WorldWideScience

Sample records for response imaging device

  1. Electronic portal imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lief, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The topics discussed include, among others, the following: Role of portal imaging; Port films vs. EPID; Image guidance: Elekta volume view; Delivery verification; Automation tasks of portal imaging; Types of portal imaging (Fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera-based imaging; Liquid ion chamber imaging; Amorpho-silicon portal imagers; Fluoroscopic portal imaging; Kodak CR reader; and Other types of portal imaging devices); QA of EPID; and Portal dosimetry (P.A.)

  2. Basic dose response of fluorescent screen-based portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, In Hwan; Yonannes, Yonas; Zhu, Yunping

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate fundamental aspects of the dose response of fluorescent screen-based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). We acquired scanned signal across portal planes as we varied the radiation that entered the EPID by changing the thickness and anatomy of the phantom as well as the air gap between the phantom and the EPID. In addition, we simulated the relative contribution of the scintillation light signal in the EPID system. We have shown that the dose profile across portal planes is a function of the air gap and phantom thickness. We have also found that depending on the density change within the phantom geometry, errors associated with dose response based on the EPID scan can be as high as 7%. We also found that scintillation light scattering within the EPID system is an important source of error. This study revealed and demonstrated fundamental characteristics of dose response of EPID, as relative to that of ion chambers. This study showed that EPID based on fluorescent screen cannot be an accurate dosimetry system

  3. Evaluating imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo, F.D.

    1977-01-01

    The performance of any imaging device depends on two principal factors inherent to the device, namely, plane sensitivity and spatial resolution. These factors may be defined as follows: plane sensitivity is the counts per second recorded by the imaging device for each disintegration per second per square centimeter occurring within a plane sheet of radioactivity. Spatial resolution may be defined as the fidelity with which the imaging device reproduces the activity distribution of an object in the image plane. In all imaging devices, a trade-off exists between these two parameters; that is, as sensitivity improves, spatial resolution is degraded, and vice versa. Therefore, to fully evaluate an imaging system a technique should be selected that measures both parameters and reflects the trade-off between the two. In addition, the method should approximate the clinical problem, namely, the detection of a focal lesion within an activity distribution. Several methods have been described to evaluate nuclear imaging devices. The more common techniques include the use of organ phantoms, bar phantoms, line-spread functions, modulation transfer functions, contrast efficiency functions, and performance index functions. Each of these techniques is briefly described in this chapter, and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. In addition, a phantom that can be used to simply and completely measure overall imaging system performance is described

  4. Correction method and software for image distortion and nonuniform response in charge-coupled device-based x-ray detectors utilizing x-ray image intensifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kazuki; Kamikubo, Hironari; Yagi, Naoto; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    An on-site method of correcting the image distortion and nonuniform response of a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based X-ray detector was developed using the response of the imaging plate as a reference. The CCD-based X-ray detector consists of a beryllium-windowed X-ray image intensifier (Be-XRII) and a CCD as the image sensor. An image distortion of 29% was improved to less than 1% after the correction. In the correction of nonuniform response due to image distortion, subpixel approximation was performed for the redistribution of pixel values. The optimal number of subpixels was also discussed. In an experiment with polystyrene (PS) latex, it was verified that the correction of both image distortion and nonuniform response worked properly. The correction for the 'contrast reduction' problem was also demonstrated for an isotropic X-ray scattering pattern from the PS latex. (author)

  5. Study on the dose response characteristics of a scanning liquid ion-chamber electronic portal imaging device

    CERN Document Server

    Ma Shao Gang; Song Yi Xin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the dose response characteristics and the influence factors such as gantry angle, field size and acquisition mode on the dosimetric response curves, when using a scanning liquid ion-chamber electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for dose verification. Methods: All experiments were carried out on a Varian 600 C/D accelerator (6 MV X-ray) equipped with a Varian PortalVision sup T sup M MK2 type EPID. To obtain the dose response curve, the relationship between the incident radiation intensity to the detector and the pixel value output from the EPID were established. Firstly, the different dose rates of 6 MV X-rays were obtained by varying SSD. Secondly, three digital portal images were acquired for each dose rate using the EPID and averaged to avoid the influence of the dose rate fluctuations of the accelerator. The pixel values of all images were read using self-designed image analysis software, and and average for a region consisting of 11 x 11 pixels around the center was taken as the res...

  6. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2015-11-24

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  7. Image Quality Characteristics of Handheld Display Devices for Medical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Asumi; Liu, Peter; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Badano, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Handheld devices such as mobile phones and tablet computers have become widespread with thousands of available software applications. Recently, handhelds are being proposed as part of medical imaging solutions, especially in emergency medicine, where immediate consultation is required. However, handheld devices differ significantly from medical workstation displays in terms of display characteristics. Moreover, the characteristics vary significantly among device types. We investigate the image quality characteristics of various handheld devices with respect to luminance response, spatial resolution, spatial noise, and reflectance. We show that the luminance characteristics of the handheld displays are different from those of workstation displays complying with grayscale standard target response suggesting that luminance calibration might be needed. Our results also demonstrate that the spatial characteristics of handhelds can surpass those of medical workstation displays particularly for recent generation devices. While a 5 mega-pixel monochrome workstation display has horizontal and vertical modulation transfer factors of 0.52 and 0.47 at the Nyquist frequency, the handheld displays released after 2011 can have values higher than 0.63 at the respective Nyquist frequencies. The noise power spectra for workstation displays are higher than 1.2×10−5 mm2 at 1 mm−1, while handheld displays have values lower than 3.7×10−6 mm2. Reflectance measurements on some of the handheld displays are consistent with measurements for workstation displays with, in some cases, low specular and diffuse reflectance coefficients. The variability of the characterization results among devices due to the different technological features indicates that image quality varies greatly among handheld display devices. PMID:24236113

  8. [Electronic Device for Retinal and Iris Imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drahanský, M; Kolář, R; Mňuk, T

    This paper describes design and construction of a new device for automatic capturing of eye retina and iris. This device has two possible ways of utilization - either for biometric purposes (persons recognition on the base of their eye characteristics) or for medical purposes as supporting diagnostic device. eye retina, eye iris, device, acquisition, image.

  9. Development of a model using narrow slit beam profiles to account for the backscatter response of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maria Das, K.J.; Ostapiak, Orest

    2008-01-01

    An electronic portal imaging device (EPID), currently used for determining proper patient placement during irradiation in a radiotherapy treatment, can also be used for the purpose of pre- treatment IMRT QA. However, the Varian aS500 portal imager exhibits dosimetric artifacts caused by non-uniform backscatter from mechanical support structures located behind the imager

  10. Use of mobile devices for medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschorn, David S; Choudhri, Asim F; Shih, George; Kim, Woojin

    2014-12-01

    Mobile devices have fundamentally changed personal computing, with many people forgoing the desktop and even laptop computer altogether in favor of a smaller, lighter, and cheaper device with a touch screen. Doctors and patients are beginning to expect medical images to be available on these devices for consultative viewing, if not actual diagnosis. However, this raises serious concerns with regard to the ability of existing mobile devices and networks to quickly and securely move these images. Medical images often come in large sets, which can bog down a network if not conveyed in an intelligent manner, and downloaded data on a mobile device are highly vulnerable to a breach of patient confidentiality should that device become lost or stolen. Some degree of regulation is needed to ensure that the software used to view these images allows all relevant medical information to be visible and manipulated in a clinically acceptable manner. There also needs to be a quality control mechanism to ensure that a device's display accurately conveys the image content without loss of contrast detail. Furthermore, not all mobile displays are appropriate for all types of images. The smaller displays of smart phones, for example, are not well suited for viewing entire chest radiographs, no matter how small and numerous the pixels of the display may be. All of these factors should be taken into account when deciding where, when, and how to use mobile devices for the display of medical images. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 21 CFR 892.2040 - Medical image hardcopy device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical image hardcopy device. 892.2040 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2040 Medical image hardcopy device. (a) Identification. A medical image hardcopy device is a device that produces a visible printed record of a medical...

  12. A device for multimodal imaging of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigulis, Janis; Garancis, Valerijs; Rubins, Uldis; Zaharans, Eriks; Zaharans, Janis; Elste, Liene

    2013-03-01

    A compact prototype device for diagnostic imaging of skin has been developed and tested. Polarized LED light at several spectral regions is used for illumination, and round skin spot of diameter 30mm is imaged by a CMOS sensor via crossoriented polarizing filter. Four consecutive imaging series are performed: (1) RGB image at white LED illumination for revealing subcutaneous structures; (2) four spectral images at narrowband LED illumination (450nm, 540nm, 660nm, 940nm) for mapping of the main skin chromophores; (3) video-imaging under green LED illumination for mapping of skin blood perfusion; (4) autofluorescence video-imaging under UV (365nm) LED irradiation for mapping of the skin fluorophores. Design details of the device as well as preliminary results of clinical tests are presented.

  13. Nuclear Medicine Imaging Devices. Chapter 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lodge, M. A.; Frey, E. C. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Imaging forms an important part of nuclear medicine and a number of different imaging devices have been developed. This chapter describes the principles and technological characteristics of the main imaging devices used in nuclear medicine. The two major categories are gamma camera systems and positron emission tomography (PET) systems. The former are used to image γ rays emitted by any nuclide, while the latter exploit the directional correlation between annihilation photons emitted by positron decay. The first section of this chapter discusses the principal components of gamma cameras and how they are used to form 2-D planar images as well as 3-D tomographic images (single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)). The second section describes related instrumentation that has been optimized for PET data acquisition. A major advance in nuclear medicine was achieved with the introduction of multi-modality imaging systems including SPECT/computed tomography (CT) and PET/CT. In these systems, the CT images can be used to provide an anatomical context for the functional nuclear medicine images and allow for attenuation compensation. The third section in this chapter provides a discussion of the principles of these devices.

  14. An image scanning device using radiating energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Daniel.

    1976-01-01

    Said invention relates to an image scanning device using radiating energy. More particularly, it relates to a device for generating a scanning beam of rectangular cross section from a γ or X-ray source. Said invention can be applied to radiographic units of the 'microdose' type used by airline staffs and others for the fast efficient inspection of luggage and parcels in view of detecting hidden things [fr

  15. Characterisation of a CMOS charge transfer device for TDI imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rushton, J.; Holland, A.; Stefanov, K.; Mayer, F.

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a prototype true charge transfer imaging sensor in CMOS is investigated. The finished device is destined for use in TDI applications, especially Earth-observation, and to this end radiation tolerance must be investigated. Before this, complete characterisation is required. This work starts by looking at charge transfer inefficiency and then investigates responsivity using mean-variance techniques

  16. Movable collimator for positron annihilation imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    A positron annihilation imaging device has two or more rings of detectors from which three or more slices through the object being scanned can be determined at once. A technique is provided for adjusting the slice widths. One slice may be imaged by all detectors in adjacent planes simultaneously, and reconstructed as if all detectors were in the same plane. The single slice facility is provided without the necessity of rotating the detector array or moving it in any way during data collection, allowing the possibility of doing physiologically gated imaging of a single slice

  17. The Image Transceiver Device: Studies of Improved Physical Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Yitzhak; Efron, Uzi

    2008-07-25

    The Image Transceiver Device (ITD) design is based on combining LCOS micro-display, image processing tools and back illuminated APS imager in single CMOS chip [1]. The device is under development for Head-Mounted Display applications in augmented and virtual reality systems. The main issues with the present design are a high crosstalk of the backside imager and the need to shield the pixel circuitry from the photocharges generated in the silicon substrate. In this publication we present a modified, "deep p-well" ITD pixel design, which provides a significantly reduced crosstalk level, as well as an effective shielding of photo-charges for the pixel circuitry. The simulation performed using Silvaco software [ATLAS Silicon Device Simulator, Ray Trace and Light Absorption programs, Silvaco International, 1998] shows that the new approach provides high photo response and allows increasing the optimal thickness of the die over and above the 10-15 micrometers commonly used for back illuminated imaging devices, thereby improving its mechanical ruggedness following the thinning process and also providing a more efficient absorption of the long wavelength photons. The proposed deep p-well pixel structure is also a technology solution for the fabrication of high performance back illuminated CMOS image sensors.

  18. The Image Transceiver Device: Studies of Improved Physical Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzi Efron

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The Image Transceiver Device (ITD design is based on combining LCOS micro-display, image processing tools and back illuminated APS imager in single CMOS chip [1]. The device is under development for Head-Mounted Display applications in augmented and virtual reality systems. The main issues with the present design are a high crosstalk of the backside imager and the need to shield the pixel circuitry from the photocharges generated in the silicon substrate. In this publication we present a modified, “deep p-well” ITD pixel design, which provides a significantly reduced crosstalk level, as well as an effective shielding of photo-charges for the pixel circuitry. The simulation performed using Silvaco software [ATLAS Silicon Device Simulator, Ray Trace and Light Absorption programs, Silvaco International, 1998] shows that the new approach provides high photo response and allows increasing the optimal thickness of the die over and above the 10-15 micrometers commonly used for back illuminated imaging devices, thereby improving its mechanical ruggedness following the thinning process and also providing a more efficient absorption of the long wavelength photons. The proposed deep p-well pixel structure is also a technology solution for the fabrication of high performance back illuminated CMOS image sensors.

  19. Metrological characterization of 3D imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, G.

    2013-04-01

    Manufacturers often express the performance of a 3D imaging device in various non-uniform ways for the lack of internationally recognized standard requirements for metrological parameters able to identify the capability of capturing a real scene. For this reason several national and international organizations in the last ten years have been developing protocols for verifying such performance. Ranging from VDI/VDE 2634, published by the Association of German Engineers and oriented to the world of mechanical 3D measurements (triangulation-based devices), to the ASTM technical committee E57, working also on laser systems based on direct range detection (TOF, Phase Shift, FM-CW, flash LADAR), this paper shows the state of the art about the characterization of active range devices, with special emphasis on measurement uncertainty, accuracy and resolution. Most of these protocols are based on special objects whose shape and size are certified with a known level of accuracy. By capturing the 3D shape of such objects with a range device, a comparison between the measured points and the theoretical shape they should represent is possible. The actual deviations can be directly analyzed or some derived parameters can be obtained (e.g. angles between planes, distances between barycenters of spheres rigidly connected, frequency domain parameters, etc.). This paper shows theoretical aspects and experimental results of some novel characterization methods applied to different categories of active 3D imaging devices based on both principles of triangulation and direct range detection.

  20. Positron annihilation imaging device having movable collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    This patent application relates to a positron annihilation imaging device comprising two circular arrays of detectors disposed in spaced apart parallel planes and circumferentially offset by half the detector spacing, axially movable annular outer collimator rings, generally disposed in a pair of opposite planes outside the associated planes of the detectors, each collimator being movable toward the opposite collimator. An inner collimator of annular configuration is disposed between the two rows of detectors and is formed in two rings which may be separated axially. The outer and inner collimators serve to enhance data readout and imaging. (author)

  1. Movable collimator for positron annihilation imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    A positron annihilation imaging device having two circular arrays of detectors disposed in spaced apart parallel planes wherein axially movable annular collimator rings are generally disposed in a pair of opposite planes outside the associated planes of the collimators to each collimator being movable toward the opposite collimator and a central collimator of annular configuration generally disposed between the two rows of detectors but being split into two rings which may be separated, the outer and inner collimators serving to enhance data readout and imaging

  2. Microwave impedance imaging on semiconductor memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Lai, Keji; Yang, Yongliang; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2011-03-01

    Microwave impedance microscopy (MIM) maps out the real and imaginary components of the tip-sample impedance, from which the local conductivity and dielectric constant distribution can be derived. The stray field contribution is minimized in our shielded cantilever design, enabling quantitative analysis of nano-materials and device structures. We demonstrate here that the MIM can spatially resolve the conductivity variation in a dynamic random access memory (DRAM) sample. With DC or low-frequency AC bias applied to the tip, contrast between n-doped and p-doped regions in the dC/dV images is observed, and p-n junctions are highlighted in the dR/dV images. The results can be directly compared with data taken by scanning capacitance microscope (SCM), which uses unshielded cantilevers and resonant electronics, and the MIM reveals more information of the local dopant concentration than SCM.

  3. Quality assurance for electronic portal imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalev, S.; Rajapakshe, R.; Gluhchev, G.; Luchka, K.

    1997-01-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDS) are assuming an ever-increasing role in the verification of radiation treatment accuracy. They are used both in a passive capacity, for the determination of field displacement distributions (''setup errors''), and also in an active role whereby the patient setup is corrected on the basis of electronic portal images. In spite of their potential impact on the precision of patient treatment, there are few quality assurance procedures available, and most of the EPIDS in clinical use are subject, at best, to only perfunctory quality assurance. The goals of this work are (a) to develop an objective and reproducible test for EPID image quality on the factory floor and during installation of the EPID on site; (b) to provide the user with a simple and accurate tool for acceptance, commissioning, and routine quality control; and (c) to initiate regional, national and international collaboration in the implementation of standardized, objective, and automated quality assurance procedures. To this end we have developed an automated test in which a simple test object is imaged daily, and the spatial and contrast resolution of the EPID are automatically evaluated in terms of ''acceptable'', ''warning'' and ''stop'' criteria. Our experience over two years shows the test to be highly sensitive, reproducible, and inexpensive in time and effort. Inter-institutional trials are under way in Canada, US and Europe which indicate large variations in EPID image quality from one EPID to another, and from one center to another. We expect the new standardized quality assurance procedure to lead to improved, and consistent image quality, increased operator acceptance of the technology, and agreement on uniform standards by equipment suppliers and health care agencies. (author)

  4. Tiny Devices Project Sharp, Colorful Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Displaytech Inc., based in Longmont, Colorado and recently acquired by Micron Technology Inc. of Boise, Idaho, first received a Small Business Innovation Research contract in 1993 from Johnson Space Center to develop tiny, electronic, color displays, called microdisplays. Displaytech has since sold over 20 million microdisplays and was ranked one of the fastest growing technology companies by Deloitte and Touche in 2005. Customers currently incorporate the microdisplays in tiny pico-projectors, which weigh only a few ounces and attach to media players, cell phones, and other devices. The projectors can convert a digital image from the typical postage stamp size into a bright, clear, four-foot projection. The company believes sales of this type of pico-projector may exceed $1.1 billion within 5 years.

  5. Multimodality imaging of the Essure tubal occlusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, W.L.; Beitia, L.

    2012-01-01

    The Essure device is a permanent birth-control device, which is gaining popularity. The micro-inserts are composed of metallic elements that can be seen on radiography, computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. Knowledge of the normal location and appearance of the Essure device will ensure appropriate patient care. The purpose of this review is to describe the Essure tubal occlusion device and illustrate its normal and abnormal appearance using various imaging methods.

  6. Fast Fiber-Coupled Imaging Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockington, Samuel; Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, Franklin

    2018-04-22

    HyperV Technologies Corp. has successfully designed, built and experimentally demonstrated a full scale 1024 pixel 100 MegaFrames/s fiber coupled camera with 12 or 14 bits, and record lengths of 32K frames, exceeding our original performance objectives. This high-pixel-count, fiber optically-coupled, imaging diagnostic can be used for investigating fast, bright plasma events. In Phase 1 of this effort, a 100 pixel fiber-coupled fast streak camera for imaging plasma jet profiles was constructed and successfully demonstrated. The resulting response from outside plasma physics researchers emphasized development of increased pixel performance as a higher priority over increasing pixel count. In this Phase 2 effort, HyperV therefore focused on increasing the sample rate and bit-depth of the photodiode pixel designed in Phase 1, while still maintaining a long record length and holding the cost per channel to levels which allowed up to 1024 pixels to be constructed. Cost per channel was $53.31, very close to our original target of $50 per channel. The system consists of an imaging "camera head" coupled to a photodiode bank with an array of optical fibers. The output of these fast photodiodes is then digitized at 100 Megaframes per second and stored in record lengths of 32,768 samples with bit depths of 12 to 14 bits per pixel. Longer record lengths are possible with additional memory. A prototype imaging system with up to 1024 pixels was designed and constructed and used to successfully take movies of very fast moving plasma jets as a demonstration of the camera performance capabilities. Some faulty electrical components on the 64 circuit boards resulted in only 1008 functional channels out of 1024 on this first generation prototype system. We experimentally observed backlit high speed fan blades in initial camera testing and then followed that with full movies and streak images of free flowing high speed plasma jets (at 30-50 km/s). Jet structure and jet collisions onto

  7. Development of a human body RMN imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Jalmes, H.

    1984-03-01

    Imaging device for human body is studied in this thesis. The section images presented are got by a projection-reconstruction method associated to a section plane selection by an oscillating gradient application. Different stages of the machine development are presented: - design and calculation of a resistive magnet for very homogeneous field imaging - design of gradient coils for imaging magnets - realization of control and acquisition interfaces - realization of imaging software in real time [fr

  8. Multimodality imaging of the Essure tubal occlusion device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, W L; Beitia, L

    2012-12-01

    The Essure device is a permanent birth-control device, which is gaining popularity. The micro-inserts are composed of metallic elements that can be seen on radiography, computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. Knowledge of the normal location and appearance of the Essure device will ensure appropriate patient care. The purpose of this review is to describe the Essure tubal occlusion device and illustrate its normal and abnormal appearance using various imaging methods. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Devices for Evaluating Imaging Systems. Chapter 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirkaya, O.; Al-Mazrou, R. [Department of Biomedical Physics, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-12-15

    A quality management system (QMS) has three main components: (a) Quality assurance (QA); (b) Quality improvement; (c) Quality control (QC). The aim of a QMS is to ensure that the deliverables meet the requirements set forth by the users. The deliverables can be, in general, all the services provided in a nuclear medicine department, and the diagnostic imaging services in particular. In this section, the primary focus is the diagnostic imaging equipment and images produced by them.

  10. 21 CFR 892.2010 - Medical image storage device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical image storage device. 892.2010 Section 892.2010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED..., and digital memory. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  11. Positron annihilation imaging device using multiple offset rings of detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    This patent application relates to a positron annihilation imaging device comprising two or more coaxial circular arrays of detectors (2,2'), with the detectors in one array angularly offset with respect to the detectors in the adjacent array to detect more than one tomographic image simultaneously through different cross-sections of a patient. (author)

  12. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing.

  13. Parallel Processing of Images in Mobile Devices using BOINC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiel, Mariela; Calle, David F.; Santamaría, Alfredo S.; Suarez, David F.; Flórez, Leonardo

    2018-04-01

    Medical image processing helps health professionals make decisions for the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Since some algorithms for processing images require substantial amounts of resources, one could take advantage of distributed or parallel computing. A mobile grid can be an adequate computing infrastructure for this problem. A mobile grid is a grid that includes mobile devices as resource providers. In a previous step of this research, we selected BOINC as the infrastructure to build our mobile grid. However, parallel processing of images in mobile devices poses at least two important challenges: the execution of standard libraries for processing images and obtaining adequate performance when compared to desktop computers grids. By the time we started our research, the use of BOINC in mobile devices also involved two issues: a) the execution of programs in mobile devices required to modify the code to insert calls to the BOINC API, and b) the division of the image among the mobile devices as well as its merging required additional code in some BOINC components. This article presents answers to these four challenges.

  14. Parallel Processing of Images in Mobile Devices using BOINC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curiel Mariela

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Medical image processing helps health professionals make decisions for the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Since some algorithms for processing images require substantial amounts of resources, one could take advantage of distributed or parallel computing. A mobile grid can be an adequate computing infrastructure for this problem. A mobile grid is a grid that includes mobile devices as resource providers. In a previous step of this research, we selected BOINC as the infrastructure to build our mobile grid. However, parallel processing of images in mobile devices poses at least two important challenges: the execution of standard libraries for processing images and obtaining adequate performance when compared to desktop computers grids. By the time we started our research, the use of BOINC in mobile devices also involved two issues: a the execution of programs in mobile devices required to modify the code to insert calls to the BOINC API, and b the division of the image among the mobile devices as well as its merging required additional code in some BOINC components. This article presents answers to these four challenges.

  15. Informatics in radiology: Efficiency metrics for imaging device productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mengqi; Pavlicek, William; Liu, Patrick T; Zhang, Muhong; Langer, Steve G; Wang, Shanshan; Place, Vicki; Miranda, Rafael; Wu, Teresa Tong

    2011-01-01

    Acute awareness of the costs associated with medical imaging equipment is an ever-present aspect of the current healthcare debate. However, the monitoring of productivity associated with expensive imaging devices is likely to be labor intensive, relies on summary statistics, and lacks accepted and standardized benchmarks of efficiency. In the context of the general Six Sigma DMAIC (design, measure, analyze, improve, and control) process, a World Wide Web-based productivity tool called the Imaging Exam Time Monitor was developed to accurately and remotely monitor imaging efficiency with use of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) combined with a picture archiving and communication system. Five device efficiency metrics-examination duration, table utilization, interpatient time, appointment interval time, and interseries time-were derived from DICOM values. These metrics allow the standardized measurement of productivity, to facilitate the comparative evaluation of imaging equipment use and ongoing efforts to improve efficiency. A relational database was constructed to store patient imaging data, along with device- and examination-related data. The database provides full access to ad hoc queries and can automatically generate detailed reports for administrative and business use, thereby allowing staff to monitor data for trends and to better identify possible changes that could lead to improved productivity and reduced costs in association with imaging services. © RSNA, 2011.

  16. Compact imaging Bragg spectrometer for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertschinger, G.; Biel, W.; Jaegers, H.; Marchuk, O.

    2004-01-01

    A compact imaging x-ray spectrometer has been designed for tokamaks and stellarators to measure the plasma parameters at different spatial chords. It has been optimized for high spectral resolution and high sensitivity. High spectral resolution is obtained by using solid state detectors and minimizing the imaging errors of the spherical crystals. It is shown, that using spherical crystals the solid angle and hence the throughput can be increased significantly, without compromising the spectral resolution. The design is useful for the measurement of the spectra of He- and H-like ions from Si to Kr. The spectral resolution is sufficient for the measurement of plasma parameters. The temporal resolution is high enough for transport studies by gas puff and laser ablation experiments. The design is based on a modified Johann spectrometer mount, utilizing a spherically bent crystal instead of the cylindrically bent crystal in the traditional Johann mount. The astigmatism of the wavelength selective reflection on the spherical crystal is applied to obtain imaging of an extended plasma source on a two-dimensional detector. For each element, a separate crystal is required, only in few cases, a crystal can be used for the spectra of two elements. For the spectra of most of the He-like ions from Si up to Kr, suitable crystal cuts have been found on quartz, silicon and germanium crystals with Bragg angles in a small interval around the design value of 53.5 deg. All of the crystals have the same radius. They are fixed on a rotational table. The distance to the detector is adjusted by an x-y table to fit to the Rowland circle

  17. A new 3-dimensional head fixation device for brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Ryoi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Yoshioka, Seiro; Ono, Shuichi; Ito, Hiroshi; Sato, Kazunori; Akaizawa, Takashi; Koyama, Masamichi; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a new head fixation device for studies of brain function. This device was designed to immobilize subject's heads during image scanning and to precisely reproduce the head position for two different imaging modalities such as MRI and PET. The device consists of a plastic frame, a pillow filled with beads of styrene foam, and a face mask of thermoplastic resin which was originally intended for application in radiotherapy. A bridge for biting was incorporated into the mask for stable fixation. The device enables immobilization of subject's heads with good reproducibility of position at the practical level. Our results indicate that this head fixation system is useful for fixation of head during activation studies using PET. (author)

  18. HDR Image Quality Enhancement Based on Spatially Variant Retinal Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horiuchi Takahiko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing demand for being able to display high dynamic range (HDR images on low dynamic range (LDR devices. Tone mapping is a process for enhancing HDR image quality on an LDR device by converting the tonal values of the original image from HDR to LDR. This paper proposes a new tone mapping algorithm for enhancing image quality by deriving a spatially-variant operator for imitating S-potential response in human retina, which efficiently improves local contrasts while conserving good global appearance. The proposed tone mapping operator is studied from a system construction point of view. It is found that the operator is regarded as a natural extension of the Retinex algorithm by adding a global adaptation process to the local adaptation. The feasibility of the proposed algorithm is examined in detail on experiments using standard HDR images and real HDR scene images, comparing with conventional tone mapping algorithms.

  19. Perceptually Aware Image Retargeting for Mobile Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yinzuo; Zhang, Luming; Zhang, Chao; Li, Ping; Li, Xuelong

    2018-05-01

    Retargeting aims at adapting an original high-resolution photograph/video to a low-resolution screen with an arbitrary aspect ratio. Conventional approaches are generally based on desktop PCs, since the computation might be intolerable for mobile platforms (especially when retargeting videos). Typically, only low-level visual features are exploited, and human visual perception is not well encoded. In this paper, we propose a novel retargeting framework that rapidly shrinks a photograph/video by leveraging human gaze behavior. Specifically, we first derive a geometry-preserving graph ranking algorithm, which efficiently selects a few salient object patches to mimic the human gaze shifting path (GSP) when viewing a scene. Afterward, an aggregation-based CNN is developed to hierarchically learn the deep representation for each GSP. Based on this, a probabilistic model is developed to learn the priors of the training photographs that are marked as aesthetically pleasing by professional photographers. We utilize the learned priors to efficiently shrink the corresponding GSP of a retargeted photograph/video to maximize its similarity to those from the training photographs. Extensive experiments have demonstrated that: 1) our method requires less than 35 ms to retarget a photograph (or a video frame) on popular iOS/Android devices, which is orders of magnitude faster than the conventional retargeting algorithms; 2) the retargeted photographs/videos produced by our method significantly outperform those of its competitors based on a paired-comparison-based user study; and 3) the learned GSPs are highly indicative of human visual attention according to the human eye tracking experiments.

  20. Noise characteristics of neutron images obtained by cooled CCD device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Ryoichi; Sasaki, Ryoya; Okuda, Shuichi; Okamoto, Ken-Ichi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Tsujimoto, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    The noise characteristics of a cooled CCD device induced by neutron and gamma ray irradiation have been investigated. In the cooled CCD images, characteristic white spot noises (CCD noise) frequently appeared, which have a shape like a pixel in most cases and their brightness is extremely high compared with that of the image pattern. They could be divided into the two groups, fixed pattern noise (FPN) and random noise. The former always appeared in the same position in the image and the latter appeared at any position. In the background image, nearly all of the CCD noises were found to be the FPN, while many of them were the random noise during the irradiation. The random CCD noises increased with irradiation and decreased soon after the irradiation. In the case of large irradiation, a part of the CCD noise remained as the FPN. These facts suggest that the CCD noise is a phenomenon strongly relating to radiation damage of the CCD device.

  1. Single-Image Distance Measurement by a Smart Mobile Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shangwen; Fang, Xianyong; Shen, Jianbing; Wang, Linbo; Shao, Ling

    2017-12-01

    Existing distance measurement methods either require multiple images and special photographing poses or only measure the height with a special view configuration. We propose a novel image-based method that can measure various types of distance from single image captured by a smart mobile device. The embedded accelerometer is used to determine the view orientation of the device. Consequently, pixels can be back-projected to the ground, thanks to the efficient calibration method using two known distances. Then the distance in pixel is transformed to a real distance in centimeter with a linear model parameterized by the magnification ratio. Various types of distance specified in the image can be computed accordingly. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Making Image More Energy Efficient for OLED Smart Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deguang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Now, more and more mobile smart devices are emerging massively; energy consumption of these devices has become an important consideration due to the limitation of battery capacity. Displays are the dominant energy consuming component of battery-operated devices, giving rise to organic light-emitting diode (OLED as a new promising display technology, which consumes different power when displaying different content due to their emissive nature. Based on this property, we propose an approach to improve image energy efficiency on OLED displays by perceiving image content. The key idea of our approach is to eliminate undesired details while preserving the region of interest of the image by leveraging the color and spatial information. First, we use edge detection algorithm to extract region of interest (ROI of an image. Next, we gradually change luminance and saturation of region of noninterest (NON-ROI of the image. Then we perform detailed experiment and case study to validate our approach; experiment results show that our approach can save 22.5% energy on average while preserving high quality of the image.

  3. 77 FR 38829 - Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Institution of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-850] Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Institution of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that a complaint was filed with the U.S. International Trade Commission on May 23, 2012...

  4. Endoscopic device for functional imaging of the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Simon; Lohani, Sweyta; Martell, Bret; Soliz, Peter; Ts'o, Dan

    2011-03-01

    Non-invasive imaging of retinal function based on the recording of spatially distributed reflectance changes evoked by visual stimuli has to-date been performed primarily using modified commercial fundus cameras. We have constructed a prototype retinal functional imager, using a commercial endoscope (Storz) for the frontend optics, and a low-cost back-end that includes the needed dichroic beam splitter to separate the stimulus path from the imaging path. This device has been tested to demonstrate its performance for the delivery of adequate near infrared (NIR) illumination, intensity of the visual stimulus and reflectance return in the imaging path. The current device was found to be capable of imaging reflectance changes of 0.1%, similar to that observable using the modified commercial fundus camera approach. The visual stimulus (a 505nm spot of 0.5secs) was used with an interrogation illumination of 780nm, and a sequence of imaged captured. At each pixel, the imaged signal was subtracted and normalized by the baseline reflectance, so that the measurement was ΔR/R. The typical retinal activity signal observed had a ΔR/R of 0.3-1.0%. The noise levels were measured when no stimulus was applied and found to vary between +/- 0.05%. Functional imaging has been suggested as a means to provide objective information on retina function that may be a preclinical indicator of ocular diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. The endoscopic approach promises to yield a significantly more economical retinal functional imaging device that would be clinically important.

  5. Image timing and detector performance of a matrix ion-chamber electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, P.

    1996-01-01

    The Oncology Centre of Auckland Hospital recently purchased a Varian PortalVision TM electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Image acquisition times, input-output characteristics and contrast-detail curves of this matrix liquid ion-chamber EPID have been measured to examine the variation in imaging performance with acquisition mode. The variation in detector performance with acquisition mode has been examined. The HV cycle time can be increased to improve image quality. Consideration should be given to the acquisition mode and HV cycle time used when imaging to ensure adequate imaging performance with reasonable imaging time. (author)

  6. Real-time computer treatment of THz passive device images with the high image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate real-time computer code improving significantly the quality of images captured by the passive THz imaging system. The code is not only designed for a THz passive device: it can be applied to any kind of such devices and active THz imaging systems as well. We applied our code for computer processing of images captured by four passive THz imaging devices manufactured by different companies. It should be stressed that computer processing of images produced by different companies requires using the different spatial filters usually. The performance of current version of the computer code is greater than one image per second for a THz image having more than 5000 pixels and 24 bit number representation. Processing of THz single image produces about 20 images simultaneously corresponding to various spatial filters. The computer code allows increasing the number of pixels for processed images without noticeable reduction of image quality. The performance of the computer code can be increased many times using parallel algorithms for processing the image. We develop original spatial filters which allow one to see objects with sizes less than 2 cm. The imagery is produced by passive THz imaging devices which captured the images of objects hidden under opaque clothes. For images with high noise we develop an approach which results in suppression of the noise after using the computer processing and we obtain the good quality image. With the aim of illustrating the efficiency of the developed approach we demonstrate the detection of the liquid explosive, ordinary explosive, knife, pistol, metal plate, CD, ceramics, chocolate and other objects hidden under opaque clothes. The results demonstrate the high efficiency of our approach for the detection of hidden objects and they are a very promising solution for the security problem.

  7. Are Portable Stereophotogrammetric Devices Reliable in Facial Imaging? A Validation Study of VECTRA H1 Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibelli, Daniele; Pucciarelli, Valentina; Cappella, Annalisa; Dolci, Claudia; Sforza, Chiarella

    2018-01-31

    Modern 3-dimensional (3D) image acquisition systems represent a crucial technologic development in facial anatomy because of their accuracy and precision. The recently introduced portable devices can improve facial databases by increasing the number of applications. In the present study, the VECTRA H1 portable stereophotogrammetric device was validated to verify its applicability to 3D facial analysis. Fifty volunteers underwent 4 facial scans using portable VECTRA H1 and static VECTRA M3 devices (2 for each instrument). Repeatability of linear, angular, surface area, and volume measurements was verified within the device and between devices using the Bland-Altman test and the calculation of absolute and relative technical errors of measurement (TEM and rTEM, respectively). In addition, the 2 scans obtained by the same device and the 2 scans obtained by different devices were registered and superimposed to calculate the root mean square (RMS; point-to-point) distance between the 2 surfaces. Most linear, angular, and surface area measurements had high repeatability in M3 versus M3, H1 versus H1, and M3 versus H1 comparisons (range, 82.2 to 98.7%; TEM range, 0.3 to 2.0 mm, 0.4° to 1.8°; rTEM range, 0.2 to 3.1%). In contrast, volumes and RMS distances showed evident differences in M3 versus M3 and H1 versus H1 comparisons and reached the maximum when scans from the 2 different devices were compared. The portable VECTRA H1 device proved reliable for assessing linear measurements, angles, and surface areas; conversely, the influence of involuntary facial movements on volumes and RMS distances was more important compared with the static device. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Electronics Related to Nuclear Medicine Imaging Devices. Chapter 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, R. J. [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, Surrey (United Kingdom); Stephenson, R. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Nuclear medicine imaging is generally based on the detection of X rays and γ rays emitted by radionuclides injected into a patient. In the previous chapter, the methods used to detect these photons were described, based most commonly on a scintillation counter although there are imaging devices that use either gas filled ionization detectors or semiconductors. Whatever device is used, nuclear medicine images are produced from a very limited number of photons, due mainly to the level of radioactivity that can be safely injected into a patient. Hence, nuclear medicine images are usually made from many orders of magnitude fewer photons than X ray computed tomography (CT) images, for example. However, as the information produced is essentially functional in nature compared to the anatomical detail of CT, the apparently poorer image quality is overcome by the nature of the information produced. The low levels of photons detected in nuclear medicine means that photon counting can be performed. Here each photon is detected and analysed individually, which is especially valuable, for example, in enabling scattered photons to be rejected. This is in contrast to X ray imaging where images are produced by integrating the flux entering the detectors. Photon counting, however, places a heavy burden on the electronics used for nuclear medicine imaging in terms of electronic noise and stability. This chapter will discuss how the signals produced in the primary photon detection process can be converted into pulses providing spatial, energy and timing information, and how this information is used to produce both qualitative and quantitative images.

  9. The optical-mechanical design of DMD modulation imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianting; Xu, Xiping; Qiao, Yang; Li, Lei; Pan, Yue

    2014-09-01

    In order to avoid the phenomenon of some image information were lost, which is due to the jamming signals, such as incident laser, make the pixels dot on CCD saturated. In this article a device of optical-mechanical structure was designed, which utilized the DMD (Digital Micro mirror Device) to modulate the image. The DMD reflection imaging optical system adopts the telecentric light path. However, because the design is not only required to guarantee a 66° angle between the optical axis of the relay optics and the DMD, but also to ensure that the optical axis of the projection system keeps parallel with the perpendicular bisector of the micro-mirror which is in the "flat" state, so the TIR prism is introduced,and making the relay optics and the DMD satisfy the optical institution's requirements. In this paper, a mechanical structure of the imaging optical system was designed and at the meanwhile the lens assembly has been well connected and fixed and fine-tuned by detailed structural design, which included the tilt decentered lens, wedge flanges, prisms. By optimizing the design, the issues of mutual restraint between the inverting optical system and the projecting system were well resolved, and prevented the blocking of the two systems. In addition, the structure size of the whole DMD reflection imaging optical system was minimized; it reduced the energy loss and ensured the image quality.

  10. Analysis of patient setup accuracy using electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onogi, Yuzo; Aoki, Yukimasa; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    1996-01-01

    Radiation therapy is performed in many fractions, and accurate patient setup is very important. This is more significant nowadays because treatment planning and radiation therapy are more precisely performed. Electronic portal imaging devices and automatic image comparison algorithms let us analyze setup deviations quantitatively. With such in mind we developed a simple image comparison algorithm. Using 2459 electronic verification images (335 ports, 123 treatment sites) generated during the past three years at our institute, we evaluated the results of the algorithm, and analyzed setup deviations according to the area irradiated, use of a fixing device (shell), and arm position. Calculated setup deviation was verified visually and their fitness was classified into good, fair, bad, and incomplete. The result was 40%, 14%, 22%, 24% respectively. Using calculated deviations classified as good (994 images), we analyzed setup deviations. Overall setup deviations described in 1 SD along axes x, y, z, was 1.9 mm, 2.5 mm, 1.7 mm respectively. We classified these deviations into systematic and random components, and found that random error was predominant in our institute. The setup deviations along axis y (cranio-caudal direction) showed larger distribution when treatment was performed with the shell. Deviations along y (cranio-caudal) and z (anterior-posterior) had larger distribution when treatment occurred with the patient's arm elevated. There was a significant time-trend error, whose deviations become greater with time. Within all evaluated ports, 30% showed a time-trend error. Using an electronic portal imaging device and automatic image comparison algorithm, we are able to analyze setup deviations more precisely and improve setup method based on objective criteria. (author)

  11. Prospective clinical evaluation of an electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalski, Jeff M.; Graham, Mary V.; Bosch, Walter R.; Wong, John; Gerber, Russell L.; Cheng, Abel; Tinger, Alfred; Valicenti, Richard K.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the clinical implementation of an electronic portal imaging device can improve the precision of daily external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: In 1991, an electronic portal imaging device was installed on a dual energy linear accelerator in our clinic. After training the radiotherapy technologists in the acquisition and evaluation of portal images, we performed a randomized study to determine whether online observation, interruption, and intervention would result in more precise daily setup. The patients were randomized to one of two groups: those whose treatments were actively monitored by the radiotherapy technologists and those that were imaged but not monitored. The treating technologists were instructed to correct the following treatment errors: (a) field placement error (FPE) > 1 cm; (b) incorrect block; (c) incorrect collimator setting; (d) absent customized block. Time of treatment delivery was recorded by our patient tracking and billing computers and compared to a matched set of patients not participating in the study. After the patients radiation therapy course was completed, an offline analysis of the patient setup error was planned. Results: Thirty-two patients were treated to 34 anatomical sites in this study. In 893 treatment sessions, 1,873 fields were treated (1,089 fields monitored and 794 fields unmonitored). Ninety percent of the treated fields had at least one image stored for offline analysis. Eighty-seven percent of these images were analyzed offline. Of the 1,011 fields imaged in the monitored arm, only 14 (1.4%) had an intervention recorded by the technologist. Despite infrequent online intervention, offline analysis demonstrated that the incidence of FPE > 10 mm in the monitored and unmonitored groups was 56 out of 881 (6.1%) and 95 out of 595 (11.2%), respectively; p 10 mm was confined to the pelvic fields. The time to treat patients in this study was 10.78 min (monitored) and 10.10 min (unmonitored

  12. Task 4 Improvised Nuclear Device Response Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alai, Maureen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Neuscamman, Stephanie [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-05-31

    LLNL performed fallout and nuclear blast modeling for the 60 cities using the NARAC modeling system and predominant weather patterns determined in a previous Task 4 effort. LLNL performed model simulations and analyses to identify and provide response curves (expressed as two-dimensional contours) for radioactive fallout deposition, transport, population, and blast overpressure as a function of yield, weather, location and time. These contours can then be further combined and correlated with infrastructure and population databases to estimate city specific effects on KPFs such as impacted infrastructure and casualty rates.

  13. Reading device of a radiation image contained in a radioluminescent screen and tomography device containing it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allemand, R.; Cuzin, M.; Parot, P.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is aimed at improving the random access time to a stimulable radioluminescent screen point (and consequently the reading time of the screen image); it is noticeably useful for longitudinal tomography. The reading device contains a source emitting a stimulation radiation beam towards the stimulable radioluminescent screen, a control mean of the stimulation radiation beam and a deflection mean which allows the beam to scan the screen surface. The device is characterized by the use of a very fast acousto-optical type deflection mean [fr

  14. Sweep devices for picosecond image-converter streak cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunin, B.; Miehe, J.A.; Sipp, B.; Schelev, M.Ya.; Serduchenko, J.N.; Thebault, J.

    1979-01-01

    Four different sweep devices based on microwave tubes, avalanche transistors, krytrons, and laser-triggered spark gaps are treated in detail. These control circuits are developed for picosecond image-converter cameras and generate sweep pulses providing streak speeds in the range of 10 7 to 5x10 10 cm/sec with maximum time resolution better than 10 -12 sec. Special low-jitter triggering schemes reduce the jitter to less than 5x10 -11 sec. Some problems arising in the construction and matching of the sweep devices and image-streak tube are discussed. Comparative parameters of nanosecond switching elements are presented. The results described can be used by other authors involved in streak camera development

  15. Radiological response of ceramic and polymeric devices for breast brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista Nogueira, Luciana; Passos Ribeiro de Campos, Tarcisio

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the radiological visibility of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom was investigated for future applications in brachytherapy. The main goal was to determine the radiological viability of ceramic and polymeric devices in vitro by performing simple radiological diagnostic methods such as conventional X-ray analysis and mammography due to its easy access to the population. The radiological response of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom was determined using conventional X-ray, mammography and CT analysis. - Highlights: ► Radiological visibility of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom. ► The barium incorporation in the seed improves the radiological contrast. ► Radiological monitoring shows the position, orientation and degradation of devices. ► Simple radiological methods such as X-ray and mammography were used for radiological monitoring.

  16. Device for congruent X-ray images of teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegner, H.; Zeumer, H.

    1987-01-01

    This invention has to do with a device for congruent X-ray images of teeth by means of the long-tube parallel technique and the long-tube semi-angle technique. The aim is to have no disturbing lever forces in order to avoid mechanical tensions between patient and X-ray tube assembly and to achieve a true projection of teeth and jaw-bone part also under unfavourable anatomical conditions

  17. Laser-based irradiation apparatus and methods for monitoring the dose-rate response of semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Kevin M [Albuquerque, NM

    2006-03-28

    A scanned, pulsed, focused laser irradiation apparatus can measure and image the photocurrent collection resulting from a dose-rate equivalent exposure to infrared laser light across an entire silicon die. Comparisons of dose-rate response images or time-delay images from before, during, and after accelerated aging of a device, or from periodic sampling of devices from fielded operational systems allows precise identification of those specific age-affected circuit structures within a device that merit further quantitative analysis with targeted materials or electrical testing techniques. Another embodiment of the invention comprises a broad-beam, dose rate-equivalent exposure apparatus. The broad-beam laser irradiation apparatus can determine if aging has affected the device's overall functionality. This embodiment can be combined with the synchronized introduction of external electrical transients into a device under test to simulate the electrical effects of the surrounding circuitry's response to a radiation exposure.

  18. Validation of a new imaging device for telemedical ulcer monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Benjamin Schnack; Frøkjær, Johnny; Bisgaard Jørgensen, Line

    2015-01-01

    between the new portable camera and the iPhone images vs. clinical assessment as the 'gold standard'. The study included 36 foot ulcers. Four specialists rated the ulcers and filled out a questionnaire, which formed the basis of the evaluation. RESULTS: We found fair to very good intra-rater agreement...... for the new PID and iPhone, respectively. The gold standard was evaluated by assessing the ulcer twice by two different specialists. Kappa values were moderate to very good with respect to inter-rater agreement except for two variables. The agreement between standard and new equipment compared to the gold......PURPOSE: To clarify whether a new portable imaging device (PID) providing 3D images for telemedical use constitutes a more correct expression of the clinical situation compared to standard telemedical equipment in this case iPhone 4s. METHOD: We investigated intra- and interindividual variability...

  19. 3D Printing of Living Responsive Materials and Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyue; Yuk, Hyunwoo; Lin, Shaoting; Parada, German Alberto; Tang, Tzu-Chieh; Tham, Eléonore; de la Fuente-Nunez, Cesar; Lu, Timothy K; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2018-01-01

    3D printing has been intensively explored to fabricate customized structures of responsive materials including hydrogels, liquid-crystal elastomers, shape-memory polymers, and aqueous droplets. Herein, a new method and material system capable of 3D-printing hydrogel inks with programed bacterial cells as responsive components into large-scale (3 cm), high-resolution (30 μm) living materials, where the cells can communicate and process signals in a programmable manner, are reported. The design of 3D-printed living materials is guided by quantitative models that account for the responses of programed cells in printed microstructures of hydrogels. Novel living devices are further demonstrated, enabled by 3D printing of programed cells, including logic gates, spatiotemporally responsive patterning, and wearable devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Living with Smartphones: Does Completion Device Affect Survey Responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Amber D.; Miller, Angie L.

    2015-01-01

    With the growing reliance on tablets and smartphones for internet access, understanding the effects of completion device on online survey responses becomes increasing important. This study uses data from the Strategic National Arts Alumni Project, a multi-institution online alumni survey designed to obtain knowledge of arts education, to explore…

  1. Examining the Efficacy of Personal Response Devices in Army Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Angelina; Babbitt, Bea

    2013-01-01

    Benefits of personal response devices (PRDs) have been demonstrated in a variety of settings and disciplines in higher education. This study looked outside of higher education to investigate the efficacy of PRDs in an Army training course in terms of trainee performance, engagement, and satisfaction. Instructors were also surveyed to determine…

  2. Fabrication of fine imaging devices using an external proton microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, T., E-mail: sakai.takuro@jaea.go.jp [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yasuda, R.; Iikura, H.; Nojima, T. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Koka, M.; Satoh, T.; Ishii, Y. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Oshima, A. [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    We have successfully fabricated novel microscopic imaging devices made from UV/EB curable resin using an external scanning proton microbeam. The devices are micro-structured fluorescent plates that consist of an array of micro-pillars that align periodically. The base material used in the pillars is UV/EB curable resin and each pillar contains phosphor grains. The pattern exposures were performed using a proton beam writing technique. The height of the pillars depends on the range of the proton beam. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy have been used to characterize the samples. The results show that the fabricated fluorescent plates are expected to be compatible with both spatial resolution and detection efficiency.

  3. Concave omnidirectional imaging device for cylindrical object based on catadioptric panoramic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaojun; Wu, Yumei; Wen, Peizhi

    2018-03-01

    To obtain information on the outer surface of a cylinder object, we propose a catadioptric panoramic imaging system based on the principle of uniform spatial resolution for vertical scenes. First, the influence of the projection-equation coefficients on the spatial resolution and astigmatism of the panoramic system are discussed, respectively. Through parameter optimization, we obtain the appropriate coefficients for the projection equation, and so the imaging quality of the entire imaging system can reach an optimum value. Finally, the system projection equation is calibrated, and an undistorted rectangular panoramic image is obtained using the cylindrical-surface projection expansion method. The proposed 360-deg panoramic-imaging device overcomes the shortcomings of existing surface panoramic-imaging methods, and it has the advantages of low cost, simple structure, high imaging quality, and small distortion, etc. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Safety of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Cardiac Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarian, Saman; Hansford, Rozann; Rahsepar, Amir A; Weltin, Valeria; McVeigh, Diana; Gucuk Ipek, Esra; Kwan, Alan; Berger, Ronald D; Calkins, Hugh; Lardo, Albert C; Kraut, Michael A; Kamel, Ihab R; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Halperin, Henry R

    2017-12-28

    Patients who have pacemakers or defibrillators are often denied the opportunity to undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) because of safety concerns, unless the devices meet certain criteria specified by the Food and Drug Administration (termed "MRI-conditional" devices). We performed a prospective, nonrandomized study to assess the safety of MRI at a magnetic field strength of 1.5 Tesla in 1509 patients who had a pacemaker (58%) or an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (42%) that was not considered to be MRI-conditional (termed a "legacy" device). Overall, the patients underwent 2103 thoracic and nonthoracic MRI examinations that were deemed to be clinically necessary. The pacing mode was changed to asynchronous mode for pacing-dependent patients and to demand mode for other patients. Tachyarrhythmia functions were disabled. Outcome assessments included adverse events and changes in the variables that indicate lead and generator function and interaction with surrounding tissue (device parameters). No long-term clinically significant adverse events were reported. In nine MRI examinations (0.4%; 95% confidence interval, 0.2 to 0.7), the patient's device reset to a backup mode. The reset was transient in eight of the nine examinations. In one case, a pacemaker with less than 1 month left of battery life reset to ventricular inhibited pacing and could not be reprogrammed; the device was subsequently replaced. The most common notable change in device parameters (>50% change from baseline) immediately after MRI was a decrease in P-wave amplitude, which occurred in 1% of the patients. At long-term follow-up (results of which were available for 63% of the patients), the most common notable changes from baseline were decreases in P-wave amplitude (in 4% of the patients), increases in atrial capture threshold (4%), increases in right ventricular capture threshold (4%), and increases in left ventricular capture threshold (3%). The observed changes in lead parameters

  5. Fast, cheap and in control: spectral imaging with handheld devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Edward A.; Deutsch, Erik R.; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2017-05-01

    Remote sensing has moved out of the laboratory and into the real world. Instruments using reflection or Raman imaging modalities become faster, cheaper and more powerful annually. Enabling technologies include virtual slit spectrometer design, high power multimode diode lasers, fast open-loop scanning systems, low-noise IR-sensitive array detectors and low-cost computers with touchscreen interfaces. High-volume manufacturing assembles these components into inexpensive portable or handheld devices that make possible sophisticated decision-making based on robust data analytics. Examples include threat, hazmat and narcotics detection; remote gas sensing; biophotonic screening; environmental remediation and a host of other applications.

  6. Micro and nano devices in passive millimetre wave imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, R.

    2013-06-01

    The impact of micro and nano technology on millimetre wave imaging from the post war years to the present day is reviewed. In the 1950s whisker contacted diodes in mixers and vacuum tubes were used to realise both radiometers and radars but required considerable skill to realise the performance needed. Development of planar semiconductor devices such as Gunn and Schottky diodes revolutionised mixer performance and provided considerable improvement. The next major breakthrough was high frequency transistors based on gallium arsenide which were initially used at intermediate frequencies but later after further development at millimeter wave frequencies. More recently Monolithic Microwave Integrated circuits(MMICs) offer exceptional performance and the opportunity for innovative design in passive imaging systems. In the future the use of micro and nano technology will continue to drive system performance and we can expect to see integration of antennae, millimetre wave and sub millimetre wave circuits and signal processing.

  7. The Biological Responses to Magnesium-Based Biodegradable Medical Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumei Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The biocompatibility of Magnesium-based materials (MBMs is critical to the safety of biodegradable medical devices. As a promising metallic biomaterial for medical devices, the issue of greatest concern is devices’ safety as degrading products are possibly interacting with local tissue during complete degradation. The aim of this review is to summarize the biological responses to MBMs at the cellular/molecular level, including cell adhesion, transportation signaling, immune response, and tissue growth during the complex degradation process. We review the influence of MBMs on gene/protein biosynthesis and expression at the site of implantation, as well as throughout the body. This paper provides a systematic review of the cellular/molecular behavior of local tissue on the response to Mg degradation, which may facilitate a better prediction of long-term degradation and the safe use of magnesium-based implants through metal innovation.

  8. Content analysis of Australian direct-to-consumer websites for emerging breast cancer imaging devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreugdenburg, Thomas D; Laurence, Caroline O; Willis, Cameron D; Mundy, Linda; Hiller, Janet E

    2014-09-01

    To describe the nature and frequency of information presented on direct-to-consumer websites for emerging breast cancer imaging devices. Content analysis of Australian website advertisements from 2 March 2011 to 30 March 2012, for three emerging breast cancer imaging devices: digital infrared thermal imaging, electrical impedance scanning and electronic palpation imaging. Type of imaging offered, device safety, device performance, application of device, target population, supporting evidence and comparator tests. Thirty-nine unique Australian websites promoting a direct-to-consumer breast imaging device were identified. Despite a lack of supporting evidence, 22 websites advertised devices for diagnosis, 20 advertised devices for screening, 13 advertised devices for prevention and 13 advertised devices for identifying breast cancer risk factors. Similarly, advertised ranges of diagnostic sensitivity (78%-99%) and specificity (44%-91%) were relatively high compared with published literature. Direct comparisons with conventional screening tools that favoured the new device were highly prominent (31 websites), and one-third of websites (12) explicitly promoted their device as a suitable alternative. Australian websites for emerging breast imaging devices, which are also available internationally, promote the use of such devices as safe and effective solutions for breast cancer screening and diagnosis in a range of target populations. Many of these claims are not supported by peer-reviewed evidence, raising questions about the manner in which these devices and their advertising material are regulated, particularly when they are promoted as direct alternatives to established screening interventions.

  9. Design Through Integration of On-Board Calibration Device with Imaging Spectroscopy Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of the Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy (AVIRIS) project is to "identify, measure, and monitor constituents of the Earth's surface and atmosphere based on molecular absorption and particle scattering signatures." The project designs, builds, and tests various imaging spectroscopy instruments that use On-Board Calibration devices (OBC) to check the accuracy of the data collected by the spectrometers. The imaging instrument records the spectral signatures of light collected during flight. To verify the data is correct, the OBC shines light which is collected by the imaging spectrometer and compared against previous calibration data to track spectral response changes in the instrument. The spectral data has the calibration applied to it based on the readings from the OBC data in order to ensure accuracy.

  10. The simulation of an imaging gamma-ray Compton backscattering device using GEANT4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechas, D.; Cristancho, F.; Sarmiento, L.G.; Fajardo, E.

    2014-01-01

    A gamma-backscattering imaging device dubbed Compton Camera, developed at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) and modified and studied at the Nuclear Physics Group of the National University of Colombia in Bogota, uses the back-to-back emission of two gamma rays in the positron annihilation to construct a bidimensional image that represents the distribution of matter in the field-of-view of the camera. This imaging capability can be used in a host of different situations, for example, to identify and study deposition and structural defects, and to help locating concealed objects, to name just two cases. In order to increase the understanding of the response of the Compton Camera and, in particular, its image formation process, and to assist in the data analysis, a simulation of the camera was developed using the GEANT4 simulation toolkit. In this work, the images resulting from different experimental conditions are shown. The simulated images and their comparison with the experimental ones already suggest methods to improve the present experimental device. (author)

  11. Image recognition and consistency of response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haygood, Tamara M.; Ryan, John; Liu, Qing Mary A.; Bassett, Roland; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the connection between conscious recognition of an image previously encountered in an experimental setting and consistency of response to the experimental question. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four radiologists viewed 40 frontal chest radiographs and gave their opinion as to the position of a central venous catheter. One-to-three days later they again viewed 40 frontal chest radiographs and again gave their opinion as to the position of the central venous catheter. Half of the radiographs in the second set were repeated images from the first set and half were new. The radiologists were asked of each image whether it had been included in the first set. For this study, we are evaluating only the 20 repeated images. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test and Fisher's exact test to determine the relationship between conscious recognition of a previously interpreted image and consistency in interpretation of the image. Results. There was no significant correlation between recognition of the image and consistency in response regarding the position of the central venous catheter. In fact, there was a trend in the opposite direction, with radiologists being slightly more likely to give a consistent response with respect to images they did not recognize than with respect to those they did recognize. Conclusion: Radiologists' recognition of previously-encountered images in an observer-performance study does not noticeably color their interpretation on the second encounter.

  12. Optically trapped atomic resonant devices for narrow linewidth spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lipeng

    This thesis focuses on the development of atomic resonant devices for spectroscopic applications. The primary emphasis is on the imaging properties of optically thick atomic resonant fluorescent filters and their applications. In addition, this thesis presents a new concept for producing very narrow linewidth light as from an atomic vapor lamp pumped by a nanosecond pulse system. This research was motivated by application for missile warning system, and presents an innovative approach to a wide angle, ultra narrow linewidth imaging filter using a potassium vapor cell. The approach is to image onto and collect the fluorescent photons emitted from the surface of an optically thick potassium vapor cell, generating a 2 GHz pass-band imaging filter. This linewidth is narrow enough to fall within a Fraunhefer dark zone in the solar spectrum, thus make the detection solar blind. Experiments are conducted to measure the absorption line shape of the potassium resonant filter, the quantum efficiency of the fluorescent behavior, and the resolution of the fluorescent image. Fluorescent images with different spatial frequency components are analyzed by using a discrete Fourier transform, and the imaging capability of the fluorescent filter is described by its Modulation Transfer Function. For the detection of radiation that is spectrally broader than the linewidth of the potassium imaging filter, the fluorescent image is seen to be blurred by diffuse fluorescence from the slightly off resonant photons. To correct this, an ultra-thin potassium imaging filter is developed and characterized. The imaging property of the ultra-thin potassium imaging cell is tested with a potassium seeded flame, yielding a resolution image of ˜ 20 lines per mm. The physics behind the atomic resonant fluorescent filter is radiation trapping. The diffusion process of the resonant photons trapped in the atomic vapor is theoretically described in this thesis. A Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the

  13. Hip fracture discrimination by the Achilles Insight QUS imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damilakis, John; Papadokostakis, George; Perisinakis, Kostas; Maris, Thomas G.; Karantanas, Apostolos H.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of osteoporosis as a major health problem is well recognized. Its major clinical manifestation is low energy fractures. Considerable effort has been directed towards search of noninvasive methods for assessing osteoporotic fracture risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) variables measured by a new heel QUS imaging device to discriminate between postmenopausal women with and without hip fracture. The subjects included 30 postmenopausal female patients with hip fracture and 30 age-matched healthy women. Measurements were acquired using the Achilles Insight QUS imaging device. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were carried out using the Lunar Prodigy DXA scanner. Achilles Insight provides images of the heel bone and measures broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and speed of sound (SOS) values in a circular region of interest. A third QUS variable, the stiffness index (SI) was also determined. The short-term precision for healthy subjects was 2.05%, 0.17% and 1.91% for BUA, SOS and SI, respectively. Corresponding values for patients with fractures were 1.80%, 0.16% and 2.04%. All QUS variables measured using the Achilles Insight were significant discriminators of hip fractures (area under ROC curve = 0.77, 0.74 and 0.77 for BUA, SOS and SI, respectively). BMD measurements of the hip had the greatest discriminatory ability (area under ROC curve = 0.88). Statistically significant differences were found between the area under the ROC curve of BMD and the corresponding curves of the QUS variables (P < 0.05 for each of the three comparisons). QUS variables measured by Achilles Insight can be expected to be useful as indicators of the risk of hip fracture in postmenopausal women

  14. Automatic analysis of image quality control for Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) devices in external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torfeh, Tarraf

    2009-01-01

    On-board imagers mounted on a radiotherapy treatment machine are very effective devices that improve the geometric accuracy of radiation delivery. However, a precise and regular quality control program is required in order to achieve this objective. Our purpose consisted of developing software tools dedicated to an automatic image quality control of IGRT devices used in external radiotherapy: 2D-MV mode for measuring patient position during the treatment using high energy images, 2D-kV mode (low energy images) and 3D Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) MV or kV mode, used for patient positioning before treatment. Automated analysis of the Winston and Lutz test was also proposed. This test is used for the evaluation of the mechanical aspects of treatment machines on which additional constraints are carried out due to the on-board imagers additional weights. Finally, a technique of generating digital phantoms in order to assess the performance of the proposed software tools is described. Software tools dedicated to an automatic quality control of IGRT devices allow reducing by a factor of 100 the time spent by the medical physics team to analyze the results of controls while improving their accuracy by using objective and reproducible analysis and offering traceability through generating automatic monitoring reports and statistical studies. (author) [fr

  15. Image guided placement of temporary anchorage devices for tooth movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahl-Palomo, L.; Bissada, N. [Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Dental Medicine, Dept. of Periodontics, Cleveland, OH (United States); Palomo, J.M.; Hans, M.G. [Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Dental Medicine, Dept. of Orthodontics, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2007-06-15

    The aim of this project is to develop an image guided protocol for placement of a temporary anchorage device without surgically reflecting a mucoperiosteal flap. Eighteen orthodontic cases were selected for skeletal anchorage from the department of orthodontics at Case University. CBCT images of the subjects were taken using the Hitachi CB MercuRay system set at 15 mA, 120 kVp. CBCT images evaluated the ideal location for TAD placement in three dimensions. Horizontal and vertical linear measurements were taken from fixed dental landmarks to clearly define the location for placement. Transverse slices were used to evaluate the thickness of the buccal plate. Using the transverse view, the angle of insertion was determined such that the maximum buccal plate surface area would contact the screw. TADs were placed in the optimum location, with the most appropriate angle of insertion using a closed approach and with minimal local anesthesia and without flap elevation. Results: All TADs were placed without anatomic encroachment and enabled fixed orthodontic anchorage. (orig.)

  16. Image guided placement of temporary anchorage devices for tooth movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahl-Palomo, L.; Bissada, N.; Palomo, J.M.; Hans, M.G.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop an image guided protocol for placement of a temporary anchorage device without surgically reflecting a mucoperiosteal flap. Eighteen orthodontic cases were selected for skeletal anchorage from the department of orthodontics at Case University. CBCT images of the subjects were taken using the Hitachi CB MercuRay system set at 15 mA, 120 kVp. CBCT images evaluated the ideal location for TAD placement in three dimensions. Horizontal and vertical linear measurements were taken from fixed dental landmarks to clearly define the location for placement. Transverse slices were used to evaluate the thickness of the buccal plate. Using the transverse view, the angle of insertion was determined such that the maximum buccal plate surface area would contact the screw. TADs were placed in the optimum location, with the most appropriate angle of insertion using a closed approach and with minimal local anesthesia and without flap elevation. Results: All TADs were placed without anatomic encroachment and enabled fixed orthodontic anchorage. (orig.)

  17. Assessment of image quality in x-ray radiography imaging using a small plasma focus device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanani, A.; Shirani, B.; Jabbari, I.; Mokhtari, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers a comprehensive investigation of image quality parameters for a small plasma focus as a pulsed hard x-ray source for radiography applications. A set of images were captured from some metal objects and electronic circuits using a low energy plasma focus at different voltages of capacitor bank and different pressures of argon gas. The x-ray source focal spot of this device was obtained to be about 0.6 mm using the penumbra imaging method. The image quality was studied by several parameters such as image contrast, line spread function (LSF) and modulation transfer function (MTF). Results showed that the contrast changes by variations in gas pressure. The best contrast was obtained at a pressure of 0.5 mbar and 3.75 kJ stored energy. The results of x-ray dose from the device showed that about 0.6 mGy is sufficient to obtain acceptable images on the film. The measurements of LSF and MTF parameters were carried out by means of a thin stainless steel wire 0.8 mm in diameter and the cut-off frequency was obtained to be about 1.5 cycles/mm. - Highlights: • We investigated a small plasma focus as pulsed x-ray source for radiography applications. • The image quality was studied by several parameters such as image contrast, LSF and MTF. • The x-ray source focal spot was obtained to be ∼0.6 mm using the penumbra imaging method. • The x-ray dose measurement showed that about 0.6 mGy is sufficient to obtain acceptable images on the film. • The profiles of LSF and MTF showed that the cut-off frequency is about 1.5 cycles/mm

  18. Image quality and stability of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) devices: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, Markus; Pasler, Marlies; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Homolka, Peter; Poetter, Richard; Georg, Dietmar

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Our aim was to implement standards for quality assurance of IGRT devices used in our department and to compare their performances with that of a CT simulator. Materials and methods: We investigated image quality parameters for three devices over a period of 16 months. A multislice CT was used as a benchmark and results related to noise, spatial resolution, low contrast visibility (LCV) and uniformity were compared with a cone beam CT (CBCT) at a linac and simulator. Results: All devices performed well in terms of LCV and, in fact, exceeded vendor specifications. MTF was comparable between CT and linac CBCT. Integral nonuniformity was, on average, 0.002 for the CT and 0.006 for the linac CBCT. Uniformity, LCV and MTF varied depending on the protocols used for the linac CBCT. Contrast-to-noise ratio was an average of 51% higher for the CT than for the linac and simulator CBCT. No significant time trend was observed and tolerance limits were implemented. Discussion: Reasonable differences in image quality between CT and CBCT were observed. Further research and development are necessary to increase image quality of commercially available CBCT devices in order for them to serve the needs for adaptive and/or online planning.

  19. Image quality and stability of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) devices: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Markus; Pasler, Marlies; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Homolka, Peter; Poetter, Richard; Georg, Dietmar

    2009-10-01

    Our aim was to implement standards for quality assurance of IGRT devices used in our department and to compare their performances with that of a CT simulator. We investigated image quality parameters for three devices over a period of 16months. A multislice CT was used as a benchmark and results related to noise, spatial resolution, low contrast visibility (LCV) and uniformity were compared with a cone beam CT (CBCT) at a linac and simulator. All devices performed well in terms of LCV and, in fact, exceeded vendor specifications. MTF was comparable between CT and linac CBCT. Integral nonuniformity was, on average, 0.002 for the CT and 0.006 for the linac CBCT. Uniformity, LCV and MTF varied depending on the protocols used for the linac CBCT. Contrast-to-noise ratio was an average of 51% higher for the CT than for the linac and simulator CBCT. No significant time trend was observed and tolerance limits were implemented. Reasonable differences in image quality between CT and CBCT were observed. Further research and development are necessary to increase image quality of commercially available CBCT devices in order for them to serve the needs for adaptive and/or online planning.

  20. Assessment of image quality in x-ray radiography imaging using a small plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanani, A.; Shirani, B.; Jabbari, I.; Mokhtari, J.

    2014-08-01

    This paper offers a comprehensive investigation of image quality parameters for a small plasma focus as a pulsed hard x-ray source for radiography applications. A set of images were captured from some metal objects and electronic circuits using a low energy plasma focus at different voltages of capacitor bank and different pressures of argon gas. The x-ray source focal spot of this device was obtained to be about 0.6 mm using the penumbra imaging method. The image quality was studied by several parameters such as image contrast, line spread function (LSF) and modulation transfer function (MTF). Results showed that the contrast changes by variations in gas pressure. The best contrast was obtained at a pressure of 0.5 mbar and 3.75 kJ stored energy. The results of x-ray dose from the device showed that about 0.6 mGy is sufficient to obtain acceptable images on the film. The measurements of LSF and MTF parameters were carried out by means of a thin stainless steel wire 0.8 mm in diameter and the cut-off frequency was obtained to be about 1.5 cycles/mm.

  1. Ceramic and polymeric devices for breast brachytherapy - Mammographic and CT response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Luciana B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2009-01-01

    The present research investigates the radiological visibility of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom (in vitro) for future applications in brachytherapy treatments. The main research goal is to investigate the viability of monitoring ceramic and polymeric devices, in vitro based on simple methods of radiological diagnostic, maintaining the easiest access to the population, represented by the conventional X-ray and mammography. The methodology involves the processing of ceramic devices constituted by bioglasses of Sm, SmBa, Ho, HoBa and the production of polymeric devices, such as polymeric membranes incorporating Ho e HoBa. Contrast agent of Barium was introduced in the syntheses of those devices to improve the radiological visibility in breast equivalent-tissue (TE) phantom. The breast phantom is constituted of glandular, adipose and skin TE, reproducing a 5 cm compressed real breast. In the compressed breast phantom, all types of ceramic and polymeric devices were implanted side by side. Radiological images were generated through X-ray equipment, mammography and computerized tomography (TC), for the samples implanted in the compressed breast phantom. The results show that SmBa and HoBa seeds on breast phantom presented suitable radiological visibility, on all the radiological diagnostic methods. However, the X-rays radiological visibility of Sm seeds without contrast was discreet. On mammography and TC images, it was not possible to identify those seeds, because the same ones were degraded after two months immersed in the glandular TE, after placed on the phantom. The Ho seeds were identified on all radiological diagnostic images, although non contrast agent in its constitution was added. However, the holmium polymeric membranes in direct contact with TE did not show Xray radiological visibility. However, the polymeric membranes of HoBa in the same conditions presented efficient X-rays radiological response. For mammography and TC methods

  2. The stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber electronic portal imaging devices for dosimetry purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louwe, R.J.W.; Tielenburg, R.; Ingen, K.M. van; Mijnheer, B.J.; Herk, M.B. van

    2004-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber (LiFi-type) electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) for dosimetric purposes. The short- and long-term stability of the response was investigated, as well as the importance of factors influencing the response (e.g., temperature fluctuations, radiation damage, and the performance of the electronic hardware). It was shown that testing the performance of the electronic hardware as well as the short-term stability of the imagers may reveal the cause of a poor long-term stability of the imager response. In addition, the short-term stability was measured to verify the validity of the fitted dose-response curve immediately after beam startup. The long-term stability of these imagers could be considerably improved by correcting for room temperature fluctuations and gradual changes in response due to radiation damage. As a result, the reproducibility was better than 1% (1 SD) over a period of two years. The results of this study were used to formulate recommendations for a quality control program for portal dosimetry. The effect of such a program was assessed by comparing the results of portal dosimetry and in vivo dosimetry using diodes during the treatment of 31 prostate patients. The improvement of the results for portal dosimetry was consistent with the deviations observed with the reproducibility tests in that particular period. After a correction for the variation in response of the imager, the average difference between the measured and prescribed dose during the treatment of prostate patients was -0.7%±1.5% (1 SD), and -0.6%±1.1% (1 SD) for EPID and diode in vivo dosimetry, respectively. It can be concluded that a high stability of the response can be achieved for this type of EPID by applying a rigorous quality control program

  3. Detection and response to unauthorized access to a communication device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rhett; Gordon, Colin

    2015-09-08

    A communication gateway consistent with the present disclosure may detect unauthorized physical or electronic access and implement security actions in response thereto. A communication gateway may provide a communication path to an intelligent electronic device (IED) using an IED communications port configured to communicate with the IED. The communication gateway may include a physical intrusion detection port and a network port. The communication gateway may further include control logic configured to evaluate physical intrusion detection signal. The control logic may be configured to determine that the physical intrusion detection signal is indicative of an attempt to obtain unauthorized access to one of the communication gateway, the IED, and a device in communication with the gateway; and take a security action based upon the determination that the indication is indicative of the attempt to gain unauthorized access.

  4. Performance of a malaria microscopy image analysis slide reading device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prescott William R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viewing Plasmodium in Romanovsky-stained blood has long been considered the gold standard for diagnosis and a cornerstone in management of the disease. This method however, requires a subjective evaluation by trained, experienced diagnosticians and establishing proficiency of diagnosis is fraught with many challenges. Reported here is an evaluation of a diagnostic system (a “device” consisting of a microscope, a scanner, and a computer algorithm that evaluates scanned images of standard Giemsa-stained slides and reports species and parasitaemia. Methods The device was challenged with two independent tests: a 55 slide, expert slide reading test the composition of which has been published by the World Health Organization (“WHO55” test, and a second test in which slides were made from a sample of consenting subjects participating in a malaria incidence survey conducted in Equatorial Guinea (EGMIS test. These subjects’ blood was tested by malaria RDT as well as having the blood smear diagnosis unequivocally determined by a worldwide panel of a minimum of six reference microscopists. Only slides with unequivocal microscopic diagnoses were used for the device challenge, n = 119. Results On the WHO55 test, the device scored a “Level 4” using the WHO published grading scheme. Broken down by more traditional analysis parameters this result was translated to 89% and 70% sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Species were correctly identified in 61% of the slides and the quantification of parasites fell within acceptable range of the validated parasitaemia in 10% of the cases. On the EGMIS test it scored 100% and 94% sensitivity/specificity, with 64% of the species correct and 45% of the parasitaemia within an acceptable range. A pooled analysis of the 174 slides used for both tests resulted in an overall 92% sensitivity and 90% specificity with 61% species and 19% quantifications correct. Conclusions In its

  5. Comprehensive model for predicting perceptual image quality of smart mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Rui; Xu, Haisong; Luo, M R; Li, Haifeng

    2015-01-01

    An image quality model for smart mobile devices was proposed based on visual assessments of several image quality attributes. A series of psychophysical experiments were carried out on two kinds of smart mobile devices, i.e., smart phones and tablet computers, in which naturalness, colorfulness, brightness, contrast, sharpness, clearness, and overall image quality were visually evaluated under three lighting environments via categorical judgment method for various application types of test images. On the basis of Pearson correlation coefficients and factor analysis, the overall image quality could first be predicted by its two constituent attributes with multiple linear regression functions for different types of images, respectively, and then the mathematical expressions were built to link the constituent image quality attributes with the physical parameters of smart mobile devices and image appearance factors. The procedure and algorithms were applicable to various smart mobile devices, different lighting conditions, and multiple types of images, and performance was verified by the visual data.

  6. A quantitative image quality comparison of four different image guided radiotherapy devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuetzel, Julia; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: A study to quantitatively compare the image quality of four different image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) devices based on phantom measurements with respect to the additional dose delivered to the patient. Methods: Images of three different head-sized phantoms (diameter 16-18 cm) were acquired with the following four IGRT-CT solutions: (i) the Siemens Primatom single slice fan beam computed tomography (CT) scanner with an acceleration voltage of 130 kV, (ii) a Tomotherapy HI-ART II unit using a fan beam scanner with an energy of 3.5 MeV and (iii) the Siemens Artiste prototype, providing the possibility to perform kV (121 kV) and MV (6 MV) cone beam (CB) CTs. For each device three scan protocols (named low, normal, high) were selected to yield the same weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDI w ). Based on the individual inserts of the different phantoms the image quality achieved with each device at a certain dose level was characterized in terms of homogeneity, spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and electron density-to-CT-number conversion. Results: Based on the current findings for head-sized phantoms all devices show an electron density-to-CT-number conversion almost independent of the imaging parameters and hence can be suited for treatment planning purposes. The evaluation of the image quality, however, points out clear differences due to the different energies and geometries. The Primatom standard CT scanner shows throughout the best performance, especially for soft tissue contrast and spatial resolution with low imaging doses. Reasonable soft tissue contrast can be obtained with slightly higher doses compared to the CT scanner with the kVCB and the Tomotherapy unit. In order to get similar results with the MVCB system a much higher dose needs to be applied to the patient. Conclusion: Considering the entire investigations, especially in terms of contrast and spatial resolution, a rough tendency for

  7. PT-symmetric planar devices for field transformation and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valagiannopoulos, C A; Monticone, F; Alù, A

    2016-01-01

    The powerful tools of transformation optics (TO) allow an effective distortion of a region of space by carefully engineering the material inhomogeneity and anisotropy, and have been successfully applied in recent years to control electromagnetic fields in many different scenarios, e.g., to realize invisibility cloaks and planar lenses. For various field transformations, it is not necessary to use volumetric inhomogeneous materials, and suitably designed ultrathin metasurfaces with tailored spatial or spectral responses may be able to realize similar functionalities within smaller footprints and more robust mechanisms. Here, inspired by the concept of metamaterial TO lenses, we discuss field transformations enabled by parity-time (PT) symmetric metasurfaces, which can emulate negative refraction. We first analyze a simple realization based on homogeneous and local metasurfaces to achieve negative refraction and imaging, and we then extend our results to arbitrary PT-symmetric two-port networks to realize aberration-free planar imaging. (paper)

  8. Theoretic simulation for CMOS device on total dose radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Baoping; Zhou Heqin; Guo Hongxia; He Chaohui; Zhou Hui; Luo Yinhong; Zhang Fengqi

    2006-01-01

    Total dose effect is simulated for C4007B, CC4007RH and CC4011 devices at different absorbed dose rate by using linear system theory. When irradiation response and dose are linear, total dose radiation and post-irradiation annealing at room temperature are determined for one random by choosing absorbed dose rate, and total dose effect at other absorbed dose rate can be predicted by using linear system theory. The simulating results agree with the experimental results at different absorbed dose rate. (authors)

  9. The digital radiographic and computed tomography imaging of two types of explosive devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiano Riveros, Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    Two well-established medical imaging methods, digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT), were employed to obtain images of two types of explosive devices, model rocket engines and shotgun shells. The images were evaluated from an airport security perspective. In terms of geometrical shape, the detection probability of the explosive devices appears to be higher with DR imaging, but in terms of the actual explosive compounds in the devices, CT appears to offer a higher detection probability. DR imaging offers a low detection probability for the explosive powder in the shotgun shells, but a rather significant detection probability for the explosive propellant in the model rocket engines

  10. Fiber bundle probes for interconnecting miniaturized medical imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Vanessa; Hofmann, Jens; Marx, Sebastian; Herter, Jonas; Nguyen, Dennis; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Schröder, Henning

    2017-02-01

    Miniaturization of medical imaging devices will significantly improve the workflow of physicians in hospitals. Photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technologies offer a high level of miniaturization. However, they need fiber optic interconnection solutions for their functional integration. As part of European funded project (InSPECT) we investigate fiber bundle probes (FBPs) to be used as multi-mode (MM) to single-mode (SM) interconnections for PIC modules. The FBP consists of a set of four or seven SM fibers hexagonally distributed and assembled into a holder that defines a multicore connection. Such a connection can be used to connect MM fibers, while each SM fiber is attached to the PIC module. The manufacturing of these probes is explored by using well-established fiber fusion, epoxy adhesive, innovative adhesive and polishing techniques in order to achieve reliable, low-cost and reproducible samples. An innovative hydrofluoric acid-free fiber etching technology has been recently investigated. The preliminary results show that the reduction of the fiber diameter shows a linear behavior as a function of etching time. Different etch rate values from 0.55 μm/min to 2.3 μm/min were found. Several FBPs with three different type of fibers have been optically interrogated at wavelengths of 630nm and 1550nm. Optical losses are found of approx. 35dB at 1550nm for FBPs composed by 80μm fibers. Although FBPs present moderate optical losses, they might be integrated using different optical fibers, covering a broad spectral range required for imaging applications. Finally, we show the use of FBPs as promising MM-to-SM interconnects for real-world interfacing to PIC's.

  11. Federal Response Assets for a Radioactive Dispersal Device Incident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan,T.

    2009-06-30

    If a large scale RDD event where to occur in New York City, the magnitude of the problem would likely exceed the capabilities of City and State to effectively respond to the event. New York State could request Federal Assistance if the United States President has not already made the decision to provide it. The United States Federal Government has a well developed protocol to respond to emergencies. The National Response Framework (NRF) describes the process for responding to all types of emergencies including RDD incidents. Depending on the location and type of event, the NRF involves appropriate Federal Agencies, e.g., Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), United States Coast Guard (USCG), Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Justice (DOJ), Department of Agriculture (USDA), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Federal response to emergencies has been refined and improved over the last thirty years and has been tested on natural disasters (e.g. hurricanes and floods), man-made disasters (oil spills), and terrorist events (9/11). However, the system has never been tested under an actual RDD event. Drills have been conducted with Federal, State, and local agencies to examine the initial (early) phases of such an event (TopOff 2 and TopOff 4). The Planning Guidance for Protection and Recovery Following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) incidents issued by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in August 2008 has never been fully tested in an interagency exercise. Recently, another exercise called Empire 09 that was situated in Albany, New York was conducted. Empire 09 consists of 3 different exercises be held in May and June, 2009. The first exercise, May 2009, involved a table top exercise for phase 1 (0-48 hours) of the response to an RDD incident. In early June, a full-scale 3- day exercise was conducted for the mid-phase response (48

  12. Development of an IMRT quality assurance program using an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, P.; Oliver, L.; Mallik, A.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Quality Assurance (QA) for an intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) megavoltage beam is a complex task. The positional accuracy of the MLC; its radiation leakage; the overall distribution of the dose delivered as compared to the treatment plan and; the accuracy of the calculated monitor units to deliver this dose, are all important parameters to clinically monitor. We are presently assessing the Varian version 6 software package with CadPlan, Helios with IMRT and inverse planning, VARiS Vision and the linear accelerator DMLC controller. Whilst conventional QA tools such as ionisation chamber and film measurements are used, these methods are inconvenient for directly monitoring an IMRT patient treatment. Varian Medical Systems has developed an improved electronic portal imaging device (EPID) with an amorphous silicon (a-Si) detector array. The A-Si has a sensitive area of 40x30cm and an improved image resolution of 512x384 pixels. Images are recorded at approximately 7-10 frames per second for an exposure rate of 100-600 MU/minute. Although the A-Si was designed as an EPID for a static treatment field, this new device could be a valuable IMRT QA tool for a range of different tests. Measurements taken on the RNSH and Varian prototype A-Si EPI devices showed a linear dose response for 6-18MeV X-ray energy. In addition to the Varian IAS2 internal software handlers, we have developed some image data handling programs to view and analyse these images in more detail. The software is primarily used to view the images; measure the reading in a region of interest or profile; or merge, overlay, add or subtract images during the analysis. The small pixel resolution provides a reliable, highly accurate means of measuring beam size, leaf position, MLC radiation leakage or profile intensity curves with a positional accuracy of 0.8mm. The images produced by an IMRT exposure is clearly discernible and appears consistent with the result expected. Step wedge images

  13. 77 FR 31875 - Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Notice of Receipt of Complaint; Solicitation of Comments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Docket No. 2898] Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Notice of... Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Electronic Imaging Devices, DN 2898; the Commission is...

  14. 77 FR 32995 - Certain Electronic Imaging Devices Corrected: Notice of Receipt of Complaint; Solicitation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Docket No. 2898] Certain Electronic Imaging Devices Corrected.... International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Electronic Imaging Devices, DN 2898; the...

  15. Evaluation of image quality for various electronic portal imaging devices in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Soon Yong; Choi, Kwan Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Min [Dept. of College of Health Science, Radiologic Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-12-15

    In megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy, delivering the dose to the target volume is important while protecting the surrounding normal tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS), and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) using an edge block in megavoltage X-ray imaging (MVI). We used an edge block, which consists of tungsten with dimensions of 19 (thickness) × 10 (length) × 1 (width) cm3 and measured the pre-sampling MTF at 6 MV energy. Various radiation therapy (RT) devices such as TrueBeamTM (Varian), BEAMVIEWPLUS (Siemens), iViewGT (Elekta) and Clinac®iX (Varian) were used. As for MTF results, TrueBeamTM(Varian) flattening filter free(FFF) showed the highest values of 0.46 mm-1and1.40mm-1for MTF 0.5 and 0.1. In NPS, iViewGT (Elekta) showed the lowest noise distribution. In DQE, iViewGT (Elekta) showed the best efficiency at a peak DQE and 1 mm-1DQE of 0.0026 and 0.00014, respectively. This study could be used not only for traditional QA imaging but also for quantitative MTF, NPS, and DQE measurement for development of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID)

  16. Post-operative orbital imaging: a focus on implants and prosthetic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Ashok; Mankad, Kshitij; Poitelea, Cornelia; Verity, David H.; Davagnanam, Indran

    2014-01-01

    Accurate interpretation of orbital imaging in the presence of either orbital implants requires a sound knowledge of both the surgical approach used and the imaging characteristics of the implanted devices themselves. In this article, the radiological appearance of the various devices used in ophthalmology, and their relationship to other orbital structures, is reviewed. In addition, the intended anatomical location, function of these devices, and clinical indications for their use are provided. (orig.)

  17. Flow characterization and patch clamp dose responses using jet microfluidics in a tubeless microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resto, Pedro J; Bhat, Abhishek; Stava, Eric; Lor, Chong; Merriam, Elliot; Diaz-Rivera, Ruben E; Pearce, Robert; Blick, Robert; Williams, Justin C

    2017-11-01

    Surface tension passive pumping is a way to actuate flow without the need for pumps, tubing or valves by using the pressure inside small drop to move liquid via a microfluidic channel. These types of tubeless devices have typically been used in cell biology. Herein we present the use of tubeless devices as a fluid exchange platform for patch clamp electrophysiology. Inertia from high-speed droplets and jets is used to create flow and perform on-the-fly mixing of solutions. These are then flowed over GABA transfected HEK cells under patch in order to perform a dose response analysis. TIRF imaging and electrical recordings are used to study the fluid exchange properties of the microfluidic device, resulting in 0-90% fluid exchange times of hundreds of milliseconds. COMSOL is used to model flow and fluid exchange within the device. Patch-clamping experiments show the ability to use high-speed passive pumping and its derivatives for studying peak dose responses, but not for studying ion channel kinetics. Our system results in fluid exchange times slower than when using a standard 12-barrel application system and is not as stable as traditional methods, but it offers a new platform with added functionality. Surface tension passive pumping and tubeless devices can be used in a limited fashion for electrophysiology. Users may obtain peak dose responses but the system, in its current form, is not capable of fluid exchange fast enough to study the kinetics of most ion channels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Verification of multileaf collimator leaf positions using an electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samant, Sanjiv S.; Zheng Wei; Parra, Nestor Andres; Chandler, Jason; Gopal, Arun; Wu Jian; Jain Jinesh; Zhu Yunping; Sontag, Marc

    2002-01-01

    An automated method is presented for determining individual leaf positions of the Siemens dual focus multileaf collimator (MLC) using the Siemens BEAMVIEW(PLUS) electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Leaf positions are computed with an error of 0.6 mm at one standard deviation (σ) using separate computations of pixel dimensions, image distortion, and radiation center. The pixel dimensions are calculated by superimposing the film image of a graticule with the corresponding EPID image. A spatial correction is used to compensate for the optical distortions of the EPID, reducing the mean distortion from 3.5 pixels (uncorrected) per localized x-ray marker to 2 pixels (1 mm) for a rigid rotation and 1 pixel for a third degree polynomial warp. A correction for a nonuniform dosimetric response across the field of view of the EPID images is not necessary due to the sharp intensity gradients across leaf edges. The radiation center, calculated from the average of the geometric centers of a square field at 0 deg. and 180 deg. collimator angles, is independent of graticule placement error. Its measured location on the EPID image was stable to within 1 pixel based on 3 weeks of repeated extensions/retractions of the EPID. The MLC leaf positions determined from the EPID images agreed to within a pixel of the corresponding values measured using film and ionization chamber. Several edge detection algorithms were tested: contour, Sobel, Roberts, Prewitt, Laplace, morphological, and Canny. These agreed with each other to within ≤1.2 pixels for the in-air EPID images. Using a test pattern, individual MLC leaves were found to be typically within 1 mm of the corresponding record-and-verify values, with a maximum difference of 1.8 mm, and standard deviations of <0.3 mm in the daily reproducibility. This method presents a fast, automatic, and accurate alternative to using film or a light field for the verification and calibration of the MLC

  19. Differentiating emotional responses to images and words

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla Birgitte Falk; Petersen, Michael Kai; Larsen, Jakob Eg

    responses are characterized by only small voltage changes that have typically been found in group studies involving multiple trials and large numbers of participants. Hypothesizing that spatial filtering might enhance retrieval, we apply independent component analysis (ICA) to cluster scalp maps and time...... series responses in a single subject based on only a few trials. Comparing our results against previous findings we identify multiple early and late ICA components that are similarly modulated by neutral, pleasant and unpleasant content in both images and words. Suggesting that we might be able to model...

  20. Assessment of dosimetrical performance in 11 Varian a-Si500 electronic portal imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavuma, Awusi; Glegg, Martin; Currie, Garry; Elliott, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Dosimetrical characteristics of 11 Varian a-Si-500 electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) in clinical use for periods ranging between 10 and 86 months were investigated for consistency of performance and portal dosimetry implications. Properties studied include short-term reproducibility, signal linearity with monitor units, response to reference beam, signal uniformity across the detector panel, signal dependence on field size, dose-rate influence, memory effects and image profiles as a function of monitor units. The EPID measurements were also compared with those of the ionization chambers' to ensure stability of the linear accelerators. Depending on their clinical installation date, the EPIDs were interfaced with one of the two different acquisition control software packages, IAS2/IDU-II or IAS3/IDU-20. Both the EPID age and image acquisition system influenced the dosimetric characteristics with the newer version (IAS3 with IDU-20) giving better data reproducibility and linearity fit than the older version (IAS2 with IDU-II). The relative signal response (uniformity) after 50 MU was better than 95% of the central value and independent of detector. Sensitivity for all EPIDs reduced continuously with increasing dose rates for the newer image acquisition software. In the dose-rate range 100-600 MU min -1 , the maximum variation in sensitivity ranged between 1 and 1.8% for different EPIDs. For memory effects, the increase in the measured signal at the centre of the irradiated field for successive images was within 1.8% and 1.0% for the older and newer acquisition systems, respectively. Image profiles acquired at a lower MU in the radial plane (gun-target) had gradients in measured pixel values of up to 25% for the older system. Detectors with software/hardware versions IAS3/IDU-20 have a high degree of accuracy and are more suitable for routine quantitative IMRT dosimetrical verification.

  1. NOTE: A method for controlling image acquisition in electronic portal imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, A. G.; Hunt, S. G.; Bonnett, D. E.

    2001-02-01

    Certain types of camera-based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) which initiate image acquisition based on sensing a change in video level have been observed to trigger unreliably at the beginning of dynamic multileaf collimation sequences. A simple, novel means of controlling image acquisition with an Elekta linear accelerator (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) is proposed which is based on illumination of a photodetector (ORP-12, Silonex Inc., Plattsburgh, NY, USA) by the electron gun of the accelerator. By incorporating a simple trigger circuit it is possible to derive a beam on/off status signal which changes at least 100 ms before any dose is measured by the accelerator. The status signal does not return to the beam-off state until all dose has been delivered and is suitable for accelerator pulse repetition frequencies of 50-400 Hz. The status signal is thus a reliable means of indicating the initiation and termination of radiation exposure, and thus controlling image acquisition of such EPIDs for this application.

  2. Device for the track useful signal discrimination during the image scanning form bubble chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipov, E.A.; Uvarov, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    A device for the image processing from the bubble chambers, developed to increase the reliability of the track useful signal discrimination at the image scanning from the background component is described. The device consists of a low-pass filter, repetition and memory circuit and subtraction circuit. Besides a delay line and extra channel consisting of a differentiating circuit in series with the selective shaping circuit are introduced into the device. The output signal of the selective shaping is the controlling signal of the repetition and memory circuit, at the output of which a signal corresponding the background component is formed. The functional diagram of the device operation is presented

  3. Signal Normalization Reduces Image Appearance Disparity Among Multiple Optical Coherence Tomography Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Bilonick, Richard A; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S

    2017-02-01

    To assess the effect of the previously reported optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal normalization method on reducing the discrepancies in image appearance among spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) devices. Healthy eyes and eyes with various retinal pathologies were scanned at the macular region using similar volumetric scan patterns with at least two out of three SD-OCT devices at the same visit (Cirrus HD-OCT, Zeiss, Dublin, CA; RTVue, Optovue, Fremont, CA; and Spectralis, Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany). All the images were processed with the signal normalization. A set of images formed a questionnaire with 24 pairs of cross-sectional images from each eye with any combination of the three SD-OCT devices either both pre- or postsignal normalization. Observers were asked to evaluate the similarity of the two displayed images based on the image appearance. The effects on reducing the differences in image appearance before and after processing were analyzed. Twenty-nine researchers familiar with OCT images participated in the survey. Image similarity was significantly improved after signal normalization for all three combinations ( P ≤ 0.009) as Cirrus and RTVue combination became the most similar pair, followed by Cirrus and Spectralis, and RTVue and Spectralis. The signal normalization successfully minimized the disparities in the image appearance among multiple SD-OCT devices, allowing clinical interpretation and comparison of OCT images regardless of the device differences. The signal normalization would enable direct OCT images comparisons without concerning about device differences and broaden OCT usage by enabling long-term follow-ups and data sharing.

  4. Transport Imaging for the Study of Quantum Scattering Phenomena in Next Generation Semiconductor Devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bradley, Frank M

    2005-01-01

    ...) and highly efficient solar cells. A novel technique has been developed utilizing direct imaging of electron/hole recombination via an optical microscope and a high sensitivity charge coupled device coupled to a scanning electron...

  5. Transcutaneous Noninvasive Device for the Responsive Delivery of Melatonin in Microgravity., Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our goal is develop a smart, transcutaneous device for individualized circadian (sleep) therapy by responsive release of melatonin, in microgravity. Additionally,...

  6. Application range of micro focus radiographic devices associated to image processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappabianca, C.; Ferriani, S.; Verre, F.

    1987-01-01

    X-ray devices having a focus area less than 100 μ are called micro focus X-ray equipment. Here the range of application and the characteristics of these devices including the possibility of employing the coupling with real time image enhancement computers are defined

  7. Digital tomosynthesis with an on-board kilovoltage imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, Devon J.; Yin, F.-F.; Oldham, Mark; Yoo, Sua; Willett, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To generate on-board digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and reference DTS images for three-dimensional image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as an alternative to conventional portal imaging or on-board cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Three clinical cases (prostate, head-and-neck, and liver) were selected to illustrate the capabilities of on-board DTS for IGRT. Corresponding reference DTS images were reconstructed from digitally reconstructed radiographs computed from planning CT image sets. The effect of scan angle on DTS slice thickness was examined by computing the mutual information between coincident CBCT and DTS images, as the DTS scan angle was varied from 0 o to 165 o . A breath-hold DTS acquisition strategy was implemented to remove respiratory motion artifacts. Results: Digital tomosynthesis slices appeared similar to coincident CBCT planes and yielded substantially more anatomic information than either kilovoltage or megavoltage radiographs. Breath-hold DTS acquisition improved soft-tissue visibility by suppressing respiratory motion. Conclusions: Improved bony and soft-tissue visibility in DTS images is likely to improve target localization compared with radiographic verification techniques and might allow for daily localization of a soft-tissue target. Breath-hold DTS is a potential alternative to on-board CBCT for sites prone to respiratory motion

  8. A Study of Residual Image in Charged-Coupled Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Jin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available For an image sensor CCD, electrons can be trapped at the front-side Si-SiO_2 surface interface in a case of exceeding the full well by bright source. Residual images can be made by the electrons remaining in the interface. These residual images are seen in the front-side-illuminated CCDs especially. It is not easy to find a quantitative analysis for this phenomenon in the domestic reports, although it is able to contaminate observation data. In this study, we find residual images in dark frames which were obtained from the front-side-illuminated CCD at Mt. Lemmon Optical Astronomy Observatory (LOAO, and analyze the effect to contaminated observation data by residual charges.

  9. Monitoring of biofilm formation on different material surfaces of medical devices using hyperspectral imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hyun; Kim, Moon S.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2012-03-01

    Contamination of the inner surface of indwelling (implanted) medical devices by microbial biofilm is a serious problem. Some microbial bacteria such as Escherichia coli form biofilms that lead to potentially lifethreatening infections. Other types of medical devices such as bronchoscopes and duodenoscopes account for the highest number of reported endoscopic infections where microbial biofilm is one of the major causes for these infections. We applied a hyperspectral imaging method to detect biofilm contamination on the surface of several common materials used for medical devices. Such materials include stainless steel, titanium, and stainless-steeltitanium alloy. Potential uses of hyperspectral imaging technique to monitor biofilm attachment to different material surfaces are discussed.

  10. Image-based surveillance and security systems using personal computers for device aiming and digital image comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiett, S.; Axtell, L.H.

    1987-01-01

    A detection-type security system using enhanced capability cameras or other imaging devices can aid in maintaining security from long distance and/or for large areas. To do so requires that the imaging device(s) be repeatedly and accurately positioned so that no areas are overlooked. Digital control using personal computers is the simplest method of achieving positional accuracy. The monitoring of large areas and/or a large number of areas also requires that a substantial quantity of visual information be catalogued and evaluated for potential security problems. While security personnel alone are typically used for such monitoring, as the quantity of visual information increases, the likelihood that potential security threats will be missed also increases. The ability of an image-based security system to detect potential security problems can be further increased with the use of selected image processing techniques. Utilizing personal computers for both imaging device position control as well as image processing, surveillance of large areas can be performed by a limited number of individuals with a high level of system confidence

  11. Evaluation of usefulness of portal image using Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) in the patients who received pelvic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Heon Jong; Park, Seong Young; Cho, Young Kap; Loh, John J. K.; Park, Won; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of electronic portal imaging device through objective compare of the images acquired using an EPID and a conventional port film. From Apr. to Oct. 1997, a total of 150 sets of images from 20 patients who received radiation therapy in the pelvis area were evaluated in the Inha University Hospital and Severance Hospital. A dual image recording technique was devised to obtain both electronic portal images and port film images simultaneously with one treatment course. We did not perform double exposure. Five to ten images were acquired from each patient. All images were acquired from posteroanterior (PA) view except images from two patients. A dose rate of 100-300 MU/min and a 10-MV X-ray beam were used and 2-10 MUs were required to produce a verification image during treatment. Kodak diagnostic film with metal/film imaging cassette which was located on the top of the EPID detector was used for the port film. The source to detector distance was 140 cm. Eight anatomical landmarks (pelvic brim, sacrum, acetabulum, iliopectineal line, symphysis, ischium, obturator foramen, sacroiliac joint) were assessed. Four radiation oncologist joined to evaluate each image. The individual landmarks in the port film or in the EPID were rated-very clear (1), clear (2), visible (3), notclear (4), not visible (5). Using an video camera based EPID system, there was no difference of image quality between no enhanced EPID images and port film images. However, when we provided some change with window level for the portal image, the visibility of the sacrum and obturator foramen was improved in the portal images than in the port film images. All anatomical landmarks were more visible in the portal images than in the port film when we applied the CLAHE mode enhancement. The images acquired using an matrix ion chamber type EPID were also improved image quality after window level adjustment. The quality of image acquired using an electronic portal imaging device was

  12. Preliminary results on tests of a Cerenkov ring imaging device employing a photoionizing PWC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durkin, S.; Honma, A.; Leith, D.W.G.S.

    1978-08-01

    A brief description of techniques and problems of ring imaging Cerenkov detectors employing photoionizing PWC's is discussed. Preliminary results on a one dimensional ring imaging device tested at SLAC in May and June of 1978 are then presented. These results include rough measurements of the Cerenkov ring in nitrogen, argon, neon, and helium produced by a collimated positron beam.

  13. Positron annihilation imaging device using multiple offset rings of detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    A means is provided for recording more than one tomographic image simultaneously through different cross-sections of a patient, using positron emission tomography. Separate rings of detectors are used to construct every odd-numbered slice, and coincident events that occur between adjacent rings of detectors provide a center or even-numbered slice. Detector rings are offset with respect to one another by half the angular separation of the detectors, allowing an image to be reconstructed from the central slice without the necessity of physically rotating the detector array while accumulating data

  14. Three-dimensional image acquisition and reconstruction system on a mobile device based on computer-generated integral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdenebat, Munkh-Uchral; Kim, Byeong-Jun; Piao, Yan-Ling; Park, Seo-Yeon; Kwon, Ki-Chul; Piao, Mei-Lan; Yoo, Kwan-Hee; Kim, Nam

    2017-10-01

    A mobile three-dimensional image acquisition and reconstruction system using a computer-generated integral imaging technique is proposed. A depth camera connected to the mobile device acquires the color and depth data of a real object simultaneously, and an elemental image array is generated based on the original three-dimensional information for the object, with lens array specifications input into the mobile device. The three-dimensional visualization of the real object is reconstructed on the mobile display through optical or digital reconstruction methods. The proposed system is implemented successfully and the experimental results certify that the system is an effective and interesting method of displaying real three-dimensional content on a mobile device.

  15. A simple device for the stereoscopic display of 3D CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haveri, M.; Suramo, I.; Laehde, S.; Karhula, V.; Junila, J.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a simple device for creating true 3D views of image pairs obtained at 3D CT reconstruction. The device presents the images in a slightly different angle of view for the left and the right eyes. This true 3D viewing technique was applied experimentally in the evaluation of complex acetabular fractures. Experiments were also made to determine the optimal angle between the images for each eye. The angle varied between 1 and 7 for different observers and also depended on the display field of view used. (orig.)

  16. Using an Elastic Band Device After a Severe Obstetric Pubic Symphyseal Separation: Clinical and Imaging Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasbleiz, Jeremy; Sevestre, François-Xavier; Moquet, Pierre-Yves

    2017-09-01

    Severe separation of the pubic symphysis is a rare delivery complication. Facing this pathology, we decided to study a new elastic band device. To evaluate the elastic band device, clinical (pain-rated) and imaging (magnetic resonance imaging and radiography) evaluations with and without the device were performed. The elastic band device is a European Conformity-certified medical device, which is made of neoprene straps, that reduces the mobility of the pelvis and the use of the internal rotator muscles. Once the elastic band device was in place, on postpartum day 1, radiography showed a decrease of the pubic width from 41 to 12 mm. Furthermore, pain decreased from 10 of 10 to 2 of 10 in 2 days, allowing the patient to ambulate and avoid surgery. After 1 month, the pubic width (6 mm) and anatomy were recovered but minor pain was still present with hip rotatory movements. The elastic band device was worn 24 hours a day from postpartum days 1-90 and 12 hours a day from postpartum days 90 to 150; afterward, the patient returned to normal life without the elastic band device. Use of an elastic band device was associated with a reduction of the pubic width and pain associated after obstetric pubic symphysis separation.

  17. Features Speech Signature Image Recognition on Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mikhailovich Alyushin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The algorithms fordynamic spectrograms images recognition, processing and soundspeech signature (SS weredeveloped. The software for mobile phones, thatcan recognize speech signatureswas prepared. The investigation of the SS recognition speed on its boundarytypes was conducted. Recommendations on the boundary types choice in the optimal ratio of recognitionspeed and required space were given.

  18. ClearPEM: prototype PET device dedicated to breast imaging

    CERN Multimedia

    Joao Varela

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials have begun in Portugal on a new breast imaging system (ClearPEM) using positron emission tomography (PET). The system, developed by a Portuguese consortium in collaboration with CERN and laboratories participating in the Crystal Clear collaboration, will detect even the smallest tumours and thus help avoid unnecessary biopsies.

  19. Raspberry Pi: a 35-dollar device for viewing DICOM images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omir Antunes Paiva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Raspberry Pi is a low-cost computer created with educational purposes. It uses Linux and, most of times, freeware applications, particularly a software for viewing DICOM images. With an external monitor, the supported resolution (1920 × 1200 pixels allows for the set up of simple viewing workstations at a reduced cost.

  20. Computer processing of image captured by the passive THz imaging device as an effective tool for its de-noising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.; Kuchik, Igor E.; Zhang, Cun-lin; Deng, Chao; Zhao, Yuan-meng; Zhang, Xin

    2012-12-01

    As it is well-known, passive THz imaging devices have big potential for solution of the security problem. Nevertheless, one of the main problems, which take place on the way of using these devices, consists in the low image quality of developed passive THz camera. To change this situation, it is necessary to improve the engineering characteristics (resolution, sensitivity and so on) of the THz camera or to use computer processing of the image. In our opinion, the last issue is more preferable because it is more inexpensive. Below we illustrate possibility of suppression of the noise of the image captured by three THz passive camera developed in CNU (Beijing. China). After applying the computer processing of the image, its quality enhances many times. Achieved quality in many cases becomes enough for the detection of the object hidden under opaque clothes. We stress that the performance of developed computer code is enough high and does not restrict the performance of passive THz imaging device. The obtained results demonstrate the high efficiency of our approach for the detection of hidden objects and they are a very promising solution for the security problem. Nevertheless, developing the new spatial filter for treatment of the THz image remains a modern problem at present time.

  1. Characterization of a high-elbow, fluoroscopic electronic portal imaging device for portal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, J.C.J. de; Visser, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    The application of a newly developed fluoroscopic (CCD-camera based) electronic portal imaging device (EPID) in portal dosimetry is investigated. A description of the EPID response to dose is presented in terms of stability, linearity and optical cross-talk inside the mechanical structure. The EPID has a relatively large distance (41 cm on-axis) between the fluorescent screen and the mirror (high-elbow), which results in cross-talk with properties quite different from that of the low-elbow fluoroscopic EPIDs that have been studied in the literature. In contrast with low-elbow systems, the maximum cross-talk is observed for points of the fluorescent screen that have the largest distance to the mirror, which is explained from the geometry of the system. An algorithm to convert the images of the EPID into portal dose images (PDIs) is presented. The correction applied for cross-talk is a position-dependent additive operation on the EPID image pixel values, with a magnitude that depends on a calculated effective field width. Deconvolution with a point spread function, as applied for low-elbow systems, is not required. For a 25 MV beam, EPID PDIs and ionization chamber measurements in the EPID detector plane were obtained behind an anthropomorphic phantom and a homogeneous absorber for various field shapes. The difference in absolute dose between the EPID and ionization chamber measurements, averaged over the four test fields presented in this paper, was 0.1±0.5% (1 SD) over the entire irradiation field, with no deviation larger than 2%. (author)

  2. The use of an electronic portal imaging device for exit dosimetry and quality control measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, Michael C.; Williams, Peter C.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To determine ways in which electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) could be used to (a) measure exit doses for external beam radiotherapy and (b) perform quality control checks on linear accelerators. Methods and Materials: When imaging, our fluoroscopic EPID adjusts the gain, offset, and frame acquisition time of the charge coupled device (CCD) camera automatically, to allow for the range of photon transmissions through the patient, and to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio. However, our EPID can be programmed to act as an integrating dosemeter. EPID dosemeter measurements were made for 20 MV photons, for different field sizes and thicknesses of unit density phantom material placed at varying exit surface to detector distances. These were compared with simultaneous Silicon diode exit dose measurements. Our exit dosimetry technique was verified using an anthropomorphic type phantom, and some initial measurements have been made for patients treated with irregularly shaped 20 MV x-ray fields. In this dosimetry mode, our EPID was also used to measure certain quality control parameters, x-ray field flatness, and the verification of segmented intensity modulated field prescriptions. Results: Configured for dosimetry, our EPID exhibited a highly linear response, capable of resolving individual monitor units. Exit doses could be measured to within about 3% of that measured using Silicon diodes. Field flatness was determined to within 1.5% of Farmer dosemeter measurements. Segmented intensity modulated fields can be easily verified. Conclusions: Our EPID has the versatility to assess a range of parameters pertinent to the delivery of high quality, high precision radiotherapy. When configured appropriately, it can measure exit doses in vivo, with reasonable accuracy, perform certain quick quality control checks, and analyze segmented intensity modulated treatment fields

  3. An improved three-dimensional non-scanning laser imaging system based on digital micromirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wenze; Han, Shaokun; Lei, Jieyu; Zhai, Yu; Timofeev, Alexander N.

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, there are two main methods to realize three-dimensional non-scanning laser imaging detection, which are detection method based on APD and detection method based on Streak Tube. However, the detection method based on APD possesses some disadvantages, such as small number of pixels, big pixel interval and complex supporting circuit. The detection method based on Streak Tube possesses some disadvantages, such as big volume, bad reliability and high cost. In order to resolve the above questions, this paper proposes an improved three-dimensional non-scanning laser imaging system based on Digital Micromirror Device. In this imaging system, accurate control of laser beams and compact design of imaging structure are realized by several quarter-wave plates and a polarizing beam splitter. The remapping fiber optics is used to sample the image plane of receiving optical lens, and transform the image into line light resource, which can realize the non-scanning imaging principle. The Digital Micromirror Device is used to convert laser pulses from temporal domain to spatial domain. The CCD with strong sensitivity is used to detect the final reflected laser pulses. In this paper, we also use an algorithm which is used to simulate this improved laser imaging system. In the last, the simulated imaging experiment demonstrates that this improved laser imaging system can realize three-dimensional non-scanning laser imaging detection.

  4. Dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device for verification of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, Peter B.; Popescu, Carmen C.

    2003-01-01

    Dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for verification of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery were investigated. The EPID was utilized with continuous frame-averaging during the beam delivery. Properties studied included effect of buildup, dose linearity, field size response, sampling of rapid multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf speeds, response to dose-rate fluctuations, memory effect, and reproducibility. The dependence of response on EPID calibration and a dead time in image frame acquisition occurring every 64 frames were measured. EPID measurements were also compared to ion chamber and film for open and wedged static fields and IMRT fields. The EPID was linear with dose and dose rate, and response to MLC leaf speeds up to 2.5 cm s-1 was found to be linear. A field size dependent response of up to 5% relative to d max ion-chamber measurement was found. Reproducibility was within 0.8% (1 standard deviation) for an IMRT delivery recorded at intervals over a period of one month. The dead time in frame acquisition resulted in errors in the EPID that increased with leaf speed and were over 20% for a 1 cm leaf gap moving at 1.0 cm s-1. The EPID measurements were also found to depend on the input beam profile utilized for EPID flood-field calibration. The EPID shows promise as a device for verification of IMRT, the major limitation currently being due to dead-time in frame acquisition

  5. Method using in vivo quantitative spectroscopy to guide design and optimization of low-cost, compact clinical imaging devices: emulation and evaluation of multispectral imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saager, Rolf B.; Baldado, Melissa L.; Rowland, Rebecca A.; Kelly, Kristen M.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2018-04-01

    With recent proliferation in compact and/or low-cost clinical multispectral imaging approaches and commercially available components, questions remain whether they adequately capture the requisite spectral content of their applications. We present a method to emulate the spectral range and resolution of a variety of multispectral imagers, based on in-vivo data acquired from spatial frequency domain spectroscopy (SFDS). This approach simulates spectral responses over 400 to 1100 nm. Comparing emulated data with full SFDS spectra of in-vivo tissue affords the opportunity to evaluate whether the sparse spectral content of these imagers can (1) account for all sources of optical contrast present (completeness) and (2) robustly separate and quantify sources of optical contrast (crosstalk). We validate the approach over a range of tissue-simulating phantoms, comparing the SFDS-based emulated spectra against measurements from an independently characterized multispectral imager. Emulated results match the imager across all phantoms (<3 % absorption, <1 % reduced scattering). In-vivo test cases (burn wounds and photoaging) illustrate how SFDS can be used to evaluate different multispectral imagers. This approach provides an in-vivo measurement method to evaluate the performance of multispectral imagers specific to their targeted clinical applications and can assist in the design and optimization of new spectral imaging devices.

  6. Improving image reviewing with a new system (Emoss, Memobank and Movicom devices)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, G.; Otto, P.; Gourlez, P.; Taillade, B.

    1991-01-01

    The need is obvious for selecting the relevant images and/or items of information from among the overwhelming amount produced by C/S systems, mainly video cameras. Image reviewing in-field provides timeless while image reviewing at headquarters is used for confirming the validity of the conclusions drawn. There is also, in many cases, a need to improve the quality of the images. The Emoss and Memobank devices developed by Himatom could be the core of this new system, with its optimized digital storage which greatly improves image quality. These devices, which are compatible with existing systems such as MIVS and MUX, have the following advantages: comprehensive storage of scenes is comparable to the video tape recording; intelligent digital storage facilitates in-field reviewing; recoverable disc storage makes it possible to carry out the review at Headquarters; printing of the events helps reviewing. The Emoss and Memobank can be triggered by external information by other systems

  7. RF Device for Acquiring Images of the Human Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, Todd C.; McGrath, William R.

    2010-01-01

    A safe, non-invasive method for forming images through clothing of large groups of people, in order to search for concealed weapons either made of metal or not, has been developed. A millimeter wavelength scanner designed in a unique, ring-shaped configuration can obtain a full 360 image of the body with a resolution of less than a millimeter in only a few seconds. Millimeter waves readily penetrate normal clothing, but are highly reflected by the human body and concealed objects. Millimeter wave signals are nonionizing and are harmless to human tissues when used at low power levels. The imager (see figure) consists of a thin base that supports a small-diameter vertical post about 7 ft (=2.13 m) tall. Attached to the post is a square-shaped ring 2 in. (=5 cm) wide and 3 ft (=91 cm) on a side. The ring is oriented horizontally, and is supported halfway along one side by a connection to a linear bearing on the vertical post. A planar RF circuit board is mounted to the inside of each side of the ring. Each circuit board contains an array of 30 receivers, one transmitter, and digitization electronics. Each array element has a printed-circuit patch antenna coupled to a pair of mixers by a 90 coupler. The mixers receive a reference local oscillator signal to a subharmonic of the transmitter frequency. A single local oscillator line feeds all 30 receivers on the board. The resulting MHz IF signals are amplified and carried to the edge of the board where they are demodulated and digitized. The transmitted signal is derived from the local oscillator at a frequency offset determined by a crystal oscillator. One antenna centrally located on each side of the square ring provides the source illumination power. The total transmitted power is less than 100 mW, resulting in an exposure level that is completely safe to humans. The output signals from all four circuit boards are fed via serial connection to a data processing computer. The computer processes the approximately 1-MB

  8. Device fabrication, characterization, and thermal neutron detection response of LiZnP and LiZnAs semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montag, Benjamin W., E-mail: bmontag@ksu.edu; Ugorowski, Philip B.; Nelson, Kyle A.; Edwards, Nathaniel S.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2016-11-11

    Nowotny-Juza compounds continue to be explored as candidates for solid-state neutron detectors. Such a device would have greater efficiency, in a compact form, than present day gas-filled {sup 3}He and {sup 10}BF{sub 3} detectors. The {sup 6}Li(n,t){sup 4}He reaction yields a total Q-value of 4.78 MeV, larger than {sup 10}B, an energy easily identified above background radiations. Hence, devices fabricated from semiconductor compounds having either natural Li (nominally 7.5% {sup 6}Li) or enriched {sup 6}Li (usually 95% {sup 6}Li) as constituent atoms may provide a material for compact high efficiency neutron detectors. Starting material was synthesized by preparing equimolar portions of Li, Zn, and As sealed under vacuum (10{sup −6} Torr) in quartz ampoules lined with boron nitride and subsequently reacted in a compounding furnace [1]. The raw synthesized material indicated the presence high impurity levels (material and electrical property characterizations). A static vacuum sublimation in quartz was performed to help purify the synthesized material [2,3]. Bulk crystalline samples were grown from the purified material [4,5]. Samples were cut using a diamond wire saw, and processed into devices. Bulk resistivity was determined from I–V curve measurements, ranging from 10{sup 6}–10{sup 11} Ω cm. Devices were characterized for sensitivity to 5.48 MeV alpha particles, 337 nm laser light, and neutron sensitivity in a thermal neutron diffracted beam at the Kansas State University TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor. Thermal neutron reaction product charge induction was measured with a LiZnP device, and the reaction product spectral response was observed. - Highlights: • Devices were fabricated from in-house synthesized and purified LiZnAs and LiZnP. • Devices ranged in bulk resistivity from 10{sup 6}–10{sup 11} Ω cm. • Devices showed sensitivity to 5.48 MeV alpha particles. • Devices were characterized with a 337 nm laser light. • Devices were evaluated

  9. A review of performance of near-infrared fluorescence imaging devices used in clinical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, B

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) molecular imaging holds great promise as a new “point-of-care” medical imaging modality that can potentially provide the sensitivity of nuclear medicine techniques, but without the radioactivity that can otherwise place limitations of usage. Recently, NIRF imaging devices of a variety of designs have emerged in the market and in investigational clinical studies using indocyanine green (ICG) as a non-targeting NIRF contrast agent to demark the blood and lymphatic vasculatures both non-invasively and intraoperatively. Approved in the USA since 1956 for intravenous administration, ICG has been more recently used off label in intradermal or subcutaneous administrations for fluorescence imaging of the lymphatic vasculature and lymph nodes. Herein, we summarize the devices of a variety of designs, summarize their performance in lymphatic imaging in a tabular format and comment on necessary efforts to develop standards for device performance to compare and use these emerging devices in future, NIRF molecular imaging studies. PMID:25410320

  10. X-ray imaging device for one-dimensional and two-dimensional radioscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The X-ray imaging device for the selectable one-dimensional or two-dimensional pictures of objects illuminated by X-rays, comprising an X-ray source, an X-ray screen, and an opto-electrical picture development device placed behind the screen, is characterized by an anamorphotic optical system, which is positioned with a one-dimensional illumination between the X-ray screen and the opto-electrical device and that a two-dimensional illumination will be developed, and that in view of the lens system which forms part of the opto-electrical device, there is placed an X-ray screen in a specified beam direction so that a magnified image may be formed by equalisation of the distance between the X-ray screen and the lens system. (G.C.)

  11. Implementation of synthetic aperture imaging on a hand-held device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Kjeldsen, Thomas; Larsen, Lee

    2014-01-01

    -held devices all with different chipsets and a BK Medical UltraView 800 ultrasound scanner emulating a wireless probe. The wireless transmission is benchmarked using an imaging setup consisting of 269 scan lines x 1472 complex samples (1.58 MB pr. frame, 16 frames per second). The measured data throughput...... reached an average of 28.8 MB/s using a LG G2 mobile device, which is more than the required data throughput of 25.3 MB/s. Benchmarking the processing performance for B-mode imaging showed a total processing time of 18.9 ms (53 frames/s), which is less than the acquisition time (62.5 ms).......This paper presents several implementations of Syn- thetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming (SASB) on commer- cially available hand-held devices. The implementations include real-time wireless reception of ultrasound radio frequency sig- nals and GPU processing for B-mode imaging. The proposed...

  12. Device for forming the image of a radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosswill, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    An improvement can be made to the space resolution of systems providing the image of a radiation source by means of a slit collimator. In order to do so, a lateral movement of the collimator (with its detectors) is superimposed on the movement of the collimator, in a transversal direction in relation to the transmission direction through the collimator as well as in relation to the walls defining the slits. The total amplitude of the lateral movement is at least equal to the distance between centres of a slit and the following one. In the near field operating system, the lateral movement is a rectilinear movement perpendicular to the walls of the slits. In the distance field operating systems, it is an angular movement about an axis perpendicular to the direction of transmission through the slits [fr

  13. Transmission dosimetry with a liquid-filled electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boellaard, R.; Van Herk, M.; Mijnheer, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of transmission dosimetry is to correlate transmission dose values with patient dose values. A liquid-filled electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been developed. After determination of the dose response relationship, i.e. the relation between pixel value and dose rate, for clinical situations it was found that the EPID is applicable for two-dimensional dosimetry with an accuracy of about 1%. The aim of this study was to investigate transmission dose distributions at different phantom-detector distances to predict exit dose distributions from transmission dose images. An extensive set of transmission dose measurements below homogeneous phantoms were performed with the EPID. The influence of several parameters such as field size, phantom thickness, phantom-detector distance and phantom-source distance on the transmission dose and its distribution were investigated. The two-dimensional transmission dose images were separated into two components: a primary dose and a scattered dose distribution. It was found that the scattered dose is maximal at a phantom thickness of about 10 cm. The scattered dose distribution below a homogeneous phantom has a Gaussian shape. The width of the Gaussian is small at small phantom-detector distances and increases for larger phantom-detector distances. The dependence of the scattered dose distribution on the field size at various phantom-detector distances has been used to estimate the dose distribution at the exit site of the phantom. More work is underway to determine the exit dose distributions for clinical situations, including the presence of inhomogeneities

  14. Transmission dosimetry with a liquid-filled electronic portal imaging device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boellaard, R; Van Herk, M; Mijnheer, B J [Nederlands Kanker Inst. ` Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis` , Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-12-01

    The aim of transmission dosimetry is to correlate transmission dose values with patient dose values. A liquid-filled electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been developed. After determination of the dose response relationship, i.e. the relation between pixel value and dose rate, for clinical situations it was found that the EPID is applicable for two-dimensional dosimetry with an accuracy of about 1%. The aim of this study was to investigate transmission dose distributions at different phantom-detector distances to predict exit dose distributions from transmission dose images. An extensive set of transmission dose measurements below homogeneous phantoms were performed with the EPID. The influence of several parameters such as field size, phantom thickness, phantom-detector distance and phantom-source distance on the transmission dose and its distribution were investigated. The two-dimensional transmission dose images were separated into two components: a primary dose and a scattered dose distribution. It was found that the scattered dose is maximal at a phantom thickness of about 10 cm. The scattered dose distribution below a homogeneous phantom has a Gaussian shape. The width of the Gaussian is small at small phantom-detector distances and increases for larger phantom-detector distances. The dependence of the scattered dose distribution on the field size at various phantom-detector distances has been used to estimate the dose distribution at the exit site of the phantom. More work is underway to determine the exit dose distributions for clinical situations, including the presence of inhomogeneities.

  15. Characterization of a direct detection device imaging camera for transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milazzo, Anna-Clare, E-mail: amilazzo@ncmir.ucsd.edu [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Moldovan, Grigore [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Lanman, Jason [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Jin, Liang; Bouwer, James C. [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Klienfelder, Stuart [University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Peltier, Steven T.; Ellisman, Mark H. [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Kirkland, Angus I. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Xuong, Nguyen-Huu [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The complete characterization of a novel direct detection device (DDD) camera for transmission electron microscopy is reported, for the first time at primary electron energies of 120 and 200 keV. Unlike a standard charge coupled device (CCD) camera, this device does not require a scintillator. The DDD transfers signal up to 65 lines/mm providing the basis for a high-performance platform for a new generation of wide field-of-view high-resolution cameras. An image of a thin section of virus particles is presented to illustrate the substantially improved performance of this sensor over current indirectly coupled CCD cameras.

  16. Characterization of a direct detection device imaging camera for transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Moldovan, Grigore; Lanman, Jason; Jin, Liang; Bouwer, James C.; Klienfelder, Stuart; Peltier, Steven T.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Kirkland, Angus I.; Xuong, Nguyen-Huu

    2010-01-01

    The complete characterization of a novel direct detection device (DDD) camera for transmission electron microscopy is reported, for the first time at primary electron energies of 120 and 200 keV. Unlike a standard charge coupled device (CCD) camera, this device does not require a scintillator. The DDD transfers signal up to 65 lines/mm providing the basis for a high-performance platform for a new generation of wide field-of-view high-resolution cameras. An image of a thin section of virus particles is presented to illustrate the substantially improved performance of this sensor over current indirectly coupled CCD cameras.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of implantable cardiac rhythm devices at 3.0 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbel, J Rod

    2008-07-01

    A relaxation of the prohibition of scanning cardiac rhythm device patients is underway, largely because of the growing experience of safe scanning events at 1.5T. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3T is becoming more common and may pose a different risk profile and outcome of MRI of cardiac device patients. No restrictions were placed on pacemaker dependency, region scanned, device type, or manufacturer. Sixteen scans at 3T were performed with an electrophysiologist present on 14 patients with a variety of devices from various manufacturers. An "MRI-S" strategy was used. Multimodal monitoring was required. Device interrogation was performed prior to, immediately after, and 1-3 months after the MRI. For nonpacemaker-dependent device patients, attempts were made to turn all device features off (with OOO programming the goal) conceptually rendering the device "invisible." In pacemaker-dependent patients, the device was programmed to asynchronous mode at highest output for the duration of the scan with the goal of rendering the device conceptually "invulnerable" to MRI effects. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was limited to 2W/kg. All patients were successfully scanned. No arrhythmias were noted. No significant change in the programmed parameters, pacing thresholds, sensing, impedance, or battery parameters was noted. The insertable loop recorder (ILR) recorded prolonged artifactual asystole during MRI. One patient noted chest burning during the scan. Device patients may undergo carefully tailored 3T MRI scans when pre-MRI reprogramming of the device occurs in conjunction with extensive monitoring, supervision, and follow-up.

  18. Estimation of four-dimensional dose distribution using electronic portal imaging device in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Asumi; Arimura, Hidetaka; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    We are developing a method to evaluate four-dimensional radiation dose distribution in a patient body based upon the animated image of EPID (electronic portal imaging device) which is an image of beam-direction at the irradiation. In the first place, we have obtained the image of the dose which is emitted from patient body at therapy planning using therapy planning CT image and dose evaluation algorism. In the second place, we have estimated the emission dose image at the irradiation using EPID animated image which is obtained at the irradiation. In the third place, we have got an affine transformation matrix including respiratory movement in the body by performing linear registration on the emission dose image at therapy planning to get the one at the irradiation. In the fourth place, we have applied the affine transformation matrix on the therapy planning CT image and estimated the CT image 'at irradiation'. Finally we have evaluated four-dimensional dose distribution by calculating dose distribution in the CT image 'at irradiation' which has been estimated for each frame of the EPID animated-image. This scheme may be useful for evaluating therapy results and risk management. (author)

  19. Features and limitations of mobile tablet devices for viewing radiological images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, J H

    2015-03-01

    Mobile radiological image display systems are becoming increasingly common, necessitating a comparison of the features of these systems, specifically the operating system employed, connection to stationary PACS, data security and rang of image display and image analysis functions. In the fall of 2013, a total of 17 PACS suppliers were surveyed regarding the technical features of 18 mobile radiological image display systems using a standardized questionnaire. The study also examined to what extent the technical specifications of the mobile image display systems satisfy the provisions of the Germany Medical Devices Act as well as the provisions of the German X-ray ordinance (RöV). There are clear differences in terms of how the mobile systems connected to the stationary PACS. Web-based solutions allow the mobile image display systems to function independently of their operating systems. The examined systems differed very little in terms of image display and image analysis functions. Mobile image display systems complement stationary PACS and can be used to view images. The impacts of the new quality assurance guidelines (QS-RL) as well as the upcoming new standard DIN 6868 - 157 on the acceptance testing of mobile image display units for the purpose of image evaluation are discussed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Blindness and Selective Mutism: One Student's Response to Voice-Output Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Mary; Johnson, Ashli; Herzberg, Tina

    2014-01-01

    This case study was designed to measure the response of one student with blindness and selective mutism to the intervention of voice-output devices across two years and two different teachers in two instructional settings. Before the introduction of the voice output devices, the student did not choose to communicate using spoken language or…

  1. Optimisation of the imaging and dosimetric characteristics of an electronic portal imaging device employing plastic scintillating fibres using Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, S J; McNamara, A L; Vial, P; Holloway, L; Kuncic, Z

    2014-11-21

    A Monte Carlo model of a novel electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been developed using Geant4 and its performance for imaging and dosimetry applications in radiotherapy has been characterised. The EPID geometry is based on a physical prototype under ongoing investigation and comprises an array of plastic scintillating fibres in place of the metal plate/phosphor screen in standard EPIDs. Geometrical and optical transport parameters were varied to investigate their impact on imaging and dosimetry performance. Detection efficiency was most sensitive to variations in fibre length, achieving a peak value of 36% at 50 mm using 400 keV x-rays for the lengths considered. Increases in efficiency for longer fibres were partially offset by reductions in sensitivity. Removing the extra-mural absorber surrounding individual fibres severely decreased the modulation transfer function (MTF), highlighting its importance in maximising spatial resolution. Field size response and relative dose profile simulations demonstrated a water-equivalent dose response and thus the prototype's suitability for dosimetry applications. Element-to-element mismatch between scintillating fibres and underlying photodiode pixels resulted in a reduced MTF for high spatial frequencies and quasi-periodic variations in dose profile response. This effect is eliminated when fibres are precisely matched to underlying pixels. Simulations strongly suggest that with further optimisation, this prototype EPID may be capable of simultaneous imaging and dosimetry in radiotherapy.

  2. Optimisation of the imaging and dosimetric characteristics of an electronic portal imaging device employing plastic scintillating fibres using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, S. J.; McNamara, A. L.; Vial, P.; Holloway, L.; Kuncic, Z.

    2014-11-01

    A Monte Carlo model of a novel electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been developed using Geant4 and its performance for imaging and dosimetry applications in radiotherapy has been characterised. The EPID geometry is based on a physical prototype under ongoing investigation and comprises an array of plastic scintillating fibres in place of the metal plate/phosphor screen in standard EPIDs. Geometrical and optical transport parameters were varied to investigate their impact on imaging and dosimetry performance. Detection efficiency was most sensitive to variations in fibre length, achieving a peak value of 36% at 50 mm using 400 keV x-rays for the lengths considered. Increases in efficiency for longer fibres were partially offset by reductions in sensitivity. Removing the extra-mural absorber surrounding individual fibres severely decreased the modulation transfer function (MTF), highlighting its importance in maximising spatial resolution. Field size response and relative dose profile simulations demonstrated a water-equivalent dose response and thus the prototype’s suitability for dosimetry applications. Element-to-element mismatch between scintillating fibres and underlying photodiode pixels resulted in a reduced MTF for high spatial frequencies and quasi-periodic variations in dose profile response. This effect is eliminated when fibres are precisely matched to underlying pixels. Simulations strongly suggest that with further optimisation, this prototype EPID may be capable of simultaneous imaging and dosimetry in radiotherapy.

  3. Response of asymmetric carbon nanotube network devices to sub-terahertz and terahertz radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayduchenko, I.; Kardakova, A.; Voronov, B.; Finkel, M.; Fedorov, G.; Jiménez, D.; Morozov, S.; Presniakov, M.; Goltsman, G.

    2015-01-01

    Demand for efficient terahertz radiation detectors resulted in intensive study of the asymmetric carbon nanostructures as a possible solution for that problem. It was maintained that photothermoelectric effect under certain conditions results in strong response of such devices to terahertz radiation even at room temperature. In this work, we investigate different mechanisms underlying the response of asymmetric carbon nanotube (CNT) based devices to sub-terahertz and terahertz radiation. Our structures are formed with CNT networks instead of individual CNTs so that effects probed are more generic and not caused by peculiarities of an individual nanoscale object. We conclude that the DC voltage response observed in our structures is not only thermal in origin. So called diode-type response caused by asymmetry of the device IV characteristic turns out to be dominant at room temperature. Quantitative analysis provides further routes for the optimization of the device configuration, which may result in appearance of novel terahertz radiation detectors

  4. Cervical external immobilization devices: evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging issues at 3.0 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Francis L; Tweardy, Lisa; Shellock, Frank G

    2010-02-15

    Laboratory investigation, ex vivo. Currently, no studies have addressed the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) issues for cervical external immobilization devices at 3-Tesla. Under certain conditions significant heating may occur, resulting in patient burns. Furthermore, artifacts can be substantial and prevent the diagnostic use of MRI. Therefore, the objective of this investigation was to evaluate MRI issues for 4 different cervical external immobilization devices at 3-Tesla. Excessive heating and substantial artifacts are 2 potential complications associated with performing MRI at 3-Tesla in patients with cervical external immobilization devices. Using ex vivo testing techniques, MRI-related heating and artifacts were evaluated for 4 different cervical devices during MRI at 3-Tesla. Four cervical external immobilization devices (Generation 80, Resolve Ring and Superstructure, Resolve Ring and Jerome Vest/Jerome Superstructure, and the V1 Halo System; Ossur Americas, Aliso Viejo, CA) underwent MRI testing at 3-Tesla. All devices were made from nonmetallic or nonmagnetic materials. Heating was determined using a gelled-saline-filled skull phantom with fluoroptic thermometry probes attached to the skull pins. MRI was performed at 3-Tesla, using a high level of RF energy. Artifacts were assessed at 3-Tesla, using standard cervical imaging techniques. The Generation 80 and V1 Halo devices exhibited substantial temperature rises (11.6 degrees C and 8.5 degrees C, respectively), with "sparking" evident for the Generation 80 during the MRI procedure. Artifacts were problematic for these devices, as well. By comparison, the 2 Resolve Ring-based cervical external immobilization devices showed little or no heating (Tesla.

  5. Possible way for increasing the quality of imaging from THz passive device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.; Deng, Chao; Zhao, Yuan-meng; Zhang, Cun-lin; Zhang, Xin

    2011-11-01

    Using the passive THz imaging system developed by the CNU-THz laboratory, we capture the passive THz image of human body with forbidden objects hidden under opaque clothes. We demonstrate the possibility of significant improving the quality of the image. Our approach bases on the application of spatial filters, developed by us for computer treatment of passive THz imaging. The THz imaging system is constructed with accordance to well known passive THz imaging principles and to the THz quasi-optical theory. It contains a scanning mechanism, which has a detector approximately with 1200μm central wavelength, a data acquisition card and a microcomputer. To get a clear imaging of object we apply a sequence of the spatial filters to the image and spectral transforms of the image. The treatment of imaging from the passive THz device is made by computer code. The performance time of treatment of the image, containing about 5000 pixels, is less than 0.1 second. To illustrate the efficiency of developed approach we detect the liquid explosive, knife, pistol and metal plate hidden under opaque clothes. The results obtained demonstrate the high efficiency of our approach for the detection and recognition of the hidden objects and are very promising for the real security application.

  6. Guide-09-1998. Quality control of darkrooms and image display devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This guide is applicable to process darkrooms relieved and receiving devices and image displays. A number of methods which require the appointed instrumentation described, some of which can be implemented in own radiology services in the country given the low complexity of themselves and others that require specific equipment and can be performed by specialized groups external to these units.

  7. Detection of fecal contamination on beef meat surfaces using handheld fluorescence imaging device (HFID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Mirae; Lee, Hoonsoo; Cho, Hyunjeong; Moon, Sang-Ho; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Moon S.

    2016-05-01

    Current meat inspection in slaughter plants, for food safety and quality attributes including potential fecal contamination, is conducted through by visual examination human inspectors. A handheld fluorescence-based imaging device (HFID) was developed to be an assistive tool for human inspectors by highlighting contaminated food and food contact surfaces on a display monitor. It can be used under ambient lighting conditions in food processing plants. Critical components of the imaging device includes four 405-nm 10-W LEDs for fluorescence excitation, a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, optical filter (670 nm used for this study), and Wi-Fi transmitter for broadcasting real-time video/images to monitoring devices such as smartphone and tablet. This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of HFID in enhancing visual detection of fecal contamination on red meat, fat, and bone surfaces of beef under varying ambient luminous intensities (0, 10, 30, 50 and 70 foot-candles). Overall, diluted feces on fat, red meat and bone areas of beef surfaces were detectable in the 670-nm single-band fluorescence images when using the HFID under 0 to 50 foot-candle ambient lighting.

  8. 77 FR 11588 - Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-831] Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission... Trade Commission on January 10, 2012, under section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, 19 U.S.C...

  9. 75 FR 39971 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Notice of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Inv. No. 337-TA-726] In the Matter of Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Notice of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of....S. International Trade Commission on May 13, 2010, under section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as...

  10. Detection of fecal contamination on beef meat surfaces using handheld fluorescence imaging device (HFID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current meat inspection in slaughter plants, for food safety and quality attributes including potential fecal contamination, is conducted through by visual examination human inspectors. A handheld fluorescence-based imaging device (HFID) was developed to be an assistive tool for human inspectors by ...

  11. Endovascular Device Testing with Particle Image Velocimetry Enhances Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Priya; Ankeny, Casey J.; Ryan, Justin; Okcay, Murat; Frakes, David H.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the use of a new system, HemoFlow™, which utilizes state of the art technologies such as particle image velocimetry to test endovascular devices as part of an undergraduate biomedical engineering curriculum. Students deployed an endovascular stent into an anatomical model of a cerebral aneurysm and measured intra-aneurysmal flow…

  12. A service protocol for post-processing of medical images on the mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Longjun; Ming, Xing; Xu, Lang; Liu, Qian

    2014-03-01

    With computing capability and display size growing, the mobile device has been used as a tool to help clinicians view patient information and medical images anywhere and anytime. It is uneasy and time-consuming for transferring medical images with large data size from picture archiving and communication system to mobile client, since the wireless network is unstable and limited by bandwidth. Besides, limited by computing capability, memory and power endurance, it is hard to provide a satisfactory quality of experience for radiologists to handle some complex post-processing of medical images on the mobile device, such as real-time direct interactive three-dimensional visualization. In this work, remote rendering technology is employed to implement the post-processing of medical images instead of local rendering, and a service protocol is developed to standardize the communication between the render server and mobile client. In order to make mobile devices with different platforms be able to access post-processing of medical images, the Extensible Markup Language is taken to describe this protocol, which contains four main parts: user authentication, medical image query/ retrieval, 2D post-processing (e.g. window leveling, pixel values obtained) and 3D post-processing (e.g. maximum intensity projection, multi-planar reconstruction, curved planar reformation and direct volume rendering). And then an instance is implemented to verify the protocol. This instance can support the mobile device access post-processing of medical image services on the render server via a client application or on the web page.

  13. Fast mega pixels video imaging of a toroidal plasma in KT5D device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Min; Wang Zhijiang; Lu Ronghua; Sun Xiang; Wen Yizhi; Yu Changxuan; Wan Shude; Liu Wandong; Wang Jun; Xiao Delong; Yu Yi; Zhu Zhenghua; Hu Linyin

    2005-01-01

    A direct imaging system, viewing visible light emission from plasmas tangentially or perpendicularly, has been set up on the KT5D toroidal device to monitor the real two-dimensional profiles of purely ECR generated plasmas. This system has a typical spatial resolution of 0.2 mm (1280x1024 pixels) when imaging the whole cross section. Interesting features of ECR plasmas have been found. Different from what classical theories have expected, a resonance layer with two or three bright spots, rather than an even vertical band, has been observed. In addition, images also indicate an intermittent splitting and drifting character of the plasmas

  14. Characteristics of NaI detector in positron imaging device HEADTOME employing circular ring array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Shuichi; Kanno, Iwao; Aizawa, Yasuo; Murakami, Matsutaro; Uemura, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    In positron emission computed tomographs employing circular ring arrays of detectors, the performance of the imaging device has been specified ultimately by the characteristics of the detector. The responses of NaI detector were studied when detecting positron annihilation photon (511 keV). The study was mainly by using the NaI detector used in hybrid emission computed tomography (CT) ''HEADTOME'' we had developed. A series of measurements were carried out positioning two detectors with 40 cm distance and scanning 22 Na point source in water. Both detectors was inclined from 0 0 through 30 0 to change incident angle of positron annihilation toward crystal face. Energy window was set from 100 to 700 keV. The results were presented as follows; 1 Shortening the crystal length from 7 to 5 cm made sensitivity decrease about 10% and resolution deteriorate about 1 mm (FWHM). 2 As the results of varying the width of the crystal, 20 mm width was optimal at any incident angle. 3 The lead septum between the detectors was the thickness of 4 mm enough to reject multiple detector interactions (crosstalk). 4 Beam mask which was made of lead in order to improve spatial resolution and placed on crystal face worked effectively for incident angles from 0 0 to 15 0 but degraded uniformity of spatial resolution from 0 0 to through 30 0 . (author)

  15. Development of a daily dosimetric control for radiation therapy using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saboori, Mohammadsaeed

    2015-01-01

    Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) can be used to perform dose measurements during radiation therapy treatments if dedicated calibration and correction procedures are applied. The purpose of this study was to provide a new calibration and correction model for an amorphous silicon (a-Si) EPID for use in transit dose verification of step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A model was created in a commercial treatment planning system to calculate the nominal two-dimensional (2D) dose map of each radiation field at the EPID level. The EPID system was calibrated and correction factors were determined using a reference set-up, which consisted a patient phantom and an EPID phantom. The advantage of this method is that for the calibration, the actual beam spectrum is used to mimic a patient measurement. As proof-of-principle, the method was tested for the verification of two 7-field IMRT treatment plans with tumor sites in the head-and-neck and pelvic region. Predicted and measured EPID responses were successfully compared to the nominal data from treatment planning using dose difference maps and gamma analyses. Based on our result it can be concluded that this new method of 2D EPID dosimetry is a potential tool for simple patient treatment fraction dose verification.

  16. Vasovagal response secondary to permanent contraception device in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Jessica; Alnuaimat, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adequate contraception is an essential component of managing pulmonary hypertension in women of childbearing age. Intrauterine devices are a popular contraceptive choice for many women but are associated with a risk of vagal response upon placement in certain patients with pulmonary hypertension, which may not be well tolerated. More recently, newer permanent contraception devices have emerged in the market, such as the Essure. We describe the first case, to our knowledge, of vagal-associated response due to an Essure device placement. PMID:26697184

  17. Bacterial Response to Antibiotic Gradients in a Porous Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, J.; Shechtman, L. A.; Sanford, R. A.; Dong, Y.; Werth, C. J.; Fouke, B. W.

    2015-12-01

    Microorganisms in nature have evolved survival strategies to cope with a wide variety of environmental stresses, including gradients in temperature, pH, substrate availability and aqueous chemistry. Microfluidic devices provide a consistently reliable real-time means to quantitatively measure, control and reproduce the dynamic nature of these stresses. As an example, accelerated adaptation from genetic mutations have been observed in E. coli as it responds to gradients of Ciprofloxacin (Zhang et. al. 2011). However, the mechanisms by which bacteria respond to antibiotic gradients, as well as the effect of changes in how the stressor is applied, have not been systematically studied. In this study, newly designed and fabricated microfluidic devices with porous media have been utilized to determine the chemical stress fields that enhance adaptation and thus to test how E. coli bacterial communities adapt to antibiotic stresses. By applying antibiotic and nutrient into inlet channels adjacent to either side of the porous media inoculated with E. coli, a gradient of antibiotic was formed. Hydrogel barriers were selectively photo-polymerized in between of the inlet channels and the porous media to prevent any undesired convection. Hence, chemical solute can only be transported by diffusion, creating a reproducible antibiotic gradient over the porous media. The bacteria were also constrained by the hydrogel boundary barriers from escaping the porous media. Preliminary results suggest that E. coli moves freely with respect to Ciprofloxacin concentrations. In addition, and unexpectedly, the E. coli colonies exhibit a concentric pulsed growth front radiating away from the point of inoculation within the micromodel ecosystem and pulse over the porous media containing antibiotic. The bacteria at the growth front grow into long filaments (up to 100μm) while the bacteria in the inner concentric area are normal size. We hypothesize that the frontier bacteria, which are first

  18. Predictive modeling for corrective maintenance of imaging devices from machine logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ravindra B; Patil, Meru A; Ravi, Vidya; Naik, Sarif

    2017-07-01

    In the cost sensitive healthcare industry, an unplanned downtime of diagnostic and therapy imaging devices can be a burden on the financials of both the hospitals as well as the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). In the current era of connectivity, it is easier to get these devices connected to a standard monitoring station. Once the system is connected, OEMs can monitor the health of these devices remotely and take corrective actions by providing preventive maintenance thereby avoiding major unplanned downtime. In this article, we present an overall methodology of predicting failure of these devices well before customer experiences it. We use data-driven approach based on machine learning to predict failures in turn resulting in reduced machine downtime, improved customer satisfaction and cost savings for the OEMs. One of the use-case of predicting component failure of PHILIPS iXR system is explained in this article.

  19. OC ToGo: bed site image integration into OpenClinica with mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haak, Daniel; Gehlen, Johan; Jonas, Stephan; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2014-03-01

    Imaging and image-based measurements nowadays play an essential role in controlled clinical trials, but electronic data capture (EDC) systems insufficiently support integration of captured images by mobile devices (e.g. smartphones and tablets). The web application OpenClinica has established as one of the world's leading EDC systems and is used to collect, manage and store data of clinical trials in electronic case report forms (eCRFs). In this paper, we present a mobile application for instantaneous integration of images into OpenClinica directly during examination on patient's bed site. The communication between the Android application and OpenClinica is based on the simple object access protocol (SOAP) and representational state transfer (REST) web services for metadata, and secure file transfer protocol (SFTP) for image transfer, respectively. OpenClinica's web services are used to query context information (e.g. existing studies, events and subjects) and to import data into the eCRF, as well as export of eCRF metadata and structural information. A stable image transfer is ensured and progress information (e.g. remaining time) visualized to the user. The workflow is demonstrated for a European multi-center registry, where patients with calciphylaxis disease are included. Our approach improves the EDC workflow, saves time, and reduces costs. Furthermore, data privacy is enhanced, since storage of private health data on the imaging devices becomes obsolete.

  20. Response of Caenorhabditis elegans to wireless devices radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasseas, Michael K; Fragopoulou, Adamantia F; Manta, Areti K; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini; Vekrellis, Konstantinos; Margaritis, Lukas H; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-03-01

    To examine the impact of electromagnetic radiation, produced by GSM (Global System for Mobile communications) mobile phones, Wi-Fi (Wireless-Fidelity) routers and wireless DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications) phones, on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We exposed synchronized populations, of different developmental stages, to these wireless devices at E-field levels below ICNIRP's (International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection) guidelines for various lengths of time. WT (wild-type) and aging- or stress-sensitive mutant worms were examined for changes in growth, fertility, lifespan, chemotaxis, short-term memory, increased ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) production and apoptosis by using fluorescent marker genes or qRT-PCR (quantitative Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction). No statistically significant differences were found between the exposed and the sham/control animals in any of the experiments concerning lifespan, fertility, growth, memory, ROS, apoptosis or gene expression. The worm appears to be robust to this form of (pulsed) radiation, at least under the exposure conditions used.

  1. The imaging pin detector - a simple and effective new imaging device for soft x-rays and soft beta emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a new bidimensional imaging detector system for soft X and beta radiations is reported. Based on the detection of the differential induction signals on pickup electrodes placed around a point anode in a gas avalanche detector, the system described has achieved a spatial resolution of better than 1mm fwhm over a field of 30mm diameter while preserving excellent pulse height resolution. The present device offers considerable potential as a cheap and robust imaging system for applications in X-ray diffraction and autoradiography. (author)

  2. Display device combining ambient light with magnified virtual images generated in the eye path of the observer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    A display device positions an observer's eye (or eyes) to look in a particular direction (eye path). An electronically controlled image generating element in the eye path generates artificial images which are magnified to create a virtual image for the eye. The image generating element is

  3. Device fabrication, characterization, and thermal neutron detection response of LiZnP and LiZnAs semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Benjamin W.; Ugorowski, Philip B.; Nelson, Kyle A.; Edwards, Nathaniel S.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2016-11-01

    Nowotny-Juza compounds continue to be explored as candidates for solid-state neutron detectors. Such a device would have greater efficiency, in a compact form, than present day gas-filled 3He and 10BF3 detectors. The 6Li(n,t)4He reaction yields a total Q-value of 4.78 MeV, larger than 10B, an energy easily identified above background radiations. Hence, devices fabricated from semiconductor compounds having either natural Li (nominally 7.5% 6Li) or enriched 6Li (usually 95% 6Li) as constituent atoms may provide a material for compact high efficiency neutron detectors. Starting material was synthesized by preparing equimolar portions of Li, Zn, and As sealed under vacuum (10-6 Torr) in quartz ampoules lined with boron nitride and subsequently reacted in a compounding furnace [1]. The raw synthesized material indicated the presence high impurity levels (material and electrical property characterizations). A static vacuum sublimation in quartz was performed to help purify the synthesized material [2,3]. Bulk crystalline samples were grown from the purified material [4,5]. Samples were cut using a diamond wire saw, and processed into devices. Bulk resistivity was determined from I-V curve measurements, ranging from 106-1011 Ω cm. Devices were characterized for sensitivity to 5.48 MeV alpha particles, 337 nm laser light, and neutron sensitivity in a thermal neutron diffracted beam at the Kansas State University TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor. Thermal neutron reaction product charge induction was measured with a LiZnP device, and the reaction product spectral response was observed.

  4. A newly developed removable dental device for fused 3-D MRI/Meg imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuboki, Takuo [Okayama Univ. (Japan). Dental School; Clark, G T; Akhtari, M; Sutherling, W W

    1999-06-01

    Recently 3-D imaging techniques have been used to shed light on the role of abnormal brain functions in such conditions as nocturnal bruxism and orofacial pain. In order to achieve precise 3-D image fusion between magnetic resonance images (MRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, we developed a removable dental device which attaches rigidly to the teeth. Using this device, correlation of MEG and MRI data points was achieved by the co-registration of 3 or more fiducial points. Using a Polhemus 3-space digitizer the locations of the points were registered on MEG and then a small amount of high-water-content material was placed at each point for registering these same points on MRI. The mean reproducibility of interpoint distances, determined for 2 subjects, was between 0.59 and 0.82 mm. Using a Monte Carlo statistical analysis we determined that the accuracy of a posterior projection from the fiducial points to any point within the strata of the brain is {+-}3.3 mm. The value of this device is that it permits reasonably precise and repeatable co-registration of these points and yet it is easily removed and replaced by the patient. Obviously such a device could also be adapted for use in diagnosis and analysis of brain functions related with other various sensory and motor functions (e.g., taste, pain, clenching) in maxillofacial region using MRI and MEG. (author)

  5. A newly developed removable dental device for fused 3-D MRI/Meg imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuboki, Takuo; Clark, G.T.; Akhtari, M.; Sutherling, W.W.

    1999-01-01

    Recently 3-D imaging techniques have been used to shed light on the role of abnormal brain functions in such conditions as nocturnal bruxism and orofacial pain. In order to achieve precise 3-D image fusion between magnetic resonance images (MRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, we developed a removable dental device which attaches rigidly to the teeth. Using this device, correlation of MEG and MRI data points was achieved by the co-registration of 3 or more fiducial points. Using a Polhemus 3-space digitizer the locations of the points were registered on MEG and then a small amount of high-water-content material was placed at each point for registering these same points on MRI. The mean reproducibility of interpoint distances, determined for 2 subjects, was between 0.59 and 0.82 mm. Using a Monte Carlo statistical analysis we determined that the accuracy of a posterior projection from the fiducial points to any point within the strata of the brain is ±3.3 mm. The value of this device is that it permits reasonably precise and repeatable co-registration of these points and yet it is easily removed and replaced by the patient. Obviously such a device could also be adapted for use in diagnosis and analysis of brain functions related with other various sensory and motor functions (e.g., taste, pain, clenching) in maxillofacial region using MRI and MEG. (author)

  6. Low dose intranasal oxytocin delivered with Breath Powered device dampens amygdala response to emotional stimuli: A peripheral effect-controlled within- subjects randomized dose-response fMRI trial

    OpenAIRE

    Quintana, Daniel; Westlye, Lars Tjelta; Alnæs, Dag; Rustan, Øyvind; Kaufmann, Tobias; Smerud, Knut Terje; Mahmoud, Ramy; Djupesland, Per G.; Andreassen, Ole Andreas

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear if and how exogenous oxytocin (OT) reaches the brain to improve social behavior and cognition and what is the optimal dose for OT response. To better understand the delivery routes of intranasal OT administration to the brain and the dose-response, we compared amygdala response to facial stimuli by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in four treatment conditions, including two different doses of intranasal OT using a novel Breath Powered device, intravenous (IV...

  7. Door and window image-based measurement using a mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guangyao; Janakaraj, Manishankar; Agam, Gady

    2015-03-01

    We present a system for door and window image-based measurement using an Android mobile device. In this system a user takes an image of a door or window that needs to be measured and using interaction measures specific dimensions of the object. The existing object is removed from the image and a 3D model of a replacement is rendered onto the image. The visualization provides a 3D model with which the user can interact. When tested on a mobile Android platform with an 8MP camera we obtain an average measurement error of roughly 0.5%. This error rate is stable across a range of view angles, distances from the object, and image resolutions. The main advantages of our mobile device application for image measurement include measuring objects for which physical access is not readily available, documenting in a precise manner the locations in the scene where the measurements were taken, and visualizing a new object with custom selections inside the original view.

  8. A detecting device with compensated directional dependence of response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viererbl, L.

    1988-01-01

    A scintillation detector making up for the directional dependence of response was devised. The jacket of the scintillator consists of a hollow body whose internal diameter is sufficient for the scintillator to be inserted, and of a ring whose height is lower than one-half of the largest dimension of the scintillator. The ring is accommodated at that side of the scintillator face which is more distant from the cathode of the photomultiplier. More than 90% of the material of the ring is constituted by atoms with atomic number higher than 23, whereas more than 90% of the material of the hollow body is constituted by atoms with atomic number lower than 14. (P.A.). 2 figs

  9. Traceable working standards with SI units of radiance for characterizing the measurement performance of investigational clinical NIRF imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Litorja, Maritoni; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2017-03-01

    All medical devices for Food and Drug market approval require specifications of performance based upon International System of Units (SI) or units derived from SI for reasons of traceability. Recently, near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging devices of a variety of designs have emerged on the market and in investigational clinical studies. Yet the design of devices used in the clinical studies vary widely, suggesting variable device performance. Device performance depends upon optimal excitation of NIRF imaging agents, rejection of backscattered excitation and ambient light, and selective collection of fluorescence emanating from the fluorophore. There remains no traceable working standards with SI units of radiance to enable prediction that a given molecular imaging agent can be detected in humans by a given NIRF imaging device. Furthermore, as technologies evolve and as NIRF imaging device components change, there remains no standardized means to track device improvements over time and establish clinical performance without involving clinical trials, often costly. In this study, we deployed a methodology to calibrate luminescent radiance of a stable, solid phantom in SI units of mW/cm2/sr for characterizing the measurement performance of ICCD and IsCMOS camera based NIRF imaging devices, such as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast. The methodology allowed determination of superior SNR of the ICCD over the IsCMOS system; comparable contrast of ICCD and IsCMOS depending upon binning strategies.

  10. Ultra-fast quantitative imaging using ptychographic iterative engine based digital micro-mirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Aihui; Tian, Xiaolin; Kong, Yan; Jiang, Zhilong; Liu, Fei; Xue, Liang; Wang, Shouyu; Liu, Cheng

    2018-01-01

    As a lensfree imaging technique, ptychographic iterative engine (PIE) method can provide both quantitative sample amplitude and phase distributions avoiding aberration. However, it requires field of view (FoV) scanning often relying on mechanical translation, which not only slows down measuring speed, but also introduces mechanical errors decreasing both resolution and accuracy in retrieved information. In order to achieve high-accurate quantitative imaging with fast speed, digital micromirror device (DMD) is adopted in PIE for large FoV scanning controlled by on/off state coding by DMD. Measurements were implemented using biological samples as well as USAF resolution target, proving high resolution in quantitative imaging using the proposed system. Considering its fast and accurate imaging capability, it is believed the DMD based PIE technique provides a potential solution for medical observation and measurements.

  11. A Quick-responsive DNA Nanotechnology Device for Bio-molecular Homeostasis Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songlin; Wang, Pei; Xiao, Chen; Li, Zheng; Yang, Bing; Fu, Jieyang; Chen, Jing; Wan, Neng; Ma, Cong; Li, Maoteng; Yang, Xiangliang; Zhan, Yi

    2016-08-10

    Physiological processes such as metabolism, cell apoptosis and immune responses, must be strictly regulated to maintain their homeostasis and achieve their normal physiological functions. The speed with which bio-molecular homeostatic regulation occurs directly determines the ability of an organism to adapt to conditional changes. To produce a quick-responsive regulatory system that can be easily utilized for various types of homeostasis, a device called nano-fingers that facilitates the regulation of physiological processes was constructed using DNA origami nanotechnology. This nano-fingers device functioned in linked open and closed phases using two types of DNA tweezers, which were covalently coupled with aptamers that captured specific molecules when the tweezer arms were sufficiently close. Via this specific interaction mechanism, certain physiological processes could be simultaneously regulated from two directions by capturing one biofactor and releasing the other to enhance the regulatory capacity of the device. To validate the universal application of this device, regulation of the homeostasis of the blood coagulant thrombin was attempted using the nano-fingers device. It was successfully demonstrated that this nano-fingers device achieved coagulation buffering upon the input of fuel DNA. This nano-device could also be utilized to regulate the homeostasis of other types of bio-molecules.

  12. Dose patient verification during treatment using an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    Today, amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (aSi EPID) are currently used to check the accuracy of patient positioning. However, they are not use for dose reconstruction yet and more investigations are required to allow the use of an aSi EPID for routine dosimetric verification. The aim of this work is first to study the dosimetric characteristics of the EPID available at the Institut Curie and then, to check patient dose during treatment using these EPID. First, performance optimization of the Varian aS500 EPID system is studied. Then, a quality assurance system is set up in order to certify the image quality on a daily basis. An additional study on the dosimetric performance of the aS500 EPID is monitored to assess operational stability for dosimetry applications. Electronic portal imaging device is also a useful tool to improve IMRT quality control. The validation and the quality assurance of a portal dose image prediction system for IMRT pre-treatment quality control are performed. All dynamic IMRT fields are verified in clinical routine with the new method based on portal dosimetry. Finally, a new formalism for in vivo dosimetry using transit dose measured with EPID is developed and validated. The absolute dose measurement issue using aSi EPID is described and the midplane dose determination using in vivo dose measurements in combination with portal imaging is used with 3D-conformal-radiation therapy. (author) [fr

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging-compatible tactile sensing device based on a piezoelectric array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Abbi; Masamune, Ken; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho; Lamperth, Michael; Dohi, Takeyoshi

    2012-07-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is a widely used medical technique, one of the drawbacks of which is the loss of direct sense of touch during the operation. Palpation is the use of fingertips to explore and make fast assessments of tissue morphology. Although technologies are developed to equip minimally invasive surgery tools with haptic feedback capabilities, the majority focus on tissue stiffness profiling and tool-tissue interaction force measurement. For greatly increased diagnostic capability, a magnetic resonance imaging-compatible tactile sensor design is proposed, which allows minimally invasive surgery to be performed under image guidance, combining the strong capability of magnetic resonance imaging soft tissue and intuitive palpation. The sensing unit is based on a piezoelectric sensor methodology, which conforms to the stringent mechanical and electrical design requirements imposed by the magnetic resonance environment The sensor mechanical design and the device integration to a 0.2 Tesla open magnetic resonance imaging scanner are described, together with the device's magnetic resonance compatibility testing. Its design limitations and potential future improvements are also discussed. A tactile sensing unit based on a piezoelectric sensor principle is proposed, which is designed for magnetic resonance imaging guided interventions.

  14. Software for X-Ray Images Calculation of Hydrogen Compression Device in Megabar Pressure Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, Nikolay; Bykov, Alexander; Pavlov, Valery

    2007-06-01

    Software for x-ray images simulation is described. The software is a part of x-ray method used for investigation of an equation of state of hydrogen in a megabar pressure range. A graphical interface that clearly and simply allows users to input data for x-ray image calculation: properties of the studied device, parameters of the x-ray radiation source, parameters of the x-ray radiation recorder, the experiment geometry; to represent the calculation results and efficiently transmit them to other software for processing. The calculation time is minimized. This makes it possible to perform calculations in a dialogue regime. The software is written in ``MATLAB'' system.

  15. Study on 3D printer production of auxiliary device for upper limb for medical imaging test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeong Gyun [Dept. of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumsung (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jae Ho [Jukwang Precision Co., Ltd., Gumi (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong Dae [Dept. of Mechanical system engineering, Kumoh Institute of Technology, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    There is a progressive development in the medical imaging technology, especially of descriptive capability for anatomical structure of human body thanks to advancement of information technology and medical devices. But however maintenance of correct posture is essential for the medical imaging checkup on the shoulder joint requiring rotation of the upper limb due to the complexity of human body. In the cases of MRI examination, long duration and fixed posture are critical, as failure to comply with them leads to minimal possibility of reproducibility only with the efforts of the examiner and will of the patient. Thus, this study aimed to develop an auxiliary device that enables rotation of the upper limb as well as fixing it at quantitative angles for medical imaging examination capable of providing diagnostic values. An auxiliary device has been developed based on the results of precedent studies, by designing a 3D model with the CATIA software, an engineering application, and producing it with the 3D printer. The printer is Objet350 Connex from Stratasys, and acrylonitrile- butadiene-styrene(ABS) is used as the material of the device. Dimensions are 120 X 150 X 190 mm, with the inner diameter of the handle being 125.9 mm. The auxiliary device has 4 components including the body (outside), handle (inside), fixture terminal and the connection part. The body and handle have the gap of 2.1 mm for smooth rotation, while the 360 degree of scales have been etched on the handle so that the angle required for observation may be recorded per patient for traceability and dual examination.

  16. Study on 3D printer production of auxiliary device for upper limb for medical imaging test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyeong Gyun; Yoon, Jae Ho; Choi, Seong Dae

    2015-01-01

    There is a progressive development in the medical imaging technology, especially of descriptive capability for anatomical structure of human body thanks to advancement of information technology and medical devices. But however maintenance of correct posture is essential for the medical imaging checkup on the shoulder joint requiring rotation of the upper limb due to the complexity of human body. In the cases of MRI examination, long duration and fixed posture are critical, as failure to comply with them leads to minimal possibility of reproducibility only with the efforts of the examiner and will of the patient. Thus, this study aimed to develop an auxiliary device that enables rotation of the upper limb as well as fixing it at quantitative angles for medical imaging examination capable of providing diagnostic values. An auxiliary device has been developed based on the results of precedent studies, by designing a 3D model with the CATIA software, an engineering application, and producing it with the 3D printer. The printer is Objet350 Connex from Stratasys, and acrylonitrile- butadiene-styrene(ABS) is used as the material of the device. Dimensions are 120 X 150 X 190 mm, with the inner diameter of the handle being 125.9 mm. The auxiliary device has 4 components including the body (outside), handle (inside), fixture terminal and the connection part. The body and handle have the gap of 2.1 mm for smooth rotation, while the 360 degree of scales have been etched on the handle so that the angle required for observation may be recorded per patient for traceability and dual examination

  17. Discrete Event Simulation Model of the Polaris 2.1 Gamma Ray Imaging Radiation Detection Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    release; distribution is unlimited DISCRETE EVENT SIMULATION MODEL OF THE POLARIS 2.1 GAMMA RAY IMAGING RADIATION DETECTION DEVICE by Andres T...ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE June 2016 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DISCRETE EVENT SIMULATION MODEL...modeled. The platform, Simkit, was utilized to create a discrete event simulation (DES) model of the Polaris. After carefully constructing the DES

  18. A device for identification of respective images in orthogonal localization roentgenograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganchev, M.

    1977-01-01

    Some problems which might be solved with the device, originally intended for localization of implanted radioactive wires, include: conjugation check-up of orthogonal localization roentgenograms; localization of partially screened radioactive sources in the patient body; localization of Fletcher's trapezium points in the pelvis; identification of the respective images of contrast filled lymph nodes and localization of some bone hallmarks, visible only on one of two localization roentgenograms. (author)

  19. Reliability of measuring pelvic floor elevation with a diagnostic ultrasonic imaging device

    OpenAIRE

    Ubukata, Hitomi; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Huo, Ming

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability of measuring the amount of pelvic floor elevation during pelvic and abdominal muscle contraction with a diagnostic ultrasonic imaging device. [Subjects] The study group comprised 11 healthy women without urinary incontinence or previous birth experience. [Methods] We measured the displacement elevation of the bladder base during contraction of the abdominal and pelvic floor muscles was measured using a diagnostic ultrasoni...

  20. Dual-modality imaging with a ultrasound-gamma device for oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, C.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; De Vincentis, G.; Lo Meo, S.; Fabbri, A.; Bennati, P.; Cencelli, V. Orsolini; Pani, R.

    2018-06-01

    Recently, dual-modality systems have been developed, aimed to correlate anatomical and functional information, improving disease localization and helping oncological or surgical treatments. Moreover, due to the growing interest in handheld detectors for preclinical trials or small animal imaging, in this work a new dual modality integrated device, based on a Ultrasounds probe and a small Field of View Single Photon Emission gamma camera, is proposed.

  1. Real-time volume rendering of digital medical images on an iOS device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noon, Christian; Holub, Joseph; Winer, Eliot

    2013-03-01

    Performing high quality 3D visualizations on mobile devices, while tantalizingly close in many areas, is still a quite difficult task. This is especially true for 3D volume rendering of digital medical images. Allowing this would empower medical personnel a powerful tool to diagnose and treat patients and train the next generation of physicians. This research focuses on performing real time volume rendering of digital medical images on iOS devices using custom developed GPU shaders for orthogonal texture slicing. An interactive volume renderer was designed and developed with several new features including dynamic modification of render resolutions, an incremental render loop, a shader-based clipping algorithm to support OpenGL ES 2.0, and an internal backface culling algorithm for properly sorting rendered geometry with alpha blending. The application was developed using several application programming interfaces (APIs) such as OpenSceneGraph (OSG) as the primary graphics renderer coupled with iOS Cocoa Touch for user interaction, and DCMTK for DICOM I/O. The developed application rendered volume datasets over 450 slices up to 50-60 frames per second, depending on the specific model of the iOS device. All rendering is done locally on the device so no Internet connection is required.

  2. Defect Characterization, Imaging, and Control in Wide-Bandgap Semiconductors and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillson, L. J.; Foster, G. M.; Cox, J.; Ruane, W. T.; Jarjour, A. B.; Gao, H.; von Wenckstern, H.; Grundmann, M.; Wang, B.; Look, D. C.; Hyland, A.; Allen, M. W.

    2018-03-01

    Wide-bandgap semiconductors are now leading the way to new physical phenomena and device applications at nanoscale dimensions. The impact of defects on the electronic properties of these materials increases as their size decreases, motivating new techniques to characterize and begin to control these electronic states. Leading these advances have been the semiconductors ZnO, GaN, and related materials. This paper highlights the importance of native point defects in these semiconductors and describes how a complement of spatially localized surface science and spectroscopy techniques in three dimensions can characterize, image, and begin to control these electronic states at the nanoscale. A combination of characterization techniques including depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, surface photovoltage spectroscopy, and hyperspectral imaging can describe the nature and distribution of defects at interfaces at both bulk and nanoscale surfaces, their metal interfaces, and inside nanostructures themselves. These features as well as temperature and mechanical strain inside wide-bandgap device structures at the nanoscale can be measured even while these devices are operating. These advanced capabilities enable several new directions for describing defects at the nanoscale, showing how they contribute to device degradation, and guiding growth processes to control them.

  3. Ion beam induced charge and cathodoluminescence imaging of response uniformity of CVD diamond radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sellin, P J; Galbiati, A; Maghrabi, M; Townsend, P D

    2002-01-01

    The uniformity of response of CVD diamond radiation detectors produced from high quality diamond film, with crystallite dimensions of >100 mu m, has been studied using ion beam induced charge imaging. A micron-resolution scanning alpha particle beam was used to produce maps of pulse height response across the device. The detectors were fabricated with a single-sided coplanar electrode geometry to maximise their sensitivity to the surface region of the diamond film where the diamond crystallites are highly ordered. High resolution ion beam induced charge images of single crystallites were acquired that demonstrate variations in intra-crystallite charge transport and the termination of charge transport at the crystallite boundaries. Cathodoluminescence imaging of the same crystallites shows an inverse correlation between the density of radiative centres and regions of good charge transport.

  4. Mapping the Salinity Gradient in a Microfluidic Device with Schlieren Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-li Sun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the use of the schlieren imaging to quantify the salinity gradients in a microfluidic device. By partially blocking the back focal plane of the objective lens, the schlieren microscope produces an image with patterns that correspond to spatial derivative of refractive index in the specimen. Since salinity variation leads to change in refractive index, the fluid mixing of an aqueous salt solution of a known concentration and water in a T-microchannel is used to establish the relation between salinity gradients and grayscale readouts. This relation is then employed to map the salinity gradients in the target microfluidic device from the grayscale readouts of the corresponding micro-schlieren image. For saline solution with salinity close to that of the seawater, the grayscale readouts vary linearly with the salinity gradient, and the regression line is independent of the flow condition and the salinity of the injected solution. It is shown that the schlieren technique is well suited to quantify the salinity gradients in microfluidic devices, for it provides a spatially resolved, non-invasive, full-field measurement.

  5. Trial making of a positive drawing phantom and its application to whole-body imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saegusa, Kenji; Arimizu, Noboru; Nakata, Tsuneo; Toyama, Haruo; Shiina, Isamu.

    1980-01-01

    In whole-body RI imaging, there are more instances of the positive pictures detecting the radioisotopes accumulating in morbid positions, such as Tc-99m bone scanning. The phantoms used to mutually compare RI imaging devices and to test their performance employ negative drawing targets embedded rather than positive ones. A simple positive drawing phantom has been made for trial, and applying this to whole-body scanning devices, the performance and the target drawing ability under different scanning conditions were comparatively examined. Though similar to Rollo's phantom, the phantom made for positive drawing uses acryl plate for its outer structure and target portions. The positive targets are cylindrical, and the diameters are 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 20 mm, and the subject contrasts are 5, 2, 1, 0.5 and 0.2. The aqueous solution of Tc-99m of about 2 mCi was injected into the phantom, and this was scanned with a whole-body camera and a multi-detector type whole-body scanner. With the phantom pictures close to actual clinical condition, the positive drawing phantom is conveniently capable of comparing the respective imaging devices for intended purposes. (J.P.N.)

  6. Technical Validation of ARTSENS–An Image Free Device for Evaluation of Vascular Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Ravikumar; Kusmakar, Shitanshu; Thrivikraman, Arya Sree; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2015-01-01

    Vascular stiffness is an indicator of cardiovascular health, with carotid artery stiffness having established correlation to coronary heart disease and utility in cardiovascular diagnosis and screening. State of art equipment for stiffness evaluation are expensive, require expertise to operate and not amenable for field deployment. In this context, we developed ARTerial Stiffness Evaluation for Noninvasive Screening (ARTSENS), a device for image free, noninvasive, automated evaluation of vascular stiffness amenable for field use. ARTSENS has a frugal hardware design, utilizing a single ultrasound transducer to interrogate the carotid artery, integrated with robust algorithms that extract arterial dimensions and compute clinically accepted measures of arterial stiffness. The ability of ARTSENS to measure vascular stiffness in vivo was validated by performing measurements on 125 subjects. The accuracy of results was verified with the state-of-the-art ultrasound imaging-based echo-tracking system. The relation between arterial stiffness measurements performed in sitting posture for ARTSENS measurement and sitting/supine postures for imaging system was also investigated to examine feasibility of performing ARTSENS measurements in the sitting posture for field deployment. This paper verified the feasibility of the novel ARTSENS device in performing accurate in vivo measurements of arterial stiffness. As a portable device that performs automated measurement of carotid artery stiffness with minimal operator input, ARTSENS has strong potential for use in large-scale screening. PMID:27170892

  7. Transient response of nonideal ion-selective microchannel-nanochannel devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, Neta; Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Park, Sinwook; Yossifon, Gilad

    2018-04-01

    We report evidence of variation in ion selectivity of a fabricated microchannel-nanochannel device resulting in the appearance of a distinct local maximum in the overlimiting chronopotentiometric response. In this system consisting of shallow microchannels joined by a nanochannel, viscous shear at the microchannel walls suppresses the electro-osmotic instability and prevents any associated contribution to the nonmonotonic response. Thus, this response is primarily electrodiffusive. Numerical simulations indicate that concentration polarization develops not only within the microchannel but also within the nanochannel itself, with a local voltage maximum in the chronopotentiometric response correlated with interfacial depletion and having the classic i-2 Sands time dependence. Furthermore, the occurrence of the local maxima is correlated with the change in selectivity due to internal concentration polarization. Understanding the transient nonideal permselective response is essential for obtaining fundamental insight and for optimizing efficient operation of practical fabricated nanofluidic and membrane devices.

  8. An MR-compatible device for delivering smoked marijuana during functional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Blaise deB; Lindsey, Kimberly P; Nickerson, Lisa D; Ryan, Elizabeth T; Lukas, Scott E

    2007-05-01

    Smoking is the preferred method of administration for two of the most frequently abused drugs, marijuana and nicotine. The high temporal and spatial resolution of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) make it a natural choice for studying the neurobiological effects of smoked drugs if the challenges of smoking in a magnetic resonance (MR) scanner can be overcome. We report on a design for an MR-compatible smoking device that can be used for smoking marijuana (or tobacco) during fMRI examinations. Nine volunteers smoked marijuana cigarettes (3.51% Delta9-THC) on two occasions: with and without the device. The device allowed subjects to smoke while they lay in the scanner, while containing all smoke and odors. Plasma Delta9-THC, subjective reports of intoxication, and heart rate increases are reported, and were all similar in individuals smoking marijuana either with or without the device. The use of this device will help advance research studies on smoked drugs including marijuana, tobacco and crack cocaine.

  9. Image-Word Pairing-Congruity Effect on Affective Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria Z., Jorge C.; Cho, Youngil; Sambai, Ami; Yamanaka, Toshimasa

    The present study explores the effects of familiarity on affective responses (pleasure and arousal) to Japanese ad elements, based on the schema incongruity theory. Print ads showing natural scenes (landscapes) were used to create the stimuli (images and words). An empirical study was conducted to measure subjects' affective responses to image-word combinations that varied in terms of incongruity. The level of incongruity was based on familiarity levels, and was statistically determined by a variable called ‘pairing-congruity status’. The tested hypothesis proposed that even highly familiar image-word combinations, when combined incongruously, would elicit strong affective responses. Subjects assessed the stimuli using bipolar scales. The study was effective in tracing interactions between familiarity, pleasure and arousal, although the incongruous image-word combinations did not elicit the predicted strong effects on pleasure and arousal. The results suggest a need for further research incorporating kansei (i.e., creativity) into the process of stimuli selection.

  10. Imaging tools to measure treatment response in gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbeth, Nicola; Doyle, Anthony J

    2018-01-01

    Imaging tests are in clinical use for diagnosis, assessment of disease severity and as a marker of treatment response in people with gout. Various imaging tests have differing properties for assessing the three key disease domains in gout: urate deposition (including tophus burden), joint inflammation and structural joint damage. Dual-energy CT allows measurement of urate deposition and bone damage, and ultrasonography allows assessment of all three domains. Scoring systems have been described that allow radiological quantification of disease severity and these scoring systems may play a role in assessing the response to treatment in gout. This article reviews the properties of imaging tests, describes the available scoring systems for quantification of disease severity and discusses the challenges and controversies regarding the use of imaging tools to measure treatment response in gout. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Reflective and Non-conscious Responses to Exercise Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Kathryn; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Short, Camille E; Conroy, David E; Rhodes, Ryan E; Jackson, Ben; Dimmock, James A; Rebar, Amanda L

    2017-01-01

    Images portraying exercise are commonly used to promote exercise behavior and to measure automatic associations of exercise (e.g., via implicit association tests). The effectiveness of these promotion efforts and the validity of measurement techniques partially rely on the untested assumption that the images being used are perceived by the general public as portrayals of exercise that is pleasant and motivating. The aim of this study was to investigate how content of images impacted people's automatic and reflective evaluations of exercise images. Participants ( N = 90) completed a response time categorization task (similar to the implicit association test) to capture how automatically people perceived each image as relevant to Exercise or Not exercise . Participants also self-reported their evaluations of the images using visual analog scales with the anchors: Exercise / Not exercise, Does not motivate me to exercise / Motivates me to exercise, Pleasant / Unpleasant , and Energizing/Deactivating . People tended to more strongly automatically associate images with exercise if the images were of an outdoor setting, presented sport (as opposed to active labor or gym-based) activities, and included young (as opposed to middle-aged) adults. People tended to reflectively find images of young adults more motivating and relevant to exercise than images of older adults. The content of exercise images is an often overlooked source of systematic variability that may impact measurement validity and intervention effectiveness.

  12. Reflective and Non-conscious Responses to Exercise Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Cope

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Images portraying exercise are commonly used to promote exercise behavior and to measure automatic associations of exercise (e.g., via implicit association tests. The effectiveness of these promotion efforts and the validity of measurement techniques partially rely on the untested assumption that the images being used are perceived by the general public as portrayals of exercise that is pleasant and motivating. The aim of this study was to investigate how content of images impacted people's automatic and reflective evaluations of exercise images. Participants (N = 90 completed a response time categorization task (similar to the implicit association test to capture how automatically people perceived each image as relevant to Exercise or Not exercise. Participants also self-reported their evaluations of the images using visual analog scales with the anchors: Exercise/Not exercise, Does not motivate me to exercise/Motivates me to exercise, Pleasant/Unpleasant, and Energizing/Deactivating. People tended to more strongly automatically associate images with exercise if the images were of an outdoor setting, presented sport (as opposed to active labor or gym-based activities, and included young (as opposed to middle-aged adults. People tended to reflectively find images of young adults more motivating and relevant to exercise than images of older adults. The content of exercise images is an often overlooked source of systematic variability that may impact measurement validity and intervention effectiveness.

  13. PRESBYOPIA OPTOMETRY METHOD BASED ON DIOPTER REGULATION AND CHARGE COUPLE DEVICE IMAGING TECHNOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Q; Wu, X X; Zhou, J; Wang, X; Liu, R F; Gao, J

    2015-01-01

    With the development of photoelectric technology and single-chip microcomputer technology, objective optometry, also known as automatic optometry, is becoming precise. This paper proposed a presbyopia optometry method based on diopter regulation and Charge Couple Device (CCD) imaging technology and, in the meantime, designed a light path that could measure the system. This method projects a test figure to the eye ground and then the reflected image from the eye ground is detected by CCD. The image is then automatically identified by computer and the far point and near point diopters are determined to calculate lens parameter. This is a fully automatic objective optometry method which eliminates subjective factors of the tested subject. Furthermore, it can acquire the lens parameter of presbyopia accurately and quickly and can be used to measure the lens parameter of hyperopia, myopia and astigmatism.

  14. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  15. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems

  16. Spherical gradient-index lenses as perfect imaging and maximum power transfer devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J M

    2000-08-01

    Gradient-index lenses can be viewed from the perspectives of both imaging and nonimaging optics, that is, in terms of both image fidelity and achievable flux concentration. The simple class of gradient-index lenses with spherical symmetry, often referred to as modified Luneburg lenses, is revisited. An alternative derivation for established solutions is offered; the method of Fermat's strings and the principle of skewness conservation are invoked. Then these nominally perfect imaging devices are examined from the additional vantage point of power transfer, and the degree to which they realize the thermodynamic limit to flux concentration is determined. Finally, the spherical gradient-index lens of the fish eye is considered as a modified Luneburg lens optimized subject to material constraints.

  17. Device model for pixelless infrared image up-converters based on polycrystalline graphene heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhii, V.; Shur, M. S.; Ryzhii, M.; Karasik, V. E.; Otsuji, T.

    2018-01-01

    We developed a device model for pixelless converters of far/mid-infrared radiation (FIR/MIR) images into near-infrared/visible (NIR/VIR) images. These converters use polycrystalline graphene layers (PGLs) immersed in the van der Waals materials integrated with a light emitting diode (LED). The PGL serves as an element of the PGL infrared photodetector (PGLIP) sensitive to the incoming FIR/MIR due to the interband absorption. The spatially non-uniform photocurrent generated in the PGLIP repeats (mimics) the non-uniform distribution (image) created by the incident FIR/MIR. The injection of the nonuniform photocurrent into the LED active layer results in the nonuniform NIR/VIR image reproducing the FIR/MIR image. The PGL and the entire layer structure are not deliberately partitioned into pixels. We analyze the characteristics of such pixelless PGLIP-LED up-converters and show that their image contrast transfer function and the up-conversion efficiency depend on the PGL lateral resistivity. The up-converter exhibits high photoconductive gain and conversion efficiency when the lateral resistivity is sufficiently high. Several teams have successfully demonstrated the large area PGLs with the resistivities varying in a wide range. Such layers can be used in the pixelless PGLIP-LED image up-converters. The PGLIP-LED image up-converters can substantially surpass the image up-converters based on the quantum-well infrared photodetector integrated with the LED. These advantages are due to the use of the interband FIR/NIR absorption and a high photoconductive gain in the GLIPs.

  18. SU-F-T-260: Using Portal Image Device for Pre-Treatment QA in Volumetric Modulated Arc Plans with Flattening Filter Free (FFF) Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, H; Qi, P; Yu, N; Xia, P [The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement and validate a method of using electronic portal image device (EPID) for pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans using flattering filter free (FFF) beams for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: On Varian Edge with 6MV FFF beam, open field (from 2×2 cm to 20×20 cm) EPID images were acquired with 200 monitor unit (MU) at the image device to radiation source distance of 150cm. With 10×10 open field and calibration unit (CU) provided by vendor to EPID image pixel, a dose conversion factor was determined by dividing the center dose calculated from the treatment planning system (TPS) to the corresponding CU readout on the image. Water phantom measured beam profile and the output factors for various field sizes were further correlated to those of EPID images. The dose conversion factor and correction factors were then used for converting the portal images to the planner dose distributions of clinical fields. A total of 28 VMAT fields of 14 SBRT plans (8 lung, 2 prostate, 2 liver and 2 spine) were measured. With 10% low threshold cutoff, the delivered dose distributions were compared to the reference doses calculated in water phantom from the TPS. A gamma index analysis was performed for the comparison in percentage dose difference/distance-to-agreement specifications. Results: The EPID device has a linear response to the open fields with increasing MU. For the clinical fields, the gamma indices between the converted EPID dose distributions and the TPS calculated 2D dose distributions were 98.7%±1.1%, 94.0%±3.4% and 70.3%±7.7% for the criteria of 3%/3mm, 2%/2mm and 1%/1mm, respectively. Conclusion: Using a portal image device, a high resolution and high accuracy portal dosimerty was achieved for pre-treatment QA verification for SBRT VMAT plans with FFF beams.

  19. An image compression method for space multispectral time delay and integration charge coupled device camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jin; Jin Long-Xu; Zhang Ran-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Multispectral time delay and integration charge coupled device (TDICCD) image compression requires a low-complexity encoder because it is usually completed on board where the energy and memory are limited. The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) has proposed an image data compression (CCSDS-IDC) algorithm which is so far most widely implemented in hardware. However, it cannot reduce spectral redundancy in multispectral images. In this paper, we propose a low-complexity improved CCSDS-IDC (ICCSDS-IDC)-based distributed source coding (DSC) scheme for multispectral TDICCD image consisting of a few bands. Our scheme is based on an ICCSDS-IDC approach that uses a bit plane extractor to parse the differences in the original image and its wavelet transformed coefficient. The output of bit plane extractor will be encoded by a first order entropy coder. Low-density parity-check-based Slepian—Wolf (SW) coder is adopted to implement the DSC strategy. Experimental results on space multispectral TDICCD images show that the proposed scheme significantly outperforms the CCSDS-IDC-based coder in each band

  20. A microfluidic device to study neuronal and motor responses to acute chemical stimuli in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candelier, Raphaël; Murmu, Meena Sriti; Romano, Sebastián Alejo; Jouary, Adrien; Debrégeas, Georges; Sumbre, Germán

    2015-07-21

    Zebrafish larva is a unique model for whole-brain functional imaging and to study sensory-motor integration in the vertebrate brain. To take full advantage of this system, one needs to design sensory environments that can mimic the complex spatiotemporal stimulus patterns experienced by the animal in natural conditions. We report on a novel open-ended microfluidic device that delivers pulses of chemical stimuli to agarose-restrained larvae with near-millisecond switching rate and unprecedented spatial and concentration accuracy and reproducibility. In combination with two-photon calcium imaging and recordings of tail movements, we found that stimuli of opposite hedonic values induced different circuit activity patterns. Moreover, by precisely controlling the duration of the stimulus (50-500 ms), we found that the probability of generating a gustatory-induced behavior is encoded by the number of neurons activated. This device may open new ways to dissect the neural-circuit principles underlying chemosensory perception.

  1. A time-gated near-infrared spectroscopic imaging device for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, Patrick; Uhring, Wilfried; Hanselmann, Walter; Glazenborg, René; Nouizi, Farouk; Zint, Virginie; Hirschi, Werner

    2013-03-01

    A time-resolved, spectroscopic, diffuse optical tomography device was assembled for clinical applications like brain functional imaging. The entire instrument lies in a unique setup that includes a light source, an ultrafast time-gated intensified camera and all the electronic control units. The light source is composed of four near infrared laser diodes driven by a nanosecond electrical pulse generator working in a sequential mode at a repetition rate of 100 MHz. The light pulses are less than 80 ps FWHM. They are injected in a four-furcated optical fiber ended with a frontal light distributor to obtain a uniform illumination spot directed towards the head of the patient. Photons back-scattered by the subject are detected by the intensified CCD camera. There are resolved according to their time of flight inside the head. The photocathode is powered by an ultrafast generator producing 50 V pulses, at 100 MHz and a width corresponding to a 200 ps FWHM gate. The intensifier has been specially designed for this application. The whole instrument is controlled by an FPGA based module. All the acquisition parameters are configurable via software through an USB plug and the image data are transferred to a PC via an Ethernet link. The compactness of the device makes it a perfect device for bedside clinical applications. The instrument will be described and characterized. Preliminary data recorded on test samples will be presented.

  2. Thermal-Responsive Polymers for Enhancing Safety of Electrochemical Storage Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Leow, Wan Ru; Chen, Xiaodong

    2018-03-01

    Thermal runway constitutes the most pressing safety issue in lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors of large-scale and high-power density due to risks of fire or explosion. However, traditional strategies for averting thermal runaway do not enable the charging-discharging rate to change according to temperature or the original performance to resume when the device is cooled to room temperature. To efficiently control thermal runaway, thermal-responsive polymers provide a feasible and reversible strategy due to their ability to sense and subsequently act according to a predetermined sequence when triggered by heat. Herein, recent research progress on the use of thermal-responsive polymers to enhance the thermal safety of electrochemical storage devices is reviewed. First, a brief discussion is provided on the methods of preventing thermal runaway in electrochemical storage devices. Subsequently, a short review is provided on the different types of thermal-responsive polymers that can efficiently avoid thermal runaway, such as phase change polymers, polymers with sol-gel transitions, and polymers with positive temperature coefficients. The results represent the important development of thermal-responsive polymers toward the prevention of thermal runaway in next-generation smart electrochemical storage devices. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Study of the detective quantum efficiency for the kinestatic charge detector as a megavoltage imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samant, Sanjiv S.; Gopal, Arun; DiBianca, Frank A.

    2003-06-01

    Megavoltage x-ray imaging suffers from relatively poor contrast and spatial resolution compared to diagnostic kilovoltage x-ray imaging due to the dominant Compton scattering in the former. Recently available amorphous silicon/selenium based flat-panel imagers overcome many of the limitations of poor contrast and spatial resolution that affect conventional video based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). An alternative technology is presented here: kinestatic charge detection (KCD). The KCD uses a slot photon beam, high-pressure gas (xenon, 100 atm) and a multi-ion rectangular chamber in scanning mode. An electric field is used to regulate the cation drift velocity. By matching the scanning speed with that of the cation drift, the cations remain static in the object frame of reference, allowing temporal integration of the signal. KCD imaging is characterized by reduced scatter and a high signal-to-noise ratio. Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of a prototype small field of view KCD detector (384 channels, 0.5 mm spacing) were carried out. Measurements yield DQE[0]=0.19 and DQE[0.5cy/mm]=0.01. KCD imaging is compared to film and commercial EPID systems using phantoms, with the KCD requiring an extremely low dose (0.1 cGy) per image. A proposed cylindrical chamber design with a higher ion-collection depth is expected to further improve image quality (DQE[0]>0.25).

  4. In situ KPFM imaging of local photovoltaic characteristics of structured organic photovoltaic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Fukuchi, Yasumasa; Fukasawa, Masako; Sassa, Takafumi; Kimoto, Atsushi; Tajima, Yusuke; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Yamashita, Takashi; Matsumoto, Mutsuyoshi; Aoyama, Tetsuya

    2014-02-12

    Here, we discuss the local photovoltaic characteristics of a structured bulk heterojunction, organic photovoltaic devices fabricated with a liquid carbazole, and a fullerene derivative based on analysis by scanning kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Periodic photopolymerization induced by an interference pattern from two laser beams formed surface relief gratings (SRG) in the structured films. The surface potential distribution in the SRGs indicates the formation of donor and acceptor spatial distribution. Under illumination, the surface potential reversibly changed because of the generation of fullerene anions and hole transport from the films to substrates, which indicates that we successfully imaged the local photovoltaic characteristics of the structured photovoltaic devices. Using atomic force microscopy, we confirmed the formation of the SRG because of the material migration to the photopolymerized region of the films, which was induced by light exposure through photomasks. The structuring technique allows for the direct fabrication and the control of donor and acceptor spatial distribution in organic photonic and electronic devices with minimized material consumption. This in situ KPFM technique is indispensable to the fabrication of nanoscale electron donor and electron acceptor spatial distribution in the devices.

  5. Anti-theft device staining on banknotes detected by mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Deleon Nascimento; Zacca, Jorge Jardim; Rocha, Werickson Fortunato de Carvalho; Borges, Rodrigo; de Souza, Wanderley; Augusti, Rodinei; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Vendramini, Pedro Henrique

    2016-03-01

    We describe the identification and limits of detection of ink staining by mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), as used in anti-theft devices (ATDs). Such ink staining is applied to banknotes during automated teller machine (ATM) explosions. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) coupled with high-resolution and high-accuracy orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS) and a moving stage device were applied to obtain 2D molecular images of the major dyes used for staining, that is, 1-methylaminoanthraquinone (MAAQ), rhodamine B (RB) and rhodamine 6G (R6G). MAAQ could not be detected because of its inefficient desorption by DESI from the banknote cellulose surface. By contrast, ATD staining on banknotes is perceptible by the human naked eye only at concentrations higher than 0.2 μg cm(-2), whereas both RB and R6G at concentrations 200 times lower (as low as 0.001 μg cm(-2)) could be easily detected and imaged by DESI-MSI, with selective and specific identification of each analyte and their spatial distribution on samples from suspects. This technique is non-destructive, and no sample preparation is required, which ensures sample preservation for further forensic investigations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Whittier R.

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 (micro)T. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz -1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm 3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm 3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm 3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T 1 ) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The measured T 1 of ex vivo normal and cancerous

  7. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance ImagingDetected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Whittier Ryan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 μT. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz-1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T1) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The

  8. Determination of the size of an imaging data storage device at a full PACS hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, S. J.; Kim, Y. H.; Hur, G.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the appropriate size of a short and long-term storage device, bearing in mind the design factors involved and the installation costs. The number of radiologic studies quoted is the number of these undertaken during a one-year period at a university hospital with 650 beds, and reflects the actual number of each type of examination performed at a full PACS hospital. The average daily number of outpatients was 1586, while that of inpatients was 639.5. The numbers of radiologic studies performed were as follows : 378 among 189 outpatients, and 165 among 41 inpatients. The average daily number of examinations was 543, comprising 460 CR, 30 ultrasonograms, 25 CT, 8 MRI, 20 others. The total amount of digital images was 17.4 GB per day, while the amount of short-term data with lossless compression was 6.7 GB per day. During 14 days short-term storage, the amount of image data was 93.7 GB in disk array. The amount of data stored mid term (1 year), with lossy compression, was 369.1 GB. The amount of data stored in the form of long-term cache and educational images was 38.7 GB and 30 GB, respectively, The total size of disk array was 531.5 GB. A device suitable for the long-term storage of images, for at least five years, requires a capacity of 1845.5 GB. At a full PACS hospital with 600 beds, the minimum disk space required for the short-and mid-term storage of image data in disk array is 540 GB. The capacity required for long term storage (at least five years) is 1900 GB. (author)

  9. Using an electronic portal imaging device for exit dose measurements in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganowicz, M.; Wozniak, B.; Bekman, A.; Maniakowski, Z.

    2003-01-01

    To present a method of determining the exit dose with the use of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). The device used was the Portal Vision LC250 (Varian). The EPID signals on the central beam axis have been related to the exit dose. The exit dose measurements were performed with the ionisation chamber in the slab phantom at the distance of dose maximum from the exit surface of the phantom. EPID reading was investigated as a function of field size, phantom thickness and source-detector distance. The relation between dose rate and the EPID reading is described with empirical functions applicable to the obtained data. The exit dose is calculated from the EPID reading as a product of the calibration factor and appropriate correction factors. The determination of the exit dose rate from the EPID signal requires the knowledge of many parameters and earlier determination of essential characteristics. (author)

  10. Four-dimensional dose reconstruction through in vivo phase matching of cine images of electronic portal imaging device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jihyung; Jung, Jae Won; Kim, Jong Oh; Yi, Byong Yong; Yeo, Inhwan

    2016-07-01

    A method is proposed to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) dose distribution using phase matching of measured cine images to precalculated images of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). (1) A phantom, designed to simulate a tumor in lung (a polystyrene block with a 3 cm diameter embedded in cork), was placed on a sinusoidally moving platform with an amplitude of 1 cm and a period of 4 s. Ten-phase 4D computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were acquired. A planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding a margin of 1 cm around the internal target volume of the tumor. (2) Three beams were designed, which included a static beam, a theoretical dynamic beam, and a planning-optimized dynamic beam (PODB). While the theoretical beam was made by manually programming a simplistic sliding leaf motion, the planning-optimized beam was obtained from treatment planning. From the three beams, three-dimensional (3D) doses on the phantom were calculated; 4D dose was calculated by means of the ten phase images (integrated over phases afterward); serving as "reference" images, phase-specific EPID dose images under the lung phantom were also calculated for each of the ten phases. (3) Cine EPID images were acquired while the beams were irradiated to the moving phantom. (4) Each cine image was phase-matched to a phase-specific CT image at which common irradiation occurred by intercomparing the cine image with the reference images. (5) Each cine image was used to reconstruct dose in the phase-matched CT image, and the reconstructed doses were summed over all phases. (6) The summation was compared with forwardly calculated 4D and 3D dose distributions. Accounting for realistic situations, intratreatment breathing irregularity was simulated by assuming an amplitude of 0.5 cm for the phantom during a portion of breathing trace in which the phase matching could not be performed. Intertreatment breathing irregularity between the time of treatment and the time of planning CT was

  11. Four-dimensional dose reconstruction through in vivo phase matching of cine images of electronic portal imaging device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jihyung; Jung, Jae Won, E-mail: jungj@ecu.edu [Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858 (United States); Kim, Jong Oh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Yi, Byong Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 (United States); Yeo, Inhwan [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: A method is proposed to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) dose distribution using phase matching of measured cine images to precalculated images of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods: (1) A phantom, designed to simulate a tumor in lung (a polystyrene block with a 3 cm diameter embedded in cork), was placed on a sinusoidally moving platform with an amplitude of 1 cm and a period of 4 s. Ten-phase 4D computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were acquired. A planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding a margin of 1 cm around the internal target volume of the tumor. (2) Three beams were designed, which included a static beam, a theoretical dynamic beam, and a planning-optimized dynamic beam (PODB). While the theoretical beam was made by manually programming a simplistic sliding leaf motion, the planning-optimized beam was obtained from treatment planning. From the three beams, three-dimensional (3D) doses on the phantom were calculated; 4D dose was calculated by means of the ten phase images (integrated over phases afterward); serving as “reference” images, phase-specific EPID dose images under the lung phantom were also calculated for each of the ten phases. (3) Cine EPID images were acquired while the beams were irradiated to the moving phantom. (4) Each cine image was phase-matched to a phase-specific CT image at which common irradiation occurred by intercomparing the cine image with the reference images. (5) Each cine image was used to reconstruct dose in the phase-matched CT image, and the reconstructed doses were summed over all phases. (6) The summation was compared with forwardly calculated 4D and 3D dose distributions. Accounting for realistic situations, intratreatment breathing irregularity was simulated by assuming an amplitude of 0.5 cm for the phantom during a portion of breathing trace in which the phase matching could not be performed. Intertreatment breathing irregularity between the time of treatment and the

  12. Controlled power delivery for super-resolution imaging of biological samples using digital micromirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiya Peedikakkal, Liyana; Cadby, Ashley

    2017-02-01

    Localization based super resolution images of a biological sample is generally achieved by using high power laser illumination with long exposure time which unfortunately increases photo-toxicity of a sample, making super resolution microscopy, in general, incompatible with live cell imaging. Furthermore, the limitation of photobleaching reduces the ability to acquire time lapse images of live biological cells using fluorescence microscopy. Digital Light Processing (DLP) technology can deliver light at grey scale levels by flickering digital micromirrors at around 290 Hz enabling highly controlled power delivery to samples. In this work, Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is implemented in an inverse Schiefspiegler telescope setup to control the power and pattern of illumination for super resolution microscopy. We can achieve spatial and temporal patterning of illumination by controlling the DMD pixel by pixel. The DMD allows us to control the power and spatial extent of the laser illumination. We have used this to show that we can reduce the power delivered to the sample to allow for longer time imaging in one area while achieving sub-diffraction STORM imaging in another using higher power densities.

  13. The effective quality assurance for image guided device using the AMC G-Box

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chong Mi [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    According to the rapid increase recently in image-guided radiation therapy, It is necessary to control of the image guidance system completely. In particular for the main subject to the accuracy of image guided radiation therapy device to be done essentially the quality assurance. We made efficient phantom in AMC for the management of the accurate and efficient. By setting up of five very important as a quality assurance inventory of the Image guidance system, we made (AMC G-Box) phantom for quality assurance efficient and accurate. Quality assurance list were the Iso-center align, the real measurement, the center align of four direction, the accuracy of table movement and the reproducibility of Hounsfield Unit. The rectangular phantom; acrylic with a thickness of 1 cm to 10 cm × 10 cm × 10 cm was inserted the three materials with different densities respectively for measure the CBCT HU. The phantom was to perform a check of consistency centered by creating a marker that indicates the position of the center fixed. By performing the quality assurance using the phantom of existing, comparing the resulting value to the different resulting value using the AMC G-Box, experiment was analyzed time and problems. Therapy equipment was used Varian device. It was measured twice at 1-week intervals. When implemented quality assurance of an image guidance system using AMC G-Box and a phantom existing has been completed, the quality assurance result is similar in 0.2 mm ± 0.1. In the case of the conventional method, it was 45 minutes at 30 minutes. When using AMC G-Box, it takes 20 minutes 15 minutes, and declined to 50% of the time. The consistency and accurate of image guidance system tend to decline using device. Therefore, We need to perform thoroughly on the quality assurance related. It needs to be checked daily to consistency check especially. When using the AMC G-Box, It is possible to enhance the accuracy of the patient care and equipment efficiently performing

  14. Microfluidic electrochemical device and process for chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis at the electrode-liquid interface in-situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li; Zhu, Zihua; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2016-03-01

    A microfluidic electrochemical device and process are detailed that provide chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis under vacuum at the surface of the electrode-sample or electrode-liquid interface in-situ. The electrochemical device allows investigation of various surface layers including diffuse layers at selected depths populated with, e.g., adsorbed molecules in which chemical transformation in electrolyte solutions occurs.

  15. PIRATE: pediatric imaging response assessment and targeting environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Russell; Zhang, Yong; Krasin, Matthew; Hua, Chiaho

    2010-02-01

    By combining the strengths of various imaging modalities, the multimodality imaging approach has potential to improve tumor staging, delineation of tumor boundaries, chemo-radiotherapy regime design, and treatment response assessment in cancer management. To address the urgent needs for efficient tools to analyze large-scale clinical trial data, we have developed an integrated multimodality, functional and anatomical imaging analysis software package for target definition and therapy response assessment in pediatric radiotherapy (RT) patients. Our software provides quantitative tools for automated image segmentation, region-of-interest (ROI) histogram analysis, spatial volume-of-interest (VOI) analysis, and voxel-wise correlation across modalities. To demonstrate the clinical applicability of this software, histogram analyses were performed on baseline and follow-up 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET images of nine patients with rhabdomyosarcoma enrolled in an institutional clinical trial at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. In addition, we combined 18F-FDG PET, dynamic-contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR, and anatomical MR data to visualize the heterogeneity in tumor pathophysiology with the ultimate goal of adaptive targeting of regions with high tumor burden. Our software is able to simultaneously analyze multimodality images across multiple time points, which could greatly speed up the analysis of large-scale clinical trial data and validation of potential imaging biomarkers.

  16. Radio imaging moving poly functional device development R.I.T.M. Medicine and biology applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saoudi, A.

    1994-07-01

    We want to the medicine request. They wish to set out weak dimension nuclear imaging equipment, allowing to be movable indeed exploitable during the operation. We are using radioactive tracers either γ or β. For the postoperatory phases, no efficient and quick method of total ''osteoid-osteoma'' exeresis was existing. The device permitted to see if the extracted pieces included the maximal radioactivity zone, essential information on the surgery therapy quality, before the anatomy pathology tests. 36 refs., 109 figs., 3 tabs., 1 appendix

  17. An MR-compatible device for delivering smoked marijuana during functional imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Frederick, Blaise deB.; Lindsey, Kimberly P.; Nickerson, Lisa D.; Ryan, Elizabeth T.; Lukas, Scott E.

    2007-01-01

    Smoking is the preferred method of administration for two of the most frequently abused drugs, marijuana and nicotine. The high temporal and spatial resolution of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) make it a natural choice for studying the neurobiological effects of smoked drugs if the challenges of smoking in a magnetic resonance (MR) scanner can be overcome. We report on a design for an MR-compatible smoking device that can be used for smoking marijuana (or tobacco) during fMRI ex...

  18. Electrostatic X-ray image recording device with mesh-base photocathode photoelectron discriminator means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    An electrostatic X-ray image recording device having a pair of spaced electrodes with a gas-filled gap therebetween, and including discrimination means, having a conductive mesh supporting a photocathodic material, positioned in the gas-filled gap between a first electrode having a layer of ultraviolet-emitting fluorescent material and a second electrode having a plastic sheet adjacent thereto for receiving photoelectrons emitted by the photocathodic material and accelerated to the second electrode by an applied field. The photoconductor-mesh element discriminates against fast electrons, produced by direct impingement of X-rays upon the photocathode to substantially reduce secondary electron production and amplification, thereby increasing both the signal-to-noise and contrast ratios. The electrostatic image formed on the plastic sheet is developed by zerographic techniques after exposure. (Auth.)

  19. A poly(dimethylsiloxane)-based device enabling time-lapse imaging with high spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Masahiko; Hoshida, Tetsushi; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a regulator-free device that enables long-term incubation of mammalian cells for epi-fluorescence imaging, based on a concept that the size of sample to be gassed and heated is reduced to observation scale. A poly(dimethylsiloxane) block stamped on a coverslip works as a long-lasting supplier of CO 2 -rich gas to adjust bicarbonate-containing medium in a tiny chamber at physiological pH, and an oil-immersion objective warms cells across the coverslip. A time-lapse imaging experiment using HeLa cells stably expressing fluorescent cell-cycle indicators showed that the cells in the chamber proliferated with normal cell-cycle period over 2 days.

  20. Automated vessel shadow segmentation of fovea-centered spectral-domain images from multiple OCT devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Gerendas, Bianca S.; Waldstein, Sebastian M.; Simader, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive modality for acquiring high reso- lution, three-dimensional (3D) cross sectional volumetric images of the retina and the subretinal layers. SD-OCT also allows the detailed imaging of retinal pathology, aiding clinicians in the diagnosis of sight degrading diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma.1 Disease diagnosis, assessment, and treatment requires a patient to undergo multiple OCT scans, possibly using different scanning devices, to accurately and precisely gauge disease activity, progression and treatment success. However, the use of OCT imaging devices from different vendors, combined with patient movement may result in poor scan spatial correlation, potentially leading to incorrect patient diagnosis or treatment analysis. Image registration can be used to precisely compare disease states by registering differing 3D scans to one another. In order to align 3D scans from different time- points and vendors using registration, landmarks are required, the most obvious being the retinal vasculature. Presented here is a fully automated cross-vendor method to acquire retina vessel locations for OCT registration from fovea centred 3D SD-OCT scans based on vessel shadows. Noise filtered OCT scans are flattened based on vendor retinal layer segmentation, to extract the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer of the retina. Voxel based layer profile analysis and k-means clustering is used to extract candidate vessel shadow regions from the RPE layer. In conjunction, the extracted RPE layers are combined to generate a projection image featuring all candidate vessel shadows. Image processing methods for vessel segmentation of the OCT constructed projection image are then applied to optimize the accuracy of OCT vessel shadow segmentation through the removal of false positive shadow regions such as those caused by exudates and cysts. Validation of segmented vessel shadows uses

  1. Device for imaging an object by means of masks of spatially modulable electromagnetic radiation or corpuscular radiation of high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, H.H.

    1979-01-01

    The radiogram of the thyroid is produced by means of a detector device operating similar to a scintillation camera. Between thyroid and detector device there is placed a mask having modulating areas, permeable and impermeable to radiation succeeding each other with decreasing extension. The scanning signal has got the shape of a radar signal with chirp modulation. The filtering unit used for it is a pulse compression filter. The image of the radiation energy distribution on the recording surface of the detector device is thus decoded and compressed to a number of image points giving the picture of the thyroid. (RW) [de

  2. Design of free space optical omnidirectional transceivers for indoor applications using non-imaging optical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Navik; Davis, Christopher C.

    2008-08-01

    Omnidirectional free space optical communication receivers can employ multiple non-imaging collectors, such as compound parabolic concentrators (CPCs), in an array-like fashion to increase the amount of possible light collection. CPCs can effectively channel light collected over a large aperture to a small area photodiode. The aperture to length ratio of such devices can increase the overall size of the transceiver unit, which may limit the practicality of such systems, especially when small size is desired. New non-imaging collector designs with smaller sizes, larger field of view (FOV), and comparable transmission curves to CPCs, offer alternative transceiver designs. This paper examines how transceiver performance is affected by the use of different non-imaging collector shapes that are designed for wide FOV with reduced efficiency compared with shapes such as the CPC that are designed for small FOV with optimal efficiency. Theoretical results provide evidence indicating that array-like transceiver designs using various non-imaging collector shapes with less efficient transmission curves, but a larger FOV will be an effective means for the design of omnidirectional optical transceiver units. The results also incorporate the effects of Fresnel loss at the collector exit aperture-photodiode interface, which is an important consideration for indoor omnidirectional FSO systems.

  3. Role of radionuclide imaging for diagnosis of device and prosthetic valve infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, Jean-François; Philippon, François; Trottier, Mikaël; Tessier, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infection and prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) remain a diagnostic challenge. Cardiac imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of patients with CIED infection or PVE. Over the past few years, cardiac radionuclide imaging has gained a key role in the diagnosis of these patients, and in assessing the need for surgery, mainly in the most difficult cases. Both 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) and radiolabelled white blood cell single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (WBC SPECT/CT) have been studied in these situations. In their 2015 guidelines for the management of infective endocarditis, the European Society of Cardiology incorporated cardiac nuclear imaging as part of their diagnostic algorithm for PVE, but not CIED infection since the data were judged insufficient at the moment. This article reviews the actual knowledge and recent studies on the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT and WBC SPECT/CT in the context of CIED infection and PVE, and describes the technical aspects of cardiac radionuclide imaging. It also discusses their accepted and potential indications for the diagnosis and management of CIED infection and PVE, the limitations of these tests, and potential areas of future research. PMID:27721936

  4. Stab injury and device implantation within the brain results in inversely multiphasic neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Kelsey A.; Buck, Amy C.; Self, Wade K.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2012-08-01

    An estimated 25 million people in the US alone rely on implanted medical devices, ˜2.5 million implanted within the nervous system. Even though many devices perform adequately for years, the host response to medical devices often severely limits tissue integration and long-term performance. This host response is believed to be particularly limiting in the case of intracortical microelectrodes, where it has been shown that glial cell encapsulation and localized neuronal cell loss accompany intracortical microelectrode implantation. Since neuronal ensembles must be within ˜50 µm of the electrode to obtain neuronal spikes and local field potentials, developing a better understanding of the molecular and cellular environment at the device-tissue interface has been the subject of significant research. Unfortunately, immunohistochemical studies of scar maturation in correlation to device function have been inconclusive. Therefore, here we present a detailed quantitative study of the cellular events and the stability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following intracortical microelectrode implantation and cortical stab injury in a chronic survival model. We found two distinctly inverse multiphasic profiles for neuronal survival in device-implanted tissue compared to stab-injured animals. For chronically implanted animals, we observed a biphasic paradigm between blood-derived/trauma-induced and CNS-derived inflammatory markers driving neurodegeneration at the interface. In contrast, stab injured animals demonstrated a CNS-mediated neurodegenerative environment. Collectively these data provide valuable insight to the possibility of multiple roles of chronic neuroinflammatory events on BBB disruption and localized neurodegeneration, while also suggesting the importance to consider multiphasic neuroinflammatory kinetics in the design of therapeutic strategies for stabilizing neural interfaces.

  5. Aberration-free FTIR spectroscopic imaging of live cells in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2013-07-21

    The label-free, non-destructive chemical analysis offered by FTIR spectroscopic imaging is a very attractive and potentially powerful tool for studies of live biological cells. FTIR imaging of live cells is a challenging task, due to the fact that cells are cultured in an aqueous environment. While the synchrotron facility has proven to be a valuable tool for FTIR microspectroscopic studies of single live cells, we have demonstrated that high quality infrared spectra of single live cells using an ordinary Globar source can also be obtained by adding a pair of lenses to a common transmission liquid cell. The lenses, when placed on the transmission cell window, form pseudo hemispheres which removes the refraction of light and hence improve the imaging and spectral quality of the obtained data. This study demonstrates that infrared spectra of single live cells can be obtained without the focus shifting effect at different wavenumbers, caused by the chromatic aberration. Spectra of the single cells have confirmed that the measured spectral region remains in focus across the whole range, while spectra of the single cells measured without the lenses have shown some erroneous features as a result of the shift of focus. It has also been demonstrated that the addition of lenses can be applied to the imaging of cells in microfabricated devices. We have shown that it was not possible to obtain a focused image of an isolated cell in a droplet of DPBS in oil unless the lenses are applied. The use of the approach described herein allows for well focused images of single cells in DPBS droplets to be obtained.

  6. Diffractive optical variable image devices generated by maskless interferometric lithography for optical security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Alexandre; Rebordão, José M.

    2011-05-01

    In optical security (protection against forgery and counterfeit of products and documents) the problem is not exact reproduction but the production of something sufficiently similar to the original. Currently, Diffractive Optically Variable Image Devices (DOVID), that create dynamic chromatic effects which may be easily recognized but are difficult to reproduce, are often used to protect important products and documents. Well known examples of DOVID for security are 3D or 2D/3D holograms in identity documents and credit cards. Others are composed of shapes with different types of microstructures yielding by diffraction to chromatic dynamic effects. A maskless interferometric lithography technique to generate DOVIDs for optical security is presented and compared to traditional techniques. The approach can be considered as a self-masking focused holography on planes tilted with respect to the reference optical axes of the system, and is based on the Scheimpflug and Hinge rules. No physical masks are needed to ensure optimum exposure of the photosensitive film. The system built to demonstrate the technique relies on the digital mirrors device MOEMS technology from Texas Instruments' Digital Light Processing. The technique is linear on the number of specified colors and does not depend either on the area of the device or the number of pixels, factors that drive the complexity of dot-matrix based systems. The results confirmed the technique innovation and capabilities in the creation of diffractive optical elements for security against counterfeiting and forgery.

  7. A delivery device for presentation of tactile stimuli during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Robert W; Miqueé, Aline; Xerri, Christian; Zennou-Azogui, Yoh'i; Rainville, Constant; Dumoulin, André; Marineau, Daniel

    2007-01-30

    We describe a novel stimulus delivery system designed to present tactile stimuli to a subject in the tunnel of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Using energy from an air-driven piston to turn a wheel, the device advances a conveyor belt with a pre-determined sequence of stimuli that differ in their spatial features into the tunnel of the MRI. The positioning of one or several stimulus objects in a window near the subject's hand is controlled by a photoelectric device that detects periodic openings in the conveyor belt. Using this electric signal to position each presentation avoids cumulative positioning errors and provides a signal related to the progression of the experiment. We used a series of shapes that differed in their spatial features but the device could carry stimuli with a diversity of shapes and textures. This flexibility allows the experimenter to design a wide variety of psychophysical experiments in the haptic world and possibly to compare and contrast these stimuli with the cognitive treatment of similar stimuli delivered to the other senses. Appropriate experimental design allows separation of motor, sensory and memory storage phases of mental processes.

  8. Augmented reality with image registration, vision correction and sunlight readability via liquid crystal devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Jen; Chen, Po-Ju; Liang, Xiao; Lin, Yi-Hsin

    2017-03-27

    Augmented reality (AR), which use computer-aided projected information to augment our sense, has important impact on human life, especially for the elder people. However, there are three major challenges regarding the optical system in the AR system, which are registration, vision correction, and readability under strong ambient light. Here, we solve three challenges simultaneously for the first time using two liquid crystal (LC) lenses and polarizer-free attenuator integrated in optical-see-through AR system. One of the LC lens is used to electrically adjust the position of the projected virtual image which is so-called registration. The other LC lens with larger aperture and polarization independent characteristic is in charge of vision correction, such as myopia and presbyopia. The linearity of lens powers of two LC lenses is also discussed. The readability of virtual images under strong ambient light is solved by electrically switchable transmittance of the LC attenuator originating from light scattering and light absorption. The concept demonstrated in this paper could be further extended to other electro-optical devices as long as the devices exhibit the capability of phase modulations and amplitude modulations.

  9. Charge transport through image charged stabilized states in a single molecule single electron transistor device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedegard, Per; Bjornholm, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The present paper gives an elaborate theoretical description of a new molecular charge transport mechanism applying to a single molecule trapped between two macroscopic electrodes in a solid state device. It is shown by a Hubbard type model of the electronic and electrostatic interactions, that the close proximity of metal electrodes may allow electrons to tunnel from the electrode directly into very localized image charge stabilized states on the molecule. Due to this mechanism, an exceptionally large number of redox states may be visited within an energy scale which would normally not allow the molecular HOMO-LUMO gap to be transversed. With a reasonable set of parameters, a good fit to recent experimental values may be obtained. The theoretical model is furthermore used to search for the physical boundaries of this effect, and it is found that a rather narrow geometrical space is available for the new mechanism to work: in the specific case of oligophenylenevinylene molecules recently explored in such devices several atoms in the terminal benzene rings need to be at van der Waal's distance to the electrode in order for the mechanism to work. The model predicts, that chemisorption of the terminal benzene rings too gold electrodes will impede the image charge effect very significantly because the molecule is pushed away from the electrode by the covalent thiol-gold bond

  10. Application of image processing and different types of imaging devices for three-dimensional imaging of coal grains

    OpenAIRE

    Oleszko, K.; Mlynarczuk, M.; Sitek, L. (Libor); Staš, L. (Lubomír)

    2015-01-01

    Precise particle size measurements are important in many aspects of engineering geology, e.g. in mineral processing and the study of methane hazard in coal mines. The volume of grains, estimated exclusively on the basis of dimensions of the grains differs tens of percent from the volume obtained from 3D digital measurements. This confirms that full three-dimensional automatic imaging can be used in the measurements of the particles. The paper discusses the technique of three-dimensional imagi...

  11. Application of image processing and different types of imaging devices for three-dimensional imaging of coal grains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oleszko, K.; Mlynarczuk, M.; Sitek, Libor; Staš, Lubomír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 196, September 2015 (2015), s. 286-292 ISSN 0013-7952 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : 3D imaging * computed tomography * grain size * confocal microscope * optical profilometery Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 2.196, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S001379521530020X#

  12. Image quality assessment of three limited field-of-view cone-beam computed tomography devices in endodontics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in dento-maxillo-facial radiology, many CBCT devices with different technical aspects and characteristics were produced. Technical variations between CBCT and acquisition settings could involve image quality differences. In order to compare the performance of three limited field-of-view CBCT devices, an objective and subjective evaluation of image quality was carried out using an ex-vivo phantom, which combines both diagnostic and technical features. A significant difference in image quality was found between the five acquisition protocols of the study. (author) [fr

  13. Latest developments in image processing for the next generation of devices with a view on DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murari, A.; Vega, J.; Mazon, D.; Arena, P.; Craciunescu, T.; Gabellieri, L.; Gelfusa, M.; Pacella, D.; Palazzo, S.; Romano, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pattern recognition methods have been successfully applied to retrieve frames in massime databases. ► The technology of Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNNs) has been upgraded to solve space variant problem. ► The CNNs have then been successfully applied to various tasks, from the real time hot spot detection to the automatic identification of instabilities. ► The method of the optical flow permits to derive information about the speed of the objects moving in the frames of a single camera. ► Since the next generation of devices will emit a lot of SXR radiation, also from the edge, new technologies (Gas Electron Multiplier detectors and policapillary lenses) are being developed to perform imaging over this region of the spectrum for a global view of the entire plasma column. - Abstract: In magnetic confinement fusion devices the use of cameras, both visible and infrared, has increased very significantly in the last years. The large amount of data (in the range of tens of Gbytes per shot) and the difficulty of the analysis tasks (ambiguity, ill posed problems, etc.), require new solutions. The technology of Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNNs) has been successfully applied to various tasks, from the real time hot spot detection to the automatic identification of instabilities. The accuracy obtained is comparable to the one of more traditional serial algorithms but the CCNs guarantee deterministic computational times independently from the image contents. Moreover the latest developments have allowed obtaining these results also in the case of space variant image analysis, without compromising the computational speed (of the order of ten thousand frames per second). The method of the optical flow permits to derive information about the speed of the objects moving in the frames of a single camera. The results of previous applications have been so successful that the approach has been extended to videos in compressed format (MPEG) to reduce the

  14. Dependence of the modulation response of quantum dot based nanocavity devices on the number of emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorke, Michael; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    A microscopic theory is used to study the dynamical properties of semiconductor quantum dot based nanocavity laser systems. The carrier kinetics and photon populations are determined using a fully quantum mechanical treatment of the light‐matter coupling. In this work, we investigate the dependency...... of the modulation response in such devices on the number of emitters coupled to the cavity mode. (© 2011 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)...

  15. GA-based optimum design of a shape memory alloy device for seismic response mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozbulut, O E; Roschke, P N; Lin, P Y; Loh, C H

    2010-01-01

    Damping systems discussed in this work are optimized so that a three-story steel frame structure and its shape memory alloy (SMA) bracing system minimize response metrics due to a custom-tailored earthquake excitation. Multiple-objective numerical optimization that simultaneously minimizes displacements and accelerations of the structure is carried out with a genetic algorithm (GA) in order to optimize SMA bracing elements within the structure. After design of an optimal SMA damping system is complete, full-scale experimental shake table tests are conducted on a large-scale steel frame that is equipped with the optimal SMA devices. A fuzzy inference system is developed from data collected during the testing to simulate the dynamic material response of the SMA bracing subcomponents. Finally, nonlinear analyses of a three-story braced frame are carried out to evaluate the performance of comparable SMA and commonly used steel braces under dynamic loading conditions and to assess the effectiveness of GA-optimized SMA bracing design as compared to alternative designs of SMA braces. It is shown that peak displacement of a structure can be reduced without causing significant acceleration response amplification through a judicious selection of physical characteristics of the SMA devices. Also, SMA devices provide a recentering mechanism for the structure to return to its original position after a seismic event

  16. Formation of a national network for rapid response to device and lead advisories: The Canadian Heart Rhythm Society Device Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Andrew D; Simpson, Christopher S; Parkash, Ratika; Yee, Raymond; Champagne, Jean; Healey, Jeffrey S; Cameron, Doug; Thibault, Bernard; Mangat, Iqwal; Tung, Stanley; Sterns, Laurence; Birnie, David H; Exner, Derek V; Sivakumaran, Soori; Davies, Ted; Coutu, Benoit; Crystal, Eugene; Wolfe, Kevin; Verma, Atul; Stephenson, Elizabeth A; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Gow, Robert; Connors, Sean; Paredes, Felix Ayala; Turabian, Mike; Kus, Teresa; Essebag, Vidal; Gardner, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Heart Rhythm Society (CHRS) Device Advisory Committee was commissioned to respond to advisories regarding cardiac rhythm device and lead performance on behalf of the CHRS. In the event of an advisory, the Chair uses an e-mail network to disseminate advisory information to Committee members broadly representative of the Canadian device community. A consensus recommendation is prepared by the Committee and made available to all Canadian centres on the CHRS Web site after approval by the CHRS executive. This collaborative approach using an e-mail network has proven very efficient in providing a rapid national response to device advisories. The network is an ideal tool to collect specific data on implanted device system performance and allows for prompt reporting of clinically relevant data to front-line clinicians and patients. PMID:19584969

  17. Initial Clinical Experience Performing Patient Treatment Verification With an Electronic Portal Imaging Device Transit Dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Sean L., E-mail: BerryS@MSKCC.org [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Polvorosa, Cynthia; Cheng, Simon; Deutsch, Israel; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Wuu, Cheng-Shie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate a 2-dimensional transit dosimetry algorithm's performance on a patient population and to analyze the issues that would arise in a widespread clinical adoption of transit electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients were enrolled on the protocol; 9 completed and were analyzed. Pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient-specific quality assurance was performed using a stringent local 3%, 3-mm γ criterion to verify that the planned fluence had been appropriately transferred to and delivered by the linear accelerator. Transit dosimetric EPID images were then acquired during treatment and compared offline with predicted transit images using a global 5%, 3-mm γ criterion. Results: There were 288 transit images analyzed. The overall γ pass rate was 89.1% ± 9.8% (average ± 1 SD). For the subset of images for which the linear accelerator couch did not interfere with the measurement, the γ pass rate was 95.7% ± 2.4%. A case study is presented in which the transit dosimetry algorithm was able to identify that a lung patient's bilateral pleural effusion had resolved in the time between the planning CT scan and the treatment. Conclusions: The EPID transit dosimetry algorithm under consideration, previously described and verified in a phantom study, is feasible for use in treatment delivery verification for real patients. Two-dimensional EPID transit dosimetry can play an important role in indicating when a treatment delivery is inconsistent with the original plan.

  18. Gallium 67 imaging in monitoring lymphoma response to treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israel, O.; Front, D.; Lam, M.; Ben-Haim, S.; Kleinhaus, U.; Ben-Shachar, M.; Robinson, E.; Kolodny, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    The value of gallium 67 (Ga) imaging in monitoring lymphoma response to treatment was assessed in 25 patients with Ga-avid tumors and compared to body computed tomography (CT), chest radiographs, and palpation of tumor infiltrated peripheral lymph nodes. Ga imaging was negative in 95% (20/21) of the patients who were clinically considered to be in remission and in whom treatment was stopped. The disease did not recur during a follow-up of 12 to 26 months in 15 patients. Six patients developed recurrence of the disease 3 to 12 months after treatment was stopped. In all six patients Ga imaging became positive again at the time of the appearance of active disease. In the group of patients in remission, CT was negative in 57% (11/19), chest x-rays in 55% (6/11) and peripheral lymph nodes were palpated in none of the patients (13/13). In four patients that did not achieve remission after treatment, Ga scans were positive. Ga imaging appears useful in monitoring lymphoma response to treatment. This is probably because Ga imaging monitors tumor cell viability, whereas body CT and chest radiographs show the tumor mass, which may consist of fibrotic or necrotic tissue

  19. Functional Store Image and Corporate Social Responsibility Image: A Congruity Analysis on Store Loyalty

    OpenAIRE

    Jamaliah Mohd. Yusof; Rosidah Musa; Sofiah Abd. Rahman

    2011-01-01

    With previous studies that examined the importance of functional store image and CSR, this study is aimed at examining their effects in the self-congruity model in influencing store loyalty. In particular, this study developed and tested a structural model in the context of retailing industry on the self-congruity theory. Whilst much of the self-congruity studies have incorporated functional store image, there has been lack of studies that examined social responsibility i...

  20. ACCURACY COMPARISON OF ALGORITHMS FOR DETERMINATION OF IMAGE CENTER COORDINATES IN OPTOELECTRONIC DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Starasotnikau

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Accuracy in determination of coordinates for image having simple shapes is considered as one of important and significant parameters in metrological optoelectronic systems such as autocollimators, stellar sensors, Shack-Hartmann sensors, schemes for geometric calibration of digital cameras for aerial and space imagery, various tracking systems. The paper describes a mathematical model for a measuring stand based on a collimator which projects a test-object onto a photodetector of an optoelectronic device. The mathematical model takes into account characteristic noises for photodetectors: a shot noise of the desired signal (photon and a shot noise of a dark signal, readout and spatial heterogeneity of CCD (charge-coupled device matrix elements. In order to reduce noise effect it is proposed to apply the Wiener filter for smoothing an image and its unambiguous identification and also enter a threshold according to brightness level. The paper contains a comparison of two algorithms for determination of coordinates in accordance with energy gravity center and contour. Sobel, Pruitt, Roberts, Laplacian Gaussian, Canni detectors have been used for determination of the test-object contour. The essence of the algorithm for determination of coordinates lies in search for an image contour in the form of a circle with its subsequent approximation and determination of the image center. An error calculation has been made while determining coordinates of a gravity center for test-objects of various diameters: 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 pixels of a photodetector and also signalto-noise ratio values: 200, 100, 70, 20, 10. Signal-to-noise ratio has been calculated as a difference between maximum image intensity of the test-object and the background which is divided by mean-square deviation of the background. The accuracy for determination of coordinates has been improved by 0.5-1 order in case when there was an increase in a signal-to-noise ratio. Accuracy

  1. Laser-based irradiation apparatus and method to measure the functional dose-rate response of semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Kevin M [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-05-20

    A broad-beam laser irradiation apparatus can measure the parametric or functional response of a semiconductor device to exposure to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light. Comparisons of dose-rate response from before, during, and after accelerated aging of a device, or from periodic sampling of devices from fielded operational systems can determine if aging has affected the device's overall functionality. The dependence of these changes on equivalent dose-rate pulse intensity and/or duration can be measured with the apparatus. The synchronized introduction of external electrical transients into the device under test can be used to simulate the electrical effects of the surrounding circuitry's response to a radiation exposure while exposing the device to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light.

  2. Study of Fish Response Using Particle Image Velocimetry and High-Speed, High-Resolution Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Mueller, Robert P.

    2004-10-23

    Department of Energy's Hydropower Program, we identified three major research areas of interest: free swimming, the boundary layer over fish, and kinematic response of fish. We propose that the highest priority is to characterize the kinematic response of fish to different turbulent environments such as high shear/turbulence and hydrodynamic disturbances created by solid structures such as deflector and turbine runner blade; the next priority is to map the boundary layer over swimming fish; the last is to document the behavior of freely swimming fish, focusing on fish of our interest. Grid turbulence and Karman vortex street will be employed to map the boundary layers over fish and investigate the effects of environmental disturbances on the swimming performance of fish, because they are well established and documented in engineering literature and are representative of fish's swimming environments. Extreme conditions characteristic of turbine environments, such as strong shear environment and collision, will be investigated. Through controlled laboratory studies, the fish injury mechanism from different sources will be evaluated in isolation. The major goals are to: gain first-hand knowledge of the biological effects under such extreme hydraulic environments in which fish could lack the capability to overcome the perturbations and be vulnerable to injury; Better understand field results by integrating the laboratory studies with the responses of sensor fish device; More importantly, provide well-defined validation cases and boundary conditions for geometry-based computational fluid-structure interaction modeling in order to simulate the complex hydraulic environments in advanced hydropower systems and their effects on fish, greatly enhancing the potential to use CFD as a bio-hydraulic design alternative.

  3. Efficient use of mobile devices for quantification of pressure injury images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Zapirain, Begonya; Sierra-Sosa, Daniel; Ortiz P, David; Isaza-Monsalve, Mariano; Elmaghraby, Adel

    2018-04-17

    Pressure Injuries are chronic wounds that are formed due to the constriction of the soft tissues against bone prominences. In order to assess these injuries, the medical personnel carry out the evaluation and diagnosis using visual methods and manual measurements, which can be inaccurate and may generate discomfort in the patients. By using segmentation techniques, the Pressure Injuries can be extracted from an image and accurately parameterized, leading to a correct diagnosis. In general, these techniques are based on the solution of differential equations and the involved numerical methods are demanding in terms of computational resources. In previous work, we proposed a technique developed using toroidal parametric equations for image decomposition and segmentation without solving differential equations. In this paper, we present the development of a mobile application useful for the non-contact assessment of Pressure Injuries based on the toroidal decomposition from images. The usage of this technique allows us to achieve an accurate segmentation almost 8 times faster than Active Contours without Edges (ACWE) and Dynamic Contours methods. We describe the techniques and the implementation for Android devices using Python and Kivy. This application allows for the segmentation and parameterization of injuries, obtain relevant information for the diagnosis and tracking the evolution of patient's injuries.

  4. Analysis of interfraction and intrafraction variation during tangential breast irradiation with an electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Ryan P.; Bloch, Peter; Harris, Eleanor E.; McDonough, James; Sarkar, Abhirup; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Steven; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the daily setup variation and the anatomic movement of the heart and lungs during breast irradiation with tangential photon beams, as measured with an electronic portal imaging device. Methods and materials: Analysis of 1,709 portal images determined changes in the radiation field during a treatment course in 8 patients. Values obtained for every image included central lung distance (CLD) and area of lung and heart within the irradiated field. The data from these measurements were used to evaluate variation from setup between treatment days and motion due to respiration and/or patient movement during treatment delivery. Results: The effect of respiratory motion and movement during treatment was minimal: the maximum range in CLD for any patient on any day was 0.25 cm. The variation caused by day-to-day setup variation was greater, with CLD values for patients ranging from 0.59 cm to 2.94 cm. Similar findings were found for heart and lung areas. Conclusions: There is very little change in CLD and corresponding lung and heart area during individual radiation treatment fractions in breast tangential fields, compared with a relatively greater amount of variation that occurs between days

  5. Synchrotron Bragg diffraction imaging characterization of synthetic diamond crystals for optical and electronic power device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Thi, Thu Nhi; Morse, J; Caliste, D; Fernandez, B; Eon, D; Härtwig, J; Barbay, C; Mer-Calfati, C; Tranchant, N; Arnault, J C; Lafford, T A; Baruchel, J

    2017-04-01

    Bragg diffraction imaging enables the quality of synthetic single-crystal diamond substrates and their overgrown, mostly doped, diamond layers to be characterized. This is very important for improving diamond-based devices produced for X-ray optics and power electronics applications. The usual first step for this characterization is white-beam X-ray diffraction topography, which is a simple and fast method to identify the extended defects (dislocations, growth sectors, boundaries, stacking faults, overall curvature etc. ) within the crystal. This allows easy and quick comparison of the crystal quality of diamond plates available from various commercial suppliers. When needed, rocking curve imaging (RCI) is also employed, which is the quantitative counterpart of monochromatic Bragg diffraction imaging. RCI enables the local determination of both the effective misorientation, which results from lattice parameter variation and the local lattice tilt, and the local Bragg position. Maps derived from these parameters are used to measure the magnitude of the distortions associated with polishing damage and the depth of this damage within the volume of the crystal. For overgrown layers, these maps also reveal the distortion induced by the incorporation of impurities such as boron, or the lattice parameter variations associated with the presence of growth-incorporated nitrogen. These techniques are described, and their capabilities for studying the quality of diamond substrates and overgrown layers, and the surface damage caused by mechanical polishing, are illustrated by examples.

  6. Devices of Responsibility: Over a Decade of Responsible Research and Innovation Initiatives for Nanotechnologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley-Egan, Clare; Bowman, Diana M; Robinson, Douglas K R

    2017-10-10

    Responsible research and innovation (RRI) has come to represent a change in the relationship between science, technology and society. With origins in the democratisation of science, and the inclusion of ethical and societal aspects in research and development activities, RRI offers a means of integrating society and the research and innovation communities. In this article, we frame RRI activities through the lens of layers of science and technology governance as a means of characterising the context in which the RRI activity is positioned and the goal of those actors promoting the RRI activities in shaping overall governance patterns. RRI began to emerge during a time of considerable deliberation about the societal and governance challenges around nanotechnology, in which stakeholders were looking for new ways of integrating notions of responsibility in nanotechnology research and development. For this reason, this article focuses on nanotechnology as the site for exploring the evolution and growth of RRI.

  7. Science-based response planning guidance for the first 100 minutes of the response to a radiological dispersal device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musolino, S.V.; Harper, F.T.

    2016-01-01

    The first 100 minutes of a response to a radiological dispersal device are critical as this period will set the stage for how the overall response will be executed. First responders will be tasked with multiple activities such as confirming a radiological release, conducting lifesaving rescue operations, issuing protective actions, and beginning characterization of the scene. These activities need to take place as soon as the responders arrive on the scene (the first few minutes). The effectiveness of these early activities will define how well or how poorly the response will be in the emergency phase. The document which is under development provides guidance that can be used for planning an effective response to an RDD that will result in protection of the responders and the members of the public. The information is based on research and results of extensive experiments conducted by the Department of Energy National Laboratories. This guidance provides a realistic estimate of the possible consequences of an RDD detonation and delineates five missions and ten tactics that should be executed by the first responders and local response agencies in the first 100 minutes of a response. The guidance includes recommendations on how to execute the strategy, equipment requirements including personal protective equipment and public messaging

  8. Hierarchical Feature Extraction With Local Neural Response for Image Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Wei, Yantao; Li, Luoqing; Chen, C L P

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a hierarchical feature extraction method is proposed for image recognition. The key idea of the proposed method is to extract an effective feature, called local neural response (LNR), of the input image with nontrivial discrimination and invariance properties by alternating between local coding and maximum pooling operation. The local coding, which is carried out on the locally linear manifold, can extract the salient feature of image patches and leads to a sparse measure matrix on which maximum pooling is carried out. The maximum pooling operation builds the translation invariance into the model. We also show that other invariant properties, such as rotation and scaling, can be induced by the proposed model. In addition, a template selection algorithm is presented to reduce computational complexity and to improve the discrimination ability of the LNR. Experimental results show that our method is robust to local distortion and clutter compared with state-of-the-art algorithms.

  9. Combining the Converse Humidity/Resistance Response Behaviors of RGO Films for Flexible Logic Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong

    2017-03-23

    Carbon nanomaterials have excellent humidity sensing performance. Here, we demonstrate that reduced-graphene-oxide- (rGO) based conductive films with different thermal reduction times have gradient and invertible humidity/electrical resistance responses: rGO films (< 11 h, negative response, regarded as a signal of “0”), rGO films (around 11-13 h, balance point) and rGO films (> 13 h, negative response, regarded as a signal of “1”). We propose a new mechanism that describes a “scale”-like model for rGO films to explain these behaviors based on contributions from Ohm-contact resistance and capacitive reactance at interplate junctions, and intrinsic resistances of the nanoplates, respectively. This mechanism is accordingly validated via a series of experiments and electrical impedance spectroscopies, which complement more classical models based on proton conductivity. To explore the practical applications of the converse humidity/resistance responses, three simple flexible logic devices were developed, i) a rGO pattern for humidity-insensitive conductive film, which has the potential to greatly improve the stability of carbon-based electrical device to humidity; ii) a Janus pattern of rGO films for gesture recognition, which is very useful to human/machine interactions; iii) a sandwich pattern of rGO films for 3-dimensional (3D) noncontact sensing, which will be complementary to existing 3D touch technique.

  10. A Monte Carlo calculation model of electronic portal imaging device for transit dosimetry through heterogeneous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jihyung; Jung, Jae Won, E-mail: jungj@ecu.edu [Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858 (United States); Kim, Jong Oh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Yeo, Inhwan [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a fast Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation model of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based on its effective atomic number modeling in the XVMC code. Methods: A previously developed EPID model, based on the XVMC code by density scaling of EPID structures, was modified by additionally considering effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) of each structure and adopting a phase space file from the EGSnrc code. The model was tested under various homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms and field sizes by comparing the calculations in the model with measurements in EPID. In order to better evaluate the model, the performance of the XVMC code was separately tested by comparing calculated dose to water with ion chamber (IC) array measurement in the plane of EPID. Results: In the EPID plane, calculated dose to water by the code showed agreement with IC measurements within 1.8%. The difference was averaged across the in-field regions of the acquired profiles for all field sizes and phantoms. The maximum point difference was 2.8%, affected by proximity of the maximum points to penumbra and MC noise. The EPID model showed agreement with measured EPID images within 1.3%. The maximum point difference was 1.9%. The difference dropped from the higher value of the code by employing the calibration that is dependent on field sizes and thicknesses for the conversion of calculated images to measured images. Thanks to the Z{sub eff} correction, the EPID model showed a linear trend of the calibration factors unlike those of the density-only-scaled model. The phase space file from the EGSnrc code sharpened penumbra profiles significantly, improving agreement of calculated profiles with measured profiles. Conclusions: Demonstrating high accuracy, the EPID model with the associated calibration system may be used for in vivo dosimetry of radiation therapy. Through this study, a MC model of EPID has been developed, and their performance has been rigorously

  11. Tunable Schottky barrier and high responsivity in graphene/Si-nanotip optoelectronic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bartolomeo, Antonio; Giubileo, Filippo; Luongo, Giuseppe; Iemmo, Laura; Martucciello, Nadia; Niu, Gang; Fraschke, Mirko; Skibitzki, Oliver; Schroeder, Thomas; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate tunable Schottky barrier height and record photo-responsivity in a new-concept device made of a single-layer CVD graphene transferred onto a matrix of nanotips patterned on n-type Si wafer. The original layout, where nano-sized graphene/Si heterojunctions alternate to graphene areas exposed to the electric field of the Si substrate, which acts both as diode cathode and transistor gate, results in a two-terminal barristor with single-bias control of the Schottky barrier. The nanotip patterning favors light absorption, and the enhancement of the electric field at the tip apex improves photo-charge separation and enables internal gain by impact ionization. These features render the device a photodetector with responsivity (3 {{A}} {{{W}}}-1 for white LED light at 3 {{mW}} {{{cm}}}-2 intensity) almost an order of magnitude higher than commercial photodiodes. We extensively characterize the voltage and the temperature dependence of the device parameters, and prove that the multi-junction approach does not add extra-inhomogeneity to the Schottky barrier height distribution. We also introduce a new phenomenological graphene/semiconductor diode equation, which well describes the experimental I-V characteristics both in forward and reverse bias.

  12. Behavioral responses of three lemur species to different food enrichment devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Morgan E; Shapiro, Hannah G; Ehmke, Erin E

    2018-05-01

    Environmental enrichment is a tool used to promote the welfare and well-being of captive animals by encouraging the display of species-specific behaviors and reducing the stress or boredom induced by captive environments. Lemurs are highly endangered, yet few studies have analyzed the behavioral impacts of enrichment on captive populations. We studied the impacts of two novel enrichment devices on three lemur species (ring-tailed lemurs [Lemur catta], red-ruffed lemurs [Varecia rubra], and Coquerel's sifaka [Propithecus coquereli]) to determine both the overall and species-specific impacts of enrichment on lemur behavior. We recorded lemur behavior using the continuous sampling method to obtain behavior duration and analyzed our results using ANOVA Repeated Measures. Results showed enrichment effectiveness differed for each species and that different enrichment devices had varying impacts on lemur behavior across all species. We attributed the differences in species-specific responses to the unique locomotor patterns and methods of diet acquisition of each species, and the variances in behavioral responses across all species to the characteristics of each device. Our study highlights the importance of species-specific enrichment and encourages further research in this field in order to maximize the positive effects of enrichment, which in turn has the potential to affect the overall well-being of captive populations. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Easy monitoring of velocity fields in microfluidic devices using spatiotemporal image correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travagliati, Marco; Girardo, Salvatore; Pisignano, Dario; Beltram, Fabio; Cecchini, Marco

    2013-09-03

    Spatiotemporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) is a simple and powerful technique, well established as a tool to probe protein dynamics in cells. Recently, its potential as a tool to map velocity fields in lab-on-a-chip systems was discussed. However, the lack of studies on its performance has prevented its use for microfluidics applications. Here, we systematically and quantitatively explore STICS microvelocimetry in microfluidic devices. We exploit a simple experimental setup, based on a standard bright-field inverted microscope (no fluorescence required) and a high-fps camera, and apply STICS to map liquid flow in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels. Our data demonstrates optimal 2D velocimetry up to 10 mm/s flow and spatial resolution down to 5 μm.

  14. Apparatus for minimizing radiation exposure and improving resolution in radiation imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashe, J.B.; Williams, G.H.; Sypal, K.L.

    1978-01-01

    A collimator is disclosed for minimizing radiation exposure and improving resolution in radiation imaging devices. The collimator provides a penetrating beam of radiation from a source thereof, which beam is substantially non-diverging in at least one direction. In the preferred embodiment, the collimator comprises an elongated sandwich assembly of a plurality of layers of material exhibiting relatively high radiation attenuation characteristics, which attenuating layers are spaced apart and separated from one another by interleaved layers of material exhibiting relatively low radiation attenuation characteristics. The sandwich assembly is adapted for lengthwise disposition and orientation between a radiation source and a target or receiver such that the attenuating layers are parallel to the desired direction of the beam with the interleaved spacing layers providing direct paths for the radiation

  15. Very high frame rate volumetric integration of depth images on mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kähler, Olaf; Adrian Prisacariu, Victor; Yuheng Ren, Carl; Sun, Xin; Torr, Philip; Murray, David

    2015-11-01

    Volumetric methods provide efficient, flexible and simple ways of integrating multiple depth images into a full 3D model. They provide dense and photorealistic 3D reconstructions, and parallelised implementations on GPUs achieve real-time performance on modern graphics hardware. To run such methods on mobile devices, providing users with freedom of movement and instantaneous reconstruction feedback, remains challenging however. In this paper we present a range of modifications to existing volumetric integration methods based on voxel block hashing, considerably improving their performance and making them applicable to tablet computer applications. We present (i) optimisations for the basic data structure, and its allocation and integration; (ii) a highly optimised raycasting pipeline; and (iii) extensions to the camera tracker to incorporate IMU data. In total, our system thus achieves frame rates up 47 Hz on a Nvidia Shield Tablet and 910 Hz on a Nvidia GTX Titan XGPU, or even beyond 1.1 kHz without visualisation.

  16. Architecture, development and implementation of a SWIR to visible integrated up-conversion imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarusi, Gabby; Templeman, Tzvi; Hechster, Elad; Nissim, Nimrod; Vitenberg, Vladimir; Maman, Nitzan; Tal, Amir; Solodar, Assi; Makov, Guy; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim; Visoly-Fisher, Iris; Golan, Yuval

    2016-04-01

    A new concept of short wavelength infrared (SWIR) to visible upconversion integrated imaging device is proposed, modeled and some initial measured results are presented. The device is a hybrid inorganic-organic device that comprises six nano-metric scale sub-layers grown on n-type GaAs substrates. The first layer is a ~300nm thick PbSe nano-columnar absorber layer grown in (111) orientation to the substrate plan (100), with a diameter of 8- 10nm and therefore exhibit quantum confinement effects parallel to the substrate and bulk properties perpendicular to it. The advantage of this structure is the high oscillator strength and hence absorption to incoming SWIR photons while maintaining the high bulk mobility of photo-excited charges along the columns. The top of the PbSe absorber layer is coated with 20nm thick metal layer that serves as a dual sided mirror, as well as a potentially surface plasmon enhanced absorption in the PbSe nano-columns layer. The photo-excited charges (holes and electrons in opposite directions) are drifted under an external applied field to the OLED section (that is composed of a hole transport layer, an emission layer and an electron transport layer) where they recombine with injected electron from the transparent cathode and emit visible light through this cathode. Due to the high absorption and enhanced transport properties this architecture has the potential of high quantum efficiency, low cost and easy implementation in any optical system. As a bench-mark, alternative concept where InGaAs/InP heterojunction couple to liquid crystal optical spatial light modulator (OSLM) structure was built that shows a full upconversion to visible of 1550nm laser light.

  17. Development of a miniature multiple reference optical coherence tomography imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Paul M.; O'Riordan, Colm; Collins, Seán.; O'Brien, Peter; Wilson, Carol; Hogan, Josh; Leahy, Martin J.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple reference optical coherence tomography (MR-OCT) is a new technology ideally suited to low-cost, compact OCT imaging. This modality is an extension of time-domain OCT with the addition of a partial mirror in front of the reference mirror. This enables extended, simultaneous depth scanning with the relatively short sweep of a miniature voice coil motor on which the scanning mirror is mounted. Applications of this technology include biometric security, ophthalmology, personal health monitoring and non-destructive testing. This work details early-stage development of the first iteration of a miniature MR-OCT device. This device utilizes a fiber-coupled input from an off-board superluminescent diode (SLD). Typical dimensions of the module are 40 × 57 mm, but future designs are expected to be more compact. Off-the-shelf miniature optical components, voice coil motors and photodetectors are used, with the complexity of design depending on specific applications. The photonic module can be configured as either polarized or non-polarized and can include balanced detection. The photodetectors are directly connected to a printed circuit board under the module containing a transimpedance amplifier with complimentary outputs. The results shown in this work are from the non-polarized device. Assembly of the photonic modules requires extensive planning. In choosing the optical components, Zemax simulations are performed to model the beam characteristics. The physical layout is modeled using Solidworks and each component is placed and aligned via a well-designed alignment procedure involving an active-alignment pick-and-place assembly system.

  18. Registration of partially overlapping surfaces for range image based augmented reality on mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgus, T.; Franz, A. M.; Seitel, A.; Marz, K.; Bartha, L.; Fangerau, M.; Mersmann, S.; Groch, A.; Meinzer, H.-P.; Maier-Hein, L.

    2012-02-01

    Visualization of anatomical data for disease diagnosis, surgical planning, or orientation during interventional therapy is an integral part of modern health care. However, as anatomical information is typically shown on monitors provided by a radiological work station, the physician has to mentally transfer internal structures shown on the screen to the patient. To address this issue, we recently presented a new approach to on-patient visualization of 3D medical images, which combines the concept of augmented reality (AR) with an intuitive interaction scheme. Our method requires mounting a range imaging device, such as a Time-of-Flight (ToF) camera, to a portable display (e.g. a tablet PC). During the visualization process, the pose of the camera and thus the viewing direction of the user is continuously determined with a surface matching algorithm. By moving the device along the body of the patient, the physician is given the impression of looking directly into the human body. In this paper, we present and evaluate a new method for camera pose estimation based on an anisotropic trimmed variant of the well-known iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. According to in-silico and in-vivo experiments performed with computed tomography (CT) and ToF data of human faces, knees and abdomens, our new method is better suited for surface registration with ToF data than the established trimmed variant of the ICP, reducing the target registration error (TRE) by more than 60%. The TRE obtained (approx. 4-5 mm) is promising for AR visualization, but clinical applications require maximization of robustness and run-time.

  19. Evaluation of early imaging response criteria in glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladwish, Adam; Koh, Eng-Siew; Hoisak, Jeremy; Lockwood, Gina; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Mason, Warren; Yu, Eugene; Laperriere, Normand J; Ménard, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    Early and accurate prediction of response to cancer treatment through imaging criteria is particularly important in rapidly progressive malignancies such as Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM). We sought to assess the predictive value of structural imaging response criteria one month after concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) in patients with GBM. Thirty patients were enrolled from 2005 to 2007 (median follow-up 22 months). Tumor volumes were delineated at the boundary of abnormal contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images prior to and 1 month after RT. Clinical Progression [CP] occurred when clinical and/or radiological events led to a change in chemotherapy management. Early Radiologic Progression [ERP] was defined as the qualitative interpretation of radiological progression one month post-RT. Patients with ERP were determined pseudoprogressors if clinically stable for ≥6 months. Receiver-operator characteristics were calculated for RECIST and MacDonald criteria, along with alternative thresholds against 1 year CP-free survival and 2 year overall survival (OS). 13 patients (52%) were found to have ERP, of whom 5 (38.5%) were pseudoprogressors. Patients with ERP had a lower median OS (11.2 mo) than those without (not reached) (p < 0.001). True progressors fared worse than pseudoprogressors (median survival 7.2 mo vs. 19.0 mo, p < 0.001). Volume thresholds performed slightly better compared to area and diameter thresholds in ROC analysis. Responses of > 25% in volume or > 15% in area were most predictive of OS. We show that while a subjective interpretation of early radiological progression from baseline is generally associated with poor outcome, true progressors cannot be distinguished from pseudoprogressors. In contrast, the magnitude of early imaging volumetric response may be a predictive and quantitative metric of favorable outcome

  20. Characterization of lipid films by an angle-interrogation surface plasmon resonance imaging device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Linlin; Wang, Qiong; Yang, Zhong; Wang, Wangang; Hu, Ning; Luo, Hongyan; Liao, Yanjian; Zheng, Xiaolin; Yang, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Surface topographies of lipid films have an important significance in the analysis of the preparation of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). In order to achieve accurately high-throughput and rapidly analysis of surface topographies of lipid films, a homemade SPR imaging device is constructed based on the classical Kretschmann configuration and an angle interrogation manner. A mathematical model is developed to accurately describe the shift including the light path in different conditions and the change of the illumination point on the CCD camera, and thus a SPR curve for each sampling point can also be achieved, based on this calculation method. The experiment results show that the topographies of lipid films formed in distinct experimental conditions can be accurately characterized, and the measuring resolution of the thickness lipid film may reach 0.05 nm. Compared with existing SPRi devices, which realize detection by monitoring the change of the reflective-light intensity, this new SPRi system can achieve the change of the resonance angle on the entire sensing surface. Thus, it has higher detection accuracy as the traditional angle-interrogation SPR sensor, with much wider detectable range of refractive index. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Central venous device-related thrombosis as imaged with MDCT in oncologic patients: prevalence and findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalano, Orlando; Castelguidone, Elisabetta de Lutio di; Granata, Vincenza; D'Errico, Adolfo Gallipoli; Sandomenico, Claudia; Petrillo, Mario; Aprea, Pasquale

    2011-01-01

    Background: Venous thrombosis is a common occurrence in cancer patients, developing spontaneously or in combination with indwelling central venous devices (CVD). Purpose: To analyze the multidetector CT (MDCT) prevalence, appearance, and significance of catheter related thoracic venous thrombosis in oncologic patients and to determine the percentage of thrombi identified in the original reports. Material and Methods: Five hundred consecutive patients were considered. Inclusion criteria were: presence of a CVD; availability of a contrast-enhanced MDCT; and cancer history. Exclusion criteria were: direct tumor compression/infiltration of the veins; poor image quality; device tip not in the scanned volume; and missing clinical data. Seventeen (3.5%) out of the final 481 patients had a diagnosis of venous thrombosis. Results: Factors showing the highest correlation with thrombosis included peripherally-inserted CVD, right brachiocephalic vein tip location, patient performance status 3, metastatic stage disease, ongoing chemotherapy, and longstanding CVD. The highest prevalence was in patients with lymphoma, lung carcinoma, melanoma, and gynecologic malignancies. Eleven out of 17 cases had not been identified in the original report. Conclusion: CVD-related thrombosis is not uncommon in cancer patients and can also be observed in outpatients with a good performance status and a non-metastatic disease. Thrombi can be very tiny. Radiologists should be aware of the possibility to identify (or overlook) small thrombi

  2. Simultaneous application of two independent EIT devices for real-time multi-plane imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schullcke, B; Krueger-Ziolek, S; Gong, B; Mueller-Lisse, U; Moeller, K

    2016-09-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of many lung diseases like cystic fibrosis (CF) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) could benefit from 3D ventilation information. Applying two EIT systems concurrently is a simple approach without specialized hardware that allows monitoring of regional changes of ventilation distribution inside the thorax at different planes with the high temporal resolution much valued in common single plane EIT. Effects of two simultaneously operated EIT devices on one subject were investigated to monitor rapid processes inside the thorax with a multi-plane approach. Results obtained by simulations with a virtual phantom and measurements with a phantom tank reveal that the distance of electrode planes has an important influence on the signal quality. Band-pass filters adapted according to the distance of the planes, can be used to reduce the crosstalk of the concurrent EIT systems. Besides simulations and phantom tank experiments measurements were also taken from a lung healthy volunteer to demonstrate the operation under realistic conditions. Reconstructed images indicate that it is possible to simultaneously visualize regional ventilation at different planes if settings of the EIT devices are chosen appropriately.

  3. Planning and Response to the Detonation of an Improvised Nuclear Device: Past, Present, and Future Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentz, A

    2008-07-31

    While the reality of an improvised nuclear device (IND) being detonated in an American city is unlikely, its destructive power is such that the scenario must be planned for. Upon reviewing the academic literature on the effects of and response to IND events, this report looks to actual responders from around the country. The results from the meetings of public officials in the cities show where gaps exist between theoretical knowledge and actual practice. In addition to the literature, the meetings reveal areas where future research needs to be conducted. This paper recommends that local response planners: meet to discuss the challenges of IND events; offer education to officials, the public, and responders on IND events; incorporate 'shelter-first' into response plans; provide information to the public and responders using the 3 Cs; and engage the private sector (including media) in response plans. In addition to these recommendations for the response planners, the paper provides research questions that once answered will improve response plans around the country. By following the recommendations, both groups, response planners and researchers, can help the country better prepare for and mitigate the effects of an IND detonation.

  4. Planning and Response to the Detonation of an Improvised Nuclear Device: Past, Present, and Future Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentz, A.

    2008-01-01

    While the reality of an improvised nuclear device (IND) being detonated in an American city is unlikely, its destructive power is such that the scenario must be planned for. Upon reviewing the academic literature on the effects of and response to IND events, this report looks to actual responders from around the country. The results from the meetings of public officials in the cities show where gaps exist between theoretical knowledge and actual practice. In addition to the literature, the meetings reveal areas where future research needs to be conducted. This paper recommends that local response planners: meet to discuss the challenges of IND events; offer education to officials, the public, and responders on IND events; incorporate 'shelter-first' into response plans; provide information to the public and responders using the 3 Cs; and engage the private sector (including media) in response plans. In addition to these recommendations for the response planners, the paper provides research questions that once answered will improve response plans around the country. By following the recommendations, both groups, response planners and researchers, can help the country better prepare for and mitigate the effects of an IND detonation

  5. An Implementation of Document Image Reconstruction System on a Smart Device Using a 1D Histogram Calibration Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the smart devices equipped with imaging functions are widely spreading for consumer application. It is very convenient for people to record information using these devices. For example, people can photo one page of a book in a library or they can capture an interesting piece of news on the bulletin board when walking on the street. But sometimes, one shot full area image cannot give a sufficient resolution for OCR soft or for human visual recognition. Therefore, people would prefer to take several partial character images of a readable size and then stitch them together in an efficient way. In this study, we propose a print document acquisition method using a device with a video camera. A one-dimensional histogram based self-calibration algorithm is developed for calibration. Because the calculation cost is low, it can be installed on a smartphone. The simulation result shows that the calibration and stitching are well performed.

  6. Feasibility study on an integrated AEC-grid device for the optimization of image quality and exposure dose in mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyo-Tae; Yun, Ryang-Young; Han, Moo-Jae; Heo, Ye-Ji; Song, Yong-Keun; Heo, Sung-Wook; Oh, Kyeong-Min; Park, Sung-Kwang

    2017-10-01

    Currently, in the radiation diagnosis field, mammography is used for the early detection of breast cancer. In addition, studies are being conducted on a grid to produce high-quality images. Although the grid ratio of the grid, which affects the scattering removal rate, must be increased to improve image quality, it increases the total exposure dose. While the use of automatic exposure control is recommended to minimize this problem, existing mammography equipment, unlike general radiography equipment, is mounted on the back of a detector. Therefore, the device is greatly affected by the detector and supporting device, and it is difficult to control the exposure dose. Accordingly, in this research, an integrated AEC-grid device that simultaneously performs AEC and grid functions was used to minimize the unnecessary exposure dose while removing scattering, thereby realizing superior image quality.

  7. Role of growth temperature on the frequency response characteristics of pentacene-based organic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Yayun; Zhang, Yang; He, Wenqiang; Wu, Sujuan; Zeng, Min; Zhang, Zhang; Gao, Xingsen; Lu, Xubing; Liu, J-M; Liu, Chuan; Minari, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    The ac frequency response characteristics (FRC) of organic thin film transistors and metal-insulator semiconductor diodes were highly improved by controlling the morphology and electrical characteristics of semiconducting pentacene films. The devices with films grown at 50 °C show much higher cutoff frequency and better frequency stability of flat-band voltage, as compared to those with films grown at other temperatures below or above. The improvement mainly originates from the maximum field effect carrier mobility of 0.78 cm 2 V −1 s −1 and a small metal/organic contact resistance (R c ) obtained in the optimum thin film transistors. Our results indicate growth temperature precisely tunes the film microstructure and metal/semiconductor interface, which together determine the FRC of pentacene-based organic devices. (paper)

  8. Quantitative SPECT brain imaging: Effects of attenuation and detector response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilland, D.R.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Bowsher, J.E.; Turkington, T.G.; Liang, Z.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    Two physical factors that substantially degrade quantitative accuracy in SPECT imaging of the brain are attenuation and detector response. In addition to the physical factors, random noise in the reconstructed image can greatly affect the quantitative measurement. The purpose of this work was to implement two reconstruction methods that compensate for attenuation and detector response, a 3D maximum likelihood-EM method (ML) and a filtered backprojection method (FB) with Metz filter and Chang attenuation compensation, and compare the methods in terms of quantitative accuracy and image noise. The methods were tested on simulated data of the 3D Hoffman brain phantom. The simulation incorporated attenuation and distance-dependent detector response. Bias and standard deviation of reconstructed voxel intensities were measured in the gray and white matter regions. The results with ML showed that in both the gray and white matter regions as the number of iterations increased, bias decreased and standard deviation increased. Similar results were observed with FB as the Metz filter power increased. In both regions, ML had smaller standard deviation than FB for a given bias. Reconstruction times for the ML method have been greatly reduced through efficient coding, limited source support, and by computing attenuation factors only along rays perpendicular to the detector

  9. X-ray diagnostic device with an X-ray image amplifier, whose output image is fed into a movie camera, as well as a brightness control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, H

    1978-02-09

    The X-ray relief appearing behind a patient is immediately or with amplificating foils converted into a latent film image. By using a X-ray image amplifier the X-ray relief is then converted into a reduced and brighter optical image and fed into a photographic or movie camera and shot. To avoid a reduction in the image quality by quantum noise and a too large patient and physician dose a brightness control is provided for the X-ray diagnostic device. The control only dims as far as a brightness per image is produced that avoids quantum noise. On the other side it opens more by strongly beam absorbing patients or a smaller imaging ratio of the X-ray image amplifier to obtain a desired irradiation.

  10. X-ray diagnostic device with an X-ray image amplifier, whose output image is fed into a movie camera, as well as a brightness control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, H.

    1978-01-01

    The X-ray relief appearing behind a patient is immediately or with amplificating foils converted into a latent film image. By using a X-ray image amplifier the X-ray relief is then converted into a reduced and brighter optical image and fed into a photographic or movie camera and shot. To avoid a reduction in the image quality by quantum noise and a too large patient and physician dose a brightness control is provided for the X-ray diagnostic device. The control only dims as far as a brightness per image is produced that avoids quantum noise. On the other side it opens more by strongly beam absorbing patients or a smaller imaging ratio of the X-ray image amplifier to obtain a desired irradiation. (DG) [de

  11. Idiopathic Chronic Parotitis: Imaging Findings and Sialendoscopic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineman, Thomas E; Kacker, Ashutosh; Kutler, David I

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate imaging and sialendoscopic findings to therapeutic response in patients with idiopathic chronic parotitis. We retrospectively reviewed 122 consecutive sialendoscopies performed in an academic medical center by two surgeons between 2008 and 2013. Forty-one (34%) and 54 (44%) patients were excluded on the basis of having parotid or submandibular sialolith, respectively. Nineteen cases were included in the study with idiopathic chronic parotitis. There was a median follow-up of 5 months. Computed tomography (CT) imaging had a sensitivity and specificity of 80.0 and 71.4%, respectively, for predicting abnormal findings on sialendoscopy, while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) had 100% accuracy in a small set of cases. In glands with noticeable pathology present on preoperative imaging or sialendoscopy, 11 out of 12 glands (92%) treated experienced symptomatic improvement, while 3 out of 7 glands (43%) without pathology on imaging or endoscopy experienced symptomatic improvement (p = 0.038). Sialendoscopy for the treatment of idiopathic chronic parotid disease can improve pain and swelling with a higher frequency of success in patients with abnormalities noted on endoscopy. CT and MRI have a moderate degree of accuracy in predicting which patients will benefit from therapeutic sialendoscopy. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Simulated human eye retina adaptive optics imaging system based on a liquid crystal on silicon device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Baoguang; Cao Zhaoliang; Mu Quanquan; Hu Lifa; Li Chao; Xuan Li

    2008-01-01

    In order to obtain a clear image of the retina of model eye, an adaptive optics system used to correct the wave-front error is introduced in this paper. The spatial light modulator that we use here is a liquid crystal on a silicon device instead of a conversional deformable mirror. A paper with carbon granule is used to simulate the retina of human eye. The pupil size of the model eye is adjustable (3-7 mm). A Shack–Hartman wave-front sensor is used to detect the wave-front aberration. With this construction, a value of peak-to-valley is achieved to be 0.086 λ, where λ is wavelength. The modulation transfer functions before and after corrections are compared. And the resolution of this system after correction (691p/m) is very close to the dirraction limit resolution. The carbon granule on the white paper which has a size of 4.7 μm is seen clearly. The size of the retina cell is between 4 and 10 mu;m. So this system has an ability to image the human eye's retina. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  13. Compact plane illumination plugin device to enable light sheet fluorescence imaging of multi-cellular organisms on an inverted wide-field microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Zeyi; Lee, Juhyun; Jiang, Hao; Dong, Siyan; Jen, Nelson; Hsiai, Tzung; Ho, Chih-Ming; Fei, Peng

    2015-01-01

    We developed a compact plane illumination plugin (PIP) device which enabled plane illumination and light sheet fluorescence imaging on a conventional inverted microscope. The PIP device allowed the integration of microscope with tunable laser sheet profile, fast image acquisition, and 3-D scanning. The device is both compact, measuring approximately 15 by 5 by 5 cm, and cost-effective, since we employed consumer electronics and an inexpensive device molding method. We demonstrated that PIP pr...

  14. Evaluation of set-of errors in pelvic irradiation with electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiaoying; Zhang Zhen; Wang Wenchao; Ren Jun; Guo Xiaomei; Lu Huizhong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the systematic and random set-up error in the pelvic irradiation u- sing electronic portal imaging device(EPID) to provide institution-specific margin for PTV design in pelvic cancer treatment planning with 3D conformal therapy and/or IMRT. Methods: From May to August 2005, twelve patients who received pelvic irradiation, were involved in this study. CT simulations were performed and DRRs were generated as the reference images. Ant-post and lateral portal images were taken daily, and total of 244 sets of EPID images were collected for the whole group. The translational shifts along right-left, superior-inferior and anterior-posterior directions were calculated with aligning the pelvic bony structures on the DRRs and electronic portal images. The systematic and random setup errors were evaluated based on the 244 sets of data. PTV margin was assessed assuming target rotation was negligible. Results: In the right- left (R-L), superior-inferior (S-I) and anterior-posterior (A-P) directions, the maximum shifts were 9.9, 14.0 and 21.1 mm and the systematic setup errors were 0.5, 0.2 and 2.3 mm respectively. For all 244 sets of data in this study, the frequency of the shift larger than 10 mm were 0% (R-L), 1% (S-I) and 3% (A -P); and in R-L and S-I direction, 92% and 91% of the times the shift was smaller than 5 mm. However, only 79% of the times the A-P shift was less than 5 mm. Conclusions: It is suggested in this study that in order to achieve a target coverage of better than 95% of the times throughout the pelvic irradiation in our institution, a 5 mm PTV margin in right-left and superior-inferior directions is required, however, the anterior-posterior margin needs to be increased to at least 10 mm. One needs to be cautious though when applying the PTV margin derived from small sample of patient population to individual patient. (authors)

  15. High Tc superconducting nonlinear inductance and quick response magnetic sensor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, T.; Mohri, K.; Ozeki, A.; Shibata, T.

    1990-01-01

    A flux penetration model considering the demagnetizing effect is presented in order to analyze the nonlinear inductance characteristics for HTcSC. Various quick response magnetic devices such as modulators, magnetic switches and magnetic sensors were constructed. The magnetizing frequency can be set up more than 10 MHz which is difficult to achieve with the conventional ferromagnetic bulk cores. The cut-off frequency of 1.6 MHz was obtained for the sensors using the HTcSC cores at a magnetizing frequency of 11.5 MHz

  16. Design of the Caltrans Seismic Response Modification Device (SRMD) test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzoni, G.; Seible, F.

    1998-01-01

    In the Seismic retrofit design of California's Toll Bridges, seismic isolation is used in several bridges to limit the seismic force input into the superstructure and to avoid costly superstructure retrofit measures which would require partial lane closures and traffic interruptions. Isolation bearings and dampers of the size required for these large span bridges have not been built or tested to date. This paper describes the design and construction of a full scale testing facility which will allow the real-time 6-DOF dynamic characterization of the seismic response modification devices designed for California's Toll Bridges. (author)

  17. Surge protective device response to steep front transient in low voltage circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcuz, J.; Binczak, S.; Bilbault, J.M. [Universite de Bourgogne, Dijon (France)], Emails: jerome.marcuz@ laposte.net, stbinc@u-bourgogne.fr, bilbault@u-bourgogne.fr; Girard, F. [ADEE Electronic, Pont de Pany (France)

    2007-07-01

    Surge propagation on cables of electrical or data lines leads to a major protection problem as the number of equipment based on solid-state circuits or microprocessors increases. Sub-microsecond components of real surge waveform has to be taken into account for a proper protection even in the case of surges caused by indirect lightning effects. The response of a model of transient voltage suppressor diode based surge protection device (SPD) to fast front transient is analytically studied, then compared to simulations, including the lines connected to the SPD and to the protected equipment. (author)

  18. WE-E-18A-08: Towards a Next-Generation Electronic Portal Device for Simultaneous Imaging and Dose Verification in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, S; Vial, P; Holloway, L; Kuncic, Z

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This work forms part of an ongoing study to develop a next-generation electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for simultaneous imaging and dose verification in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to characterize the imaging performance of a novel EPID that has previously been demonstrated to exhibit a water-equivalent response. The EPID ' s response was quantified in several configurations and model parameters were empirically validated against experimental measurements. Methods: A MC model of a novel a-Si EPID incorporating an array of plastic scintillating fibers was developed. Square BCF-99-06A scintillator fibers with PMMA cladding (Saint-Gobain Crystals) were modelled in a matrix with total area measuring 150×150 mm 2 . The standard electromagnetic and optical physics Geant4 classes were used to simulate radiation transport from an angled slit source (6 MV energy spectrum) through the EPID and optical photons reaching the photodiodes were scored. The prototype's modulation transfer function (MTF) was simulated and validated against experimental measurements. Several optical transport parameters, fiber lengths and thicknesses of an air gap between the scintillator and photodiodes were investigated to quantify their effects on the prototype's detection efficiency, sensitivity and MTF. Results: Simulated EPID response was more sensitive to variations in geometry than in the optical parameters studied. The MTF was particularly sensitive to the introduction of a 0.5–1.0 mm air gap between the scintillator and photodiodes, which lowered the MTF relative to that simulated without the gap. As expected, increasing the fiber length increased the detector efficiency and sensitivity while decreasing the MTF. Conclusion: A model of a novel water-equivalent EPID has been developed and benchmarked against measurements using a physical prototype. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this new device and are continuing to optimize

  19. Physiological responses of adult rainbow trout experimentally released through a unique fish conveyance device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Gee, Lisa P.; Weiland, Lisa K.; Christiansen, Helena E.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the physiological stress responses (i.e., plasma levels of cortisol, glucose, and lactate) of adult Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss at selected time intervals after they had passed a distance of 15 m through a unique fish conveyance device (treatment fish) or not (controls). This device differs from traditional fish pumps in two important ways: (1) it transports objects in air, rather than pumping them from and with water; and (2) it uses a unique tube for transport that has a series of soft, deformable baffles spaced evenly apart and situated perpendicular within a rigid, but flexible outer shell. Mean concentrations of the plasma constituents never differed (P > 0.05) between control and treatment fish at 0, 1, 4, 8, or 24 h after passage, and only minor differences were apparent between the different time intervals within a group. We observed no obvious injuries on any of our fish. Our results indicate that passage through this device did not severely stress or injure fish and it may allow for the rapid and safe movement of fish at hatcheries, sorting or handling facilities, or passage obstacles.

  20. Imaging the DNA damage response with PET and SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, James C.; Koustoulidou, Sofia; Cornelissen, Bart [University of Oxford, CR-UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    DNA integrity is constantly challenged by endogenous and exogenous factors that can alter the DNA sequence, leading to mutagenesis, aberrant transcriptional activity, and cytotoxicity. Left unrepaired, damaged DNA can ultimately lead to the development of cancer. To overcome this threat, a series of complex mechanisms collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR) are able to detect the various types of DNA damage that can occur and stimulate the appropriate repair process. Each DNA damage repair pathway leads to the recruitment, upregulation, or activation of specific proteins within the nucleus, which, in some cases, can represent attractive targets for molecular imaging. Given the well-established involvement of DDR during tumorigenesis and cancer therapy, the ability to monitor these repair processes non-invasively using nuclear imaging techniques may facilitate the earlier detection of cancer and may also assist in monitoring response to DNA damaging treatment. This review article aims to provide an overview of recent efforts to develop PET and SPECT radiotracers for imaging of DNA damage repair proteins. (orig.)

  1. Real-time two-dimensional imaging of potassium ion distribution using an ion semiconductor sensor with charged coupled device technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Toshiaki; Masaki, Yoshitomo; Atsumi, Kazuya; Kato, Ryo; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional real-time observation of potassium ion distributions was achieved using an ion imaging device based on charge-coupled device (CCD) and metal-oxide semiconductor technologies, and an ion selective membrane. The CCD potassium ion image sensor was equipped with an array of 32 × 32 pixels (1024 pixels). It could record five frames per second with an area of 4.16 × 4.16 mm(2). Potassium ion images were produced instantly. The leaching of potassium ion from a 3.3 M KCl Ag/AgCl reference electrode was dynamically monitored in aqueous solution. The potassium ion selective membrane on the semiconductor consisted of plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) with bis(benzo-15-crown-5). The addition of a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane to the plasticized PVC membrane greatly improved adhesion of the membrane onto Si(3)N(4) of the semiconductor surface, and the potential response was stabilized. The potential response was linear from 10(-2) to 10(-5) M logarithmic concentration of potassium ion. The selectivity coefficients were K(K(+),Li(+))(pot) = 10(-2.85), K(K(+),Na(+))(pot) = 10(-2.30), K(K(+),Rb(+))(pot) =10(-1.16), and K(K(+),Cs(+))(pot) = 10(-2.05).

  2. Assessing the accommodation response after near visual tasks using different handheld electronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini I. Moulakaki

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To assess the accommodation response after short reading periods using a tablet and a smartphone as well as determine potential differences in the accommodation response at various stimulus vergences using a Hartmann- Shack aberrometer. Methods: Eighteen healthy subjects with astigmatism of less than 1 D, corrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better, and normal findings in an ophthalmic examination were enrolled. Accommodation responses were obtained under three different conditions: accommodation system of the eye relaxed and visually stressed with a tablet and an smartphone for 10 min, at a distance of 0.25 m from the subject's eyes. Three measurements of accommodation response were monocularly acquired at stimulus vergences ranging from 0 to 4 D (1-D step. Results: No statistically significant differences were found in the accommodation responses among the conditions. A moderate but gradually increasing root mean square, coma-like aberration was found for every condition. Conversely, the spherical aberration decreased as stimulus vergences increased. These outcomes were identified in comparison to the one-to-one ideal accommodation response, implying that a certain lag value was present in all stimulus vergences different from 0 D. Conclusions: The results support the hypothesis that the difference between the ideal and real accommodation responses is mainly attributed to parameters associated with the accommodation process, such as the near visual acuity, depth of focus, pupil diameter, and wavefront aberrations. The wavefront aberrations were dependent on the 3-mm pupil size selected in this study. The accommoda tion response was not dependent on the electronic device employed in each condition, and it was mainly associated with young age and level of amplitude of accommodation of the subjects.

  3. Nuclear medicine imaging to predict response to radiotherapy: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiele, Christophe van de; Lahorte, Christophe; Oyen, Wim; Boerman, Otto; Goethals, Ingeborg; Slegers, Guido; Dierckx, Rudi Andre

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To review available literature on positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) for the measurement of tumor metabolism, hypoxia, growth factor receptor expression, and apoptosis as predictors of response to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Medical literature databases (Pubmed, Medline) were screened for available literature and critically analyzed as to their scientific relevance. Results: Studies on 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET as a predictor of response to radiotherapy in head-and-neck carcinoma are promising but need confirmation in larger series. 18 F-fluorothymine is stable in human plasma, and preliminary clinical data obtained with this marker of tumor cell proliferation are promising. For imaging tumor hypoxia, novel, more widely available radiopharmaceuticals with faster pharmacokinetics are mandatory. Imaging of ongoing apoptosis and growth factor expression is at a very early stage, but results obtained in other domains with radiolabeled peptides appear promising. Finally, for most of the tracers discussed, validation against a gold standard is needed. Conclusion: Optimization of the pharmacokinetics of relevant radiopharmaceuticals as well as validation against gold-standard tests in large patient series are mandatory if PET and SPECT are to be implemented in routine clinical practice for the purpose of predicting response to radiotherapy

  4. Intrasurgical Human Retinal Imaging With Manual Instrument Tracking Using a Microscope-Integrated Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Paul; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Cunefare, David; Migacz, Justin; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A; Toth, Cynthia A

    2015-07-01

    To characterize the first in-human intraoperative imaging using a custom prototype spectral-domain microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography (MIOCT) device during vitreoretinal surgery with instruments in the eye. Under institutional review board approval for a prospective intraoperative study, MIOCT images were obtained at surgical pauses with instruments held static in the vitreous cavity and then concurrently with surgical maneuvers. Postoperatively, MIOCT images obtained at surgical pauses were compared with images obtained with a high-resolution handheld spectral-domain OCT (HHOCT) system with objective endpoints, including acquisition of images acceptable for analysis and identification of predefined macular morphologic or pathologic features. Human MIOCT images were successfully obtained before incision and during pauses in surgical maneuvers. MIOCT imaging confirmed preoperative diagnoses, such as epiretinal membrane, full-thickness macular hole, and vitreomacular traction and demonstrated successful achievement of surgical goals. MIOCT and HHOCT images obtained at surgical pauses in two cohorts of five patients were comparable with greater than or equal to 80% correlation in 80% of patients. Real-time video-imaging concurrent with surgical manipulations enabled, for the first time using this device, visualization of dynamic instrument-retina interaction with targeted OCT tracking. MIOCT is successful for imaging at surgical pauses and for real-time image guidance with implementation of targeted OCT tracking. Even faster acquisition speeds are currently being developed with incorporation of a swept-source MIOCT engine. Further refinements and investigations will be directed toward continued integration for real-time volumetric imaging of surgical maneuvers. Ongoing development of seamless MIOCT systems will likely transform surgical visualization, approaches, and decision-making.

  5. High-resolution imaging of magnetic fields using scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong de Los Santos, Luis E.

    Development of a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope system with interchangeable sensor configurations for imaging magnetic fields of room-temperature (RT) samples with sub-millimeter resolution. The low-critical-temperature (Tc) niobium-based monolithic SQUID sensor is mounted in the tip of a sapphire rod and thermally anchored to the cryostat helium reservoir. A 25 mum sapphire window separates the vacuum space from the RT sample. A positioning mechanism allows adjusting the sample-to-sensor spacing from the top of the Dewar. I have achieved a sensor-to-sample spacing of 100 mum, which could be maintained for periods of up to 4 weeks. Different SQUID sensor configurations are necessary to achieve the best combination of spatial resolution and field sensitivity for a given magnetic source. For imaging thin sections of geological samples, I used a custom-designed monolithic low-Tc niobium bare SQUID sensor, with an effective diameter of 80 mum, and achieved a field sensitivity of 1.5 pT/Hz1/2 and a magnetic moment sensitivity of 5.4 x 10-18 Am2/Hz1/2 at a sensor-to-sample spacing of 100 mum in the white noise region for frequencies above 100 Hz. Imaging action currents in cardiac tissue requires higher field sensitivity, which can only be achieved by compromising spatial resolution. I developed a monolithic low-Tc niobium multiloop SQUID sensor, with sensor sizes ranging from 250 mum to 1 mm, and achieved sensitivities of 480 - 180 fT/Hz1/2 in the white noise region for frequencies above 100 Hz, respectively. For all sensor configurations, the spatial resolution was comparable to the effective diameter and limited by the sensor-to-sample spacing. Spatial registration allowed us to compare high-resolution images of magnetic fields associated with action currents and optical recordings of transmembrane potentials to study the bidomain nature of cardiac tissue or to match petrography to magnetic field maps in thin sections of

  6. Metal artifact reduction image reconstruction algorithm for CT of implanted metal orthopedic devices: a work in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Patrick T.; Pavlicek, William P.; Peter, Mary B.; Roberts, Catherine C.; Paden, Robert G.; Spangehl, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Despite recent advances in CT technology, metal orthopedic implants continue to cause significant artifacts on many CT exams, often obscuring diagnostic information. We performed this prospective study to evaluate the effectiveness of an experimental metal artifact reduction (MAR) image reconstruction program for CT. We examined image quality on CT exams performed in patients with hip arthroplasties as well as other types of implanted metal orthopedic devices. The exam raw data were reconstructed using two different methods, the standard filtered backprojection (FBP) program and the MAR program. Images were evaluated for quality of the metal-cement-bone interfaces, trabeculae ≤1 cm from the metal, trabeculae 5 cm apart from the metal, streak artifact, and overall soft tissue detail. The Wilcoxon Rank Sum test was used to compare the image scores from the large and small prostheses. Interobserver agreement was calculated. When all patients were grouped together, the MAR images showed mild to moderate improvement over the FBP images. However, when the cases were divided by implant size, the MAR images consistently received higher image quality scores than the FBP images for large metal implants (total hip prostheses). For small metal implants (screws, plates, staples), conversely, the MAR images received lower image quality scores than the FBP images due to blurring artifact. The difference of image scores for the large and small implants was significant (p=0.002). Interobserver agreement was found to be high for all measures of image quality (k>0.9). The experimental MAR reconstruction algorithm significantly improved CT image quality for patients with large metal implants. However, the MAR algorithm introduced blurring artifact that reduced image quality with small metal implants. (orig.)

  7. Biochemical analysis of force-sensitive responses using a large-scale cell stretch device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Derrick J; Ewald, Makena L; Kim, Timothy; Yamada, Soichiro

    2017-09-03

    Physical force has emerged as a key regulator of tissue homeostasis, and plays an important role in embryogenesis, tissue regeneration, and disease progression. Currently, the details of protein interactions under elevated physical stress are largely missing, therefore, preventing the fundamental, molecular understanding of mechano-transduction. This is in part due to the difficulty isolating large quantities of cell lysates exposed to force-bearing conditions for biochemical analysis. We designed a simple, easy-to-fabricate, large-scale cell stretch device for the analysis of force-sensitive cell responses. Using proximal biotinylation (BioID) analysis or phospho-specific antibodies, we detected force-sensitive biochemical changes in cells exposed to prolonged cyclic substrate stretch. For example, using promiscuous biotin ligase BirA* tagged α-catenin, the biotinylation of myosin IIA increased with stretch, suggesting the close proximity of myosin IIA to α-catenin under a force bearing condition. Furthermore, using phospho-specific antibodies, Akt phosphorylation was reduced upon stretch while Src phosphorylation was unchanged. Interestingly, phosphorylation of GSK3β, a downstream effector of Akt pathway, was also reduced with stretch, while the phosphorylation of other Akt effectors was unchanged. These data suggest that the Akt-GSK3β pathway is force-sensitive. This simple cell stretch device enables biochemical analysis of force-sensitive responses and has potential to uncover molecules underlying mechano-transduction.

  8. Overview of 3-year experience with large-scale electronic portal imaging device-based 3-dimensional transit dosimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mijnheer, Ben J.; González, Patrick; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Rozendaal, Roel A.; van Herk, Marcel; Mans, Anton

    2015-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based 3-dimensional (3D) transit dosimetry in a radiation therapy department by analyzing a large set of dose verification results. In our institution, routine in vivo dose verification of all treatments is performed by means of 3D

  9. A high-speed scintillation-based electronic portal imaging device to quantitatively characterize IMRT delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranade, Manisha K; Lynch, Bart D; Li, Jonathan G; Dempsey, James F

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) employing a fast scintillator and a high-speed camera. The device is designed to accurately and independently characterize the fluence delivered by a linear accelerator during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with either step-and-shoot or dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) delivery. Our aim is to accurately obtain the beam shape and fluence of all segments delivered during IMRT, in order to study the nature of discrepancies between the plan and the delivered doses. A commercial high-speed camera was combined with a terbium-doped gadolinium-oxy-sulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillator to form an EPID for the unaliased capture of two-dimensional fluence distributions of each beam in an IMRT delivery. The high speed EPID was synchronized to the accelerator pulse-forming network and gated to capture every possible pulse emitted from the accelerator, with an approximate frame rate of 360 frames-per-second (fps). A 62-segment beam from a head-and-neck IMRT treatment plan requiring 68 s to deliver was recorded with our high speed EPID producing approximately 6 Gbytes of imaging data. The EPID data were compared with the MLC instruction files and the MLC controller log files. The frames were binned to provide a frame rate of 72 fps with a signal-to-noise ratio that was sufficient to resolve leaf positions and segment fluence. The fractional fluence from the log files and EPID data agreed well. An ambiguity in the motion of the MLC during beam on was resolved. The log files reported leaf motions at the end of 33 of the 42 segments, while the EPID observed leaf motions in only 7 of the 42 segments. The static IMRT segment shapes observed by the high speed EPID were in good agreement with the shapes reported in the log files. The leaf motions observed during beam-on for step-and-shoot delivery were not temporally resolved by the log files.

  10. A high-speed scintillation-based electronic portal imaging device to quantitatively characterize IMRT delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranade, Manisha K.; Lynch, Bart D.; Li, Jonathan G.; Dempsey, James F.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) employing a fast scintillator and a high-speed camera. The device is designed to accurately and independently characterize the fluence delivered by a linear accelerator during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with either step-and-shoot or dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) delivery. Our aim is to accurately obtain the beam shape and fluence of all segments delivered during IMRT, in order to study the nature of discrepancies between the plan and the delivered doses. A commercial high-speed camera was combined with a terbium-doped gadolinium-oxy-sulfide (Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb) scintillator to form an EPID for the unaliased capture of two-dimensional fluence distributions of each beam in an IMRT delivery. The high speed EPID was synchronized to the accelerator pulse-forming network and gated to capture every possible pulse emitted from the accelerator, with an approximate frame rate of 360 frames-per-second (fps). A 62-segment beam from a head-and-neck IMRT treatment plan requiring 68 s to deliver was recorded with our high speed EPID producing approximately 6 Gbytes of imaging data. The EPID data were compared with the MLC instruction files and the MLC controller log files. The frames were binned to provide a frame rate of 72 fps with a signal-to-noise ratio that was sufficient to resolve leaf positions and segment fluence. The fractional fluence from the log files and EPID data agreed well. An ambiguity in the motion of the MLC during beam on was resolved. The log files reported leaf motions at the end of 33 of the 42 segments, while the EPID observed leaf motions in only 7 of the 42 segments. The static IMRT segment shapes observed by the high speed EPID were in good agreement with the shapes reported in the log files. The leaf motions observed during beam-on for step-and-shoot delivery were not temporally resolved by the log files

  11. Cost and detection rate of glaucoma screening with imaging devices in a primary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Alfonso Anton,1–4 Monica Fallon,3,5 Francesc Cots,2 María A Sebastian,6 Antonio Morilla-Grasa,4 Sergi Mojal,3 Xavier Castells2 1Medicine School, Universidad Internacional de Cataluña, 2Servei d’Estudies, Parc de Salut Mar, 3Instituto Hospital del Mar de Investigaciones Médicas (IMIM, 4Glaucoma Department, Instituto Catalán de Retina (ICR, 5Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, 6Centro de Atención Primaria Larrard, Barcelona, Spain Purpose: To analyze the cost and detection rate of a screening program for detecting glaucoma with imaging devices. Materials and methods: In this cross-sectional study, a glaucoma screening program was applied in a population-based sample randomly selected from a population of 23,527. Screening targeted the population at risk of glaucoma. Examinations included optic disk tomography (Heidelberg retina tomograph [HRT], nerve fiber analysis, and tonometry. Subjects who met at least 2 of 3 endpoints (HRT outside normal limits, nerve fiber index ≥30, or tonometry ≥21 mmHg were referred for glaucoma consultation. The currently established (“conventional” detection method was evaluated by recording data from primary care and ophthalmic consultations in the same population. The direct costs of screening and conventional detection were calculated by adding the unit costs generated during the diagnostic process. The detection rate of new glaucoma cases was assessed. Results: The screening program evaluated 414 subjects; 32 cases were referred for glaucoma consultation, 7 had glaucoma, and 10 had probable glaucoma. The current detection method assessed 677 glaucoma suspects in the population, of whom 29 were diagnosed with glaucoma or probable glaucoma. Glaucoma screening and the conventional detection method had detection rates of 4.1% and 3.1%, respectively, and the cost per case detected was 1,410 and 1,435€, respectively. The cost of screening 1 million inhabitants would be 5.1 million euros and would allow

  12. Ghosting effect in Siemens electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for step and shoot IMRT dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, S.; Vial, P.; Goozee, G.; Holloway, L.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: To assess the ghosting effect of a Siemens EPID (Optivue 1000: while acquiring IMRT fluence with step and shoot delivery. Six sets of segmented fields with 1,2,3,5, J( and 20 monitor units (MU) per segment were designed. Each set consisted of ten segments of equal MU and field size (J 0 x 10 cm 2 ) Standard single fields (non-segmented) of the same total MU as the segmented fields were also created (10-200 MU). EPID images for these fields were acquired with multi-frame acquisition mode. The integrated EPID response was determined as the mean central 20 x 21 pixel readout multiplied by the number of frames. The same fields wen measured with an ionization chamber at a depth of dose maximum in, solid water phantom. The total signal measured from the segmented fields was compared to the corresponding non-segmented fields. The ratio of EPID response between segmented and non-segmented delivery indicates an under-response for segmented fields by 5, 4, 2.5 and 2% for 1,2,3, and 5 MU per segment exposures respectively compared to ionisation chamber response (se Fig. I). The ratio was within 2% for 5 MU per segment and above. Th error bar in Fig. I indicate the intra-segment response variation. The Siemens EPID exhibited significant ghosting effect and variation in response for small M U segments. EPID dosimetry ( IMRT fields with less than 5 MU per segment requires corrections t maintain dose calibration accuracy to within 2%. (author)

  13. Manifestation of plasmonic response in the detection of sub-terahertz radiation by graphene-based devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayduchenko, I. A.; Fedorov, G. E.; Moskotin, M. V.; Yagodkin, D. I.; Seliverstov, S. V.; Goltsman, G. N.; Kuntsevich, A. Yu; Rybin, M. G.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Leiman, V. G.; Shur, M. S.; Otsuji, T.; Ryzhii, V. I.

    2018-06-01

    We report on the sub-terahertz (THz) (129–450 GHz) photoresponse of devices based on single layer graphene and graphene nanoribbons with asymmetric source and drain (vanadium and gold) contacts. Vanadium forms a barrier at the graphene interface, while gold forms an Ohmic contact. We find that at low temperatures (77 K) the detector responsivity rises with the increasing frequency of the incident sub-THz radiation. We interpret this result as a manifestation of a plasmonic effect in the devices with the relatively long plasmonic wavelengths. Graphene nanoribbon devices display a similar pattern, albeit with a lower responsivity.

  14. How Well Does the Latest Anthropomorphic Test Device Mimic Human Impact Responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Nate; Somers, Jeff; Caldewll, Erin; Gernhardt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    One of the goals of the NASA Occupant Protection Group is to understand the human tolerance to dynamic loading. This knowledge has to come through indirect approaches such as existing human response databases, anthropometric test devices (ATD), animal testing, post-­-mortem human subjects, and models. This study investigated the biofidelity of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's ATD named the THOR (test device for human occupant restraint). If THOR responds comparably to humans, then it could potentially be used as a human surrogate to help validate space vehicle requirements for occupant protection. The THOR responses to frontal and spinal impacts (ranging from 8 to 12 G with rise times of 40, 70, and 100 ms) were measured and compared to human volunteer responses (95 trials in frontal and 58 in spinal) previously collected by the U. S. Air Force on the same horizontal impact accelerator. The impact acceleration profiles tested are within the expected range of multi-­-purpose crew vehicle (MPCV) landing dynamics. A correlation score was calculated for each THOR to human comparison using CORA (CORrelation and Analysis) software. A two-­-parameter beta distribution model fit was obtained for each dependent variable using maximum likelihood estimation. For frontal impacts, the THOR head x-­-acceleration peak response correlated with the human response at 8 and 10-­-G 100 ms but not 10-­-G 70 ms. The phase lagged the human response. Head z-­-acceleration was not correlated. Chest x-­-acceleration was in phase, had a higher peak response, and was well correlated with lighter subjects (Cora = 0.8 for 46 kg vs. Cora = 0.4 for 126 kg). Head x-­-displacement had a leading phase. Several subjects responded with the same peak displacement but the mean of the group was lower. The shoulder x-­-displacement was in phase but had higher peaks than the human response. For spinal impacts, the THOR head x-­-acceleration was not well correlated. Head and

  15. Imaging modes for potential mapping in semiconductor devices by electron holography with improved lateral resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickmann, Jan, E-mail: jan.sickmann@triebenberg.de [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Formanek, Petr; Linck, Martin [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Muehle, Uwe [Institut fuer Werkstoffwissenschaft, Technische Universitaet Bergakademie Freiberg, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Lichte, Hannes [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Electron holography is the highest resolving tool for dopant profiling at nanometre-scale resolution. In order to measure the object areas of interest in a hologram, both a wide field of view and a sufficient lateral resolution are required. The usual path of rays for recording holograms with an electron biprism using the standard objective lens does not meet these requirements, because the field of view amounts to some 10 nm only, however, at a resolution of 0.1 nm better than needed here. Therefore, instead of the standard objective lens, the Lorentz lens is widely used for holography of semiconductors, since it provides a field of view up to 1000 nm at a sufficient lateral resolution of about 10 nm. Since the size of semiconductor structures is steadily shrinking, there is now a need for better lateral resolution at an appropriate field of view. Therefore, additional paths of rays for recording holograms are studied with special emphasis on the parameters field of view and lateral resolution. The findings allow an optimized scheme with a field of view of 200 nm and a lateral resolution of 3.3 nm filling the gap between the existing set-ups. In addition, the Lorentz lens is no longer required for investigation of non-magnetic materials, since the new paths of rays are realized with the standard objective lens and diffraction lens. An example proves the applicability of this arrangement for future semiconductor technology. -- Research highlights: {yields} Imaging modes for potential mapping in semiconductor devices by electron holography. {yields} Using objective and diffraction lens for imaging instead of Lorentz lens. {yields} Detailed investigation of four different paths of rays and its basic parameters for holographic application: field of view, lateral resolution, signal resolution. {yields} Measuring the phase profile of a field effect transistor with 3 nm lateral resolution at field of view of 200 nm.

  16. Towards the development of a comprehensive model of an electronic portal imaging device using Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, S.; Kuncic, Z.; Vial, P.; Holloway, L.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: This work represents the first stage of an ongoing study to investigate the physical processes occurring within electronic portal imaging devices (EPlDs), including the effects of optical scattering on image quality and dosimetry. The objective of this work was to develop an initial Monte Carlo model of a linear accelerator (Iinac) beam and an EPID. The ability to simulate the radiation transport of both high energy and optical photons in a single Monte Carlo model was tested. Data from the Phase-space database for external beam radiotherapy (International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA) was used with the Geant4 toolkit to construct a model of a Siemens Primus linac 6 MY photon source. Dose profiles and percent depth dose (PDD) curves were extracted from simulations of dose in water and compared to experimental measurements. A preliminary EPID model was developed to incorporate both high energy radiation and optical photon transport. Agreement in dose profiles inside the open beam was within 1.6%. Mean agreement in PDD curves beyond depth of dose maximum was within 6.1 % (local percent difference). The radiation transport of both high energy and optical photons were simulated and visualized in the EPID model. Further work is required to experimentally validate the EPID model. The comparison of simulated dose in water with measurements indicates that the IAEA phase-space may represent an accurate model of a linac source. We have demonstrated the feasibility of developing a comprehensive EPID model incorporating both high energy and optical physics in Geant4. (author)

  17. SU-G-BRA-06: Quantification of Tracking Performance of a Multi-Layer Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Y; Rottmann, J; Myronakis, M; Berbeco, R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the improvement in tumor tracking, with and without fiducial markers, afforded by employing a multi-layer (MLI) electronic portal imaging device (EPID) over the current state-of-the-art, single-layer, digital megavolt imager (DMI) architecture. Methods: An ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio (d’) approach was used to quantify the ability of an MLI EPID and a current, state-of-the-art DMI EPID to track lung tumors from the treatment beam’s-eye-view. Using each detector modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectrum (NPS) as inputs, a detection task was employed with object functions describing simple three-dimensional Cartesian shapes (spheres and cylinders). Marker-less tumor tracking algorithms often use texture discrimination to differentiate benign and malignant tissue. The performance of such algorithms is simulated by employing a discrimination task for the ideal observer, which measures the ability of a system to differentiate two image quantities. These were defined as the measured textures for benign and malignant lung tissue. Results: The NNPS of the MLI ∼25% of that of the DMI at the expense of decreased MTF at intermediate frequencies (0.25≤imager layers. This implies that further improvements in tracking may be gained through increasing the thickness of each MLI layer. For tracking, the MLI performance is limited by noise response. Losses in MTF result in negligible differences in d

  18. Conditions for reliable time-resolved dosimetry of electronic portal imaging devices for fixed-gantry IMRT and VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Inhwan Jason; Patyal, Baldev; Mandapaka, Anant; Jung, Jae Won; Yi, Byong Yong; Kim, Jong Oh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The continuous scanning mode of electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) that offers time-resolved information has been newly explored for verifying dynamic radiation deliveries. This study seeks to determine operating conditions (dose rate stability and time resolution) under which that mode can be used accurately for the time-resolved dosimetry of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams.Methods: The authors have designed the following test beams with variable beam holdoffs and dose rate regulations: a 10 × 10 cm open beam to serve as a reference beam; a sliding window (SW) beam utilizing the motion of a pair of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves outside the 10 × 10 cm jaw; a step and shoot (SS) beam to move the pair in step; a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) beam. The beams were designed in such a way that they all produce the same open beam output of 10 × 10 cm. Time-resolved ion chamber measurements at isocenter and time-resolved and integrating EPID measurements were performed for all beams. The time-resolved EPID measurements were evaluated through comparison with the ion chamber and integrating EPID measurements, as the latter are accepted procedures. For two-dimensional, time-resolved evaluation, a VMAT beam with an infield MLC travel was designed. Time-resolved EPID measurements and Monte Carlo calculations of such EPID dose images for this beam were performed and intercompared.Results: For IMRT beams (SW and SS), the authors found disagreement greater than 2%, caused by frame missing of the time-resolved mode. However, frame missing disappeared, yielding agreement better than 2%, when the dose rate of irradiation (and thus the frame acquisition rates) reached a stable and planned rate as the dose of irradiation was raised past certain thresholds (a minimum 12 s of irradiation per shoot used for SS IMRT). For VMAT, the authors found that dose rate does not affect the frame acquisition rate, thereby causing no frame missing

  19. Large-scale automated image analysis for computational profiling of brain tissue surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices using Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Somasundar, Vinay; Megjhani, Murad; Xu, Yan; Lu, Yanbin; Padmanabhan, Raghav; Trett, Kristen; Shain, William; Roysam, Badri

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we describe the use of Python for large-scale automated server-based bio-image analysis in FARSIGHT, a free and open-source toolkit of image analysis methods for quantitative studies of complex and dynamic tissue microenvironments imaged by modern optical microscopes, including confocal, multi-spectral, multi-photon, and time-lapse systems. The core FARSIGHT modules for image segmentation, feature extraction, tracking, and machine learning are written in C++, leveraging widely used libraries including ITK, VTK, Boost, and Qt. For solving complex image analysis tasks, these modules must be combined into scripts using Python. As a concrete example, we consider the problem of analyzing 3-D multi-spectral images of brain tissue surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices, acquired using high-throughput multi-spectral spinning disk step-and-repeat confocal microscopy. The resulting images typically contain 5 fluorescent channels. Each channel consists of 6000 × 10,000 × 500 voxels with 16 bits/voxel, implying image sizes exceeding 250 GB. These images must be mosaicked, pre-processed to overcome imaging artifacts, and segmented to enable cellular-scale feature extraction. The features are used to identify cell types, and perform large-scale analysis for identifying spatial distributions of specific cell types relative to the device. Python was used to build a server-based script (Dell 910 PowerEdge servers with 4 sockets/server with 10 cores each, 2 threads per core and 1TB of RAM running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux linked to a RAID 5 SAN) capable of routinely handling image datasets at this scale and performing all these processing steps in a collaborative multi-user multi-platform environment. Our Python script enables efficient data storage and movement between computers and storage servers, logs all the processing steps, and performs full multi-threaded execution of all codes, including open and closed-source third party libraries.

  20. Large-scale automated image analysis for computational profiling of brain tissue surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices using Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eRey-Villamizar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe use of Python for large-scale automated server-based bio-image analysis in FARSIGHT, a free and open-source toolkit of image analysis methods for quantitative studies of complex and dynamic tissue microenvironments imaged by modern optical microscopes including confocal, multi-spectral, multi-photon, and time-lapse systems. The core FARSIGHT modules for image segmentation, feature extraction, tracking, and machine learning are written in C++, leveraging widely used libraries including ITK, VTK, Boost, and Qt. For solving complex image analysis task, these modules must be combined into scripts using Python. As a concrete example, we consider the problem of analyzing 3-D multi-spectral brain tissue images surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices, acquired using high-throughput multi-spectral spinning disk step-and-repeat confocal microscopy. The resulting images typically contain 5 fluorescent channels, 6,000$times$10,000$times$500 voxels with 16 bits/voxel, implying image sizes exceeding 250GB. These images must be mosaicked, pre-processed to overcome imaging artifacts, and segmented to enable cellular-scale feature extraction. The features are used to identify cell types, and perform large-scale analytics for identifying spatial distributions of specific cell types relative to the device. Python was used to build a server-based script (Dell 910 PowerEdge servers with 4 sockets/server with 10 cores each, 2 threads per core and 1TB of RAM running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux linked to a RAID 5 SAN capable of routinely handling image datasets at this scale and performing all these processing steps in a collaborative multi-user multi-platform environment consisting. Our Python script enables efficient data storage and movement between compute and storage servers, logging all processing steps, and performs full multi-threaded execution of all codes, including open and closed-source third party libraries.

  1. Standard practice for determining relative image quality response of industrial radiographic imaging systems

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This standard provides a practice whereby industrial radiographic imaging systems may be comparatively assessed using the concept of relative image quality response (RIQR). The RIQR method presented within this practice is based upon the use of equivalent penetrameter sensitivity (EPS) described within Practice E 1025 and subsection 5.2 of this practice. Figure 1 illustrates a relative image quality indicator (RIQI) that has four different steel plaque thicknesses (.015, .010, .008, and .005 in.) sequentially positioned (from top to bottom) on a ¾-in. thick steel plate. The four plaques contain a total of 14 different arrays of penetrameter-type hole sizes designed to render varied conditions of threshold visibility ranging from 1.92 % EPS (at the top) to .94 % EPS (at the bottom) when exposed to nominal 200 keV X-ray radiation. Each “EPS” array consists of 30 identical holes; thus, providing the user with a quantity of threshold sensitivity levels suitable for relative image qualitative response com...

  2. Modeling a color-rendering operator for high dynamic range images using a cone-response function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ho-Hyoung; Kim, Gi-Seok; Yun, Byoung-Ju

    2015-09-01

    Tone-mapping operators are the typical algorithms designed to produce visibility and the overall impression of brightness, contrast, and color of high dynamic range (HDR) images on low dynamic range (LDR) display devices. Although several new tone-mapping operators have been proposed in recent years, the results of these operators have not matched those of the psychophysical experiments based on the human visual system. A color-rendering model that is a combination of tone-mapping and cone-response functions using an XYZ tristimulus color space is presented. In the proposed method, the tone-mapping operator produces visibility and the overall impression of brightness, contrast, and color in HDR images when mapped onto relatively LDR devices. The tone-mapping resultant image is obtained using chromatic and achromatic colors to avoid well-known color distortions shown in the conventional methods. The resulting image is then processed with a cone-response function wherein emphasis is placed on human visual perception (HVP). The proposed method covers the mismatch between the actual scene and the rendered image based on HVP. The experimental results show that the proposed method yields an improved color-rendering performance compared to conventional methods.

  3. A moving image system for cardiovascular nuclear medicine. A dedicated auxiliary device for the total capacity imaging system for multiple plane dynamic colour display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iio, M.; Toyama, H.; Murata, H.; Takaoka, S.

    1981-01-01

    The recent device of the authors, the dedicated multiplane dynamic colour image display system for nuclear medicine, is discussed. This new device is a hardware-based auxiliary moving image system (AMIS) attached to the total capacity image processing system of the authors' department. The major purpose of this study is to develop the dedicated device so that cardiovascular nuclear medicine and other dynamic studies will include the ability to assess the real time delicate processing of the colour selection, edge detection, phased analysis, etc. The auxiliary system consists of the interface for image transferring, four IC refresh memories of 64x64 matrix with 10 bit count depth, a digital 20-in colour TV monitor, a control keyboard and a control panel with potentiometers. This system has five major functions for colour display: (1) A microcomputer board can select any one of 40 different colour tables preset in the colour transformation RAM. This key also provides edge detection at a certain level of the count by leaving the optional colour and setting the rest of the levels at 0 (black); (2) The arithmetic processing circuit performs the operation of the fundamental rules, permitting arithmetic processes of the two images; (3) The colour level control circuit is operated independently by four potentiometers for four refresh image memories, so that the gain and offset of the colour level can be manually and visually controlled to the satisfaction of the operator; (4) The simultaneous CRT display of the maximum four images with or without cinematic motion is possible; (5) The real time movie interval is also adjustable by hardware, and certain frames can be freezed with overlapping of the dynamic frames. Since this system of AMIS is linked with the whole capacity image processing system of the CPU size of 128kW, etc., clinical applications are not limited to cardiovascular nuclear medicine. (author)

  4. A protocol for patients with cardiovascular implantable devices undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): should defibrillation threshold testing be performed post-(MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Peter Thomas; Ghanbari, Hamid; Alexander, Patrick B; Shaw, Michael K; Daccarett, Marcos; Machado, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIED) has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Recent data suggests MRI as a relative rather than absolute contraindication in CIED patients. Recently, the American Heart Association has recommended defibrillation threshold testing (DFTT) in implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) patients undergoing MRI. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of a protocol for MRI in CIED patients, incorporating the new recommendations on DFTT. Consecutive patients with CIED undergoing MRI were included. The protocol consisted of continuous monitoring during imaging, device interrogation pre- and post-MRI, reprogramming of the pacemaker to an asynchronous mode in pacemaker-dependent (PMD) patients and a non-tracking/sensing mode for non-PMD patients. All tachyarrhythmia therapies were disabled. Devices were interrogated for lead impedance, battery life, pacing, and sensing thresholds. All patients with ICD underwent DFTT/defibrillator safety margin testing (DSMT) post-MRI. A total of 92 MRI's at 1.5 Tesla were performed in 38 patients. A total of 13 PMD patients, ten ICD patients, four cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) patients, and 11 non-PMD patients were scanned from four major manufacturers. No device circuitry damage, programming alterations, inappropriate shocks, failure to pace, or changes in sensing, pacing, or defibrillator thresholds were found on single or multiple MRI sessions. Our protocol for MRI in CIED patients appears safe, feasible, and reproducible. This is irrespective of the type of CIED, pacemaker dependancy or multiple 24-h scanning sessions. Our protocol addresses early detection of potential complications and establishes a response system for potential device-related complications. Our observation suggests that routine DFTT/DSMT post-MRI may not be necessary.

  5. Analysis on the Effect of Sensor Views in Image Reconstruction Produced by Optical Tomography System Using Charge-Coupled Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaludin, Juliza; Rahim, Ruzairi Abdul; Fazul Rahiman, Mohd Hafiz; Mohd Rohani, Jemmy

    2018-04-01

    Optical tomography (OPT) is a method to capture a cross-sectional image based on the data obtained by sensors, distributed around the periphery of the analyzed system. This system is based on the measurement of the final light attenuation or absorption of radiation after crossing the measured objects. The number of sensor views will affect the results of image reconstruction, where the high number of sensor views per projection will give a high image quality. This research presents an application of charge-coupled device linear sensor and laser diode in an OPT system. Experiments in detecting solid and transparent objects in crystal clear water were conducted. Two numbers of sensors views, 160 and 320 views are evaluated in this research in reconstructing the images. The image reconstruction algorithms used were filtered images of linear back projection algorithms. Analysis on comparing the simulation and experiments image results shows that, with 320 image views giving less area error than 160 views. This suggests that high image view resulted in the high resolution of image reconstruction.

  6. Comparison of corneal power obtained from VERION image-guided surgery system and four other devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin HY

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hung-Yuan Lin,1,* Hsin-Yang Chen,1,2,* Han Bor Fam,3 Ya-Jung Chuang,1 Ronald Yeoh,4 Pi-Jung Lin5 1Universal Eye Center, Zhongli Branch, Zhongli County, TaoYuan City, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2Ophthalmology Department, Ningbo First Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Ophthalmology Department, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Jalan Tan Tock Seng, 4Ophthalmology Department, Eye and Retina Surgeons, Camden Medical Centre, Singapore; 5Universal Eye Center, Xinnan Branch, Taipei City, Taiwan, Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To assess the corneal keratometric values obtained using the VERION image-guided surgery system and other devices.Methods: This study evaluated the right eyes of 115 cataract patients before intraocular lens (IOL implantation through consecutive tests using 5 devices: VERION Reference Unit , Placido-based corneal topography (OPD-Scan III, monochromatic light-emitting diodes (LenStar LS900 and AL-Scan, and rotary prism technology (auto kerato-refractometer KR-8800. Analyzed parameters were corneal steep and flat keratometric values (Ks and Kf and corneal astigmatism and axis. These parameters were evaluated using the one-sample two-tailed t-test and the 95% limits of agreement (95% LOAs between the devices.Results: The mean corneal cylinder value measurements were -0.97±0.63 D, -0.88± 0.60 D, -0.90±0.69 D, -0.90±0.67 D, and -0.83±0.60 D with VERION, LenStar, AL-Scan (2.4 mm, OPD III, and KR-8800, respectively. Only KR-8800 showed a significant difference from VERION in the corneal cylinder value (P<0.05. The mean differences in the Kf and Ks of VERION compared to those of OPD III were 0.18±0.45 D and 0.17±0.38 D (P<0.05, respectively. The 95% LOAs of Bland–Altman analysis for the corneal astigmatism axis of the VERION with LenStar, AL-Scan (2.4 mm, OPD III, and KR-8800 were -26.25° to 58.71°, -20.61° to 47.44°, -25.03° to 58.98°, and -27.85

  7. Use of a line-pair resolution phantom for comprehensive quality assurance of electronic portal imaging devices based on fundamental imaging metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopal, Arun; Samant, Sanjiv S.

    2009-01-01

    Image guided radiation therapy solutions based on megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) involve the extension of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) from their traditional role of weekly localization imaging and planar dose mapping to volumetric imaging for 3D setup and dose verification. To sustain the potential advantages of MVCT, EPIDs are required to provide improved levels of portal image quality. Therefore, it is vital that the performance of EPIDs in clinical use is maintained at an optimal level through regular and rigorous quality assurance (QA). Traditionally, portal imaging QA has been carried out by imaging calibrated line-pair and contrast resolution phantoms and obtaining arbitrarily defined QA indices that are usually dependent on imaging conditions and merely indicate relative trends in imaging performance. They are not adequately sensitive to all aspects of image quality unlike fundamental imaging metrics such as the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) that are widely used to characterize detector performance in radiographic imaging and would be ideal for QA purposes. However, due to the difficulty of performing conventional MTF measurements, they have not been used for routine clinical QA. The authors present a simple and quick QA methodology based on obtaining the MTF, NPS, and DQE of a megavoltage imager by imaging standard open fields and a bar-pattern QA phantom containing 2 mm thick tungsten line-pair bar resolution targets. Our bar-pattern based MTF measurement features a novel zero-frequency normalization scheme that eliminates normalization errors typically associated with traditional bar-pattern measurements at megavoltage x-ray energies. The bar-pattern QA phantom and open-field images are used in conjunction with an automated image analysis algorithm that quickly computes the MTF, NPS, and DQE of an EPID system. Our approach combines the fundamental advantages of

  8. Respiratory and cardiovascular response during electronic control device (ECD exposure in law enforcement trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten M. VanMeenen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Law enforcement represents a large population of workers who may be exposed to electronic control devices (ECDs. Little is known about the potential effect of exposure to these devices on respiration or cardiovascular response during current discharge. Methods: Participants (N=23 were trainees exposed to 5 seconds of an ECD (Taser X26® as a component of training. Trainees were asked to volitionally inhale during exposure. Respiratory recordings involved a continuous waveform recorded throughout the session including during the exposure period. Heart rate was calculated from a continuous pulse oximetry recording. Results: The exposure period resulted in the cessation of normal breathing patterns in all participants and in particular a decrease in inspiratory activity. No significant changes in heart rate during ECD exposure were found. Conclusions: This is the first study to examine breathing patterns during ECD exposure with the resolution to detect changes over this discrete period of time. In contrast to reports suggesting respiration is unaffected by ECDs, present evidence suggests that voluntary inspiration is severely compromised. There is no evidence of cardiac disruption during ECD exposure.

  9. Response of GaAs charge storage devices to transient ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetherington, D. L.; Klem, J. F.; Hughes, R. C.; Weaver, H. T.

    Charge storage devices in which non-equilibrium depletion regions represent stored charge are sensitive to ionizing radiation. This results since the radiation generates electron-hole pairs that neutralize excess ionized dopant charge. Silicon structures, such as dynamic RAM or CCD cells are particularly sensitive to radiation since carrier diffusion lengths in this material are often much longer than the depletion width, allowing collection of significant quantities of charge from quasi-neutral sections of the device. For GaAs the situation is somewhat different in that minority carrier diffusion lengths are shorter than in silicon, and although mobilities are higher, we expect a reduction of radiation sensitivity as suggested by observations of reduced quantum efficiency in GaAs solar cells. Dynamic memory cells in GaAs have potential increased retention times. In this paper, we report the response of a novel GaAs dynamic memory element to transient ionizing radiation. The charge readout technique is nondestructive over a reasonable applied voltage range and is more sensitive to stored charge than a simple capacitor.

  10. Thomas Alva Edison—battery and device innovation in response to application's needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkind, Alvin J.; Israel, Paul

    Thomas Alva Edison, the most prolific inventor in North America, with over 1000 patents, was the descendant of early settlers from the Netherlands to the Hudson Valley region of New York/New Jersey. However, his genealogical trail encompasses many cities, provinces, states, and countries, including Holland, France, Scotland, New Amsterdam, New York, New Jersey, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Ohio, and Michigan. He was motivated to develop and invent in response to perceived needs of commercial devices and was the creator of the concept of an industrial research laboratory. His activities covered a wide-range of chemical, electrical, medical, metallurgical, entertainment, and communication devices and led to the creation of major worldwide industries. However, his expressed underlying concern was the "service it might give others". This presentation reviews commercial developments in comparison with the technologies and motivations of the time and is illustrated by material from the Rutgers University 'Edison Papers Project', Edison's personal notes found in the Edison Battery Factory and preserved by Professor Salkind, and records of The Electrochemical Society.

  11. Implant Strategy-Specific Changes in Symptoms in Response to Left Ventricular Assist Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher S; Gelow, Jill M; Chien, Christopher V; Hiatt, Shirin O; Bidwell, Julie T; Denfeld, Quin E; Grady, Kathleen L; Mudd, James O

    Although we know that the quality of life generally improves after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation, we know little about how symptoms change in response to LVAD. The purpose of this study was to compare the changes in symptoms between bridge and destination therapy patients as part of a prospective cohort study. Physical (dyspnea and wake disturbances) and affective symptoms (depression and anxiety) were measured before LVAD and at 1, 3, and 6 months after LVAD. Multiphase growth modeling was used to capture the 2 major phases of change: initial improvements between preimplant and 1 month after LVAD and subsequent improvements between 1 and 6 months after LVAD. The sample included 64 bridge and 22 destination therapy patients as the preimplant strategy. Destination patients had worse preimplant dyspnea and wake disturbances, and they experienced greater initial improvements in these symptoms compared with bridge patients (all P .05). Destination patients had worse preimplant depression (P = .042) but experienced similar initial and subsequent improvements in depression in response to LVAD compared with bridge patients (both P > .05). Destination patients had similar preimplant anxiety (P = .279) but experienced less initial and greater subsequent improvements in anxiety after LVAD compared with bridge patients (both P < .05). There are many differences in the magnitude and timing of change in symptom responses to LVAD between bridge and destination therapy patients. Detailed information on changes in specific symptoms may better inform shared decision-making regarding LVAD.

  12. Conversion Between Sine Wave and Square Wave Spatial Frequency Response of an Imaging System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nill, Norman B

    2001-01-01

    ...), is a primary image quality metric that is commonly measured with a sine wave target. The FBI certification program for commercial fingerprint capture devices, which MITRE actively supports, has an MTF requirement...

  13. An electrically actuated imperfect microbeam: Dynamical integrity for interpreting and predicting the device response

    KAUST Repository

    Ruzziconi, Laura

    2013-02-20

    In this study we deal with a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) and develop a dynamical integrity analysis to interpret and predict the experimental response. The device consists of a clamped-clamped polysilicon microbeam, which is electrostatically and electrodynamically actuated. It has non-negligible imperfections, which are a typical consequence of the microfabrication process. A single-mode reduced-order model is derived and extensive numerical simulations are performed in a neighborhood of the first symmetric natural frequency, via frequency response diagrams and behavior chart. The typical softening behavior is observed and the overall scenario is explored, when both the frequency and the electrodynamic voltage are varied. We show that simulations based on direct numerical integration of the equation of motion in time yield satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. Nevertheless, these theoretical predictions are not completely fulfilled in some aspects. In particular, the range of existence of each attractor is smaller in practice than in the simulations. This is because these theoretical curves represent the ideal limit case where disturbances are absent, which never occurs under realistic conditions. A reliable prediction of the actual (and not only theoretical) range of existence of each attractor is essential in applications. To overcome this discrepancy and extend the results to the practical case where disturbances exist, a dynamical integrity analysis is developed. After introducing dynamical integrity concepts, integrity profiles and integrity charts are drawn. They are able to describe if each attractor is robust enough to tolerate the disturbances. Moreover, they detect the parameter range where each branch can be reliably observed in practice and where, instead, becomes vulnerable, i.e. they provide valuable information to operate the device in safe conditions according to the desired outcome and depending on the expected disturbances

  14. A biomimetic membrane device that modulates the excessive inflammatory response to sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Ding

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Septic shock has a clinical mortality rate approaching fifty percent. The major clinical manifestations of sepsis are due to the dysregulation of the host's response to infection rather than the direct consequences of the invading pathogen. Central to this initial immunologic response is the activation of leukocytes and microvascular endothelium resulting in cardiovascular instability, lung injury and renal dysfunction. Due to the primary role of leukocyte activation in the sepsis syndrome, a synthetic biomimetic membrane, called a selective cytopheretic device (SCD, was developed to bind activated leukocytes. The incorporation of the SCD along an extracorporeal blood circuit coupled with regional anticoagulation with citrate to lower blood ionized calcium was devised to modulate leukocyte activation in sepsis. DESIGN: Laboratory investigation. SETTING: University of Michigan Medical School. SUBJECTS: Pigs weighing 30-35 kg. INTERVENTIONS: To assess the effect of the SCD in septic shock, pigs were administered 30×10(10 bacteria/kg body weight of Escherichia coli into the peritoneal cavity and within 1 hr were immediately placed in an extracorporeal circuit containing SCD. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: In this animal model, the SCD with citrate compared to control groups without the SCD or with heparin anticoagulation ameliorated the cardiovascular instability and lung sequestration of activated leukocytes, reduced renal dysfunction and improved survival time compared to various control groups. This effect was associated with minimal elevations of systemic circulating neutrophil activation. CONCLUSIONS: These preclinical studies along with two favorable exploratory clinical trials form the basis of an FDA-approved investigational device exemption for a pivotal multicenter, randomized control trial currently underway.

  15. Evaluation of body image and self-esteem in patients with external fixation devices: a Turkish perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükyilmaz, Funda; Sendir, Merdiye; Salmond, Susan

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive study aimed to describe the body image and self-esteem of patients with external fixation devices. Fifty patients with external fixation devices who came for follow-up to the Ilizarov Outpatient Clinic of a university hospital in Turkey were included in this study. Data were collected by using a Demographic Questionnaire Form, Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ), and Coppersmith Self-Esteem Inventory. The perceived body image (197.58 +/- 25.14) and self-esteem (65.28 +/- 17.97) of the patients with external fixation devices were in the moderate range. There was no significant correlation between body image and self-esteem. Self-esteem was correlated with one's perception of whether external fixation impacted one's appearance and whether one wanted to avoid being seen by certain individuals because of the appearance of the external fixator. The study highlighted that body image disturbance and threats to self-esteem are not universal with the use of external fixation and need to be assessed individually.

  16. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Kyle L; Pop, Eric; King, William P

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 μV K(-1). This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  17. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, Kyle L. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Pop, Eric [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); King, William P., E-mail: wpk@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 μV K{sup −1}. This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  18. A pH-responsive supramolecular polymer gel as an enteric elastomer for use in gastric devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiyi; Bellinger, Andrew M.; Glettig, Dean L.; Barman, Ross; Lee, Young-Ah Lucy; Zhu, Jiahua; Cleveland, Cody; Montgomery, Veronica A.; Gu, Li; Nash, Landon D.; Maitland, Duncan J.; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Devices resident in the stomach--used for a variety of clinical applications including nutritional modulation for bariatrics, ingestible electronics for diagnosis and monitoring, and gastric-retentive dosage forms for prolonged drug delivery--typically incorporate elastic polymers to compress the devices during delivery through the oesophagus and other narrow orifices in the digestive system. However, in the event of accidental device fracture or migration, the non-degradable nature of these materials risks intestinal obstruction. Here, we show that an elastic, pH-responsive supramolecular gel remains stable and elastic in the acidic environment of the stomach but can be dissolved in the neutral-pH environment of the small and large intestines. In a large animal model, prototype devices with these materials as the key component demonstrated prolonged gastric retention and safe passage. These enteric elastomers should increase the safety profile for a wide range of gastric-retentive devices.

  19. Use of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device for multileaf collimator quality control and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S J K; Budgell, G J; MacKay, R I

    2005-01-01

    Multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and quality control is a time-consuming procedure typically involving the processing, scanning and analysis of films to measure leaf and collimator positions. Faster and more reliable calibration procedures are required for these tasks, especially with the introduction of intensity modulated radiotherapy which requires more frequent checking and finer positional leaf tolerances than previously. A routine quality control (QC) technique to measure MLC leaf bank gain and offset, as well as minor offsets (individual leaf position relative to a reference leaf), using an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been developed. The technique also tests the calibration of the primary and back-up collimators. A detailed comparison between film and EPID measurements has been performed for six linear accelerators (linacs) equipped with MLC and amorphous silicon EPIDs. Measurements of field size from 4 to 24 cm with the EPID were systematically smaller than film measurements over all field sizes by 0.4 mm for leaves/back-up collimators and by 0.2 mm for conventional collimators. This effect is due to the gain calibration correction applied by the EPID, resulting in a 'flattening' of primary beam profiles. Linac dependent systematic differences of up to 0.5 mm in individual leaf/collimator positions were also found between EPID and film measurements due to the difference between the mechanical and radiation axes of rotation. When corrections for these systematic differences were applied, the residual random differences between EPID and film were 0.23 mm and 0.26 mm (1 standard deviation) for field size and individual leaf/back-up collimator position, respectively. Measured gains (over a distance of 220 mm) always agreed within 0.4 mm with a standard deviation of 0.17 mm. Minor offset measurements gave a mean agreement between EPID and film of 0.01 ± 0.10 mm (1 standard deviation) after correction for the tilt of the

  20. Non-contact detection of cardiac rate based on visible light imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huishi; Zhao, Yuejin; Dong, Liquan

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a non-contact method to detect human cardiac rate at a distance. This detection is based on the general lighting condition. Using the video signal of human face region captured by webcam, we acquire the cardiac rate based on the PhotoPlethysmoGraphy theory. In this paper, the cardiac rate detecting method is mainly in view of the blood's different absorptivities of the lights various wavelengths. Firstly, we discompose the video signal into RGB three color signal channels and choose the face region as region of interest to take average gray value. Then, we draw three gray-mean curves on each color channel with time as variable. When the imaging device has good fidelity of color, the green channel signal shows the PhotoPlethysmoGraphy information most clearly. But the red and blue channel signals can provide more other physiological information on the account of their light absorptive characteristics of blood. We divide red channel signal by green channel signal to acquire the pulse wave. With the passband from 0.67Hz to 3Hz as a filter of the pulse wave signal and the frequency spectrum superimposed algorithm, we design frequency extracted algorithm to achieve the cardiac rate. Finally, we experiment with 30 volunteers, containing different genders and different ages. The results of the experiments are all relatively agreeable. The difference is about 2bmp. Through the experiment, we deduce that the PhotoPlethysmoGraphy theory based on visible light can also be used to detect other physiological information.

  1. Automated hotspot analysis with aerial image CD metrology for advanced logic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttgereit, Ute; Trautzsch, Thomas; Kim, Min-ho; Seo, Jung-Uk; Yoon, Young-Keun; Han, Hak-Seung; Chung, Dong Hoon; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Meyers, Gary

    2014-09-01

    Continuously shrinking designs by further extension of 193nm technology lead to a much higher probability of hotspots especially for the manufacturing of advanced logic devices. The CD of these potential hotspots needs to be precisely controlled and measured on the mask. On top of that, the feature complexity increases due to high OPC load in the logic mask design which is an additional challenge for CD metrology. Therefore the hotspot measurements have been performed on WLCD from ZEISS, which provides the benefit of reduced complexity by measuring the CD in the aerial image and qualifying the printing relevant CD. This is especially of advantage for complex 2D feature measurements. Additionally, the data preparation for CD measurement becomes more critical due to the larger amount of CD measurements and the increasing feature diversity. For the data preparation this means to identify these hotspots and mark them automatically with the correct marker required to make the feature specific CD measurement successful. Currently available methods can address generic pattern but cannot deal with the pattern diversity of the hotspots. The paper will explore a method how to overcome those limitations and to enhance the time-to-result in the marking process dramatically. For the marking process the Synopsys WLCD Output Module was utilized, which is an interface between the CATS mask data prep software and the WLCD metrology tool. It translates the CATS marking directly into an executable WLCD measurement job including CD analysis. The paper will describe the utilized method and flow for the hotspot measurement. Additionally, the achieved results on hotspot measurements utilizing this method will be presented.

  2. Utilization of an electronic portal imaging device for measurement of dynamic wedge data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, Eric S.; Miner, Marc S.; Butker, Elizabeth K.; Sutton, Danny S.; Davis, Lawrence W.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Due to the motion of the collimator during dynamic wedge treatments, the conventional method of collecting comprehensive wedge data with a water tank and a scanning ionization chamber is obsolete. It is the objective of this work to demonstrate the use of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and software to accomplish this task. Materials and Methods: A Varian Clinac[reg] 2300 C/D, equipped with a PortalVision TM EPID and Dosimetry Research Mode experimental software, was used to produce the radiation field. The Dosimetry Research Mode experimental software allows for a band of 10 of 256 high voltage electrodes to be continuously read and averaged by the 256 electrometer electrodes. The file that is produced contains data relating to the integrated ionization at each of the 256 points, essentially the cross plane beam profile. Software was developed using Microsoft C ++ to reformat the data for import into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet allowing for easy mathematical manipulation and graphical display. Beam profiles were measured by the EPID with a 100 cm TSD for various field sizes. Each field size was measured open, steel wedged, and dynamically wedged. Scanning ionization chamber measurements performed in a water tank were compared to the open and steel wedged fields. Ionization chamber measurements taken in a water tank were compared with the dynamically wedged measurements. For the EPID measurements the depth was varied using Gammex RMI Solid Water TM placed directly above the EPID sensitive volume. Bolus material was placed between the Solid Water TM and the EPID to avoid an air gap. Results: Comparison of EPID measurements with those from an ion chamber in a water tank showed a discrepancy of ∼5%. Scans were successfully obtained for open, steel wedged and dynamically wedged beams. Software has been developed to allow for easy graphical display of beam profiles. Conclusions: Measurement of dynamic wedge data proves to be easily

  3. A portable thermal imaging device as a feedback system for breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, Oshrit A.; Ben-David, Merav A.; Katz, Eyal; Sholomov, Meny; Kelson, Itzhak; Gannot, Israel

    2018-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among women in the Western world. Currently, no imaging technique assesses tumor heat generation and vasculature changes during radiotherapy in viable tumor and as adjuvant therapy. Thermography is a non-ionizing, non-invasive, portable and low-cost imaging modality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of thermography in cancer treatment monitoring for feedback purposes. Six stage-IV breast cancer patients with viable breast tumor and 8 patients (9 breasts) who underwent tumor resection were monitored by a thermal camera prior to radiotherapy sessions over several weeks of radiation treatment. The thermal changes over the treated breast were calculated and analyzed for comparison with healthy surrounded breast tissue or contralateral breast. A model of a breast with a tumor was created. The COMSOL FEM software was used to carry out the analysis. The effects of tumor metabolism and breast tissue perfusion on the temperature difference were analyzed. All patients with active tumors exhibited drops in maximal temperature of the tumor during radiation therapy. The patients who underwent radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment exhibited a rise in maximal temperature over the treated breast in correlation with skin erythema during radiation. This difference between the groups was statistically significant (P=0.001). The simulated human breast cancer models analysis showed that tumor aggressiveness reduction causes decrease in the tumor temperature. Inflammation causes vasodilatation and increases tissue perfusion, resulted in an increase in breast tissue temperature. A correlation was demonstrated between the clinical outcome and the simulation. We report a method for monitoring cancer response to radiation therapy, which measures the physiological response along with clinical response. These anticipatory efficacy evaluations of radiotherapy during treatment may further promote changes in treatment regimen

  4. Vibration response imaging in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Xia; Guan, Wei-Jie; Xie, Yan-Qing; An, Jia-Ying; Jiang, Mei; Zhu, Zheng; Guo, E; Yu, Xin-Xin; Liu, Wen-Ting; Gao, Yi; Zheng, Jin-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Vibration response imaging (VRI) is a novel imaging technique and little is known about its characteristics and diagnostic value in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The aim of this study was to investigate the features of VRI in subjects with IPF. We enrolled 23 subjects with IPF (42-74 y old) and 28 healthy subjects (42-72 y old). Subjects with IPF were diagnosed by lung biopsy and underwent VRI, spirometry, lung diffusion testing, and chest x-ray or computed tomography, which entailed assessment of the value of VRI indices. The total VRI score correlated statistically with single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity percent predicted (r = -0.30, P = .04), but not with FVC percent predicted, FEV1 percent predicted, and FEV1/FVC (r = -0.27, -0.22, and 0.19; all P > .05). Compared with healthy subjects (17.9%), 20 subjects with IPF (86.96%, P .05), except for the upper right and lower left lobes (P diagnostic value (sensitivity, 1.00; specificity, 0.82), followed by presence of abundant crackles (sensitivity, 0.70; specificity, 0.96). Total VRI score was not a sensitive indicator of IPF, owing to low assay sensitivity (0.70) and specificity (0.64). VRI may be helpful to discriminate between IPF subjects and healthy individuals. Maximum energy frame and abundant crackles might serve as a diagnostic tool for IPF. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  5. Disease-responsive drug delivery: the next generation of smart delivery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanakule, Prinda; Roy, Krishnendu

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of highly potent and cytotoxic drugs, it is increasingly critical that they be targeted and released only in cells of diseased tissues, while sparing physiologically normal neighbors. Simple ligand-based targeting of drug carriers, although promising, cannot always provide the required specificity to achieve this since often normal cells also express significant levels of the targeted receptors. Therefore, stimuli-responsive delivery systems are being explored to allow drug release from nano- and microcarriers and implantable devices, primarily in the presence of physiological or disease-specific pathophysiological signals. Designing smart biomaterials that respond to temperature or pH changes, protein and ligand binding, disease-specific degradation, e.g. enzymatic cleavage, has become an integral part of this approach. These strategies are used in combination with nano- and microparticle systems to improve delivery efficiency through several routes of administration, and with injectable or implantable systems for long term controlled release. This review focuses on recent developments in stimuli-responsive systems, their physicochemical properties, release profiles, efficacy, safety and biocompatibility, as well as future perspectives.

  6. The impact of communication materials on public responses to a radiological dispersal device (RDD) attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, M Brooke; Amlôt, Richard; Rubin, G James

    2013-03-01

    It is a common assumption that, in the event of a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) attack, a well-prepared and informed public is more likely to follow official recommendations regarding the appropriate safety measures to take. We present findings from a UK study investigating the ability of crisis communication to influence perceptions of risk and behavioral intentions in the general public in response to CBRN terrorism. We conducted a focus group study involving a scenario presented in mock news broadcasts to explore levels of public knowledge, information needs, and intended behavioral reactions to an attack involving an overt radiological dispersal device (RDD), or dirty bomb. We used the findings from these focus groups to design messages for the public that could be presented in a short leaflet. We then tested the effects of the leaflet on reactions to the same scenario in 8 further focus groups. The impact of the new messages on levels of knowledge, information needs, and intended compliance with official recommendations was assessed. The provision of information increased the perceived credibility of official messages and increased reported levels of intended compliance with advice to return to normal/stop sheltering, attend a facility for assessment and treatment, and return to a previously contaminated area after decontamination of the environment has taken place. Should a real attack with an RDD occur, having pretested messages available to address common concerns and information needs should facilitate the public health response to the attack.

  7. The design and fabrication of highly piezoelectric polymeric composites and their use in responsive devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Cary Allen

    In this work, novel approaches to the design of highly piezoelectric and flexible polymer composites were explored. Diverging from past work focused on the addition of piezoelectric particles into polymer matrices, this research explores the ability to increase the piezoelectric performance of a host polymer through the incorporation of charge via polarizable, organic particles. The ability to insert charge into polymers, known as electrets, is well documented but widely considered impractical because of the low lifetime and temperature resistance of the inserted charge. Through the addition of particles that are polarizable, charge can be inserted into a system in a stable manner that results in highly charged materials with long lifetimes. Here, carbon structures, such as Buckminsterfullerenes (C60) and single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), were composited into poly(vinylidene difluoride) at very low loading levels (0.05-0.25 wt%), resulting in the ability to insert stable charge into the system. We show that these highly charged systems can result in a doubling of the piezoelectric response of the host polymer when optimized. The low amount of nanoparticle filler required to improve these materials allows for the advantageous properties of the polymer matrix such as flexibility and compliance to be preserved, enabling highly piezoelectric and flexible system. This dissertation outlines research efforts towards the design and fabrication of 1) polymer composites with high piezoelectric response, 2) piezoelectric composites with increased operating temperatures, 3) motion control devices that incorporate piezoelectric materials and shape memory polymers, and 4) artificial muscles with piezoelectric polymers. The piezoelectric polymer composites developed in this work have potential to be utilized as highly efficient, flexible energy harvesters that can be used to capture ambient energy from environmental vibrations and motion from the human body. As actuators, these

  8. Thermal imager based on the array light sensor device of 128×128 CdHgTe-photodiodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reva V. P.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigation of developed thermal imager for middle (3—5 µm infrared region are presented and its applications features are discussed. The thermal imager consists of cooled to 80 K 128×128 diodes focal plane array on the base of cadmium–mercury–telluride compound and cryostat with temperature checking system. The photodiode array is bonded with readout device (silicon focal processor via indium microcontacts. The measured average value of noise equivalent temperature difference was NETD= 20±4 mK (background radiation temperature T = 300 K, field of view 2θ = 180°, the cooled diaphragm was not used.

  9. Novel PET and Near Infrared Imaging Probes for the Specific Detection of Bacterial Infections Associated With Cardiac Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemiya, Kiyoko; Ning, Xinghai; Seo, Wonewoo; Wang, Xiaojian; Mohammad, Rafi; Joseph, Giji; Titterington, Jane S; Kraft, Colleen S; Nye, Jonathan A; Murthy, Niren; Goodman, Mark M; Taylor, W Robert

    2018-04-13

    The aim of this study was to develop imaging agents to detect early stage infections in implantable cardiac devices. Bacteria ingest maltodextrins through the specific maltodextrin transporter. We developed probes conjugated with either a fluorescent dye (maltohexaose fluorescent dye probe [MDP]) or a F-18 (F18 fluoromaltohexaose) and determined their usefulness in a model of infections associated with implanted cardiac devices. Stainless steel mock-ups of medical devices were implanted subcutaneously in rats. On post-operative day 4, animals were injected with either Staphylococcus aureus around the mock-ups to induce a relatively mild infection or oil of turpentine to induce noninfectious inflammation. Animals with a sterile implant were used as control subjects. On post-operative day 6, either the MDP or F18 fluoromaltohexaose was injected intravenously, and the animals were scanned with the appropriate imaging device. Additional positron emission tomography imaging studies were performed with F18-fluorodeoxyglucose as a comparison of the specificity of our probes (n = 5 to 9 per group). The accumulation of the MDP in the infected rats was significantly increased at 1 h after injection when compared with the control and noninfectious inflammation groups (intensity ratio 1.54 ± 0.07 vs. 1.26 ± 0.04 and 1.20 ± 0.05, respectively; p F18 fluoromaltohexaose and F18 fluorodeoxyglucose significantly accumulated in the infected area 30 min after the injection (maximum standard uptake value ratio 4.43 ± 0.30 and 4.87 ± 0.28, respectively). In control rats, there was no accumulation of imaging probes near the device. In the noninfectious inflammation rats, no significant accumulation was observed with F18 fluoromaltohexaose, but F18 fluorodeoxyglucose accumulated in the mock-up area (maximum standard uptake value 2.53 ± 0.39 vs. 4.74 ± 0.46, respectively; p < 0.05). Our results indicate that maltohexaose-based imaging probes are potentially useful for the

  10. Effect of post crosslinking haze on the repeatability of Scheimpflug-based and slit-scanning imaging devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Shetty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of postcollagen crosslinking (CXL haze on the measurement and repeatability of pachymetry and mean keratometry (Km of four corneal topographers. Materials and Methods: Sixty eyes of sixty patients with progressive keratoconus who had undergone accelerated CXL (ACXL underwent imaging with a scanning slit imaging device (Orbscan II and three Scheimpflug imaging devices (Pentacam HR, Sirius, and Galilei. Post-ACXL haze was measured using the densitometry software on the Pentacam HR. Readings of the thinnest corneal thickness (TCT and Km from three scans of each device were analyzed. Effect of haze on the repeatability of TCT and Km measurements was evaluated using regression models. Repeatability was assessed by coefficient of variation. Results: Corneal densitometry in different zones affected the repeatability of TCT measurement of Orbscan (P < 0.05 significantly but not the repeatability of TCT with Pentacam HR and Sirius (P = 0.03 and 0.05, respectively. Km values were affected by haze when measured with the Pentacam HR (P < 0.05. The repeatability of Km readings for all devices was unaffected by haze. In the anterior 0–2 mm and 2–6 mm zone, TCT (P = 0.43 and 0.45, respectively, Km values (P = 0.4 and 0.6, respectively, repeatability of TCT (P = 0.1 in both zones, and Km (P = 0.5 and 0.1, respectively with Galilei were found to be the most reliable. Conclusion: Galilei measurements appear to be least affected by post-ACXL haze when compared with other devices. Hence, topography measurements in the presence of haze need to be interpreted with caution.

  11. THERMAL IMAGING OF Si, GaAs AND GaN -BASED DEVICES WITHIN THE MICROTHERM PROJECT

    OpenAIRE

    Pavageau , S.; Tessier , G.; Filloy , C.; Jerosolimski , G.; Fournier , D.; Polignano , M.-L.; Mica , I.; Cassette , S.; Aubry , R.; Durand , O.

    2005-01-01

    Submitted on behalf of EDA Publishing Association (http://irevues.inist.fr/handle/2042/5920); International audience; Within the european project Microtherm, we have developed a CCD-based thermoreflectance system which delivers thermal images of working integrated circuits with high spatial and thermal resolutions (down to 350 nm and 0.1 K respectively). We illustrate the performances of this set-up on several classes of semiconductor devices including high power transistors and transistor ar...

  12. Development of targeted STORM for super resolution imaging of biological samples using digital micro-mirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiya Peedikakkal, Liyana; Steventon, Victoria; Furley, Andrew; Cadby, Ashley J.

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate a simple illumination system based on a digital mirror device which allows for fine control over the power and pattern of illumination. We apply this to localization microscopy (LM), specifically stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM). Using this targeted STORM, we were able to image a selected area of a labelled cell without causing photo-damage to the surrounding areas of the cell.

  13. Enabling Real-Time Volume Rendering of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging on an iOS Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, Joseph; Winer, Eliot

    2017-12-01

    Powerful non-invasive imaging technologies like computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used daily by medical professionals to diagnose and treat patients. While 2D slice viewers have long been the standard, many tools allowing 3D representations of digital medical data are now available. The newest imaging advancement, functional MRI (fMRI) technology, has changed medical imaging from viewing static to dynamic physiology (4D) over time, particularly to study brain activity. Add this to the rapid adoption of mobile devices for everyday work and the need to visualize fMRI data on tablets or smartphones arises. However, there are few mobile tools available to visualize 3D MRI data, let alone 4D fMRI data. Building volume rendering tools on mobile devices to visualize 3D and 4D medical data is challenging given the limited computational power of the devices. This paper describes research that explored the feasibility of performing real-time 3D and 4D volume raycasting on a tablet device. The prototype application was tested on a 9.7" iPad Pro using two different fMRI datasets of brain activity. The results show that mobile raycasting is able to achieve between 20 and 40 frames per second for traditional 3D datasets, depending on the sampling interval, and up to 9 frames per second for 4D data. While the prototype application did not always achieve true real-time interaction, these results clearly demonstrated that visualizing 3D and 4D digital medical data is feasible with a properly constructed software framework.

  14. A Review of the Research on Response to Improvised Nuclear Device Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentz, A; Buddemeier, B; Dombroski, M

    2008-07-01

    Following the events of September 11, a litany of imaginable horribles was trotted out before an anxious and concerned public. To date, government agencies and academics are still grappling with how to best respond to such catastrophes, and as Senator Lieberman's quote says above, now is the time to plan and prepare for such events. One of the nation's worst fears is that terrorists might detonate an improvised nuclear device (IND) in an American city. With 9/11 serving as the catalyst, the government and many NGOs have invested money into research and development of response capabilities throughout the country. Yet, there is still much to learn about how to best respond to an IND event. Understanding the state of knowledge, identifying gaps, and making recommendations for how to fill those gaps, this paper will provide a framework under which past findings can be understood and future research can fit. The risk of an improvised nuclear device (IND) detonation may seem unlikely; and while this is hopefully true, due to its destructive capability, IND events must be prepared for. Many people still live under the Cold War mentality that if a city is attacked with a nuclear weapon, there is little chance of survival. This assumption, while perhaps true in the case of multiple, thermonuclear weapons exchanges, does not hold for the current threat. If a single IND were detonated in the United States, there would be many casualties at the point of impact; however, there would also be many survivors and the initial response by two major groups will mean the difference between life and death for many people. These groups are the first responders and the public. Understanding how these two groups prepare, react and interact will improve response to nuclear terrorism. Figure 1 provides a visualization of the response timeline of an IND event. For the purposes of this assessment, it is assumed that to accurately inform the public, three functions need to be

  15. Emergency CT brain: preliminary interpretation with a tablet device: image quality and diagnostic performance of the Apple iPad.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Laughlin, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    Tablet devices have recently been used in radiological image interpretation because they have a display resolution comparable to desktop LCD monitors. We identified a need to examine tablet display performance prior to their use in preliminary interpretation of radiological images. We compared the spatial and contrast resolution of a commercially available tablet display with a diagnostic grade 2 megapixel monochrome LCD using a contrast detail phantom. We also recorded reporting discrepancies, using the ACR RADPEER system, between preliminary interpretation of 100 emergency CT brain examinations on the tablet display and formal review on a diagnostic LCD. The iPad display performed inferiorly to the diagnostic monochrome display without the ability to zoom. When the software zoom function was enabled on the tablet device, comparable contrast detail phantom scores of 163 vs 165 points were achieved. No reporting discrepancies were encountered during the interpretation of 43 normal examinations and five cases of acute intracranial hemorrhage. There were seven RADPEER2 (understandable) misses when using the iPad display and 12 with the diagnostic LCD. Use of software zoom in the tablet device improved its contrast detail phantom score. The tablet allowed satisfactory identification of acute CT brain findings, but additional research will be required to examine the cause of "understandable" reporting discrepancies that occur when using tablet devices.

  16. Testing a Novel 3D Printed Radiographic Imaging Device for Use in Forensic Odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Tara L; Bruhn, Ann M; Giles, Bridget; Garcia, Hector M; Diawara, Norou

    2017-01-01

    There are specific challenges related to forensic dental radiology and difficulties in aligning X-ray equipment to teeth of interest. Researchers used 3D printing to create a new device, the combined holding and aiming device (CHAD), to address the positioning limitations of current dental X-ray devices. Participants (N = 24) used the CHAD, soft dental wax, and a modified external aiming device (MEAD) to determine device preference, radiographer's efficiency, and technique errors. Each participant exposed six X-rays per device for a total of 432 X-rays scored. A significant difference was found at the 0.05 level between the three devices (p = 0.0015), with the MEAD having the least amount of total errors and soft dental wax taking the least amount of time. Total errors were highest when participants used soft dental wax-both the MEAD and the CHAD performed best overall. Further research in forensic dental radiology and use of holding devices is needed. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. In situ scanning tunneling microscope tip treatment device for spin polarization imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An-Ping [Oak Ridge, TN; Jianxing, Ma [Oak Ridge, TN; Shen, Jian [Knoxville, TN

    2008-04-22

    A tip treatment device for use in an ultrahigh vacuum in situ scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The device provides spin polarization functionality to new or existing variable temperature STM systems. The tip treatment device readily converts a conventional STM to a spin-polarized tip, and thereby converts a standard STM system into a spin-polarized STM system. The tip treatment device also has functions of tip cleaning and tip flashing a STM tip to high temperature (>2000.degree. C.) in an extremely localized fashion. Tip coating functions can also be carried out, providing the tip sharp end with monolayers of coating materials including magnetic films. The device is also fully compatible with ultrahigh vacuum sample transfer setups.

  18. Spatial mapping of cadmium zinc telluride materials properties and electrical response to improve device yield and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Van Scyoc, J M; Yoon, H; Gilbert, T S; Hilton, N R; Lund, J C; James, R B

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride has experienced tremendous growth in its application to various radiation sensing problems over the last five years. However, there are still issues with yield, particularly of the large volume devices needed for imaging and sensitivity-critical applications. Inhomogeneities of various types and on various length scales currently prevent the fabrication of large devices of high spectral performance. This paper discusses the development of a set of characterization tools for quantifying these inhomogeneities, in order to develop improvement strategies to achieve the desired cadmium zinc telluride crystals for detector fabrication.

  19. An electronic image processing device featuring continuously selectable two-dimensional bipolar filter functions and real-time operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charleston, B.D.; Beckman, F.H.; Franco, M.J.; Charleston, D.B.

    1981-01-01

    A versatile electronic-analogue image processing system has been developed for use in improving the quality of various types of images with emphasis on those encountered in experimental and diagnostic medicine. The operational principle utilizes spatial filtering which selectively controls the contrast of an image according to the spatial frequency content of relevant and non-relevant features of the image. Noise can be reduced or eliminated by selectively lowering the contrast of information in the high spatial frequency range. Edge sharpness can be enhanced by accentuating the upper midrange spatial frequencies. Both methods of spatial frequency control may be adjusted continuously in the same image to obtain maximum visibility of the features of interest. A precision video camera is used to view medical diagnostic images, either prints, transparencies or CRT displays. The output of the camera provides the analogue input signal for both the electronic processing system and the video display of the unprocessed image. The video signal input to the electronic processing system is processed by a two-dimensional spatial convolution operation. The system employs charged-coupled devices (CCDs), both tapped analogue delay lines (TADs) and serial analogue delay lines (SADs), to store information in the form of analogue potentials which are constantly being updated as new sampled analogue data arrive at the input. This information is convolved with a programmed bipolar radially symmetrical hexagonal function which may be controlled and varied at each radius by the operator in real-time by adjusting a set of front panel controls or by a programmed microprocessor control. Two TV monitors are used, one for processed image display and the other for constant reference to the original image. The working prototype has a full-screen display matrix size of 200 picture elements per horizontal line by 240 lines. The matrix can be expanded vertically and horizontally for the

  20. CMOS Image Sensor and System for Imaging Hemodynamic Changes in Response to Deep Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Noor, Muhammad S; McCracken, Clinton B; Kiss, Zelma H T; Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Murari, Kartikeya

    2016-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a therapeutic intervention used for a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, but its mechanism of action is not well understood. It is known that DBS modulates neural activity which changes metabolic demands and thus the cerebral circulation state. However, it is unclear whether there are correlations between electrophysiological, hemodynamic and behavioral changes and whether they have any implications for clinical benefits. In order to investigate these questions, we present a miniaturized system for spectroscopic imaging of brain hemodynamics. The system consists of a 144 ×144, [Formula: see text] pixel pitch, high-sensitivity, analog-output CMOS imager fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS process, along with a miniaturized imaging system comprising illumination, focusing, analog-to-digital conversion and μSD card based data storage. This enables stand alone operation without a computer, nor electrical or fiberoptic tethers. To achieve high sensitivity, the pixel uses a capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA). The nMOS transistors are in the pixel while pMOS transistors are column-parallel, resulting in a fill factor (FF) of 26%. Running at 60 fps and exposed to 470 nm light, the CMOS imager has a minimum detectable intensity of 2.3 nW/cm(2) , a maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 49 dB at 2.45 μW/cm(2) leading to a dynamic range (DR) of 61 dB while consuming 167 μA from a 3.3 V supply. In anesthetized rats, the system was able to detect temporal, spatial and spectral hemodynamic changes in response to DBS.

  1. Rice pads. Devices to improve the effect of fat suppression of CHESS images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Susumu; Yokobayashi, Tsuneo; Miki, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    The chemical shift selective (CHESS) method is often used for fat suppression in magnetic resonance imaging. CHESS has several advantages, including versatility, quick imaging, and applicability to contrast examinations. One disadvantage of CHESS is the lingering fat signal generated as a result of nonuniformity of the static magnetic field. To overcome this drawback, some researchers have used pads made with polished rice (rice pads), a simple method in which rice pads are placed outside the area to be imaged. We describe ways to improve CHESS images, characteristics of the rice pad, its application to imaging, and methods of placing the pad. (author)

  2. Effect of a television digital noise reduction device on fluoroscopic image quality and dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, C.C.; Orphanoudakis, S.C.; Ablow, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    In conventional fluoroscopy, the current, and therefore the dose rate, is usually determined by the level at which the radiologist visualizes a just tolerable amount of photon ''mottle'' on the video monitor. In this study, digital processing of the analogue video image reduced noise and generated a television image at half the usual exposure rate. The technique uses frame delay to compare an incoming frame with the preceding output frame. A first-order recursive filter implemented under a motion-detection scheme operates on the image of a point-by-point basis. This effective motion detection algorithm permits noise suppression without creating noticeable lag in moving structures. Eight radiologists evaluated images of vesicoureteral reflux in the pig for noise, contrast, resolution, and general image quality on a five-point preferential scale. They rated the digitally processed fluoroscopy images equivalent in diagnostic value to unprocessed images

  3. The cell envelope stress response of Bacillus subtilis: from static signaling devices to dynamic regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radeck, Jara; Fritz, Georg; Mascher, Thorsten

    2017-02-01

    The cell envelope stress response (CESR) encompasses all regulatory events that enable a cell to protect the integrity of its envelope, an essential structure of any bacterial cell. The underlying signaling network is particularly well understood in the Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis. It consists of a number of two-component systems (2CS) and extracytoplasmic function σ factors that together regulate the production of both specific resistance determinants and general mechanisms to protect the envelope against antimicrobial peptides targeting the biogenesis of the cell wall. Here, we summarize the current picture of the B. subtilis CESR network, from the initial identification of the corresponding signaling devices to unraveling their interdependence and the underlying regulatory hierarchy within the network. In the course of detailed mechanistic studies, a number of novel signaling features could be described for the 2CSs involved in mediating CESR. This includes a novel class of so-called intramembrane-sensing histidine kinases (IM-HKs), which-instead of acting as stress sensors themselves-are activated via interprotein signal transfer. Some of these IM-HKs are involved in sensing the flux of antibiotic resistance transporters, a unique mechanism of responding to extracellular antibiotic challenge.

  4. Plasma response to electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    An electron energy filter (EEF) is embedded in the Large Volume Plasma Device plasma for carrying out studies on excitation of plasma turbulence by a gradient in electron temperature (ETG) described in the paper of Mattoo et al. [S. K. Mattoo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255007 (2012)]. In this paper, we report results on the response of the plasma to the EEF. It is shown that inhomogeneity in the magnetic field of the EEF switches on several physical phenomena resulting in plasma regions with different characteristics, including a plasma region free from energetic electrons, suitable for the study of ETG turbulence. Specifically, we report that localized structures of plasma density, potential, electron temperature, and plasma turbulence are excited in the EEF plasma. It is shown that structures of electron temperature and potential are created due to energy dependence of the electron transport in the filter region. On the other hand, although structure of plasma density has origin in the particle transport but two distinct steps of the density structure emerge from dominance of collisionality in the source-EEF region and of the Bohm diffusion in the EEF-target region. It is argued and experimental evidence is provided for existence of drift like flute Rayleigh-Taylor in the EEF plasma

  5. Response of the REWARD detection system to the presence of a Radiological Dispersal Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luís, R.; Fleta, C.; Balbuena, J.; Baptista, M.; Barros, S.; Disch, C.; Jumilla, C.; Lozano, M.; Marques, J.G.; Vaz, P.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the REWARD project consisted in building a mobile system for real time, wide area radiation surveillance, using a CdZnTe detector for gamma radiation and a neutron detector based on novel silicon technologies. The sensing unit includes a GPS system and a wireless communication interface to send the data remotely to a monitoring base station, where it will be analyzed in real time and correlated with historical data from the tag location, in order to generate an alarm when an abnormal situation is detected. The main objective of this work consisted in making predictions regarding the behavior of the REWARD system in the presence of a Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD), one of the reference scenarios foreseen for REWARD, using experimental data and the Monte Carlo simulation program MCNP6. Experimental tests were performed at the Fire Brigades Facilities in Rome and at the Naples Fire Brigades. The response of the REWARD detection system to the presence of an RDD is predicted and discussed. - Highlights: • A prototype mobile system for real-time, wide-area radiation surveillance was built. • Experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations were used to test the system. • The system is suitable to detect and identify radiation sources in threat scenarios.

  6. Impact of measuring electron tracks in high-resolution scientific charge-coupled devices within Compton imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chivers, D.H.; Coffer, A.; Plimley, B.; Vetter, K.

    2011-01-01

    We have implemented benchmarked models to determine the gain in sensitivity of electron-tracking based Compton imaging relative to conventional Compton imaging by the use of high-resolution scientific charge-coupled devices (CCD). These models are based on the recently demonstrated ability of electron-tracking based Compton imaging by using fully depleted scientific CCDs. Here we evaluate the gain in sensitivity by employing Monte Carlo simulations in combination with advanced charge transport models to calculate two-dimensional charge distributions corresponding to experimentally obtained tracks. In order to reconstruct the angle of the incident γ-ray, a trajectory determination algorithm was used on each track and integrated into a back-projection routine utilizing a geodesic-vertex ray tracing technique. Analysis was performed for incident γ-ray energies of 662 keV and results show an increase in sensitivity consistent with tracking of the Compton electron to approximately ±30 o .

  7. 75 FR 8375 - Device Improvements to Reduce Unnecessary Radiation Exposure From Medical Imaging; Public Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... hardware and software features should manufacturers build into CT and fluoroscopic devices in order to... ALARA concept (maintaining dose As Low As Reasonably Achievable) and utilize or provide for...

  8. Imaging response during therapy with radium-223 for castration-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keizman, D; Fosboel, M O; Reichegger, H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The imaging response to radium-223 therapy is at present poorly described. We aimed to describe the imaging response to radium-223 treatment. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the computed tomography (CT) and bone scintigraphy response of metastatic castration-resistant prostate c....../or radiological) may be noted during the first 3 months, and should not be confused with progression. Imaging by CT scan should be considered after three and six doses of radium-223 to rule out extraskeletal disease progression....

  9. Automatic Prostate Tracking and Motion Assessment in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy With an Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azcona, Juan Diego; Li, Ruijiang; Mok, Edward; Hancock, Steven; Xing, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the prostate intrafraction motion in volumetric modulated arc therapy treatments using cine megavoltage (MV) images acquired with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients were treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy using a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator equipped with an EPID for acquiring cine MV images during treatment. Cine MV images acquisition was scheduled for single or multiple treatment fractions (between 1 and 8). A novel automatic fiducial detection algorithm that can handle irregular multileaf collimator apertures, field edges, fast leaf and gantry movement, and MV image noise and artifacts in patient anatomy was used. All sets of images (approximately 25,000 images in total) were analyzed to measure the positioning accuracy of implanted fiducial markers and assess the prostate movement. Results: Prostate motion can vary greatly in magnitude among different patients. Different motion patterns were identified, showing its unpredictability. The mean displacement and standard deviation of the intrafraction motion was generally less than 2.0 ± 2.0 mm in each of the spatial directions. In certain patients, however, the percentage of the treatment time in which the prostate is displaced more than 5 mm from its planned position in at least 1 spatial direction was 10% or more. The maximum prostate displacement observed was 13.3 mm. Conclusion: Prostate tracking and motion assessment was performed with MV imaging and an EPID. The amount of prostate motion observed suggests that patients will benefit from its real-time monitoring. Megavoltage imaging can provide the basis for real-time prostate tracking using conventional linear accelerators

  10. Optically-tracked handheld fluorescence imaging platform for monitoring skin response in the management of soft tissue sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamma, Emilie; Qiu, Jimmy; Lindvere-Teene, Liis; Blackmore, Kristina M.; Majeed, Safa; Weersink, Robert; Dickie, Colleen I.; Griffin, Anthony M.; Wunder, Jay S.; Ferguson, Peter C.; DaCosta, Ralph S.

    2015-07-01

    Standard clinical management of extremity soft tissue sarcomas includes surgery with radiation therapy. Wound complications (WCs) arising from treatment may occur due to bacterial infection and tissue breakdown. The ability to detect changes in these parameters during treatment may lead to earlier interventions that mitigate WCs. We describe the use of a new system composed of an autofluorescence imaging device and an optical three-dimensional tracking system to detect and coregister the presence of bacteria with radiation doses. The imaging device visualized erythema using white light and detected bacterial autofluorescence using 405-nm excitation light. Its position was tracked relative to the patient using IR reflective spheres and registration to the computed tomography coordinates. Image coregistration software was developed to spatially overlay radiation treatment plans and dose distributions on the white light and autofluorescence images of the surgical site. We describe the technology, its use in the operating room, and standard operating procedures, as well as demonstrate technical feasibility and safety intraoperatively. This new clinical tool may help identify patients at greater risk of developing WCs and investigate correlations between radiation dose, skin response, and changes in bacterial load as biomarkers associated with WCs.

  11. Fluorescence guided lymph node biopsy in large animals using direct image projection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringhausen, Elizabeth; Wang, Tylon; Pitts, Jonathan; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-03-01

    The use of fluorescence imaging for aiding oncologic surgery is a fast growing field in biomedical imaging, revolutionizing open and minimally invasive surgery practices. We have designed, constructed, and tested a system for fluorescence image acquisition and direct display on the surgical field for fluorescence guided surgery. The system uses a near-infrared sensitive CMOS camera for image acquisition, a near-infra LED light source for excitation, and DLP digital projector for projection of fluorescence image data onto the operating field in real time. Instrument control was implemented in Matlab for image capture, processing of acquired data and alignment of image parameters with the projected pattern. Accuracy of alignment was evaluated statistically to demonstrate sensitivity to small objects and alignment throughout the imaging field. After verification of accurate alignment, feasibility for clinical application was demonstrated in large animal models of sentinel lymph node biopsy. Indocyanine green was injected subcutaneously in Yorkshire pigs at various locations to model sentinel lymph node biopsy in gynecologic cancers, head and neck cancer, and melanoma. Fluorescence was detected by the camera system during operations and projected onto the imaging field, accurately identifying tissues containing the fluorescent tracer at up to 15 frames per second. Fluorescence information was projected as binary green regions after thresholding and denoising raw intensity data. Promising results with this initial clinical scale prototype provided encouraging results for the feasibility of optical projection of acquired luminescence during open oncologic surgeries.

  12. Imaging assessment of a portable hemodialysis device: detection of possible failure modes and monitoring of functional performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olorunsola, Olufoladare G; Kim, Steven H; Chang, Ryan; Kuo, Yuo-Chen; Hetts, Steven W; Heller, Alex; Kant, Rishi; Saeed, Maythem; Fissell, William H; Roy, Shuvo; Wilson, Mark W

    2014-03-27

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility and limitations of various imaging modalities in the noninvasive assessment of a novel compact hemodialyzer under development for renal replacement therapy, with specific aim towards monitoring its functional performance. The prototype is a 4×3×6 cm aluminum cartridge housing "blood" and "dialysate" flow paths arranged in parallel. A sheet of semipermeable silicon nanopore membranes forms the blood-dialysate interface, allowing passage of small molecules. Blood flow was simulated using a peristaltic pump to instill iodinated contrast through the blood compartment, while de-ionized water was instilled through the dialysate compartment at a matched rate in the countercurrent direction. Images were acquired under these flow conditions using multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), fluoroscopy, high-resolution quantitative computed tomography (HR-QCT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MDCT was used to monitor contrast diffusion efficiency by plotting contrast density as a function of position along the path of flow through the cartridge during steady state infusion at 1 and 20 mL/min. Both linear and exponential regressions were used to model contrast decay along the flow path. Both linear and exponential models of contrast decay appeared to be reasonable approximations, yielding similar results for contrast diffusion during a single pass through the cartridge. There was no measurable difference in contrast diffusion when comparing 1 mL/min and 20 mL/min flow rates. Fluoroscopy allowed a gross qualitative assessment of flow within the device, and revealed flow inhomogeneity within the corner of the cartridge opposite the blood inlet port. MRI and HR-QCT were both severely limited due to the paramagnetic properties and high atomic number of the target material, respectively. During testing, we encountered several causes of device malfunction, including leak formation, trapped gas, and contrast

  13. Comparison of horizontal and vertical noise power spectrum in measurements by using various electronic portal imaging devices in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Won [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gang-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kwan Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Baekseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Seo Goo [Dept. of Medical Science, Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Kyung Tae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Dongnam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Son, Soon Yong [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Son, Jin Hyun; Min, Jung Whan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shingu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The quality assurance (QA) is very important for diagnostic field and radiation therapy field to evaluate the characteristic of devices. The purpose of this study was to compare different NPS methodologies results which are measuring NPS with regard to horizontal and vertical directions by using megavoltage X-ray energies. The NPS evaluation methods were applied to the International Electro-technical Commission standard (IEC 62220-1). The electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) devices such as Siemens BEAMVIEWPLUS, Elekta iViewGT and Varian ClinacR iX aS1000 were used. NPS data were expressed by corresponding each frequency about average of noise value corresponding the each frequency, and NPS were evaluated quantitatively by totaling up the noise values of average frequency which are on horizontal and vertical directions. In NPS results for Elekta iViewGT, NPS of horizontal and vertical by using 4 methods were indicated the difference of 3-5% between horizontal and vertical direction. In the results of Siemens BEAMVIEWPLUS and Varian ClinacR iX aS1000, the NPS of horizontal and vertical direction were indicated the difference of 15% when averaging the whole values. This study were evaluated the NPS of each devices by totaling up the noise values of average frequency which are on horizontal and vertical directions suggesting the quantitative evaluation method using the data.

  14. Mechanical and thermo-mechanical response of a lead-core bearing device subjected to different loading conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhelyazov Todor

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution is focused on the numerical modelling, simulation and analysis of a lead-core bearing device for passive seismic isolation. An accurate finite element model of a lead-core bearing device is presented. The model is designed to analyse both mechanical and thermo-mechanical responses of the seismic isolator to different loading conditions. Specifically, the mechanical behaviour in a typical identification test is simulated. The response of the lead-core bearing device to circular sinusoidal paths is analysed. The obtained shear displacement – shear force relationship is compared to experimental data found in literature sources. The hypothesis that heating of the lead-core during cyclic loading affects the degrading phenomena in the bearing device is taken into account. Constitutive laws are defined for each material: lead, rubber and steel. Both predefined constitutive laws (in the used general–purpose finite element code and semi-analytical procedures aimed at a more accurate modelling of the constitutive relations are tested. The results obtained by finite element analysis are to be further used to calibrate a macroscopic model of the lead-core bearing device seen as a single-degree-of-freedom mechanical system.

  15. An implementation of wireless medical image transmission system on mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, SangBock; Lee, Taesoo; Jin, Gyehwan; Hong, Juhyun

    2008-12-01

    The advanced technology of computing system was followed by the rapid improvement of medical instrumentation and patient record management system. The typical examples are hospital information system (HIS) and picture archiving and communication system (PACS), which computerized the management procedure of medical records and images in hospital. Because these systems were built and used in hospitals, doctors out of hospital have problems to access them immediately on emergent cases. To solve these problems, this paper addressed the realization of system that could transmit the images acquired by medical imaging systems in hospital to the remote doctors' handheld PDA's using CDMA cellular phone network. The system consists of server and PDA. The server was developed to manage the accounts of doctors and patients and allocate the patient images to each doctor. The PDA was developed to display patient images through remote server connection. To authenticate the personal user, remote data access (RDA) method was used in PDA accessing the server database and file transfer protocol (FTP) was used to download patient images from the remove server. In laboratory experiments, it was calculated to take ninety seconds to transmit thirty images with 832 x 488 resolution and 24 bit depth and 0.37 Mb size. This result showed that the developed system has no problems for remote doctors to receive and review the patient images immediately on emergent cases.

  16. Wearable Device-Based Gait Recognition Using Angle Embedded Gait Dynamic Images and a Convolutional Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongjia; Zhou, Suiping

    2017-02-28

    The widespread installation of inertial sensors in smartphones and other wearable devices provides a valuable opportunity to identify people by analyzing their gait patterns, for either cooperative or non-cooperative circumstances. However, it is still a challenging task to reliably extract discriminative features for gait recognition with noisy and complex data sequences collected from casually worn wearable devices like smartphones. To cope with this problem, we propose a novel image-based gait recognition approach using the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) without the need to manually extract discriminative features. The CNN's input image, which is encoded straightforwardly from the inertial sensor data sequences, is called Angle Embedded Gait Dynamic Image (AE-GDI). AE-GDI is a new two-dimensional representation of gait dynamics, which is invariant to rotation and translation. The performance of the proposed approach in gait authentication and gait labeling is evaluated using two datasets: (1) the McGill University dataset, which is collected under realistic conditions; and (2) the Osaka University dataset with the largest number of subjects. Experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves competitive recognition accuracy over existing approaches and provides an effective parametric solution for identification among a large number of subjects by gait patterns.

  17. Wearable Device-Based Gait Recognition Using Angle Embedded Gait Dynamic Images and a Convolutional Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongjia; Zhou, Suiping

    2017-01-01

    The widespread installation of inertial sensors in smartphones and other wearable devices provides a valuable opportunity to identify people by analyzing their gait patterns, for either cooperative or non-cooperative circumstances. However, it is still a challenging task to reliably extract discriminative features for gait recognition with noisy and complex data sequences collected from casually worn wearable devices like smartphones. To cope with this problem, we propose a novel image-based gait recognition approach using the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) without the need to manually extract discriminative features. The CNN’s input image, which is encoded straightforwardly from the inertial sensor data sequences, is called Angle Embedded Gait Dynamic Image (AE-GDI). AE-GDI is a new two-dimensional representation of gait dynamics, which is invariant to rotation and translation. The performance of the proposed approach in gait authentication and gait labeling is evaluated using two datasets: (1) the McGill University dataset, which is collected under realistic conditions; and (2) the Osaka University dataset with the largest number of subjects. Experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves competitive recognition accuracy over existing approaches and provides an effective parametric solution for identification among a large number of subjects by gait patterns. PMID:28264503

  18. Ovarian responses and pregnancy rate with previously used intravaginal progesterone releasing devices for fixed-time artificial insemination in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilariño, M; Rubianes, E; Menchaca, A

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to determine serum progesterone concentrations, ovarian responses, and pregnancy rate in sheep inseminated following a short-term protocol (6 days of treatment) with a previously used controlled internal drug release-G (CIDR-G) device. In experiment 1, 30 ewes were put on a short-term protocol using a CIDR-G of first use (new devices, N = 10), second use (previously used for 6 days, N = 10), or third use (previously used twice for 6 days, N = 10). All ewes were given prostaglandin F(2α) (10 mg dinoprost) and eCG (300 IU) im at device withdrawal. Mean serum progesterone concentrations were greater for ewes treated with new versus reused devices (P synchronization and ovulation, with lower serum progesterone concentrations for reused devices. Three times used CIDR-G yielded a pregnancy rate >70%, which tended to be lower than that obtained with new devices, adding evidence of the detrimental effect of low serum progesterone concentrations on fertility in sheep. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dosimetric verification of radiation therapy including intensity modulated treatments, using an amorphous-silicon electronic portal imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chytyk-Praznik, Krista Joy

    Radiation therapy is continuously increasing in complexity due to technological innovation in delivery techniques, necessitating thorough dosimetric verification. Comparing accurately predicted portal dose images to measured images obtained during patient treatment can determine if a particular treatment was delivered correctly. The goal of this thesis was to create a method to predict portal dose images that was versatile and accurate enough to use in a clinical setting. All measured images in this work were obtained with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (a-Si EPID), but the technique is applicable to any planar imager. A detailed, physics-motivated fluence model was developed to characterize fluence exiting the linear accelerator head. The model was further refined using results from Monte Carlo simulations and schematics of the linear accelerator. The fluence incident on the EPID was converted to a portal dose image through a superposition of Monte Carlo-generated, monoenergetic dose kernels specific to the a-Si EPID. Predictions of clinical IMRT fields with no patient present agreed with measured portal dose images within 3% and 3 mm. The dose kernels were applied ignoring the geometrically divergent nature of incident fluence on the EPID. A computational investigation into this parallel dose kernel assumption determined its validity under clinically relevant situations. Introducing a patient or phantom into the beam required the portal image prediction algorithm to account for patient scatter and attenuation. Primary fluence was calculated by attenuating raylines cast through the patient CT dataset, while scatter fluence was determined through the superposition of pre-calculated scatter fluence kernels. Total dose in the EPID was calculated by convolving the total predicted incident fluence with the EPID-specific dose kernels. The algorithm was tested on water slabs with square fields, agreeing with measurement within 3% and 3 mm. The

  20. Response of the REWARD detection system to the presence of a Radiological Dispersal Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luis, R.; Baptista, M.; Barros, S.; Marques, J.; Vaz, P.; Balbuena, J.; Disch, C.; Fleta, C.; Jumilla, C.; Lozano, M.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years an increased international concern has emerged about the radiological and nuclear (RN) threats associated with the illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials that could be potentially used for terrorist attacks. The objective of the REWARD (Real Time Wide Area Radiation Surveillance System) project, co-funded by the European Union 7. Framework Programme Security, consisted in building a mobile system for real time, wide area radiation surveillance, using a CdZnTe detector for gamma radiation and a neutron detector based on novel silicon technologies. The sensing unit includes a GPS system and a wireless communication interface to send the data remotely to a monitoring base station, where it will be analyzed in real time and correlated with historical data from the tag location, in order to generate an alarm when an abnormal situation is detected. Due to its portability and accuracy, the system will be extremely useful in many different scenarios such as nuclear terrorism, lost radioactive sources, radioactive contamination or nuclear accidents. This paper shortly introduces the REWARD detection system, depicts some terrorist threat scenarios involving radioactive sources and special nuclear materials and summarizes the simulation work undertaken during the past three years in the framework of the REWARD project. The main objective consisted in making predictions regarding the behavior of the REWARD system in the presence of a Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD), one of the reference scenarios foreseen for REWARD, using the Monte Carlo simulation program MCNP6. The reference scenario is characterized in detail, from the i) radiological protection, ii) radiation detection requirements and iii) communications points of view. Experimental tests were performed at the Fire Brigades Facilities in Rome and at the Naples Fire Brigades, and the results, which validate the simulation work, are presented and analyzed. The response of the REWARD

  1. Response of the REWARD detection system to the presence of a Radiological Dispersal Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luis, R.; Baptista, M.; Barros, S.; Marques, J.; Vaz, P. [IST - Campus Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10 - km 139.7, 2695-066, Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Balbuena, J.; Disch, C. [Physical Institut, University of Freiburg Hermann-Herder-Str. 3 D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Fleta, C.; Jumilla, C.; Lozano, M. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona - IMB-CNM, CSIC, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    In recent years an increased international concern has emerged about the radiological and nuclear (RN) threats associated with the illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials that could be potentially used for terrorist attacks. The objective of the REWARD (Real Time Wide Area Radiation Surveillance System) project, co-funded by the European Union 7. Framework Programme Security, consisted in building a mobile system for real time, wide area radiation surveillance, using a CdZnTe detector for gamma radiation and a neutron detector based on novel silicon technologies. The sensing unit includes a GPS system and a wireless communication interface to send the data remotely to a monitoring base station, where it will be analyzed in real time and correlated with historical data from the tag location, in order to generate an alarm when an abnormal situation is detected. Due to its portability and accuracy, the system will be extremely useful in many different scenarios such as nuclear terrorism, lost radioactive sources, radioactive contamination or nuclear accidents. This paper shortly introduces the REWARD detection system, depicts some terrorist threat scenarios involving radioactive sources and special nuclear materials and summarizes the simulation work undertaken during the past three years in the framework of the REWARD project. The main objective consisted in making predictions regarding the behavior of the REWARD system in the presence of a Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD), one of the reference scenarios foreseen for REWARD, using the Monte Carlo simulation program MCNP6. The reference scenario is characterized in detail, from the i) radiological protection, ii) radiation detection requirements and iii) communications points of view. Experimental tests were performed at the Fire Brigades Facilities in Rome and at the Naples Fire Brigades, and the results, which validate the simulation work, are presented and analyzed. The response of the REWARD

  2. Investigation of the degradation mechanisms of a variety of organic photovoltaic devices by combination of imaging techniques—the ISOS-3 inter-laboratory collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösch, Roland; Tanenbaum, David; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    The investigation of degradation of seven distinct sets (with a number of individual cells of n $ 12) of state of the art organic photovoltaic devices prepared by leading research laboratories with a combination of imaging methods is reported. All devices have been shipped to and degraded at Risø...

  3. A low-cost microwell device for high-resolution imaging of neurite outgrowth in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuan; Mlodzianoski, Michael J.; Cheun Lee, Aih; Huang, Fang; Suter, Daniel M.

    2018-06-01

    Objective. Current neuronal cell culture is mostly performed on two-dimensional (2D) surfaces, which lack many of the important features of the native environment of neurons, including topographical cues, deformable extracellular matrix, and spatial isotropy or anisotropy in three dimensions. Although three-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems provide a more physiologically relevant environment than 2D systems, their popularity is greatly hampered by the lack of easy-to-make-and-use devices. We aim to develop a widely applicable 3D culture procedure to facilitate the transition of neuronal cultures from 2D to 3D. Approach. We made a simple microwell device for 3D neuronal cell culture that is inexpensive, easy to assemble, and fully compatible with commonly used imaging techniques, including super-resolution microscopy. Main results. We developed a novel gel mixture to support 3D neurite regeneration of Aplysia bag cell neurons, a system that has been extensively used for quantitative analysis of growth cone dynamics in 2D. We found that the morphology and growth pattern of bag cell growth cones in 3D culture closely resemble the ones of growth cones observed in vivo. We demonstrated the capability of our device for high-resolution imaging of cytoskeletal and signaling proteins as well as organelles. Significance. Neuronal cell culture has been a valuable tool for neuroscientists to study the behavior of neurons in a controlled environment. Compared to 2D, neurons cultured in 3D retain the majority of their native characteristics, while offering higher accessibility, control, and repeatability. We expect that our microwell device will facilitate a wider adoption of 3D neuronal cultures to study the mechanisms of neurite regeneration.

  4. Frequency response improvement of a two-port surface acoustic wave device based on epitaxial AlN thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junning; Hao, Zhibiao; Luo, Yi; Li, Guoqiang

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an exploration on improving the frequency response of the symmetrical two-port AlN surface acoustic wave (SAW) device, using epitaxial AlN thin film on (0001) sapphire as the piezoelectric substrate. The devices were fabricated by lift-off processes with Ti/Al composite electrodes as interleaved digital transducers (IDT). The impact of DL and the number of the IDT finger pairs on the frequency response was carefully investigated. The overall properties of the device are found to be greatly improved with DL elongation, indicated by the reduced pass band ripple and increased stop band rejection ratio. The rejection increases by 8.3 dB when DL elongates from 15.5λ to 55.5λ and 4.4 dB further accompanying another 50λ elongation. This is because larger DL repels the stray acoustic energy out of the propagation path and provides a cleaner traveling channel for functional SAW, and at the same time restrains electromagnetic feedthrough. It is also found that proper addition of the IDT finger pairs is beneficial for the device response, indicated by the ripple reduction and the insertion loss drop.

  5. 75 FR 38118 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Inv. No. 337-TA-724] In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices... AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of investigation pursuant to 19 U.S.C. 1337. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that a complaint was filed with the U.S. International Trade...

  6. 77 FR 4059 - Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof; Receipt...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [DN 2869] Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting... Interest AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled In Re Certain Electronic...

  7. 77 FR 27463 - Device Improvements for Pediatric X-Ray Imaging; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... material and instructions for pediatric digital radiography (Ref. 8) and fluoroscopy (ongoing project.... The draft guidance provides as follows: ``Manufacturers seeking marketing clearance for a new x-ray... the device in pediatric populations. Manufacturers who seek marketing clearance only for general...

  8. Impact on reproducibility of the treatment position by improving immobilization device in image guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Yuko; Sasaki, Junichi; Shiomi, Hiroya; Oh, Ryoongjin; Inoue, Toshihiko; Tajiri, Shingo

    2012-01-01

    The immobilization device for treatment becomes important to obtain fixation and reproducibility of the treatment position. It was confirmed that reproducibility of the treatment position obtains higher accuracy by the method of using immobilization device. We divided into three terms by the methods of immobilization. An infrared reflective marker performs the setup of a position at the start of treatment, and setup of the patient in a fixed implement is performed by ExacTrac. Difference between coordinates of the immobilization device and the patient position was calculated by the vector in three directions. We estimated the position error index (PE index ) by using the square root of the sum of square of each vectors, and evaluated the amount of differences of patient position at three terms. Mean and standard deviation of index values were 9.53±7.21, 8.50±5.93, and 6.42±3.80 at each three terms. With every passing year, the amount of gap and difference of the patient fixation has decreased. By the improvement of the use of the immobilization device, gap and difference of fixation has decreased. Accordingly, we could obtain better accuracy of fixation. (author)

  9. Imaging flaws in thin metal plates using a magneto-optic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, B.; Prabhu, D. R.; Namkung, M.; Birt, E. A.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of the capabilities of the magnetooptic/eddy-current imager (MEI) apparatus in the case of aging aircraft structure-type flaws in 2024-T3 Al alloy plates. Attention is given to images of cyclically grown fatigue cracks from rivetted joints in fabricated lap-joint structures, electrical discharge machining notches, and corrosion spots. Although conventional eddy-current methods could have been used, the speed and ease of MEI's use in these tests is unmatched by such means. Results are displayed in real time as a test piece is scanned, furnishing easily interpreted flaw images.

  10. Design and implementation of I2Vote-An interactive image-based voting system using windows mobile devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Broekema, A.; Oudkerk, M.

    Purpose: To develop, implement and test a novel audience response system (ARS) that allows image based interaction for radiology education. Methods: The ARS developed in this project is based on standard Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) (HP iPAQ 114 classic handheld) running Microsoft (R) Windows

  11. An electrically actuated imperfect microbeam: Dynamical integrity for interpreting and predicting the device response

    KAUST Repository

    Ruzziconi, Laura; Younis, Mohammad I.; Lenci, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    observed in practice and where, instead, becomes vulnerable, i.e. they provide valuable information to operate the device in safe conditions according to the desired outcome and depending on the expected disturbances. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media

  12. Performance study of a fan beam collimator designed for a multi-modality small animal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbir Ahmed, ASM; Kramer, Gary H.; Semmler, Wolfrad; Peter, Jorg

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology to design and conduct the performances of a fan beam collimator. This fan beam collimator was designed to use with a multi-modality small animal imaging device and the performance of the collimator was studied for a 3D geometry. Analytical expressions were formulated to calculate the parameters for the collimator. A Monte Carlo model was developed to analyze the scattering and image noises for a 3D object. The results showed that the performance of the fan beam collimator was strongly dependent on the source distribution and position. The fan beam collimator showed increased counting efficiency in comparison to a parallel hole collimator. Inside attenuating medium, the increased attenuating effect outweighed the fan beam increased counting efficiency.

  13. Advances in the development of an imaging device for plaque measurement in the area of the carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ličev, Lačezar; Krumnikl, Michal; Škuta, Jaromír; Babiuch, Marek; Farana, Radim

    2014-03-04

    This paper describes the advances in the development and subsequent testing of an imaging device for three-dimensional ultrasound measurement of atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid artery. The embolization from the atherosclerotic carotid plaque is one of the most common causes of ischemic stroke and, therefore, we consider the measurement of the plaque as extremely important. The paper describes the proposed hardware for enhancing the standard ultrasonic probe to provide a possibility of accurate probe positioning and synchronization with the cardiac activity, allowing the precise plaque measurements that were impossible with the standard equipment. The synchronization signal is derived from the output signal of the patient monitor (electrocardiogram (ECG)), processed by a microcontroller-based system, generating the control commands for the linear motion moving the probe. The controlling algorithm synchronizes the movement with the ECG waveform to obtain clear images not disturbed by the heart activity.

  14. Electronic portal imaging device detection of radioopaque markers for the evaluation of prostate position during megavoltage irradiation: a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigneault, Eric; Pouliot, Jean; Laverdiere, Jacques; Roy, Jean; Dorion, Marc

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess daily prostatic apex motion relative to pelvic bone structures during megavoltage irradiation. Methods and Materials: Radioopaque markers were implanted under ultrasound guidance near the prostatic apex of 11 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma. Patients were subsequently treated with a four field-box technique at a beam energy of 23 MV. During treatment, on-line images were obtained with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). The marker was easily identified, even on unprocessed images, and the distance between the marker and a bony landmark was measured. Timelapse movies were also reviewed. After the completion of treatment, a transcrectal ultrasound examination was performed in 8 of 11 patients, to verify the position of the marker. Results: We acquired over 900 digital portal images and analyzed posterioanterior and right lateral views. The quality of portal images obtained with megavoltage irradiation was good. It was possible to evaluate pelvic bone structures even without image histogram equalization. Moreover, the radioopaque marker was easily visible on every online portal image. The review of timelapse movies showed important interfraction motion of the marker while bone structures remained stable. We measured the position of the marker for each fraction. Marker displacements up to 1.6 cm were measured between 2 consecutive days of treatment. Important marker motions were predominantly in the posteroanterior and cephalocaudal directions. In eight patients, we verified the position of the marker relative to the prostatic apex with ultrasound at the end of the treatments. The marker remained in the trapezoid zone. Intratreatment images reviewed in two cases showed no change in marker position. Our results, obtained during the treatment courses, indicate similar or larger prostate motions than previously observed in studies that used intertreatment x-ray films and CT images. Marker implantation under

  15. Concurrent Calculations on Reconfigurable Logic Devices Applied to the Analysis of Video Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio R. Geninatti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and implementation on FPGA devices of an algorithm for computing similarities between neighboring frames in a video sequence using luminance information. By taking advantage of the well-known flexibility of Reconfigurable Logic Devices, we have designed a hardware implementation of the algorithm used in video segmentation and indexing. The experimental results show the tradeoff between concurrent sequential resources and the functional blocks needed to achieve maximum operational speed while achieving minimum silicon area usage. To evaluate system efficiency, we compare the performance of the hardware solution to that of calculations done via software using general-purpose processors with and without an SIMD instruction set.

  16. Evaluation of an edge method for computed radiography and an electronic portal imaging device in radiotherapy: image quality measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Soon-Yong [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Bo-Young [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Woo [Konkuk University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Min [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi-Woun [The Baekseok Culture University College of Korea, Cheon-an (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ham-Gyum; Kim, Wha-Sun [The Ansan University College of Korea, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Lyu, Kwang-Yeul; Min, Jung-Whan [The Shingu University College of Korea, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki-Won [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Regular quality assurance (QA) of image quality is essential for reasonable patient dose and accurate treatment. Thus, QA should be performed as a routine for correction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the computed radiography (CR) system and the digital radiography (DR) system by using the edge method in megavoltage X-ray imaging (MVI). We used an edge block, which consisting of tungsten with dimensions of 19 (thickness) x 10 (length) x 1 (width) cm{sup 3} and measured the pre-sampling MTF by using a 6-megavolt (MV) energy. Computed radiography with an image plate (CR-IP) showed the values of 0.4 mm{sup -1} and 1.19 mm{sup -1} for MTF 0.5 and 0.1. In the DR group, Elekta iViewGT showed the highest value of 0.27 mm{sup -1} for MTF 0.5, and Siemens BEAMVIEW{sup PLUS} showed the highest value of 0.98 mm{sup -1} for MTF 0.1. In CR, the NPS of CR-IP showed a favorable noise distribution. Thus, in the DR group, the NPS of Elekta iViewGT showed the highest noise distribution. CR-IP showed values at peak DQE and 1 mm{sup -1} DQE of 0.0013 and 0.00011, respectively. In the DR group, Elekta iViewGT showed the best efficiency at a peak DQE of 0.0009, and Siemens BEAMVIEW{sup PLUS} showed the best efficiency at a 1-mm{sup -1} DQE of 0.000008. The edge method produced fast assessments of the MTF and the DQE. We could validate the evaluation of the edge method by comparing of the CR system to the DR system. This study demonstrated that the edge method can be used for not only traditional QA imaging but also quantitative MTF, NPS and DQE measurements in detector development.

  17. Fast imaging diagnostics on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granstedt, E. M., E-mail: egranstedt@trialphaenergy.com; Petrov, P.; Knapp, K.; Cordero, M.; Patel, V. [Tri Alpha Energy, P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The C-2U device employed neutral beam injection, end-biasing, and various particle fueling techniques to sustain a Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma. As part of the diagnostic suite, two fast imaging instruments with radial and nearly axial plasma views were developed using a common camera platform. To achieve the necessary viewing geometry, imaging lenses were mounted behind re-entrant viewports attached to welded bellows. During gettering, the vacuum optics were retracted and isolated behind a gate valve permitting their removal if cleaning was necessary. The axial view incorporated a stainless-steel mirror in a protective cap assembly attached to the vacuum-side of the viewport. For each system, a custom lens-based, high-throughput optical periscope was designed to relay the plasma image about half a meter to a high-speed camera. Each instrument also contained a remote-controlled filter wheel, set between shots to isolate a particular hydrogen or impurity emission line. The design of the camera platform, imaging performance, and sample data for each view is presented.

  18. Simulating charge transport to understand the spectral response of Swept Charge Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athiray, P. S.; Sreekumar, P.; Narendranath, S.; Gow, J. P. D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Swept Charge Devices (SCD) are novel X-ray detectors optimized for improved spectral performance without any demand for active cooling. The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) experiment onboard the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft used an array of SCDs to map the global surface elemental abundances on the Moon using the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique. The successful demonstration of SCDs in C1XS spurred an enhanced version of the spectrometer on Chandrayaan-2 using the next-generation SCD sensors. Aims: The objective of this paper is to demonstrate validation of a physical model developed to simulate X-ray photon interaction and charge transportation in a SCD. The model helps to understand and identify the origin of individual components that collectively contribute to the energy-dependent spectral response of the SCD. Furthermore, the model provides completeness to various calibration tasks, such as generating spectral matrices (RMFs - redistribution matrix files), estimating efficiency, optimizing event selection logic, and maximizing event recovery to improve photon-collection efficiency in SCDs. Methods: Charge generation and transportation in the SCD at different layers related to channel stops, field zones, and field-free zones due to photon interaction were computed using standard drift and diffusion equations. Charge collected in the buried channel due to photon interaction in different volumes of the detector was computed by assuming a Gaussian radial profile of the charge cloud. The collected charge was processed further to simulate both diagonal clocking read-out, which is a novel design exclusive for SCDs, and event selection logic to construct the energy spectrum. Results: We compare simulation results of the SCD CCD54 with measurements obtained during the ground calibration of C1XS and clearly demonstrate that our model reproduces all the major spectral features seen in calibration data. We also describe our understanding of interactions at

  19. Per-Pixel Coded Exposure for High-Speed and High-Resolution Imaging Using a Digital Micromirror Device Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Feng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High-speed photography is an important tool for studying rapid physical phenomena. However, low-frame-rate CCD (charge coupled device or CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor camera cannot effectively capture the rapid phenomena with high-speed and high-resolution. In this paper, we incorporate the hardware restrictions of existing image sensors, design the sampling functions, and implement a hardware prototype with a digital micromirror device (DMD camera in which spatial and temporal information can be flexibly modulated. Combined with the optical model of DMD camera, we theoretically analyze the per-pixel coded exposure and propose a three-element median quicksort method to increase the temporal resolution of the imaging system. Theoretically, this approach can rapidly increase the temporal resolution several, or even hundreds, of times without increasing bandwidth requirements of the camera. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method via extensive examples and achieve 100 fps (frames per second gain in temporal resolution by using a 25 fps camera.

  20. Assessment of flatness and symmetry of megavoltage x-ray beam with an electronic portal imaging device

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, G; Bezak, E

    2002-01-01

    The input/output characteristics of the Wellhofer BIS 710 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) have been investigated to establish its efficacy for periodic quality assurance (QA) applications. Calibration curves have been determined for the energy fluence incident on the detector versus the pixel values. The effect of the charge coupled device (CCD) camera sampling time and beam parameters (such as beam field size, dose rate, photon energy) on the calibration have been investigated for a region of interest (ROI) around the central beam axis. The results demonstrate that the pixel output is a linear function of the incident exposure, as expected for a video-based electronic portal imaging system. The field size effects of the BIS 710 are similar to that of an ion chamber for smaller field sizes up to 10 x 10 cm sup 2. However, for larger field sizes the pixel value increases more rapidly. Furthermore, the system is slightly sensitive to dose rate and is also energy dependent. The BIS 710 has been used in t...

  1. Low-cost near-infrared imaging device for inspection of historical manuscripts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Ashhar Khalid

    2004-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) or sometimes called black light is a waveform beyond visible light and it is not detectable by human eyes. However electronic sensors such as the type used in digital cameras are able to detect signals in the infrared band. To avoid distortion in the pictures obtained near-infrared is blocked by optical filters inserted in digital cameras. By carrying out minor modification allowing near-infrared signal to be imaged while blocking the visible signal, the camera is turned into a low-cost NIR imaging instrument. NIR imaging can be a useful tool in historical manuscript study or restoration. A few applications have been successfully demonstrated in laboratory experiment using the instrument available in MINT. However, due to unavailability of historical items, easily available texts and paintings are used in the demonstrations. This paper reports achievements of early work on the application of digital camera in the detection of damaged prints or writings. (Author)

  2. Dynamic tissue phantoms and their use in assessment of a noninvasive optical plethysmography imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Jeffrey E.; Plant, Kevin D.; King, Darlene R.; Block, Kenneth L.; Fan, Wensheng; DiMaio, J. Michael

    2014-05-01

    Non-contact photoplethysmography (PPG) has been studied as a method to provide low-cost and non-invasive medical imaging for a variety of near-surface pathologies and two dimensional blood oxygenation measurements. Dynamic tissue phantoms were developed to evaluate this technology in a laboratory setting. The purpose of these phantoms was to generate a tissue model with tunable parameters including: blood vessel volume change; pulse wave frequency; and optical scattering and absorption parameters. A non-contact PPG imaging system was evaluated on this model and compared against laser Doppler imaging (LDI) and a traditional pulse oximeter. Results indicate non-contact PPG accurately identifies pulse frequency and appears to identify signals from optically dense phantoms with significantly higher detection thresholds than LDI.

  3. First experience with THE AUTOLAP™ SYSTEM: an image-based robotic camera steering device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijsman, Paul J M; Broeders, Ivo A M J; Brenkman, Hylke J; Szold, Amir; Forgione, Antonello; Schreuder, Henk W R; Consten, Esther C J; Draaisma, Werner A; Verheijen, Paul M; Ruurda, Jelle P; Kaufman, Yuval

    2018-05-01

    Robotic camera holders for endoscopic surgery have been available for 20 years but market penetration is low. The current camera holders are controlled by voice, joystick, eyeball tracking, or head movements, and this type of steering has proven to be successful but excessive disturbance of surgical workflow has blocked widespread introduction. The Autolap™ system (MST, Israel) uses a radically different steering concept based on image analysis. This may improve acceptance by smooth, interactive, and fast steering. These two studies were conducted to prove safe and efficient performance of the core technology. A total of 66 various laparoscopic procedures were performed with the AutoLap™ by nine experienced surgeons, in two multi-center studies; 41 cholecystectomies, 13 fundoplications including hiatal hernia repair, 4 endometriosis surgeries, 2 inguinal hernia repairs, and 6 (bilateral) salpingo-oophorectomies. The use of the AutoLap™ system was evaluated in terms of safety, image stability, setup and procedural time, accuracy of imaged-based movements, and user satisfaction. Surgical procedures were completed with the AutoLap™ system in 64 cases (97%). The mean overall setup time of the AutoLap™ system was 4 min (04:08 ± 0.10). Procedure times were not prolonged due to the use of the system when compared to literature average. The reported user satisfaction was 3.85 and 3.96 on a scale of 1 to 5 in two studies. More than 90% of the image-based movements were accurate. No system-related adverse events were recorded while using the system. Safe and efficient use of the core technology of the AutoLap™ system was demonstrated with high image stability and good surgeon satisfaction. The results support further clinical studies that will focus on usability, improved ergonomics and additional image-based features.

  4. Element distribution imaging in rat kidney using a 2 D rapid scan EDXRF device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, R. G. [Universidad de la Frontera, Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Av. Francisco Salazar 1145, Temuco 4811230, Araucania (Chile); Lozano, E. [Instituto Nacional del Cancer, Unidad de Fisica Medica, Av. Profesor Zanartu 1010, Santiago (Chile); Bongiovanni, G., E-mail: figueror@ufro.cl [IDEPA-CONICET, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Investigacion y Desarrollo de la Patagonia Norte, Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquen (Argentina)

    2013-08-01

    Visualization of elemental distributions of biological tissue is gaining importance in many disciplines of biological, forensic and medical research. Furthermore, the maps of elements have wide application in archaeology for the understanding of the pigments, modes of preservation and environmental context. Since major advances in relation to collimators and detectors have yielded micro scale images, the chemical mapping via synchrotron scanning micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-{mu}X RF) is widely used as microanalytical techniques. However, the acquisition time is a limitation of current SR-{mu}X RF imaging protocols, doing tedious micro analysis of samples of more than 1 cm and very difficult to study of larger samples such as animal organ, whole organisms, work or art, etc. Recently we have developed a robotic system to image the chemistry of large specimens rapidly ar concentration levels of parts per million. Multiple images of distribution of elements can be obtained on surfaces of 100 x 100 mm and a spatial resolution of up to 0.2 mm{sup 2} per pixel, with a spectral capture time up to 1 ms per point. This system has proven to be highly efficient for the X RF mapping of elements in large biological samples, achieving comparable s results to those obtained by SR-{mu}X RF. Thus, images of As and Cu accumulation in renal cortex of arsenic-exposed rats were obtained by both methodologies. However, the new imaging system enables the X RF scanning in few minutes, whereas SR-{mu}X RF required several hours. These and other advantages as well as the potential applications of this system, will be discussed. (Author)

  5. Enlargement device of an image part contained in a video signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossaert, J.; Bodelet, P.; Tomietto, T.

    1994-01-01

    To filter a signal delivered in an interlaced manner, it is foreseen to introduce in series one filter on half frame having a pass-band transfer function in the horizontal plane and a pass-high transfer function in the vertical plane. This filter carries out on the global image signal a general pass-band transfer function. All is managed so that the central frequency of this pass-band filter fits with an elaborate image resolution. By acting so the contours of structures can be enhanced. The method applies particularly to medical radiography. 3 refs., 5 figs

  6. The use of radioactive tracers in medicine. Part 2. The development of devices for imaging radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    Tracer techniques have been used in medical research for more that two centuries. The history of the measurement of radiotracer in vivo is presented starting with non-imaging, quantitative measurements, and continuing with gamma cameras through to PET scanners. The latest represent the state-of-the-art due to the combination of in-vivo use of tracers with medical tomographic imaging. Its ability to correct accurately for attenuation makes it potentially quantifiable in radioactivity concentration terms and from this follows the ability to determine biological parameters non-invasively. 8 refs., 1 tab. 3 figs

  7. Low-cost photodynamic therapy devices for global health settings: Characterization of battery-powered LED performance and smartphone imaging in 3D tumor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempstead, Joshua; Jones, Dustin P.; Ziouche, Abdelali; Cramer, Gwendolyn M.; Rizvi, Imran; Arnason, Stephen; Hasan, Tayyaba; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2015-05-01

    A lack of access to effective cancer therapeutics in resource-limited settings is implicated in global cancer health disparities between developed and developing countries. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a light-based treatment modality that has exhibited safety and efficacy in the clinic using wavelengths and irradiances achievable with light-emitting diodes (LEDs) operated on battery power. Here we assess low-cost enabling technology to extend the clinical benefit of PDT to regions with little or no access to electricity or medical infrastructure. We demonstrate the efficacy of a device based on a 635 nm high-output LED powered by three AA disposable alkaline batteries, to achieve strong cytotoxic response in monolayer and 3D cultures of A431 squamous carcinoma cells following photosensitization by administering aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to induce the accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). Here we characterize challenges of battery-operated device performance, including battery drain and voltage stability specifically over relevant PDT dose parameters. Further motivated by the well-established capacity of PDT photosensitizers to serve as tumour-selective fluorescence contrast agents, we demonstrate the capability of a consumer smartphone with low-cost add-ons to measure concentration-dependent PpIX fluorescence. This study lays the groundwork for the on-going development of image-guided ALA-PDT treatment technologies for global health applications.

  8. Improved cardiovascular diagnostic accuracy by pocket size imaging device in non-cardiologic outpatients: the NaUSiCa (Naples Ultrasound Stethoscope in Cardiology study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiattarella Pier

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Miniaturization has evolved in the creation of a pocket-size imaging device which can be utilized as an ultrasound stethoscope. This study assessed the additional diagnostic power of pocket size device by both experts operators and trainees in comparison with physical examination and its appropriateness of use in comparison with standard echo machine in a non-cardiologic population. Three hundred four consecutive non cardiologic outpatients underwent a sequential assessment including physical examination, pocket size imaging device and standard Doppler-echo exam. Pocket size device was used by both expert operators and trainees (who received specific training before the beginning of the study. All the operators were requested to give only visual, qualitative insights on specific issues. All standard Doppler-echo exams were performed by expert operators. One hundred two pocket size device exams were performed by experts and two hundred two by trainees. The time duration of the pocket size device exam was 304 ± 117 sec. Diagnosis of cardiac abnormalities was made in 38.2% of cases by physical examination and in 69.7% of cases by physical examination + pocket size device (additional diagnostic power = 31.5%, p In conclusion, pocket size device showed a relevant additional diagnostic value in comparison with physical examination. Sensitivity and specificity were good in experts and suboptimal in trainees. Specificity was particularly influenced by the level of experience. Training programs are needed for pocket size device users.

  9. Toward Development of a Field-Deployable Imaging Device for TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    up calcified stones within the kidney and gallbladder , standard applications create a short acoustic wave train whose shape is far from sinusoidal...for each mouse brain. This feature extraction analysis was performed 3 times for each image in a blinded fashion to ensure that there was no operator

  10. Use of a portable fluorescence imaging device to facilitate cleaning of deli slicers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross-contamination is a recognized food safety concern for deli departments, and deli slicers remain a particular concern. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that deli commodity residues can be detected using fluorescence imaging, and that the efficacy of cleaning and sanitation in produce proc...

  11. Distributed Read-out Imaging Device array for astronomical observations in UV/VIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijmering, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    STJ (Superconducting Tunneling Junctions) are being developed as spectro-photometers in wavelengths ranging from the NIR to X-rays. 10x12 arrays of STJs have already been successfully used as optical imaging spectrometers with the S-Cam 3, on the William Hershel Telescope on La Palma and on the

  12. Role of radionuclide imaging for diagnosis of device and prosthetic valve infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Fran?ois Sarrazin; Fran?ois Philippon; Mika?l Trottier; Michel Tessier

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular implantable electronic device(CIED) infection and prosthetic valve endocarditis(PVE) remain a diagnostic challenge.Cardiac imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of patients with CIED infection or PVE.Over the past few years,cardiac radionuclide imaging has gained a key role in the diagnosis of these patients,and in assessing the need for surgery,mainly in the most difficult cases.Both 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography(18F-FDG PET/CT) and radiolabelled white blood cell single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography(WBC SPECT/CT) have been studied in these situations.In their 2015 guidelines for the management of infective endocarditis,the European Society of Cardiology incorporated cardiac nuclear imaging as part of their diagnostic algorithm for PVE,but not CIED infection since the data were judged insufficient at the moment.This article reviews the actual knowledge and recent studies on the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT and WBC SPECT/CT in the context of CIED infection and PVE,and describes the technical aspects of cardiac radionuclide imaging.It also discusses their accepted and potential indications for the diagnosis and management of CIED infection and PVE,the limitations of these tests,and potential areas of future research.

  13. Device for generation of transversal tomographic images of a body by penetrating radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hounsfield, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    An improvement of equipment for the examination of patients using penetrating radiation (e.g. gamma or X-ray radiation) is proposed, in particular of equipment as under US patent 3778614, which avoids undesirable patterns on the reconstructed image. The invention is explained by several models. (orig./PW)

  14. Information retrieval based on single-pixel optical imaging with quick-response code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yin; Chen, Wen

    2018-04-01

    Quick-response (QR) code technique is combined with ghost imaging (GI) to recover original information with high quality. An image is first transformed into a QR code. Then the QR code is treated as an input image in the input plane of a ghost imaging setup. After measurements, traditional correlation algorithm of ghost imaging is utilized to reconstruct an image (QR code form) with low quality. With this low-quality image as an initial guess, a Gerchberg-Saxton-like algorithm is used to improve its contrast, which is actually a post processing. Taking advantage of high error correction capability of QR code, original information can be recovered with high quality. Compared to the previous method, our method can obtain a high-quality image with comparatively fewer measurements, which means that the time-consuming postprocessing procedure can be avoided to some extent. In addition, for conventional ghost imaging, the larger the image size is, the more measurements are needed. However, for our method, images with different sizes can be converted into QR code with the same small size by using a QR generator. Hence, for the larger-size images, the time required to recover original information with high quality will be dramatically reduced. Our method makes it easy to recover a color image in a ghost imaging setup, because it is not necessary to divide the color image into three channels and respectively recover them.

  15. Emergency response activities and collecting damaged radiation devices from a war affected area in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subasic, Damir; Schaller, Antum

    1997-01-01

    A number of various devices containing ionizing radiation sources were in use in the area affected by the recent war in Croatia. In destruction caused by the war operations, a number of these devices were damaged, destroyed or even missed/lost. The actions undertaken to (re)collect these radiation sources, experience gained and lessons learned are reviewed. The importance of a well-organized national regulatory system is highlighted as a precondition for the efficient identification and safe collection of radiation sources which were under ruins. Experience from this event could be well applicable to similar situations caused by disasters and particularly for regulatory authorities who design emergency preparedness plans. (author)

  16. Initial Experience with a Handheld Device Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine Viewer: OsiriX Mobile on the iPhone

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhri, Asim F.; Radvany, Martin G.

    2010-01-01

    Medical imaging is commonly used to diagnose many emergent conditions, as well as plan treatment. Digital images can be reviewed on almost any computing platform. Modern mobile phones and handheld devices are portable computing platforms with robust software programming interfaces, powerful processors, and high-resolution displays. OsiriX mobile, a new Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine viewing program, is available for the iPhone/iPod touch platform. This raises the possibility o...

  17. Astronomical imaging with a low temperature InSb charge injection device (CID)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouan, D.; Lacombe, F.; Tiphene, D.; Stefanovitch, D.; Phan van, D.

    1986-01-01

    InSb charge injection device (CID) technology focal plane arrays employ two coupled MIS capacitors which collect and store photon-generated charge carriers. Attention is presently given to two-dimensional arrays for 77 K and 4 K operating temperatures in astronomical applications; two such prototypes for ground observations have been developed for use with a 2-m telescope. A CID InSb array is noted to be a useful candidate for the proposed IR Space Observatory's focal plane camera. 7 references

  18. Image deblurring in smartphone devices using built-in inertial measurement sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šindelář, Ondřej; Šroubek, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Long-exposure handheld photography is degraded with blur, which is difficult to remove without prior information about the camera motion. In this work, we utilize inertial sensors (accelerometers and gyroscopes) in modern smartphones to detect exact motion trajectory of the smartphone camera during exposure and remove blur from the resulting photography based on the recorded motion data. The whole system is implemented on the Android platform and embedded in the smartphone device, resulting in a close-to-real-time deblurring algorithm. The performance of the proposed system is demonstrated in real-life scenarios.

  19. Evolution of the use of the portal imaging device: prospective study over three periods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barillot, I.; Maingon, P.; Truc, G.; D'Hombres, A.; Steyer, B.; Naudy, S.; Horiot, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    From 1990, as part of the quality assurance research programs, the radiotherapy department of the G. F. Leclerc Centre of Dijon used EPID system in a prospective fashion. During the first of the three periods (PER 1:1990-1993), the study consisted of analysis criteria determination, software efficiency improvement and a selection of patients who could benefit from the method. Eight hundred and forty-five images of 40 patients were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively. Two verifications per week were planned, and the action level for correction was 10 mm. Head and neck images also displayed in 'cinema' presentation for internal movements analysis. From 1994 to 1995 (PER 2), off-line procedure (OLP) based upon early correction of the systemic error and the rules calculated from our previous experience were tested for checking the brain, head and neck (LOC 1: 396 images) and many of the pelvic irradiations (LOC 2: 260 images). A double-exposure procedure and/or movie loop presentation was reserved for other patients. During the last period (PER 3: 1996-1997), the OLP procedure was routinely performed in 54 patients (images: 321 LOC 1, 680 LOC 2). LOC 1: deviations of < 3 mm increased from 75.5% during PER 1 to 81 % during PER 2 to 83% during PER 3. Conversely, deviations of 3-5 mm dropped from 19.5 to 13%, while deviations of more than 5 mm remained stable, around 5%. The actual standard error of the mean deviation observed was 2 mm. LOC 2: deviations of < 5 mm were observed in 81% of the cases during PER 1 and in 91% during PER 3 (89.5% in PER 2). These good results led to a decrease in deviation of 5 to 7 mm (11 to 6 %) and also to a significant drop in deviations of more than 7 mm, 8 to 3% respectively. The actual precision obtained was 2.5 mm ± SD. (author)

  20. SIFT: A method to verify the IMRT fluence delivered during patient treatment using an electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Sandra C.; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Boer, Hans C.J. de

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy patients are increasingly treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and high tumor doses. As part of our quality control program to ensure accurate dose delivery, a new method was investigated that enables the verification of the IMRT fluence delivered during patient treatment using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), irrespective of changes in patient geometry. Methods and materials: Each IMRT treatment field is split into a static field and a modulated field, which are delivered in sequence. Images are acquired for both fields using an EPID. The portal dose image obtained for the static field is used to determine changes in patient geometry between the planning CT scan and the time of treatment delivery. With knowledge of these changes, the delivered IMRT fluence can be verified using the portal dose image of the modulated field. This method, called split IMRT field technique (SIFT), was validated first for several phantom geometries, followed by clinical implementation for a number of patients treated with IMRT. Results: The split IMRT field technique allows for an accurate verification of the delivered IMRT fluence (generally within 1% [standard deviation]), even if large interfraction changes in patient geometry occur. For interfraction radiological path length changes of 10 cm, deliberately introduced errors in the delivered fluence could still be detected to within 1% accuracy. Application of SIFT requires only a minor increase in treatment time relative to the standard IMRT delivery. Conclusions: A new technique to verify the delivered IMRT fluence from EPID images, which is independent of changes in the patient geometry, has been developed. SIFT has been clinically implemented for daily verification of IMRT treatment delivery

  1. Epidermal photonic devices for quantitative imaging of temperature and thermal transport characteristics of the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Zhang, Yihui; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Jia, Lin; Jang, Kyung-In; Chad Webb, R.; Fu, Haoran; Shi, Yan; Zhou, Guoyan; Shi, Luke; Shah, Deesha; Huang, Xian; Xu, Baoxing; Yu, Cunjiang; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2014-09-01

    Characterization of temperature and thermal transport properties of the skin can yield important information of relevance to both clinical medicine and basic research in skin physiology. Here we introduce an ultrathin, compliant skin-like, or ‘epidermal’, photonic device that combines colorimetric temperature indicators with wireless stretchable electronics for thermal measurements when softly laminated on the skin surface. The sensors exploit thermochromic liquid crystals patterned into large-scale, pixelated arrays on thin elastomeric substrates; the electronics provide means for controlled, local heating by radio frequency signals. Algorithms for extracting patterns of colour recorded from these devices with a digital camera and computational tools for relating the results to underlying thermal processes near the skin surface lend quantitative value to the resulting data. Application examples include non-invasive spatial mapping of skin temperature with milli-Kelvin precision (±50 mK) and sub-millimetre spatial resolution. Demonstrations in reactive hyperaemia assessments of blood flow and hydration analysis establish relevance to cardiovascular health and skin care, respectively.

  2. MR imaging of metabolic white matter diseases: Therapeutic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebarski, S.S.; Allen, R.

    1987-01-01

    In metabolic diseases affecting the brain, MR imaging abnormalities include white-matter signal aberrations suggesting myelination delay, dysmyelination and demyelination, pathologic iron storage, and finally, loss of substance usually in a nonspecific pattern. The authors suggest that MR imaging may have therapeutic implications: (1) classic galactosemia - white-matter signal aberration became normal after dietary therapy; (2) phenylketonuria - age- and sex-matched treated and nontreated adolescents showed marked differences in brain volume, with the treated patient's volume nearly normal; (3) maple syrup urine disease - gross white-matter signal aberration became nearly normal after dietary therapy; and (4) hyperglycinemia - relentless progression of white-matter signal aberration and loss of brain substance despite therapy. These data suggest that brain MR imaging may provide a therapeutic index in certain metabolic diseases

  3. Response of Adult Lymantriid Moths to Illumination Devices in the Russian Far East

    Science.gov (United States)

    William E. Wallner; Lee M. Humble; Robert E. Levin; Yuri N. Baranchikov; Ring T. Carde; Ring T. Carde

    1995-01-01

    In field studies in the Russian Far East, five types of illuminating devices were evaluated for attracting adult gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), pink gypsy moth, L. mathura Moore, and nun moth, L. monacha (L.). Our objective was to determine if light from commercial lamps suited to out-of-doors floodlighting could be modified to reduce their attractiveness to moths...

  4. Negative Stimulus-Response Compatibility Observed with a Briefly Displayed Image of a Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainio, Lari

    2011-01-01

    Manual responses can be primed by viewing an image of a hand. The left-right identity of the viewed hand reflexively facilitates responses of the hand that corresponds to the identity. Previous research also suggests that when the response activation is triggered by an arrow, which is backward-masked and presented briefly, the activation manifests…

  5. Method and System for Physiologically Modulating Videogames and Simulations which Use Gesture and Body Image Sensing Control Input Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Alan T. (Inventor); Stephens, Chad L. (Inventor); Habowski, Tyler (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Method for physiologically modulating videogames and simulations includes utilizing input from a motion-sensing video game system and input from a physiological signal acquisition device. The inputs from the physiological signal sensors are utilized to change the response of a user's avatar to inputs from the motion-sensing sensors. The motion-sensing system comprises a 3D sensor system having full-body 3D motion capture of a user's body. This arrangement encourages health-enhancing physiological self-regulation skills or therapeutic amplification of healthful physiological characteristics. The system provides increased motivation for users to utilize biofeedback as may be desired for treatment of various conditions.

  6. Pre-clinical and Clinical Evaluation of High Resolution, Mobile Gamma Camera and Positron Imaging Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Downloaded on February 20,2010 at 10:55:59 EST from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply. STUDENSKI et al.: ACQUISITION AND PROCESSING METHODS FOR A BEDSIDE...February 20,2010 at 10:55:59 EST from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply. 208 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 57, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2010 from the...59 EST from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply. STUDENSKI et al.: ACQUISITION AND PROCESSING METHODS FOR A BEDSIDE CARDIAC SPECT IMAGING SYSTEM 209

  7. Where Does It Lead? Imaging Features of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices on Chest Radiograph and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzman, Rotem S.; Blondin, Dirk; Furst, Gunter; Scherer, Axel; R Miese, Falk; Kroepil, Patric [University of Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Winter, Joachim [University Hospital Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Abbara, Suhny [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (US)

    2011-10-15

    Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are being increasingly employed in patients suffering from cardiac rhythm disturbances. The principal objective of this article is to familiarize radiologists with pacemakers and ICDs on chest radiographs and CT scans. Therefore, the preferred lead positions according to pacemaker types and anatomic variants are introduced in this study. Additionally, the imaging features of incorrect lead positions and defects, as well as complications subsequent to pacemaker implantation are demonstrated herein.

  8. Where Does It Lead? Imaging Features of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices on Chest Radiograph and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzman, Rotem S.; Blondin, Dirk; Furst, Gunter; Scherer, Axel; R Miese, Falk; Kroepil, Patric; Winter, Joachim; Abbara, Suhny

    2011-01-01

    Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are being increasingly employed in patients suffering from cardiac rhythm disturbances. The principal objective of this article is to familiarize radiologists with pacemakers and ICDs on chest radiographs and CT scans. Therefore, the preferred lead positions according to pacemaker types and anatomic variants are introduced in this study. Additionally, the imaging features of incorrect lead positions and defects, as well as complications subsequent to pacemaker implantation are demonstrated herein.

  9. Expansion of Smartwatch Touch Interface from Touchscreen to Around Device Interface Using Infrared Line Image Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Soo-Chul; Shin, Jungsoon; Kim, Seung-Chan; Park, Joonah

    2015-01-01

    Touchscreen interaction has become a fundamental means of controlling mobile phones and smartwatches. However, the small form factor of a smartwatch limits the available interactive surface area. To overcome this limitation, we propose the expansion of the touch region of the screen to the back of the user’s hand. We developed a touch module for sensing the touched finger position on the back of the hand using infrared (IR) line image sensors, based on the calibrated IR intensity and the maxi...

  10. Investigation of the mechanical performance of Siemens linacs components during arc: gantry, MLC, and electronic portal imaging device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Häring, Peter; Riis, Hans L; Zimmermann, Sune J; Ebert, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linac components including gantry, collimation system, and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt, and the sag in leaf bank assembly due to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with five ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of image data. Three Siemens linacs were investigated. The average EPID sag was within 1 mm for all tested linacs. Two machines showed >1 mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 7.5 mm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in leaf bank assembly was <1 mm. The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behavior of Siemens linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Siemens machines.

  11. Synchrotron Bragg diffraction imaging characterization of synthetic diamond crystals for optical and electronic power device applications1 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Thi, Thu Nhi; Morse, J.; Caliste, D.; Fernandez, B.; Eon, D.; Härtwig, J.; Mer-Calfati, C.; Tranchant, N.; Arnault, J. C.; Lafford, T. A.; Baruchel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Bragg diffraction imaging enables the quality of synthetic single-crystal diamond substrates and their overgrown, mostly doped, diamond layers to be characterized. This is very important for improving diamond-based devices produced for X-ray optics and power electronics applications. The usual first step for this characterization is white-beam X-ray diffraction topography, which is a simple and fast method to identify the extended defects (dislocations, growth sectors, boundaries, stacking faults, overall curvature etc.) within the crystal. This allows easy and quick comparison of the crystal quality of diamond plates available from various commercial suppliers. When needed, rocking curve imaging (RCI) is also employed, which is the quantitative counterpart of monochromatic Bragg diffraction imaging. RCI enables the local determination of both the effective misorientation, which results from lattice parameter variation and the local lattice tilt, and the local Bragg position. Maps derived from these parameters are used to measure the magnitude of the distortions associated with polishing damage and the depth of this damage within the volume of the crystal. For overgrown layers, these maps also reveal the distortion induced by the incorporation of impurities such as boron, or the lattice parameter variations associated with the presence of growth-incorporated nitrogen. These techniques are described, and their capabilities for studying the quality of diamond substrates and overgrown layers, and the surface damage caused by mechanical polishing, are illustrated by examples. PMID:28381981

  12. The Role of Retinal Imaging and Portable Screening Devices in Tele-ophthalmology Applications for Diabetic Retinopathy Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBuc, Delia Cabrera

    2016-12-01

    In the years since its introduction, retinal imaging has transformed our capability to visualize the posterior pole of the eye. Increasing practical advances in mobile technology, regular monitoring, and population screening for diabetic retinopathy management offer the opportunity for further development of cost-effective applications through remote assessment of the diabetic eye using portable retinal cameras, smart-phone-based devices and telemedicine networks. Numerous retinal imaging methods and mobile technologies in tele-ophthalmology applications have been reported for diabetic retinopathy screening and management. They provide several advantages of automation, sensitivity, specificity, portability, and miniaturization for the development of point-of-care diagnostics for eye complications in diabetes. The aim of this paper is to review the role of retinal imaging and mobile technologies in tele-ophthalmology applications for diabetic retinopathy screening and management. At large, although improvements in current technology and telemedicine services are still needed, telemedicine has demonstrated to be a worthy tool to support health caregivers in the effective management and prevention of diabetes and its complications.

  13. Magnetic Field Interactions of Copper-Containing Intrauterine Devices in 3.0-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In Vivo Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Einspieler, Henrik [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Hachemian, Nilouparak [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Prayer, Daniela; Trattnig, Siegfried; Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    An ex vivo study found a copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) to be safe for women undergoing an MRI examination at a 3.0-T field. No significant artifacts caused by the metallic implant were detected. However, there are still no in vivo data about these concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate 3.0-T magnetic field interactions of copper-containing IUDs in vivo. Magnetic field interactions and potential adverse events were evaluated in 33 women using a questionnaire-based telephone survey. Two experienced radiologists performed artifact evaluation on MR images of the pelvis. Eighteen patients were eligible for the survey. One patient reported a dislocation of the IUD after the MR examination. All other patients had no signs of field interactions. No IUD-related artifacts were found. MRI at 3.0-T is possible for women with copper-containing IUDs. However, consulting a gynecologist to check the correct position of the IUD and exclude complications after an MR examination is highly recommended. High-quality clinical imaging of the female pelvis can be performed without a loss in image quality.

  14. Magnetic Field Interactions of Copper-Containing Intrauterine Devices in 3.0-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In Vivo Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Einspieler, Henrik; Hachemian, Nilouparak; Prayer, Daniela; Trattnig, Siegfried; Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    An ex vivo study found a copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) to be safe for women undergoing an MRI examination at a 3.0-T field. No significant artifacts caused by the metallic implant were detected. However, there are still no in vivo data about these concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate 3.0-T magnetic field interactions of copper-containing IUDs in vivo. Magnetic field interactions and potential adverse events were evaluated in 33 women using a questionnaire-based telephone survey. Two experienced radiologists performed artifact evaluation on MR images of the pelvis. Eighteen patients were eligible for the survey. One patient reported a dislocation of the IUD after the MR examination. All other patients had no signs of field interactions. No IUD-related artifacts were found. MRI at 3.0-T is possible for women with copper-containing IUDs. However, consulting a gynecologist to check the correct position of the IUD and exclude complications after an MR examination is highly recommended. High-quality clinical imaging of the female pelvis can be performed without a loss in image quality

  15. Assessment of Set-up Accuracy in Tangential Breast Treatment Using Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Koo; Kang, Soo Man

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the setup accuracy for tangential breast treatment patients using electronic portal image and 2-D reconstruction image Twenty two patients undergoing tangential breast treatment. To explore the setup accuracy, distances between chosen landmarks were taken as reference parameters. The difference between measured reference parameters on simulation films and electronic portal images (EPIs) was calculated as the setup error. A total of 22 simulation films and 110 EPIs were evaluated. In the tangential fields, the calculated reference parameters were the central lung distance (CLD), central soft-tissue distance (CSTD), and above lung distance (ALD), below lung distance (BLD). In the medial tangential field, the average difference values for these parameters were 1.0, -6.4, -2.1 and 2.0, respectively; and the values were 1.5, 2.3, 4.1 and 1.1, respectively. In the lateral tangential field, the average difference values for these parameters were -1.5, -4.3, -2.7 and -1.3, respectively; and the values were 3.3, 2.1, 2.9 and 2.5, respectively. CLD, CSTD, ALD and BLD in the tangential fields are easily identifiable and are helpful for detecting setup errors using EPIs in patients undergoing tangential breast radiotherapy treatment.

  16. Assessment of Set-up Accuracy in Tangential Breast Treatment Using Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Koo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Soo Man [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea University Gospel Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the setup accuracy for tangential breast treatment patients using electronic portal image and 2-D reconstruction image Twenty two patients undergoing tangential breast treatment. To explore the setup accuracy, distances between chosen landmarks were taken as reference parameters. The difference between measured reference parameters on simulation films and electronic portal images (EPIs) was calculated as the setup error. A total of 22 simulation films and 110 EPIs were evaluated. In the tangential fields, the calculated reference parameters were the central lung distance (CLD), central soft-tissue distance (CSTD), and above lung distance (ALD), below lung distance (BLD). In the medial tangential field, the average difference values for these parameters were 1.0, -6.4, -2.1 and 2.0, respectively; and the values were 1.5, 2.3, 4.1 and 1.1, respectively. In the lateral tangential field, the average difference values for these parameters were -1.5, -4.3, -2.7 and -1.3, respectively; and the values were 3.3, 2.1, 2.9 and 2.5, respectively. CLD, CSTD, ALD and BLD in the tangential fields are easily identifiable and are helpful for detecting setup errors using EPIs in patients undergoing tangential breast radiotherapy treatment.

  17. Body enhancement : body images, vulnerability and moral responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dikken, A.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this explorative study is to show that it is highly relevant to integrate cultural and personal body images into the ethical debate on human enhancement. The current debate has little attention for the motivations to make use of technology to alter the human body, such as cultural

  18. Generating color terrain images in an emergency response system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belles, R.D.

    1985-08-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) provides real-time assessments of the consequences resulting from an atmospheric release of radioactive material. In support of this operation, a system has been created which integrates numerical models, data acquisition systems, data analysis techniques, and professional staff. Of particular importance is the rapid generation of graphical images of the terrain surface in the vicinity of the accident site. A terrain data base and an associated acquisition system have been developed that provide the required terrain data. This data is then used as input to a collection of graphics programs which create and display realistic color images of the terrain. The graphics system currently has the capability of generating color shaded relief images from both overhead and perspective viewpoints within minutes. These images serve to quickly familiarize ARAC assessors with the terrain near the release location, and thus permit them to make better informed decisions in modeling the behavior of the released material. 7 refs., 8 figs

  19. A new hyperspectral imaging based device for quality control in plastic recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifazi, G.; D'Agostini, M.; Dall'Ava, A.; Serranti, S.; Turioni, F.

    2013-05-01

    The quality control of contamination level in the recycled plastics stream has been identified as an important key factor for increasing the value of the recycled material by both plastic recycling and compounder industries. Existing quality control methods for the detection of both plastics and non-plastics contaminants in the plastic waste streams at different stages of the industrial process (e.g. feed, intermediate and final products) are currently based on the manual collection from the stream of a sample and on the subsequent off-line laboratory analyses. The results of such analyses are usually available after some hours, or sometimes even some days, after the material has been processed. The laboratory analyses are time-consuming and expensive (both in terms of equipment cost and their maintenance and of labour cost).Therefore, a fast on-line assessment to monitor the plastic waste feed streams and to characterize the composition of the different plastic products, is fundamental to increase the value of secondary plastics. The paper is finalized to describe and evaluate the development of an HSI-based device and of the related software architectures and processing algorithms for quality assessment of plastics in recycling plants, with particular reference to polyolefins (PO). NIR-HSI sensing devices coupled with multivariate data analysis methods was demonstrated as an objective, rapid and non-destructive technique that can be used for on-line quality and process control in the recycling process of POs. In particular, the adoption of the previous mentioned HD&SW integrated architectures can provide a solution to one of the major problems of the recycling industry, which is the lack of an accurate quality certification of materials obtained by recycling processes. These results could therefore assist in developing strategies to certify the composition of recycled PO products.

  20. 3D FaceCam: a fast and accurate 3D facial imaging device for biometrics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jason; Zhuang, Ping; May, Patrick; Yi, Steven; Tunnell, David

    2004-08-01

    Human faces are fundamentally three-dimensional (3D) objects, and each face has its unique 3D geometric profile. The 3D geometric features of a human face can be used, together with its 2D texture, for rapid and accurate face recognition purposes. Due to the lack of low-cost and robust 3D sensors and effective 3D facial recognition (FR) algorithms, almost all existing FR systems use 2D face images. Genex has developed 3D solutions that overcome the inherent problems in 2D while also addressing limitations in other 3D alternatives. One important aspect of our solution is a unique 3D camera (the 3D FaceCam) that combines multiple imaging sensors within a single compact device to provide instantaneous, ear-to-ear coverage of a human face. This 3D camera uses three high-resolution CCD sensors and a color encoded pattern projection system. The RGB color information from each pixel is used to compute the range data and generate an accurate 3D surface map. The imaging system uses no moving parts and combines multiple 3D views to provide detailed and complete 3D coverage of the entire face. Images are captured within a fraction of a second and full-frame 3D data is produced within a few seconds. This described method provides much better data coverage and accuracy in feature areas with sharp features or details (such as the nose and eyes). Using this 3D data, we have been able to demonstrate that a 3D approach can significantly improve the performance of facial recognition. We have conducted tests in which we have varied the lighting conditions and angle of image acquisition in the "field." These tests have shown that the matching results are significantly improved when enrolling a 3D image rather than a single 2D image. With its 3D solutions, Genex is working toward unlocking the promise of powerful 3D FR and transferring FR from a lab technology into a real-world biometric solution.

  1. Evaluation of IsoCal geometric calibration system for Varian linacs equipped with on-board imager and electronic portal imaging device imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; Du, Weiliang; Balter, Peter; Munro, Peter; Jeung, Andrew

    2014-05-08

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of the IsoCal geometric calibration system for kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) imagers on Varian C-series linear accelerators (linacs). IsoCal calibration starts by imaging a phantom and collimator plate using MV images with different collimator angles, as well as MV and kV images at different gantry angles. The software then identifies objects on the collimator plate and in the phantom to determine the location of the treatment isocenter and its relation to the MV and kV imager centers. It calculates offsets between the positions of the imaging panels and the treatment isocenter as a function of gantry angle and writes a correction file that can be applied to MV and kV systems to correct for those offsets in the position of the panels. We performed IsoCal calibration three times on each of five Varian C-series linacs, each time with an independent setup. We then compared the IsoCal calibrations with a simplified Winston-Lutz (WL)-based system and with a Varian cubic phantom (VC)-based system. The maximum IsoCal corrections ranged from 0.7 mm to 1.5 mm for MV and 0.9 mm to 1.8 mm for kV imagers across the five linacs. The variations in the three calibrations for each linac were less than 0.2 mm. Without IsoCal correction, the WL results showed discrepancies between the treatment isocenter and the imager center of 0.9 mm to 1.6 mm (for the MV imager) and 0.5 mm to 1.1 mm (for the kV imager); with IsoCal corrections applied, the differences were reduced to 0.2 mm to 0.6 mm (MV) and 0.3 mm to 0.6 mm (kV) across the five linacs. The VC system was not as precise as the WL system, but showed similar results, with discrepancies of less than 1.0 mm when the IsoCal corrections were applied. We conclude that IsoCal is an accurate and consistent method for calibration and periodic quality assurance of MV and kV imaging systems.

  2. Wheeled mobility device transportation safety in fixed route and demand-responsive public transit vehicles within the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Karen L; van Roosmalen, Linda; Bertocci, Gina; Cross, Douglas J

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the current status of wheelchair transportation safety in fixed route and demand-responsive, non-rail, public transportation vehicles within the US is presented. A description of each mode of transportation is provided, followed by a discussion of the primary issues affecting safety, accessibility, and usability. Technologies such as lifts, ramps, securement systems, and occupant restraint systems, along with regulations and voluntary industry standards have been implemented with the intent of improving safety and accessibility for individuals who travel while seated in their wheeled mobility device (e.g., wheelchair or scooter). However, across both fixed route and demand-responsive transit systems a myriad of factors such as nonuse and misuse of safety systems, oversized wheeled mobility devices, vehicle space constraints, and inadequate vehicle operator training may place wheeled mobility device (WhMD) users at risk of injury even under non-impact driving conditions. Since WhMD-related incidents also often occur during the boarding and alighting process, the frequency of these events, along with factors associated with these events are described for each transit mode. Recommendations for improving WhMD transportation are discussed given the current state of

  3. Emergency response activities and collecting damaged radiation devices from a war affected area in Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subasic, Damir; Schaller, Antum [APO-Hazardous Waste Management Agency, Zagreb (Croatia)

    1997-12-31

    A number of various devices containing ionizing radiation sources were in use in the area affected by the recent war in Croatia. In destruction caused by the war operations, a number of these devices were damaged, destroyed or even missed/lost. The actions undertaken to (re)collect these radiation sources, experience gained and lessons learned are reviewed. The importance of a well-organized national regulatory system is highlighted as a precondition for the efficient identification and safe collection of radiation sources which were under ruins. Experience from this event could be well applicable to similar situations caused by disasters and particularly for regulatory authorities who design emergency preparedness plans. (author) 4 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Study of DOI resolution and imaging resolution of a PET device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Lipika; Saitoh, Kazumi; Kobayashi, Shigeharu

    2004-01-01

    As a recent trend of DOI measurement for the PET, a simple method of utilizing the light attenuation properties of scintillation materials has been paid attention. We have studied the DOI resolutions for less expensive materials as BGO in both the bench test and the simulation by GEANT4.0. By comparison with both the results, we have recognized the importance of removing the multiple Compton absorption events to obtain the better DOI information. The simulation results for the imaging resolution suggested that its deterioration attributes to the parallax error as well as the systematic displacement inherent in the present method of 3D-reconstruction

  5. Toward Development of a Field-Deployable Imaging Device for TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    of the head then application of a lotion hair remover. Prior to surgery, lidocaine (1 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously to the surgery site. For...resonance imaging (MRI) are capable of identifying TBI, their logistics make them ineffective diagnostic tools in the field, where rapid triage can...Dwight Co, INC., Princeton, NJ, USA). Following epilation, subcutaneous lidocaine (0.08 mL, 20 mg/mL) and bupivicaine (0.08 mL, 0.32 mg/mL) were

  6. Emergency response activities and the collection of damaged radiation devices in the war areas of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subasic, D.; Schaller, A.

    1998-01-01

    Several kinds of devices containing sources of ionizing radiation had been in use in the areas of Croatia which were affected by the recent war, principally in industrial and medical applications. The greater share of these devices was constituted by 151 radioactive lightning conductors with a maximum individual activity of 19.5 GBq and some 8300 smoke detectors. In the destruction caused by the war, some of these devices were damaged, destroyed or lost. The actions undertaken to retrieve them and their sources are described, as well as the experience gained and lessons learned. The importance of a well organized national regulatory system is underscored as a precondition for the efficient identification and safe recovery of radiation sources lying amidst the ruins in the area affected by the war. The experience gained in these actions may be applicable to similar situations caused by natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, etc. and of particular interest to regulatory authorities for the drawing up of emergency preparedness plans. (author)

  7. Image charge models for accurate construction of the electrostatic self-energy of 3D layered nanostructure devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, John R.; Martinez, Antonio

    2018-04-01

    Efficient analytical image charge models are derived for the full spatial variation of the electrostatic self-energy of electrons in semiconductor nanostructures that arises from dielectric mismatch using semi-classical analysis. The methodology provides a fast, compact and physically transparent computation for advanced device modeling. The underlying semi-classical model for the self-energy has been established and validated during recent years and depends on a slight modification of the macroscopic static dielectric constants for individual homogeneous dielectric regions. The model has been validated for point charges as close as one interatomic spacing to a sharp interface. A brief introduction to image charge methodology is followed by a discussion and demonstration of the traditional failure of the methodology to derive the electrostatic potential at arbitrary distances from a source charge. However, the self-energy involves the local limit of the difference between the electrostatic Green functions for the full dielectric heterostructure and the homogeneous equivalent. It is shown that high convergence may be achieved for the image charge method for this local limit. A simple re-normalisation technique is introduced to reduce the number of image terms to a minimum. A number of progressively complex 3D models are evaluated analytically and compared with high precision numerical computations. Accuracies of 1% are demonstrated. Introducing a simple technique for modeling the transition of the self-energy between disparate dielectric structures we generate an analytical model that describes the self-energy as a function of position within the source, drain and gated channel of a silicon wrap round gate field effect transistor on a scale of a few nanometers cross-section. At such scales the self-energies become large (typically up to ~100 meV) close to the interfaces as well as along the channel. The screening of a gated structure is shown to reduce the self

  8. Treatment verification system in radiotherapy using a digital portal imaging device. Comparison with screen/film systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Manabu; Komai, Yoshinori; Okada, Takashi; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Chadani, Kazuma; Nohara, Hiroki; Kazusa, Chudou.

    1994-01-01

    A digital portal imaging (DPI) system for megavoltage photon beams was installed recently in our department. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the image quality of this system. We have analyzed the following properties of the system; relationship between measured dose-rate and pixel values of the DPI, spatial resolution, detectability of low-contrast objects and setup errors. The results were compared with those of conventional screen-film systems. As a result, the relationship between the measured dose-rate and the pixel value of the DPI was found to be linear in the dose-rate range between 100 and 400 cGy/min. Spatial resolution was 1.25 and 0.5 mm for the DPI and the screen-film systems, respectively. The slope of the contrast-detail curves differed between the DPI and the screen-film systems, the contrast thresholds were 0.6 and 0.3% for the DPI and the screen-film systems, respectively. The detectability of a setup error of 1 mm and 2 mm for the DPI was lower than that by the screen-film systems, although the difference was not very significant. In conclusion, the image quality of the DPI at present time is slightly inferior to the conventional screen-film systems. However, notable advantages of the DPI system are that any positional changes in patients during irradiation can be detected very quickly, and that quantitative analysis of the setup variation can be obtained. The image quality of the DPI will be improved as the technology regarding advances. Therefore, this verification system using the DPI device, is expected to be used for clinical radiation therapy in the future. (author)

  9. Detection of organ movement in cervix cancer patients using a fluoroscopic electronic portal imaging device and radiopaque markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaatee, Robert S.J.P.; Olofsen, Manouk J.J.; Verstraate, Marjolein B.J.; Quint, Sandra; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of a fluoroscopic electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and radiopaque markers to detect internal cervix movement. Methods and Materials: For 10 patients with radiopaque markers clamped to the cervix, electronic portal images were made during external beam irradiation. Bony structures and markers in the portal images were registered with the same structures in the corresponding digitally reconstructed radiographs of the planning computed tomogram. Results: The visibility of the markers in the portal images was good, but their fixation should be improved. Generally, the correlation between bony structure displacements and marker movement was poor, the latter being substantially larger. The standard deviations describing the systematic and random bony anatomy displacements were 1.2 and 2.6 mm, 1.7 and 2.9 mm, and 1.6 and 2.7 mm in the lateral, cranial-caudal, and dorsal-ventral directions, respectively. For the marker movement those values were 3.4 and 3.4 mm, 4.3 and 5.2 mm, 3.2 and 5.2 mm, respectively. Estimated clinical target volume to planning target volume (CTV-PTV) planning margins (∼11 mm) based on the observed overall marker displacements (bony anatomy + internal cervix movement) are only marginally larger than the margins required to account for internal marker movement alone. Conclusions: With our current patient setup techniques and methods of setup verification and correction, the required CTV-PTV margins are almost fully determined by internal organ motion. Setup verification and correction using radiopaque markers might allow decreasing those margins, but technical improvements are needed

  10. Neon-like Iron Ion Lines Measured in NIFS/Large Helical Device (LHD) and Hinode /EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tetsuya; Hara, Hirohisa [National Astronomical Observatory, National Institutes of Natural Sciences 2-21-1 Osawa Mitaka Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Daiji; Morita, Shigeru [SOKENDAI (Graduate University for Advanced Studies) Hayama, Miura-gun, Kanagawa, 240-0193 (Japan); Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Suzuki, Chihiro; Tamura, Naoki [National Institute for Fusion Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki Gifu, 509-5292 (Japan); Yamamoto, Norimasa [Chubu University 1200 Matsumoto-cho, Kasugai Aichi, 487-0027 (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuyuki, E-mail: watanabe@uvlab.mtk.nao.ac.jp [The University of Electro-Communications 1-5-1 Chofugaoka, Chofu Tokyo, 182-8585 (Japan)

    2017-06-10

    Line intensities emerging from the Ne-sequence iron ion (Fe xvii) are measured in the laboratory, by the Large Helical Device at the National Institute for Fusion Science, and in the solar corona by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode mission. The intensity ratios of Fe xvii λ 204.6/ λ 254.8 are derived in the laboratory by unblending the contributions of the Fe xiii and xii line intensities. They are consistent with theoretical predictions and solar observations, the latter of which endorses the in-flight radiometric calibrations of the EIS instrument. The still remaining temperature-dependent behavior of the line ratio suggests the contamination of lower-temperature iron lines that are blended with the λ 204.6 line.

  11. Excimer laser doping technique for application in an integrated CdTe imaging device

    CERN Document Server

    Mochizuki, D; Aoki, T; Tomita, Y; Nihashi, T; Hatanaka, Y

    1999-01-01

    CdTe is an attractive semiconductor material for applications in solid-state high-energy X-ray and gamma-ray imaging systems because of its high absorption coefficient, large band gap, good mobility lifetime product of holes and stability at normal atmospheric conditions. We propose a new concept for fabricating an integrated CdTe with monolithic circuit configuration for two-dimensional imaging systems suitable for medical, research or industrial applications and operation at room temperature. A new doping technique has been recently developed that employs excimer laser radiation to diffuse impurity atoms into the semiconductor. Accordingly, heavily doped n- and p-type layers with resistivities less than 1 OMEGA cm can be formed on the high resistive CdTe crystals. We have further extended this technique for doping with spatial pattern. We will present the laser doping technique and various results thus obtained. Spatially patterned doping is demonstrated and we propose the use of these doping techniques for...

  12. A novel non-imaging optics based Raman spectroscopy device for transdermal blood analyte measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae-Ryon Kong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to its high chemical specificity, Raman spectroscopy has been considered to be a promising technique for non-invasive disease diagnosis. However, during Raman excitation, less than one out of a million photons undergo spontaneous Raman scattering and such weakness in Raman scattered light often require highly efficient collection of Raman scattered light for the analysis of biological tissues. We present a novel non-imaging optics based portable Raman spectroscopy instrument designed for enhanced light collection. While the instrument was demonstrated on transdermal blood glucose measurement, it can also be used for detection of other clinically relevant blood analytes such as creatinine, urea and cholesterol, as well as other tissue diagnosis applications. For enhanced light collection, a non-imaging optical element called compound hyperbolic concentrator (CHC converts the wide angular range of scattered photons (numerical aperture (NA of 1.0 from the tissue into a limited range of angles accommodated by the acceptance angles of the collection system (e.g., an optical fiber with NA of 0.22. A CHC enables collimation of scattered light directions to within extremely narrow range of angles while also maintaining practical physical dimensions. Such a design allows for the development of a very efficient and compact spectroscopy system for analyzing highly scattering biological tissues. Using the CHC-based portable Raman instrument in a clinical research setting, we demonstrate successful transdermal blood glucose predictions in human subjects undergoing oral glucose tolerance tests.

  13. Spectral survey of helium lines in a linear plasma device for use in HELIOS imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, H. B.; Biewer, T. M.; Fehling, D. T.; Isler, R. C.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2016-11-01

    Fast visible cameras and a filterscope are used to examine the visible light emission from Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Proto-MPEX. The filterscope has been configured to perform helium line ratio measurements using emission lines at 667.9, 728.1, and 706.5 nm. The measured lines should be mathematically inverted and the ratios compared to a collisional radiative model (CRM) to determine Te and ne. Increasing the number of measurement chords through the plasma improves the inversion calculation and subsequent Te and ne localization. For the filterscope, one spatial chord measurement requires three photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) connected to pellicle beam splitters. Multiple, fast visible cameras with narrowband filters are an alternate technique for performing these measurements with superior spatial resolution. Each camera contains millions of pixels; each pixel is analogous to one filterscope PMT. The data can then be inverted and the ratios compared to the CRM to determine 2-dimensional "images" of Te and ne in the plasma. An assessment is made in this paper of the candidate He I emission lines for an imaging technique.

  14. NEAR REAL-TIME GEOREFERENCE OF UMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE IMAGES FOR POST-EARTHQUAKE RESPONSE

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, S.; Wang, X.; Dou, A.; Yuan, X.; Ding, L.; Ding, X.

    2018-01-01

    The rapid collection of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) remote sensing images plays an important role in the fast submitting disaster information and the monitored serious damaged objects after the earthquake. However, for hundreds of UAV images collected in one flight sortie, the traditional data processing methods are image stitching and three-dimensional reconstruction, which take one to several hours, and affect the speed of disaster response. If the manual searching method is employed, we ...

  15. Effects of structure and oxygen flow rate on the photo-response of amorphous IGZO-based photodetector devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jun Tae; Ko, Daehyun; Choi, Sungju; Kang, Hara; Kim, Jae-Young; Yu, Hye Ri; Ahn, Geumho; Jung, Haesun; Rhee, Jihyun; Lee, Heesung; Choi, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dong Myong; Kim, Dae Hwan

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we investigated how the structure and oxygen flow rate (OFR) during the sputter-deposition affects the photo-responses of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO)-based photodetector devices. As the result of comparing three types of device structures with one another, which are a global Schottky diode, local Schottky diode, and thin-film transistor (TFT), the IGZO TFT with the gate pulse technique suppressing the persistent photoconductivity (PPC) is the most promising photodetector in terms of a high photo-sensitivity and uniform sensing characteristic. In order to analyze the IGZO TFT-based photodetectors more quantitatively, the time-evolution of sub-gap density-of-states (DOS) was directly observed under photo-illumination and consecutively during the PPC-compensating period with applying the gate pulse. It shows that the increased ionized oxygen vacancy (VO2+) defects under photo-illumination was fully recovered by the positive gate pulse and even overcompensated by additional electron trapping. Based on experimentally extracted sub-gap DOS, the origin on PPC was successfully decomposed into the hole trapping and the VO ionization. Although the VO ionization is enhanced in lower OFR (O-poor) device, the PPC becomes more severe in high OFR (O-rich) device because the hole trapping dominates the PPC in IGZO TFT under photo-illumination rather than the VO ionization and more abundant holes are trapped into gate insulator and/or interface in O-rich TFTs. Similarly, the electron trapping during the PPC-compensating period with applying the positive gate pulse becomes more prominent in O-rich TFTs. It is attributed to more hole/electron traps in the gate insulator and/or interface, which is associated with oxygen interstitials, or originates from the ion bombardment-related lower quality gate oxide in O-rich devices.

  16. University Social Responsibility and Brand Image of Private Universities in Bangkok

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plungpongpan, Jirawan; Tiangsoongnern, Leela; Speece, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of university social responsibility (USR) on the brand image of private universities in Thailand. Brand image is important for entry into the consideration set as prospective students evaluate options for university study. USR activities may be implicit or explicit, i.e., actively…

  17. Comparing Four Touch-Based Interaction Techniques for an Image-Based Audience Response System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Prins, Jonatan T.; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the most appropriate touch-based interaction technique for I2Vote, an image-based audience response system for radiology education in which users need to accurately mark a target on a medical image. Four plausible techniques were identified: land-on, take-off,

  18. Spatially pooled contrast responses predict neural and perceptual similarity of naturalistic image categories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris I A Groen

    Full Text Available The visual world is complex and continuously changing. Yet, our brain transforms patterns of light falling on our retina into a coherent percept within a few hundred milliseconds. Possibly, low-level neural responses already carry substantial information to facilitate rapid characterization of the visual input. Here, we computationally estimated low-level contrast responses to computer-generated naturalistic images, and tested whether spatial pooling of these responses could predict image similarity at the neural and behavioral level. Using EEG, we show that statistics derived from pooled responses explain a large amount of variance between single-image evoked potentials (ERPs in individual subjects. Dissimilarity analysis on multi-electrode ERPs demonstrated that large differences between images in pooled response statistics are predictive of more dissimilar patterns of evoked activity, whereas images with little difference in statistics give rise to highly similar evoked activity patterns. In a separate behavioral experiment, images with large differences in statistics were judged as different categories, whereas images with little differences were confused. These findings suggest that statistics derived from low-level contrast responses can be extracted in early visual processing and can be relevant for rapid judgment of visual similarity. We compared our results with two other, well- known contrast statistics: Fourier power spectra and higher-order properties of contrast distributions (skewness and kurtosis. Interestingly, whereas these statistics allow for accurate image categorization, they do not predict ERP response patterns or behavioral categorization confusions. These converging computational, neural and behavioral results suggest that statistics of pooled contrast responses contain information that corresponds with perceived visual similarity in a rapid, low-level categorization task.

  19. Spatially Pooled Contrast Responses Predict Neural and Perceptual Similarity of Naturalistic Image Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Iris I. A.; Ghebreab, Sennay; Lamme, Victor A. F.; Scholte, H. Steven

    2012-01-01

    The visual world is complex and continuously changing. Yet, our brain transforms patterns of light falling on our retina into a coherent percept within a few hundred milliseconds. Possibly, low-level neural responses already carry substantial information to facilitate rapid characterization of the visual input. Here, we computationally estimated low-level contrast responses to computer-generated naturalistic images, and tested whether spatial pooling of these responses could predict image similarity at the neural and behavioral level. Using EEG, we show that statistics derived from pooled responses explain a large amount of variance between single-image evoked potentials (ERPs) in individual subjects. Dissimilarity analysis on multi-electrode ERPs demonstrated that large differences between images in pooled response statistics are predictive of more dissimilar patterns of evoked activity, whereas images with little difference in statistics give rise to highly similar evoked activity patterns. In a separate behavioral experiment, images with large differences in statistics were judged as different categories, whereas images with little differences were confused. These findings suggest that statistics derived from low-level contrast responses can be extracted in early visual processing and can be relevant for rapid judgment of visual similarity. We compared our results with two other, well- known contrast statistics: Fourier power spectra and higher-order properties of contrast distributions (skewness and kurtosis). Interestingly, whereas these statistics allow for accurate image categorization, they do not predict ERP response patterns or behavioral categorization confusions. These converging computational, neural and behavioral results suggest that statistics of pooled contrast responses contain information that corresponds with perceived visual similarity in a rapid, low-level categorization task. PMID:23093921

  20. Contextual analysis of immunological response through whole-organ fluorescent imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Matthew C; Herndon, Caroline N; Heesters, B A; Carroll, Michael C

    2013-09-01

    As fluorescent microscopy has developed, significant insights have been gained into the establishment of immune response within secondary lymphoid organs, particularly in draining lymph nodes. While established techniques such as confocal imaging and intravital multi-photon microscopy have proven invaluable, they provide limited insight into the architectural and structural context in which these responses occur. To interrogate the role of the lymph node environment in immune response effectively, a new set of imaging tools taking into account broader architectural context must be implemented into emerging immunological questions. Using two different methods of whole-organ imaging, optical clearing and three-dimensional reconstruction of serially sectioned lymph nodes, fluorescent representations of whole lymph nodes can be acquired at cellular resolution. Using freely available post-processing tools, images of unlimited size and depth can be assembled into cohesive, contextual snapshots of immunological response. Through the implementation of robust iterative analysis techniques, these highly complex three-dimensional images can be objectified into sortable object data sets. These data can then be used to interrogate complex questions at the cellular level within the broader context of lymph node biology. By combining existing imaging technology with complex methods of sample preparation and capture, we have developed efficient systems for contextualizing immunological phenomena within lymphatic architecture. In combination with robust approaches to image analysis, these advances provide a path to integrating scientific understanding of basic lymphatic biology into the complex nature of immunological response.

  1. Analysis of image heterogeneity using 2D Minkowski functionals detects tumor responses to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Timothy J; Canuto, Holly C; Kettunen, Mikko I; Booth, Thomas C; Hu, De-En; Krishnan, Anant S; Bohndiek, Sarah E; Neves, André A; McLachlan, Charles; Hobson, Michael P; Brindle, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    The acquisition of ever increasing volumes of high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has created an urgent need to develop automated and objective image analysis algorithms that can assist in determining tumor margins, diagnosing tumor stage, and detecting treatment response. We have shown previously that Minkowski functionals, which are precise morphological and structural descriptors of image heterogeneity, can be used to enhance the detection, in T1 -weighted images, of a targeted Gd(3+) -chelate-based contrast agent for detecting tumor cell death. We have used Minkowski functionals here to characterize heterogeneity in T2 -weighted images acquired before and after drug treatment, and obtained without contrast agent administration. We show that Minkowski functionals can be used to characterize the changes in image heterogeneity that accompany treatment of tumors with a vascular disrupting agent, combretastatin A4-phosphate, and with a cytotoxic drug, etoposide. Parameterizing changes in the heterogeneity of T2 -weighted images can be used to detect early responses of tumors to drug treatment, even when there is no change in tumor size. The approach provides a quantitative and therefore objective assessment of treatment response that could be used with other types of MR image and also with other imaging modalities. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Design and evaluation of a high-performance charge coupled device camera for astronomical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, Yuanyuan; Guan, Yong; Zhang, Weigong; Pan, Wei; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Jie

    2009-01-01

    The Space Solar Telescope (SST) is the first Chinese space astronomy mission. This paper introduces the design of a high-performance 2K × 2K charge coupled device (CCD) camera that is an important payload in the Space Solar Telescope. The camera is composed of an analogue system and a digital embedded system. The analogue system is first discussed in detail, including the power and bias voltage supply circuit, power protection unit, CCD clock driver circuit, 16 bit A/D converter and low-noise amplifier circuit. The digital embedded system integrated with an NIOS II soft-core processor serves as the control and data acquisition system of the camera. In addition, research on evaluation methods for CCDs was carried out to evaluate the performance of the TH7899 CCD camera in relation to the requirements of the SST project. We present the evaluation results, including readout noise, linearity, quantum efficiency, dark current, full-well capacity, charge transfer efficiency and gain. The results show that this high-performance CCD camera can satisfy the specifications of the SST project

  3. Optimization of the imaging response of scanning microwave microscopy measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardi, G. M.; Lucibello, A.; Proietti, E.; Marcelli, R., E-mail: romolo.marcelli@imm.cnr.it [National Research Council, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Kasper, M.; Gramse, G. [Biophysics Institute, Johannes Kepler University, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Kienberger, F. [Keysight Technologies Austria GmbH, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria)

    2015-07-20

    In this work, we present the analytical modeling and preliminary experimental results for the choice of the optimal frequencies when performing amplitude and phase measurements with a scanning microwave microscope. In particular, the analysis is related to the reflection mode operation of the instrument, i.e., the acquisition of the complex reflection coefficient data, usually referred as S{sub 11}. The studied configuration is composed of an atomic force microscope with a microwave matched nanometric cantilever probe tip, connected by a λ/2 coaxial cable resonator to a vector network analyzer. The set-up is provided by Keysight Technologies. As a peculiar result, the optimal frequencies, where the maximum sensitivity is achieved, are different for the amplitude and for the phase signals. The analysis is focused on measurements of dielectric samples, like semiconductor devices, textile pieces, and biological specimens.

  4. 78 FR 55014 - Machine Guns, Destructive Devices and Certain Other Firearms; Background Checks for Responsible...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... trust or corporate entity, so as to avoid the need for a law enforcement certificate. The petitioner... Other Firearms; Background Checks for Responsible Persons of a Corporation, Trust or Other Legal Entity... changes include: Defining the term ``responsible person,'' as used in reference to a trust, partnership...

  5. Initial experience with a handheld device digital imaging and communications in medicine viewer: OsiriX mobile on the iPhone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhri, Asim F; Radvany, Martin G

    2011-04-01

    Medical imaging is commonly used to diagnose many emergent conditions, as well as plan treatment. Digital images can be reviewed on almost any computing platform. Modern mobile phones and handheld devices are portable computing platforms with robust software programming interfaces, powerful processors, and high-resolution displays. OsiriX mobile, a new Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine viewing program, is available for the iPhone/iPod touch platform. This raises the possibility of mobile review of diagnostic medical images to expedite diagnosis and treatment planning using a commercial off the shelf solution, facilitating communication among radiologists and referring clinicians.

  6. Two-dimensional polarimeter with a charge-coupled-device image sensor and a piezoelastic modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povel, H P; Keller, C U; Yadigaroglu, I A

    1994-07-01

    We present the first measurements and scientific observations of the solar photosphere obtained with a new two-dimensional polarimeter based on piezoelastic modulators and synchronous demodulation in a CCD imager. This instrument, which is developed for precision solar-vector polarimetry, contains a specially masked CCD that has every second row covered with an opaque mask. During exposure the charges are shifted back and forth between covered and light-sensitive rows synchronized with the modulation. In this way Stokes I and one of the other Stokes parameters can be recorded. Since the charge shifting is performed at frequencies well above the seeing frequencies and both polarization states are measured with the same pixel, highly sensitive and accurate polarimetry is achieved. We have tested the instrument in laboratory conditions as well as at three solar telescopes.

  7. Low dose intranasal oxytocin delivered with Breath Powered device dampens amygdala response to emotional stimuli: A peripheral effect-controlled within-subjects randomized dose-response fMRI trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Daniel S; Westlye, Lars T; Alnæs, Dag; Rustan, Øyvind G; Kaufmann, Tobias; Smerud, Knut T; Mahmoud, Ramy A; Djupesland, Per G; Andreassen, Ole A

    2016-07-01

    It is unclear if and how exogenous oxytocin (OT) reaches the brain to improve social behavior and cognition and what is the optimal dose for OT response. To better understand the delivery routes of intranasal OT administration to the brain and the dose-response, we compared amygdala response to facial stimuli by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in four treatment conditions, including two different doses of intranasal OT using a novel Breath Powered device, intravenous (IV) OT, which provided similar concentrations of blood plasma OT, and placebo. We adopted a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, crossover design, with 16 healthy male adults administering a single-dose of these four treatments. We observed a treatment effect on right amygdala activation during the processing of angry and happy face stimuli, with pairwise comparisons revealing reduced activation after the 8IU low dose intranasal treatment compared to placebo. These data suggest the dampening of amygdala activity in response to emotional stimuli occurs via direct intranasal delivery pathways rather than across the blood-brain barrier via systemically circulating OT. This trial is registered at the U.S. National Institutes of Health clinical trial registry (www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01983514) and as EudraCT no. 2013-001608-12. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterizing the Utility and Limitations of Repurposing an Open-Field Optical Imaging Device for Fluorescence-Guided Surgery in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lindsay S; Rosenthal, Eben L; Chung, Thomas K; de Boer, Esther; Patel, Neel; Prince, Andrew C; Korb, Melissa L; Walsh, Erika M; Young, E Scott; Stevens, Todd M; Withrow, Kirk P; Morlandt, Anthony B; Richman, Joshua S; Carroll, William R; Zinn, Kurt R; Warram, Jason M

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of U.S. Food and Drug Administration-cleared devices designed for indocyanine green-based perfusion imaging to identify cancer-specific bioconjugates with overlapping excitation and emission wavelengths. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated potential for fluorescence-guided surgery, but the time and cost of the approval process may impede clinical translation. To expedite this translation, we explored the feasibility of repurposing existing optical imaging devices for fluorescence-guided surgery. Consenting patients (n = 15) scheduled for curative resection were enrolled in a clinical trial evaluating the safety and specificity of cetuximab-IRDye800 (NCT01987375). Open-field fluorescence imaging was performed preoperatively and during the surgical resection. Fluorescence intensity was quantified using integrated instrument software, and the tumor-to-background ratio characterized fluorescence contrast. In the preoperative clinic, the open-field device demonstrated potential to guide preoperative mapping of tumor borders, optimize the day of surgery, and identify occult lesions. Intraoperatively, the device demonstrated robust potential to guide surgical resections, as all peak tumor-to-background ratios were greater than 2 (range, 2.2-14.1). Postresection wound bed fluorescence was significantly less than preresection tumor fluorescence (P open-field imaging device was successfully repurposed to distinguish cancer from normal tissue in the preoperative clinic and throughout surgical resection. This study illuminated the potential for existing open-field optical imaging devices with overlapping excitation and emission spectra to be used for fluorescence-guided surgery. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  9. Effects of oxycodone on brain responses to emotional images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, Margaret C; Fitzgerald, Daniel A; Angstadt, Michael; Rabinak, Christine A; de Wit, Harriet; Phan, K Luan

    2014-11-01

    Evidence from animal and human studies suggests that opiate drugs decrease emotional responses to negative stimuli and increase responses to positive stimuli. Such emotional effects may motivate misuse of oxycodone (OXY), a widely abused opiate. Yet, we know little about how OXY affects neural circuits underlying emotional processing in humans. We examined effects of OXY on brain activity during presentation of positive and negative visual emotional stimuli. We predicted that OXY would decrease amygdala activity to negative stimuli and increase ventral striatum (VS) activity to positive stimuli. Secondarily, we examined the effects of OXY on other emotional network regions on an exploratory basis. In a three-session study, healthy adults (N = 17) received placebo, 10 and 20 mg OXY under counterbalanced, double-blind conditions. At each session, participants completed subjective and cardiovascular measures and underwent functional MRI (fMRI) scanning while completing two emotional response tasks. Our emotional tasks reliably activated emotional network areas. OXY produced subjective effects but did not alter either behavioral responses to emotional stimuli or activity in our primary areas of interest. OXY did decrease right medial orbitofrontal cortex (MOFC) responses to happy faces. Contrary to our expectations, OXY did not affect behavioral or neural responses to emotional stimuli in our primary areas of interest. Further, the effects of OXY in the MOFC would be more consistent with a decrease in value for happy faces. This may indicate that healthy adults do not receive emotional benefits from opiates, or the pharmacological actions of OXY differ from other opiates.

  10. Imaging the inflammatory response to acute myocardial infarction in man using indium-111-labeled autologous platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, R.A.; Thakur, M.L.; Berger, H.J.; Wackers, F.J.T.; Gottschalk, A.; Zaret, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of imaging the inflammatory response to acute transmural myocardial infarction in man using indium-111 ( 111 In)-labeled autologous leukocytes was assessed in 36 patients. Indium-111 leukocytes were injected i.v. 18 to 112 hs after the onset of chest pain. Cardiac imaging was performed 24 hs later with a mobile gamma camera. Twenty-one patients had positive images and 15 had negative images. The percent of positive images increased as the interval between infarction and 111 In-leukocyte injection shortened; all patients injected within 24 hs of infarction had positive images. Patients with positive images were injected with 111 In leukocytes earlier after infarction and were younger than those with negative images. Several other parameters that could possibly have affected the imaging results were examined and were not significantly different in patients with positive and negative images. These included peak serum creatine kinase, location of infarction, incidence of pericarditis, use of antiinflammatory drugs or membrane-active antiarrhythmic drugs, peripheral leukocyte count, and cell labeling efficiency. The function of the labeled cells was similar in patients with positive and negative images. Six patients with acute infarction serving as controls and given free 111 In-oxine and six patients with stable coronary artery disease given 111 In-leukocytes all had negative cardiac images

  11. Influence of different irradiation facilities on the response of radioprotection devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeren de Oliveira, A.

    1984-05-01

    An EIC 1 extrapolation chamber, flushed with a methan based tissue equivalent gas is presented. This measuring device serves as a reference instrument to calibrate in tissue absorbed dose beta beams from different irradiation facilities; point radioactive sources, sources used with beam flattening filters, large area sources simulated by moving a point source. The source to detector distance has to be greater than 3 cm, requiring a transfer dosemeter for smaller distances. Influence of these different irradiation geometries has been studied on several radioprotection instruments (babyline, individual dosemeter, ionisation chamber), using three radionucleides: 147 Pm, 204 Tl, 90 Sr + 90 Y [fr

  12. Non-destructive failure analysis and measurement for molded devices and complex assemblies with X-ray CT and 3D image processing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Xiaoming; Liew, Seaw Jia; Jiang, Ting Ying; Xu, Jian; Kakarala, Ramakrishna

    2013-01-01

    In both automotive and healthcare sectors, reliable failure analysis and accurate measurement of molded devices and complex assemblies are important. Current methods of failure analysis and measurement require these molded parts to be cross-sectioned so that internal features or dimensions can be accessible. As a result, the parts are deemed unusable and additional failure introduced by sectioning may cause misinterpretation of the results. X-ray CT and 3D image processing techniques provide a new nondestructive solution for failure analysis and measurement of molded devices and complex assemblies. These techniques simplify failure analysis and measurement of molded devices and assemblies, and improve the productivity of molding manufacturing significantly.

  13. High speed, intermediate resolution, large area laser beam induced current imaging and laser scribing system for photovoltaic devices and modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Adam B.; Song, Zhaoning; DeWitt, Jonathan L.; Stone, Jon M.; Krantz, Patrick W.; Royston, John M.; Zeller, Ryan M.; Mapes, Meghan R.; Roland, Paul J.; Dorogi, Mark D.; Zafar, Syed; Faykosh, Gary T.; Ellingson, Randy J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a laser beam induced current imaging tool for photovoltaic devices and modules that utilizes diode pumped Q-switched lasers. Power densities on the order of one sun (100 mW/cm2) can be produced in a ˜40 μm spot size by operating the lasers at low diode current and high repetition rate. Using galvanostatically controlled mirrors in an overhead configuration and high speed data acquisition, large areas can be scanned in short times. As the beam is rastered, focus is maintained on a flat plane with an electronically controlled lens that is positioned in a coordinated fashion with the movements of the mirrors. The system can also be used in a scribing mode by increasing the diode current and decreasing the repetition rate. In either mode, the instrument can accommodate samples ranging in size from laboratory scale (few cm2) to full modules (1 m2). Customized LabVIEW programs were developed to control the components and acquire, display, and manipulate the data in imaging mode.

  14. Development of a one-stop beam verification system using electronic portal imaging devices for routine quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sangwook; Ma, Sun Young; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yi, Byong Yong; Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Suk; Cho, Sam Ju; Choi, Jinho

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a computer-based system for routine quality assurance (QA) of a linear accelerator (linac) was developed by using the dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID). An acrylic template phantom was designed such that it could be placed on the EPID and be aligned with the light field of the collimator. After irradiation, portal images obtained from the EPID were transferred in DICOM format to a computer and analyzed using a program we developed. The symmetry, flatness, field size, and congruence of the light and radiation fields of the photon beams from the linac were verified simultaneously. To validate the QA system, the ion chamber and film (X-Omat V2; Kodak, New York, NY) measurements were compared with the EPID measurements obtained in this study. The EPID measurements agreed with the film measurements. Parameters for beams with energies of 6 MV and 15 MV were obtained daily for 1 month using this system. It was found that our QA tool using EPID could substitute for the film test, which is a time-consuming method for routine QA assessment.

  15. Sensor Fusion of a Mobile Device to Control and Acquire Videos or Images of Coffee Branches and for Georeferencing Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Jimena Ramos Giraldo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones show potential for controlling and monitoring variables in agriculture. Their processing capacity, instrumentation, connectivity, low cost, and accessibility allow farmers (among other users in rural areas to operate them easily with applications adjusted to their specific needs. In this investigation, the integration of inertial sensors, a GPS, and a camera are presented for the monitoring of a coffee crop. An Android-based application was developed with two operating modes: (i Navigation: for georeferencing trees, which can be as close as 0.5 m from each other; and (ii Acquisition: control of video acquisition, based on the movement of the mobile device over a branch, and measurement of image quality, using clarity indexes to select the most appropriate frames for application in future processes. The integration of inertial sensors in navigation mode, shows a mean relative error of ±0.15 m, and total error ±5.15 m. In acquisition mode, the system correctly identifies the beginning and end of mobile phone movement in 99% of cases, and image quality is determined by means of a sharpness factor which measures blurriness. With the developed system, it will be possible to obtain georeferenced information about coffee trees, such as their production, nutritional state, and presence of plagues or diseases.

  16. Development of a one-stop beam verification system using electronic portal imaging devices for routine quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sangwook, E-mail: medicalphysics@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kosin University College of Medicine, Seo-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ma, Sun Young; Jeung, Tae Sig [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kosin University College of Medicine, Seo-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Byong Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lee, Sang Hoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cheil General Hospital and Women' s Healthcare Center, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Jung-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Suk [Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sam Ju [Department of Radiation Oncology, Eulji University School of Medicine, Eulji General Hospital, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jinho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Namdong-gu, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a computer-based system for routine quality assurance (QA) of a linear accelerator (linac) was developed by using the dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID). An acrylic template phantom was designed such that it could be placed on the EPID and be aligned with the light field of the collimator. After irradiation, portal images obtained from the EPID were transferred in DICOM format to a computer and analyzed using a program we developed. The symmetry, flatness, field size, and congruence of the light and radiation fields of the photon beams from the linac were verified simultaneously. To validate the QA system, the ion chamber and film (X-Omat V2; Kodak, New York, NY) measurements were compared with the EPID measurements obtained in this study. The EPID measurements agreed with the film measurements. Parameters for beams with energies of 6 MV and 15 MV were obtained daily for 1 month using this system. It was found that our QA tool using EPID could substitute for the film test, which is a time-consuming method for routine QA assessment.

  17. Comparison of noise power spectrum methodologies in measurements by using various electronic portal imaging devices in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Soon Yong [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kwan Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Baekseok Culture University College, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Kyung Tae [Dep. of Radiological Technology, Dongnam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Won [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gang-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Ah; Son, Jin Hyun; Min, Jung Whan [Shingu University College, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The noise power spectrum (NPS) is one of the most general methods for measuring the noise amplitude and the quality of an image acquired from a uniform radiation field. The purpose of this study was to compare different NPS methodologies by using megavoltage X-ray energies. The NPS evaluation methods in diagnostic radiation were applied to therapy using the International Electro-technical Commission standard (IEC 62220-1). Various radiation therapy (RT) devices such as TrueBeamTM(Varian), BEAMVIEWPLUS(Siemens), iViewGT(Elekta) and ClinacR iX (Varian) were used. In order to measure the region of interest (ROI) of the NPS, we used the following four factors: the overlapping impact, the non-overlapping impact, the flatness and penumbra. As for NPS results, iViewGT(Elekta) had the higher amplitude of noise, compared to BEAMVIEWPLUS (Siemens), TrueBeamTM(Varian) flattening filter, ClinacRiXaS1000(Varian) and TrueBeamTM(Varian) flattening filter free. The present study revealed that various factors could be employed to produce megavoltage imaging (MVI) of the NPS and as a baseline standard for NPS methodologies control in MVI.

  18. Sensor Fusion of a Mobile Device to Control and Acquire Videos or Images of Coffee Branches and for Georeferencing Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Paula Jimena Ramos; Aguirre, Álvaro Guerrero; Muñoz, Carlos Mario; Prieto, Flavio Augusto; Oliveros, Carlos Eugenio

    2017-04-06

    Smartphones show potential for controlling and monitoring variables in agriculture. Their processing capacity, instrumentation, connectivity, low cost, and accessibility allow farmers (among other users in rural areas) to operate them easily with applications adjusted to their specific needs. In this investigation, the integration of inertial sensors, a GPS, and a camera are presented for the monitoring of a coffee crop. An Android-based application was developed with two operating modes: ( i ) Navigation: for georeferencing trees, which can be as close as 0.5 m from each other; and ( ii ) Acquisition: control of video acquisition, based on the movement of the mobile device over a branch, and measurement of image quality, using clarity indexes to select the most appropriate frames for application in future processes. The integration of inertial sensors in navigation mode, shows a mean relative error of ±0.15 m, and total error ±5.15 m. In acquisition mode, the system correctly identifies the beginning and end of mobile phone movement in 99% of cases, and image quality is determined by means of a sharpness factor which measures blurriness. With the developed system, it will be possible to obtain georeferenced information about coffee trees, such as their production, nutritional state, and presence of plagues or diseases.

  19. Characterization of Organic Solar Cell Devices and their Interfaces under Degradation: Imaging, Electrical and Mechanical Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corazza, Michael

    Renewable energies are a critical and necessary technological development deeply connected to human evolution and even survival. The extraordinary technological development of the past century brought tremendous changes to the planet which, despite the scepticism of some, are indubitably affecting...... the natural ecosystem and maybe even the destiny of Earth. Human evolution does not mean only advanced technological development, but also deeper consciousness and responsibility for the next generations to come. Everything on Earth exists because of the Sun: heat, wind, life... everything. Therefore, solar...

  20. Metabolic imaging of tumor for diagnosis and response for therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagaynova, Elena; Shirmanova, Marina; Lukina, Maria; Dudenkova, Varvara; Ignatova, Nadezgda; Elagin, Vadim; Shlivko, Irena; Scheslavsky, Vladislav; Orlinskay, Natalia

    2018-02-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging is a non-invasive imaging technique, based on the study of fluorescence decay times of naturally occurring fluorescent molecules, enabling a noninvasive investigation of the biological tissue with subcellular resolution. Cancer exhibits altered cellular metabolism, which affects the autofluorescence of metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD. In this study features of tumor metabolism in different systems of organization (from cell culture to patient lesion) was showed. The observed differences in the relative contributions of free NAD(P)H and FAD testify to an increased a glycolytic metabolism in cancer cells compare to fibroblasts. In 3D spheroids, the cells of the proliferating zone had greater a1 and lower tm values than the cells of the quiescent zone, which likely is a consequence of their higher glycolytic rate. During the growth of colorectal cancer in the experimental mouse model, the contribution of the free component of NAD(P)H was increased. Dysplastic nevus and melanoma is characterized by raised contribution of free NADH compare to healthy skin. Therefore, melanoma cells had very short value of τ1.

  1. Towards a uniform specification of light therapy devices for the treatment of affective disorders and use for non-image forming effects: Radiant flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, M P J; Rosemann, A L P

    2018-08-01

    For treating affective disorders like SAD, light therapy is used although the underlying mechanism explaining this success remains unclear. To accelerate the research on defining the light characteristics responsible for inducing a specific effect a uniform manner for specifying the irradiance at the eye should be defined. This allows a genuine comparison between light-affect studies. An important factor impacting the irradiance at the eye are the radiant characteristics of the used light therapy device. In this study the radiant fluxes of five different light therapy devices were measured. The values were weighted against the spectral sensitivity of the five photopigments present in the human eye. A measurement was taken every five minutes to control for a potential stabilizing effect. The results show that all five devices show large differences in radiant flux. The devices equipped with blue LED lights have a much lower spectral radiant flux than the devices equipped with a fluorescent light source or a white LED. The devices with fluorescent lamps needed 30 min to stabilize to a constant radiant flux. In this study only five devices were measured. Radiant flux is just the first step to identify uniform specifications for light therapy devices. It is recommended to provide all five α-opic radiant fluxes. Preferably, the devices should come with a spectral power distribution of the radiant flux. For the devices equipped with a fluorescent lamp it is recommended to provide information on the stabilization time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Compact plane illumination plugin device to enable light sheet fluorescence imaging of multi-cellular organisms on an inverted wide-field microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zeyi; Lee, Juhyun; Jiang, Hao; Dong, Siyan; Jen, Nelson; Hsiai, Tzung; Ho, Chih-Ming; Fei, Peng

    2016-01-01

    We developed a compact plane illumination plugin (PIP) device which enabled plane illumination and light sheet fluorescence imaging on a conventional inverted microscope. The PIP device allowed the integration of microscope with tunable laser sheet profile, fast image acquisition, and 3-D scanning. The device is both compact, measuring approximately 15 by 5 by 5 cm, and cost-effective, since we employed consumer electronics and an inexpensive device molding method. We demonstrated that PIP provided significant contrast and resolution enhancement to conventional microscopy through imaging different multi-cellular fluorescent structures, including 3-D branched cells in vitro and live zebrafish embryos. Imaging with the integration of PIP greatly reduced out-of-focus contamination and generated sharper contrast in acquired 2-D plane images when compared with the stand-alone inverted microscope. As a result, the dynamic fluid domain of the beating zebrafish heart was clearly segmented and the functional monitoring of the heart was achieved. Furthermore, the enhanced axial resolution established by thin plane illumination of PIP enabled the 3-D reconstruction of the branched cellular structures, which leads to the improvement on the functionality of the wide field microscopy.

  3. Use of Portable Digital Devices to Analyze Autonomic Stress Response in Psychology Objective Structured Clinical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Velasco, Ana Isabel; Bellido-Esteban, Alberto; Ruisoto-Palomera, Pablo; Clemente-Suárez, Vicente Javier

    2018-01-12

    The aim of the present study was to explore changes in the autonomic stress response of Psychology students in a Psychology Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) and their relationship with OSCE performance. Variables of autonomic modulation by the analysis of heart rate variability in temporal, frequency and non-linear domains, subjective perception of distress strait and academic performance were measured before and after the two different evaluations that composed the OSCE. A psychology objective structured clinical examination composed by two different evaluation scenarios produced a large anxiety anticipatory response, a habituation response in the first of the evaluation scenarios and a in the entire evaluation, and a no habituation response in the second evaluation scenario. Autonomic modulation parameters do not correlate with academic performance of students.

  4. Spectral survey of helium lines in a linear plasma device for use in HELIOS imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, H. B., E-mail: rayhb@ornl.gov [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Biewer, T. M.; Fehling, D. T.; Isler, R. C.; Unterberg, E. A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Fast visible cameras and a filterscope are used to examine the visible light emission from Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Proto-MPEX. The filterscope has been configured to perform helium line ratio measurements using emission lines at 667.9, 728.1, and 706.5 nm. The measured lines should be mathematically inverted and the ratios compared to a collisional radiative model (CRM) to determine T{sub e} and n{sub e}. Increasing the number of measurement chords through the plasma improves the inversion calculation and subsequent T{sub e} and n{sub e} localization. For the filterscope, one spatial chord measurement requires three photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) connected to pellicle beam splitters. Multiple, fast visible cameras with narrowband filters are an alternate technique for performing these measurements with superior spatial resolution. Each camera contains millions of pixels; each pixel is analogous to one filterscope PMT. The data can then be inverted and the ratios compared to the CRM to determine 2-dimensional “images” of T{sub e} and n{sub e} in the plasma. An assessment is made in this paper of the candidate He I emission lines for an imaging technique.

  5. Expansion of Smartwatch Touch Interface from Touchscreen to Around Device Interface Using Infrared Line Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Chul Lim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Touchscreen interaction has become a fundamental means of controlling mobile phones and smartwatches. However, the small form factor of a smartwatch limits the available interactive surface area. To overcome this limitation, we propose the expansion of the touch region of the screen to the back of the user’s hand. We developed a touch module for sensing the touched finger position on the back of the hand using infrared (IR line image sensors, based on the calibrated IR intensity and the maximum intensity region of an IR array. For complete touch-sensing solution, a gyroscope installed in the smartwatch is used to read the wrist gestures. The gyroscope incorporates a dynamic time warping gesture recognition algorithm for eliminating unintended touch inputs during the free motion of the wrist while wearing the smartwatch. The prototype of the developed sensing module was implemented in a commercial smartwatch, and it was confirmed that the sensed positional information of the finger when it was used to touch the back of the hand could be used to control the smartwatch graphical user interface. Our system not only affords a novel experience for smartwatch users, but also provides a basis for developing other useful interfaces.

  6. Expansion of Smartwatch Touch Interface from Touchscreen to Around Device Interface Using Infrared Line Image Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soo-Chul; Shin, Jungsoon; Kim, Seung-Chan; Park, Joonah

    2015-07-09

    Touchscreen interaction has become a fundamental means of controlling mobile phones and smartwatches. However, the small form factor of a smartwatch limits the available interactive surface area. To overcome this limitation, we propose the expansion of the touch region of the screen to the back of the user's hand. We developed a touch module for sensing the touched finger position on the back of the hand using infrared (IR) line image sensors, based on the calibrated IR intensity and the maximum intensity region of an IR array. For complete touch-sensing solution, a gyroscope installed in the smartwatch is used to read the wrist gestures. The gyroscope incorporates a dynamic time warping gesture recognition algorithm for eliminating unintended touch inputs during the free motion of the wrist while wearing the smartwatch. The prototype of the developed sensing module was implemented in a commercial smartwatch, and it was confirmed that the sensed positional information of the finger when it was used to touch the back of the hand could be used to control the smartwatch graphical user interface. Our system not only affords a novel experience for smartwatch users, but also provides a basis for developing other useful interfaces.

  7. Expansion of Smartwatch Touch Interface from Touchscreen to Around Device Interface Using Infrared Line Image Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soo-Chul; Shin, Jungsoon; Kim, Seung-Chan; Park, Joonah

    2015-01-01

    Touchscreen interaction has become a fundamental means of controlling mobile phones and smartwatches. However, the small form factor of a smartwatch limits the available interactive surface area. To overcome this limitation, we propose the expansion of the touch region of the screen to the back of the user’s hand. We developed a touch module for sensing the touched finger position on the back of the hand using infrared (IR) line image sensors, based on the calibrated IR intensity and the maximum intensity region of an IR array. For complete touch-sensing solution, a gyroscope installed in the smartwatch is used to read the wrist gestures. The gyroscope incorporates a dynamic time warping gesture recognition algorithm for eliminating unintended touch inputs during the free motion of the wrist while wearing the smartwatch. The prototype of the developed sensing module was implemented in a commercial smartwatch, and it was confirmed that the sensed positional information of the finger when it was used to touch the back of the hand could be used to control the smartwatch graphical user interface. Our system not only affords a novel experience for smartwatch users, but also provides a basis for developing other useful interfaces. PMID:26184202

  8. A visible light imaging device for cardiac rate detection with reduced effect of body movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaotian; Liu, Ming; Zhao, Yuejin

    2014-09-01

    A visible light imaging system to detect human cardiac rate is proposed in this paper. A color camera and several LEDs, acting as lighting source, were used to avoid the interference of ambient light. From people's forehead, the cardiac rate could be acquired based on photoplethysmography (PPG) theory. The template matching method was used after the capture of video. The video signal was discomposed into three signal channels (RGB) and the region of interest was chosen to take the average gray value. The green channel signal could provide an excellent waveform of pulse wave on the account of green lights' absorptive characteristics of blood. Through the fast Fourier transform, the cardiac rate was exactly achieved. But the research goal was not just to achieve the cardiac rate accurately. With the template matching method, the effects of body movement are reduced to a large extent, therefore the pulse wave can be detected even while people are in the moving state and the waveform is largely optimized. Several experiments are conducted on volunteers, and the results are compared with the ones gained by a finger clamped pulse oximeter. The contrast results between these two ways are exactly agreeable. This method to detect the cardiac rate and the pulse wave largely reduces the effects of body movement and can probably be widely used in the future.

  9. Investigation of the mechanical performance of Siemens linacs components during arc: gantry, MLC, and electronic portal imaging device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowshanfarzad P

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pejman Rowshanfarzad,1 Peter Häring,2 Hans L Riis,3 Sune J Zimmermann,3 Martin A Ebert1,4 1School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia; 2German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ, Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg, Germany; 3Radiofysisk Laboratorium, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark; 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA, Australia Background: In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linac components including gantry, collimation system, and electronic portal imaging device (EPID during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. Methods: The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD, EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt, and the sag in leaf bank assembly due to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with five ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of image data. Three Siemens linacs were investigated. Results: The average EPID sag was within 1 mm for all tested linacs. Two machines showed >1 mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 7.5 mm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in leaf bank assembly was <1 mm. Conclusion: The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behavior of Siemens linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Siemens machines. Keywords: linac, Siemens, arc, sag, EPID, gantry

  10. Evaluation of a HDR image sensor with logarithmic response for mobile video-based applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tektonidis, Marco; Pietrzak, Mateusz; Monnin, David

    2017-10-01

    The performance of mobile video-based applications using conventional LDR (Low Dynamic Range) image sensors highly depends on the illumination conditions. As an alternative, HDR (High Dynamic Range) image sensors with logarithmic response are capable to acquire illumination-invariant HDR images in a single shot. We have implemented a complete image processing framework for a HDR sensor, including preprocessing methods (nonuniformity correction (NUC), cross-talk correction (CTC), and demosaicing) as well as tone mapping (TM). We have evaluated the HDR sensor for video-based applications w.r.t. the display of images and w.r.t. image analysis techniques. Regarding the display we have investigated the image intensity statistics over time, and regarding image analysis we assessed the number of feature correspondences between consecutive frames of temporal image sequences. For the evaluation we used HDR image data recorded from a vehicle on outdoor or combined outdoor/indoor itineraries, and we performed a comparison with corresponding conventional LDR image data.

  11. - LAA Occluder View for post-implantation Evaluation (LOVE) - standardized imaging proposal evaluating implanted left atrial appendage occlusion devices by cardiac computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnes, Michael; Akin, Ibrahim; Sartorius, Benjamin; Fastner, Christian; El-Battrawy, Ibrahim; Borggrefe, Martin; Haubenreisser, Holger; Meyer, Mathias; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Henzler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A standardized imaging proposal evaluating implanted left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion devices by cardiac computed tomography angiography (cCTA) has never been investigated. cCTA datasets were acquired on a 3 rd generation dual-source CT system and reconstructed with a slice thickness of 0.5 mm. An interdisciplinary evaluation was performed by two interventional cardiologists and one radiologist on a 3D multi-planar workstation. A standardized multi-planar reconstruction algorithm was developed in order to assess relevant clinical aspects of implanted LAA occlusion devices being outlined within a pictorial essay. The following clinical aspects of implanted LAA occlusion devices were evaluated within the most appropriate cCTA multi-planar reconstruction: (1) topography to neighboring structures, (2) peri-device leaks, (3) coverage of LAA lobes, (4) indirect signs of neo-endothelialization. These are illustrated within concise CT imaging examples emphasizing the potential value of the proposed cCTA imaging algorithm: Starting from anatomical cCTA planes and stepwise angulation planes perpendicular to the base of the LAA devices generates an optimal LAA Occluder View for post-implantation Evaluation (LOVE). Aligned true axial, sagittal and coronal LOVE planes offer a standardized and detailed evaluation of LAA occlusion devices after percutaneous implantation. This pictorial essay presents a standardized imaging proposal by cCTA using multi-planar reconstructions that enables systematical follow-up and comparison of patients after LAA occlusion device implantation. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12880-016-0127-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  12. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in carotid angioplasty and stenting with balloon embolic protection devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Fumio; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Sakaida, Hiroshi; Toma, Naoki; Matsushima, Satoshi; Kuraishi, Keita; Tanemura, Hiroshi; Miura, Yoichi; Taki, Waro; Maeda, Masayuki

    2006-01-01

    We compared the results of two procedures to protect against distal embolism caused by embolic debris from carotid angioplasty with stent deployment (CAS) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The study group comprised 39 men and 3 women (42 and 3 CAS procedures, respectively) with severe carotid stenosis (average age 70.0±6.6 years). During 20 CAS procedures the internal carotid artery was protected with a single balloon. A PercuSurge GuardWire was used for temporary occlusion. During 25 CAS procedures the internal and external carotid arteries were simultaneously temporarily occluded with a PercuSurge GuardWire and a Sentry balloon catheter, respectively. Diffusion-weighted MRI was performed 1 to 3 days after CAS. Data from 26 patients undergoing conventional angiography for diagnosis of cerebral ischemic disease, cerebral aneurysm or brain tumors were included as controls. Diffusion-weighted MRI after conventional diagnostic angiography showed ischemic spots in 3 of the 26 controls (11.5%). Ischemic spots were observed during 11 of 20 CAS procedures with the internal carotid artery protected with a single balloon (55.0%), and were observed during 9 of 25 CAS procedures with both the internal and external carotid arteries protected (36.0%). This difference was significant (P=0.0068). Ischemic lesions appeared not only ipsilateral to the carotid stenosis but also in the contralateral carotid artery (31.9%) and vertebrobasilar territory (25.3%). Better protection was obtained with simultaneous double occlusion of both the internal and external carotid artery than with single protection of the internal carotid artery during CAS. (orig.)

  13. Near Real-Time Georeference of Umanned Aerial Vehicle Images for Post-Earthquake Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Wang, X.; Dou, A.; Yuan, X.; Ding, L.; Ding, X.

    2018-04-01

    The rapid collection of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) remote sensing images plays an important role in the fast submitting disaster information and the monitored serious damaged objects after the earthquake. However, for hundreds of UAV images collected in one flight sortie, the traditional data processing methods are image stitching and three-dimensional reconstruction, which take one to several hours, and affect the speed of disaster response. If the manual searching method is employed, we will spend much more time to select the images and the find images do not have spatial reference. Therefore, a near-real-time rapid georeference method for UAV remote sensing disaster data is proposed in this paper. The UAV images are achieved georeference combined with the position and attitude data collected by UAV flight control system, and the georeferenced data is organized by means of world file which is developed by ESRI. The C # language is adopted to compile the UAV images rapid georeference software, combined with Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL). The result shows that it can realize rapid georeference of remote sensing disaster images for up to one thousand UAV images within one minute, and meets the demand of rapid disaster response, which is of great value in disaster emergency application.

  14. NEAR REAL-TIME GEOREFERENCE OF UMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE IMAGES FOR POST-EARTHQUAKE RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The rapid collection of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV remote sensing images plays an important role in the fast submitting disaster information and the monitored serious damaged objects after the earthquake. However, for hundreds of UAV images collected in one flight sortie, the traditional data processing methods are image stitching and three-dimensional reconstruction, which take one to several hours, and affect the speed of disaster response. If the manual searching method is employed, we will spend much more time to select the images and the find images do not have spatial reference. Therefore, a near-real-time rapid georeference method for UAV remote sensing disaster data is proposed in this paper. The UAV images are achieved georeference combined with the position and attitude data collected by UAV flight control system, and the georeferenced data is organized by means of world file which is developed by ESRI. The C # language is adopted to compile the UAV images rapid georeference software, combined with Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL. The result shows that it can realize rapid georeference of remote sensing disaster images for up to one thousand UAV images within one minute, and meets the demand of rapid disaster response, which is of great value in disaster emergency application.

  15. On-line fast response device and method for measuring dissolved gas in a fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutu, Narinder Kumar [Manorville, NY

    2011-01-11

    A method and device for the measurement of dissolved gas within a fluid. The fluid, substantially a liquid, is pumped into a pipe. The flow of the fluid is temporally restricted, creating one or more low pressure regions. A measurement indicative of trapped air is taken before and after the restriction. The amount of dissolved air is calculated from the difference between the first and second measurements. Preferably measurements indicative of trapped air is obtained from one or more pressure transducers, capacitance transducers, or combinations thereof. In the alternative, other methods such as those utilizing x-rays or gamma rays may also be used to detect trapped air. Preferably, the fluid is a hydraulic fluid, whereby dissolved air in the fluid is detected.

  16. Study of fish response using particle image velocimetry and high-speed, high-resolution imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gruensch, G. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Fish swimming has fascinated both engineers and fish biologists for decades. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging are recently developed analysis tools that can help engineers and biologists better understand how fish respond to turbulent environments. This report details studies to evaluate DPIV. The studies included a review of existing literature on DPIV, preliminary studies to test the feasibility of using DPIV conducted at our Flow Biology Laboratory in Richland, Washington September through December 2003, and applications of high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging with advanced motion analysis to investigations of fish injury mechanisms in turbulent shear flows and bead trajectories in laboratory physical models. Several conclusions were drawn based on these studies, which are summarized as recommendations for proposed research at the end of this report.

  17. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements using microlens array and area imaging devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merk, Susanne; Lietz, Achim; Kroner, Margareta; Valler, Martin; Heilker, Ralf

    2004-02-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) assay formats are frequently used technologies in high-throughput screening. In this article, we have characterised the novel Plate::Vision(2) 96-microlens array reader (Carl Zeiss Jena GmbH, Germany) and compared it to the novel LEADseeker Generation IV multimodality imaging system (LEADseeker Gen IV; Amersham Biosciences UK Ltd., UK) for applications in the TRF mode. In europium measurements using the TRF mode, the Plate::Vision displayed a limit of detection for europium of approximately 3 pM, which was comparable to two established TRF readers, the Discovery and the Victor V (both PerkinElmer Life Sciences Inc., USA). The LEADseeker's limit of detection only extended down to europium concentrations of approximately 10 pM in these experiments. For TRF resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) experiments, a europium-biotin (Eu-biotin) conjugate was titrated with a streptavidin-allophycocyanin (SA-APC) conjugate. The Plate::Vision produced Z' values larger than 0.5 for the acceptor fluorophor emission with concentrations of Eu-biotin as low as 3 nM combined with 175 pM SA-APC. To achieve Z' values of at least 0.5 with the LEADseeker, concentrations of 10 nM Eu-biotin combined with SA-APC of at least 0.8 nM were required. In a drug screening application using TR-FRET, the energy transfer from a europium-labelled protein X (Eu-protein X) to a complex of biotinylated peptide Y with SA-APC was measured. Using the Plate::Vision, a Z' factor larger than 0.5 for the acceptor fluorophor emission was only obtained for a Eu-protein X concentration of at least 10 nM in combination with biotinylated peptide Y/SA-APC at saturating concentrations. Both the Plate::Vision and the LEADseeker show good quality results for applications in the TRF mode and enable an increased throughput based on their shortened measurement time in comparison to classic photomultiplier tube-based readers.

  18. Thermal Response of In Vivo Human Skin to Fractional Radiofrequency Microneedle Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woraphong Manuskiatti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fractional radiofrequency microneedle system (FRMS is a novel fractional skin resurfacing system. Data on thermal response to this fractional resurfacing technique is limited. Objectives. To investigate histologic response of in vivo human skin to varying energy settings and pulse stacking of a FRMS in dark-skinned subjects. Methods. Two female volunteers who were scheduled for abdominoplasty received treatment with a FRMS with varying energy settings at 6 time periods including 3 months, 1 month, 1 week, 3 days, 1 day, and the time immediately before abdominoplasty. Biopsy specimens were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E, Verhoeff-Van Gieson (VVG, colloidal iron, and Fontana-Masson stain. Immunohistochemical study was performed by using Heat Shock Protein 70 (HSP70 antibody and collagen III monoclonal antibody. Results. The average depth of radiofrequency thermal zone (RFTZ ranged from 100 to 300 μm, correlating with energy levels. Columns of cell necrosis and collagen denaturation followed by inflammatory response were initially demonstrated, with subsequent increasing of mucin at 1 and 3 months after treatment. Immunohistochemical study showed positive stain with HSP70. Conclusion. A single treatment with a FRMS using appropriate energy setting induces neocollagenesis. This wound healing response may serve as a mean to improve the appearance of photodamaged skin and atrophic scars.

  19. Biological in situ Dose Painting for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Using Drug-Loaded Implantable Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormack, Robert A.; Sridhar, Srinivas; Suh, W. Warren; D'Amico, Anthony V.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Implantable devices routinely used for increasing spatial accuracy in modern image-guided radiation treatments (IGRT), such as fiducials or brachytherapy spacers, encompass the potential for in situ release of biologically active drugs, providing an opportunity to enhance the therapeutic ratio. We model this new approach for two types of treatment. Methods and Materials: Radiopaque fiducials used in IGRT, or prostate brachytherapy spacers ('eluters'), were assumed to be loaded with radiosensitizer for in situ drug slow release. An analytic function describing the concentration of radiosensitizer versus distance from eluters, depending on diffusion-elimination properties of the drug in tissue, was developed. Tumor coverage by the drug was modeled for tumors typical of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy treatments for various eluter dimensions and drug properties. Six prostate 125 I brachytherapy cases were analyzed by assuming implantation of drug-loaded spacers. Radiosensitizer-induced subvolume boost was simulated from which biologically effective doses for typical radiosensitizers were calculated in one example. Results: Drug distributions from three-dimensional arrangements of drug eluters versus eluter size and drug properties were tabulated. Four radiosensitizer-loaded fiducials provide adequate radiosensitization for ∼4-cm-diameter lung tumors, thus potentially boosting biologically equivalent doses in centrally located stereotactic body treated lesions. Similarly, multiple drug-loaded spacers provide prostate brachytherapy with flexible shaping of 'biologically equivalent doses' to fit requirements difficult to meet by using radiation alone, e.g., boosting a high-risk region juxtaposed to the urethra while respecting normal tissue tolerance of both the urethra and the rectum. Conclusions: Drug loading of implantable devices routinely used in IGRT provides new opportunities for therapy modulation via biological in situ dose painting.

  20. Spectral Imaging by Upconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to obtain spectrally resolved images using upconversion. By this method an image is spectrally shifted from one spectral region to another wavelength. Since the process is spectrally sensitive it allows for a tailored spectral response. We believe this will allow standard...... silicon based cameras designed for visible/near infrared radiation to be used for spectral images in the mid infrared. This can lead to much lower costs for such imaging devices, and a better performance....

  1. Two-dimensional exit dosimetry using a liquid-filled electronic portal imaging device and a convolution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boellaard, Ronald; Herk, Marcel van; Uiterwaal, Hans; Mijnheer, Ben

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the accuracy of two-dimensional exit dose measurements with an electronic portal imaging device, EPID, using a convolution model for a variety of clinically relevant situations. Materials and methods: Exit doses were derived from portal dose images, obtained with a liquid-filled EPID at distances of 50 cm or more behind the patient, by using a convolution model. The resulting on- and off-axis exit dose values were first compared with ionization chamber exit dose measurements for homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms in open and wedged 4,8 and 18 MV photon beams. The accuracy of the EPID exit dose measurements was then determined for a number of anthropomorphic phantoms (lung and larynx) irradiated under clinical conditions and for a few patients treated in an 8 MV beam. The latter results were compared with in vivo exit dose measurements using diodes. Results: The exit dose can be determined from portal images with an accuracy of 1.2% (1 SD) compared with ionization chamber measurements for open beams and homogeneous phantoms at all tested beam qualities. In the presence of wedges and for inhomogeneous phantoms the average relative accuracy slightly deteriorated to 1.7% (1 SD). For lung phantoms in a 4 MV beam a similar accuracy was obtained after refinement of our convolution model, which requires knowledge of the patient contour. Differences between diode and EPID exit dose measurements for an anthropomorphic lung phantom in an 8 MV beam were 2.5% at most, with an average agreement within 1% (1 SD). For larynx phantoms in a 4 MV beam exit doses obtained with an ionization chamber and EPID agreed within 1.5% (1 SD). Finally, exit doses in a few patients irradiated in an 8 MV beam could be determined with the EPID with an accuracy of 1.1% (1 SD) relative to exit dose measurements using diodes. Conclusions: Portal images, obtained with our EPID and analyzed with our convolution model, can be used to determine the exit dose

  2. Multi-modality imaging of tumor phenotype and response to therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyflot, Matthew J.

    2011-12-01

    Imaging and radiation oncology have historically been closely linked. However, the vast majority of techniques used in the clinic involve anatomical imaging. Biological imaging offers the potential for innovation in the areas of cancer diagnosis and staging, radiotherapy target definition, and treatment response assessment. Some relevant imaging techniques are FDG PET (for imaging cellular metabolism), FLT PET (proliferation), CuATSM PET (hypoxia), and contrast-enhanced CT (vasculature and perfusion). Here, a technique for quantitative spatial correlation of tumor phenotype is presented for FDG PET, FLT PET, and CuATSM PET images. Additionally, multimodality imaging of treatment response with FLT PET, CuATSM, and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is presented, in a trial of patients receiving an antiangiogenic agent (Avastin) combined with cisplatin and radiotherapy. Results are also presented for translational applications in animal models, including quantitative assessment of proliferative response to cetuximab with FLT PET and quantification of vascular volume with a blood-pool contrast agent (Fenestra). These techniques have clear applications to radiobiological research and optimized treatment strategies, and may eventually be used for personalized therapy for patients.

  3. Research of the system response of neutron double scatter imaging for MLEM reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, M., E-mail: wyj2013@163.com [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi’an 710024 (China); State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Radiation-Simulation and Effect, Xi’an 710024 (China); Peng, B.D.; Sheng, L.; Li, K.N.; Zhang, X.P.; Li, Y.; Li, B.K.; Yuan, Y.; Wang, P.W.; Zhang, X.D.; Li, C.H. [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi’an 710024 (China); State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Radiation-Simulation and Effect, Xi’an 710024 (China)

    2015-03-01

    A Maximum Likelihood image reconstruction technique has been applied to neutron scatter imaging. The response function of the imaging system can be obtained by Monte Carlo simulation, which is very time-consuming if the number of image pixels and particles is large. In this work, to improve time efficiency, an analytical approach based on the probability of neutron interaction and transport in the detector is developed to calculate the system response function. The response function was applied to calculate the relative efficiency of the neutron scatter imaging system as a function of the incident neutron energy. The calculated results agreed with simulations by the MCNP5 software. Then the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstruction method with the system response function was used to reconstruct data simulated by Monte Carlo method. The results showed that there was good consistency between the reconstruction position and true position. Compared with back-projection reconstruction, the improvement in