25

    Anticipated action effects have been shown to govern action selection and initiation, as described in ideomotor theory, and they have also been demonstrated to determine crosstalk between different tasks in multitasking studies. Such effect-based crosstalk was observed not only in a forward manner (with a first task influencing performance in a following second task) but also in a backward manner (the second task influencing the preceding first task), suggesting that action effect codes can become activated prior to a capacity-limited processing stage often denoted as response selection. The process of effect-based response production, by contrast, has been proposed to be capacity-limited. These observations jointly suggest that effect code activation can occur independently of effect-based response production, though this theoretical implication has not been tested directly at present. We tested this hypothesis by employing a dual-task set-up in which we manipulated the ease of effect-based response production (via response-effect compatibility) in an experimental design that allows for observing forward and backward crosstalk. We observed robust crosstalk effects and response-effect compatibility effects alike, but no interaction between both effects. These results indicate that effect activation can occur in parallel for several tasks, independently of effect-based response production, which is confined to one task at a time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Institutional effectiveness of REDD+ MRV: Countries progress in implementing technical guidelines and good governance requirements

    Ochieng, R.M.; Visseren-Hamakers, Ingrid; Arts, B.; Brockhaus, M.; Herold, M.

    2016-01-01

    The UNFCCC requires REDD+ countries wishing to receive results-based payments to measure, report and verify (MRV) REDD+ impacts; and outlines technical guidelines and good governance requirements for MRV. This article examines institutional effectiveness of REDD+ MRV by assessing countries’ progress

  4. Does modifying personal responsibility moderate the mental contamination effect?

    Kennedy, Tinisha S; Simonds, Laura M

    2017-12-01

    Mental contamination is the psychological sense of internal dirtiness that arises in the absence of physical contact with a perceived contaminant. Mental contamination can be evoked through imagining perpetrating a moral transgression. This study experimentally evoked mental contamination by asking men to imagine perpetrating a non-consensual kiss. It explored whether reducing sense of personal responsibility for the kiss moderated the mental contamination effect. Male students (N = 60) imagined giving either a consensual or non-consensual kiss. Personal responsibility for the kiss was manipulated in one of two non-consensual kiss conditions by way of the inclusion of social influence information. Feelings of mental contamination were assessed by self-report and through a behavioural index. Mental contamination was successfully induced in the two non-consensual kiss conditions. There was evidence to support the hypothesis that reducing personal responsibility might moderate specific components of mental contamination (shame, dirtiness and urge to cleanse). The effect of responsibility modification was evident in the self-report measures, but not in the behavioural index. The sample comprised male university students which limits generalizability of the findings. The behavioural assessment of mental contamination was limited to a proxy measure. Imagined moral violations are associated with increases in indices of mental contamination. Further research should investigate whether feelings of shame, dirtiness and urge to cleanse are particularly responsive to responsibility modifications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of oxycodone on brain responses to emotional images.

    Wardle, Margaret C; Fitzgerald, Daniel A; Angstadt, Michael; Rabinak, Christine A; de Wit, Harriet; Phan, K Luan

    2014-11-01

    Evidence from animal and human studies suggests that opiate drugs decrease emotional responses to negative stimuli and increase responses to positive stimuli. Such emotional effects may motivate misuse of oxycodone (OXY), a widely abused opiate. Yet, we know little about how OXY affects neural circuits underlying emotional processing in humans. We examined effects of OXY on brain activity during presentation of positive and negative visual emotional stimuli. We predicted that OXY would decrease amygdala activity to negative stimuli and increase ventral striatum (VS) activity to positive stimuli. Secondarily, we examined the effects of OXY on other emotional network regions on an exploratory basis. In a three-session study, healthy adults (N = 17) received placebo, 10 and 20 mg OXY under counterbalanced, double-blind conditions. At each session, participants completed subjective and cardiovascular measures and underwent functional MRI (fMRI) scanning while completing two emotional response tasks. Our emotional tasks reliably activated emotional network areas. OXY produced subjective effects but did not alter either behavioral responses to emotional stimuli or activity in our primary areas of interest. OXY did decrease right medial orbitofrontal cortex (MOFC) responses to happy faces. Contrary to our expectations, OXY did not affect behavioral or neural responses to emotional stimuli in our primary areas of interest. Further, the effects of OXY in the MOFC would be more consistent with a decrease in value for happy faces. This may indicate that healthy adults do not receive emotional benefits from opiates, or the pharmacological actions of OXY differ from other opiates.

  6. Effects of response preference on resistance to change.

    Ringdahl, Joel E; Berg, Wendy K; Wacker, David P; Crook, Kayla; Molony, Maggie A; Vargo, Kristina K; Neurnberger, Jodi E; Zabala, Karla; Taylor, Christopher J

    2018-01-01

    Treatments based on differential reinforcement of alternative behavior, such as functional communication training, are widely used. Research regarding the maintenance of related treatment effects is limited. Nevin and Wacker (2013) provided a conceptual framework, rooted in behavioral momentum theory, for the study of treatment maintenance that addressed two components: (a) reemergence of problem behavior, and (b) continued expression of appropriate behavior. In the few studies on this topic, focus has been on variables impacting the reemergence of problem behavior, with fewer studies evaluating the persistence of appropriate behavior. Given the findings from applied research related to functional communication training, variables related to response topography, such as response preference, may impact this aspect of maintenance. In the current study, the impact of response preference on persistence was evaluated in the context of functional communication training for individuals who did not exhibit problem behavior (Experiment 1) and for individuals with a history of reinforcement for problem behavior (Experiment 2). High-preferred mands were more persistent than low-preferred mands. These findings suggest that response related variables, such as response preference, impact response persistence and further suggest that response related variables should be considered when developing interventions such as functional communication training. © 2018 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  7. Designing effective questions for classroom response system teaching

    Beatty, Ian D.; Gerace, William J.; Leonard, William J.; Dufresne, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Classroom response systems can be powerful tools for teaching physics. Their efficacy depends strongly on the quality of the questions. Creating effective questions is difficult and differs from creating exam and homework problems. Each classroom response system question should have an explicit pedagogic purpose consisting of a content goal, a process goal, and a metacognitive goal. Questions can be designed to fulfill their purpose through four complementary mechanisms: directing students' attention, stimulating specific cognitive processes, communicating information to the instructor and students via classroom response system-tabulated answer counts, and facilitating the articulation and confrontation of ideas. We identify several tactics that are useful for designing potent questions and present four "makeovers" to show how these tactics can be used to convert traditional physics questions into more powerful questions for a classroom response system.

  8. Effect of radiographic contrast agents on leukocyte metabolic response

    Hernanz-Schulman, M. [Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanholder, R.; Waterloos, M.A. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Nephrology Section, University Hospital, Gent (Belgium); Hakim, R.; Schulman, G. [Department of Nephrology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2000-06-01

    Barium, at clinical dilutions, causes a significant increase of baseline ''resting state'' phagocytic activity, which in turn leads to significant blunting of subsequent response to phagocytic challenge and adversely affects the response to all bacteria tested. There is no baseline activation of leukocytes by the water-soluble media, although there was some inhibition (rather than activation) of leukocyte metabolic activity. The effect of the water-soluble media in bacteria was more complex (although inhibition is minor compared to barium). Our data demonstrate that barium is a significat activator of phagocytic cells, which results in deactivation of phagocytic response when challenged; these dsata serve to explain the enhanced adverse effect of barium in cased of fecal peritonitis. (orig.)

  9. Effect of radiographic contrast agents on leukocyte metabolic response

    Hernanz-Schulman, M.; Vanholder, R.; Waterloos, M.A.; Hakim, R.; Schulman, G.

    2000-01-01

    Barium, at clinical dilutions, causes a significant increase of baseline ''resting state'' phagocytic activity, which in turn leads to significant blunting of subsequent response to phagocytic challenge and adversely affects the response to all bacteria tested. There is no baseline activation of leukocytes by the water-soluble media, although there was some inhibition (rather than activation) of leukocyte metabolic activity. The effect of the water-soluble media in bacteria was more complex (although inhibition is minor compared to barium). Our data demonstrate that barium is a significant activator of phagocytic cells, which results in deactivation of phagocytic response when challenged; these data serve to explain the enhanced adverse effect of barium in cased of fecal peritonitis. (orig.)

  10. Effect of childhood physical abuse on cortisol stress response.

    Carpenter, Linda L; Shattuck, Thaddeus T; Tyrka, Audrey R; Geracioti, Thomas D; Price, Lawrence H

    2011-03-01

    Abuse and neglect are highly prevalent in children and have enduring neurobiological effects. Stressful early life environments perturb the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which in turn may predispose to psychiatric disorders in adulthood. However, studies of childhood maltreatment and adult HPA function have not yet rigorously investigated the differential effects of maltreatment subtypes, including physical abuse. In this study, we sought to replicate our previous finding that childhood maltreatment was associated with attenuated cortisol responses to stress and determine whether the type of maltreatment was a determinant of the stress response. Salivary cortisol response to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) was examined in a non-clinical sample of women (n = 110). Subjects had no acute medical problems and were not seeking psychiatric treatment. Effects of five maltreatment types, as measured by the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, on cortisol response to the TSST were investigated. To further examine the significant (p < 0.005) effect of one maltreatment type, women with childhood physical abuse (PA) (n = 20) were compared to those without past PA (n = 90). Women reporting childhood PA displayed a significantly blunted cortisol response to the TSST compared with subjects without PA, after controlling for estrogen use, age, other forms of maltreatment, and other potential confounds. There were no differences between PA and control groups with regard to physiological arousal during the stress challenge. In a non-clinical sample of women with minimal or no current psychopathology, physical abuse is associated with a blunted cortisol response to a psychosocial stress task.

  11. Effect of Mangifera Indica Leaves Extract on Growth Response of ...

    Effect of Mangifera indica leaves extracts on growth response of Oreochromis niloticus was evaluated for 42 days. 5 diets at approximately 40% crude protein containing varying levels of the extracts at 0%, 5%, 15% and 25% were formulated. These were fed to fingerlings of O. niloticus (mean weight, 5.25 – 6.05g) that were ...

  12. Computer security incident response team effectiveness : A needs assessment

    Kleij, R. van der; Kleinhuis, G.; Young, H.J.

    2017-01-01

    Computer security incident response teams (CSIRTs) respond to a computer security incident when the need arises. Failure of these teams can have far-reaching effects for the economy and national security. CSIRTs often have to work on an ad-hoc basis, in close cooperation with other teams, and in

  13. Transgenerational effects enhance specific immune response in a wild passerine

    Juli Broggi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate mothers transfer diverse compounds to developing embryos that can affect their development and final phenotype (i.e., maternal effects. However, the way such effects modulate offspring phenotype, in particular their immunity, remains unclear. To test the impact of maternal effects on offspring development, we treated wild breeding house sparrows (Passer domesticus in Sevilla, SE Spain with Newcastle disease virus (NDV vaccine. Female parents were vaccinated when caring for first broods, eliciting a specific immune response to NDV. The immune response to the same vaccine, and to the PHA inflammatory test were measured in 11-day-old chicks from their following brood. Vaccinated chicks from vaccinated mothers developed a stronger specific response that was related to maternal NDV antibody concentration while rearing their chicks. The chicks’ carotenoid concentration and total antioxidant capacity in blood were negatively related to NDV antibody concentration, whereas no relation with PHA response was found. Specific NDV antibodies could not be detected in 11-day-old control chicks from vaccinated mothers, implying that maternally transmitted antibodies are not directly involved but may promote offspring specific immunity through a priming effect, while other immunity components remain unaffected. Maternally transmitted antibodies in the house sparrow are short-lived, depend on maternal circulation levels and enhance pre-fledging chick specific immunity when exposed to the same pathogens as the mothers.

  14. the effects of legislation on corporate social responsibility in the ...

    RAYAN_

    This paper examines the effect of legislated Corporate Social Responsibility in the minerals and mines sector .... mining companies for shared commitment to the mining enterprise between the host communities and the ..... Even in some developing countries such as Chile, Botswana and Malaysia, good governance went a ...

  15. Effects of Different Student Response Modes on Science Learning

    Kho, Lee Sze; Chen, Chwen Jen

    2017-01-01

    Student response systems (SRSs) are wireless answering devices that enable students to provide simple real-time feedback to instructors. This study aims to evaluate the effects of different SRS interaction modes on elementary school students' science learning. Three interaction modes which include SRS Individual, SRS Collaborative, and Classroom…

  16. Effect of external noise on the current response in superlattices

    Suqing Duan; Wu Binyi; Wang Zhigang; Zhao Xiangeng

    2004-01-01

    Within the single-band model and the nearest-neighbor approximation we investigate the effect of external noise on the current response driven by dc-ac field which has a fluctuating component. We find the external noise can destroy the current resonant peaks. When the strength of the external noise becomes enough large, all the current resonant peaks will completely disappear

  17. Effect of Forewarning on Emotional Responses to a Horror Film.

    Cantor, Joanne; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes a study which used the heart rate of subjects as the measure of physiological arousal to assess the effect of forewarning on emotional reactions and physiological responses to a frightening television film. Results indicate that although forewarning did not significantly affect anxiety, it did promote more intense fright and upset. (MBR)

  18. Simulate the Effect of Climate Change on Development, Irrigation Requirements and Soybean Yield in Gorgan

    A.R. Nehbandani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Atmospheric CO2 concentration has continuously been increasing during the past century and it is expected to increase from current 384 ppm to 550 ppm in 2050. This increase is expected to increase global temperature by 1.4 to 5.8 oC which can have major effects on crop plants. Since both CO2 and temperature are among the most important environmental variables that regulate physiological and phenological processes in plants, it is critical to evaluate the effects of CO2 and air temperature on the growth and yield of key crop plants. Warming of Earth's atmosphere can increase dark respiration and photorespiration in C3 plants. Rate of photosynthesis is affected by temperature, Therefore, rate of biochemical reactions, morphological reactions, CO2 and energy exchange with the atmosphere could be affected by temperature. Increase in CO2 concentration causes further yield improvement in C3 plants (Such as wheat, rice and soybeans in comparison with C4 plants (Such as corn, sorghum and sugarcane. In general, increasing CO2 concentration affects plant processes in two ways:direct effect on physiological processes in plant and indirect effect by changes in temperature and rainfall. Studying climate change effects including increase in temperature and CO2 concentration can help understanding adaptation strategies to reach higher and sustainable crop yields. Therefore, the objective of this research was to examine the effects of temperature and CO2 changes on days to maturity, irrigation water requirement, and yield in soybean under irrigation conditions of Gorganusing SSM-iLegume-Soybean model. Materials and methods: The model SSM-iLegume-Soybean simulates phenological development, leaf development and senescence, crop mass production and partitioning, plant nitrogen balance, yield formation and soil water and nitrogen balances. The model includes responses of crop processes to environmental factors of solar radiation, temperature and

  19. On the Compliance of Simbol-X Mirror Roughness with its Effective Area Requirements

    Spiga, D.; Basso, S.; Cotroneo, V.; Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2009-01-01

    Surface microroughness of X-ray mirrors is a key issue for the angular resolution of Simbol-X to comply with the required one (<20 arcsec at 30 keV). The maximum tolerable microroughness for Simbol-X mirrors, in order to satisfy the required imaging capability, has already been derived in terms of its PSD (Power Spectral Density). However, also the Effective Area of the telescope is affected by the mirror roughness. In this work we will show how the expected effective area of the Simbol-X mirror module can be computed from the roughness PSD tolerance, checking its compliance with the requirements.

  20. On the Compliance of Simbol-X Mirror Roughness with its Effective Area Requirements

    Spiga, D.; Basso, S.; Cotroneo, V.; Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2009-05-01

    Surface microroughness of X-ray mirrors is a key issue for the angular resolution of Simbol-X to comply with the required one (Simbol-X mirrors, in order to satisfy the required imaging capability, has already been derived in terms of its PSD (Power Spectral Density). However, also the Effective Area of the telescope is affected by the mirror roughness. In this work we will show how the expected effective area of the Simbol-X mirror module can be computed from the roughness PSD tolerance, checking its compliance with the requirements.

  1. Nursing home staffing requirements and input substitution: effects on housekeeping, food service, and activities staff.

    Bowblis, John R; Hyer, Kathryn

    2013-08-01

    To study the effect of minimum nurse staffing requirements on the subsequent employment of nursing home support staff. Nursing home data from the Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) System merged with state nurse staffing requirements. Facility-level housekeeping, food service, and activities staff levels are regressed on nurse staffing requirements and other controls using fixed effect panel regression. OSCAR surveys from 1999 to 2004. Increases in state direct care and licensed nurse staffing requirements are associated with decreases in the staffing levels of all types of support staff. Increased nursing home nurse staffing requirements lead to input substitution in the form of reduced support staffing levels. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  2. Immune response is required for the control of in vivo translocation and chronic toxicity of graphene oxide

    Wu, Qiuli; Zhao, Yunli; Fang, Jianpeng; Wang, Dayong

    2014-05-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) shows great promise as a nanomaterial for medical applications; however, the mechanism for its long-term adverse effects is still largely unclear. Here, we show that chronic GO exposure not only caused damage on the function of both primary and secondary targeted organs but also induced severe accumulation of pathogenic microbial food (OP50) in the intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans, a non-mammalian alternative toxicity assay system. GO accumulated in the intestine could be largely co-localized with OP50 and induced decreased immune response of animals. In contrast, feeding with UV-treated OP50 suppressed GO toxicity and accumulation in the intestine and maintained the relatively normal immune response of animals. The severe accumulation of OP50 in the intestine might be partially due to the damage by GO on the development and function of AVL and DVB neurons controlling defecation behavior. Reduction of chronic GO toxicity by PEG surface modification largely resulted from the inhibition of OP50 accumulation in the intestine and the maintenance of normal immune response. Our results highlight the key role of innate immunity in regulating in vivo chronic GO toxicity, which will be helpful for our understanding of the interactions between nanomaterials and biological systems during the long-term development of animals.Graphene oxide (GO) shows great promise as a nanomaterial for medical applications; however, the mechanism for its long-term adverse effects is still largely unclear. Here, we show that chronic GO exposure not only caused damage on the function of both primary and secondary targeted organs but also induced severe accumulation of pathogenic microbial food (OP50) in the intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans, a non-mammalian alternative toxicity assay system. GO accumulated in the intestine could be largely co-localized with OP50 and induced decreased immune response of animals. In contrast, feeding with UV-treated OP50 suppressed GO

  3. Expression of MUC17 is regulated by HIF1α-mediated hypoxic responses and requires a methylation-free hypoxia responsible element in pancreatic cancer.

    Sho Kitamoto

    Full Text Available MUC17 is a type 1 membrane-bound glycoprotein that is mainly expressed in the digestive tract. Recent studies have demonstrated that the aberrant overexpression of MUC17 is correlated with the malignant potential of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs; however, the exact regulatory mechanism of MUC17 expression has yet to be identified. Here, we provide the first report of the MUC17 regulatory mechanism under hypoxia, an essential feature of the tumor microenvironment and a driving force of cancer progression. Our data revealed that MUC17 was significantly induced by hypoxic stimulation through a hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α-dependent pathway in some pancreatic cancer cells (e.g., AsPC1, whereas other pancreatic cancer cells (e.g., BxPC3 exhibited little response to hypoxia. Interestingly, these low-responsive cells have highly methylated CpG motifs within the hypoxia responsive element (HRE, 5'-RCGTG-3', a binding site for HIF1α. Thus, we investigated the demethylation effects of CpG at HRE on the hypoxic induction of MUC17. Treatment of low-responsive cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine followed by additional hypoxic incubation resulted in the restoration of hypoxic MUC17 induction. Furthermore, DNA methylation of HRE in pancreatic tissues from patients with PDACs showed higher hypomethylation status as compared to those from non-cancerous tissues, and hypomethylation was also correlated with MUC17 mRNA expression. Taken together, these findings suggested that the HIF1α-mediated hypoxic signal pathway contributes to MUC17 expression, and DNA methylation of HRE could be a determinant of the hypoxic inducibility of MUC17 in pancreatic cancer cells.

  4. Effect of temperatures up to 130 deg C on the responses of TLD 700

    Douglas, J A; Binns, P J [UKAEA Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell. Environmental and Medical Sciences Div.

    1984-01-01

    The need to measure doses at temperatures up to 130 deg C led to an investigation into the effect of exposure and storage at these temperatures on the response of TLD 700 before and after UV phototransfer. As a preliminary, the delays required during the UV re-estimation process were optimised. The effects of storage and exposure were compared. This was followed by a detailed examination of the effects of storage at temperatures up to 130 deg C. Glow curves were analysed to investigate the rates of growth and decay of the different peaks. The findings for peaks 6 and 7 are compatible with previously reported effects at lower temperatures on peaks 3, 4 and 5. Storage at temperatures of 130 deg C or below for periods up to 28 days does not affect the UV photo-transfer response.

  5. What is the effect of different skin types on the required dose for photodynamic therapy?

    Karsten, AE

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available For effective laser treatment it is very important to provide the correct dose at the required treatment depth. In South Africa we have a richness of ethnic groups contributing to a large variety in skin tones. Effective laser treatment of skin...

  6. 21 CFR 864.3 - Effective dates of requirement for premarket approval.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effective dates of requirement for premarket approval. 864.3 Section 864.3 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES General Provisions § 864.3 Effective...

  7. Equatorial electrojet and its response to external electromagnetic effects

    Bespalov, P. A.; Savina, O. N.

    2012-09-01

    In the quiet low-latitude Earth's ionosphere, a sufficiently developed current system that is responsible for the Sq magnetic-field variations is formed in quiet Sun days under the action of tidal streams. The density of the corresponding currents is maximum in the midday hours at the equatorial latitudes, where the so-called equatorial electrojet is formed. In this work, we discuss the nature of the equatorial electrojet. This paper studies the value of its response to external effects. First of all, it is concerned with estimating the possibility of using the equatorial electrojet for generating low-frequency electromagnetic signals during periodic heating of the ionosphere by the heating-facility radiation. The equatorial electrojet can also produce electrodynamic response to the natural atmospheric processes, e.g., an acoustic-gravity wave.

  8. Cross-Cultural Competence: Leader Requirements for Intercultural Effectiveness in the Human Domain

    2014-06-13

    patience with me along the way. I also need to thank the Combined Arms Research Library staff for their assistance in many different ways, and the staff...and low levels of ethnocentrism required in jobs with complex international and multicultural responsibilities, as found in the empirical study by... multicultural perspective taking skills. Technical Report, U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, Fort Belvoir, VA

  9. The effect of stimulus intensity on response time and accuracy in dynamic, temporally constrained environments.

    Causer, J; McRobert, A P; Williams, A M

    2013-10-01

    The ability to make accurate judgments and execute effective skilled movements under severe temporal constraints are fundamental to elite performance in a number of domains including sport, military combat, law enforcement, and medicine. In two experiments, we examine the effect of stimulus strength on response time and accuracy in a temporally constrained, real-world, decision-making task. Specifically, we examine the effect of low stimulus intensity (black) and high stimulus intensity (sequin) uniform designs, worn by teammates, to determine the effect of stimulus strength on the ability of soccer players to make rapid and accurate responses. In both field- and laboratory-based scenarios, professional soccer players viewed developing patterns of play and were required to make a penetrative pass to an attacking player. Significant differences in response accuracy between uniform designs were reported in laboratory- and field-based experiments. Response accuracy was significantly higher in the sequin compared with the black uniform condition. Response times only differed between uniform designs in the laboratory-based experiment. These findings extend the literature into a real-world environment and have significant implications for the design of clothing wear in a number of domains. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Neuropharmacologic responses of animals to extreme effects: exposure to radiation

    Mikhajlichenko, P.P.; Tikhonchuk, V.S.; Ushakov, I.B.

    1990-01-01

    The functional state of neurochemical structures of male mice was investigated after their gamma-irradiation with 137 Cs (1.9 Gy/min) at a dose of 100 Gy. The animals were treated with the following drugs that produce selective effects on specific receptors: galanthamine, amizyl, arpenal, phenamine, phentolamine and obsidan, haloperidol, apomorphine, phenazepam, phenibut and strychnin. The results point to the development of heterologous desensibilization of receptors at early post-irradiation periods. The high effectiveness of agonists and antagonists of CNS transmitters in the nonirradiated animals and their low effectiveness in the irradiated animals and their low effectiveness in the irradiated animals may be considered as an indicator of post-radiation injury of specific receptors. These neuropharmacological interactions may obviously be modified in response to the combined effects of space flight factors

  11. Response inhibition under alcohol: effects of cognitive and motivational conflict.

    Fillmore, M T; Vogel-Sprott, M

    2000-03-01

    This experiment tested the effect of cognitive and motivational conflict on response inhibition under alcohol. Fifty-six male social drinkers were randomly assigned to one of eight groups (n = 8). Four pairs of groups received 0.62 g/kg of alcohol, or a placebo, and each pair performed a go/stop choice reaction time task under one of four conflict conditions. One condition (C) produced cognitive conflict by presenting "go" and "stop" signals in the task. Another condition (IR) added motivational conflict by administering an equal monetary reward for inhibiting responses to stop-signals, and for responding to go-signals. The remaining two conditions resolved the motivational conflict by administering the monetary reward only for inhibitions (I), or only for responses (R). Compared with placebo, alcohol reduced inhibitions (i.e., impaired inhibitory control) under cognitive conflict (C; p = .041) and under motivational conflict (IR; p = .012). No significant effect of alcohol on inhibitions was observed in conditions where conflict was resolved (i.e., I and R). The study shows that alcohol can reduce the ability to inhibit a response. However, impaired inhibitory control is not an inevitable outcome of the drug action, because it can be counteracted by the consequences of behavior in the situation.

  12. Users' Requirements for Environmental Effects From Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems and Their Fuel Cycles

    Carreter, M.; Gray, M.; Falck, E.; Bonne, A.; Bell, M.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) is to support the safe, sustainable, economic and proliferation resistant use of nuclear technology to meet the needs of the 21. century. The first part of the project focusses on the development of an understanding of the requirements of possible users of innovative concepts for reactors and fuel cycle applications. This paper reports progress made on the identification of user requirements as they relate to the environment and environmental protection. The user requirements being formulated are intended to limit adverse environmental effects from the different facilities involved in the nuclear fuel cycles to be well below maximum acceptable levels. To determine if the user requirements are met, it is necessary to identify those factors that are relevant to assessment of the environmental performance of innovative nuclear systems. To this effect, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and the Material Flow accounting (MFA) methodologies are being appraised for the suitability for application. This paper develops and provides the rationale for the 'users' requirements' as they are currently defined. Existing Environmental Impact Assessment and Materials Flow Accounting methodologies that can be applied to determine whether or not innovative technologies conform to the User Requirements are briefly described. It is concluded that after establishing fundamental principles, it is possible to formulate sets of general and specific users' requirements against which, the potential adverse environmental effects to be expected from innovative nuclear energy systems (INES) can be assessed. The application of these users' requirements should keep the adverse environmental effects from INES's within acceptable limits. (authors)

  13. Effects of dose fractionation on the response of alanine dosimetry

    Lundahl, Brad; Logar, John; Desrosiers, Marc; Puhl, James

    2014-01-01

    Alanine dosimetry is well established as a transfer standard and is becoming more prevalently used in routine dosimetry systems for radiation processing. Many routine measurement applications in radiation processing involve absorbed dose measurements resulting from fractioned exposures to ionizing radiation. Fractioning of absorbed dose is identified as an influence quantity (ISO/ASTM, 2013). This paper reports on study results of absorbed dose fractioning characteristics of alanine for gamma and high energy electron beam radiation sources. The results of this study indicate a radiation response difference due to absorbed dose fractioning in response can be observed after four fractionations for high-energy electron beams and no difference up to seven fractions for gamma rays using an ANOVA evaluation method. - Highlights: • Fractioning effects signaled in electron beam using an ANOVA at 6 equal increments. • Fractioning effects not signaled in gamma using an ANOVA up to 7 equal increments. • Insensitivity of alanine to dose fractioning indicates nominal impact on calibration

  14. Does transcutaneous nerve stimulation have effect on sympathetic skin response?

    Okuyucu, E Esra; Turhanoğlu, Ayşe Dicle; Guntel, Murat; Yılmazer, Serkan; Savaş, Nazan; Mansuroğlu, Ayhan

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on the sympathetic nerve system by sympathetic skin response test. Fifty-five healthy volunteers received either: (i) 30minutes TENS (25 participants) (ii) 30minutes sham TENS (30 participants) and SSR test was performed pre- and post-TENS. The mean values of latency and peak-to-peak amplitude of five consecutive SSRs were calculated. A significant amplitude difference was found between TENS and sham TENS group both in right and left hand (p=0.04, p=0.01, respectively). However there was no significant latancy difference between two groups (p>0.05 ). TENS has an inhibitory effect on elicited SNS responses when compared with sham TENS control group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. On the effect of response transformations in sequential parameter optimization.

    Wagner, Tobias; Wessing, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Parameter tuning of evolutionary algorithms (EAs) is attracting more and more interest. In particular, the sequential parameter optimization (SPO) framework for the model-assisted tuning of stochastic optimizers has resulted in established parameter tuning algorithms. In this paper, we enhance the SPO framework by introducing transformation steps before the response aggregation and before the actual modeling. Based on design-of-experiments techniques, we empirically analyze the effect of integrating different transformations. We show that in particular, a rank transformation of the responses provides significant improvements. A deeper analysis of the resulting models and additional experiments with adaptive procedures indicates that the rank and the Box-Cox transformation are able to improve the properties of the resultant distributions with respect to symmetry and normality of the residuals. Moreover, model-based effect plots document a higher discriminatory power obtained by the rank transformation.

  16. Effects of air humidity on ionization chamber response

    Meger, C.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Venci, R.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the effect of air humidity on four different ionization chamber cap materials verified earlier studies (Kristensen and Sundbom, 1981; Mijnheer et al., 1983) and extended our understanding of the problem. We found nylon and A-150 plastic caps swell as they absorb water from the air. This accounts for as much as 2.5% increase in ionization response. Graphite chambers readily absorb and desorb water from the air. This creates a problem in maintaining dry air in a wet graphite chamber. Humid air has a different density and W value than dry air (Niatel, 1969, 1975). This decreases the charge collected in a wet graphite chamber. We observe a decrease in response of approximately 2%, a value greater than can be accounted for by these effects alone. Polyethylene chambers are unaffected by humid air. 4 refs., 9 figs

  17. Effect of support conditions on structural response under dynamic loading

    Akram, T.; Memon, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    In design practice, dynamic structural analysis is carried out with base of structure considered as fixed; this means that foundation is placed on rock like soil material. While conducting this type of analyses the role of foundation and soil behaviour is totally neglected. The actions in members and loads transferred at foundation level obtained in this manner do not depict the true structural behaviour. FEM (Finite Element Methods) analysis where both superstructure and foundation soil are coupled together is quite complicated and expensive for design environments. A simplified model is required to depict dynamic response of structures with foundations based on flexible soils. The primary purpose of this research is to compare the superstructure dynamic responses of structural systems with fixed base to that of simple soil model base. The selected simple soil model is to be suitable for use in a design environment to give more realistic results. For this purpose building models are idealized with various heights and structural systems in both 2D (Two Dimensional) and 3D (Three Dimensional) space. These models are then provided with visco-elastic supports representing three soil bearing capacities and the analysis results are compared to that of fixed supports models. The results indicate that fixed support system underestimates natural time period of the structures. Dynamic behavior and force response of visco-elastic support is different from fixed support model. Fixed support models result in over designed base columns and under designed beams. (author)

  18. Secondary IgG responses to type III pneumococcal polysaccharide. II. Different cellular requirements for induction and elicitation.

    Braley-Mullen, H

    1976-04-01

    Mice primed with a thymus- (T) dependent form of Type III pneumococcal polysaccharide (S3), i.e., S3 coupled to erythrocytes (S3-RBC) produce S3-specific IgG antibody after secondary challenge with either S3 or S3-RBC. The production of IgG antibody by mice challenged with S3 was shown to be T independent since secondary responses were enhanced when mice were treated with anti-lymphocyte serum (ALS) at the time of secondary challenge with S3 and T-depleted spleen cells responded as well as unfractionated spleen cells to S3 in an adoptive transfer system. Secondary S3-specific IgG responses in mice challenged with S3-RBC were shown to be T dependent by the same criteria. The results obtained by using S3 as the antigen indicate that IgG-producing B cells (B lambda cells) can recognize and respond to antigen in the absence of helper T cells. On the other hand, T cells were required for the induction of S3-specific memory B lambda cells since mice depleted of T cells by treatment with ALS at the time of priming with S3-RBC failed to produce S3-specific IgG antibody after secondary challenge with either S3-specific IgG antibody after secondary chall-nge with either S3 or S3rbc. Since RBC-specific memory cells were induced in T-deprived mice the results suggest that T cell regulation of IgG antibody production may vary for different antigens.

  19. Sunk cost and work ethic effects reflect suboptimal choice between different work requirements.

    Magalhães, Paula; White, K Geoffrey

    2013-03-01

    We investigated suboptimal choice between different work requirements in pigeons (Columba livia), namely the sunk cost effect, an irrational tendency to persist with an initial investment, despite the availability of a better option. Pigeons chose between two keys, one with a fixed work requirement to food of 20 pecks (left key), and the other with a work requirement to food which varied across conditions (center key). On some trials within each session, such choices were preceded by an investment of 35 pecks on the center key, whereas on others they were not. On choice trials preceded by the investment, the pigeons tended to stay and complete the schedule associated with the center key, even when the number of pecks to obtain reward was greater than for the concurrently available left key. This result indicates that pigeons, like humans, commit the sunk cost effect. With higher work requirements, this preference was extended to trials where there was no initial investment, so an overall preference for the key associated with more work was evident, consistent with the work ethic effect. We conclude that a more general work ethic effect is amplified by the effect of the prior investment, that is, the sunk cost effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Giving patients responsibility or fostering mutual response-ability: family physicians' constructions of effective chronic illness management.

    Thille, Patricia H; Russell, Grant M

    2010-10-01

    Current visions of family medicine and models of chronic illness management integrate evidence-based medicine with collaborative, patient-centered care, despite critiques that these constructs conflict with each other. With this potential conflict in mind, we applied a critical discursive psychology methodology to present discursive patterns articulated by 13 family physicians in Ontario, Canada, regarding care of patients living with multiple chronic illnesses. Physicians constructed competing versions of the terms "effective chronic illness management" and "patient involvement." One construction integrated individual responsibility for health with primacy of "evidence," resulting in a conceptualization consistent with paternalistic care. The second constructed effective care as involving active partnership of physician and patient, implying a need to foster the ability of both practitioners and patients to respond to complex challenges as they arose. The former pattern is inconsistent with visions of family medicine and chronic illness management, whereas the latter embodies it.

  1. Alignment effects in beer mugs: Automatic action activation or response competition?

    Roest, Sander A; Pecher, Diane; Naeije, Lilian; Zeelenberg, René

    2016-08-01

    Responses to objects with a graspable handle are faster when the response hand and handle orientation are aligned (e.g., a key press with the right hand is required and the object handle is oriented to the right) than when they are not aligned. This effect could be explained by automatic activation of specific motor programs when an object is viewed. Alternatively, the effect could be explained by competition at the response level. Participants performed a reach-and-grasp or reach-and-button-press action with their left or right hand in response to the color of a beer mug. The alignment effect did not vary as a function of the type of action. In addition, the alignment effect disappeared in a go/no-go version of the task. The same results were obtained when participants made upright/inverted decisions, so that object shape was task-relevant. Our results indicate that alignment effects are not due to automatic motor activation of the left or right limb.

  2. Pharmacogenetics of clozapine treatment response and side-effects in schizophrenia: an update.

    Sriretnakumar, Venuja; Huang, Eric; Müller, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Clozapine (CLZ) is the most effective treatment for treatment-resistant schizophrenia (SCZ) patients, with potential added benefits of reduction in suicide risk and aggression. However, CLZ is also mainly underused due to its high risk for the potentially lethal side-effect of agranulocytosis as well as weight gain and related metabolic dysregulation. Pharmacogenetics promises to enable the prediction of patient treatment response and risk of adverse effects based on patients' genetics, paving the way toward individualized treatment. This article reviews pharmacogenetics studies of CLZ response and side-effects with a focus on articles from January 2012 to February 2015, as an update to the previous reviews. Pharmacokinetic genes explored primarily include CYP1A2, while pharmacodynamic genes consisted of traditional pharmacogenetic targets such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor as well novel mitochondrial genes, NDUFS-1 and translocator protein. Pharmacogenetics is a promising avenue for individualized medication of CLZ in SCZ, with several consistently replicated gene variants predicting CLZ response and side-effects. However, a large proportion of studies have yielded mixed results. Large-scale Genome-wide association studies (e.g., CRESTAR) and targeted gene studies with standardized designs (response measurements, treatment durations, plasma level monitoring) are required for further progress toward clinical translation. Additionally, in order to improve study quality, we recommend accounting for important confounders, including polypharmacy, baseline measurements, treatment duration, gender, and age at onset.

  3. Response effects in the perception of conjunctions of colour and form.

    Chmiel, N

    1989-01-01

    Two experiments addressed the question whether visual search for a target defined by a conjunction of colour and form requires a central, serial, attentional process, but detection of a single feature, such as colour, is preattentive, as proposed by the feature-integration theory of attention. Experiment 1 investigated conjunction and feature search using small array sizes of up to five elements, under conditions which precluded eye-movements, in contrast to previous studies. The results were consistent with the theory. Conjunction search showed the effect of adding distractors to the display, the slopes of the curves relating RT to array size were in the approximate ratio of 2:1, consistent with a central, serial search process, exhaustive for absence responses and self-terminating for presence responses. Feature search showed no significant effect of distractors for presence responses. Experiment 2 manipulated the response requirements in conjunction search, using vocal response in a GO-NO GO procedure, in contrast to Experiment 1, which used key-press responses in a YES-NO procedure. Strikingly, presence-response RT was not affected significantly by the number of distractors in the array. The slope relating RT to array size was 3.92. The absence RT slope was 30.56, producing a slope ratio of approximately 8:1. There was no interaction of errors with array size and the presence and absence conditions, implying that RT-error trade-offs did not produce this slope ratio. This result suggests that feature-integration theory is at least incomplete.

  4. Olive Cultivation in the Southern Hemisphere: Flowering, Water Requirements and Oil Quality Responses to New Crop Environments

    Torres, Mariela; Pierantozzi, Pierluigi; Searles, Peter; Rousseaux, M. Cecilia; García-Inza, Georgina; Miserere, Andrea; Bodoira, Romina; Contreras, Cibeles; Maestri, Damián

    2017-01-01

    Olive (Olea europaea L.) is a crop well adapted to the environmental conditions prevailing in the Mediterranean Basin. Nevertheless, the increasing international demand for olive oil and table olives in the last two decades has led to expansion of olive cultivation in some countries of the southern hemisphere, notably in Argentina, Chile, Perú and Australia. While the percentage of world production represented by these countries is still low, many of the new production regions do not have typical Mediterranean climates, and some are located at subtropical latitudes where there is relatively little information about crop function. Thus, the primary objective of this review was to assess recently published scientific literature on olive cultivation in these new crop environments. The review focuses on three main aspects: (a) chilling requirements for flowering, (b) water requirements and irrigation management, and (c) environmental effects on fruit oil concentration and quality. In many arid and semiarid regions of South America, temperatures are high and rainfall is low in the winter and early spring months compared to conditions in much of the Mediterranean Basin. High temperatures have often been found to have detrimental effects on olive flowering in many olive cultivars that have been introduced to South America, and a better understanding of chilling requirements is needed. Lack of rainfall in the winter and spring also has resulted in an urgent need to evaluate water requirements from the flower differentiation period in the winter to early fruit bearing. Additionally, in some olive growing areas of South America and Australia, high early season temperatures affect the timing of phenological events such that the onset of oil synthesis occurs sooner than in the Mediterranean Basin with most oil accumulation taking place in the summer when temperatures are very high. Increasing mean daily temperatures have been demonstrated to decrease fruit oil concentration

  5. Effect of soil stabilized by cement on dynamic response of machine foundations

    Al-Wakel Saad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Machine foundations require significant attention from designers. The main goal of the design of machine foundation is to limit the amplitude displacement and not disturb the people who work near the machine. In some cases, if the design of machine foundations does not satisfy the acceptable value of the dynamic response (such as maximum amplitude of displacement, the stabilization of soil under the machine foundation may be used to decrease the amplitude of displacement. This paper outlines effect of stabilized soil under the foundation by cement on the displacement response of machine foundations. Three-dimensional analyses by using finite element method are carried out to investigate the effect of depth of stabilized layer with different percentage of cement content on the dynamic response of the machine foundation. In addition, the effect of area stabilized by cement material on the dynamic response of machine foundation is investigated. The results shown that, the dynamic response of machine foundations generally decreases with increasing the depth of soil layer stabilized with cement. A significant decrease in the displacement of machine foundations is occurred for the stabilized soil layer with a depth of two times of the width of foundation, and the optimum percentage of cement for stabilizing is 6%.

  6. Environmental Requirements Management

    Cusack, Laura J.; Bramson, Jeffrey E.; Archuleta, Jose A.; Frey, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prime contractor responsible for the environmental cleanup of the Hanford Site Central Plateau. As part of this responsibility, the CH2M HILL is faced with the task of complying with thousands of environmental requirements which originate from over 200 federal, state, and local laws and regulations, DOE Orders, waste management and effluent discharge permits, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) response and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action documents, and official regulatory agency correspondence. The challenge is to manage this vast number of requirements to ensure they are appropriately and effectively integrated into CH2M HILL operations. Ensuring compliance with a large number of environmental requirements relies on an organization’s ability to identify, evaluate, communicate, and verify those requirements. To ensure that compliance is maintained, all changes need to be tracked. The CH2M HILL identified that the existing system used to manage environmental requirements was difficult to maintain and that improvements should be made to increase functionality. CH2M HILL established an environmental requirements management procedure and tools to assure that all environmental requirements are effectively and efficiently managed. Having a complete and accurate set of environmental requirements applicable to CH2M HILL operations will promote a more efficient approach to: • Communicating requirements • Planning work • Maintaining work controls • Maintaining compliance

  7. PTTG1, A novel androgen responsive gene is required for androgen-induced prostate cancer cell growth and invasion

    Zhang, Zheng; Jin, Bo; Jin, Yaqiong; Huang, Shengquan; Niu, Xiaohua; Mao, Zebin; Xin, Dianqi

    2017-01-01

    Androgens (AR) play an important role in initiation and progression of prostate cancer. It has been shown that AR exert their effects mainly through the androgen-activated AR which binds to androgen response elements (AREs) in the regulatory regions of target genes to regulate the transcription of androgen-responsive genes, thus, identification of AR downstream target gene is critical to understand androgen function in prostate cancer. In this study, our results showed that androgen treatment of LNCaP cells induced PTTG1 expression, which was blocked by the androgen receptor antagonist, Casodex. Bioinformatics analysis and experiments using PTTG1 promoter deletion mutants showed that the PTTG1 promoter contains a putative androgen response element (ARE), which localizes in the −851 to −836 region of the promoter. Androgen activated androgen receptor (AR) binding to this ARE was confirmed by Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Furthermore, Knockdown of PTTG1 expression using short hairpin RNA significantly reduced androgen-induced LNCaP cell growth and invasion. In addition, we showed PTTG1 is highly expressed in metastasis prostate cancer tissue. These results suggest that PTTG1 is a novel downstream target gene of androgen receptor and take part in prostate cancer proliferation and metastasis. - Highlights: • Androgen treatment of LNCaP cells induced PTTG1 expression. • Knockdown of PTTG1 expression significantly reduced androgen-induced LNCaP cell growth and invasion. • PTTG1 is highly expressed in metastasis prostate cancer tissue. • PTTG1 is a novel downstream target gene of androgen receptor.

  8. The Effect of Music on the Human Stress Response

    Thoma, Myriam V.; La Marca, Roberto; Brönnimann, Rebecca; Finkel, Linda; Ehlert, Ulrike; Nater, Urs M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Music listening has been suggested to beneficially impact health via stress-reducing effects. However, the existing literature presents itself with a limited number of investigations and with discrepancies in reported findings that may result from methodological shortcomings (e.g. small sample size, no valid stressor). It was the aim of the current study to address this gap in knowledge and overcome previous shortcomings by thoroughly examining music effects across endocrine, autonomic, cognitive, and emotional domains of the human stress response. Methods Sixty healthy female volunteers (mean age = 25 years) were exposed to a standardized psychosocial stress test after having been randomly assigned to one of three different conditions prior to the stress test: 1) relaxing music (‘Miserere’, Allegri) (RM), 2) sound of rippling water (SW), and 3) rest without acoustic stimulation (R). Salivary cortisol and salivary alpha-amylase (sAA), heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), subjective stress perception and anxiety were repeatedly assessed in all subjects. We hypothesized that listening to RM prior to the stress test, compared to SW or R would result in a decreased stress response across all measured parameters. Results The three conditions significantly differed regarding cortisol response (p = 0.025) to the stressor, with highest concentrations in the RM and lowest in the SW condition. After the stressor, sAA (p=0.026) baseline values were reached considerably faster in the RM group than in the R group. HR and psychological measures did not significantly differ between groups. Conclusion Our findings indicate that music listening impacted the psychobiological stress system. Listening to music prior to a standardized stressor predominantly affected the autonomic nervous system (in terms of a faster recovery), and to a lesser degree the endocrine and psychological stress response. These findings may help better understanding the

  9. Memory retrieval in response to partial cues requires NMDA receptor-dependent neurotransmission in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    Jo, Yong Sang; Choi, June-Seek

    2014-03-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been suggested to play a crucial role in retrieving detailed contextual information about a previous learning episode in response to a single retrieval cue. However, few studies investigated the neurochemical mechanisms that mediate the prefrontal retrieval process. In the current study, we examined whether N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) in the mPFC were necessary for retrieval of a well-learned spatial location on the basis of partial or degraded spatial cues. Rats were initially trained to find a hidden platform in the Morris water maze using four extramaze cues in the surrounding environment. Their retrieval performance was subsequently tested under different cue conditions. Infusions of DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV), a NMDAR antagonist, significantly disrupted memory retrieval when three of the original cues were removed. By contrast, APV injections into the mPFC did not affect animals' retrieval performance when the original cues were presented or when three novels landmarks were added alongside the original cues. These results indicate that prefrontal NMDARs are required for memory retrieval when allocentric spatial information is degraded. NMDAR-dependent neurotransmission in the mPFC may facilitate an active retrieval process to reactivate complete contextual representations associated with partial retrieval cues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A dynamic ribosomal biogenesis response is not required for IGF-1-mediated hypertrophy of human primary myotubes.

    Crossland, Hannah; Timmons, James A; Atherton, Philip J

    2017-12-01

    Increased ribosomal DNA transcription has been proposed to limit muscle protein synthesis, making ribosome biogenesis central to skeletal muscle hypertrophy. We examined the relationship between ribosomal RNA (rRNA) production and IGF-1-mediated myotube hypertrophy in vitro Primary skeletal myotubes were treated with IGF-1 (50 ng/ml) with or without 0.5 µM CX-5461 (CX), an inhibitor of RNA polymerase I. Myotube diameter, total protein, and RNA and DNA levels were measured along with markers of RNA polymerase I regulatory factors and regulators of protein synthesis. CX treatment reduced 45S pre-rRNA expression (-64 ± 5% vs. IGF-1; P IGF-1; P IGF-1-treated myotubes. IGF-1-mediated increases in myotube diameter (1.27 ± 0.09-fold, P IGF-1 treatment did not prevent early increases in AKT (+203 ± 39% vs. CX; P IGF-1, myotube diameter and protein accretion were sustained. Thus, while ribosome biogenesis represents a potential site for the regulation of skeletal muscle protein synthesis and muscle mass, it does not appear to be a prerequisite for IGF-1-induced myotube hypertrophy in vitro. -Crossland, H., Timmons, J. A., Atherton, P. J. A dynamic ribosomal biogenesis response is not required for IGF-1-mediated hypertrophy of human primary myotubes. © The Author(s).

  11. Radiation effects on tumor-specific DTH response, 2

    Nobusawa, Hiroshi; Hachisu, Reiko.

    1991-01-01

    Tumor-specific immunity was induced in C3H mice by immunizing with syngeneic MH134 hepatoma cells. Radiation sensitivity of anti-tumor activity of immunized spleen cells were examined and compared with the radiation sensitivity of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH)-response. The spleen cells were irradiated in vitro, then mixed with the tumor cells. DTH-response intensity was determined from the footpad increment twenty-four hours after inoculation of tumor cells with immunized spleen cells. Anti-tumor activity of the spleen cells, based on growth inhibition of tumor cells, was measured by a cytostatic test in vivo with diffusion chambers. Tumor-specific DTH response was suppressed dose-dependently in the range of 12-24 Gy irradiation. No suppression was observed below 12 Gy. Without irradiation, growth of tumor cells was inhibited by immunized spleen cells more effectively than by normal spleen cells. Anti-tumor activity of immunized and normal spleen cells was diminished by irradiation doses of 20 Gy and 10 Gy, respectively. Comparing our report with others that analyzed the type of anti-tumor effector cells induced in this experimental system, we concluded that tumor-specific anti-tumor activity (tumor growth inhibition in vivo) that was radiosensitive at 10-20 Gy depended on a DTH-response. (author)

  12. Transient Response Dynamic Module Modifications to Include Static and Kinetic Friction Effects

    Misel, J. E.; Nenno, S. B.; Takahashi, D.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology that supports forced transient response dynamic solutions when both static and kinetic friction effects are included in a structural system model is described. Modifications that support this type of nonlinear transient response solution are summarized for the transient response dynamics (TRD) NASTRAN module. An overview of specific modifications for the NASTRAN processing subroutines, INITL, TRD1C, and TRD1D, are described with further details regarding inspection of nonlinear input definitions to define the type of nonlinear solution required, along with additional initialization requirements and specific calculation subroutines to successfully solve the transient response problem. The extension of the basic NASTRAN nonlinear methodology is presented through several stages of development to the point where constraint equations and residual flexibility effects are introduced into the finite difference Newmark-Beta recurrsion formulas. Particular emphasis is placed on cost effective solutions for large finite element models such as the Space Shuttle with friction degrees of freedom between the orbiter and payloads mounted in the cargo bay. An alteration to the dynamic finite difference equations of motion is discussed, which allows one to include friction effects at reasonable cost for large structural systems such as the Space Shuttle. Data are presented to indicate the possible impact of transient friction loads to the payload designer for the Space Shuttle. Transient response solution data are also included, which compare solutions without friction forces and those with friction forces for payloads mounted in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. These data indicate that payload components can be sensitive to friction induced loads.

  13. Effects of CEOs’ Negative Traits on Corporate Social Responsibility

    Jae Kyu Myung

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The dark triad, composed of Machiavellianism, psychopathy and narcissism, refers to negative personality traits, which may influence business processes. While negative traits could be an important factor explaining the relationship between a CEO’s immoral and unethical behavior and corporate social responsibility (CSR, there has been minimal research focusing on this relationship. This paper thus attempts to investigate how a CEO exhibiting these negative traits affects CSR, and if an employee’s perception of ethics and social responsibility would mediate the relationship. In addition, this paper considers the moderating effects of an individual performance-based compensation system (IPBCS between employee’s CSR perception and CSR activities. The data are collected through a survey conducted on 165 employees (companies in twelve industries. The regression result indicates an inverse relationship between the negative traits of a CEO and an employee’s perception of ethics and social responsibility and CSR activities, and the mediating effect of the perception in the relationship between the negative traits and CSR activities. It also indicates that an IPBCS moderates the relationship between CSR perception and activities. Implications for the study, future research directions, and management approach are discussed.

  14. Leptin's effect on taste bud calcium responses and transmitter secretion.

    Meredith, Tricia L; Corcoran, Alan; Roper, Stephen D

    2015-05-01

    Leptin, a peptide hormone released by adipose tissue, acts on the hypothalamus to control cravings and appetite. Leptin also acts to decrease taste responses to sweet substances, though there is little detailed information regarding where leptin acts in the taste transduction cascade. The present study examined the effects of leptin on sweet-evoked responses and neuro transmitter release from isolated taste buds. Our results indicate that leptin moderately decreased sweet-evoked calcium mobilization in isolated mouse taste buds. We also employed Chinese hamster ovary biosensor cells to examine taste transmitter release from isolated taste buds. Leptin reduced ATP and increased serotonin release in response to sweet stimulation. However, leptin has no effect on bitter-evoked transmitter release, further showing that the action of leptin is sweet specific. Our results support those of previous studies, which state that leptin acts on taste tissue via the leptin receptor, most likely on Type II (Receptor) cells, but also possibly on Type III (Presynaptic) cells. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Effect of produced water on cod (Gadus morhua) immune responses

    Hamoutene, D.; Mabrouk, G.; Samuelson, S.; Mansour, A.; Lee, K. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Dartmouth, NS (Canada). Maritimes Region, Ocean Sciences Division; Volkoff, H.; Parrish, C. [Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL (Canada); Mathieu, A. [Oceans Ltd., St. John' s, NL (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    Studies have shown that produced water (PW) discharged from North Sea offshore platforms affects the biota at greater distances from operational platforms than originally presumed. According to PW dispersion simulations, dilution by at least 240 times occurs within 50-100 m, and up to 9000 times by 20 km from the discharge. In this study, the effect of PW on cod immunity was investigated by exposing fish to 0, 100 ppm (x 10,000 dilution) or 200 ppm (x 500) of PW for 76 days. Immune responses were evaluated at the end of the exposure. Fish from the 3 groups were injected with Aeromonas salmonicida lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Blood cell observation and flow cytometry were used to investigate the serum cortisol levels and gill histology along with ratios and respiratory burst (RB) responses of both circulating and head-kidney white blood cells (WBCs). The study revealed that baseline immunity and stress response were not affected by PW, other than an irritant-induced change in gill cells found in treated cod. In all groups, LPS injection resulted in a pronounced decrease in RB of head-kidney cells and an increase in serum cortisol and protein levels. However, the group exposed to 200 ppm of PW exhibited the most significant changes. LPS injection was also shown to influence WBC ratios, but further studies are needed to determine if this impact is stronger in fish exposed to PW. This study suggested an effect of PW on cod immunity after immune challenge with LPS.

  16. Medical education and the ACGME duty hour requirements: assessing the effect of a day float system on educational activities.

    Roey, Steve

    2006-01-01

    In July 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) instituted new resident work hour mandates, which are being shown to improve resident well-being and patient safety. However, there are limited data on the impact these new mandates may have on educational activities. To assess the impact on educational activities of a day float system created to meet ACGME work hour mandates. The inpatient ward coverage was changed by adding a day float team responsible for new patient admissions in the morning, with the on-call teams starting later and being responsible for new patient admissions thereafter. I surveyed the residents to assess the impact of this new system on educational activities-resident autonomy, attending teaching, conference attendance, resident teaching, self-directed learning, and ability to complete patient care responsibilities. There was no adverse effect of the day float system on educational activities. House staff reported increased autonomy, enhanced teaching from attending physicians, and improved ability to complete patient care responsibilities. Additionally, house staff demonstrated improved compliance with the ACGME mandates. The implementation of a novel day float system for the inpatient medicine ward service improved compliance with ACGME work duty requirements and did not adversely impact educational activities of the residency training program.

  17. The effect of using low-polluting building materials on ventilation requirements and energy use in buildings

    Wargocki, P.; Frontczak, M. (International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, DTU, Kgs. Lyngby (DK)); Knudsen, Henrik N. (Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg Univ., Hoersholm (DK))

    2007-07-01

    The main objective of the ongoing research project described in this paper was to study the potential for reducing energy used for ventilating buildings by using low-polluting building materials, without compromising the indoor air quality. To quantify this potential, the exposure-response relationships, i.e. the relationships between ventilation rate and perceived indoor air quality, were established for rooms furnished with different categories of polluting materials and the simulations of energy used for ventilation were carried out. The exposure-response relationships were based on a summary of data reported in the literature on exposure-response relationships for materials tested in laboratory settings in small-scale glass chambers, and in full-scale in climate chambers, test rooms or normal offices. New experiments were also considered in which the effect of using low-polluting materials on perceived air quality was examined in test rooms ventilated with different outdoor air supply rates, low-polluting materials being selected in small glass chambers. The results suggest that the exposure-response relationships vary between different building materials and that the perceived air quality can be improved considerably when polluting building materials are substituted with materials that pollute less. The preliminary energy simulations indicate that selecting low-polluting materials will result in considerable energy savings as a result of reducing the ventilation rates required to achieve acceptable indoor air quality. (au)

  18. Nontrivial ac spin response in the effective Luttinger model

    Hu Liangbin; Zhong Jiansong; Hu Kaige

    2006-01-01

    Based on the three-dimensional effective Luttinger Hamiltonian and the exact Heisenberg equations of motion and within a self-consistent semiclassical approximation, we present a theoretical investigation on the nontrivial ac spin responses due to the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling of holes in p-doped bulk semiconductors. We show that the nontrivial ac spin responses induced by the combined action of an ac external electric field and the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling of holes may lead to the generation of a nonvanishing ac spin Hall current in a p-doped bulk semiconductor, which shares some similarities with the dissipationless dc spin Hall current conceived previously and also exhibits some interesting new features that was not found before

  19. Effect of particle size on the thermoluminescent response of hydroxyapatite

    Barrera V, A.; Zarate M, J.; Contreras, M. E.; Rivera M, T.

    2016-10-01

    We present the study of the structural characterization and the thermoluminescent response of the hydroxyapatite as a function of the calcination temperature and the effect of the particle size. For precipitation synthesis, calcium nitrate (Ca(NO_3)_2 and dibasic ammonium phosphate ((NH_4)_2HPO_4) were used as precursors and ammonium hydroxide (NH_4OH) as a ph controlling agent. The characterization of the samples was carried out by the techniques of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The powders obtained are composed of hydroxyapatite, with a different degree of dehydroxylation. The thermoluminescent characterization indicates that at higher calcination temperature there is a higher thermoluminescent response, the calcined powders at 1300 degrees Celsius show a very well defined brightness curve with a higher intensity, with its maximum intensity located at a temperature of 210 degrees Celsius, which indicates that this material can be used as a dosimeter. (Author)

  20. Effect of Fiber Reinforcement on the Response of Structural Members

    Fischer, Gregor; Li, Victor

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a series of investigations on the effect of fiber reinforcement on the response of structural members in direct tension and flexure under reversed cyclic loading conditions. The design approach of the fiber reinforced cementitious composite is based on fracture mechanics...... principles, which will be described in the first part of the paper along with an introduction of the relevant material properties of the resulting engineered cementitious composite (ECC). This class of composites is characterized by strain hardening and multiple cracking properties in uniaxial tension...... and an ultimate tensile strain capacity on the order of several percent. Subsequently, the synergistic effects of composite deformation mechanisms in the ECC and structural members subjected to large shear reversals are identified. Beneficial effects observed in the reinforced ECC structural members as compared...

  1. Effectiveness of classroom response systems within an active learning environment.

    Welch, Susan

    2013-11-01

    In nursing education, the inclusion of pedagogical tools is necessary to transform Millennial classrooms. One such pedagogical tool currently offered is classroom response systems (CRS). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CRS as a pedagogical tool in improving nursing students' examination performance within an active learning environment. A pretest-posttest design was used to determine whether there was a relationship between the use of CRS (independent variable) and nursing students' examination performance in a first-year Professional Practice course (dependent variable). Paired t tests revealed no greater improvement in posttest scores. Therefore, the use of CRS technology was not effective in increasing nursing students' examination scores in the Professional Practice course. Additional research is needed to provide adequate understanding of the effectiveness of CRS within the nursing education classroom. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Orienting attention in visual working memory requires central capacity: decreased retro-cue effects under dual-task conditions.

    Janczyk, Markus; Berryhill, Marian E

    2014-04-01

    The retro-cue effect (RCE) describes superior working memory performance for validly cued stimulus locations long after encoding has ended. Importantly, this happens with delays beyond the range of iconic memory. In general, the RCE is a stable phenomenon that emerges under varied stimulus configurations and timing parameters. We investigated its susceptibility to dual-task interference to determine the attentional requirements at the time point of cue onset and encoding. In Experiment 1, we compared single- with dual-task conditions. In Experiment 2, we borrowed from the psychological refractory period paradigm and compared conditions with high and low (dual-) task overlap. The secondary task was always binary tone discrimination requiring a manual response. Across both experiments, an RCE was found, but it was diminished in magnitude in the critical dual-task conditions. A previous study did not find evidence that sustained attention is required in the interval between cue offset and test. Our results apparently contradict these findings and point to a critical time period around cue onset and briefly thereafter during which attention is required.

  3. 78 FR 66841 - Turtles Intrastate and Interstate Requirements; Confirmation of Effective Date

    2013-11-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 1240 [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0639] Turtles Intrastate and Interstate Requirements; Confirmation of Effective Date AGENCY... turtle eggs and live turtles with a carapace length of less than 4 inches to remove procedures for...

  4. 15 CFR 8a.535 - Effect of state or local law or other requirements.

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Effect of state or local law or other requirements. 8a.535 Section 8a.535 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce... are not imposed upon members of the other sex. (b) Benefits. A recipient that provides any...

  5. 13 CFR 113.535 - Effect of state or local law or other requirements.

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Effect of state or local law or other requirements. 113.535 Section 113.535 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... obligation to comply with §§ 113.500 through 113.550 is not obviated or alleviated by the existence of any...

  6. Effect of viscosity on seismic response of waste storage tanks

    Tang, Yu; Uras, R.A.; Chang, Yao-Wen.

    1992-06-01

    The dynamic response of liquid-storage tanks subjected to harmonic excitations and earthquake ground motions has been studied. A rigid tank of negligible mass, rigidly supported at the base having a diameter of 50 ft. and fluid height of 20.4 ft. was used in the computer analysis. The liquid is assumed to have a density of 1.5 g/ml. Viscosity values, μ = 60, 200, 100, and 10,000 cP, were used in the numerical analyses to study the effects of viscosity on sloshing wave height, impulsive and convective pressure on the tank wall, base shear and base moments. Harmonic excitations as well as earthquake ground motions were used as input motions. The harmonic excitations used in the analyses covers a wide range of frequencies, including both the resonant and non-resonant frequencies. Two earthquake motions were used. One matches the Newmark-Hall median response spectrum and is anchored at 0.24 g for a rock site with a damping of 2% and a time duration of 10 s. The other is the 1978 Tabas earthquake which had a peak ZPA of 0.81 g and a time duration of 29 s. A small tank, about 1/15 the size of the typical waste storage tank, was used in the harmonic excitation study to investigate the effect of viscosity on the response of liquid-storage tanks and how the viscosity effect is affected by the size of the storage tank. The results of this study show that for the typical waste storage tank subjected to earthquake motions, the effect of viscosity on sloshing wave height and impulsive and convective pressures is very small and can be neglected. For viscosity effect to become noticeable in the response of the typical waste storage tank, the waste viscosity must be greater than 10,000 cP. This value is far greater than the estimated viscosity value of the high level wastes, which may range from 60 to 200 cP for some tanks

  7. [Achromatic watercolor effect: about requirement of formation of sumi painting effect].

    Takashima, Midori

    2008-10-01

    The watercolor effect (Pinna, Brelstaff, & Spillmann, 2001) is a new color spreading phenomenon. Pinna et al. (2001) proposed that the watercolor effect is a new Gestalt factor because it determines figure-ground organization more strongly than classical Gestalt factors. We used achroriatic watercolor patterns and varied the lightness of the background and two border lines to study the relationship between the color spreading effect and figure-ground organization. The results demonstrated (a)a bidirectional color spreading phenomenon when the background lightness was between the two border-lines' lightness, and that (b) some patterns elicit only a color spreading effect without organization of figure-ground, while others elicit only figure-ground organization without a color spreading effect.

  8. Test requirements for the integral effect test to simulate Korean PWR plants

    Song, Chul Hwa; Park, C. K.; Lee, S. J.; Kwon, T. S.; Yun, B. J.; Chung, M. K

    2001-02-01

    In this report, the test requirements are described for the design of the integral effect test facility to simulate Korean PWR plants. Since the integral effect test facility should be designed so as to simulate various thermal hydraulic phenomena, as closely as possible, to be occurred in real plants during operation or anticipated transients, the design and operational characteristics of the reference plants (Korean Standard Nuclear Plant and Korean Next Generation Reactor)were analyzed in order to draw major components, systems, and functions to be satisfied or simulated in the test facility. The test matrix is set up by considering major safety concerns of interest and the test objectives to confirm and enhance the safety of the plants. And the analysis and prioritization of the test matrix leads to the general design requirements of the test facility. Based on the general design requirements, the design criteria is set up for the basic and detailed design of the test facility. And finally it is drawn the design requirements specific to the fluid system and measurement system of the test facility. The test requirements in this report will be used as a guideline to the scaling analysis and basic design of the test facility. The test matrix specified in this report can be modified in the stage of main testing by considering the needs of experiments and circumstances at that time.

  9. Test requirements for the integral effect test to simulate Korean PWR plants

    Song, Chul Hwa; Park, C. K.; Lee, S. J.; Kwon, T. S.; Yun, B. J.; Chung, M. K.

    2001-02-01

    In this report, the test requirements are described for the design of the integral effect test facility to simulate Korean PWR plants. Since the integral effect test facility should be designed so as to simulate various thermal hydraulic phenomena, as closely as possible, to be occurred in real plants during operation or anticipated transients, the design and operational characteristics of the reference plants (Korean Standard Nuclear Plant and Korean Next Generation Reactor)were analyzed in order to draw major components, systems, and functions to be satisfied or simulated in the test facility. The test matrix is set up by considering major safety concerns of interest and the test objectives to confirm and enhance the safety of the plants. And the analysis and prioritization of the test matrix leads to the general design requirements of the test facility. Based on the general design requirements, the design criteria is set up for the basic and detailed design of the test facility. And finally it is drawn the design requirements specific to the fluid system and measurement system of the test facility. The test requirements in this report will be used as a guideline to the scaling analysis and basic design of the test facility. The test matrix specified in this report can be modified in the stage of main testing by considering the needs of experiments and circumstances at that time

  10. 33 CFR 155.1040 - Response plan requirements for unmanned tank barges carrying oil as a primary cargo.

    2010-07-01

    ... POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS Tank Vessel Response Plans for Oil § 155.1040 Response plan...-based support or advice; (ii) The individuals who shall be notified of a casualty potentially affecting... coordinator responsible for overseeing or directing those actions. (4) The organizational structure that will...

  11. Dissociating stimulus-stimulus and response-response effects in the Stroop task

    Schmidt, James; Cheesman, J

    2005-01-01

    The separate semantic and response competition interactions between colour and word processing in a manual Stroop task were evaluated by comparing three trial types. Identity trials are both semantically compatible and response compatible (e.g., BLUE in the colour blue), different response trials are both semantically incompatible and response incompatible (e.g., BLUE in the colour green, where blue and green have different response keys), and same response trials are semantically incompatibl...

  12. Effect of gamma irradiation on the hemocyte-mediated immune response of Aedes aegypti against microfilariae

    Christensen, B.M.; Huff, B.M.; Li, J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the melanotic encapsulation response of Aedes aegypti black eye Liverpool strain against inoculated Dirofilaria immitis microfilariae (mff) was assessed at 1, 2, 3, and 6 days postinoculation (PI). Mosquitoes received 6000 rad from a 137Cs source (Shepard Mark I irradiator) at 3 days postemergence and were inoculated with 15-20 mff 24 hr later. These mosquitoes were compared to nonirradiated controls that also were inoculated with 15-20 mff at 3 days postemergence. The immune response was significantly reduced in irradiated mosquitoes as compared with controls at all days PI. Although the response was significantly inhibited compared with controls, irradiated mosquitoes were still capable of eliciting a response against 69% of recovered mff at 6 days PI. External gamma irradiation did not significantly affect the proliferation of hemocytes associated with the melanotic encapsulation response of A. aegypti. The number of circulating hemocytes increased in irradiated mosquitoes in response to inoculated mff in a manner similar to nonirradiated, inoculated controls. Hemocyte monophenol oxidase activity, however, was significantly reduced in gamma-irradiated mosquitoes at 12 hr PI as compared with controls. The reduced immunological capacity of irradiated mosquitoes might be related to an interference with gene activity required for the synthesis or activation of enzymes that are directly or indirectly involved in the biochemical processes associated with the production of melanotic substances that sequester mff

  13. In vivo functional requirement of the mouse Ifitm1 gene for germ cell development, interferon mediated immune response and somitogenesis.

    Ingeborg Klymiuk

    Full Text Available The mammalian Interferon induced transmembrane protein 1 (Ifitm1 gene was originally identified as a member of a gene family highly inducible by type I and type II interferons. Based on expression analyses, it was suggested to be required for normal primordial germ cell migration. The knockdown of Ifitm1 in mouse embryos provided evidence for a role in somitogenesis. We generated the first targeted knockin allele of the Ifitm1 gene to systematically reassess all inferred functions. Sperm motility and the fertility of male and female mutant mice are as in wild type littermates. Embryonic somites and the adult vertebral column appear normal in homozygous Ifitm1 knockout mice, demonstrating that Ifitm1 is not essential for normal segmentation of the paraxial mesoderm. Proportions of leucocyte subsets, including granulocytes, monocytes, B-cells, T-cells, NK-cells, and NKT-cells, are unchanged in mutant mice. Based on a normal immune response to Listeria monocytogenes infection, there is no evidence for a dysfunction in downstream IFNγ signaling in Ifitm1 mutant mice. Expression from the Ifitm1 locus from E8.5 to E14.5 is highly dynamic. In contrast, in adult mice, Ifitm1 expression is highly restricted and strong in the bronchial epithelium. Intriguingly, IFITM1 is highly overexpressed in tumor epithelia cells of human squamous cell carcinomas and in adenocarcinomas of NSCLC patients. These analyses underline the general importance of targeted in vivo studies for the functional annotation of the mammalian genome. The first comprehensive description of the Ifitm1 expression pattern provides a rational basis for the further examination of Ifitm1 gene functions. Based on our data, the fact that IFITM1 can function as a negative regulator of cell proliferation, and because the gene maps to chromosome band 11p15.5, previously associated with NSCLC, it is likely that IFITM1 in man has a key role in tumor formation.

  14. Leptin Signaling Is Required for Adaptive Changes in Food Intake, but Not Energy Expenditure, in Response to Different Thermal Conditions

    Kaiyala, Karl J.; Ogimoto, Kayoko; Nelson, Jarrell T.; Schwartz, Michael W.; Morton, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Survival of free-living animals depends on the ability to maintain core body temperature in the face of rapid and dramatic changes in their thermal environment. If food intake is not adjusted to meet the changing energy demands associated with changes of ambient temperature, a serious challenge to body energy stores can occur. To more fully understand the coupling of thermoregulation to energy homeostasis in normal animals and to investigate the role of the adipose hormone leptin to this process, comprehensive measures of energy homeostasis and core temperature were obtained in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and their wild-type (WT) littermate controls when housed under cool (14°C), usual (22°C) or ∼ thermoneutral (30°C) conditions. Our findings extend previous evidence that WT mice robustly defend normothermia in response to either a lowering (14°C) or an increase (30°C) of ambient temperature without changes in body weight or body composition. In contrast, leptin-deficient, ob/ob mice fail to defend normothermia at ambient temperatures lower than thermoneutrality and exhibit marked losses of both body fat and lean mass when exposed to cooler environments (14°C). Our findings further demonstrate a strong inverse relationship between ambient temperature and energy expenditure in WT mice, a relationship that is preserved in ob/ob mice. However, thermal conductance analysis indicates defective heat retention in ob/ob mice, irrespective of temperature. While a negative relationship between ambient temperature and energy intake also exists in WT mice, this relationship is disrupted in ob/ob mice. Thus, to meet the thermoregulatory demands of different ambient temperatures, leptin signaling is required for adaptive changes in both energy intake and thermal conductance. A better understanding of the mechanisms coupling thermoregulation to energy homeostasis may lead to the development of new approaches for the treatment of obesity. PMID:25756181

  15. Influence of esmolol on requirement of inhalational agent using entropy and assessment of its effect on immediate postoperative pain score

    Bhawna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Context: Beta - blockers have been used for attenuation of stress response, decreasing anaesthetic requirement and augmentation of the effect of opioids during general anaesthesia. Aims and Objectives: The present study aims to evaluate the influence of esmolol on the requirement of an inhalational agent while monitoring the depth of anaesthesia by entropy and also its effect on immediate postoperative pain score. Methods: Fifty American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA I and II patients, between 25 and 65 years of age who underwent lower abdominal surgeries were randomly allocated to two groups: Group E and Group S of 25 patients each. Group E received esmolol infusion while Group S received the same volume of saline infusion. Demographic data, haemodynamics, amount of isoflurane used, end-tidal isoflurane concentration, postoperative pain score and total dose of morphine consumed in immediate postoperative period of 30 min were analyzed by using appropriate statistical tests. Value of P<0.05 was considered significant and P<0.001 as highly significant. Results: The two groups were comparable with respect to age, weight, ASA physical status, duration of surgery and amount of isoflurane used during anaesthesia. Assessment of postoperative pain was assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS which showed significant difference at 30 min. The total dose of morphine consumption was significantly less (P<0.05 in Group E for relief of postoperative pain. Conclusions: We conclude that in light of depth of anaesthesia monitor esmolol has no effect on requirement of isoflurane, but it decreases the postoperative pain as well as postoperative requirement of morphine without increasing the risk of awareness.

  16. Effect of age on proximal esophageal response to swallowing

    Roberto Oliveira Dantas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: It has been demonstrated that the ageing process affects esophageal motility. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of the age on the proximal esophageal response to wet swallows. METHOD: We measured the proximal esophageal response to swallows of a 5 mL bolus of water in 69 healthy volunteers, 20 of them aged 18-30 years (group I, 27 aged 31-50 years (group II, and 22 aged 51-74 years (group III. We used the manometric method with continuous perfusion. The proximal esophageal contractions were recorded 5 cm from a pharyngeal recording site located 1 cm above the upper esophageal sphincter. The time between the onset of the pharyngeal and of the proximal esophageal recording (pharyngeal-esophageal time and the amplitude, duration and area under the curve of the proximal esophageal contraction were measured. RESULTS: The pharyngeal-esophageal time was shorter in group I subjects than in group II and III subjects (P<0.05. The duration of proximal esophageal contractions was longer in group I than in groups II and III (P<0.001. There was no differences between groups in the amplitude or area under the curve of contractions. There were no differences between groups II and III for any of the measurements. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the age may affects the response of the proximal esophagus to wet swallows.

  17. Predicting the effective response of bulk polycrystalline ferroelectric ceramics via improved spectral phase field methods

    Vidyasagar, A.; Tan, W. L.; Kochmann, D. M.

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the electromechanical response of bulk polycrystalline ferroelectric ceramics requires scale-bridging approaches. Recent advances in fast numerical methods to compute the homogenized mechanical response of materials with heterogeneous microstructure have enabled the solution of hitherto intractable systems. In particular, the use of a Fourier-based spectral method as opposed to the traditional finite element method has gained significant interest in the homogenization of periodic microstructures. Here, we solve the periodic, electro-mechanically-coupled boundary value problem at the mesoscale of polycrystalline ferroelectrics in order to extract the effective response of barium titanate (BaTiO3) and lead zirconate titanate (PZT) under applied electric fields. Results include the effective electric hysteresis and the associated butterfly curve of strain vs. electric field for mean stress-free electric loading. Computational predictions of the 3D polycrystalline response show convincing agreement with our experimental electric cycling and strain hysteresis data for PZT-5A. In addition to microstructure-dependent effective physics, we also show how finite-difference-based approximations in the spectral solution scheme significantly reduce instability and ringing phenomena associated with spectral techniques and lead to spatial convergence with h-refinement, which have been major challenges when modeling high-contrast systems such as polycrystals.

  18. The influence of the diffusion of responsibility effect on outcome evaluations: electrophysiological evidence from an ERP study.

    Li, Peng; Jia, Shiwei; Feng, Tingyong; Liu, Qiang; Suo, Tao; Li, Hong

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies have revealed that personal responsibility has an influence on outcome evaluation, although the way this influence works is still unclear. This study imitated the phenomenon of responsibility diffusion in a laboratory to examine the influence of the effect of responsibility diffusion on the processing of outcome evaluation using the event-related potential (ERP) technique. Participants of the study were required to perform the gambling task individually in the high-responsibility condition and with others in the low-responsibility scenario. Self-rating results showed that the participants felt more responsible for monetary loss and believed that they had more contributions to the monetary gains in the high-responsibility condition than in the low-responsibility situation. Both the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P300 were sensitive to the responsibility level, as evidenced by the enhanced amplitudes in the high-responsibility condition for both components. Further correlation analysis showed a negative correlation between FRN amplitudes and subjective rating scores (i.e., the higher the responsibility level, the larger the FRN amplitude). The results probably indicate that the FRN and P300 reflect personal responsibility processing under the social context of diffusion of responsibility. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute LSD effects on response inhibition neural networks.

    Schmidt, A; Müller, F; Lenz, C; Dolder, P C; Schmid, Y; Zanchi, D; Lang, U E; Liechti, M E; Borgwardt, S

    2017-10-02

    Recent evidence shows that the serotonin 2A receptor (5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor, 5-HT2AR) is critically involved in the formation of visual hallucinations and cognitive impairments in lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD)-induced states and neuropsychiatric diseases. However, the interaction between 5-HT2AR activation, cognitive impairments and visual hallucinations is still poorly understood. This study explored the effect of 5-HT2AR activation on response inhibition neural networks in healthy subjects by using LSD and further tested whether brain activation during response inhibition under LSD exposure was related to LSD-induced visual hallucinations. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, LSD (100 µg) and placebo were administered to 18 healthy subjects. Response inhibition was assessed using a functional magnetic resonance imaging Go/No-Go task. LSD-induced visual hallucinations were measured using the 5 Dimensions of Altered States of Consciousness (5D-ASC) questionnaire. Relative to placebo, LSD administration impaired inhibitory performance and reduced brain activation in the right middle temporal gyrus, superior/middle/inferior frontal gyrus and anterior cingulate cortex and in the left superior frontal and postcentral gyrus and cerebellum. Parahippocampal activation during response inhibition was differently related to inhibitory performance after placebo and LSD administration. Finally, activation in the left superior frontal gyrus under LSD exposure was negatively related to LSD-induced cognitive impairments and visual imagery. Our findings show that 5-HT2AR activation by LSD leads to a hippocampal-prefrontal cortex-mediated breakdown of inhibitory processing, which might subsequently promote the formation of LSD-induced visual imageries. These findings help to better understand the neuropsychopharmacological mechanisms of visual hallucinations in LSD-induced states and neuropsychiatric disorders.

  20. Effect of trehalose addition on volatiles responsible for strawberry aroma.

    Kopjar, Mirela; Hribar, Janez; Simcic, Marjan; Zlatić, Emil; Pozrl, Tomaz; Pilizota, Vlasta

    2013-12-01

    Aroma is one of the most important quality properties of food products and has a great influence on quality and acceptability of foods. Since it is very difficult to control, in this study the effect of addition of trehalose (3, 5 and 10%) to freeze-dried strawberry cream fillings was investigated as a possible means for retention of some of the aroma compounds responsible for the strawberry aroma. In samples with added trehalose, higher amounts of fruity esters were determined. Increase of trehalose content did not cause a proportional increase in the amount of fruity esters. However, results of our research showed that trehalose addition did not have the same effect on both gamma-decalactone and furaneol.

  1. Theory of synergistic effects: Hill-type response surfaces as 'null-interaction' models for mixtures.

    Schindler, Michael

    2017-08-02

    The classification of effects caused by mixtures of agents as synergistic, antagonistic or additive depends critically on the reference model of 'null interaction'. Two main approaches are currently in use, the Additive Dose (ADM) or concentration addition (CA) and the Multiplicative Survival (MSM) or independent action (IA) models. We compare several response surface models to a newly developed Hill response surface, obtained by solving a logistic partial differential equation (PDE). Assuming that a mixture of chemicals with individual Hill-type dose-response curves can be described by an n-dimensional logistic function, Hill's differential equation for pure agents is replaced by a PDE for mixtures whose solution provides Hill surfaces as 'null-interaction' models and relies neither on Bliss independence or Loewe additivity nor uses Chou's unified general theory. An n-dimensional logistic PDE decribing the Hill-type response of n-component mixtures is solved. Appropriate boundary conditions ensure the correct asymptotic behaviour. Mathematica 11 (Wolfram, Mathematica Version 11.0, 2016) is used for the mathematics and graphics presented in this article. The Hill response surface ansatz can be applied to mixtures of compounds with arbitrary Hill parameters. Restrictions which are required when deriving analytical expressions for response surfaces from other principles, are unnecessary. Many approaches based on Loewe additivity turn out be special cases of the Hill approach whose increased flexibility permits a better description of 'null-effect' responses. Missing sham-compliance of Bliss IA, known as Colby's model in agrochemistry, leads to incompatibility with the Hill surface ansatz. Examples of binary and ternary mixtures illustrate the differences between the approaches. For Hill-slopes close to one and doses below the half-maximum effect doses MSM (Colby, Bliss, Finney, Abbott) predicts synergistic effects where the Hill model indicates 'null

  2. Effects of stimulus response compatibility on covert imitation of vowels.

    Adank, Patti; Nuttall, Helen; Bekkering, Harold; Maegherman, Gwijde

    2018-03-13

    When we observe someone else speaking, we tend to automatically activate the corresponding speech motor patterns. When listening, we therefore covertly imitate the observed speech. Simulation theories of speech perception propose that covert imitation of speech motor patterns supports speech perception. Covert imitation of speech has been studied with interference paradigms, including the stimulus-response compatibility paradigm (SRC). The SRC paradigm measures covert imitation by comparing articulation of a prompt following exposure to a distracter. Responses tend to be faster for congruent than for incongruent distracters; thus, showing evidence of covert imitation. Simulation accounts propose a key role for covert imitation in speech perception. However, covert imitation has thus far only been demonstrated for a select class of speech sounds, namely consonants, and it is unclear whether covert imitation extends to vowels. We aimed to demonstrate that covert imitation effects as measured with the SRC paradigm extend to vowels, in two experiments. We examined whether covert imitation occurs for vowels in a consonant-vowel-consonant context in visual, audio, and audiovisual modalities. We presented the prompt at four time points to examine how covert imitation varied over the distracter's duration. The results of both experiments clearly demonstrated covert imitation effects for vowels, thus supporting simulation theories of speech perception. Covert imitation was not affected by stimulus modality and was maximal for later time points.

  3. Effect of ghrelin on inflammatory response in lung contusion

    Berrak Guven

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ghrelin on inflammatory response and tissue damage following trauma-induced acute lung injury. Thirty male wistar albino rats (300–400 g were randomly assigned into three groups: control group (n = 6, lung contusion plus saline (saline-treated, n = 12, and lung contusion plus ghrelin (ghrelin-treated, n = 12. Saline- or ghrelin-treated traumatic rats were sacrificed at two time points (24 and 72 hours after lung contusion. Blood was collected for the analysis of serum adenosine deaminase (ADA. Tissue transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and histopathological examination was performed on the lung tissue samples. Our results indicated that ghrelin significantly reduced morphologic damages. Serum ADA activities were significantly decreased after lung contusion and this decline started early with ghrelin treatment. TGF-β1 and MMP-2 levels in lung tissue were elevated at 72 hours after lung contusion and treatment with ghrelin significantly increased TGF-β1 level and reduced MMP-2 level. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that acute lung injury initiated proinflammatory responses and ghrelin administration showed an anti-inflammatory effect in lung contusion.

  4. Evaluation of a sudden brake warning system: effect on the response time of the following driver.

    Isler, Robert B; Starkey, Nicola J

    2010-07-01

    This study used a video-based braking simulation dual task to carry out a preliminary evaluation of the effect of a sudden brake warning system (SBWS) in a leading passenger vehicle on the response time of the following driver. The primary task required the participants (N=25, 16 females, full NZ license holders) to respond to sudden braking manoeuvres of a lead vehicle during day and night driving, wet and dry conditions and in rural and urban traffic, while concurrently performing a secondary tracking task using a computer mouse. The SBWS in the lead vehicle consisted of g-force controlled activation of the rear hazard lights (the rear indicators flashed), in addition to the standard brake lights. Overall, the results revealed that responses to the braking manoeuvres of the leading vehicles when the hazard lights were activated by the warning system were 0.34 s (19%) faster compared to the standard brake lights. The SBWS was particularly effective when the simulated braking scenario of the leading vehicle did not require an immediate and abrupt braking response. Given this, the SBWS may also be beneficial for allowing smoother deceleration, thus reducing fuel consumption. These preliminary findings justify a larger, more ecologically valid laboratory evaluation which may lead to a naturalistic study in order to test this new technology in 'real world' braking situations. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hard thermal loops, static response, and the composite effective action

    Jackiw, R.; Liu, Q.; Lucchesi, C.

    1994-01-01

    First, we investigate the static non-Abelian Kubo equation. We prove that it does not possess finite energy solutions; thereby we establish that gauge theories do not support hard thermal solitons. This general result is verified by a numerical solution of the equations. A similar argument shows that ''static'' instantons are absent. In addition, we note that the static equations reproduce the expected screening of the non-Abelian electric field by a gauge-invariant Debye mass m=gT √(N+N F /2)/3 . Second, we derive the non-Abelian Kubo equation from the composite effective action. This is achieved by showing that the requirement of stationarity of the composite effective action is equivalent, within a kinematical approximation scheme, to the condition of gauge invariance for the generating functional of hard thermal loops

  6. Diffusible signal factor (DSF) synthase RpfF of Xylella fastidiosa is a multifunction protein also required for response to DSF.

    Ionescu, Michael; Baccari, Clelia; Da Silva, Aline Maria; Garcia, Angelica; Yokota, Kenji; Lindow, Steven E

    2013-12-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, like related Xanthomonas species, employs an Rpf cell-cell communication system consisting of a diffusible signal factor (DSF) synthase, RpfF, and a DSF sensor, RpfC, to coordinate expression of virulence genes. While phenotypes of a ΔrpfF strain in Xanthomonas campestris could be complemented by its own DSF, the DSF produced by X. fastidiosa (XfDSF) did not restore expression of the XfDSF-dependent genes hxfA and hxfB to a ΔrpfF strain of X. fastidiosa, suggesting that RpfF is involved in XfDSF sensing or XfDSF-dependent signaling. To test this conjecture, rpfC and rpfF of X. campestris were replaced by those of X. fastidiosa, and the contribution of each gene to the induction of a X. campestris DSF-dependent gene was assessed. As in X. fastidiosa, XfDSF-dependent signaling required both X. fastidiosa proteins RpfF and RpfC. RpfF repressed RpfC signaling activity, which in turn was derepressed by XfDSF. A mutated X. fastidiosa RpfF protein with two substitutions of glutamate to alanine in its active site was incapable of XfDSF production yet enabled a response to XfDSF, indicating that XfDSF production and the response to XfDSF are two separate functions in which RpfF is involved. This mutant was also hypervirulent to grape, demonstrating the antivirulence effects of XfDSF itself in X. fastidiosa. The Rpf system of X. fastidiosa is thus a novel example of a quorum-sensing signal synthase that is also involved in the response to the signal molecule that it synthesizes.

  7. Homology-guided mutational analysis reveals the functional requirements for antinociceptive specificity of collapsin response mediator protein 2-derived peptides.

    Moutal, Aubin; Li, Wennan; Wang, Yue; Ju, Weina; Luo, Shizhen; Cai, Song; François-Moutal, Liberty; Perez-Miller, Samantha; Hu, Jackie; Dustrude, Erik T; Vanderah, Todd W; Gokhale, Vijay; Khanna, May; Khanna, Rajesh

    2017-02-05

    N-type voltage-gated calcium (Ca v 2.2) channels are critical determinants of increased neuronal excitability and neurotransmission accompanying persistent neuropathic pain. Although Ca v 2.2 channel antagonists are recommended as first-line treatment for neuropathic pain, calcium-current blocking gabapentinoids inadequately alleviate chronic pain symptoms and often exhibit numerous side effects. Collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) targets Ca v 2.2 channels to the sensory neuron membrane and allosterically modulates their function. A 15-amino-acid peptide (CBD3), derived from CRMP2, disrupts the functional protein-protein interaction between CRMP2 and Ca v 2.2 channels to inhibit calcium influx, transmitter release and acute, inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Here, we have mapped the minimal domain of CBD3 necessary for its antinociceptive potential. Truncated as well as homology-guided mutant versions of CBD3 were generated and assessed using depolarization-evoked calcium influx in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, binding between CRMP2 and Ca v 2.2 channels, whole-cell voltage clamp electrophysiology and behavioural effects in two models of experimental pain: post-surgical pain and HIV-induced sensory neuropathy induced by the viral glycoprotein 120. The first six amino acids within CBD3 accounted for all in vitro activity and antinociception. Spinal administration of a prototypical peptide (TAT-CBD3-L5M) reversed pain behaviours. Homology-guided mutational analyses of these six amino acids identified at least two residues, Ala1 and Arg4, as being critical for antinociception in two pain models. These results identify an antinociceptive scaffold core in CBD3 that can be used for development of low MW mimetics of CBD3. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Effects of climate change on spring wheat phenophase and water requirement in Heihe River basin, China

    Han, Dongmei; Yan, Denghua; Xu, Xinyi; Gao, Yu

    2017-02-01

    Climate change has significantly altered the temperature rhythm which is a key factor for the growth and phenophase of the crop. And temperature change further affects crop water requirement and irrigation system. In the north-west of China, one of the most important crop production bases is Heihe River basin where the observed phenological data is scarce. This study thus first adopted accumulated temperature threshold (ATT) method to define the phenological stages of the crop, and analysed the effect of climate change on phenological stages and water requirement of the crop during growing season. The results indicated the ATT was available for the determination of spring wheat phenological stages. The start dates of all phenological stages became earlier and the growing season length (days) was reduced by 7 days under climate change. During the growing season, water requirement without consideration of phenophase change has been increased by 26.1 mm, while that with consideration of phenophase change was featured in the decrease of water requirement by 50 mm. When temperature increased by 1°C on average, the changes were featured in the 2 days early start date of growing season, 2 days decrease of growing season length, and the 1.4 mm increase of water requirement, respectively.

  9. Effects of asphalt fume condensate exposure on acute pulmonary responses

    Ma, J.Y.C.; Barger, M.W.; Castranova, V. [Health Effects Lab. Div., National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV (United States); Kriech, A.J. [Heritage Research Group, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2000-10-01

    The present study was carried out to characterize the effects of in vitro exposure to paving asphalt fume condensate (AFC) on alveolar macrophage (AM) functions and to monitor acute pulmonary responses to in vivo AFC exposure in rats. Methods: For in vitro studies, rat primary AM cultures were incubated with various concentrations of AFC for 24 h at 37 C. AM-conditioned medium was collected and assayed for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as a marker of cytotoxicity. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) production were assayed in AM-conditioned medium to monitor AM function. The effect of AFC on chemiluminescence (CL) generated by resting AM or AM in response to zymosan or PMA stimulation was also determined as a marker of AM activity. For in vivo studies, rats received either (1) a single intratracheal (IT) instillation of saline, or 0.1 mg or 0.5 mg AFC and were killed 1 or 3 days later; or (2) IT instillation of saline, or 0.1, 0.5, or 2 mg AFC for three consecutive days and were killed the following day. Differential counts of cells harvested by bronchoalveolar lavage were measured to monitor inflammation. Acellular LDH and protein content in the first lavage fluid were measured to monitor damage. CL generation, TNF-{alpha} and IL-1 production by AM were assayed to monitor AM function. Results: In vitro AFC exposure at <200 {mu}g/ml did not induce cytotoxicity, oxidant generation, or IL-1 production by AM, but it did cause a small but significant increase in TNF-{alpha} release from AM. In vitro exposure of AM to AFC resulted in a significant decline of CL in response to zymosan or PMA stimulation. The in vivo studies showed that AFC exposure did not induce significant neutrophil infiltration or alter LDH or protein content in acellular lavage samples. Macrophages obtained from AFC-exposed rats did not show significant differences in oxidant production or cytokine secretion at rest or in response to LPS in comparison with control

  10. Phosphorylation at tyrosine 114 of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is required for adipogenesis in response to high fat diet

    Lo, Yuan-Hung; Ho, Po-Chun; Chen, Min-Shan; Hugo, Eric; Ben-Jonathan, Nira [Department of Cancer Biology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3125 Eden Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0521 (United States); Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3223 Eden Avenue, Kettering Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0056 (United States); Wang, Shao-Chun, E-mail: shao-chun.wang@uc.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3125 Eden Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0521 (United States); Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3223 Eden Avenue, Kettering Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0056 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is phosphorylated at Y114. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phospho-Y114 of PCNA is not required for cell proliferation for normal growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MCE during adipogenesis is abolished in the lack of the phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homozygous Y114F mice are resistant to high fat diet induced obesity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results shed light on the interface between proliferation and differentiation. -- Abstract: Clonal proliferation is an obligatory component of adipogenesis. Although several cell cycle regulators are known to participate in the transition between pre-adipocyte proliferation and terminal adipocyte differentiation, how the core DNA synthesis machinery is coordinately regulated in adipogenesis remains elusive. PCNA (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen) is an indispensable component for DNA synthesis during proliferation. Here we show that PCNA is subject to phosphorylation at the highly conserved tyrosine residue 114 (Y114). Replacing the Y114 residue with phenylalanine (Y114F), which is structurally similar to tyrosine but cannot be phosphorylated, does not affect normal animal development. However, when challenged with high fat diet, mice carrying homozygous Y114F alleles (PCNA{sup F/F}) are resistant to adipose tissue enlargement in comparison to wild-type (WT) mice. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) harboring WT or Y114F mutant PCNA proliferate at similar rates. However, when subjected to adipogenesis induction in culture, PCNA{sup F/F} MEFs are not able to re-enter the cell cycle and fail to form mature adipocytes, while WT MEFs undergo mitotic clonal expansion in response to the adipogenic stimulation, accompanied by enhanced Y114 phosphorylation of PCNA, and differentiate to mature adipocytes. Consistent with the function of Y114 phosphorylation in clonal proliferation in adipogenesis, fat tissues isolated from WT

  11. Managerial response to stockouts: the effect of remedies on consumer behavior

    Ester Quirino Dias Sampaio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stockouts remain a significant problem for retail firms. Estimates of stockout rates in the past fifty years consistently averaged approximately 8 percent. The consequences of stockouts transcend the retail store to include its supporting supply chain. In addition to the effect on the behavior of consumers, stockouts can impact the firm’s replenishment policy, the level and location of inventories and the cost of emergency shipments required to replenish out-of-stock items. Although there is a substantive literature in logistics that measures the frequency of and the consumer response to stockouts, investigation of the effect of remedies on consumer response is sparse. To address this problem, the effectiveness of five remedies as tools to manage retail stockouts was investigated: apology, raincheck, home delivery, trade-up and discount. A remedy is an incentive to induce consumers to not leave a store in response to a stockout. In addition the influence of consumer characteristics (i.e., brand loyalty and shopping situations (i.e., urgency of purchase on the effect of each remedy on consumer behavior was examined. The results suggest that the remedies are usually effective. The most effective remedy is home delivery. The least effective remedy is a simple apology, which may actually increase the percentage of consumers leaving the store. The results also indicate that the urgency of the purchase and store loyalty have the most impact on remedy effectiveness. These results suggest that there are significant opportunities to use remedies as tools to manage the effect of stockouts on retail stores and their supporting supply chains.

  12. Requirements for effective academic leadership in Iran: A Nominal Group Technique exercise

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Brommels, Mats; Shoghli, Alireza; Sohrabi, Zohreh; Masiello, Italo

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background During the last two decades, medical education in Iran has shifted from elite to mass education, with a considerable increase in number of schools, faculties, and programs. Because of this transformation, it is a good case now to explore academic leadership in a non-western country. The objective of this study was to explore the views on effective academic leadership requirements held by key informants in Iran's medical education system. Methods A nominal group study was c...

  13. High pulmonary vascular resistance in addition to low right ventricular stroke work index effectively predicts biventricular assist device requirement.

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Kinoshita, Osamu; Nawata, Kan; Ono, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Although the right ventricular stroke work index (RVSWI) is a good index for RV function, a low RVSWI is not necessarily an indicator for the need for a right ventricular assist device at the time of left VAD implantation. We here aimed to determine a more precise indicator for the need for a biventricular assist device (BiVAD). In total, 116 patients (mean age, 38 ± 14 years), who underwent hemodynamic assessments preoperatively including 12 BiVAD patients, and had been followed at our institute from 2003 to 2015, were included. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that RVSWI and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) were independent predictors of BiVAD requirement (P 5 g/m, PVR 5, PVR > 3.7), (3) RV failure (RVSWI 3.7), and examined. Most of the patients in Group 4 (75 %), with acutely depressed hemodynamics and inflammatory responses in the myocardium, required BiVAD. Overall, patients with BiVAD had a worse survival rate as compared with those with LVAD alone. In conclusion, high PVR in addition to low RVSWI effectively predicts BiVAD requirement.

  14. Cells responsible for tumor surveillance in man: effects of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and biologic response modifiers

    Reizenstein, P.; Ogier, C.; Blomgren, H.; Petrini, B.; Wasserman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Currently, the most probable theory of tumor surveillance is neither the existence of any tumor-specific, antigen-dependent, T-cell-mediated cytotoxic effect that could eliminate spontaneous tumors in man and that could be used for some kind of vaccination against tumors, nor the complete absence of any surveillance or defense systems against tumors. What is probable is the cooperation of a number of antigen-independent, relatively weakly cytotoxic or possibly only cytostatic humoral and cellular effects, including nutritional immunity, tumor necrosis factor, certain cytokines, and the cytotoxic effects mediated by macrophages, NK cells, NK-like cells, and certain stimulated T-cells. One question remaining to be solved is why these antigen-independent effects do not attack normal cells. A number of plausible hypotheses are discussed. The hypothetical surveillance system is modulated both by traditional cancer treatment and by attempts at immunomodulation. Radiotherapy reduced the T-helper cell function for almost a decade, but not those of macrophages or NK cells. T-cell changes have no prognostic implication, supporting, perhaps, the suggestion of a major role for macrophages and NK cells. Cyclic adjuvant chemotherapy reduces the peripheral lymphocyte population and several lymphocyte functions but not NK activity. Most of the parameters were normalized some years following treatment, but NK activity remained elevated and Th/Ts cell ratio was still decreased. This might possibly be taken to support the surveillance role of NK cells. Bestatin increases the frequency of lymphocytes forming rosettes with sheep red blood cells (but not their mitogenic responses), enhances NK activity, and augments the phagocytic capacity of granulocytes and monocytes (but not their cytotoxic activity). 154 references

  15. Effect of acclimation to caging on nephrotoxic response of rats to uranium.

    Damon, E G; Eidson, A F; Hobbs, C H; Hahn, F F

    1986-02-01

    Animal studies of the toxicity and metabolism of radionuclides and chemicals often require housing of rats in metabolism cages for excreta collection. Response of rats to toxic substances may be affected by environmental factors such as the type of cage used. Dose-response studies were conducted to assess the effects of two types of cages on the nephrotoxic response of rats to uranium from implanted refined uranium ore (yellowcake). The LD50/21 days was 6 mg of uranium ore per kilogram body weight (6 mg U/kg). The 95% confidence limit (C.L.) was 3-8 mg U/kg for rats housed in metabolism cages beginning on the day of implantation (naive rats). However, for rats housed in metabolism cages for 21 days before implantation (acclimated rats) the LD50/21 days was 360 mg U/kg (95% C.L. = 220-650 mg U/kg), which was the same value obtained for rats housed continuously in polycarbonate cages. This significant difference (P less than 0.01) in response of naive rats compared to response of acclimated rats appeared related to a significantly lower water consumption by the naive rats.

  16. Undernutrition, the Acute Phase Response to Infection, and Its Effects on Micronutrient Status Indicators12

    Bresnahan, Kara A.; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A.

    2014-01-01

    Infection and undernutrition are prevalent in developing countries and demonstrate a synergistic relation. Undernutrition increases infection-related morbidity and mortality. The acute phase response (APR) is an innate, systemic inflammatory reaction to a wide array of disruptions in a host’s homeostasis, including infection. Released from immune cells in response to deleterious stimuli, proinflammatory cytokines act on distant tissues to induce behavioral (e.g., anorexia, weakness, and fatigue) and systemic effects of the APR. Cytokines act to increase energy and protein requirements to manifest fever and support hepatic acute phase protein (APP) production. Blood concentrations of glucose and lipid are augmented to provide energy to immune cells in response to cytokines. Additionally, infection decreases intestinal absorption of nutrients and can cause direct loss of micronutrients. Traditional indicators of iron, zinc, and vitamin A status are altered during the APR, leading to inaccurate estimations of deficiency in populations with a high or unknown prevalence of infection. Blood concentrations of APPs can be measured in nutrition interventions to assess the time stage and severity of infection and correct for the APR; however, standardized cutoffs for nutrition applications are needed. Protein-energy malnutrition leads to increased gut permeability to pathogens, abnormal immune cell populations, and impaired APP response. Micronutrient deficiencies cause specific immune impairments that affect both innate and adaptive responses. This review describes the antagonistic interaction between the APR and nutritional status and emphasizes the need for integrated interventions to address undernutrition and to reduce disease burden in developing countries. PMID:25398733

  17. IAEA Response and Assistance Network. Date Effective: 1 September 2013

    2013-01-01

    The Parties to the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the 'Assistance Convention') have undertaken to cooperate between themselves and with the IAEA to facilitate the timely provision of assistance in the case of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, in order to mitigate its consequences. In September 2000, the General Conference of the IAEA, in resolution GC(44)/RES/16, encouraged Member States ''to implement instruments for improving their response, in particular their contribution to international response, to nuclear and radiological emergencies'' as well as ''to participate actively in the process of strengthening international, national and regional capabilities for responding to nuclear and radiological emergencies and to make those capabilities more consistent and coherent''. As part of the IAEA's strategy for supporting the practical implementation of the Assistance Convention, in 2000 the IAEA Secretariat established a global Emergency Response Network (ERNET) of teams suitably qualified to respond to nuclear or radiological emergencies rapidly and, in principle, on a regional basis. The IAEA Secretariat published IAEA Emergency Response Network - ERNET (EPR-ERNET) in 2000, which set out the criteria and requirements to be met by members of the network. An updated edition was published in 2002. The Second Meeting of the Representatives of Competent Authorities Identified under the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency, held in Vienna in June 2003, recommended that the IAEA Secretariat convene a Technical Meeting to formulate recommendations aimed at improving participation in the network. Participants in a Technical Meeting held in March 2004 developed a new concept for the network and a completely new draft of the publication. In July 2005, the Third Meeting of Competent Authorities

  18. Stimulus-Response Compatibility effect in the near-far dimension: A developmental study

    Aurélien Richez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the developmental aspect of stimulus-response compatibility effect in 8 to 11-years-old children. The task consisted in manually responding to the colour of a pawn presented on a chessboard at different distances. Manual responses were provided by reaching a proximal or distal location depending on the colour of the stimulus. We found that reaction time was affected by the conflict generated by the response suggested by the location of the stimulus and the response required according to its colour. This was not the case for movement time despite we found a higher rate of long duration movements in the incongruent than in the congruent spatial condition. The SRC effect was however observed in children older than 10 years old. These findings provide additional evidence for a reorganization of the perceptual system during the period of 8 to 10 years, integrating progressively multimodal information and preparing more efficiently the body to act in the environment.

  19. Effects of aging on neuromagnetic mismatch responses to pitch changes.

    Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Baillet, Sylvain; Hsiao, Fu-Jung; Lin, Yung-Yang

    2013-06-07

    Although aging-related alterations in the auditory sensory memory and involuntary change discrimination have been widely studied, it remains controversial whether the mismatch negativity (MMN) or its magnetic counterpart (MMNm) is modulated by physiological aging. This study aimed to examine the effects of aging on mismatch activity to pitch deviants by using a whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) together with distributed source modeling analysis. The neuromagnetic responses to oddball paradigms consisting of standards (1000 Hz, p=0.85) and deviants (1100 Hz, p=0.15) were recorded in healthy young (n=20) and aged (n=18) male adults. We used minimum norm estimate of source reconstruction to characterize the spatiotemporal neural dynamics of MMNm responses. Distributed activations to MMNm were identified in the bilateral fronto-temporo-parietal areas. Compared to younger participants, the elderly exhibited a significant reduction of cortical activation in bilateral superior temporal guri, superior temporal sulci, inferior fontal gyri, orbitofrontal cortices and right inferior parietal lobules. In conclusion, our results suggest an aging-related decline in auditory sensory memory and automatic change detection as indexed by MMNm. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Responsible tax as corporate social responsibility: the case of multinational enterprises and effective tax in India

    Muller, A.; Kolk, A.

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence often suggests that multinational enterprises (MNEs) operating in developing countries "exploit their multinationality" to avoid paying taxes to host governments. This article explores the concept of "responsible tax" as a corporate social responsibility (CSR) issue for MNEs,

  1. Spasmodic dysphonia: onset, course, socioemotional effects, and treatment response.

    Tanner, Kristine; Roy, Nelson; Merrill, Ray M; Sauder, Cara; Houtz, Daniel R; Smith, Marshall E

    2011-07-01

    This investigation explored the onset, progression, socioemotional effects, and treatment outcomes of spasmodic dysphonia (SD). A cross-sectional epidemiological approach was used to examine questionnaire responses from 150 individuals with SD. Symptoms of SD (mean age at onset, 46 years) began gradually in 76% of cases and were progressive (ie, failed to plateau) in 34% of cases. Botulinum toxin A (Botox) helped to attenuate voice symptoms in 91% of cases; however, the scores on the Voice-Related Quality of Life questionnaire (V-RQOL) were not associated with this effect. The V-RQOL scores improved with time since symptom onset, independent of age and treatment. The patients with only SD experienced onset, course, and progression of symptoms similar to those of the patients with SD and coexisting vocal tremor. The symptoms of SD begin gradually and worsen over time. New evidence indicates that SD symptoms may continue to progress without plateau in at least a subset of patients. Individuals with SD and coexisting vocal tremor experience symptom trajectories similar to those of patients with SD only. Although Botox may attenuate voice symptoms, these effects do not appear to be strongly related to the V-RQOL scores. These results provide new and valuable insights regarding the onset, course, progression, and treatment of SD.

  2. Pupil response and the subliminal mere exposure effect.

    Yoshimoto, Sanae; Imai, Hisato; Kashino, Makio; Takeuchi, Tatsuto

    2014-01-01

    The subliminal mere exposure effect (SMEE) is the phenomenon wherein people tend to prefer patterns they have repeatedly observed without consciously identifying them. One popular explanation for the SMEE is that perceptual fluency within exposed patterns is misattributed to a feeling of preference for those patterns. Assuming that perceptual fluency is negatively correlated with the amount of mental effort needed to analyze perceptual aspects of incoming stimuli, pupil diameter should associate with SMEE strength since the former is known to reflect mental effort. To examine this hypothesis, we measured participants' pupil diameter during exposure to subthreshold stimuli. Following exposure, a preference test was administered. Average pupil diameter throughout exposure was smaller when the SMEE was induced than when the SMEE was not induced. This supports the hypothesis that increasing perceptual fluency during mere exposure modulates autonomic nervous responses, such as pupil diameter, and eventually leads to preference.

  3. Pupil Response and the Subliminal Mere Exposure Effect

    Yoshimoto, Sanae; Imai, Hisato; Kashino, Makio; Takeuchi, Tatsuto

    2014-01-01

    The subliminal mere exposure effect (SMEE) is the phenomenon wherein people tend to prefer patterns they have repeatedly observed without consciously identifying them. One popular explanation for the SMEE is that perceptual fluency within exposed patterns is misattributed to a feeling of preference for those patterns. Assuming that perceptual fluency is negatively correlated with the amount of mental effort needed to analyze perceptual aspects of incoming stimuli, pupil diameter should associate with SMEE strength since the former is known to reflect mental effort. To examine this hypothesis, we measured participants’ pupil diameter during exposure to subthreshold stimuli. Following exposure, a preference test was administered. Average pupil diameter throughout exposure was smaller when the SMEE was induced than when the SMEE was not induced. This supports the hypothesis that increasing perceptual fluency during mere exposure modulates autonomic nervous responses, such as pupil diameter, and eventually leads to preference. PMID:24587408

  4. Alcohol and cirrhosis: dose--response or threshold effect?

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Grønbaek, Morten; Tolstrup, Janne

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: General population studies have shown a strong association between alcohol intake and death from alcoholic cirrhosis, but whether this is a dose-response or a threshold effect remains unknown, and the relation among alcohol misusers has not been studied. METHODS: A cohort of 6152...... alcohol misusing men and women aged 15-83 were interviewed about drinking pattern and social issues and followed for 84,257 person-years. Outcome was alcoholic cirrhosis mortality. Data was analyzed by means of Cox-regression models. RESULTS: In this large prospective cohort study of alcohol misusers...... there was a 27 fold increased mortality from alcoholic cirrhosis in men and a 35 fold increased mortality from alcoholic cirrhosis in women compared to the Danish population. Number of drinks per day was not significantly associated with death from alcoholic cirrhosis, since there was no additional risk of death...

  5. UV radiation in marine ectotherms: Molecular effects and responses

    Dahms, Hans-U.; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge on ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced cellular and molecular damage in marine ectotherms (invertebrates and fish). UVR impairs sperm motility, reduces fertilization, and causes embryo malformation that in turn affects recruitment and therefore the sustainability of natural populations. The direct molecular effects of UVR are mediated by absorption of certain wavelengths by specific macromolecules and the dissipation of the absorbed energy via photochemical reactions. Most organisms have defense mechanisms that either prevent UVR-induced damage, or mechanisms that repair the damage. Photoprotective pigments, antioxidant defense compounds, and cell cycle development genes are some of the molecules involved in UVR defense. Photoenzymatic repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two primary DNA repair systems in marine ectotherms. We anticipate that toxicogenomic studies will gain importance in UVR research because they can elucidate the primary processes involved in UVR damage and the cellular response to this damage.

  6. Effect of gas pressure on active screen plasma nitriding response

    Nishimoto, Akio; Nagatsuka, Kimiaki; Narita, Ryota; Nii, Hiroaki; Akamatsu, Katsuya

    2010-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 was active screen plasma nitrided using a 304 steel screen to investigate the effect of the gas pressure on the ASPN response. The sample was treated for 18 ks at 723 K in 25% N2 + 75% H2 gases. The gas pressure was changed to 100, 600 and 1200 Pa. The distance between screen and sample was also changed to 10, 30 and 50 mm. The nitrided samples were characterized by appearance observation, surface roughness, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and microhardness testing. After nitriding, polygonal particles with a normal distribution were observed at the center and edges of all the ASPN-treated sample surfaces. Particles on the sample surfaces were finer with an increase in the gas pressure. The nitrided layer with a greater and homogeneous thickness was obtained at a low gas pressure of 100 Pa. (author)

  7. Pupil response and the subliminal mere exposure effect.

    Sanae Yoshimoto

    Full Text Available The subliminal mere exposure effect (SMEE is the phenomenon wherein people tend to prefer patterns they have repeatedly observed without consciously identifying them. One popular explanation for the SMEE is that perceptual fluency within exposed patterns is misattributed to a feeling of preference for those patterns. Assuming that perceptual fluency is negatively correlated with the amount of mental effort needed to analyze perceptual aspects of incoming stimuli, pupil diameter should associate with SMEE strength since the former is known to reflect mental effort. To examine this hypothesis, we measured participants' pupil diameter during exposure to subthreshold stimuli. Following exposure, a preference test was administered. Average pupil diameter throughout exposure was smaller when the SMEE was induced than when the SMEE was not induced. This supports the hypothesis that increasing perceptual fluency during mere exposure modulates autonomic nervous responses, such as pupil diameter, and eventually leads to preference.

  8. Zinc, iron, manganese and copper uptake requirement in response to nitrogen supply and the increased grain yield of summer maize.

    Yanfang Xue

    Full Text Available The relationships between grain yields and whole-plant accumulation of micronutrients such as zinc (Zn, iron (Fe, manganese (Mn and copper (Cu in maize (Zea mays L. were investigated by studying their reciprocal internal efficiencies (RIEs, g of micronutrient requirement in plant dry matter per Mg of grain. Field experiments were conducted from 2008 to 2011 in North China to evaluate RIEs and shoot micronutrient accumulation dynamics during different growth stages under different yield and nitrogen (N levels. Fe, Mn and Cu RIEs (average 64.4, 18.1 and 5.3 g, respectively were less affected by the yield and N levels. ZnRIE increased by 15% with an increased N supply but decreased from 36.3 to 18.0 g with increasing yield. The effect of cultivars on ZnRIE was similar to that of yield ranges. The substantial decrease in ZnRIE may be attributed to an increased Zn harvest index (from 41% to 60% and decreased Zn concentrations in straw (a 56% decrease and grain (decreased from 16.9 to 12.2 mg kg-1 rather than greater shoot Zn accumulation. Shoot Fe, Mn and Cu accumulation at maturity tended to increase but the proportions of pre-silking shoot Fe, Cu and Zn accumulation consistently decreased (from 95% to 59%, 90% to 71% and 91% to 66%, respectively. The decrease indicated the high reproductive-stage demands for Fe, Zn and Cu with the increasing yields. Optimized N supply achieved the highest yield and tended to increase grain concentrations of micronutrients compared to no or lower N supply. Excessive N supply did not result in any increases in yield or micronutrient nutrition for shoot or grain. These results indicate that optimized N management may be an economical method of improving micronutrient concentrations in maize grain with higher grain yield.

  9. Placebo Response and Practice Effects in Schizophrenia Cognition Trials.

    Keefe, Richard S E; Davis, Vicki G; Harvey, Philip D; Atkins, Alexandra S; Haig, George M; Hagino, Owen; Marder, Stephen; Hilt, Dana C; Umbricht, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    /anxiety (F1,438 = 5.41; P = .02), more motivation (F1,272 = 4.63; P = .03), and less improvement from screening to baseline (F1,421 = 59.32; P < .001). Placebo effects were minimal and associated with the number of postbaseline assessments and several patient characteristics. Given that the patients performed 2.28 SDs below normative standards on average at baseline, a mean placebo-associated improvement of less than 0.2 SD provides evidence that ceiling effects do not occur in these trials. These minimal changes in the MCCB could not be responsible for effective active treatments failing to separate from placebo.

  10. CaMKII effects on inotropic but not lusitropic force frequency responses require phospholamban

    Wu, Yiming; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Lee, Eun-Jeong; Hidalgo, Carlos; Yang, Jinying; Gao, Zhan; Li, Jingdong; Wehrens, Xander; Granzier, Henk; Anderson, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    Increasing heart rate enhances cardiac contractility (force frequency relationship, FFR) and accelerates cardiac relaxation (frequency-dependent acceleration of relaxation, FDAR). The positive FFR together with FDAR promotes rapid filling and ejection of blood from the left ventricle (LV) at higher heart rates. Recent studies indicate that the multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is involved in regulating FFR and FDAR. We used isolated perfused mouse hearts to ...

  11. Effect of power system technology and mission requirements on high altitude long endurance aircraft

    Colozza, Anthony J.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis was performed to determine how various power system components and mission requirements affect the sizing of a solar powered long endurance aircraft. The aircraft power system consists of photovoltaic cells and a regenerative fuel cell. Various characteristics of these components, such as PV cell type, PV cell mass, PV cell efficiency, fuel cell efficiency, and fuel cell specific mass, were varied to determine what effect they had on the aircraft sizing for a given mission. Mission parameters, such as time of year, flight altitude, flight latitude, and payload mass and power, were also altered to determine how mission constraints affect the aircraft sizing. An aircraft analysis method which determines the aircraft configuration, aspect ratio, wing area, and total mass, for maximum endurance or minimum required power based on the stated power system and mission parameters is presented. The results indicate that, for the power system, the greatest benefit can be gained by increasing the fuel cell specific energy. Mission requirements also substantially affect the aircraft size. By limiting the time of year the aircraft is required to fly at high northern or southern latitudes, a significant reduction in aircraft size or increase in payload capacity can be achieved.

  12. Effects of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase inhibition on radiation response in canine osteosarcoma cells.

    Mantovani, Fernanda B; Morrison, Jodi A; Mutsaers, Anthony J

    2016-05-31

    Radiation therapy is a palliative treatment modality for canine osteosarcoma, with transient improvement in analgesia observed in many cases. However there is room for improvement in outcome for these patients. It is possible that the addition of sensitizing agents may increase tumor response to radiation therapy and prolong quality of life. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression has been documented in canine osteosarcoma and higher EGFR levels have been correlated to a worse prognosis. However, effects of EGFR inhibition on radiation responsiveness in canine osteosarcoma have not been previously characterized. This study examined the effects of the small molecule EGFR inhibitor erlotinib on canine osteosarcoma radiation responses, target and downstream protein expression in vitro. Additionally, to assess the potential impact of treatment on tumor angiogenesis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in conditioned media were measured. Erlotinib as a single agent reduced clonogenic survival in two canine osteosarcoma cell lines and enhanced the impact of radiation in one out of three cell lines investigated. In cell viability assays, erlotinib enhanced radiation effects and demonstrated single agent effects. Erlotinib did not alter total levels of EGFR, nor inhibit downstream protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) activation. On the contrary, erlotinib treatment increased phosphorylated Akt in these osteosarcoma cell lines. VEGF levels in conditioned media increased after erlotinib treatment as a single agent and in combination with radiation in two out of three cell lines investigated. However, VEGF levels decreased with erlotinib treatment in the third cell line. Erlotinib treatment promoted modest enhancement of radiation effects in canine osteosarcoma cells, and possessed activity as a single agent in some cell lines, indicating a potential role for EGFR inhibition in the treatment of a subset of osteosarcoma patients. The relative radioresistance of

  13. The Effects of Caffeine on Arousal, Response Time, Accuracy, and Performance in Division I Collegiate Fencers.

    Doyle, Taylor P; Lutz, Rafer S; Pellegrino, Joseph K; Sanders, David J; Arent, Shawn M

    2016-11-01

    Doyle, TP, Lutz, RS, Pellegrino, JK, Sanders, DJ, and Arent, SM. The effects of caffeine on arousal, response time, accuracy, and performance in Division I collegiate fencers. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3228-3235, 2016-Caffeine has displayed ergogenic effects on aerobic performance. However, sports requiring precision and quick reaction may also be impacted by central nervous system arousal because of caffeine consumption. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of caffeine on arousal, response time (RT), and accuracy during a simulated fencing practice. Using a randomized, within-subjects, placebo-controlled, double-blind design, Division I male and female college fencers (N = 13; 69.1 ± 3.5 kg) were administered caffeine doses of 0, 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, or 7.5 mg·kg during separate testing days. Performance was assessed via RT and accuracy to a 4-choice reaction task. A total of 25 trials were performed each day using a random 2- to 8-s delay between trials. Arousal was assessed using the activation-deactivation adjective check list. Results of repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance revealed a significant dose effect (p = 0.02) on performance. Follow-up analyses indicated this was due to a significant effect for RT (p = 0.03), with the dose-response curve exhibiting a quadratic relationship. Response time was significantly faster (p performance (p performance beginning to deteriorate at 7.5 mg·kg. Energetic arousal, tiredness, tension, and calmness all significantly changed as a function of caffeine dose (p ≤ 0.05). Based on these results, caffeine improves RT and overall performance in fencers, particularly as doses increase up to 4.5-6.0 mg·kg. Above this level, performance begins to deteriorate, consistent with an "inverted-U" model of arousal and performance.

  14. Temperature and humidity effects on the response of radiochromic dye films

    Chappas, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    The radiochromic dye films developed by Chalkley and McLaughlin are quickly becoming one of the principal methods for secondary dosimetry. Their useful dose and dose rate ranges, long-term color stability, small and flexible size, and ease of reading make them ideal for spatial dose distribution measurements in the complex targets often encountered in research and industry. At room temperature, however, their response is slow, often requiring several hours after irradiation for full color development. This work examines the effect of humidity on the film's time response and describes two methods for accelerating the film's color development. By keeping the film in a controlled humidity environment or through a simple heating technique, the film can be read in minutes instead of hours after irradiation. The results are shown to be identical to those of films stored for 24 hours at room temperature. (author)

  15. Requirements for effective academic leadership in Iran: A Nominal Group Technique exercise

    Shoghli Alireza

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last two decades, medical education in Iran has shifted from elite to mass education, with a considerable increase in number of schools, faculties, and programs. Because of this transformation, it is a good case now to explore academic leadership in a non-western country. The objective of this study was to explore the views on effective academic leadership requirements held by key informants in Iran's medical education system. Methods A nominal group study was conducted by strategic sampling in which participants were requested to discuss and report on requirements for academic leadership, suggestions and barriers. Written notes from the discussions were transcribed and subjected to content analysis. Results Six themes of effective academic leadership emerged: 1shared vision, goal, and strategy, 2 teaching and research leadership, 3 fair and efficient management, 4 mutual trust and respect, 5 development and recognition, and 6 transformational leadership. Current Iranian academic leadership suffers from lack of meritocracy, conservative leaders, politicization, bureaucracy, and belief in misconceptions. Conclusion The structure of the Iranian medical university system is not supportive of effective academic leadership. However, participants' views on effective academic leadership are in line with what is also found in the western literature, that is, if the managers could create the premises for a supportive and transformational leadership, they could generate mutual trust and respect in academia and increase scientific production.

  16. Requirements for effective academic leadership in Iran: A Nominal Group Technique exercise

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Brommels, Mats; Shoghli, Alireza; Sohrabi, Zohreh; Masiello, Italo

    2008-01-01

    Background During the last two decades, medical education in Iran has shifted from elite to mass education, with a considerable increase in number of schools, faculties, and programs. Because of this transformation, it is a good case now to explore academic leadership in a non-western country. The objective of this study was to explore the views on effective academic leadership requirements held by key informants in Iran's medical education system. Methods A nominal group study was conducted by strategic sampling in which participants were requested to discuss and report on requirements for academic leadership, suggestions and barriers. Written notes from the discussions were transcribed and subjected to content analysis. Results Six themes of effective academic leadership emerged: 1)shared vision, goal, and strategy, 2) teaching and research leadership, 3) fair and efficient management, 4) mutual trust and respect, 5) development and recognition, and 6) transformational leadership. Current Iranian academic leadership suffers from lack of meritocracy, conservative leaders, politicization, bureaucracy, and belief in misconceptions. Conclusion The structure of the Iranian medical university system is not supportive of effective academic leadership. However, participants' views on effective academic leadership are in line with what is also found in the western literature, that is, if the managers could create the premises for a supportive and transformational leadership, they could generate mutual trust and respect in academia and increase scientific production. PMID:18430241

  17. Proteolysis of MDA5 and IPS-1 is not required for inhibition of the type I IFN response by poliovirus.

    Kotla, Swathi; Gustin, Kurt E

    2015-10-06

    The type I interferon (IFN) response is a critical component of the innate immune response to infection by RNA viruses and is initiated via recognition of viral nucleic acids by RIG-like receptors (RLR). Engagement of these receptors in the cytoplasm initiates a signal transduction pathway leading to activation of the transcription factors NF-κB, ATF-2 and IRF-3 that coordinately upregulate transcription of type I IFN genes, such as that encoding IFN-β. In this study the impact of poliovirus infection on the type I interferon response has been examined. The type I IFN response was assessed by measuring IFN-β mRNA levels using qRT-PCR and normalizing to levels of β-actin mRNA. The status of host factors involved in activation of the type I IFN response was examined by immunoblot, immunofluorescence microcopy and qRT-PCR. The results show that poliovirus infection results in induction of very low levels of IFN-β mRNA despite clear activation of NF-κB and ATF-2. In contrast, analysis of IRF-3 revealed no transcriptional induction of an IRF-3-responsive promoter or homodimerization of IRF-3 indicating it is not activated in poliovirus-infected cells. Exposure of poliovirus-infected cells to poly(I:C) results in lower levels of IFN-β mRNA synthesis and IRF-3 activation compared to mock-infected cells. Analysis of MDA-5 and IPS-1 revealed that these components of the RLR pathway were largely intact at times when the type I IFN response was suppressed. Collectively, these results demonstrate that poliovirus infection actively suppresses the host type I interferon response by blocking activation of IRF-3 and suggests that this is not mediated by cleavage of MDA-5 or IPS-1.

  18. A CHROMATIN MODIFYING ENZYME, SDG8, IS REQUIRED FOR MORPHOLOGICAL, GENE EXPRESSION, AND EPIGENETIC RESPONSES TO MECHANICAL STIMULATION

    Christopher Ian Cazzonelli; Nazia eNisar; Andrea C Roberts; Kevin eMurray; Justin O Borevitz; Barry James Pogson

    2014-01-01

    Thigmomorphogenesis is viewed as being a response process of acclimation to short repetitive bursts of mechanical stimulation or touch. The underlying molecular mechanisms that coordinate changes in how touch signals lead to long-term morphological changes are enigmatic. Touch responsive gene expression is rapid and transient, and no transcription factor or DNA regulatory motif has been reported that could confer a genome wide mechanical stimulus. We report here on a chromatin modifying enzy...

  19. Retrieval effects on ventilation and cooling requirements for a nuclear waste repository

    Hambley, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425) and the regulations promulgated in Title 10, Part 60 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10CFR60) by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for an underground repository for spent fuel and high level nuclear waste (HLW) require that it is possible to retrieve waste, for whatever reason, from such a facility for a period of 50 years from initial storage or until the completion of the performance confirmation period, whichever comes first. This paper considers the effects that the retrievability option mandates on ventilation and cooling systems required for normal repository operations. An example is given for a hypothetical repository in salt. 18 refs., 1 tab

  20. Assessing potential legal responses to medical ghostwriting: effectiveness and constitutionality

    Chen, Chung-Lin

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Pharmaceutical companies are extensively involved in shaping medical knowledge to market their products to physicians and consumers. Specialized planning is undertaken to produce scientific articles driven by commercial interests. Rather than the listed authors, hidden analysts and publication management firms hired by pharmaceutical companies are often responsible for the content of scientific articles. Such ghostwriting practices raise serious concerns regarding the integrity of knowledge and thus demand urgent attention. This paper analyses the strategies of legal regulation on medical ghostwriting and their comparative advantages and disadvantages. Many of regulatory proposals suffer from a lack of effectiveness, whereas others are subject to constitutional concerns. The analysis in this paper offers insights into framing adequate regulation; it supports the strategy for reforming the structure of information production while calling for cautiousness in shaping its regulatory outline. In addition, this paper contributes to the analysis of First Amendment jurisprudence, suggesting that the judiciary should allow a certain amount of leeway for political branches to develop effective regulation PMID:29707217

  1. Effects of ubiquilin 1 on the unfolded protein response.

    Lu, Alice; Hiltunen, Mikko; Romano, Donna M; Soininen, Hilkka; Hyman, Bradley T; Bertram, Lars; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2009-05-01

    Previous studies have implicated the unfolded protein response (UPR) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We previously reported that DNA variants in the ubiquilin 1 (UBQLN1) gene increase the risk for AD. Since UBQLN1 has been shown to play a role in the UPR, we assessed the effects of overexpression and downregulation of UBQLN1 splice variants during tunicamycin-induced ER stress. In addition to previously described transcript variants, TV1 and TV2, we identified two novel transcript variants of UBQLN1 in brain: TV3 (lacking exons 2-4) and TV4 (lacking exon 4). Overexpression of TV1-3, but not TV4 significantly decreased the mRNA induction of UPR-inducible genes, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), BiP/GRP78, and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) during the UPR. Stable overexpression of TV1-3, but not TV4, also significantly decreased the induction of CHOP protein and increased cell viability during the UPR. In contrast, downregulation of UBQLN1 did not affect CHOP mRNA induction, but instead increased PDI mRNA levels. These findings suggest that overexpression UBQLN1 transcript variants TV1-3, but not TV4, exert a protective effect during the UPR by attenuating CHOP induction and potentially increasing cell viability.

  2. Effects of music engagement on responses to painful stimulation.

    Bradshaw, David H; Chapman, C Richard; Jacobson, Robert C; Donaldson, Gary W

    2012-06-01

    We propose a theoretical framework for the behavioral modulation of pain based on constructivism, positing that task engagement, such as listening for errors in a musical passage, can establish a construction of reality that effectively replaces pain as a competing construction. Graded engagement produces graded reductions in pain as indicated by reduced psychophysiological arousal and subjective pain report. Fifty-three healthy volunteers having normal hearing participated in 4 music listening conditions consisting of passive listening (no task) or performing an error detection task varying in signal complexity and task difficulty. During all conditions, participants received normally painful fingertip shocks varying in intensity while stimulus-evoked potentials (SEP), pupil dilation responses (PDR), and retrospective pain reports were obtained. SEP and PDR increased with increasing stimulus intensity. Task performance decreased with increasing task difficulty. Mixed model analyses, adjusted for habituation/sensitization and repeated measures within person, revealed significant quadratic trends for SEP and pain report (Pchangemusic listening task. Engaging activities may prevent pain by creating competing constructions of reality that draw on the same processing resources as pain. Better understanding of these processes will advance the development of more effective pain modulation through improved manipulation of engagement strategies.

  3. Disease specific stress of tumor patients at the beginning of radiotherapy. Effect on psychosocial support requirement

    Sehlen, S.; Hollenhorst, H.; Schymura, B.; Firsching, M.; Duehmke, E.; Herschbach, P.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy brings a tumor patient into a special life situation in which different variables play a role of often unknown importance. The goal of this study was to investigate disease specific stress of tumor patients at the beginning of radiotherapy with established psychodiagnostic questionnaires and to evaluate the effect on psychosocial support requirement in order to reduce stress and to improve quality of life and compliance during radiotherapeutical treatment. Patients and Methods: 732 patients were screened, of whom 446 (60.9%) fulfilled the criteria for inclusion (refusals 21.0%, low Karnofsky performance status 6.6%, management problems 3.4%, language barriers 3.0%, cognitive restrictions 2.6%, death 2.5%). Disease specific aspects of stress in the questionnaire (Fragebogen zur Belastung von Krebspatienten, FBK), life situation (LS) and self-defined care requirements (BB) were self-rated by patients with different tumor types before radiotherapy. Medical and sociodemographic data were also documented. We investigated 446 patients (262 male, 184 female; median age 60.0 years) with different diagnoses. Results: Stress was observed mainly due to reduction of efficiency, anxiety and pain on the subscales. Women had a significant higher stress on subscales of pain (p=0.016) and anxiety (p=0.009), patients younger than 45 years in the subscale information (p=0.002) and patients older than 45 and younger than 60 years in the subscale anxiety (p=0.002) and the total score (p=0.003). Patients with mamma carcinoma had the highest stress. The maximum percentages of patients under high stress were found for the subscales of efficiency (43%) and anxiety (40%). The support requirement was characterized by the need of more medical information and dialogue with the doctor. We saw a significant correlation of high stress and high care requirement. Conclusions: Psychosocial support should be founded on psychosocial stress diagnostic and self-defined care

  4. Food consumption patterns and their effect on water requirement in China

    J. Liu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that food consumption patterns significantly impact water requirements. The aim of this paper is to quantify how food consumption patterns influence water requirements in China. The findings show that per capita water requirement for food (CWRF has increased from 255 m3 cap-1y−1 in 1961 to 860 m3 cap-1 y−1 in 2003, largely due to an increase in the consumption of animal products in recent decades. Although steadily increasing, the CWRF of China is still much lower than that of many developed countries. The total water requirement for food (TWRF has been determined as 1127 km3 y-1 in 2003. Three scenarios are proposed to project future TWRF, representing low, medium, and high levels of modernization (S1, S2, and S3, respectively. Analysis of these three scenarios indicates that TWRF will likely continue to increase in the next three decades. An additional amount of water ranging between 407 and 515 km3 y-1 will be required in 2030 compared to the TWRF in 2003. This will undoubtedly put high pressure on China's already scarce water resources. We conclude that the effect of the food consumption patterns on China's water resources is substantial both in the recent past and in the near future. China will need to strengthen "green water" management and to take advantage of "virtual water" import to meet the additional TWRF.

  5. FDG-PET response of skeletal (bone marrow and bone) involvement after induction chemotherapy in pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma - Are specific response criteria required?

    Georgi, Thomas Walter; Kluge, Regine; Kurch, Lars; Chavdarova, Lidia; Hasenclever, Dirk; Stoevesandt, Dietrich; Pelz, Tanja; Landman-Parker, Judith; Wallace, Hamish; Karlen, Jonas; Fernandez-Teijeiro, Ana; Cepelova, Michaela; Fossa, Alexander; Balwierz, Walentyna; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Ammann, Roland A; Pears, Jane; Hraskova, Andrea; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Beishuizen, Auke; Dieckmann, Karin; Leblanc, Thierry; Daw, Stephen; Baumann, Julia; Körholz, Dieter; Sabri, Osama; Mauz-Körholz, Christine

    2018-04-13

    Purpose: This study focused on skeletal involvement in FDG-PET (PET) in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). We aimed at a systematic evaluation of the different types of skeletal involvement and their PET response after two cycles of chemotherapy (PET-2), to answer the question whether the current PET response criterion for skeletal involvement is suitable. A secondary objective was to observe the influence of initial uptake intensity and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) of skeletal lesions on the PET-2 response. Methods: Initial PET scans (PET-0) of 1068 pediatric HL patients from the EuroNet-PHL-C1 (C1) trial were evaluated by central review for skeletal involvement. Three types of skeletal lesions were distinguished: skeletal lesions detected only in PET (PETonly), bone marrow (BM) lesions confirmed by MRI or BM biopsy and bone lesions. Uptake intensity (measured as qPET value) and MTV were calculated for each skeletal lesion. All PET-2 scans were assessed for residual tumor activity. The rates of complete metabolic response in PET-2 of skeletal and nodal involvement were compared. Results: 139/1068 (13%) C1 patients showed skeletal involvement (44/139 PETonly patients, 32/139 BM patients and 63/139 bone patients). 101/139 (73%) patients became PET-2 negative in the skeleton while lymph node involvement was PET-2 negative in 94/139 (68%) patients. Highest skeletal PET-2 negative rate was seen in 42/44 (95%) PETonly patients, followed by 22/32 (69%) BM patients and 37/63 (59%) bone patients. Skeletal lesions who became PET-2 negative showed lower median values for initial qPET (2.74) and MTV (2ml) than lesions who remained PET-2 positive (3.84; 7ml). Conclusion: In this study with pediatric HL patients, the complete response rate in PET-2 of skeletal and nodal involvement was similar. Bone flare seemed to be irrelevant. Overall, the current skeletal PET response criterion - comparison with the local skeletal background - is well suited. Initial uptake intensity and MTV of

  6. IAEA Response and Assistance Network. Date Effective: 1 January 2011

    2010-01-01

    This publication is a tool for (1) supporting the provision of international assistance in the event of a nuclear or radiological incident or emergency, (2) cooperation between States, their competent authorities and the IAEA, and (3) harmonization of response capabilities of States offering assistance under the Response and Assistance Network (RANET). The publication may also assist competent authorities and other response organizations in their efforts to establish and/or maintain their own response capabilities.

  7. cAMP response element-binding protein in the amygdala is required for long- but not short-term conditioned taste aversion memory.

    Lamprecht, R; Hazvi, S; Dudai, Y

    1997-11-01

    In conditioned taste aversion (CTA) organisms learn to avoid a taste if the first encounter with that taste is followed by transient poisoning. The neural mechanisms that subserve this robust and long-lasting association of taste and malaise have not yet been elucidated, but several brain areas have been implicated in the process, including the amygdala. In this study we investigated the role of amygdala in general, and the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in the amygdala in particular, in CTA learning and memory. Toward that end, we combined antisense technology in vivo with behavioral, molecular, and histochemical analysis. Local microinjection of phosphorothioate-modified oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) antisense to CREB into the rat amygdala several hours before CTA training transiently reduced the level of CREB protein during training and impaired CTA memory when tested 3-5 d later. In comparison, sense ODNs had no effect on memory. The effect of antisense was not attributable to differential tissue damage and was site-specific. CREB antisense in the amygdala had no effect on retrieval of CTA memory once it had been formed, and did not affect short-term CTA memory. We propose that the amygdala, specifically the central nucleus, is required for the establishment of long-term CTA memory in the behaving rat; that the process involves long-term changes, subserved by CRE-regulated gene expression, in amygdala neurons; and that the amygdala may retain some CTA-relevant information over time rather than merely modulating the gustatory trace during acquisition of CTA.

  8. Fast-Response-Time Shape-Memory-Effect Foam Actuators

    Jardine, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Bulk shape memory alloys, such as Nitinol or CuAlZn, display strong recovery forces undergoing a phase transformation after being strained in their martensitic state. These recovery forces are used for actuation. As the phase transformation is thermally driven, the response time of the actuation can be slow, as the heat must be passively inserted or removed from the alloy. Shape memory alloy TiNi torque tubes have been investigated for at least 20 years and have demonstrated high actuation forces [3,000 in.-lb (approximately equal to 340 N-m) torques] and are very lightweight. However, they are not easy to attach to existing structures. Adhesives will fail in shear at low-torque loads and the TiNi is not weldable, so that mechanical crimp fits have been generally used. These are not reliable, especially in vibratory environments. The TiNi is also slow to heat up, as it can only be heated indirectly using heater and cooling must be done passively. This has restricted their use to on-off actuators where cycle times of approximately one minute is acceptable. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) has been used in the past to make porous TiNi metal foams. Shape Change Technologies has been able to train SHS derived TiNi to exhibit the shape memory effect. As it is an open-celled material, fast response times were observed when the material was heated using hot and cold fluids. A methodology was developed to make the open-celled porous TiNi foams as a tube with integrated hexagonal ends, which then becomes a torsional actuator with fast response times. Under processing developed independently, researchers were able to verify torques of 84 in.-lb (approximately equal to 9.5 Nm) using an actuator weighing 1.3 oz (approximately equal to 37 g) with very fast (less than 1/16th of a second) initial response times when hot and cold fluids were used to facilitate heat transfer. Integrated structural connections were added as part of the net shape process, eliminating

  9. Improving cost-effectiveness and mitigating risks of renewable energy requirements

    Griffin, James P.

    Policy makers at the federal and state levels of government are debating actions to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions and dependence on oil as an energy source. Several concerns drive this debate: sharp rises in energy prices, increasing unease about the risks of climate change, energy security, and interest in expanding the domestic renewable energy industry. Renewable energy requirements are frequently proposed to address these concerns, and are currently in place, in various forms, at the federal and state levels of government. These policies specify that a certain portion of the energy supply come from renewable energy sources. This dissertation focuses on a specific proposal, known as 25 X 25, which requires 25% of electricity and motor vehicle transportation fuels supplied to U.S. consumers to come from renewable energy sources, such as wind power and ethanol, by 2025. This dissertation builds on prior energy policy analysis, and more specifically analyses of renewable energy requirements, by assessing the social welfare implications of a 25 x 25 policy and applying new methods of uncertainty analysis to multiple policy options decision makers can use to implement the policy. These methods identify policy options that can improve the cost-effectiveness and reduce the risks of renewable energy requirements. While the dissertation focuses on a specific policy, the research methods and findings are applicable to other renewable energy requirement policies. In the dissertation, I analyze six strategies for implementing a 25 x 25 policy across several hundred scenarios that represent plausible futures for uncertainties in energy markets, such as renewable energy costs, energy demand, and fossil fuel prices. The strategies vary in the availability of resources that qualify towards the policy requirement and the use of a "safety valve" that allows refiners and utilities to pay a constant fee after renewable energy costs reach a predetermined threshold. I test

  10. Organizing company specialists for rapid and effective response

    Jardim, G.M.; McDermott, H.J.

    1993-01-01

    The staff needed for the support of cleanup operations can be large even for moderately sized spills. Marshallng sufficient and qualified people to respond on short notice at locations throughout the world can tax even the largest corporations. This paper describes how Chevron has prepared for this important aspect of spill response. Basically, Chevron has formed 13 separate teams covering specially areas such as safety, finance, public relations, and legal. Each team is organized and managed by people who regularly work within that function. Members of each team are regular employees of the various Chevron companies throughout the world. The incident command system and coordinated plans are the common threads which allow these groups to work together effectively. Drills and self-audits are used to keep the plans current and team members prepared. The organization and activities of the Safety, Fire and Health (SF ampersand H) Functional Team is described in detail as an illustrated example of the functional team approach. This team consists of about 50 professionals in related fields. To facilitate rapid mobilization worldwide, each member has been medically qualified and has a current passport and selected evaluations. The team plan outlines the responsibilities of each professional group, the call-out procedure and telephone lists, and information on pre-identified SF ampersand H contractors that can be called upon if additional resources are needed. The plan is flexible so that it can be used by one or two people to handle alI SF ampersand H functions at a small spill or by many persons within each specialty for larger incidents

  11. Prostatic acid phosphatase is required for the antinociceptive effects of thiamine and benfotiamine.

    Hurt, Julie K; Coleman, Jennifer L; Fitzpatrick, Brendan J; Taylor-Blake, Bonnie; Bridges, Arlene S; Vihko, Pirkko; Zylka, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    Thiamine (Vitamin B1) is an essential vitamin that must be obtained from the diet for proper neurological function. At higher doses, thiamine and benfotiamine (S-benzoylthiamine O-monophosphate, BT)-a phosphorylated derivative of thiamine-have antinociceptive effects in animals and humans, although how these compounds inhibit pain is unknown. Here, we found that Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP) can dephosphorylate BT in vitro, in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and in primary-afferent axon terminals in the dorsal spinal cord. The dephosphorylated product S-benzoylthiamine (S-BT) then decomposes to O-benzoylthiamine (O-BT) and to thiamine in a pH-dependent manner, independent of additional enzymes. This unique reaction mechanism reveals that BT only requires a phosphatase for conversion to thiamine. However, we found that the antinociceptive effects of BT, thiamine monophosphate (TMP) and thiamine-a compound that is not phosphorylated-were entirely dependent on PAP at the spinal level. Moreover, pharmacokinetic studies with wild-type and Pap(-/-) mice revealed that PAP is not required for the conversion of BT to thiamine in vivo. Taken together, our study highlights an obligatory role for PAP in the antinociceptive effects of thiamine and phosphorylated thiamine analogs, and suggests a novel phosphatase-independent function for PAP.

  12. Prostatic acid phosphatase is required for the antinociceptive effects of thiamine and benfotiamine.

    Julie K Hurt

    Full Text Available Thiamine (Vitamin B1 is an essential vitamin that must be obtained from the diet for proper neurological function. At higher doses, thiamine and benfotiamine (S-benzoylthiamine O-monophosphate, BT-a phosphorylated derivative of thiamine-have antinociceptive effects in animals and humans, although how these compounds inhibit pain is unknown. Here, we found that Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP can dephosphorylate BT in vitro, in dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons and in primary-afferent axon terminals in the dorsal spinal cord. The dephosphorylated product S-benzoylthiamine (S-BT then decomposes to O-benzoylthiamine (O-BT and to thiamine in a pH-dependent manner, independent of additional enzymes. This unique reaction mechanism reveals that BT only requires a phosphatase for conversion to thiamine. However, we found that the antinociceptive effects of BT, thiamine monophosphate (TMP and thiamine-a compound that is not phosphorylated-were entirely dependent on PAP at the spinal level. Moreover, pharmacokinetic studies with wild-type and Pap(-/- mice revealed that PAP is not required for the conversion of BT to thiamine in vivo. Taken together, our study highlights an obligatory role for PAP in the antinociceptive effects of thiamine and phosphorylated thiamine analogs, and suggests a novel phosphatase-independent function for PAP.

  13. The intestinal flora is required to support antibody responses to systemic immunization in infant and germ free mice.

    Lamousé-Smith, Esi S; Tzeng, Alice; Starnbach, Michael N

    2011-01-01

    The presence of a complex and diverse intestinal flora is functionally important for regulating intestinal mucosal immune responses. However, the extent to which a balanced intestinal flora regulates systemic immune responses is still being defined. In order to specifically examine whether the acquisition of a less complex flora influences responses to immunization in the pre-weaning stages of life, we utilize a model in which infant mice acquire an intestinal flora from their mothers that has been altered by broad-spectrum antibiotics. In this model, pregnant dams are treated with a cocktail of antibiotics that alters both the density and microbial diversity of the intestinal flora. After challenge with a subcutaneous immunization, the antibiotic altered flora infant mice have lower antigen specific antibody titers compared to control age-matched mice. In a second model, we examined germ free (GF) mice to analyze how the complete lack of flora influences the ability to mount normal antibody responses following subcutaneous immunization. GF mice do not respond well to immunization and introduction of a normal flora into GF mice restores the capacity of these mice to respond. These results indicate that a gastrointestinal flora reduced in density and complexity at critical time points during development adversely impacts immune responses to systemic antigens.

  14. Solar Sail Material Performance Property Response to Space Environmental Effects

    Edwards, David L.; Semmel, Charles; Hovater, Mary; Nehls, Mary; Gray, Perry; Hubbs, Whitney; Wertz, George

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues research into the utilization of photonic materials for spacecraft propulsion. Spacecraft propulsion, using photonic materials, will be achieved using a solar sail. A solar sail operates on the principle that photons, originating from the sun, impart pressure to the sail and therefore provide a source for spacecraft propulsion. The pressure imparted to a solar sail can be increased, up to a factor of two, if the sun-facing surface is perfectly reflective. Therefore, these solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic sun-facing layer, a thin polymeric substrate and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. Near term solar sail propelled science missions are targeting the Lagrange point 1 (Ll) as well as locations sunward of L1 as destinations. These near term missions include the Solar Polar Imager and the L1 Diamond. The Environmental Effects Group at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues to actively characterize solar sail material in preparation for these near term solar sail missions. Previous investigations indicated that space environmental effects on sail material thermo-optical properties were minimal and would not significantly affect the propulsion efficiency of the sail. These investigations also indicated that the sail material mechanical stability degrades with increasing radiation exposure. This paper will further quantify the effect of space environmental exposure on the mechanical properties of candidate sail materials. Candidate sail materials for these missions include Aluminum coated Mylar[TM], Teonex[TM], and CPl (Colorless Polyimide). These materials were subjected to uniform radiation doses of electrons and protons in individual exposures sequences. Dose values ranged from 100 Mrads to over 5 Grads. The engineering performance property responses of thermo-optical and mechanical properties were

  15. Awareness tool for safe and responsible driving (OSCAR): a potential educational intervention for increasing interest, openness and knowledge about the abilities required and compensatory strategies among older drivers.

    Levasseur, Mélanie; Audet, Thérèse; Gélinas, Isabelle; Bédard, Michel; Langlais, Marie-Ève; Therrien, France-Hélène; Renaud, Judith; Coallier, Jean-Claude; D'Amours, Monia

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study aimed to verify the impact of the awareness tool for safe and responsible driving (OSCAR) on older adults' (1) interest, openness, and knowledge about the abilities and compensatory strategies required for safe driving; (2) awareness of changes that have occurred in their own driving abilities; and (3) actual utilization of compensatory strategies. A preexperimental design, including a pretest (T0) and posttest (T1) 8 to 10 weeks after exposure to the intervention, was used with 48 drivers aged between 67 and 84. The participants had a valid driving license and drove at least once a week. Overall, the results demonstrate that OSCAR increased interest, openness, and knowledge about the abilities and compensatory strategies of older drivers (P driving, OSCAR also improved awareness of the changes that could negatively impact safe driving and enhanced utilization of compensatory strategies. While promoting safe driving and the prevention of crashes and injuries, this intervention could ultimately help older adults maintain or increase their transportation mobility. More studies are needed to further evaluate OSCAR and identify ways to improve its effectiveness.

  16. Effect of environmental and material factors on the response of nanocomposite foam impact sensors

    Bird, Evan; Merrell, Jake; Rosquist, Parker; Martineau, Adin; Bowden, Anton; Seeley, Matthew; Fullwood, David

    2018-05-01

    Nanocomposite foam (NCF) is a multifunctional material that can be used to measure impact. Interactions between the flexible polymer matrix and conductive particles dispersed throughout it produce a voltage signal under dynamic strain, which correlates to the magnitude of impact. Though promising in applications requiring both impact sensing and energy absorption, NCF’s voltage response has been observed to suffer from significant signal drift. This paper investigates several causes of variance in the response of NCF sensors to consistent impacts. These effects can be classified into three general types: recoverable transient effects (such as those relating to viscoelasticity or capacitive charging), environmental drift (due to humidity and temperature), and permanent signal decay from material degradation. The motivation for the study arises from various potential repeat-impact applications where periodic recalibration of the sensor would be difficult (such as a gait-tracking insole in use for a marathon event). A cyclic drop testing machine was used to apply consistent impacts to NCF, and drift resulting from each factor (in ranges typical of an insole environment) was experimentally isolated. Models representing each factor’s contribution to signal drift are presented. Of the factors investigated, humidity and temperature caused the most significant drift, with permanent material degradation accounting for only minor decay in voltage response. Transient effects were also observed, with a characteristic ‘warm-up’ (or ‘charging’) time required for the NCF to achieve steady-state; this phenomenon, and the related ‘recovery’ time for the material to return to its original state, were determined. The resultant data can be leveraged to implement a correction algorithm or other drift-compensating method to retain an NCF sensor’s accuracy in both long and short data collection scenarios.

  17. The nociception genes painless and Piezo are required for the cellular immune response of Drosophila larvae to wasp parasitization.

    Tokusumi, Yumiko; Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Schulz, Robert A

    2017-05-13

    In vertebrates, interaction between the nervous system and immune system is important to protect a challenged host from stress inputs from external sources. In this study, we demonstrate that sensory neurons are involved in the cellular immune response elicited by wasp infestation of Drosophila larvae. Multidendritic class IV neurons sense contacts from external stimuli and induce avoidance behaviors for host defense. Our findings show that inactivation of these sensory neurons impairs the cellular response against wasp parasitization. We also demonstrate that the nociception genes encoding the mechanosensory receptors Painless and Piezo, both expressed in class IV neurons, are essential for the normal cellular immune response to parasite challenge. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Food and Natural Materials Target Mechanisms to Effectively Regulate Allergic Responses.

    Shin, Hee Soon; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    An immune hypersensitivity disorder called allergy is caused by diverse allergens entering the body via skin contact, injection, ingestion, and/or inhalation. These allergic responses may develop into allergic disorders, including inflammations such as atopic dermatitis, asthma, anaphylaxis, food allergies, and allergic rhinitis. Several drugs have been developed to treat these allergic disorders; however, long-term intake of these drugs could have adverse effects. As an alternative to these medicines, food and natural materials that ameliorate allergic disorder symptoms without producing any side effects can be consumed. Food and natural materials can effectively regulate successive allergic responses in an allergic chain-reaction mechanism in the following ways: [1] Inhibition of allergen permeation via paracellular diffusion into epithelial cells, [2] suppression of type 2 T-helper (Th) cell-related cytokine production by regulating Th1/Th2 balance, [3] inhibition of pathogenic effector CD4(+) T cell differentiation by inducing regulatory T cells (Treg), and [4] inhibition of degranulation in mast cells. The immunomodulatory effects of food and natural materials on each target mechanism were scientifically verified and shown to alleviate allergic disorder symptoms. Furthermore, consumption of certain food and natural materials such as fenugreek, skullcap, chitin/chitosan, and cheonggukjang as anti-allergics have merits such as safety (no adverse side effects), multiple suppressive effects (as a mixture would contain various components that are active against allergic responses), and ease of consumption when required. These merits and anti-allergic properties of food and natural materials help control various allergic disorders.

  19. Effect of wavelength, epidermal thickness and skin type on the required dose for photodynamic therapy

    Karsten, AE

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Wavelength, Epidermal Thickness and Skin Type on the Required Dose for Photodynamic Therapy A.E. Karsten1,2 1CSIR National Laser Centre, Biophotonics Group, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa 2Physics Department, Faculty of Natural... a certain depth in the skin. For most laser treatments and diagnostics apllications, wavelengths ranging between 600 and 1 000 nm are used. 1.1 Photodynamic therapy (PDT) In South Africa, as in many other countries, cancer is a major health...

  20. The Army Materiel Requirements Documents: Qualitative Analysis of Efficiency and Effectiveness

    2013-06-30

    65 - k~î~ä=mçëíÖê~Çì~íÉ=pÅÜççä= We measure efficiency based on two BPP initiatives: (1) Build Stronger Partnerships With the Requirements...poor,” “average,” or “excellent” based on comments received from SMEs in relation to the definitions of each BPP initiative during our interviews. A...M-ATV, and JLTV and how well they rank in terms of efficiency and effectiveness according to BPP initiatives. For efficiency, we assign a

  1. Response

    Higgins, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

  2. Effects of ZNF804A on auditory P300 response in schizophrenia.

    O'Donoghue, T

    2014-01-01

    The common variant rs1344706 within the zinc-finger protein gene ZNF804A has been strongly implicated in schizophrenia (SZ) susceptibility by a series of recent genetic association studies. Although associated with a pattern of altered neural connectivity, evidence that increased risk is mediated by an effect on cognitive deficits associated with the disorder has been equivocal. This study investigated whether the same ZNF804A risk allele was associated with variation in the P300 auditory-evoked response, a cognitively relevant putative endophenotype for SZ. We compared P300 responses in carriers and noncarriers of the ZNF804A risk allele genotype groups in Irish patients and controls (n=97). P300 response was observed to vary according to genotype in this sample, such that risk allele carriers showed relatively higher P300 response compared with noncarriers. This finding accords with behavioural data reported by our group and others. It is also consistent with the idea that ZNF804A may have an impact on cortical efficiency, reflected in the higher levels of activations required to achieve comparable behavioural accuracy on the task used.

  3. Partial demethylation of oligogalacturonides by pectin methyl esterase 1 is required for eliciting defence responses in wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca).

    Osorio, Sonia; Castillejo, Cristina; Quesada, Miguel A; Medina-Escobar, Nieves; Brownsey, Geoff J; Suau, Rafael; Heredia, Antonio; Botella, Miguel A; Valpuesta, Victoriano

    2008-04-01

    In addition to the role of the cell wall as a physical barrier against pathogens, some of its constituents, such as pectin-derived oligogalacturonides (OGA), are essential components for elicitation of defence responses. To investigate how modifications of pectin alter defence responses, we expressed the fruit-specific Fragaria x ananassa pectin methyl esterase FaPE1 in the wild strawberry Fragaria vesca. Pectin from transgenic ripe fruits differed from the wild-type with regard to the degree and pattern of methyl esterification, as well as the average size of pectin polymers. Purified oligogalacturonides from the transgenic fruits showed a reduced degree of esterification compared to oligogalacturonides from wild-type fruits. This reduced esterification is necessary to elicit defence responses in strawberry. The transgenic F. vesca lines had constitutively activated pathogen defence responses, resulting in higher resistance to the necrotropic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Further studies in F. vesca and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves showed that the elicitation capacity of the oligogalacturonides is more specific than previously envisaged.

  4. Cellular adhesion responses to the heparin-binding (HepII) domain of fibronectin require heparan sulfate with specific properties

    Mahalingam, Yashithra; Gallagher, John T; Couchman, John R

    2006-01-01

    of fibronectin (HepII domain) through its HS chains. The fine structure of HS is critical to growth factor responses, and whether this extends to matrix ligands is unknown but is suggested from in vitro experiments. Cell attachment to HepII showed that heparin oligosaccharides of >or=14 sugar residues were...

  5. Cooperative and Competitive Contextual Effects on Social Cognitive and Empathic Neural Responses

    Minhye Lee

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to differentiate the neural responses to cooperative and competitive contexts, which are the two of the most important social contexts in human society. Healthy male college students were asked to complete a Tetris-like task requiring mental rotation skills under individual, cooperative, and competitive contexts in an fMRI scanner. While the participants completed the task, pictures of others experiencing pain evoking emotional empathy randomly appeared to capture contextual effects on empathic neural responses. Behavioral results indicated that, in the presence of cooperation, participants solved the tasks more accurately and quickly than what they did when in the presence of competition. The fMRI results revealed activations in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC related to executive functions and theory of mind when participants performed the task under both cooperative and competitive contexts, whereas no activation of such areas was observed in the individual context. Cooperation condition exhibited stronger neural responses in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC and dmPFC than competition condition. Competition condition, however, showed marginal neural responses in the cerebellum and anterior insular cortex (AIC. The two social contexts involved stronger empathic neural responses to other’s pain than the individual context, but no substantial differences between cooperation and competition were present. Regions of interest analyses revealed that individual’s trait empathy modulated the neural activity in the state empathy network, the AIC, and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC depending on the social context. These results suggest that cooperation improves task performance and activates neural responses associated with reward and mentalizing. Furthermore, the interaction between trait- and state-empathy was explored by correlation analyses between individual

  6. Antiapolipoprotein A-1 IgG chronotropic effects require nongenomic action of aldosterone on L-type calcium channels.

    Rossier, Michel F; Pagano, Sabrina; Python, Magaly; Maturana, Andres D; James, Richard W; Mach, François; Roux-Lombard, Pascale; Vuilleumier, Nicolas

    2012-03-01

    Autoantibodies to apolipoprotein A-1 (antiapoA-1 IgG) have been shown to be associated with higher resting heart rate and morbidity in myocardial infarction patients and to behave as a chronotropic agent in the presence of aldosterone on isolated neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVC). We aimed at identifying the pathways accounting for this aldosterone-dependent antiapoA-1 IgG-positive chronotropic effect on NRVC. The rate of regular spontaneous contractions was determined on NRVC in the presence of different steroid hormones and antagonists. AntiapoA-1 IgG chronotropic response was maximal within 20 min and observed only in aldosterone-pretreated cells but not in those exposed to other steroids. The positive antiapoA-1 IgG chronotropic effect was already significant after 5 min aldosterone preincubation, was dependent on 3-kinase and protein kinase A activities, was not inhibited by actinomycin D, and was fully abrogated by eplerenone (but not by spironolactone), demonstrating the dependence on a nongenomic action of aldosterone elicited through the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). Under oxidative conditions (but not under normal redox state), corticosterone mimicked the permissive action of aldosterone on the antiapoA-1 IgG chronotropic response. Pharmacological and patch-clamp studies identified L-type calcium channels as crucial effectors of antiapoA-1 IgG chronotropic action, involving two converging pathways that increase the channel activity. The first one involves the rapid, nongenomic activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase enzyme by MR, and the second one requires a constitutive basal protein kinase A activity. In conclusion, our results indicate that, on NRVC, the aldosterone-dependent chronotropic effects of antiapoA-1 IgG involve the nongenomic activation of L-type calcium channels.

  7. 33 CFR 155.1035 - Response plan requirements for manned vessels carrying oil as a primary cargo.

    2010-07-01

    ... actions in the event of a— (i) Transfer system leak; (ii) Tank overflow; or (iii) Suspected cargo tank or hull leak; (2) Procedures in the order of priority for the crew to mitigate or prevent any discharge or... this section must be capable of providing the equipment and supplies necessary to meet the requirements...

  8. The Effects of Preoperative Oral Pregabalin and Perioperative Intravenous Lidocaine Infusion on Postoperative Morphine Requirement in Patients Undergoing Laparatomy

    Senniye Ulgen Zengin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate and compare the effects of preoperative oral pregabalin and perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative morphine requirement, adverse effects, patients’ satisfaction, mobilization, time to first defecation and time to discharge in patients undergoing laparotomy.

  9. A comparison of immunotoxic effects of nanomedicinal products with regulatory immunotoxicity testing requirements

    Giannakou C

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Christina Giannakou,1,2 Margriet VDZ Park,1 Wim H de Jong,1 Henk van Loveren,1,2 Rob J Vandebriel,1 Robert E Geertsma1 1Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM, Bilthoven, 2Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Abstract: Nanomaterials (NMs are attractive for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications because of their unique physicochemical and biological properties. A major application area of NMs is drug delivery. Many nanomedicinal products (NMPs currently on the market or in clinical trials are most often based on liposomal products or polymer conjugates. NMPs can be designed to target specific tissues, eg, tumors. In virtually all cases, NMPs will eventually reach the immune system. It has been shown that most NMs end up in organs of the mononuclear phagocytic system, notably liver and spleen. Adverse immune effects, including allergy, hypersensitivity, and immunosuppression, have been reported after NMP administration. Interactions of NMPs with the immune system may therefore constitute important side effects. Currently, no regulatory documents are specifically dedicated to evaluate the immunotoxicity of NMs or NMPs. Their immunotoxicity assessment is performed based on existing guidelines for conventional substances or medicinal products. Due to the unique properties of NMPs when compared with conventional medicinal products, it is uncertain whether the currently prescribed set of tests provides sufficient information for an adequate evaluation of potential immunotoxicity of NMPs. The aim of this study was therefore, to compare the current regulatory immunotoxicity testing requirements with the accumulating knowledge on immunotoxic effects of NMPs in order to identify potential gaps in the safety assessment. This comparison showed that immunotoxic effects, such as complement activation-related pseudoallergy, myelosuppression, inflammasome

  10. Sevoflurane requirement during elective ankle day surgery: the effects of etirocoxib premedication, a prospective randomised study

    Jakobsson Jan G

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAIDs, have become an important part of the pain management in day surgery. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Coxib premedication on the intra-operative anaesthetic requirements in patients undergoing elective ankle surgery in general anaesthesia. Type of study Prospective, randomized study of the intra-operative anaesthetic-sparing effects of etoricoxib premedication as compared to no NSAID preoperatively. Methods The intra-operative requirement of sevoflurane was studied in forty-four ASA 1–2 patients undergoing elective ankle day surgical in balanced general anaesthesia. Primary study endpoint was end-tidal sevoflurane concentration to maintain Cerebral State Index of 40 – 50 during surgery. Results All anaesthesia and surgery was uneventful, no complications or adverse events were noticed. The mean end-tidal sevoflurane concentration intra-operatively was 1.25 (SD 0.2 and 0.91 (SD 0.2 for the pre and post-operative administered group of patients respectively (p Conclusion Coxib premedication before elective day surgery has an anaesthetic sparing potential.

  11. Duox, Flotillin-2, and Src42A are required to activate or delimit the spread of the transcriptional response to epidermal wounds in Drosophila.

    Michelle T Juarez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The epidermis is the largest organ of the body for most animals, and the first line of defense against invading pathogens. A breach in the epidermal cell layer triggers a variety of localized responses that in favorable circumstances result in the repair of the wound. Many cellular and genetic responses must be limited to epidermal cells that are close to wounds, but how this is regulated is still poorly understood. The order and hierarchy of epidermal wound signaling factors are also still obscure. The Drosophila embryonic epidermis provides an excellent system to study genes that regulate wound healing processes. We have developed a variety of fluorescent reporters that provide a visible readout of wound-dependent transcriptional activation near epidermal wound sites. A large screen for mutants that alter the activity of these wound reporters has identified seven new genes required to activate or delimit wound-induced transcriptional responses to a narrow zone of cells surrounding wound sites. Among the genes required to delimit the spread of wound responses are Drosophila Flotillin-2 and Src42A, both of which are transcriptionally activated around wound sites. Flotillin-2 and constitutively active Src42A are also sufficient, when overexpressed at high levels, to inhibit wound-induced transcription in epidermal cells. One gene required to activate epidermal wound reporters encodes Dual oxidase, an enzyme that produces hydrogen peroxide. We also find that four biochemical treatments (a serine protease, a Src kinase inhibitor, methyl-ß-cyclodextrin, and hydrogen peroxide are sufficient to globally activate epidermal wound response genes in Drosophila embryos. We explore the epistatic relationships among the factors that induce or delimit the spread of epidermal wound signals. Our results define new genetic functions that interact to instruct only a limited number of cells around puncture wounds to mount a transcriptional response, mediating

  12. Myeloablative temozolomide enhances CD8⁺ T-cell responses to vaccine and is required for efficacy against brain tumors in mice.

    Luis A Sanchez-Perez

    Full Text Available Temozolomide (TMZ is an alkylating agent shown to prolong survival in patients with high grade glioma and is routinely used to treat melanoma brain metastases. A prominent side effect of TMZ is induction of profound lymphopenia, which some suggest may be incompatible with immunotherapy. Conversely, it has been proposed that recovery from chemotherapy-induced lymphopenia may actually be exploited to potentiate T-cell responses. Here, we report the first demonstration of TMZ as an immune host-conditioning regimen in an experimental model of brain tumor and examine its impact on antitumor efficacy of a well-characterized peptide vaccine. Our results show that high-dose, myeloablative (MA TMZ resulted in markedly reduced CD4(+, CD8(+ T-cell and CD4(+Foxp3(+ TReg counts. Adoptive transfer of naïve CD8(+ T cells and vaccination in this setting led to an approximately 70-fold expansion of antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells over controls. Ex vivo analysis of effector functions revealed significantly enhanced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from mice receiving MA TMZ when compared to those treated with a lower lymphodepletive, non-myeloablative (NMA dose. Importantly, MA TMZ, but not NMA TMZ was uniquely associated with an elevation of endogenous IL-2 serum levels, which we also show was required for optimal T-cell expansion. Accordingly, in a murine model of established intracerebral tumor, vaccination-induced immunity in the setting of MA TMZ-but not lymphodepletive, NMA TMZ-led to significantly prolonged survival. Overall, these results may be used to leverage the side-effects of a clinically-approved chemotherapy and should be considered in future study design of immune-based treatments for brain tumors.

  13. Effects of childhood trauma on left inferior frontal gyrus function during response inhibition across psychotic disorders.

    Quidé, Y; O'Reilly, N; Watkeys, O J; Carr, V J; Green, M J

    2018-07-01

    Childhood trauma is a risk factor for psychosis. Deficits in response inhibition are common to psychosis and trauma-exposed populations, and associated brain functions may be affected by trauma exposure in psychotic disorders. We aimed to identify the influence of trauma-exposure on brain activation and functional connectivity during a response inhibition task. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine brain function within regions-of-interest [left and right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right supplementary motor area, right inferior parietal lobule and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex], during the performance of a Go/No-Go Flanker task, in 112 clinical cases with psychotic disorders and 53 healthy controls (HCs). Among the participants, 71 clinical cases and 21 HCs reported significant levels of childhood trauma exposure, while 41 clinical cases and 32 HCs did not. In the absence of effects on response inhibition performance, childhood trauma exposure was associated with increased activation in the left IFG, and increased connectivity between the left IFG seed region and the cerebellum and calcarine sulcus, in both cases and healthy individuals. There was no main effect of psychosis, and no trauma-by-psychosis interaction for any other region-of-interest. Within the clinical sample, the effects of trauma-exposure on the left IFG activation were mediated by symptom severity. Trauma-related increases in activation of the left IFG were not associated with performance differences, or dependent on clinical diagnostic status; increased IFG functionality may represent a compensatory (overactivation) mechanism required to exert adequate inhibitory control of the motor response.

  14. Deletion of glutamate dehydrogenase in beta-cells abolishes part of the insulin secretory response not required for glucose homeostasis

    Carobbio, Stefania; Frigerio, Francesca; Rubi, Blanca

    2009-01-01

    Insulin exocytosis is regulated in pancreatic ss-cells by a cascade of intracellular signals translating glucose levels into corresponding secretory responses. The mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is regarded as a major player in this process, although its abrogation has not been...... tested yet in animal models. Here, we generated transgenic mice, named betaGlud1(-/-), with ss-cell-specific GDH deletion. Our results show that GDH plays an essential role in the full development of the insulin secretory response. In situ pancreatic perfusion revealed that glucose-stimulated insulin...... secretion was reduced by 37% in betaGlud1(-/-). Furthermore, isolated islets with either constitutive or acute adenovirus-mediated knock-out of GDH showed a 49 and 38% reduction in glucose-induced insulin release, respectively. Adenovirus-mediated re-expression of GDH in betaGlud1(-/-) islets fully restored...

  15. CREB binding protein is a required coactivator for Smad-dependent, transforming growth factor β transcriptional responses in endothelial cells

    Topper, James N.; DiChiara, Maria R.; Brown, Jonathan D.; Williams, Amy J.; Falb, Dean; Collins, Tucker; Gimbrone, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily of growth factors and cytokines has been implicated in a variety of physiological and developmental processes within the cardiovascular system. Smad proteins are a recently described family of intracellular signaling proteins that transduce signals in response to TGF-β superfamily ligands. We demonstrate by both a mammalian two-hybrid and a biochemical approach that human Smad2 and Smad4, two essential Smad proteins involved in mediating TG...

  16. Intrinsic JNK-MAPK pathway involvement requires daf-16-mediated immune response during Shigella flexneri infection in C. elegans.

    Marudhupandiyan, Shanmugam; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2017-06-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinase-mitogen-activated protein kinase (JNK-MAPK) pathway assists in modulating signals for growth, survival, and metabolism, thereby coordinating many cellular events during normal and stress conditions. To understand the role of the JNK-MAPK pathway during bacterial infection, an in vivo model organism Caenorhabditis elegans was used. In order to check the involvement of the JNK-MAPK pathway, the survival rate of C. elegans wild type (WT), and JNK-MAPK pathway mutant worms' upon exposure to selective Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, was studied. Among the pathogens, Shigella flexneri M9OT was found to efficiently colonize inside the WT and JNK-MAPK pathway mutant worms. qPCR studies had suggested that the above pathway-specific genes kgb-2 and jnk-1 were prominently responsible for the immune response elicited by the host during the M9OT infection. In addition, daf-16, which is a major transcription factor of the insulin/insulin growth factor-1 signaling (IIS) pathway, was also found to be involved during the host response. Crosstalk between IIS and JNK-MAPK pathways has probably been involved in the activation of the host immune system, which consequently leads to lifespan extension. Furthermore, it is also observed that daf-16 activation by JNK-MAPK pathway leads to antimicrobial response, by activating lys-7 expression. These findings suggest that JNK-MAPK is not the sole pathway that enhances the immunity of the host. Nonetheless, the IIS pathway bridges the JNK-MAPK pathway that influences in protecting the host in counter to the M9OT infection.

  17. The Mere Exposure Effect: Relationship to Response Competition and Imagery Ability.

    Vrana, Scott R.

    Exposure to novel stimuli increases one's liking for such stimuli. Response competition is one theory attempting to account for this effect: as a stimulus becomes more familiar, competing responses drop out in favor of one dominant response and the stimulus becomes better liked. Imagery ability refers to the regeneration of responses during…

  18. The cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factors requires co-ordinated signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis.

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-08-18

    VEGFs (vascular endothelial growth factors) are a family of conserved disulfide-linked soluble secretory glycoproteins found in higher eukaryotes. VEGFs mediate a wide range of responses in different tissues including metabolic homoeostasis, cell proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis. Such responses are initiated by VEGF binding to soluble and membrane-bound VEGFRs (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases) and co-receptors. VEGF and receptor splice isoform diversity further enhances complexity of membrane protein assembly and function in signal transduction pathways that control multiple cellular responses. Different signal transduction pathways are simultaneously activated by VEGFR-VEGF complexes with membrane trafficking along the endosome-lysosome network further modulating signal output from multiple enzymatic events associated with such pathways. Balancing VEGFR-VEGF signal transduction with trafficking and proteolysis is essential in controlling the intensity and duration of different intracellular signalling events. Dysfunction in VEGF-regulated signal transduction is important in chronic disease states including cancer, atherosclerosis and blindness. This family of growth factors and receptors is an important model system for understanding human disease pathology and developing new therapeutics for treating such ailments. © 2015 Authors.

  19. The G protein-coupled receptor FSHR-1 is required for the Caenorhabditis elegans innate immune response.

    Powell, Jennifer R; Kim, Dennis H; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2009-02-24

    Innate immunity is an ancient defense system used by both vertebrates and invertebrates. Previously characterized innate immune responses in plants and animals are triggered by detection of pathogens using specific receptors, which typically use a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain to bind molecular patterns associated with infection. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans uses defense pathways conserved with vertebrates; however, the mechanism by which C. elegans detects pathogens is unknown. We screened all LRR-containing transmembrane receptors in C. elegans and identified the G protein-coupled receptor FSHR-1 as an important component of the C. elegans immune response to Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. FSHR-1 acts in the C. elegans intestine, the primary site of exposure to ingested pathogens. FSHR-1 signals in parallel to the known p38 MAPK pathway but converges to regulate the transcriptional induction of an overlapping but nonidentical set of antimicrobial effectors. FSHR-1 may act generally to boost the nematode immune response, or it may function as a pathogen receptor.

  20. Estimating required information size by quantifying diversity in random-effects model meta-analyses

    Wetterslev, Jørn; Thorlund, Kristian; Brok, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    an intervention effect suggested by trials with low-risk of bias. METHODS: Information size calculations need to consider the total model variance in a meta-analysis to control type I and type II errors. Here, we derive an adjusting factor for the required information size under any random-effects model meta......-analysis. RESULTS: We devise a measure of diversity (D2) in a meta-analysis, which is the relative variance reduction when the meta-analysis model is changed from a random-effects into a fixed-effect model. D2 is the percentage that the between-trial variability constitutes of the sum of the between...... and interpreted using several simulations and clinical examples. In addition we show mathematically that diversity is equal to or greater than inconsistency, that is D2 >or= I2, for all meta-analyses. CONCLUSION: We conclude that D2 seems a better alternative than I2 to consider model variation in any random...

  1. Nitric oxide is required for the insulin sensitizing effects of contraction in mouse skeletal muscle.

    Zhang, Xinmei; Hiam, Danielle; Hong, Yet-Hoi; Zulli, Anthony; Hayes, Alan; Rattigan, Stephen; McConell, Glenn K

    2017-12-15

    People with insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes can substantially increase their skeletal muscle glucose uptake during exercise and insulin sensitivity after exercise. Skeletal muscle nitric oxide (NO) is important for glucose uptake during exercise, although how prior exercise increases insulin sensitivity is unclear. In the present study, we examined whether NO is necessary for normal increases in skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity after contraction ex vivo in mouse muscle. The present study uncovers, for the first time, a novel role for NO in the insulin sensitizing effects of ex vivo contraction, which is independent of blood flow. The factors regulating the increase in skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity after exercise are unclear. We examined whether nitric oxide (NO) is required for the increase in insulin sensitivity after ex vivo contractions. Isolated C57BL/6J mouse EDL muscles were contracted for 10 min or remained at rest (basal) with or without the NO synthase (NOS) inhibition (N G -monomethyl-l-arginine; l-NMMA; 100 μm). Then, 3.5 h post contraction/basal, muscles were exposed to saline or insulin (120 μU ml -1 ) with or without l-NMMA during the last 30 min. l-NMMA had no effect on basal skeletal muscle glucose uptake. The increase in muscle glucose uptake with insulin (57%) was significantly (P contraction (140% increase). NOS inhibition during the contractions had no effect on this insulin-sensitizing effect of contraction, whereas NOS inhibition during insulin prevented the increase in skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity post-contraction. Soluble guanylate cyclase inhibition, protein kinase G (PKG) inhibition or cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibition each had no effect on the insulin-sensitizing effect of prior contraction. In conclusion, NO is required for increases in insulin sensitivity several hours after contraction of mouse skeletal muscle via a cGMP/PKG independent pathway. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology

  2. Effect of partially purified fumonisins on cellular immune response in ...

    After 7 days, cellular immune response was evaluated by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and lymphoproliferative assays (LA) using spleen cells. Nitric oxide (NO) production by spleen cells was also evaluated. The specific LA response to Pb antigen was higher in group PB than in FB and CTR groups (p< 0.05) but not ...

  3. The assessment of the effect of corporate social responsibility on ...

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) integrates major areas of an organisation, including community, environment, ethics, workforce, human rights, responsibility in the market, vision and values and workplace. Much work has been done on the organization giving back to the environment and community; however other ...

  4. Specific Ion Effects in Thermo-Responsive Polymer Solutions

    Moghaddam, Saeed Zajforoushan

    Stimuli-responsive polymers are macromolecules that undergo a significant change in conformation and interactions in response to an external stimulus such as temperature and addition of salts. The applications of these materials are numerous ranging from biomedical applications to fabrication of ...

  5. The effect of the glycaemic response of three commonly consumed ...

    2015-06-30

    Jun 30, 2015 ... classifying glycaemic response to carbohydrate-containing foods. The GI is defined as ... of conducting this study was to evaluate the glycaemic response of some commonly ... basis was determined according to the Association of Analytic ... medical laboratory scientist using the glucose oxidation method.

  6. The Effects of Message Framing on Response to Environmental Communications.

    Davis, Joel J.

    1995-01-01

    Explores how the framing of environmental communication influences attitudes and environmentally responsible behaviors. Finds that communication that discussed losses (rather than gains) to the current (rather than future) generation gave rise to the most positive responses and the highest levels of intent to participate in…

  7. The effects of nedocromil sodium on the response to grain dust in West Australian grain workers.

    Blainey, A D; Musk, A W; Ryan, G; Phillips, M J; Buccilli, C; Troon, S; Kidd, G

    1990-01-01

    Seasonal grain workers in Western Australia who develop respiratory symptoms after exposure to grain dust develop concomitant changes in lung function and bronchial responsiveness to methacholine. The mechanisms underlying these changes are not known. A detailed study was undertaken of seasonal grain workers in Western Australia to evaluate the effect of nedocromil sodium (Fisons, United Kingdom) on these changes to see if they could be prevented by this drug. Forty seven subjects participated. Symptoms and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were recorded before the study and before, during, and after each working shift, and bronchial responsiveness to methacholine was measured at the beginning and end of the study. Twenty three subjects received nedocromil and 22 received a placebo in a double blind design; there was no difference in baseline characteristics between the two groups. At the end of the study, no differences were found between the nedocromil and placebo groups in the prevalence of symptoms or development of new symptoms during the study. The drug had no effect on changes in methacholine PD20 or FEV1. As in previous studies, new symptoms developing during the season were more common in atopic subjects and were associated with a fall in methacholine PD20. It is concluded that nedocromil has no effect on the development of new symptoms in grain workers. The mechanisms underlying these symptoms require further study. PMID:2171630

  8. The Unfolded Protein Response Is Induced by the Cell Wall Integrity Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Cascade and Is Required for Cell Wall Integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Scrimale, Thomas; Didone, Louis; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L.; Krysan, Damian J.

    2009-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is an extracellular structure that is dependent on secretory and membrane proteins for its construction. We investigated the role of protein quality control mechanisms in cell wall integrity and found that the unfolded protein response (UPR) and, to a lesser extent, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) pathways are required for proper cell wall construction. Null mutation of IRE1, double mutation of ERAD components (hrd1Δ and ubc7Δ) and ire1Δ, or expres...

  9. Effect of Dietary Lipids on Endotoxemia Influences Postprandial Inflammatory Response.

    López-Moreno, Javier; García-Carpintero, Sonia; Jimenez-Lucena, Rosa; Haro, Carmen; Rangel-Zúñiga, Oriol A; Blanco-Rojo, Ruth; Yubero-Serrano, Elena M; Tinahones, Francisco J; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Pérez-Martínez, Pablo; Roche, Helen M; López-Miranda, José; Camargo, Antonio

    2017-09-06

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) results in postprandial metabolic alterations that predisposes one to a state of chronic low-grade inflammation and increased oxidative stress. We aimed to assess the effect of the consumption of the quantity and quality of dietary fat on fasting and postprandial plasma lipopolysaccharides (LPS). A subgroup of 75 subjects with metabolic syndrome was randomized to receive 1 of 4 diets: HSFA, rich in saturated fat; HMUFA, rich in monounsaturated fat; LFHCC n-3, low-fat, rich in complex carbohydrate diet supplemented with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids; LFHCC low-fat, rich in complex carbohydrate diet supplemented with placebo, for 12 weeks each. We administered a fat challenge reflecting the fatty acid composition of the diets at postintervention. We determined the plasma lipoproteins and glucose and gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and adipose tissue. LPS and LPS binding protein (LBP) plasma levels were determined by ELISA, at fasting and postprandial (4 h after a fat challenge) states. We observed a postprandial increase in LPS levels after the intake of the HSFA meal, whereas we did not find any postprandial changes after the intake of the other three diets. Moreover, we found a positive relationship between the LPS plasma levels and the gene expression of IkBa and MIF1 in PBMC. No statistically significant differences in the LBP plasma levels at fasting or postprandial states were observed. Our results suggest that the consumption of HSFA diet increases the intestinal absorption of LPS which, in turn, increases postprandial endotoxemia levels and the postprandial inflammatory response.

  10. 78 FR 17890 - Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for Automated External Defibrillator System.

    2013-03-25

    ... requiring this device to meet the statute's premarket approval requirements and the benefits to the public... requiring the device to have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP and the benefit to the public from... consider exercising enforcement discretion for devices lawfully distributed before the requirement to have...

  11. Initiation of Swarming Motility by Proteus mirabilis Occurs in Response to Specific Cues Present in Urine and Requires Excess l-Glutamine

    Armbruster, Chelsie E.; Hodges, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a leading cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CaUTI), differentiates into swarm cells that migrate across catheter surfaces and medium solidified with 1.5% agar. While many genes and nutrient requirements involved in the swarming process have been identified, few studies have addressed the signals that promote initiation of swarming following initial contact with a surface. In this study, we show that P. mirabilis CaUTI isolates initiate swarming in response to specific nutrients and environmental cues. Thirty-three compounds, including amino acids, polyamines, fatty acids, and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates, were tested for the ability to promote swarming when added to normally nonpermissive media. l-Arginine, l-glutamine, dl-histidine, malate, and dl-ornithine promoted swarming on several types of media without enhancing swimming motility or growth rate. Testing of isogenic mutants revealed that swarming in response to the cues required putrescine biosynthesis and pathways involved in amino acid metabolism. Furthermore, excess glutamine was found to be a strict requirement for swarming on normal swarm agar in addition to being a swarming cue under normally nonpermissive conditions. We thus conclude that initiation of swarming occurs in response to specific cues and that manipulating concentrations of key nutrient cues can signal whether or not a particular environment is permissive for swarming. PMID:23316040

  12. The effect of aspirin on blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients with femoral neck fractures.

    Manning, Brian J

    2012-02-03

    Although it is widely accepted that aspirin will increase the risk of intra- and post-operative bleeding, clinical studies have not consistently supported this assumption. We aimed to assess the effect of pre-operative aspirin on blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients undergoing emergency fixation of femoral neck fractures. A prospective case-control study was undertaken in patients presenting with femoral neck fractures. Parameters recorded included intra-operative blood loss, post-operative blood loss, transfusion requirements and peri-operative reduction in haemoglobin concentration. Of 89 patients presenting with femoral neck fractures 32 were on long-term aspirin therapy. Pre-operative aspirin ingestion did not significantly affect peri-operative blood loss, or change in haemoglobin concentration or haematocrit. However those patients taking aspirin pre-operatively had a significantly lower haemoglobin concentration and haematocrit and were more likely to be anaemic at presentation than those who were not receiving aspirin. Patients taking aspirin were also more likely to receive blood transfusion post-operatively.

  13. Effects and costs of requiring child-restraint systems for young children traveling on commercial airplanes.

    Newman, Thomas B; Johnston, Brian D; Grossman, David C

    2003-10-01

    The US Federal Aviation Administration is planning a new regulation requiring children younger than 2 years to ride in approved child-restraint seats on airplanes. To estimate the annual number of child air crash deaths that might be prevented by the proposed regulation, the threshold proportion of families switching from air to car travel above which the risks of the policy would exceed its benefits, and the cost per death prevented. Risk and economic analyses. Child-restraint seat use could prevent about 0.4 child air crash deaths per year in the United States. Increased deaths as a result of car travel could exceed deaths prevented by restraint seat use if the proportion of families switching from air to car travel exceeded about 5% to 10%. The estimate for this proportion varied with assumptions about trip distance, driver characteristics, and the effectiveness of child-restraint seats but is unlikely to exceed 15%. Assuming no increase in car travel, for each dollar increase in the cost of implementing the regulation per round trip per family, the cost per death prevented would increase by about $6.4 million. Unless space for young children in restraint seats can be provided at low cost to families, with little or no diversion to automobile travel, a policy requiring restraint seat use could cause a net increase in deaths. Even excluding this possibility, the cost of the proposed policy per death prevented is high.

  14. The Effect of Management Compensation and Debt Requirements on Earnings Management Concerning The Impairment of Assets

    Lloyd Kevin Co Abrigo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study determines the relationship between the impairment decision, as well as its magnitude, and two earnings management motivations, namely increasing management compensation, and meeting debt requirements. The computation of value in use in the impairment loss is subject to management’s estimate of future cash flows and choice of discount rate, which tolerates earnings management. Certain indicators and financial ratios were used to depict the effect of the two motives on impairment. In addition to this, the effect of firm size on impairment was also analyzed. The data were obtained from the OSIRIS database and the SEC form 17-A of the respective companies, as well as from telephone interviews and surveys. Probit regression was used to analyze the effect of the different motives to the impairment decision while multiple linear regression was used for the impairment magnitude. The findings show that publicly listed companies in the Philippines are engaging in “income smoothing” and “big bath” accounting with the use of impairment. Results also indicate that most “big bath” happens during periods where changes in the company’s executive officers occur. Lastly, there is also evidence that financially strong companies are deferring their impairment recognition to obtain a lower cost of financing.

  15. SAP expression in invariant NKT cells is required for cognate help to support B-cell responses.

    Detre, Cynthia; Keszei, Marton; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Castro, Wilson; Agyemang, Amma F; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Carroll, Michael C; Tsokos, George C; Wang, Ninghai; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A; Terhorst, Cox

    2012-07-05

    One of the manifestations of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is progressive agammaglobulinemia, caused by the absence of a functional signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) in T, invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells and NK cells. Here we report that α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) activated NKT cells positively regulate antibody responses to haptenated protein antigens at multiple checkpoints, including germinal center formation and affinity maturation. Whereas NKT cell-dependent B cell responses were absent in SAP(-/-).B6 mice that completely lack NKT cells, the small number of SAP-deficient NKT cells in SAP(-/-).BALB/c mice adjuvated antibody production, but not the germinal center reaction. To test the hypothesis that SAP-deficient NKT cells can facilitate humoral immunity, SAP was deleted after development in SAP(fl/fl).tgCreERT2.B6 mice. We find that NKT cell intrinsic expression of SAP is dispensable for noncognate helper functions, but is critical for providing cognate help to antigen-specific B cells. These results demonstrate that SLAM-family receptor-regulated cell-cell interactions are not limited to T-B cell conjugates. We conclude that in the absence of SAP, several routes of NKT cell-mediated antibody production are still accessible. The latter suggests that residual NKT cells in XLP patients might contribute to variations in dysgammaglobulinemia.

  16. MyD88 Adaptor Protein Is Required for Appropriate Hepcidin Induction in Response to Dietary Iron Overload in Mice

    Antonio Layoun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis is tightly regulated to provide virtually all cells in the body, particularly red blood cells, with this essential element while defending against its toxicity. The peptide hormone hepcidin is central to the control of the amount of iron absorbed from the diet and iron recycling from macrophages. Previously, we have shown that hepcidin induction in macrophages following Toll-like receptor (TLR stimulation depends on the presence of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88. In this study, we analyzed the regulation of iron metabolism in MyD88−/− mice to further investigate MyD88 involvement in iron sensing and hepcidin induction. We show that mice lacking MyD88 accumulate significantly more iron in their livers than wild-type counterparts in response to dietary iron loading as they are unable to appropriately control hepcidin levels. The defect was associated with inappropriately low levels of Smad4 protein and Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation in liver samples found in the MyD88−/− mice compared to wild-type mice. In conclusion, our results reveal a previously unknown link between MyD88 and iron homeostasis, and provide new insights into the regulation of hepcidin through the iron-sensing pathway.

  17. Effect of an interactive voice response system on oral anticoagulant management.

    Oake, Natalie; van Walraven, Carl; Rodger, Marc A; Forster, Alan J

    2009-04-28

    Monitoring oral anticoagulants is logistically challenging for both patients and medical staff. We evaluated the effect of adding an interactive voice response system to computerized decision support for oral anticoagulant management. We developed an interactive voice response system to communicate to patients the results of international normalized ratio testing and their dosage schedules for anticoagulation therapy. The system also reminded patients of upcoming and missed appointments for blood tests. We recruited patients whose anticoagulation control was stable after at least 3 months of warfarin therapy. We prospectively examined clinical data and outcomes for these patients for an intervention period of at least 3 months. We also collected retrospective data for each patient for the 3 months before study enrolment. We recruited 226 patients between Nov. 23, 2006, and Aug. 1, 2007. The mean duration of the intervention period (prospective data collection) was 4.2 months. Anticoagulation control was similar for the periods during and preceding the intervention (mean time within the therapeutic range 80.3%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 77.5% to 83.1% v. 79.9%, 95% CI 77.3% to 82.6%). The interactive voice response system delivered 1211 (77.8%) of 1557 scheduled dosage messages, with no further input required from clinic staff. The most common reason for clinic staff having to deliver the remaining messages (accounting for 143 [9.2%] of all messages) was an international normalized ratio that was excessively high or low, (i.e., 0.5 or more outside the therapeutic range). When given the option, 76.6% of patients (164/214) chose to continue with the interactive voice response system for management of their anticoagulation after the study was completed. The system reduced staff workload for monitoring anticoagulation therapy by 48 min/wk, a 33% reduction from the baseline of 2.4 hours. Interactive voice response systems have a potential role in improving the

  18. The Effects of information barrier requirements on the trilateral initiative attribute measurement system (AVNG)

    MacArthur, D.W.; Langner, D.C.; Whiteson, R.; Wolford, J.K.

    2001-01-01

    Although the detection techniques used for measuring classified materials are very similar to those used in unclassified measurements, the surrounding packaging is generally very different. If iZ classified item is to be measured, an information barrier is required to protect any classified data acquired. This information barrier must protect the classified information while giving the inspector confidence that the unclassified outputs accurately reflect the classified inputs, Both information barrier and authentication considerations must be considered during all phases of system design and fabrication. One example of such a measurement system is the attribute measurement system (termed the AVNG) designed for the: Trilateral Initiative. We will discuss the integration of information barrier components into this system as well as the effects of an information barrier (including authentication) concerns on the implementation of the detector systems.

  19. Lowering social security's duration-of-marriage requirement: distributional effects for future female retirees.

    Tamborini, Christopher R; Whitman, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    A number of alternatives to Social Security's auxiliary benefit system have been proposed in the context of changes in American family and work patterns. This article focuses on one modification therein-lowering the 10-year duration-of-marriage requirement for divorced spouses. Using a powerful microsimulation model (MINT), we examine the distributional effects of extending spouse and survivor benefit eligibility to 5- and 7-year marriages ending in divorce among female retirees in 2030, a population largely comprised of baby boomers. Results show that the options would increase benefits for a small share of female retirees, around 2 to 4%, and would not affect the vast majority of low-income divorced older women. However, of those affected, the options would substantially increase benefits and lower incidence of poverty and near poor. Low-income divorced retirees with marriages between 5 and 9 years in length and a deceased former spouse face the greatest potential gains.

  20. Research requirements for a unified approach to modelling chemical effects associated with radioactive waste disposal

    Krol, A.A.; Read, D.

    1986-09-01

    This report contains the results of a review of the current modelling, laboratory experiments and field experiments being conducted in the United Kingdom to aid understanding and improve prediction of the effects of chemistry on the disposal of radioactive wastes. The aim has been to summarise present work and derive a structure for future research effort that would support the use of probabilistic risk assessment (pra) methods for the disposal of radioactive wastes. The review was conducted by a combination of letter and personal visits, and preliminary results were reported to a plenary meeting of participants held in April, 1986. Following this meeting, copies of the report were circulated to participants at draft stage, so that the finalised report should be taken to provide as far as possible a consensus of opinion of research requirements. (author)

  1. Stretching the Stress Boundary: Linking Air Pollution Health Effects to a Neurohormonal Stress Response

    Inhaled pollutants produce effects in virtually all organ systems in our body and have been linked to chronic diseases including hypertension, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s and diabetes. A neurohormonal stress response (referred here as a systemic response produced by activation ...

  2. Analysis of dispersed frequency response for ionic glasses: influence of electrode and nearly constant loss effects

    Macdonald, J Ross

    2005-01-01

    Analysis by D L Sidebottom of the dispersive frequency response of the real-part of the conductivity, σ'(ω), for many alkali phosphate and metaphosphate glasses, using a fitting model involving a 'universal dynamic response' power law with an exponent n and a constant-loss term, led to anomalous n behaviour that he explained as arising from variable constriction of the local cation conduction space. In order to obtain adequate fits, he eliminated from the data all low-frequency decreases of σ'(ω) below the dc plateau, ones actually associated with electrode effects. Such a cut-off does not, however, eliminate electrode effects possibly present in the high-frequency part of the data range. The results of the present detailed analysis and fitting of both synthetic data and several of his experimental data sets show unequivocally that his anomalous n behaviour arose from neglecting electrode effects. Their inclusion, with or without data cut-off in the fitting model, leads to the expected high-frequency slope value of n = 2/3 associated with bulk conduction, as required by recently published topological effective-dimension considerations for dielectric relaxation in conductive systems. Further, the effects of the inclusion in a full fitting model of series and possibly parallel complex constant-phase-element contributions, representing electrode and nearly constant loss effects, respectively, have been investigated in detail. Such composite models usually lead to best fitting of either the full or cut-off complex data when they include the semi-universal, topologically based K1 bulk model, one indirectly derived from the assumption of stretched-exponential temporal behaviour

  3. The effect of internal audit effectiveness, auditor responsibility and training in fraud detection

    George Drogalas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between internal audit effectiveness, internal auditor’s responsibility, training and fraud detection. During the last decade internal auditing has become an integral part of modern businesses since it is capable of detecting errors or offences which lead to fraud. In order to investigate the above relationship, we conducted a survey of companies listed in the Athens Stock Exchange. We used factor analysis to validate the survey instrument and to construct our variables measuring fraud detection, internal audit effectiveness, auditor responsibility and training. We used regression analysis to test for significance between the constructed variables. Our analysis shows that audit effectiveness, auditor responsibility and auditor training affect positively and significantly the detection of fraud. Our results highlight the importance of internal audit in detecting accounting fraud and the need of companies to invest on internal audit processes and training in order to achieve enhanced corporate performance. Finally, our research stresses the importance of internal audit and fraud detection for companies which operate in countries which are in a period of economic crisis.

  4. The Effects of Faulty or Potentially Harmful Products on Brand Reputation and Social Responsibility of Business

    Claudiu-Cătălin Munteanu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Building a strong brand requires a good management of brand reputation over time. Social responsibility of business is a key factor in evoking a positive brand reputation. Both the product itself and brand related actions and communications define brand reputation in the eyes of consumers, thus influencing perceived corporate social responsibility. As a consequence, it can be easily hindered or endangered by many product related issues such as faulty products or potentially harmful products. The purpose of this article is to provide an insight on the link between brand reputation and social responsibility in order to help organizations provide better services and protection for consumers. We examined how brand reputation is influenced by the negative bias generated by brand related communications regarding potentially harmful products. This study also analyzes how under normal consumption circumstances, consumers' experiences related to faulty products can influence brand reputation. To investigate this, we propose a model based on perceptual brand constructs and possible outcomes of brand reputation. In both circumstances, negative spillover effects are highlighted using structural equation modeling. The findings reveal that both faulty products and potentially harmful products have a negative bias on brand reputation, but affected perceptual brand constructs are different.

  5. Effects of fit and motive articulation on sponsorship response

    Abramova, Anna

    2013-01-01

    This study is dedicated to finding the right combination between provision of fit and motive articulation to provide the best sponsorship response. The paper integrates different factors used in the sponsorship literature and other academic articles in the field of marketing into a conceptual model. Such mediating variables as corporate ability, corporate social responsibility, sponsor attitude and persuasion knowledge and moderating variables as involvement, self-congruence and frequency of ...

  6. Improving Cybersecurity Incident Response Team (CSIRT) Skills, Dynamics and Effectiveness

    2017-03-01

    Analysts. Cognitive prompts can reduce overconfidence and information bias. One such strategy is the “Five-Why Analysis,” developed by Toyota and used...building trust among CSIRTs and MTS members (including those from other CSIRTs and agencies), as well as developing an environment of psychological safety...recommendations for optimal CSIRT performance. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cyber Incident Response, Response Teams, Cognitive Task Analysis 16. SECURITY

  7. Effect of PKCbeta on retinal oxygenation response in experimental diabetes.

    Luan, H.; Leitges, M.; Gupta, R.; Pacheco, D.; Seidner, A.; Liggett, J.; Ito, Y.; Kowluru, R.; Berkowitz, B.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test the hypotheses that, in mice, breathing carbogen (95% O(2)-5% CO(2)) oxygenates the retina better than breathing 100% oxygen, the superior hemiretinal oxygenation response to carbogen inhalation is subnormal early in diabetes, and diabetes-induced elevation of retinal protein kinase C (PKC)-beta contributes to this pathophysiology. METHODS: Retinal oxygenation response (DeltaPO(2)) was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and either carbogen or 100% oxyg...

  8. Murine macrophage response from peritoneal cavity requires signals mediated by chemokine receptor CCR-2 during Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Nandi, Ajeya; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2016-02-01

    C-C chemokine receptor-2 (CCR-2) is a cognate receptor for monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and recent studies revealed that MCP-1-CCR-2 signaling is involved in several inflammatory diseases characterized by macrophage infiltration. Currently, there is no study on the involvement of CCR-2 in the killing of S. aureus by macrophages of Swiss albino mice, and its substantial role in host defense against S. aureus infection in murine macrophages is still unclear. Therefore, the present study was aimed to investigate the functional and interactive role of CCR-2 and MCP-1 in regulating peritoneal macrophage responses with respect to acute S. aureus infection. We found that phagocytosis of S. aureus can serve as an important stimulus for MCP-1 production by peritoneal macrophages, which is dependent directly or indirectly on cytokines, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. Neutralization of CCR-2 in macrophages leads to increased production of IL-10 and decreased production of IFN-γ and IL-6. In CCR-2 blocked macrophages, pretreatment with specific blocker of NF-κB or p38-MAPK causes elevation in MCP-1 level and subsequent downregulation of CCR-2 itself. We speculate that CCR-2 is involved in S. aureus-induced MCP-1 production via NF-κB or p38-MAPK signaling. We also hypothesized that unnaturally high level of MCP-1 that build up upon CCR-2 neutralization might allow promiscuous binding to one or more other chemokine receptors, a situation that would not occur in CCR-2 non-neutralized condition. This may be the plausible explanation for such observed Th-2 response in CCR-2 blocked macrophages infected with S. aureus in the present study.

  9. A comparison of immunotoxic effects of nanomedicinal products with regulatory immunotoxicity testing requirements.

    Giannakou, Christina; Park, Margriet Vdz; de Jong, Wim H; van Loveren, Henk; Vandebriel, Rob J; Geertsma, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are attractive for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications because of their unique physicochemical and biological properties. A major application area of NMs is drug delivery. Many nanomedicinal products (NMPs) currently on the market or in clinical trials are most often based on liposomal products or polymer conjugates. NMPs can be designed to target specific tissues, eg, tumors. In virtually all cases, NMPs will eventually reach the immune system. It has been shown that most NMs end up in organs of the mononuclear phagocytic system, notably liver and spleen. Adverse immune effects, including allergy, hypersensitivity, and immunosuppression, have been reported after NMP administration. Interactions of NMPs with the immune system may therefore constitute important side effects. Currently, no regulatory documents are specifically dedicated to evaluate the immunotoxicity of NMs or NMPs. Their immunotoxicity assessment is performed based on existing guidelines for conventional substances or medicinal products. Due to the unique properties of NMPs when compared with conventional medicinal products, it is uncertain whether the currently prescribed set of tests provides sufficient information for an adequate evaluation of potential immunotoxicity of NMPs. The aim of this study was therefore, to compare the current regulatory immunotoxicity testing requirements with the accumulating knowledge on immunotoxic effects of NMPs in order to identify potential gaps in the safety assessment. This comparison showed that immunotoxic effects, such as complement activation-related pseudoallergy, myelosuppression, inflammasome activation, and hypersensitivity, are not readily detected by using current testing guidelines. Immunotoxicity of NMPs would be more accurately evaluated by an expanded testing strategy that is equipped to stratify applicable testing for the various types of NMPs.

  10. Molecular requirements for the combined effects of TRAIL and ionising radiation

    Marini, Patrizia; Jendrossek, Verena; Durand, Elise; Gruber, Charlotte; Budach, Wilfried; Belka, Claus

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Previously it was shown that combination of death ligand TRAIL and irradiation strongly increases cell kill in several human tumour cell lines. Since Bcl-2 overexpression did not strongly interfere with the efficacy, components of the mitochondrial death pathway are not required for an effective combined treatment. In the present study the minimal molecular prerequisites for the efficacy of a combined treatment were determined. Materials and methods: Apoptosis induction in control, caspase-8 and FADD negative Jurkat cells, BJAB control and FADD-DN cells was analysed by FACS. Activation of caspase-8, -10 and -3 and cleavage of PARP was determined by immunoblotting. TRAIL receptors were activated using recombinant human TRAIL. Surface expression of TRAIL receptors DR4 and DR5 was analysed by FACS. Results: Jurkat T-cells express the agonistic DR5 receptor but not DR4. Presence of FADD was found to be essential for TRAIL induced apoptosis. Caspase-8 negative cells show very low rates of apoptosis after prolonged stimulation with TRAIL. No combined effects of TRAIL with irradiation could be found in FADD-DN over expressing and FADD deficient cells. However, the combination of TRAIL and irradiation clearly lead to a combined effect in caspase-8 negative Jurkat cells, albeit with reduced death rates. In these cells activation of the alternative initiator caspase-10 could be detected after combined treatment. Conclusion: Our data show that a combined therapy with TRAIL and irradiation will only be effective in cells expressing at least one agonistic TRAIL receptor, FADD and caspase-8 or caspase-10

  11. Phosphorylation of MCT-1 by p44/42 MAPK is required for its stabilization in response to DNA damage

    Nandi, S; Reinert, Line; Hachem, A

    2007-01-01

    We discovered a novel oncogene in a T-cell lymphoma cell line, multiple copies in T-cell lymphoma-1 (MCT-1), that has been shown to decrease cell-doubling time, shorten the duration of G(1) transit time and/or G(1)-S transition, and transform NIH3T3 fibroblasts. We subsequently demonstrated...... that there were significantly increased levels of MCT-1 protein in a subset of primary diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Levels of MCT-1 protein were shown to be increased after exposure to DNA damaging agents. This increase did not require new protein synthesis, suggesting that post-translational mechanisms were...... growth and proliferation through phosphorylation-dependent regulation of several substrates. The MCT-1 protein is predicted to have numerous putative phosphorylation sites. Using a combination of genetic and pharmacological approaches, we established that phosphorylation of MCT-1 protein by p44/p42...

  12. Software requirements

    Wiegers, Karl E

    2003-01-01

    Without formal, verifiable software requirements-and an effective system for managing them-the programs that developers think they've agreed to build often will not be the same products their customers are expecting. In SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS, Second Edition, requirements engineering authority Karl Wiegers amplifies the best practices presented in his original award-winning text?now a mainstay for anyone participating in the software development process. In this book, you'll discover effective techniques for managing the requirements engineering process all the way through the development cy

  13. Glucocorticoid effects on object recognition memory require training-associated emotional arousal.

    Okuda, Shoki; Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L

    2004-01-20

    Considerable evidence implicates glucocorticoid hormones in the regulation of memory consolidation and memory retrieval. The present experiments investigated whether the influence of these hormones on memory depends on the level of emotional arousal induced by the training experience. We investigated this issue in male Sprague-Dawley rats by examining the effects of immediate posttraining systemic injections of the glucocorticoid corticosterone on object recognition memory under two conditions that differed in their training-associated emotional arousal. In rats that were not previously habituated to the experimental context, corticosterone (0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) administered immediately after a 3-min training trial enhanced 24-hr retention performance in an inverted-U shaped dose-response relationship. In contrast, corticosterone did not affect 24-hr retention of rats that received extensive prior habituation to the experimental context and, thus, had decreased novelty-induced emotional arousal during training. Additionally, immediate posttraining administration of corticosterone to nonhabituated rats, in doses that enhanced 24-hr retention, impaired object recognition performance at a 1-hr retention interval whereas corticosterone administered after training to well-habituated rats did not impair 1-hr retention. Thus, the present findings suggest that training-induced emotional arousal may be essential for glucocorticoid effects on object recognition memory.

  14. The Design of Effective ICT-Supported Learning Activities: Exemplary Models, Changing Requirements, and New Possibilities

    Cameron Richards

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the imperatives of policy and rhetoric about their integration in formal education, Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs are often used as an "add-on" in many classrooms and in many lesson plans. Nevertheless, many teachers find that interesting and well-planned tasks, projects, and resources provide a key to harnessing the educational potential of digital resources, Internet communications and interactive multimedia to engage the interest, interaction, and knowledge construction of young learners. To the extent that such approaches go beyond and transform traditional "transmission" models of teaching and formal lesson planning, this paper investigates the changing requirements and new possibilities represented by the challenge of integrating ICTs in education in a way which at the same time connects more effectively with both the specific contents of the curriculum and the various stages and elements of the learning process. Case studies from teacher education foundation courses provide an exemplary focus of inquiry in order to better link relevant new theories or models of learning with practice, to build upon related learner-centered strategies for integrating ICT resources and tools, and to incorporate interdependent functions of learning as information access, communication, and applied interactions. As one possible strategy in this direction, the concept of an "ICT-supported learning activity" suggests the need for teachers to approach this increasing challenge more as "designers" of effective and integrated learning rather than mere "transmitters" of skills or information through an add-on use of ICTs.

  15. Swedish contribution to the greenhouse effect and required reductions to meet the 550 ppmv target

    Lindell, Lina; Nilsson, Kristina

    2002-11-01

    According to the Swedish Parliament, the Swedish international climate strategy should focus on a stabilisation of the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. An equilibrium concentration lower than 550 ppmv CO 2 -equivalents should be achieved by the end of this century. As an interim target, the yearly emissions should not exceed 4.5 tonnes CO 2 -equivalents per capita by 2050. In this study an inventory of Swedish emissions from 1834 until 2000, for the six greenhouse gases regulated by the Kyoto Protocol, is carried out. Future emission scenarios for carbon dioxide during the time period 2000-2050 are also defined. This data is used for estimating the contribution to the greenhouse effect both today and in the future. Further it is investigated if the 2050-target is sufficient for not exceeding an atmospheric concentration of 550 ppmv. The required reduction for 2100 to reach an equilibrium concentration below this level is also estimated. The Swedish contribution to the greenhouse effect today is about 30 % larger than it should be according to the fairness factor used in this study. The Swedish emission target set for 2050 is sufficient for not exceeding 550 ppmv by that year. However, to reach a stabilisation of the concentration below this level the emissions have to be reduced to 1.0-1.5 tonnes CO 2 -equivalents per capita by 2100

  16. The effect of etoricoxib premedication on postoperative analgesia requirement in orthopedic and trauma patients

    Siddiqui, Ahsan K.; Al-Ghamdi, Abdulmohsin A.; Mowafi, Hany A.; Ismail, Salah A.; Sadat-Ali, M.; Al-Dakheel, Dakheel A.

    2008-01-01

    We have hypothesized that etoricoxib premedication would reduce the need for additional opioids following orthopedic trauma surgery. A double blind, controlled study, conducted in King Fahd University Hospital, King Faisal University, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. After obtaining the approval of Research and Ethics Committee and written consent, 200 American Society of Anesthesiology grade I and II patients that underwent elective upper limb or lower limb fracture fixation surgeries during the period from August 2005 to October 2007 were studied. Patients were randomly premedicated using 120 mg of etoricoxib or placebo n=100, each. To alleviate postoperative pain, a patient controlled analgesia device was programmed to deliver one mg of morphine intravenously locked lockout time, 6 minutes. Visual analog scale and total postoperative morphine consumption over 24 hours and the adverse effects were recorded. One hundred patients in each group completed the study period. Etoricoxib premedication provides a statistically significant postoperative morphine sparing effect over 24 hours postoperatively. Total morphine consumption was 44.2 (8.2) in the placebo and 35.17 mg in the etoricoxib groups p<0.001. The incidence of nausea and vomiting requiring treatment was lower in the etoricoxib group. p=0.014. The postoperative blood loss was similar in both groups. Etoricoxib is a suitable premedication before traumatic orthopedic surgery as it enhanced postoperative analgesia and reduced the need for morphine. (author)

  17. Swedish contribution to the greenhouse effect and required reductions to meet the 550 ppmv target

    Lindell, Lina; Nilsson, Kristina [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). School of Engineering

    2002-11-01

    According to the Swedish Parliament, the Swedish international climate strategy should focus on a stabilisation of the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. An equilibrium concentration lower than 550 ppmv CO{sub 2}-equivalents should be achieved by the end of this century. As an interim target, the yearly emissions should not exceed 4.5 tonnes CO{sub 2}-equivalents per capita by 2050. In this study an inventory of Swedish emissions from 1834 until 2000, for the six greenhouse gases regulated by the Kyoto Protocol, is carried out. Future emission scenarios for carbon dioxide during the time period 2000-2050 are also defined. This data is used for estimating the contribution to the greenhouse effect both today and in the future. Further it is investigated if the 2050-target is sufficient for not exceeding an atmospheric concentration of 550 ppmv. The required reduction for 2100 to reach an equilibrium concentration below this level is also estimated. The Swedish contribution to the greenhouse effect today is about 30 % larger than it should be according to the fairness factor used in this study. The Swedish emission target set for 2050 is sufficient for not exceeding 550 ppmv by that year. However, to reach a stabilisation of the concentration below this level the emissions have to be reduced to 1.0-1.5 tonnes CO{sub 2}-equivalents per capita by 2100.

  18. In Vivo Visualizing the IFN-β Response Required for Tumor Growth Control in a Therapeutic Model of Polyadenylic-Polyuridylic Acid Administration.

    Nocera, David Andrés; Roselli, Emiliano; Araya, Paula; Nuñez, Nicolás Gonzalo; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Jablonska, Jadwiga; Weiss, Siegfried; Gatti, Gerardo; Brinkmann, Melanie M; Kröger, Andrea; Morón, Gabriel; Maccioni, Mariana

    2016-03-15

    The crucial role that endogenously produced IFN-β plays in eliciting an immune response against cancer has recently started to be elucidated. Endogenous IFN-β has an important role in immune surveillance and control of tumor development. Accordingly, the role of TLR agonists as cancer therapeutic agents is being revisited via the strategy of intra/peritumoral injection with the idea of stimulating the production of endogenous type I IFN inside the tumor. Polyadenylic-polyuridylic acid (poly A:U) is a dsRNA mimetic explored empirically in cancer immunotherapy a long time ago with little knowledge regarding its mechanisms of action. In this work, we have in vivo visualized the IFN-β required for the antitumor immune response elicited in a therapeutic model of poly A:U administration. In this study, we have identified the role of host type I IFNs, cell populations that are sources of IFN-β in the tumor microenvironment, and other host requirements for tumor control in this model. One single peritumoral dose of poly A:U was sufficient to induce IFN-β, readily visualized in vivo. IFN-β production relied mainly on the activation of the transcription factor IFN regulatory factor 3 and the molecule UNC93B1, indicating that TLR3 is required for recognizing poly A:U. CD11c(+) cells were an important, but not the only source of IFN-β. Host type I IFN signaling was absolutely required for the reduced tumor growth, prolonged mice survival, and the strong antitumor-specific immune response elicited upon poly A:U administration. These findings add new perspectives to the use of IFN-β-inducing compounds in tumor therapy. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. An investigation of response and stimulus modality transfer effects after dual-task training in younger and older.

    Lussier, Maxime; Gagnon, Christine; Bherer, Louis

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that dual-task training leads to significant improvement in dual-task performance in younger and older adults. However, the extent to which training benefits to untrained tasks requires further investigation. The present study assessed (a) whether dual-task training leads to cross-modality transfer in untrained tasks using new stimuli and/or motor responses modalities, (b) whether transfer effects are related to improved ability to prepare and maintain multiple task-set and/or enhanced response coordination, (c) whether there are age-related differences in transfer effects. Twenty-three younger and 23 older adults were randomly assigned to dual-task training or control conditions. All participants were assessed before and after training on three dual-task transfer conditions; (1) stimulus modality transfer (2) response modality transfer (3) stimulus and response modalities transfer task. Training group showed larger improvement than the control group in the three transfer dual-task conditions, which suggests that training leads to more than specific learning of stimuli/response associations. Attentional costs analyses showed that training led to improved dual-task cost, only in conditions that involved new stimuli or response modalities, but not both. Moreover, training did not lead to a reduced task-set cost in the transfer conditions, which suggests some limitations in transfer effects that can be expected. Overall, the present study supports the notion that cognitive plasticity for attentional control is preserved in late adulthood.

  20. An investigation of far response and stimulus modality transfer effects after dual-task training in younger and older adults

    Maxime eLussier

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that dual-task training leads to significant improvement in dual-task performances in younger and older adults. However, the extent to which training benefits to untrained tasks requires further investigation. The present study assessed (a whether dual-task training leads to cross-modality transfer in untrained tasks using new stimuli and/or motor responses modalities, (b whether transfer effects are related to improvement in working memory and/or enhanced response coordination, (c whether there are age-related differences in transfer effects. Twenty-three younger and 23 older adults were randomly assigned to dual-task training or control conditions. All participants were assessed before and after training on three dual-task transfer conditions; (1 stimulus modality transfer (2 response modality transfer (3 stimulus and response modalities transfer task. Training group showed larger improvement than the control group in the three transfer dual-task conditions, which suggests that training leads to more than specific learning of stimuli/response associations. Attentional cost analyses showed that training led to improved dual-task cost, only in conditions that involved new stimuli or response modalities, but not both. Moreover, training did not lead to a reduced task-set cost in the transfer conditions, which suggests some limitations in transfer effects that can be expected. Overall, the present study supports the notion that cognitive plasticity for attentional control is preserved in late adulthood.

  1. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Is Required for Cell Proliferation and Inflammatory Responses in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synoviocytes

    Yan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS invasive proliferation, and joint destruction. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS is a cytosolic DNA sensor that induces immune activation. In this study, we examined whether cGAS plays a role in RA FLS. In this study, cGAS was overexpressed in RA-FLS compared with OA FLS. TNFα stimulation induced cGAS expression in RA FLS. Overexpression of cGAS promoted the proliferation and knockdown of cGAS inhibited the proliferation of RA FLS. cGAS overexpression enhanced the production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs as well as AKT and ERK phosphorylation in TNFα-stimulated FLS. In contrast, cGAS silencing inhibited production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs as well as AKT and ERK phosphorylation in TNFα-stimulated FLS. These results suggest that cGAS activates the AKT and ERK pathways to promote the inflammatory response of RA FLS, and the development of strategies targeting cGAS may have therapeutic potential for human RA.

  2. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Is Required for Cell Proliferation and Inflammatory Responses in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synoviocytes.

    Wang, Yan; Su, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Fang; Chu, Jing-Xue; Wang, Yun-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) invasive proliferation, and joint destruction. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor that induces immune activation. In this study, we examined whether cGAS plays a role in RA FLS. In this study, cGAS was overexpressed in RA-FLS compared with OA FLS. TNFα stimulation induced cGAS expression in RA FLS. Overexpression of cGAS promoted the proliferation and knockdown of cGAS inhibited the proliferation of RA FLS. cGAS overexpression enhanced the production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as well as AKT and ERK phosphorylation in TNFα-stimulated FLS. In contrast, cGAS silencing inhibited production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as well as AKT and ERK phosphorylation in TNFα-stimulated FLS. These results suggest that cGAS activates the AKT and ERK pathways to promote the inflammatory response of RA FLS, and the development of strategies targeting cGAS may have therapeutic potential for human RA.

  3. Refining in the 1990s: Technological response to environmental concerns, product quality requirements and changes in demand patterns

    Naber, J.E.; Stork, W.H.J.; Blauwhoff, P.M.M. (Koninklijke Shell, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Lab.); Groeneveld, K.J.W. (Shell Internationale Petroleum Maatschappij B.V., The Hague (Netherlands))

    1990-01-01

    The refining industry is faced with a pressing need to protect the environment and with increasing demands for higher quality and changes in the composition of the product mix, partly as a result of a continued decline in demand for residual fuel due to energy savings and competition from other energy sources. An important part of the response to these challenges has been the development and implementation of new and improved technology to increase the refiner's ability to upgrade relatively low-value products to high-quality fuels. This generally involves an increase of the hydrogen content of the products, either by rejecting carbon or by adding hydrogen. In consequence, advanced technology has recently been developed for the conversion of residual components in catalytic crackers (carbon rejection) as well as in residue hydroprocessing (hydrogen addition). However, as a result of the increasing amounts of aromatic components in distillates from residue conversion, higher product quality demands in conjunction with a shift to diesel fuel can only be met by significant further developments in hydroprocessing. These developments favour the low hetero-atom and low-aromatics production in modern hydrocrackers utilising advanced catalysts and process technology. In the more distant future, the advent of new technology for large-scale production of synthesis gas (CO/H{sub 2}) from partial oxidation of natural gas, heavy oil or coal will enable the production of superior-quality non-aromatic middle distillates through sophisticated Fischer-Tropsch catalysis. (orig./EF).

  4. Balanced nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 are required for a complete plant innate immune response.

    Ana V García

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available An important layer of plant innate immunity to host-adapted pathogens is conferred by intracellular nucleotide-binding/oligomerization domain-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR receptors recognizing specific microbial effectors. Signaling from activated receptors of the TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor-NB-LRR class converges on the nucleo-cytoplasmic immune regulator EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1. In this report we show that a receptor-stimulated increase in accumulation of nuclear EDS1 precedes or coincides with the EDS1-dependent induction and repression of defense-related genes. EDS1 is capable of nuclear transport receptor-mediated shuttling between the cytoplasm and nucleus. By enhancing EDS1 export from inside nuclei (through attachment of an additional nuclear export sequence (NES or conditionally releasing EDS1 to the nucleus (by fusion to a glucocorticoid receptor (GR in transgenic Arabidopsis we establish that the EDS1 nuclear pool is essential for resistance to biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens and for transcriptional reprogramming. Evidence points to post-transcriptional processes regulating receptor-triggered accumulation of EDS1 in nuclei. Changes in nuclear EDS1 levels become equilibrated with the cytoplasmic EDS1 pool and cytoplasmic EDS1 is needed for complete resistance and restriction of host cell death at infection sites. We propose that coordinated nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 enable the plant to mount an appropriately balanced immune response to pathogen attack.

  5. Changes in root cap pH are required for the gravity response of the Arabidopsis root

    Fasano, J. M.; Swanson, S. J.; Blancaflor, E. B.; Dowd, P. E.; Kao, T. H.; Gilroy, S.

    2001-01-01

    Although the columella cells of the root cap have been identified as the site of gravity perception, the cellular events that mediate gravity signaling remain poorly understood. To determine if cytoplasmic and/or wall pH mediates the initial stages of root gravitropism, we combined a novel cell wall pH sensor (a cellulose binding domain peptide-Oregon green conjugate) and a cytoplasmic pH sensor (plants expressing pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein) to monitor pH dynamics throughout the graviresponding Arabidopsis root. The root cap apoplast acidified from pH 5.5 to 4.5 within 2 min of gravistimulation. Concomitantly, cytoplasmic pH increased in columella cells from 7.2 to 7.6 but was unchanged elsewhere in the root. These changes in cap pH preceded detectable tropic growth or growth-related pH changes in the elongation zone cell wall by 10 min. Altering the gravity-related columella cytoplasmic pH shift with caged protons delayed the gravitropic response. Together, these results suggest that alterations in root cap pH likely are involved in the initial events that mediate root gravity perception or signal transduction.

  6. Effects of climate change on timber supply and possible management responses

    Comeau, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    Potential effects of climate change on Pacific Northwest forests include increases in net primary production of some high-elevation or high-latitude forests due to temperature increases; reduced net primary production or tree mortality due to increased water stress or failure to meet chilling requirements; and increased risk of damage from insects and fires. The net effects of climate change will vary depending on the species involved, current environmental conditions, and the nature, magnitude, and rate of climate change. Risks are likely to differ substantially for regeneration, young established forests, and mature established forests. Decisions about responses have to be made in the face of considerable uncertainty about future climate, resources, and market conditions. A proactive option involves developing flexible, adaptive approaches to forest management that serve to reduce future risk. Strategic decisions could include decisions about land purchases or sales based on assessments of risk of impact from climate change. Selection of species least vulnerable to potential climate change, increased investment in fire control and pest management in vulnerable areas, and other operational decisions can be made. Timing of actions will be important, and a substantial body of information is required as a basis for making informed decisions, some of which is already available. 8 refs

  7. A loss-of-function mutation in the nucleoporin AtNUP160 indicates that normal auxin signalling is required for a proper ethylene response in Arabidopsis

    Robles, Linda M.; Deslauriers, Stephen D.; Alvarez, Ashley A.; Larsen, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    As part of a continuing effort to elucidate mechanisms that regulate the magnitude of ethylene signalling, an Arabidopsis mutant with an enhanced ethylene response was identified. Subsequent characterization of this loss-of-function mutant revealed severe hypocotyl shortening in the presence of saturating ethylene along with increased expression in leaves of a subset of ethylene-responsive genes. It was subsequently determined by map-based cloning that the mutant (sar1-7) represents a loss-of-function mutation in the previously described nucleoporin AtNUP160 (At1g33410, SAR1). In support of previously reported results, the sar1-7 mutant partially restored auxin responsiveness to roots of an rce1 loss-of-function mutant, indicating that AtNUP160/SAR1 is required for proper expression of factors responsible for the repression of auxin signalling. Analysis of arf7-1/sar1-7 and arf19-1/sar1-7 double mutants revealed that mutations affecting either ARF7 or ARF19 function almost fully blocked manifestation of the sar1-7-dependent ethylene hypersensitivity phenotype, suggesting that ARF7- and ARF19-mediated auxin signalling is responsible for regulating the magnitude of and/or competence for the ethylene response in Arabidopsis etiolated hypocotyls. Consistent with this, addition of auxin to ethylene-treated seedlings resulted in severe hypocotyl shortening, reminiscent of that seen for other eer (enhanced ethylene response) mutants, suggesting that auxin functions in part synergistically with ethylene to control hypocotyl elongation and other ethylene-dependent phenomena. PMID:22238449

  8. Chitosan Oligosaccharide Reduces Propofol Requirements and Propofol-Related Side Effects

    Zhiwen Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Propofol is one of the main sedatives but its negative side effects limit its clinical application. Chitosan oligosaccharide (COS, a kind of natural product with anti-pain and anti-inflammatory activities, may be a potential adjuvant to propofol use. A total of 94 patients receiving surgeries were evenly and randomly assigned to two groups: 10 mg/kg COS oral administration and/or placebo oral administration before being injected with propofol. The target-controlled infusion of propofol was adjusted to maintain the values of the bispectral index at 50. All patients’ pain was evaluated on a four-point scale and side effects were investigated. To explore the molecular mechanism for the functions of COS in propofol use, a mouse pain model was established. The activities of Nav1.7 were analyzed in dorsal root ganglia (DRG cells. The results showed that the patients receiving COS pretreatment were likely to require less propofol than the patients pretreated with placebo for maintaining an anesthetic situation (p < 0.05. The degrees of injection pain were lower in a COS-pretreated group than in a propofol-pretreated group. The side effects were also more reduced in a COS-treated group than in a placebo-pretreated group. COS reduced the activity of Nav1.7 and its inhibitory function was lost when Nav1.7 was silenced (p > 0.05. COS improved propofol performance by affecting Nav1.7 activity. Thus, COS is a potential adjuvant to propofol use in surgical anesthesia.

  9. Activity in prelimbic cortex is required for adjusting the anxiety response level during the elevated plus-maze retest.

    Stern, C A J; Do Monte, F H M; Gazarini, L; Carobrez, A P; Bertoglio, L J

    2010-09-29

    The prelimbic (PL) subregion of medial prefrontal cortex has been implicated in anxiety regulation. It is unknown, however, whether PL cortex also serves to fine-tuning the level of anxiety-related behavior exhibited on the next exposure to the same potentially threatening situation. To address this, we infused cobalt (1.0 mM) to temporarily inactivate the PL cortex during testing, post-testing or retesting in the elevated plus-maze (EPM). This protocol was chosen because it allowed us to concurrently investigate anxiety and the process of aversive learning and memory. PL cortex inactivation during the EPM testing increased the exploration of open-arms, substantiating its role in anxiety. PL cortex inactivation during the EPM retesting counteracted the further avoidance to open-arms exhibited by rats. Interestingly, as evidenced by min-by-min analysis, the cobalt-treated group behaved on EPM retesting as did the vehicle-treated group on EPM testing. This result may imply that activity in PL cortex is necessary for retrieving previously learned information that adjusts the anxiety response level on EPM retesting. Alternatively, a simple reduction in anxiety could explain the cobalt-induced increase in retest open-arms exploration. Neither test nor post-test PL cortex inactivation affected the further avoidance to open-arms observed on EPM retesting. To extend the investigation of PL cortex role in the regulation of open-arms avoidance, we infused other drugs prior to testing or retesting in the EPM. Antagonism of PL cortex adrenergic beta-1 receptors with atenolol (10 nmol), cholinergic muscarinic receptors with scopolamine (20 nmol) or glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors with AP5 (6.0 nmol) interfered with the level of open-arms exploration on testing, but not on retesting. Copyright 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The central cannabinoid CB1 receptor is required for diet-induced obesity and rimonabant's antiobesity effects in mice.

    Pang, Zhen; Wu, Nancy N; Zhao, Weiguang; Chain, David C; Schaffer, Erica; Zhang, Xin; Yamdagni, Preeti; Palejwala, Vaseem A; Fan, Chunpeng; Favara, Sarah G; Dressler, Holly M; Economides, Kyriakos D; Weinstock, Daniel; Cavallo, Jean S; Naimi, Souad; Galzin, Anne-Marie; Guillot, Etienne; Pruniaux, Marie-Pierre; Tocci, Michael J; Polites, H Greg

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid receptor CB1 is expressed abundantly in the brain and presumably in the peripheral tissues responsible for energy metabolism. It is unclear if the antiobesity effects of rimonabant, a CB1 antagonist, are mediated through the central or the peripheral CB1 receptors. To address this question, we generated transgenic mice with central nervous system (CNS)-specific knockdown (KD) of CB1, by expressing an artificial microRNA (AMIR) under the control of the neuronal Thy1.2 promoter. In the mutant mice, CB1 expression was reduced in the brain and spinal cord, whereas no change was observed in the superior cervical ganglia (SCG), sympathetic trunk, enteric nervous system, and pancreatic ganglia. In contrast to the neuronal tissues, CB1 was undetectable in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) or the liver. Consistent with the selective loss of central CB1, agonist-induced hypothermia was attenuated in the mutant mice, but the agonist-induced delay of gastrointestinal transit (GIT), a primarily peripheral nervous system-mediated effect, was not. Compared to wild-type (WT) littermates, the mutant mice displayed reduced body weight (BW), adiposity, and feeding efficiency, and when fed a high-fat diet (HFD), showed decreased plasma insulin, leptin, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels, and elevated adiponectin levels. Furthermore, the therapeutic effects of rimonabant on food intake (FI), BW, and serum parameters were markedly reduced and correlated with the degree of CB1 KD. Thus, KD of CB1 in the CNS recapitulates the metabolic phenotype of CB1 knockout (KO) mice and diminishes rimonabant's efficacy, indicating that blockade of central CB1 is required for rimonabant's antiobesity actions.

  11. The climate responsibilities of the fossil fuel industry: why the Paris Agreement goals require an end to growth

    Trout, K.; Muttitt, G.; Kretzmann, S.; Stockman, L.; Doukas, A.

    2017-12-01

    In December 2015, governments agreed in Paris to limit global average temperature rise to well below 2°C, and to aim to limit it to 1.5°C, compared to pre-industrial levels. Achieving these goals would require greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero early in the second half of this century, and consequently most fossil fuel use to be phased out. This has clear implications for fossil fuel industry, and shines light on what should be expected of the industry in its business decisions - complementing the discussion of the industry's role in the scientific debate. This presentation shares the results to date of ongoing research into the committed emissions from oilfields, gasfields and coal mines, compared to carbon budgets. Building on prior work on fossil fuel reserves (notably Meinshausen 2009), our research focuses just on the developed reserves, from already-producing fields and mines. We estimate developed reserves of oil and gas using industry databases, and of coal using analysis by the International Energy Agency, and compare with carbon budgets published in the IPCC's 5th Assessment Report. The key findings are that: Developed reserves of oil, gas, and coal are more than we can afford to burn while keeping likely warming below 2°C. Developed reserves of oil and gas alone would take the world beyond 1.5°C. The implications are that development of any new fields or mines will either push the world beyond agreed climate limits, or cause some existing extraction assets to become stranded. This suggests that fossil fuel companies should stop developing new infrastructure, and governments should oversee a managed decline of the industry over the coming decades, combined with an upscaling of clean energy, as existing fossil fuel reserves are depleted.

  12. Effect of bimodularity on frequency response of cylindrical panels ...

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The actual stress strain behaviour ... The work on frequency response of bimodular structures is scarce in open literature (Khan .... Analysis is carried out using a C0 eight-noded serendipity quadrilateral shear flexible shell ..... specified convergence tolerance (each incremental displacement becomes less than equal to. 10.

  13. Heart Rate Variability: Effect of Exercise Intensity on Postexercise Response

    James, David V. B.; Munson, Steven C.; Maldonado-Martin, Sara; De Ste Croix, Mark B. A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of two exercise intensities (moderate and severe) on heart rate variability (HRV) response in 16 runners 1 hr prior to (-1 hr) and at +1 hr, +24 hr, +48 hr, and +72 hr following each exercise session. Time domain indexes and a high frequency component showed a significant decrease…

  14. Effectiveness of Responsive Teaching with Children with Down Syndrome

    Karaaslan, Ozcan; Mahoney, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    A randomized control study was conducted to evaluate Responsive Teaching (RT) with a sample of 15 Turkish preschool aged children with Down syndrome (DS) and their mothers over a six-month period of time. RT is an early intervention curriculum that attempts to promote children's development by encouraging parents to engage in highly responsive…

  15. Effects of sintering on microstructure and dielectric response in ...

    Single phase nanocrystalline YCrO3 has been prepared by combustion. ... (1,−1) setting of 1 1 1 reflections from silicon single crystals with specimen between .... tion, hopping, jumping, diffusion etc, which is mainly responsible for the loss in.

  16. Effect of intravenous paracetamol on postoperative morphine requirements in neonates and infants undergoing major noncardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial

    Ceelie, Ilse; de Wildt, Saskia N.; van Dijk, Monique; van den Berg, Margreeth M. J.; van den Bosch, Gerbrich E.; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; de Leeuw, Tom G.; Mathôt, Ron; Knibbe, Catherijne A. J.; Tibboel, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Continuous morphine infusion as standard postoperative analgesic therapy in young infants is associated with unwanted adverse effects such as respiratory depression. To determine whether intravenous paracetamol (acetaminophen) would significantly (>30%) reduce morphine requirements in neonates and

  17. Continuous Dose-Response Response Relationship of the LDL-Cholesterol-Lowering Effect of Phytosterol Intake 1,2

    Demonty, I.; Ras, R.T.; Knaap, van der H.C.M.; Duchateau, G.S.M.J.E.; Meijer, L.; Zock, P.L.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Trautwein, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Phytosterols (plant sterols and stanols) are well known for their LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C)¿lowering effect. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in adults was performed to establish a continuous dose-response relationship that would allow predicting the LDL-C¿lowering efficacy of different

  18. Kisspeptin Signaling Is Required for the Luteinizing Hormone Response in Anestrous Ewes following the Introduction of Males

    De Bond, Julie-Ann P.; Li, Qun; Millar, Robert P.; Clarke, Iain J.; Smith, Jeremy T.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of a novel male stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of female sheep during seasonal anestrus, leading to the resumption of follicle maturation and ovulation. How this pheromone cue activates pulsatile secretion of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)/luteinizing hormone (LH) is unknown. We hypothesised that pheromones activate kisspeptin neurons, the product of which is critical for the stimulation of GnRH neurons and fertility. During the non-breeding season, female sheep were exposed to novel males and blood samples collected for analysis of plasma LH profiles. Females without exposure to males served as controls. In addition, one hour before male exposure, a kisspeptin antagonist (P-271) or vehicle was infused into the lateral ventricle and continued for the entire period of male exposure. Introduction of a male led to elevated mean LH levels, due to increased LH pulse amplitude and pulse frequency in females, when compared to females not exposed to a male. Infusion of P-271 abolished this effect of male exposure. Brains were collected after the male effect stimulus and we observed an increase in the percentage of kisspeptin neurons co-expressing Fos, by immunohistochemistry. In addition, the per-cell expression of Kiss1 mRNA was increased in the rostral and mid (but not the caudal) arcuate nucleus (ARC) after male exposure in both aCSF and P-271 treated ewes, but the per-cell content of neurokinin B mRNA was decreased. There was also a generalized increase in Fos positive cells in the rostral and mid ARC as well as the ventromedial hypothalamus of females exposed to males. We conclude that introduction of male sheep to seasonally anestrous female sheep activates kisspeptin neurons and other cells in the hypothalamus, leading to increased GnRH/LH secretion. PMID:23469121

  19. Insulin-induced translocation of IR to the nucleus in insulin responsive cells requires a nuclear translocation sequence.

    Kesten, Dov; Horovitz-Fried, Miriam; Brutman-Barazani, Tamar; Sampson, Sanford R

    2018-04-01

    Insulin binding to its cell surface receptor (IR) activates a cascade of events leading to its biological effects. The Insulin-IR complex is rapidly internalized and then is either recycled back to the plasma membrane or sent to lysosomes for degradation. Although most of the receptor is recycled or degraded, a small amount may escape this pathway and migrate to the nucleus of the cell where it might be important in promulgation of receptor signals. In this study we explored the mechanism by which insulin induces IR translocation to the cell nucleus. Experiments were performed cultured L6 myoblasts, AML liver cells and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Insulin treatment induced a rapid increase in nuclear IR protein levels within 2 to 5 min. Treatment with WGA, an inhibitor of nuclear import, reduced insulin-induced increases nuclear IR protein; IR was, however, translocated to a perinuclear location. Bioinformatics tools predicted a potential nuclear localization sequence (NLS) on IR. Immunofluorescence staining showed that a point mutation on the predicted NLS blocked insulin-induced IR nuclear translocation. In addition, blockade of nuclear IR activation in isolated nuclei by an IR blocking antibody abrogated insulin-induced increases in IR tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear PKCδ levels. Furthermore, over expression of mutated IR reduced insulin-induced glucose uptake and PKB phosphorylation. When added to isolated nuclei, insulin induced IR phosphorylation but had no effect on nuclear IR protein levels. These results raise questions regarding the possible role of nuclear IR in IR signaling and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Superradiance Effects in the Linear and Nonlinear Optical Response of Quantum Dot Molecules

    Sitek, A.; Machnikowski, P.

    2008-11-01

    We calculate the linear optical response from a single quantum dot molecule and the nonlinear, four-wave-mixing response from an inhomogeneously broadened ensemble of such molecules. We show that both optical signals are affected by the coupling-dependent superradiance effect and by optical interference between the two polarizations. As a result, the linear and nonlinear responses are not identical.

  1. The effect of methylphenidate on three forms of response inhibition in boys with AD/HD

    Scheres, A.; Oosterlaan, J.; Swanson, J.; Morein-Zamir, S.; Meiran, N.; Schut, H.; Vlasveld, L.; Sergeant, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    The current study was aimed at (a) investigating the effect of three doses methylphenidate (MPH) and placebo on inhibition of a prepotent response, inhibition of an ongoing response, and interference control in Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD), and (b) studying dose-response

  2. Design of web questionnaires : An information-processing perspective for the effect of response categories

    Toepoel, V.; Vis, C.M.; Das, J.W.M.; van Soest, A.H.O.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, an information-processing perspective is used to explore the impact of response categories on the answers respondents provide in Web surveys. Response categories have a significant effect on response formulation in questions that are difficult to process, whereas in easier questions

  3. Effects of Personalization and Invitation Email Length on Web-Based Survey Response Rates

    Trespalacios, Jesús H.; Perkins, Ross A.

    2016-01-01

    Individual strategies to increase response rate and survey completion have been extensively researched. Recently, efforts have been made to investigate a combination of interventions to yield better response rates for web-based surveys. This study examined the effects of four different survey invitation conditions on response rate. From a large…

  4. Effect of Spermidine Analogues on Cell Growth of Escherichia coli Polyamine Requiring Mutant MA261.

    Taketo Yoshida

    Full Text Available The effects of spermidine analogues [norspermidine (NSPD, 33, spermidine (SPD, 34, homospermidine (HSPD, 44 and aminopropylcadaverine (APCAD, 35] on cell growth were studied using Escherichia coli polyamine-requiring mutant MA261. Cell growth was compared at 32°C, 37°C, and 42°C. All four analogues were taken up mainly by the PotABCD spermidine-preferential uptake system. The degree of stimulation of cell growth at 32°C and 37°C was NSPD ≥ SPD ≥ HSPD > APCAD, and SPD ≥ HSPD ≥ NSPD > APCAD, respectively. However, at 42°C, it was HSPD » SPD > NSPD > APCAD. One reason for this is HSPD was taken up effectively compared with other triamines. In addition, since natural polyamines (triamines and teteraamines interact mainly with RNA, and the structure of RNA is more flexible at higher temperatures, HSPD probably stabilized RNA more tightly at 42°C. We have thus far found that 20 kinds of protein syntheses are stimulated by polyamines at the translational level. Among them, synthesis of OppA, RpoE and StpA was more strongly stimulated by HSPD at 42°C than at 37°C. Stabilization of the initiation region of oppA and rpoE mRNA was tighter by HSPD at 42°C than 37°C determined by circular dichroism (CD. The degree of polyamine stimulation of OppA, RpoE and StpA synthesis by NSPD, SPD and APCAD was smaller than that by HSPD at 42°C. Thus, the degree of stimulation of cell growth by spermidine analogues at the different temperatures is dependent on the stimulation of protein synthesis by some components of the polyamine modulon.

  5. Effects of copper on CHO cells: cellular requirements and product quality considerations.

    Yuk, Inn H; Russell, Stephen; Tang, Yun; Hsu, Wei-Ting; Mauger, Jacob B; Aulakh, Rigzen P S; Luo, Jun; Gawlitzek, Martin; Joly, John C

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports highlight the impact of copper on lactate metabolism: CHO cell cultures with higher initial copper levels shift to net lactate consumption and yield lower final lactate and higher titers. These studies investigated the effects of copper on metabolite and transcript profiles, but did not measure in detail the dependences of cell culture performance and product quality on copper concentrations. To more thoroughly map these dependences, we explored the effects of various copper treatments on four recombinant CHO cell lines. In the first cell line, when extracellular copper remained above the limit of detection (LOD), cultures shifted to net lactate consumption and yielded comparable performances irrespective of the differences in copper levels; when extracellular copper dropped below LOD (∼13 nM), cultures failed to shift to net lactate consumption, and yielded significantly lower product titers. Across the four cell lines, the ability to grow and consume lactate seemed to depend on the presence of a minimum level of copper, beyond which there were no further gains in culture performance. Although this minimum cellular copper requirement could not be directly quantified, we estimated its probable range for the first cell line by applying several assumptions. Even when different copper concentrations did not affect cell culture performance, they affected product quality profiles: higher initial copper concentrations increased the basic variants in the recombinant IgG1 products. Therefore, in optimizing chemically defined media, it is important to select a copper concentration that is adequate and achieves desired product quality attributes. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  6. Pharmaceutical strategic purchasing requirements in Iran: Price interventions and the related effective factors.

    Bastani, Peivand; Dinarvand, Rasoul; SamadBeik, Mahnaz; Pourmohammadi, Kimia

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical access for the poor is an essential factor in developing countries that can be improved through strategic purchasing. This study was conducted to identify the elements affecting price in order to enable insurance organizations to put strategic purchasing into practice. This was a qualitative study conducted through content analysis with an inductive approach applying a five-stage framework analysis (familiarization, identifying a thematic framework, indexing, mapping, and interpretation). Data analysis was started right after transcribing each interview applying ATLAS.ti. Data were saturated after 32 semi-structured interviews by experts. These key informants were selected purposefully and through snowball sampling. Findings showed that there are four main themes as Pharmaceutical Strategic Purchasing Requirements in Iran as follows essential and structural factors, international factors, economical factors, and legal factors. Moreover, totally 14 related sub-themes were extracted in this area as the main effective variables. It seems that paying adequate attention to the four present themes and 14 sub-themes affecting price can enable health system policy-makers of developing countries like Iran to make the best decisions through strategic purchasing of drugs by the main insurers in order to improve access and health in the country.

  7. Effect of increased regulation on capital costs and manual labor requirements of nuclear power plants

    Paik, S.; Schriver, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain the impact of increasing governmental regulation on capital costs and labor requirements for constructing light water reactor (LWR) electric power plants. The principal factors contributing to these increases are: (1) market conditions and (2) increased regulation. General market conditions include additional costs attributable to price inflation of equipment, material, labor, and the increased cost of money. The central objective of this work is to estimate the impact of increasing regulation on plant costs and, conversely, on output. To do this it is necessary to isolate two opposing sets of forces which have been in operation during the period of major regulatory expansion: learning based upon plant design experience and economies of scale with increasing size (generating capacity) of newer plants. Conceptual models are specified to capture the independent effects of increasing regulation, learning, and economies of scale. Empirical results were obtained by estimating the models on data collected from industry experience during the 1967-1980 period. 23 refs

  8. Pharmaceutical strategic purchasing requirements in Iran: Price interventions and the related effective factors

    Bastani, Peivand; Dinarvand, Rasoul; SamadBeik, Mahnaz; Pourmohammadi, Kimia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pharmaceutical access for the poor is an essential factor in developing countries that can be improved through strategic purchasing. This study was conducted to identify the elements affecting price in order to enable insurance organizations to put strategic purchasing into practice. Methods: This was a qualitative study conducted through content analysis with an inductive approach applying a five-stage framework analysis (familiarization, identifying a thematic framework, indexing, mapping, and interpretation). Data analysis was started right after transcribing each interview applying ATLAS.ti. Data were saturated after 32 semi-structured interviews by experts. These key informants were selected purposefully and through snowball sampling. Findings: Findings showed that there are four main themes as Pharmaceutical Strategic Purchasing Requirements in Iran as follows essential and structural factors, international factors, economical factors, and legal factors. Moreover, totally 14 related sub-themes were extracted in this area as the main effective variables. Conclusion: It seems that paying adequate attention to the four present themes and 14 sub-themes affecting price can enable health system policy-makers of developing countries like Iran to make the best decisions through strategic purchasing of drugs by the main insurers in order to improve access and health in the country. PMID:26985434

  9. A distal ABA responsive element in AtNCED3 promoter is required for positive feedback regulation of ABA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Yan-Zhuo Yang

    Full Text Available The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA plays a crucial role in plant development and responses to abiotic stresses. Recent studies indicate that a positive feedback regulation by ABA exists in ABA biosynthesis in plants under dehydration stress. To understand the molecular basis of this regulation, we analyzed the cis-elements of the AtNCED3 promoter in Arabidopsis. AtNCED3 encodes the first committed and highly regulated dioxygenase in the ABA biosynthetic pathway. Through delineated and mutagenesis analyses in stable-transformed Arabidopsis, we revealed that a distal ABA responsive element (ABRE: GGCACGTG, -2372 to -2364 bp is required for ABA-induced AtNCED3 expression. By analyzing the AtNCED3 expression in ABRE binding protein ABF3 over-expression transgenic plants and knock-out mutants, we provide evidence that the ABA feedback regulation of AtNCED3 expression is not mediated by ABF3.

  10. A distal ABA responsive element in AtNCED3 promoter is required for positive feedback regulation of ABA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Yang, Yan-Zhuo; Tan, Bao-Cai

    2014-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a crucial role in plant development and responses to abiotic stresses. Recent studies indicate that a positive feedback regulation by ABA exists in ABA biosynthesis in plants under dehydration stress. To understand the molecular basis of this regulation, we analyzed the cis-elements of the AtNCED3 promoter in Arabidopsis. AtNCED3 encodes the first committed and highly regulated dioxygenase in the ABA biosynthetic pathway. Through delineated and mutagenesis analyses in stable-transformed Arabidopsis, we revealed that a distal ABA responsive element (ABRE: GGCACGTG, -2372 to -2364 bp) is required for ABA-induced AtNCED3 expression. By analyzing the AtNCED3 expression in ABRE binding protein ABF3 over-expression transgenic plants and knock-out mutants, we provide evidence that the ABA feedback regulation of AtNCED3 expression is not mediated by ABF3.

  11. Effects of Demand Response on Retail and Wholesale Power Markets

    Chassin, David P.; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2012-07-26

    Demand response has grown to be a part of the repertoire of resources used by utilities to manage the balance between generation and load. In recent years, advances in communications and control technology have enabled utilities to consider continuously controlling demand response to meet generation, rather than the other way around. This paper discusses the economic applications of a general method for load resource analysis that parallels the approach used to analyze generation resources and uses the method to examine the results of the US Department of Energy’s Olympic Peninsula Demonstration Testbed. A market-based closed-loop system of controllable assets is discussed with necessary and sufficient conditions on system controllability, observability and stability derived.

  12. Observations on the effects of odours on the homeopathic response.

    McGuigan, Moira

    2014-07-01

    Samuel Hahnemann described incidences where the homeopathic response was disrupted by noxious smells in the environment. An earlier paper proposed that homeopathic medicines may be sensed by vomeronasal cells (VNCs) i.e. microvillus or brush cells in the vomeronasal organ (VNO), the taste buds and associated with the trigeminal nerve and nervus terminalis. This paper proposes an extension to the theory and suggests that a subset of solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs) in the diffuse chemosensory system (DCS) that is morphologically similar to VNCs might also be receptive to homeopathic medicines. The types of odours that may interfere with this process are described. Two clinical cases of disruption of the homeopathic response are given as examples, showing that successful re-establishment of remedy action can be produced by timely repetition of the medicine. The ramifications on clinical homeopathic practice are discussed. Copyright © 2014 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Transcriptional activation of transforming growth factor alpha by estradiol: requirement for both a GC-rich site and an estrogen response element half-site.

    Vyhlidal, C; Samudio, I; Kladde, M P; Safe, S

    2000-06-01

    17beta-Estradiol (E2) induces transforming growth factor alpha (TGFalpha) gene expression in MCF-7 cells and previous studies have identified a 53 bp (-252 to -200) sequence containing two imperfect estrogen responsive elements (EREs) that contribute to E2 responsiveness. Deletion analysis of the TGFalpha gene promoter in this study identified a second upstream region of the promoter (-623 to -549) that is also E2 responsive. This sequence contains three GC-rich sites and an imperfect ERE half-site, and the specific cis-elements and trans-acting factors were determined by promoter analysis in transient transfection experiments, gel mobility shift assays and in vitro DNA footprinting. The results are consistent with an estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha)/Sp1 complex interacting with an Sp1(N)(30) ERE half-site ((1/2)) motif in which both ERalpha and Sp1 bind promoter DNA. The ER/Sp1-DNA complex is formed using nuclear extracts from MCF-7 cells but not with recombinant human ERalpha or Sp1 proteins, suggesting that other nuclear factor(s) are required for complex stabilization. The E2-responsive Sp1(N)(x)ERE(1/2) motif identified in the TGFalpha gene promoter has also been characterized in the cathepsin D and heat shock protein 27 gene promoters; however, in the latter two promoters the numbers of intervening nucleotides are 23 and 10 respectively.

  14. Performance Incentives Within Firms: The Effect of Managerial Responsibility

    Rajesh K. Aggarwal; Andrew A. Samwick

    1999-01-01

    Empirical research on executive compensation has focused almost exclusively on the incentives provided to chief executive officers. However, firms are run by teams of managers, and a theory of the firm should also explain the distribution of incentives and responsibilities for other members of the top management team. An extension of the standard principal-agent model to allow for multiple signals of effort predicts that executives who have other, more precise signals of their effort than fir...

  15. The stress response to surgery: release mechanisms and the modifying effect of pain relief

    Kehlet, H

    1989-01-01

    This short review updates information on the release mechanisms of the systemic response to surgical injury and the modifying effect of pain relief. Initiation of the response is primarily due to afferent nerve impulses combined with release of humoral substances (such as prostaglandins, kinins...... in releasing the classical endocrine catabolic response, while humoral factors are important for the hyperthermic response, changes in coagulation and fibrinolysis immunofunction, and capillary permeability. The modifying effect of pain relief on the surgical stress response is dependent upon the technique...... on the stress response. In summary, pain alleviation itself may not necessarily lead to an important modification of the stress response, and a combined approach with inhibition of the neural and humoral release mechanisms is necessary for a pronounced inhibition or prevention of the response to surgical injury....

  16. Effect of thermal decomposition of hydroxyapatite on the thermoluminescent response

    Sandoval C, K. J.; Zarate M, J.; Lemus R, J.; Rivera M, T.

    2014-08-01

    In this work, a study on the thermoluminescence (Tl) induced by gamma radiation in synthetic hydroxyapatite (Hap) annealed at different temperatures obtained by the precipitation method is presented. Synthesis of hydroxyapatite Hap was carried out starting from inorganic precursors [Ca(NO 3 ) 2 ·4H 2 O and (NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 ]. The precipitate was filtered, washed, dried and then the powder was calcined at different temperatures until the Hap decomposition. The structural and morphological characterization was carried out using both X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (Sem) techniques. Thermoluminescent (Tl) properties of Hap powders were irradiated at different gamma radiation doses. According to X ray diffraction patterns, the tricalcium diphosphate phase (Tcp) appear when the Hap was calcined at 900 grades C. Tl glow curve showed two peaks located at around 200 and 300 grades C, respectively. Tl response as a function of gamma radiation dose was in a wide range from 25 to 100 Gy. The fading of the Tl response at 134 days after irradiation was measured. Experimental results showed that the synthetic hydroxyapatite obtained by precipitation technique may have dosimetric applications when is annealed at temperature of 900 grades C, where the Tcp phase appears and contributes to Tl response, which opens the possibility of using this biomaterials in the area of dosimetry, as they are generally used for biomedical implants. (author)

  17. Quantitative SPECT brain imaging: Effects of attenuation and detector response

    Gilland, D.R.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Bowsher, J.E.; Turkington, T.G.; Liang, Z.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    Two physical factors that substantially degrade quantitative accuracy in SPECT imaging of the brain are attenuation and detector response. In addition to the physical factors, random noise in the reconstructed image can greatly affect the quantitative measurement. The purpose of this work was to implement two reconstruction methods that compensate for attenuation and detector response, a 3D maximum likelihood-EM method (ML) and a filtered backprojection method (FB) with Metz filter and Chang attenuation compensation, and compare the methods in terms of quantitative accuracy and image noise. The methods were tested on simulated data of the 3D Hoffman brain phantom. The simulation incorporated attenuation and distance-dependent detector response. Bias and standard deviation of reconstructed voxel intensities were measured in the gray and white matter regions. The results with ML showed that in both the gray and white matter regions as the number of iterations increased, bias decreased and standard deviation increased. Similar results were observed with FB as the Metz filter power increased. In both regions, ML had smaller standard deviation than FB for a given bias. Reconstruction times for the ML method have been greatly reduced through efficient coding, limited source support, and by computing attenuation factors only along rays perpendicular to the detector

  18. Effect of strain on the plasmonic response of graphene

    Codorniu Pujals, D.

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental researches have shown that the plasmonic response of graphene to the electromagnetic excitations can be comparable to that of certain metals like silver and gold, that have been traditionally used to produce the plasmonic surface resonance (SPR) in different systems. The possible use of graphene in substitution of the mentioned metals for this and other applications has stimulated the interest in studying the waves of plasma in this material, what has given place to a series of works in which approximate equations for the plasmons in the graphene lattice have been obtained, and the essential differences of the graphene plasmons, with regard to those of other materials, have been settled down. Those differences are a consequence of the behavior of the electrons in the graphene as massless Dirac fermions. In this direction, a topic of special theoretical and practical interest is the study of the external factors able to modify the plasmonic response. In this work, the possibility of achieving those modifications by straining the graphene lattice is analyzed. With that aim, the results obtained by other authors for the plasmonic response, based on the Many Body Theory, are combined with a tight binding approach of the electronic structure of strained graphene. On this basis, the influence of the strain fields on the Fermi velocity and on the plasma frequency of graphene is analyzed. Possible practical implications of the obtained results for different applications in nano-sciences and nano-technologies, as well as alternatives for further theoretical developments, are discussed. (Author)

  19. Effect of thermal decomposition of hydroxyapatite on the thermoluminescent response

    Sandoval C, K. J.; Zarate M, J.; Lemus R, J. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Instituto de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, Ciudad Universitaria, Edificio U, 58060 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Rivera M, T., E-mail: karlasandovalc@gmail.com [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    In this work, a study on the thermoluminescence (Tl) induced by gamma radiation in synthetic hydroxyapatite (Hap) annealed at different temperatures obtained by the precipitation method is presented. Synthesis of hydroxyapatite Hap was carried out starting from inorganic precursors [Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4}]. The precipitate was filtered, washed, dried and then the powder was calcined at different temperatures until the Hap decomposition. The structural and morphological characterization was carried out using both X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (Sem) techniques. Thermoluminescent (Tl) properties of Hap powders were irradiated at different gamma radiation doses. According to X ray diffraction patterns, the tricalcium diphosphate phase (Tcp) appear when the Hap was calcined at 900 grades C. Tl glow curve showed two peaks located at around 200 and 300 grades C, respectively. Tl response as a function of gamma radiation dose was in a wide range from 25 to 100 Gy. The fading of the Tl response at 134 days after irradiation was measured. Experimental results showed that the synthetic hydroxyapatite obtained by precipitation technique may have dosimetric applications when is annealed at temperature of 900 grades C, where the Tcp phase appears and contributes to Tl response, which opens the possibility of using this biomaterials in the area of dosimetry, as they are generally used for biomedical implants. (author)

  20. Reirradiation on recurrent cervical cancer case: Treatment response and side effects

    Siregar, M. F.; Supriana, N.; Nuranna, L.; Prihartono, J.

    2017-08-01

    Management of recurrent cervical cancer by reirradiation after radiation treatment remains controversial. In Indonesia, there is currently no data about reirradiation tumor response and side effects. This study aims to assess the tumor response to and side effects of reirradiation, the effect of time interval between first radiation treatment and cancer recurrence on the tumor response and side effects, and the effect of tumor size on tumor response. A cohort retrospective study with no comparison was done with the Radiotherapy Department at Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital, Jakarta. Participants were recurrent cervical cancer patients undergoing reirradiation. Data was collected from patients’ medical records and follow-up phone calls. Twenty-two patients participated in this study. Nine patients (40.9%) had complete responses, 10 patients (45.5%) had partial responses, 1 patient (4.5%) had a stable response, and 2 patients (9.1%) had tumor progressions. In general, 15 patients (68.2%) had no to light side effects (grade 0-2 RTOG) and 7 patients (31.8%) had severe side effects (grade 3-4 RTOG). Four patients (18.1%) had severe gastrointestinal acute side effects, 6 patients (27.3%) had severe gastrointestinal late side effects, 2 patients (9.1%) had severe urogenital side effects, and there were no patients had severe urogenital late side effects. There was no significant difference in tumor response between patients with time interval between first radiation treatment and recurrence of 4 cm. Reirradiation can be considered as a modality in recurrent cervical cancer management since good tumor response was achieved and the majority of patients had no to light side effects (grade 0-2 RTOG). This study found no correlation between tumor response, side effects, and time gap between first radiation treatment and recurrence of 4 cm.

  1. Plant γH2AX foci are required for proper DNA DSB repair responses and colocalize with E2F factors

    Smetana, Ondrej; Sanchez-Calderon, Lenin; Lincker, Frédéric; Genestier, Julie; Schmit, Anne-Catherine; Houlné, Guy; Chabouté, Marie Edith

    2012-01-01

    Cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are linked in mammals and yeasts to the phosphorylated histones H2AX (cH2AX) repair foci which are multiproteic nuclear complexes responsible for DSB sensing and signalling. However, neither the components of these foci nor their role are yet known in plants. In this paper, we describe the effects of cH2AX deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana plants challenged with DSBs in terms of genotoxic sensitivity and E2F-mediated transcriptional respo...

  2. [Effect of climate change on rice irrigation water requirement in Songnen Plain, Northeast China].

    Huang, Zhi-gang; Wang, Xiao-li; Xiao, Ye; Yang, Fei; Wang, Chen-xi

    2015-01-01

    Based on meteorological data from China national weather stations and climate scenario grid data through regional climate model provided by National Climate Center, rice water requirement was calculated by using McCloud model and Penman-Monteith model combined with crop coefficient approach. Then the rice irrigation water requirement was estimated by water balance model, and the changes of rice water requirement were analyzed. The results indicated that either in historical period or in climate scenario, rice irrigation water requirement contour lines during the whole growth period and Lmid period decreased along southwest to northeast, and the same irrigation water requirement contour line moved north with decade alternation. Rice irrigation water requirement during the whole growth period increased fluctuantly with decade alternation at 44.2 mm . 10 a-1 in historical period and 19.9 mm . 10 a-1 in climate scenario. The increase in rice irrigation water requirement during the Lmid period with decade alternation was significant in historical period, but not significant in climate scenario. Contribution rate of climate change to rice irrigation water requirement would be fluctuantly increased with decade alternation in climate scenario. Compared with 1970s, contribution rates of climate change to rice irrigation water requirement were 23.6% in 2000s and 34.4% in 2040s, which increased 14.8 x 10(8) m3 irrigation water in 2000s and would increase 21.2 x 10(8) m3 irrigation water in 2040s.

  3. Vertical axis wind turbine turbulent response model. Part 2: Response of Sandia National laboratories' 34-meter VAWT with aeroelastic effects

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic response of Sandia National Laboratories' 34-m Darrieus rotor wind turbine at Bushland, Texas, is presented. The formulation used a double-multiple streamtube aerodynamic model with a turbulent airflow and included the effects of linear aeroelastic forces. The structural analysis used established procedures with the program MSC/NASTRAN. The effects of aeroelastic forces on the damping of natural modes agree well with previous results at operating rotor speeds, but show some discrepancies at very high rotor speeds. A number of alternative expressions for the spectrum of turbulent wind were investigated. The model loading represented by each does not differ significantly; a more significant difference is caused by imposing a full lateral coherence of the turbulent flow. Spectra of the predicted stresses at various locations show that without aeroelastic forces, very severe resonance is likely to occur at certain natural frequencies. Inclusion of aeroelastic effects greatly attenuates this stochastic response, especially in modes involving in-plane blade bending.

  4. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B

  5. Cadmium and health: A toxicological and epidemiological appraisal Volume II: Effects and response

    Friberg, L.; Elinder, C.; Kjellstrom, T.; Nordberg, G.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains the following chapters: Respiratory Effects. Renal Effects. Effects on Bone, on Vitamin D, and Calcium Metabolism. Other Toxic Effects. Carcinogenic and Genetic Effects. Critical Organs, Critical Concentrations, and Whole Body Dose-Response Relationships. General Summary and Conclusions and Some Aspects of Diagnosis and Poisoning. Appendix

  6. 18 CFR 157.6 - Applications; general requirements.

    2010-04-01

    ... showing the revenue responsibility for each firm rate schedule under the pipeline's currently effective... this section requires an applicant to reveal Critical Energy Infrastructure Information (CEII), as...

  7. America's Climate Choices: Informing an Effective Response to Climate Change (Invited)

    Liverman, D. M.; McConnell, M. C.; Raven, P.

    2010-12-01

    climate-related decisions that society will confront over the coming decades will require an informed and engaged public and an education system that provides students with the knowledge to make informed choices. Although nearly all Americans have now heard of climate change, many have yet to understand the full implications of the issue and the opportunities and risks that lie in the solutions. Nonetheless, national surveys demonstrate a clear public desire for more information about climate change and how it might affect local communities. A majority of Americans want the government to take action in response to climate change and are willing to take action themselves. Although communicating about climate change and choices is vitally important, it can be difficult. This report summarizes some simple guidelines for more effective communications.

  8. Effects of embedment including slip and separation on seismic SSI response of a nuclear reactor building

    Saxena, Navjeev; Paul, D.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Both the slip and separation of reactor base reduce with increase in embedment. ► The slip and separation become insignificant beyond 1/4 and 1/2 embedment respectively. ► The stresses in reactor reduce significantly upto 1/4 embedment. ► The stress reduction with embedment is more pronounced in case of tensile stresses. ► The modeling of interface is important beyond 1/8 embedment as stresses are underestimated otherwise. - Abstract: The seismic response of nuclear reactor containment building considering the effects of embedment, slip and separation at soil–structure interface requires modeling of the soil, structure and interface altogether. Slip and separation at the interface causes stress redistribution in the soil and the structure around the interface. The embedment changes the dynamic characteristics of the soil–structure system. Consideration of these aspects allows capturing the realistic response of the structure, which has been a research gap and presented here individually as well as taken together. Finite element analysis has been carried out in time domain to attempt the highly nonlinear problem. The study draws important conclusions useful for design of nuclear reactor containment building.

  9. Learned helplessness in the rat: effect of response topography in a within-subject design.

    dos Santos, Cristiano Valerio; Gehm, Tauane; Hunziker, Maria Helena Leite

    2011-02-01

    Three experiments investigated learned helplessness in rats manipulating response topography within-subject and different intervals between treatment and tests among groups. In Experiment 1, rats previously exposed to inescapable shocks were tested under an escape contingency where either jumping or nose poking was required to terminate shocks; tests were run either 1, 14 or 28 days after treatment. Most rats failed to jump, as expected, but learned to nose poke, regardless of the interval between treatment and tests and order of testing. The same results were observed in male and female rats from a different laboratory (Experiment 2) and despite increased exposure to the escape contingencies using a within-subject design (Experiment 3). Furthermore, no evidence of helplessness reversal was observed, since animals failed to jump even after having learned to nose-poke in a previous test session. These results are not consistent with a learned helplessness hypothesis, which claims that shock (un)controllability is the key variable responsible for the effect. They are nonetheless consistent with the view that inescapable shocks enhance control by irrelevant features of the relationship between the environment and behavior. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Angular Variation on Split D Differential Eddy Current Probe Response (Postprint)

    2016-02-10

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2016-0327 EFFECTS OF ANGULAR VARIATION ON SPLIT D DIFFERENTIAL EDDY CURRENT PROBE RESPONSE (POSTPRINT) Ryan D...March 2014 – 22 September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EFFECTS OF ANGULAR VARIATION ON SPLIT D DIFFERENTIAL EDDY CURRENT PROBE RESPONSE (POSTPRINT... Current Probe Response Ryan D. Mooers1, a) and John C. Aldrin2 1United States Air Force Research Labs, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Structural

  11. Acute effects of cocaine and cannabis on response inhibition in humans: an ERP investigation

    Spronk, D.B.; De Bruijn, E.R.; van Wel, J.H.; Ramaekers, J.G.; Verkes, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Substance abuse has often been associated with alterations in response inhibition in humans. Not much research has examined how the acute effects of drugs modify the neurophysiological correlates of response inhibition, or how these effects interact with individual variation in trait levels of

  12. The effects of noncontingent music and response interruption and redirection on vocal stereotypy.

    Gibbs, Ashley R; Tullis, Christopher A; Thomas, Raven; Elkins, Brittany

    2018-06-17

    Vocal stereotypy is a commonly occurring challenging behavior in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) that is frequently maintained by automatic reinforcement and often interferes with skill acquisition. Matched stimulation (MS), and response interruption and redirection (RIRD) are two interventions that have been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the occurrence of vocal stereotypy with participants with ASD. The current study sought to determine if the combination of MS (noncontingent music) and RIRD was more effective at reducing vocal stereotypy than RIRD alone and if the parents of children with ASD found the combination of MS and RIRD more socially valid than RIRD alone. The results suggested that the combined intervention resulted in greater suppression of vocal stereotypy and increased occurrences of on-task behavior in both participants. Additionally, RIRD required fewer implementations and had a shorter duration when combined with MS. Results suggest that the combination of MS and RIRD may be an effective intervention outside of highly controlled settings. © 2018 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  13. Persistent effects of chronic clozapine on the cellular and behavioral responses to LSD in mice

    Moreno, José L.; Holloway, Terrell; Umali, Adrienne; Rayannavar, Vinayak; Sealfon, Stuart C.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale In schizophrenia patients, optimal treatment with antipsychotics requires weeks to months of sustained drug therapy. However, single administration of antipsychotic drugs can reverse schizophrenia-like behavioral alterations in rodent models of psychosis. This raises questions about the physiological relevance of such antipsychotic-like activity. Objective This study evaluates the effects of chronic treatment with clozapine on the cellular and behavioral responses induced by the hallucinogenic serotonin 5-HT2A receptor agonist lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) as a mouse model of psychosis. Method Mice were treated chronically (21 days) with 25 mg/kg/day clozapine. Experiments were conducted 1, 7, 14, and 21 days after the last clozapine administration. [3H]Ketanserin binding and 5-HT2A mRNA expression were determined in mouse somatosensory cortex. Head-twitch behavior, expression of c-fos, which is induced by all 5-HT2A agonists, and expression of egr-1 and egr-2, which are LSD-like specific, were assayed. Results Head-twitch response was decreased and [3H]ketanserin binding was downregulated in 1, 7, and 14 days after chronic clozapine. 5-HT2A mRNA was reduced 1 day after chronic clozapine. Induction of c-fos, but not egr-1 and egr-2, was rescued 7 days after chronic clozapine. These effects were not observed after short treatment (2 days) with clozapine or chronic haloperidol (1 mg/kg/day). Conclusion Our findings provide a murine model of chronic atypical antipsychotic drug action and suggest downregulation of the 5-HT2A receptor as a potential mechanism involved in these persistent therapeutic-like effects. PMID:22842765

  14. Solar cell development requires effective metrology: lock-in thermography can help

    Tarin, M.; Overstreet, R.

    2013-01-01

    The environmental and political benefits of renewable energy sources are understood by any informed observer with an interest in the future sustainability of our planet. Solar cells are getting a lot of attention - not only because they are a clean source of renewable energy, but also because their energy input is essentially free. Through the use of photovoltaic (PV) technology, solar cells convert the sun's rays directly into electricity. According to John Boyd, a technology analyst at Semiconductor Insights, 'a solar array 150 x 150 km could, in principle, meet all of North America's energy needs.' Assuming adequate installation space, and a solution for power grid load balancing, the main problem remaining to be solved is achieving grid parity - the point at which the cost of generating PV power is competitive with that of generating power using existing power plants. Currently, the cost of generating PV power is approximately $0.20/kWh globally. This is still roughly twice the rate of coal-based alternatives. The current generation of silicon solar cells typically achieves conversion efficiencies between 15% and 25%, while typical metallic thin film cells have efficiencies in the 5% to 20% range, depending on materials used. R and D efforts are aimed at increasing the efficiency of both solar cell technologies and reducing PV cell power generation costs to around $0.05/kWh. The primary challenges in reducing the cost of PV power generation exist in the production phase of the development cycle. Too many defects in the semiconducting material structure go undetected before solar cells are put into use. Identifying these defects requires efficient, cost effective test and measurement methods for characterizing a cell's performance and its electronic structure.(author)

  15. The effects of habitat on coral bleaching responses in Kenya.

    Grimsditch, Gabriel; Mwaura, Jelvas M; Kilonzo, Joseph; Amiyo, Nassir

    2010-06-01

    This study examines the bleaching responses of scleractinian corals at four sites in Kenya (Kanamai, Vipingo, Mombasa and Nyali) representing two distinct lagoon habitats (relatively shallow and relatively deep). Bleaching incidence was monitored for the whole coral community, while zooxanthellae densities and chlorophyll levels were monitored for target species (Pocillopora damicornis, Porites lutea, and Porites cylindrica) during a non-bleaching year (2006) and a year of mild-bleaching (2007). Differences in bleaching responses between habitats were observed, with shallower sites Kanamai and Vipingo exhibiting lower bleaching incidence than deeper sites Nyali and Mombasa. These shallower lagoons display more fluctuating thermal and light environments than the deeper sites, suggesting that corals in the shallower lagoons have acclimatized and/or adapted to the fluctuating environmental conditions they endure on a daily basis and have become more resistant to bleaching stress. In deeper sites that did exhibit higher bleaching (Mombasa and Nyali), it was found that coral recovery occurred more quickly in the protected area than in the non-protected area.

  16. The effect of submergence on structural response in confined pools

    Sturm, A.J. Jr.; Song, C.C.S.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper the response of single and multi degree of submerged systems is investigated. The complete equations of motions including fluid coupling terms are developed for submerged bodies where the surrounding fluid is both moving in phase and out of phase with the support motion. The analysis considers both structural and fluid damping. Also included is an analysis of two degrees of freedom fluid coupling for submerged bodies completely enclosed within another body. In this case limiting conditions of the inner body hydrodynamic mass are examined, along the frequency response characteristics of these systems. The paper developes a simplified forcing function approach for in phase fluid support motion systems. This method is applicable for both modal-spectral and time history dynamic analyses of any linear structure. The results of the analysis are expanded for s structures with non-linear support configuration, i.e. (sliding or rocking bases) to again define a simplified analytical approach accounting for in phase fluid support motion. (orig.)

  17. Effect of silica particle size on macrophage inflammatory responses.

    Toshimasa Kusaka

    Full Text Available Amorphous silica particles, such as nanoparticles (<100 nm diameter particles, are used in a wide variety of products, including pharmaceuticals, paints, cosmetics, and food. Nevertheless, the immunotoxicity of these particles and the relationship between silica particle size and pro-inflammatory activity are not fully understood. In this study, we addressed the relationship between the size of amorphous silica (particle dose, diameter, number, and surface area and the inflammatory activity (macrophage phagocytosis, inflammasome activation, IL-1β secretion, cell death and lung inflammation. Irrespective of diameter size, silica particles were efficiently internalized by mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages via an actin cytoskeleton-dependent pathway, and induced caspase-1, but not caspase-11, activation. Of note, 30 nm-1000 nm diameter silica particles induced lysosomal destabilization, cell death, and IL-1β secretion at markedly higher levels than did 3000 nm-10000 nm silica particles. Consistent with in vitro results, intra-tracheal administration of 30 nm silica particles into mice caused more severe lung inflammation than that of 3000 nm silica particles, as assessed by measurement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of mice, and by the micro-computed tomography analysis. Taken together, these results suggest that silica particle size impacts immune responses, with submicron amorphous silica particles inducing higher inflammatory responses than silica particles over 1000 nm in size, which is ascribed not only to their ability to induce caspase-1 activation but also to their cytotoxicity.

  18. Conditions required for the appearance of double responses in hippocampal field CA1 to application of single stimuli to Shäffer collaterals in freely moving rats.

    Zosimovskii, V A; Korshunov, V A; Markevich, V A

    2008-03-01

    Stimulation of Shäffer collaterals with single current impulses could evoke double responses in hippocampal field CA1 in freely moving rats. The late response - the population excitatory postsynaptic potential with a preceding transient potential, often biphasic - occurred only after an early population spike and was time-locked to it. The shape characteristics of the late response, its polarity, and its latent period relative to the early population spike suggest that stimulation of Shäffer collaterals gives rise, in CA1, to a wave of excitation which passes through the entorhinal cortex and returns to CA1 directly via fibers of the perforant path. In conscious rats, medium-strength stimulation of Shäffer collaterals, sufficient to evoke a quite early population spike in CA1, did not usually lead to the appearance of a late response; the same stimulation became effective after tetanization of Shäffer collaterals in conditions of long-term potentiation of the early population spike. Furthermore, the appearance of the late response was facilitated in rats falling asleep on the background of high-amplitude, low-frequency EEG oscillations in CA1 characteristic of slow-wave sleep, as well as in sleeping rats, regardless of the EEG pattern.

  19. 19 CFR 200.735-123 - Effect of employees' and special Government employees' statements on other requirements.

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effect of employees' and special Government... Employment and Financial Interests § 200.735-123 Effect of employees' and special Government employees... statements required of employees and special Government employees are in addition to, and not in substitution...

  20. Discrete Emotion Effects on Lexical Decision Response Times

    Briesemeister, Benny B.; Kuchinke, Lars; Jacobs, Arthur M.

    2018-01-01

    Our knowledge about affective processes, especially concerning effects on cognitive demands like word processing, is increasing steadily. Several studies consistently document valence and arousal effects, and although there is some debate on possible interactions and different notions of valence, broad agreement on a two dimensional model of affective space has been achieved. Alternative models like the discrete emotion theory have received little interest in word recognition research so far....

  1. Impact of the millennium effect on insurance for damage and civil responsibility

    Baena Maestre, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute, as far as possible, to sounding the alarm so that executives and directors will be prepared for the effect mentioned above, without ruling out the possibility os someone else inside their company being responsible for studying and solving the problem. The millennium bug, Y 2k, 2000 Year's Shock, 2000 Effect, are some of the expressions used to name a common problem which will affect every computing system in all areas of the global economy, because both process and management computers that use the old-fashioned two digit date formats, will believe that the new year after 1999 is the year 1900. That mistake may produce unknown problems, due to lack of experience in establishing a universal basis of foreseeability. Therefore, we are facing a complex challenge, the possible solutions of which are still not unknown, but which, from the insurace point of view, and because of the definition itself of an accident as a sudden, unforeseen event causing damage to people or to things, we can state that those problems deriving from the Millennium Effect do not, fulfil the basic requirements of suddeness and unforeseeability, because both their existence and their possible effects are known and, therefore, Operators are obliged to take the necessary steps in order to avoid any demaging consequence. All Risk Managers must start a round of consultations with their brokers, advisers and insurance companies, with the intention of, if after having taken all the suitable steps accessible to the Operators, the Contractors and the Equipment Suppliers, an accident due to the Millenium Effect occurs, then the insurance companies will cover such sinisters. The suitable steps mentioned above include: identification of the affected systems, correction of the effect, performing of real or simulated tests proving that the correction has been succesful, and its acceptable from both technical and documentary points of view. In conclusion, it can be

  2. Effects of aging on the immunopathologic response to sepsis.

    Turnbull, Isaiah R; Clark, Andrew T; Stromberg, Paul E; Dixon, David J; Woolsey, Cheryl A; Davis, Christopher G; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-03-01

    Aging is associated with increased inflammation following sepsis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this represents a fundamental age-based difference in the host response or is secondary to the increased mortality seen in aged hosts. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Animal laboratory in a university medical center. Young (6-12 weeks) and aged (20-24 months) FVB/N mice. Mice were subjected to 2 x 25 or 1 x 30 cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Survival was similar in young mice subjected to 2 x 25 CLP and aged mice subjected to 1 x 30 CLP (p = 0.15). Young mice subjected to 1 x 30 CLP had improved survival compared with the other groups (p < 0.05). When injury was held constant but mortality was greater, both systemic and peritoneal levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 were elevated 24 hours after CLP in aged animals compared with young animals (p < 0.05). When mortality was similar but injury severity was different, there were no significant differences in systemic cytokines between aged mice and young mice. In contrast, peritoneal levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, IL-6, and IL-10 were higher in aged mice subjected to 1 x 30 CLP than young mice subjected to 2 x 25 CLP despite their similar mortalities (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in either bacteremia or peritoneal cultures when animals of different ages sustained similar injuries or had different injuries with similar mortalities. Aged mice are more likely to die of sepsis than young mice when subjected to an equivalent insult, and this is associated with increases in both systemic and local inflammation. There is an exaggerated local but not systemic inflammatory response in aged mice compared with young mice when mortality is similar. This suggests that systemic processes that culminate in death may be age independent, but the local inflammatory response may be greater with aging.

  3. Effects of aging on the immunopathological response to sepsis

    Turnbull, Isaiah R.; Clark, Andrew T.; Stromberg, Paul E.; Dixon, David J.; Woolsey, Cheryl A.; Davis, Christopher G.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Buchman, Timothy G.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Aging is associated with increased inflammation following sepsis. The purpose of this study was to determine if this represents a fundamental age-based difference in the host response or is secondary to the increased mortality seen in aged hosts. Design Prospective, randomized controlled study. Setting Animal laboratory in a university medical center. Subjects Young (6–12 week) and aged (20–24 month) FVB/N mice. Interventions Mice were subjected to 2×25 or 1×30 cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Measurements and Main Results Survival was similar in young mice subjected to 2×25 CLP and aged mice subjected to 1×30 CLP (p=0.15). Young mice subjected to 1×30 CLP had improved survival compared to both other groups (p<0.05). When injury was held constant but mortality was greater, both systemic and peritoneal levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1 were elevated 24 hours after CLP in aged animals compared to young animals (p<0.05). When mortality was similar but injury severity was different, there were no significant differences in systemic cytokines between aged mice and young mice. In contrast, peritoneal levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 were higher in aged mice subjected to 1×30 CLP than young mice subjected to 2×25 CLP despite their similar mortalities (p<0.05). There were no significant differences in either bacteremia or peritoneal cultures when animals of different ages sustained similar injuries or had different injuries with similar mortalities. Conclusions Aged mice are more likely to die from sepsis than young mice when subjected to an equivalent insult, and this is associated with increases in both systemic and local inflammation. There is an exaggerated local but not systemic inflammatory response in aged mice compared to young mice when mortality is similar. This suggests that systemic processes that culminate in death may be age-independent, but the local inflammatory response may be greater with aging. PMID:19237912

  4. Performance Support Technology to Assess Training Effectiveness: Functional and Test-Bed Requirements

    1992-10-01

    Su22ort Technologv SN Conge ~t ------------------ ------------------------------ 1. Compliance with TRADOC policy 1.1 Job aid that lays out SOP. 1.2 Tutorial...Inverse area . .Mark area after matched I-Custom cursor w rong respons,,e ¶Try again (Change Response TUpe jane) Erase feedback: SOK" Edit dlsplag OK...MANAGER for GROUP rou Choose an option: U - USER NAMES *2* A - ACTIVITIES *2* F - FILE MANAGEMENr C - CODEWORD E - ERROP REPORT *PRESENT* S - SPECIAL

  5. The Zygosaccharomyces bailii transcription factor Haa1 is required for acetic acid and copper stress responses suggesting subfunctionalization of the ancestral bifunctional protein Haa1/Cup2.

    Palma, Margarida; Dias, Paulo Jorge; Roque, Filipa de Canaveira; Luzia, Laura; Guerreiro, Joana Fernandes; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2017-01-13

    The food spoilage yeast species Zygosaccharomyces bailii exhibits an extraordinary capacity to tolerate weak acids, in particular acetic acid. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Haa1 (ScHaa1) is considered the main player in genomic expression reprogramming in response to acetic acid stress, but the role of its homologue in Z. bailii (ZbHaa1) is unknown. In this study it is demonstrated that ZbHaa1 is a ScHaa1 functional homologue by rescuing the acetic acid susceptibility phenotype of S. cerevisiae haa1Δ. The disruption of ZbHAA1 in Z. bailii IST302 and the expression of an extra ZbHAA1 copy confirmed ZbHAA1 as a determinant of acetic acid tolerance. ZbHaa1 was found to be required for acetic acid stress-induced transcriptional activation of Z. bailii genes homologous to ScHaa1-target genes. An evolutionary analysis of the Haa1 homologues identified in 28 Saccharomycetaceae species genome sequences, including Z bailii, was carried out using phylogenetic and gene neighbourhood approaches. Consistent with previous studies, this analysis revealed a group containing pre-whole genome duplication species Haa1/Cup2 single orthologues, including ZbHaa1, and two groups containing either Haa1 or Cup2 orthologues from post-whole genome duplication species. S. cerevisiae Cup2 (alias Ace1) is a transcription factor involved in response and tolerance to copper stress. Taken together, these observations led us to hypothesize and demonstrate that ZbHaa1 is also involved in copper-induced transcriptional regulation and copper tolerance. The transcription factor ZbHaa1 is required for adaptive response and tolerance to both acetic acid and copper stresses. The subfunctionalization of the single ancestral Haa1/Cup2 orthologue that originated Haa1 and Cup2 paralogues after whole genome duplication is proposed.

  6. The effect of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) on oxidative stress response enzymes of the macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum.

    Esterhuizen-Londt, M; Pflugmacher, S; Downing, T G

    2011-04-01

    Cyanobacteria are known to produce bioactive secondary metabolites such as hepatotoxins, cytotoxins and neurotoxins. The newly recognized neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a naturally occurring non-protein amino acid found in the majority of cyanobacterial genera tested. Evidence that exists for implication of BMAA in neurodegenerative disorders relies on bioaccumulation and biomagnification from symbiotic cyanobacteria. Uptake and accumulation of free BMAA by various non-symbiotic organisms, including aquatic macrophytes, has been documented but to date limited evidence of ecotoxicology exists. We therefore investigated the effect of BMAA on the oxidative stress responses of the macrophyte, Ceratophyllum demersum. Markers for oxidative stress in this study are the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. We found that BMAA had an inhibitory effect on all the oxidative stress response enzymes tested in plants exposed to BMAA. However enzymes not related to oxidative stress response were not affected by BMAA in in vitro experiments. Binding studies in the presence of BMAA showed reduced enzyme specific activity over time compared to the control. This study shows that BMAA causes oxidative stress indirectly as it inhibits antioxidant enzymes required to combat reactive oxygen species that cause damage to cells. Further investigations are required to fully understand the inhibitory effect of BMAA on these enzymes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dose response curves for effects of low-level radiation

    Myers, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    The linear dose-response model used by international committees to assess the genetic and carcinogenic hazards of low-level radiation appears to be the most reasonable interpretation of the available scientific data that are relevant to this topic. There are, of course, reasons to believe that this model may overestimate radiation hazards in certain instances, a fact acknowledged in recent reports of these committees. The linear model is now also being utilized to estimate the potential carcinogenic hazards of other agents such as asbestos and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. This model implies that there is no safe dose for any of these agents and that potential health hazards will increase in direct proportion to total accumulated dose. The practical implication is the recommendation that all exposures should be kept 'as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account'. (auth)

  8. The effect of response-delay on estimating reachability.

    Gabbard, Carl; Ammar, Diala

    2008-11-01

    The experiment was conducted to compare visual imagery (VI) and motor imagery (MI) reaching tasks in a response-delay paradigm designed to explore the hypothesized dissociation between vision for perception and vision for action. Although the visual systems work cooperatively in motor control, theory suggests that they operate under different temporal constraints. From this perspective, we expected that delay would affect MI but not VI because MI operates in real time and VI is postulated to be memory-driven. Following measurement of actual reach, right-handers were presented seven (imagery) targets at midline in eight conditions: MI and VI with 0-, 1-, 2-, and 4-s delays. Results indicted that delay affected the ability to estimate reachability with MI but not with VI. These results are supportive of a general distinction between vision for perception and vision for action.

  9. Reconciliation of equipment flexibility effects on piping system dynamic response

    Geraets, L.H.

    1987-01-01

    Piping systems are connected to equipment; if the equipment cannot be considered as ''rigid'' relative to excitation frequencies, nozzle response spectra techniques, or equipment modeling techniques are used. If the equipment is considered rigid, a fixed anchor is assumed. However, occasionally after (seismic) dynamic analysis has been completed, tests or detailed equipment dynamic analyses demonstrate that the assumption of ''infinite stiff'' is questionable. This paper reviews several classes of equipment (pumps, vessels, reservoirs, heat exchangers), and the associated (piping stresses, support loads, equipment nozzle allowables). Significant divergences between design and ''as built'' results are shown (for heat exchangers in particular). The paper discusses the reconciliation process performed for a belgian PWR plant through the use of less conservative seismic damping data (Code Case N-411)

  10. Effects and Responses to Spaceflight in the Mouse Retina

    Zanello, Susana B.; Theriot, Corey; Westby, Christian; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Several stress environmental factors are combined in a unique fashion during spaceflight, affecting living beings widely across their physiological systems. Recently, attention has been placed on vision changes in astronauts returning from long duration missions. Alterations include hyperoptic shift, globe flattening, choroidal folds and optic disc edema, which are probably associated with increased intracranial pressure. These observations justify a better characterization of the ocular health risks associated with spaceflight. This study investigates the impact of spaceflight on the biology of the mouse retina. Within a successful tissue sharing effort, eyes from albino Balb/cJ mice aboard STS-133 were collected for histological analysis and gene expression profiling of the retina at 1 and 7 days after landing. Both vivarium and AEM (Animal Enclosure Module) mice were used as ground controls. Oxidative stress-induced DNA damage was higher in the flight samples compared to controls on R+1, and decreased on R+7. A trend toward higher oxidative and cellular stress response gene expression was also observed on R+1 compared to AEM controls, and these levels decreased on R+7. Several genes coding for key antioxidant enzymes, namely, heme-oxygenase-1, peroxiredoxin, and catalase, were among those upregulated after flight. Likewise, NF B and TGFbeta1, were upregulated in one flight specimen that overall showed the most elevated oxidative stress markers on R+1. In addition, retinas from vivarium control mice evidenced higher oxidative stress markers, NF B and TGFbeta1, likely due to the more intense illumination in vivarium cages versus the AEM. These preliminary data suggest that spaceflight represents a source of environmental stress that translates into oxidative and cellular stress in the retina, which is partially reversible upon return to Earth. Further work is needed to dissect the contribution of the various spaceflight factors (microgravity, radiation) and to

  11. Effects of soil stiffness and embedment on reactor building response

    Michalopoulos, A.P.; Vardanega, C.; Cornaggia, L.

    1981-01-01

    A parametric study was made to assess the influence of soil conditions and foundation embedment depth on the floor response spectra for a reactor building. The analyses incorporated soft, medium and hard soils, and three different embedment depths, in a seismic environment described by a 0.36 g peak ground acceleration. The shear wave velocity profiles for the soft, medium and hard soil conditions, were assumed to increase in proportion to the square root of depth from their ground surface values of 300, 600 and 900 meters per second, respectively. Foundation embedment depths of zero, eight and fourteen meters were analyzed using elastic half-space theory, accounting for kinematic interaction. The variation of shear modulus with depth under earthquake excitation was determined using a deconvolution process. Horizontal and vertical synthetic time histories, matching the USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.60 design ground response spectra, were applied at the ground surface and then deconvolved to the foundation level to obtain the input for the soil-structure model. The mathematical model of the superstructure consisted of four lumped-mass close-coupled systems, representing containment shells and components, while the foundation mat was modeled as rigid. Lumped soil compliances (springs and dashpots) were used to represent the horizontal, vertical and rotational modes of vibration. The dynamic analyses were performed utilizing the computer code DAPSYS, and consisted of mode frequency analyses and modal superposition. Modal damping was computed as a weighted average of structural and soil (radiation and material) damping, using the strain energy stored in the respective components as the weighting factor and distinguishing the hysteric nature of the structural and soil material damping, and the viscous nature of the soil radiation damping. (orig./RW)

  12. Monaural and binaural response properties of neurons in the inferior colliculus of the rabbit: effects of sodium pentobarbital.

    Kuwada, S; Batra, R; Stanford, T R

    1989-02-01

    1. We studied the effects of sodium pentobarbital on 22 neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of the rabbit. We recorded changes in the sensitivity of these neurons to monaural stimulation and to ongoing interaural time differences (ITDs). Monaural stimuli were tone bursts at or near the neuron's best frequency. The ITD was varied by delivering tones that differed by 1 Hz to the two ears, resulting in a 1-Hz binaural beat. 2. We assessed a neuron's ITD sensitivity by calculating three measures from the responses to binaural beats: composite delay, characteristic delay (CD), and characteristic phase (CP). To obtain the composite delay, we first derived period histograms by averaging, showing the response at each stimulating frequency over one period of the beat frequency. Second, the period histograms were replotted as a function of their equivalent interaural delay and then averaged together to yield the composite delay curve. Last, we calculated the composite peak or trough delay by fitting a parabola to the peak or trough of this composite curve. The composite delay curve represents the average response to all frequencies within the neuron's responsive range, and the peak reflects the interaural delay that produces the maximum response. The CD and CP were estimated from a weighted fit of a regression line to the plot of the mean interaural phase of the response versus the stimulating frequency. The slope and phase intercept of this regression line yielded estimates of CD and CP, respectively. These two quantities are thought to reflect the mechanism of ITD sensitivity, which involves the convergence of phase-locked inputs on a binaural cell. The CD estimates the difference in the time required for the two inputs to travel from either ear to this cell, whereas the CP reflects the interaural phase difference of the inputs at this cell. 3. Injections of sodium pentobarbital at subsurgical dosages (less than 25 mg/kg) almost invariably altered the neuron's response

  13. Design Tools for Cost-Effective Implementation of Planetary Protection Requirements

    Hamlin, Louise; Belz, Andrea; Evans, Michael; Kastner, Jason; Satter, Celeste; Spry, Andy

    2006-01-01

    Since the Viking missions to Mars in the 1970s, accounting for the costs associated with planetary protection implementation has not been done systematically during early project formulation phases, leading to unanticipated costs during subsequent implementation phases of flight projects. The simultaneous development of more stringent planetary protection requirements, resulting from new knowledge about the limits of life on Earth, together with current plans to conduct life-detection experiments on a number of different solar system target bodies motivates a systematic approach to integrating planetary protection requirements and mission design. A current development effort at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is aimed at integrating planetary protection requirements more fully into the early phases of mission architecture formulation and at developing tools to more rigorously predict associated cost and schedule impacts of architecture options chosen to meet planetary protection requirements.

  14. The effectiveness of a monetary incentive offer on survey response rates and response completeness in a longitudinal study.

    Yu, Shengchao; Alper, Howard E; Nguyen, Angela-Maithy; Brackbill, Robert M; Turner, Lennon; Walker, Deborah J; Maslow, Carey B; Zweig, Kimberly C

    2017-04-26

    Achieving adequate response rates is an ongoing challenge for longitudinal studies. The World Trade Center Health Registry is a longitudinal health study that periodically surveys a cohort of ~71,000 people exposed to the 9/11 terrorist attacks in New York City. Since Wave 1, the Registry has conducted three follow-up surveys (Waves 2-4) every 3-4 years and utilized various strategies to increase survey participation. A promised monetary incentive was offered for the first time to survey non-respondents in the recent Wave 4 survey, conducted 13-14 years after 9/11. We evaluated the effectiveness of a monetary incentive in improving the response rate five months after survey launch, and assessed whether or not response completeness was compromised due to incentive use. The study compared the likelihood of returning a survey for those who received an incentive offer to those who did not, using logistic regression models. Among those who returned surveys, we also examined whether those receiving an incentive notification had higher rate of response completeness than those who did not, using negative binomial regression models and logistic regression models. We found that a $10 monetary incentive offer was effective in increasing Wave 4 response rates. Specifically, the $10 incentive offer was useful in encouraging initially reluctant participants to respond to the survey. The likelihood of returning a survey increased by 30% for those who received an incentive offer (AOR = 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.4), and the incentive increased the number of returned surveys by 18%. Moreover, our results did not reveal any significant differences on response completeness between those who received an incentive offer and those who did not. In the face of the growing challenge of maintaining a high response rate for the World Trade Center Health Registry follow-up surveys, this study showed the value of offering a monetary incentive as an additional refusal conversion strategy. Our

  15. Stress effects on mood, HPA axis, and autonomic response: comparison of three psychosocial stress paradigms.

    Grace E Giles

    Full Text Available Extensive experimental psychology research has attempted to parse the complex relationship between psychosocial stress, mood, cognitive performance, and physiological changes. To do so, it is necessary to have effective, validated methods to experimentally induce psychosocial stress. The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST is the most commonly used method of experimentally inducing psychosocial stress, but it is resource intensive. Less resource intense psychosocial stress tasks include the Socially Evaluative Cold Pressor Task (SECPT and a computerized mental arithmetic task (MAT. These tasks effectively produce a physiological and psychological stress response and have the benefits of requiring fewer experimenters and affording data collection from multiple participants simultaneously. The objective of this study was to compare the magnitude and duration of these three experimental psychosocial stress induction paradigms. On each of four separate days, participants completed either a control non-stressful task or one of the three experimental stressors: the TSST, SECPT, or MAT. We measured mood, working memory performance, salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase (AA, and heart rate. The TSST and SECPT exerted the most robust effects on mood and physiological measures. TSST effects were generally evident immediately post-stress as well as 10- and 20-minutes after stress cessation, whereas SECPT effects were generally limited to the duration of the stressor. The stress duration is a key determinant when planning a study that utilizes an experimental stressor, as researchers may be interested in collecting dependent measures prior to stress cessation. In this way, the TSST would allow the investigator a longer window to administer tasks of interest.

  16. Order Effects in Children's Gender-Constancy Responses.

    Siegal, Michael; Robinson, Judith

    1987-01-01

    Study examines the Slaby and Frey (1975) gender-constancy interview, which has been widely used in tests of the cognitive-developmental account. Sixty children, aged between 42 and 54 months, were given the interview either in the traditional order or in a reversed order. Order effects were found. Methodological issues are discussed. (Author/BN)

  17. Discrete Emotion Effects on Lexical Decision Response Times

    Briesemeister, Benny B.; Kuchinke, Lars; Jacobs, Arthur M.

    2011-01-01

    Our knowledge about affective processes, especially concerning effects on cognitive demands like word processing, is increasing steadily. Several studies consistently document valence and arousal effects, and although there is some debate on possible interactions and different notions of valence, broad agreement on a two dimensional model of affective space has been achieved. Alternative models like the discrete emotion theory have received little interest in word recognition research so far. Using backward elimination and multiple regression analyses, we show that five discrete emotions (i.e., happiness, disgust, fear, anger and sadness) explain as much variance as two published dimensional models assuming continuous or categorical valence, with the variables happiness, disgust and fear significantly contributing to this account. Moreover, these effects even persist in an experiment with discrete emotion conditions when the stimuli are controlled for emotional valence and arousal levels. We interpret this result as evidence for discrete emotion effects in visual word recognition that cannot be explained by the two dimensional affective space account. PMID:21887307

  18. Effects of Taraxacum mongolicum on in vitro response of milk ...

    The anti-inflammatory effects of Taraxacum mongolicum (TM) were investigated in Holstein-Friesian dairy cows, in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, isolated milk somatic cells were pretreated with various concentrations (31 to 500, μg/ml) of TM extract (TME) and subsequently incubated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1 μg/ml).

  19. The effect of anesthesia type on stress hormone response ...

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different types of anesthesia on stress hormones. Materials and Methods: The study was included 60 ASAI-II cases scheduled for major lower extremity surgery. The cases were randomized into 2 groups: The EA group was administered epidural anesthesia and the ...

  20. Effect of piles on the seismic response of mosques minarets

    Mohamed Ahmed Abdel-Motaal

    2014-03-01

    Minaret (60.0-m height was studied to investigate the effects of soil stiffness, pile length, diameter, and arrangement, on the minaret and pile dynamic behavior. Comparison between study results and conventional analysis method is illustrated. Study results, discussion, and conclusion are given.