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Sample records for response grows unbounded

  1. Stability of abstract nonlinear nonautonomous differential-delay equations with unbounded history-responsive operators

    Gil', M. I.

    2005-08-01

    We consider a class of nonautonomous functional-differential equations in a Banach space with unbounded nonlinear history-responsive operators, which have the local Lipshitz property. Conditions for the boundedness of solutions, Lyapunov stability, absolute stability and input-output one are established. Our approach is based on a combined usage of properties of sectorial operators and spectral properties of commuting operators.

  2. Response of growing bones to irradiation

    Gonzalez Gonzalez, D.

    1980-01-01

    This thesis describes the effects of ionizing radiations on growing bones. The epiphyseal disc of growing mouse tibia was selected as a model for the experiments. An attempt has been made to obtain clinical data from irradiated bones during the childhood and to quantitate this information. Within the range of possibilities correlations have been established between the experimental and clinical data. (Auth.)

  3. Growth, haematological and biochemical responses of growing ...

    p2492989

    Abstract. Physiological and productive responses to recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) injection and calcium soap of fatty acids (CSFA) supplementation were studied in post-weaning male Rahmani lambs. Male lambs (n = 20) of similar initial body weight (27.9 kg) and age (162 d) were divided randomly into four.

  4. Multifraction dose response of growing and resting phase hair follicles

    Vegesna, V.; Withers, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    It has been established in both the clinic and the laboratory that there is a differentiation response to changes in dose per fraction in early and late responding tissues. To study one possible biological reason for differences in early and late responses. The authors selected one kind of cellular entity, the hair follicle, in two different phases of mitotic activity. The follicles are usually in a resting phase (7-12 wks), but mitotic activity can be initiated by plucking the club hairs. This was done on one half of the thorax and then exposing mice to doses of radiation (cesium gamma-ray). Dose responses for epilation between growing (early) and resting (late) follicles were compared for the same mouse. The fractionated response was studied by reducing the dose down to 2.5 Gy/fx. As the literature suggests, the total dose tolerated by a resting (late) follicle increased more than that for a growing (early) follicle

  5. Population level response of downy brome to soil growing medium

    Downy brome (Bromus tectorum) is the most ubiquitous exotic invasive weed in the Intermountain West. A major issue for management is the extreme generalist plastic nature of downy brome. We hypothesized that soil growing medium would effect all measured response variables representing some degree of...

  6. Dynamical decoupling of unbounded Hamiltonians

    Arenz, Christian; Burgarth, Daniel; Facchi, Paolo; Hillier, Robin

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the possibility to suppress interactions between a finite dimensional system and an infinite dimensional environment through a fast sequence of unitary kicks on the finite dimensional system. This method, called dynamical decoupling, is known to work for bounded interactions, but physical environments such as bosonic heat baths are usually modeled with unbounded interactions; hence, here, we initiate a systematic study of dynamical decoupling for unbounded operators. We develop a sufficient decoupling criterion for arbitrary Hamiltonians and a necessary decoupling criterion for semibounded Hamiltonians. We give examples for unbounded Hamiltonians where decoupling works and the limiting evolution as well as the convergence speed can be explicitly computed. We show that decoupling does not always work for unbounded interactions and we provide both physically and mathematically motivated examples.

  7. On some classes of unbounded commutants of unbounded operator families

    Shabani, J.

    1985-08-01

    We consider some classes of unbounded commutants and bicommutants and we investigate their behaviour with respect to the quasi weak* topology which seems to play here the role of the weak topology for bounded operators. In particular we give some sufficient conditions in order that the bicommutants be the quasi weak* closure of the original set of operators. (author)

  8. Computation as an Unbounded Process

    van Leeuwen, J.; Wiedermann, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 429, 20 April (2012), s. 202-212 ISSN 0304-3975 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP202/10/1333 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : arithmetical hierarchy * hypercomputation * mind change complexity * nondeterminism * relativistic computation * unbounded computation Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 0.489, year: 2012

  9. Individual responses of growing pigs to threonine intake

    Renan Di Giovanni Isola

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A nitrogen balance test was performed to evaluate the individual responses of growing pigs to threonine intake. Eight commercial barrows were used (body weight ranging from 15 to 20 kg. A dose-response study was performed, in which the threonine supply increased in seven equidistant steps (the seven dietary threonine levels ranged from 50 to 120% of the requirements every three days for each pig. The levels of all other amino acids were 20% higher than the tested amino acid. Nitrogen retention as a function of threonine intake was calculated per individual and per group (NLIN and NLMixed, respectively using a linear plateau model. The highest break point value was 42.42 g of threonine intake (the most demanding individual, whereas the lowest value was 34.16 g (the least demanding individual, corresponding to a difference of 19%. In terms of N retention, the highest plateau value was 66.71 g and the lowest was 49.48 g, with a difference of 25%. There was no significant correlation between slope and plateau values or between slope and break point values. When using the model in which all parameters were random effects, the variations in threonine intake and nitrogen retention were 1.68±1.30 and 0.01±0.10 g, respectively, and no variance in the slope of the curve was detected. The average daily threonine intake values for the maximum response obtained in the group, as calculated by the NLIN and NLMixed procedures, were 13.96 and 14.02 g/day, respectively. The threonine intake for the maximum N retention between individuals ranged from 34.16 to 42.42 g, corresponding to a difference of 19%. The current recommended intake to optimize N retention is 14.02 g/day. The group responses obtained by the NLMixed procedures are very similar to those estimated by the NLIN procedure (all individuals.

  10. Responses of Calathea species in different growing media ...

    ... substrate of top soil and poultry manure mixtures. Although C.nigerica produced higher number of leaves and taller plants than C. zebrina, the latter may be preferred because of its more attractive leaves and its many plantlets that quickly fill the growing container. Key words: growth , container, media, Calathea Species.

  11. Bubbling in unbounded coflowing liquids.

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M; Herrada, Miguel A; Garstecki, Piotr

    2006-03-31

    An investigation of the stability of low density and viscosity fluid jets and spouts in unbounded coflowing liquids is presented. A full parametrical analysis from low to high Weber and Reynolds numbers shows that the presence of any fluid of finite density and viscosity inside the hollow jet elicits a transition from an absolute to a convective instability at a finite value of the Weber number, for any value of the Reynolds number. Below that critical value of the Weber number, the absolute character of the instability leads to local breakup, and consequently to local bubbling. Experimental data support our model.

  12. Learning and Growing: Trust, Leadership, and Response to Crisis

    Sutherland, Ian E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of trust in a school community related to the leadership response to crisis. Design/Methodology/Approach: This study was a multiple-source qualitative study of a single case of a PreK-12 international school called The Learning School. Findings: The findings revealed the nature of how…

  13. Unbound particles in dark matter halos

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Loeb, Abraham; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2013-06-13

    We investigate unbound dark matter particles in halos by tracing particle trajectories in a simulation run to the far future (a = 100). We find that the traditional sum of kinetic and potential energies is a very poor predictor of which dark matter particles will eventually become unbound from halos. We also study the mass fraction of unbound particles, which increases strongly towards the edges of halos, and decreases significantly at higher redshifts. We discuss implications for dark matter detection experiments, precision calibrations of the halo mass function, the use of baryon fractions to constrain dark energy, and searches for intergalactic supernovae.

  14. The damped wave equation with unbounded damping

    Freitas, P.; Siegl, Petr; Tretter, C.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 264, č. 12 (2018), s. 7023-7054 ISSN 0022-0396 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : damped wave equation * unbounded damping * essential spectrum * quadratic operator funciton with unbounded coefficients * Schrodinger operators with complex potentials Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Atomic, molecular and chemical physics (physics of atoms and molecules including collision, interaction with radiation, magnetic resonances, Mössbauer effect) Impact factor: 1.988, year: 2016

  15. Remotely Sensed Northern Vegetation Response to Changing Climate: Growing Season and Productivity Perspective

    Ganguly, S.; Park, Taejin; Choi, Sungho; Bi, Jian; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Myneni, Ranga

    2016-01-01

    Vegetation growing season and maximum photosynthetic state determine spatiotemporal variability of seasonal total gross primary productivity of vegetation. Recent warming induced impacts accelerate shifts on growing season and physiological status over Northern vegetated land. Thus, understanding and quantifying these changes are very important. Here, we first investigate how vegetation growing season and maximum photosynthesis state are evolved and how such components contribute on inter-annual variation of seasonal total gross primary productivity. Furthermore, seasonally different response of northern vegetation to changing temperature and water availability is also investigated. We utilized both long-term remotely sensed data to extract larger scale growing season metrics (growing season start, end and duration) and productivity (i.e., growing season summed vegetation index, GSSVI) for answering these questions. We find that regionally diverged growing season shift and maximum photosynthetic state contribute differently characterized productivity inter-annual variability and trend. Also seasonally different response of vegetation gives different view of spatially varying interaction between vegetation and climate. These results highlight spatially and temporally varying vegetation dynamics and are reflective of biome-specific responses of northern vegetation to changing climate.

  16. Locally Perturbed Random Walks with Unbounded Jumps

    Paulin, Daniel; Szász, Domokos

    2010-01-01

    In \\cite{SzT}, D. Sz\\'asz and A. Telcs have shown that for the diffusively scaled, simple symmetric random walk, weak convergence to the Brownian motion holds even in the case of local impurities if $d \\ge 2$. The extension of their result to finite range random walks is straightforward. Here, however, we are interested in the situation when the random walk has unbounded range. Concretely we generalize the statement of \\cite{SzT} to unbounded random walks whose jump distribution belongs to th...

  17. Ideals in algebras of unbounded operators

    Timmermann, W.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents a continuation of investigations on ideals in algebras of unbounded operators. A general procedure is given to get ideals in L + (D) starting with ideals in B(H). A definition of the two types of ideals is given: one contains only bounded operators, the other involves both bounded and unbounded operators. Some algebraic properties of ideals Ssub(phi)(D) derived from the well-known symmetrically normed ideals Ssub(phi) are investigated. Topologies in such ideals are introduced, and some results connected with topological properties of these ideals are given

  18. Characterization of Unbound Granular Materials for Pavements

    Araya, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    This research is focused on the characterization of the mechanical behavior of unbound granular road base materials (UGMs). An extensive laboratory investigation is described, in which various methods for determination of the mechanical properties of granular materials are examined for their

  19. States on algebras of unbounded operators

    Timmermann, W.

    1985-01-01

    There are reviewed some of the fundamental results on normal states on algebras of unbounded operators. It is ndicated how these results are related with ideal theory. Few known facts concerning perturbation of normal states are included. There are contained some new results on singular states

  20. Verification of Software Components: Addressing Unbounded Paralelism

    Adámek, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2007), s. 300-309 ISSN 1525-9293 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400300504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : software components * formal verification * unbounded parallelism Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software

  1. Statistical mechanics of systems of unbounded spins

    Lebowitz, J L [Yeshiva Univ., New York (USA). Belfer Graduate School of Science; Presutti, E [L' Aquila Univ. (Italy). Istituto di Matematica

    1976-11-01

    We develop the statistical mechanics of unbounded n-component spin systems interacting via potentials which are superstable and strongly tempered. The uniqueness of the equilibrium state is then proven for one component ferromagnetic spins whose free energy is differentiable with respect to the magnetic field.

  2. The divergence theorem for unbounded vector fields

    De Pauw, Thierry; Pfeffer, Washek F.

    2007-01-01

    In the context of Lebesgue integration, we derive the divergence theorem for unbounded vector. elds that can have singularities at every point of a compact set whose Minkowski content of codimension greater than two is. nite. The resulting integration by parts theorem is applied to removable sets of holomorphic and harmonic functions.

  3. Measuring Risk When Expected Losses Are Unbounded

    Alejandro Balbás

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new method to introduce coherent risk measures for risks with infinite expectation, such as those characterized by some Pareto distributions. Extensions of the conditional value at risk, the weighted conditional value at risk and other examples are given. Actuarial applications are analyzed, such as extensions of the expected value premium principle when expected losses are unbounded.

  4. Differential Macrophage Response to Slow- and Fast-Growing Pathogenic Mycobacteria

    A. Cecilia Helguera-Repetto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM have recently been recognized as important species that cause disease even in immunocompetent individuals. The mechanisms that these species use to infect and persist inside macrophages are not well characterised. To gain insight concerning this process we used THP-1 macrophages infected with M. abscessus, M. fortuitum, M. celatum, and M. tuberculosis. Our results showed that slow-growing mycobacteria gained entrance into these cells with more efficiency than fast-growing mycobacteria. We have also demonstrated that viable slow-growing M. celatum persisted inside macrophages without causing cell damage and without inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS, as M. tuberculosis caused. In contrast, fast-growing mycobacteria destroyed the cells and induced high levels of ROS. Additionally, the macrophage cytokine pattern induced by M. celatum was different from the one induced by either M. tuberculosis or fast-growing mycobacteria. Our results also suggest that, in some cases, the intracellular survival of mycobacteria and the immune response that they induce in macrophages could be related to their growth rate. In addition, the modulation of macrophage cytokine production, caused by M. celatum, might be a novel immune-evasion strategy used to survive inside macrophages that is different from the one reported for M. tuberculosis.

  5. High order Poisson Solver for unbounded flows

    Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Chatelain, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a high order method for solving the unbounded Poisson equation on a regular mesh using a Green’s function solution. The high order convergence was achieved by formulating mollified integration kernels, that were derived from a filter regularisation of the solution field....... The method was implemented on a rectangular domain using fast Fourier transforms (FFT) to increase computational efficiency. The Poisson solver was extended to directly solve the derivatives of the solution. This is achieved either by including the differential operator in the integration kernel...... the equations of fluid mechanics as an example, but can be used in many physical problems to solve the Poisson equation on a rectangular unbounded domain. For the two-dimensional case we propose an infinitely smooth test function which allows for arbitrary high order convergence. Using Gaussian smoothing...

  6. The damped wave equation with unbounded damping

    Freitas, Pedro; Siegl, Petr; Tretter, Christiane

    2018-06-01

    We analyze new phenomena arising in linear damped wave equations on unbounded domains when the damping is allowed to become unbounded at infinity. We prove the generation of a contraction semigroup, study the relation between the spectra of the semigroup generator and the associated quadratic operator function, the convergence of non-real eigenvalues in the asymptotic regime of diverging damping on a subdomain, and we investigate the appearance of essential spectrum on the negative real axis. We further show that the presence of the latter prevents exponential estimates for the semigroup and turns out to be a robust effect that cannot be easily canceled by adding a positive potential. These analytic results are illustrated by examples.

  7. An LPS based method to stimulate the inflammatory response in growing rabbits

    C. Knudsen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Reliable indicators are needed to study the relationship between the inflammatory response of the growing rabbit and breeding factors such as feeding practices. A lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation of the inflammatory response is a valid model of bacterial infection in laboratory animals, but no data on the growing rabbit has yet been obtained. The aim of our study was to determine an adequate dose of LPS to inject in growing rabbits in order to elicit a measurable inflammatory response in terms of plasmatic TNF-α and rise in rectal temperature. Three trials were carried out in this study: 2 development trials, the first (n=18 testing 3 doses of LPS (2, 10, 50 μg/kg on the plasmatic TNF-α concentration at 90 and 180 min post injection, and the second trial (n=36 testing 4 doses of LPS (50, 75, 100 and 150 μg/kg on the TNF-α concentration 90 min post injection and the rectal temperature. The third trial was designed as an application of the method in a large number of animals (n=32 to study the effect of feed restriction and dietary increase in digestible fibre to starch ratio on the LPS inflammatory challenge response of growing rabbits. In development trials 1 and 2, animals had measurable TNF-α responses for doses higher than 10 μg/kg at 90 min post injection, with an increase in the number of responsive animals along with the dose. High variability was observed in TNF-α concentrations in responsive animals (coefficient of variation from 44 to 94%. Animals demonstrated an increase in rectal temperature for all doses injected in the range of 50-150 μg/kg from 90 min post injection with a peak at 180 min (ΔTr =1.9±0.7°C. Our observations led us to choose a dose of 100 μg/kg of LPS for our following studies, as the responses in terms of temperature and TNF-α were the most satisfactory. The application of our LPS injection protocol to our nutritional study enabled us to validate our protocol (ΔTr =1.1±0.7°C at 180 min and 15

  8. Embedded Fibre Bragg Grating Sensor Response Model: Crack Growing Detection in Fibre Reinforced Plastic Materials

    Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard; McGugan, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a novel method to simulate the sensor output response of a Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor when embedded in a host material (Composite material or adhesive), during a crack growing/damage event. A finite element model of the crack growth mechanisms was developed, and differ...... the applicability of this technique to more complicated structures, and to be used as a structural health monitoring design tool....

  9. Metabolomic response of Calotropis procera growing in the desert to changes in water availability.

    Ramadan, Ahmed; Sabir, Jamal S M; Alakilli, Saleha Y M; Shokry, Ahmed M; Gadalla, Nour O; Edris, Sherif; Al-Kordy, Magdy A; Al-Zahrani, Hassan S; El-Domyati, Fotouh M; Bahieldin, Ahmed; Baker, Neil R; Willmitzer, Lothar; Irgang, Susann

    2014-01-01

    Water availability is a major limitation for agricultural productivity. Plants growing in severe arid climates such as deserts provide tools for studying plant growth and performance under extreme drought conditions. The perennial species Calotropis procera used in this study is a shrub growing in many arid areas which has an exceptional ability to adapt and be productive in severe arid conditions. We describe the results of studying the metabolomic response of wild C procera plants growing in the desert to a one time water supply. Leaves of C. procera plants were taken at three time points before and 1 hour, 6 hours and 12 hours after watering and subjected to a metabolomics and lipidomics analysis. Analysis of the data reveals that within one hour after watering C. procera has already responded on the metabolic level to the sudden water availability as evidenced by major changes such as increased levels of most amino acids, a decrease in sucrose, raffinose and maltitol, a decrease in storage lipids (triacylglycerols) and an increase in membrane lipids including photosynthetic membranes. These changes still prevail at the 6 hour time point after watering however 12 hours after watering the metabolomics data are essentially indistinguishable from the prewatering state thus demonstrating not only a rapid response to water availability but also a rapid response to loss of water. Taken together these data suggest that the ability of C. procera to survive under the very harsh drought conditions prevailing in the desert might be associated with its rapid adjustments to water availability and losses.

  10. Unbound Bilirubin and Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder in Late Preterm and Term Infants with Severe Jaundice.

    Amin, Sanjiv B; Wang, Hongyue; Laroia, Nirupama; Orlando, Mark

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluates whether unbound bilirubin is a better predictor of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) than total serum bilirubin (TSB) or the bilirubin:albumin molar ratio (BAMR) in late preterm and term neonates with severe jaundice (TSB ≥20 mg/dL or TSB that met exchange transfusion criteria). Infants ≥34 weeks' gestation with severe jaundice during the first 2 weeks of life were eligible for the prospective observational study. A comprehensive auditory evaluation was performed within 72 hours of peak TSB. ANSD was defined as absent or abnormal auditory brainstem evoked response waveform morphology at 80-decibel click intensity in the presence of normal outer hair cell function. TSB, serum albumin, and unbound bilirubin were measured using the colorimetric, bromocresol green, and modified peroxidase method, respectively. Five of 44 infants developed ANSD. By logistic regression, peak unbound bilirubin but not peak TSB or peak BAMR was associated with ANSD (OR, 4.6; 95% CI, 1.6-13.5; P = .002). On comparing receiver operating characteristic curves, the area under the curve for unbound bilirubin (0.92) was significantly greater (P = .04) compared with the area under the curve for TSB (0.50) or BAMR (0.62). Unbound bilirubin is a more sensitive and specific predictor of ANSD than TSB or BAMR in late preterm and term infants with severe jaundice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Numerical model for the analysis of unbounded prestressed structures using the hybrid type finite element method

    Barbieri, R.A.; Gastal, F.P.S.L.; Filho, A.C.

    2005-01-01

    Unbounded prestressed concrete has a growing importance all over the world and may be an useful technique for the structures involved in the construction of nuclear facilities. The absence of bonding means no strain compatibility so that equations developed for reinforced concrete are no longer valid. Practical estimates about the ultimate stress in the unbounded tendons may be obtained with empirical or numerical methods only. In order to contribute to the understanding on the behaviour of unbounded prestressed concrete members, a numerical model has been developed using a hybrid type finite element formulation for planar frame structures. Instead of short elements, as in the conventional finite element formulation, long elements may be used, improving computational efficiency. A further advantage is that the curvature variation within the element is obtained with higher accuracy if compared to the traditional formulation. This feature is important for unbounded tendons since its stresses depend on the whole member deformation. Second order effects in the planar frame are considered with either Updated or Partially Updated Lagrangian approaches. Instantaneous and time dependent behaviour as well as cyclic loads are considered too. Comparison with experimental results for prestressed concrete beams shows the adequacy of the proposed model. (authors)

  12. Domain decomposition method for solving elliptic problems in unbounded domains

    Khoromskij, B.N.; Mazurkevich, G.E.; Zhidkov, E.P.

    1991-01-01

    Computational aspects of the box domain decomposition (DD) method for solving boundary value problems in an unbounded domain are discussed. A new variant of the DD-method for elliptic problems in unbounded domains is suggested. It is based on the partitioning of an unbounded domain adapted to the given asymptotic decay of an unknown function at infinity. The comparison of computational expenditures is given for boundary integral method and the suggested DD-algorithm. 29 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  13. Analysis of unbounded operators and random motion

    Jorgensen, Palle E. T.

    2009-01-01

    We study infinite weighted graphs with view to 'limits at infinity' or boundaries at infinity. Examples of such weighted graphs arise in infinite (in practice, that means 'very' large) networks of resistors or in statistical mechanics models for classical or quantum systems. However, more generally, our analysis includes reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces and associated operators on them. If X is some infinite set of vertices or nodes, in applications the essential ingredient going into the definition is a reproducing kernel Hilbert space; it measures the differences of functions on X evaluated on pairs of points in X. Moreover, the Hilbert norm-squared in H(X) will represent a suitable measure of energy. Associated unbounded operators will define a notion or dissipation, it can be a graph Laplacian or a more abstract unbounded Hermitian operator defined from the reproducing kernel Hilbert space under study. We prove that there are two closed subspaces in reproducing kernel Hilbert space H(X) that measure quantitative notions of limits at infinity in X: one generalizes finite-energy harmonic functions in H(X) and the other a deficiency index of a natural operator in H(X) associated directly with the diffusion. We establish these results in the abstract, and we offer examples and applications. Our results are related to, but different from, potential theoretic notions of 'boundaries' in more standard random walk models. Comparisons are made.

  14. Propagator of a time-dependent unbound quadratic Hamiltonian system

    Yeon, K.H.; Kim, H.J.; Um, C.I.; George, T.F.; Pandey, L.N.

    1996-01-01

    The propagator for a time-dependent unbound quadratic Hamiltonian system is explicitly evaluated using the path integral method. Two time-invariant quantities of the system are found where these invariants determine whether or not the system is bound. Several examples are considered to illustrate that the propagator obtained for the unbound systems is correct

  15. Policy responses during the Trump administration to older people's growing economic risk exposure.

    Tolson, Michele E; Weller, Christian E

    2018-04-10

    Economic risk exposure through increased labor market volatility and growing caregiving responsibilities has risen for older Americans. At the same time, key protections such as unemployment insurance and Social Security have declined, while other protections-particularly in the private market-are limited or nonexistent. Social policy can lower the chance of risk exposure and the associated costs, especially with respect to unemployment and caregiving. In virtually all instances, however, the Trump administration has already moved to weaken existing protections. And it has offered either no proposals or very limited proposals to increase protections in the private sector As a result, an aging population will increasingly face rising economic risks on their own.

  16. Study of the unbound systems 16B and 13Be

    Lecouey, J.L.

    2002-12-01

    A description of a study of the neutron-rich unbound systems 16 B and 13 Be is presented. The structure of these nuclei provides strong constraints on current models and vital information for a three-body description of the Borromean two-neutron halo nuclei 17 B and 14 Be. The experimental work was undertaken at GANIL. Single-proton removal reactions were employed to populate the nuclei of interest, starting with a secondary beam of 17 C at 35 MeV/nucleon (for 16 B) and 14 B at 41 MeV/nucleon (for 13 Be). The charged fragments were detected using a position-sensitive Si-Si-CsI telescope of the CHARISSA collaboration, and the neutron using the DEMON modular array. The decay energy spectra for 16 B and 13 Be were thus reconstructed from the measured 15 B-n and 12 Be-n coincidences. A theoretical description, based on the sudden approximation, of the population of unbound final states was developed. The predicted decay energy spectra were compared with the measurements after folding in the response of the experimental setup. This involved the use of simulations based on GEANT and a code, BELZEBUTH, developed specifically for the present work. In the case of 15 B+n the data were best reproduced assuming the population of a narrow (Γ ≤ 100 keV), low-lying (E r = 85 keV) d-wave resonance(s). The 12 Be+n data were consistent with the population of a very broad (Γ ≅ 1-2 MeV) s-wave state at around 600-800 keV and a d-wave resonance at 2.5 MeV (Γ ∼ 400 keV). (author)

  17. World oil demand's shift toward faster growing and less price-responsive products and regions

    Dargay, Joyce M.; Gately, Dermot

    2010-01-01

    Using data for 1971-2008, we estimate the effects of changes in price and income on world oil demand, disaggregated by product - transport oil, fuel oil (residual and heating oil), and other oil - for six groups of countries. Most of the demand reductions since 1973-74 were due to fuel-switching away from fuel oil, especially in the OECD; in addition, the collapse of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) reduced their oil consumption substantially. Demand for transport and other oil was much less price-responsive, and has grown almost as rapidly as income, especially outside the OECD and FSU. World oil demand has shifted toward products and regions that are faster growing and less price-responsive. In contrast to projections to 2030 of declining per-capita demand for the world as a whole - by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), International Energy Agency (IEA) and OPEC - we project modest growth. Our projections for total world demand in 2030 are at least 20% higher than projections by those three institutions, using similar assumptions about income growth and oil prices, because we project rest-of-world growth that is consistent with historical patterns, in contrast to the dramatic slowdowns which they project. (author)

  18. Physiological responses of growing pigs to high ambient temperature and/or inflammatory challenges

    Paulo Henrique Reis Furtado Campos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Global warming is one of the major environmental threats facing the world in the 21st century. This fact will have a significant impact on pig production due to its direct effects on welfare, health, and performance of pigs. Besides, the effects of high temperatures will presumably become more important over the next decades due to the development of pig production in developing countries mainly located in tropical and subtropical areas, where animals are often exposed to ambient temperatures above their thermal comfort zone. Furthermore, pigs reared in tropical areas are often confronted to sanitary challenges including poor hygiene conditions, lack of respect for sanitary rules, and pathogens. This results in the stimulation of the immune system and, as a consequence, in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neuroendocrine adjustments that, in turn, usually have a negative impact on growth and feed efficiency. Although the effects of high ambient temperature and disease on pig physiology and performance have been well documented in literature, little is known about the associated effects of both factors. This understanding may contribute to a better quantification and comprehension of the physiological and metabolic disturbances occurring in practical conditions of pig production in tropical areas and, more generally, in many other geographic areas that will be influenced by the perspective of global warming. Therefore, the objective of this work is to provide an overview of recent research advances on the physiological responses of growing pigs during acclimation to high ambient temperature and on the potential effects of high ambient temperature on the ability of growing pigs to resist, cope with, or recover from an inflammatory challenge.

  19. Light unbound nuclear systems beyond the dripline

    Aksyutina, Yuliya

    2009-01-01

    Starting from the first observation of the halo phenomenon 20 years ago, more and more neutron-rich light nuclei were observed. The study of unstable nuclear systems beyond the dripline is a relatively new branch of nuclear physics. In the present work, the results of an experiment at GSI (Darmstadt) with relativistic beams of the halo nuclei 8 He, 11 Li and 14 Be with energies of 240, 280 and 305 MeV/nucleon, respectively, impinging on a liquid hydrogen target are discussed. Neutron/proton knockout reactions lead to the formation of unbound systems, followed by their immediate decay. The experimental setup, consisting of the neutron detector LAND, the dipole spectrometer ALADIN and different types of tracking detectors, allows the reconstruction of the momentum vectors of all reaction products measured in coincidence. The properties of unbound nuclei are investigated by reconstructing the relative-energy spectra as well as by studying the angular correlations between the reaction products. The observed systems are 9 He, 10 He, 10 Li, 12 Li and 13 Li. The isotopes 12 Li and 13 Li are observed for the first time. They are produced in the 1 H( 14 Be, 2pn) 12 Li and 1 H( 14 Be, 2p) 13 Li knockout reactions. The obtained relative-energy spectrum of 12 Li is described as a single virtual s-state with a scattering length of as = -13.7(1.6) fm. The spectrum of 13 Li is interpreted as a resonance at an energy of E r =1.47(13) MeV and a width of Γ ∼2 MeV superimposed on a broad correlated background distribution. The isotope 10 Li is observed after one-neutron knockout from the halo nucleus 11 Li. The obtained relative-energy spectrum is described by a low-lying virtual s-state with a scattering length a s =-22.4(4.8) fm and a p-wave resonance with E r =0.566(14) MeV and Γ=0.548(30) MeV, in agreement with previous experiments. The observation of the nucleus 8 He in coincidence with one or two neutrons, as a result of proton knockout from 11 Li, allows to reconstruct the

  20. Light unbound nuclear systems beyond the dripline

    Aksyutina, Yuliya

    2009-07-01

    Starting from the first observation of the halo phenomenon 20 years ago, more and more neutron-rich light nuclei were observed. The study of unstable nuclear systems beyond the dripline is a relatively new branch of nuclear physics. In the present work, the results of an experiment at GSI (Darmstadt) with relativistic beams of the halo nuclei {sup 8}He, {sup 11}Li and {sup 14}Be with energies of 240, 280 and 305 MeV/nucleon, respectively, impinging on a liquid hydrogen target are discussed. Neutron/proton knockout reactions lead to the formation of unbound systems, followed by their immediate decay. The experimental setup, consisting of the neutron detector LAND, the dipole spectrometer ALADIN and different types of tracking detectors, allows the reconstruction of the momentum vectors of all reaction products measured in coincidence. The properties of unbound nuclei are investigated by reconstructing the relative-energy spectra as well as by studying the angular correlations between the reaction products. The observed systems are {sup 9}He, {sup 10}He, {sup 10}Li, {sup 12}Li and {sup 13}Li. The isotopes {sup 12}Li and {sup 13}Li are observed for the first time. They are produced in the {sup 1}H({sup 14}Be, 2pn){sup 12}Li and {sup 1}H({sup 14}Be, 2p){sup 13}Li knockout reactions. The obtained relative-energy spectrum of {sup 12}Li is described as a single virtual s-state with a scattering length of as = -13.7(1.6) fm. The spectrum of {sup 13}Li is interpreted as a resonance at an energy of E{sub r}=1.47(13) MeV and a width of {gamma} {approx}2 MeV superimposed on a broad correlated background distribution. The isotope {sup 10}Li is observed after one-neutron knockout from the halo nucleus {sup 11}Li. The obtained relative-energy spectrum is described by a low-lying virtual s-state with a scattering length a{sub s}=-22.4(4.8) fm and a p-wave resonance with E{sub r}=0.566(14) MeV and {gamma}=0.548(30) MeV, in agreement with previous experiments. The observation of the

  1. Fast-growing Acer rubrum differs from slow-growing Quercus alba in leaf, xylem and hydraulic trait coordination responses to simulated acid rain.

    Medeiros, Juliana S; Tomeo, Nicholas J; Hewins, Charlotte R; Rosenthal, David M

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effects of historic soil chemistry changes associated with acid rain, i.e., reduced soil pH and a shift from nitrogen (N)- to phosphorus (P)-limitation, on the coordination of leaf water demand and xylem hydraulic supply traits in two co-occurring temperate tree species differing in growth rate. Using a full-factorial design (N × P × pH), we measured leaf nutrient content, water relations, leaf-level and canopy-level gas exchange, total biomass and allocation, as well as stem xylem anatomy and hydraulic function for greenhouse-grown saplings of fast-growing Acer rubrum (L.) and slow-growing Quercus alba (L.). We used principle component analysis to characterize trait coordination. We found that N-limitation, but not P-limitation, had a significant impact on plant water relations and hydraulic coordination of both species. Fast-growing A. rubrum made hydraulic adjustments in response to N-limitation, but trait coordination was variable within treatments and did not fully compensate for changing allocation across N-availability. For slow-growing Q. alba, N-limitation engendered more strict coordination of leaf and xylem traits, resulting in similar leaf water content and hydraulic function across all treatments. Finally, low pH reduced the propensity of both species to adjust leaf water relations and xylem anatomical traits in response to nutrient manipulations. Our data suggest that a shift from N- to P-limitation has had a negative impact on the water relations and hydraulic function of A. rubrum to a greater extent than for Q. alba We suggest that current expansion of A. rubrum populations could be tempered by acidic N-deposition, which may restrict it to more mesic microsites. The disruption of hydraulic acclimation and coordination at low pH is emphasized as an interesting area of future study. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Unbound color, prefaced by remarks on baryon spectroscopy

    Greenberg, O.W.

    Theoretical and experimental issues related to the possibility that color is unbound are surveyed. This implies that quarks, gluons and other particles carrying color can exist as isolated objects. It is surprisingly difficult to distinguish models with unbound color from those in which color is permanently confined. None-the-less, the present situation seems discouraging for unbound color because there is no unambiguous support for it and because the crucial prediction of formation of a colored gluon in e + e - collisions has been ruled out wherever sufficient data exists. The above survey is prefaced by remarks on the symmetric quark model for baryon spectroscopy

  3. Mutielemental concentration and physiological responses of Lavandula pedunculata growing in soils developed on different mine wastes.

    Santos, Erika S; Abreu, Maria Manuela; Saraiva, Jorge A

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to: i) evaluate the accumulation and translocation patterns of potentially hazardous elements into the Lavandula pedunculata and their influence in the concentrations of nutrients; and ii) compare some physiological responses associated with oxidative stress (concentration of chlorophylls (Chla, Chlb and total), carotenoids, and total protein) and several components involved in tolerance mechanisms (concentrations of proline and acid-soluble thiols and total/specific activity of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)), in plants growing in soils with a multielemental contamination and non-contaminated. Composite samples of soils, developed on mine wastes and/or host rocks, and L. pedunculata (roots and shoots) were collected in São Domingos mine (SE of Portugal) and in a reference area with non-contaminated soils, Corte do Pinto, with the same climatic conditions. São Domingos soils had high total concentrations of several hazardous elements (e.g. As and Pb) but their available fractions were small (mainly Lavandula pedunculata plants are able to survive in soils developed on different mine wastes with multielemental contamination and low fertility showing no symptoms (visible and physiological) of phytotoxicity or deficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The unbound isotopes He-9,He-10

    Jonson, B; Cortina-Gil, D; Simon, H; Emling, H; Nyman, G; Nilsson, T; Johansson, H T; Borge, M J G; Paschalis, S; Muenzenberg, G; Zhukov, M V; Weick, H; Pramanik, U Datta; LeBleis, T; Meister, M; Reifarth, R; Chulkov, L V; Lantz, M; Riisager, K; Mahata, K; Suemmerer, K; Langer, C; Chatillon, A; Richter, A; Kulessa, R; Palit, R; Aksyutina, Yu; Geissel, H; Aumann, T; Prokopowicz, W; Forssen, C; Ickert, G; Fynbo, H O U; Tengblad, O; Boretzky, K

    2010-01-01

    The unbound nuclei He-9 and He-10 have been produced in proton-knockout reactions from a 280 MeV/u Li-11 beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target at the ALADIN-LAND setup at GSI. Information on their nuclear structure has been obtained from the relative-energy spectra, He-8 + n and He-8 + 2n, employing reaction models incorporating the structure of Li-11. The (8H)e + n relative-energy spectrum is dominated by a strong peak-like structure at low energy, which may be interpreted within the effective-range approximation as the result of an s-wave interaction with a neutron scattering length of -3.17(66) fm. This spectrum also shows evidence for resonance states at 1.33(8) MeV and at 2.4 MeV above the He-8 + n threshold. It is argued that the s-state might not be the He-9 ground state. For He-8 + n + n, the analysis of the relative-energy spectrum gives two alternative possibilities for an interpretation: either a narrow resonance at 1.42(10) MeV (Gamma = 1.11(76) MeV) superimposed on a correlated background, o...

  5. Unbounded critical points for a class of lower semicontinuous functionals

    Pellacci, Benedetta; Squassina, Marco

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we prove existence and multiplicity results of unbounded critical points for a general class of weakly lower semicontinuous functionals. We will apply a suitable nonsmooth critical point theory.

  6. Risk Unbound: Threat, Catastrophe, and the End of Homeland Security

    2015-09-01

    October 10, 2010). 106 Percy Bysshe Shelley, Prometheus Unbound: A Lyrical Drama in Four Acts (London, UK: J.M Dent and Company, 1898), Act iii, Scene...make us safe. 156 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 157 LIST OF REFERENCES Acker, P., and C. Larrington. The Poetic Edda: Essays on...Brookhaven.” Paper. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2003. Percy Bysshe Shelley. Prometheus Unbound: A Lyrical Drama in Four Acts. London

  7. Unbound (bioavailable IGF1 enhances somatic growth

    Sebastien Elis

    2011-09-01

    Understanding insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1 biology is of particular importance because, apart from its role in mediating growth, it plays key roles in cellular transformation, organ regeneration, immune function, development of the musculoskeletal system and aging. IGF1 bioactivity is modulated by its binding to IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs and the acid labile subunit (ALS, which are present in serum and tissues. To determine whether IGF1 binding to IGFBPs is necessary to facilitate normal growth and development, we used a gene-targeting approach and generated two novel knock-in mouse models of mutated IGF1, in which the native Igf1 gene was replaced by Des-Igf1 (KID mice or R3-Igf1 (KIR mice. The KID and KIR mutant proteins have reduced affinity for the IGFBPs, and therefore present as unbound IGF1, or ‘free IGF1’. We found that both KID and KIR mice have reduced serum IGF1 levels and a concomitant increase in serum growth hormone levels. Ternary complex formation of IGF1 with the IGFBPs and the ALS was markedly reduced in sera from KID and KIR mice compared with wild type. Both mutant mice showed increased body weight, body and bone lengths, and relative lean mass. We found selective organomegaly of the spleen, kidneys and uterus, enhanced mammary gland complexity, and increased skeletal acquisition. The KID and KIR models show unequivocally that IGF1-complex formation with the IGFBPs is fundamental for establishing normal body and organ size, and that uncontrolled IGF bioactivity could lead to pathological conditions.

  8. Physiological response of Cistus monspeliensis L. growing in two mine areas of the Iberian Pyrite Belt

    Arenas Lago, Daniel; Carvalho, Luisa C.; Santos, Erika S.; Abreu, Maria Manuela; Andrade, María Luisa

    2015-04-01

    São Domingos and Lousal mines, nowadays in abandoned state, are located in Portugal, in the Iberian Pyrite Belt, a world-class volcanic-hosted massive sulfide. As a result of the intense mining activity large volumes of wastes containing metal(loid)s were partly exposed to weathering realising potential hazardous elements contaminating waters, soils and sediments. In both mines, a great part of the contaminated areas is relatively covered by several wild species. These species have developed mechanisms of response to oxidative stress originated by high concentration of metal(loid)s in plant tissues, whose presence leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species, thus causing oxidative damage. The main objective of this study was to evaluate changes in the ecophysiological behaviour of Cistus monspeliensis L., which grows spontaneously in both mine areas, in soils containing high concentrations of metal(loid)s. With this purpose, the variation of some physiological parameters was analysed in order to identify which parameters can be indicators of the plant'sresponse to oxidative stress. Representative soils from rhizosphere and plants were sampled, in the same locations, in different areas of São Domingos and Lousal mines and in an uncontaminated area nearby São Domingos. Soils were characterized for the classic properties. Multielemental total concentration was analysed in soils and plants (shoots and roots), and multielemental concentration in the available fraction of soils. Pigments (chlorophylls, anthocyanins and carotenoids), glutathione, ascorbate, H2O2 and antioxidative enzyme activities were measured in plant shoots. In general, total and available concentrations (mg/kg) of Zn (total 149-463; available 2-16), As (total 62-3030; available 0.03-1.9), Cd (total 0.3-1.2; available 0.01-0.05), Cu (total 79-375; available 0.8-10) and Pb (total 95-9210; available 0.2-40) are significantly higher in mine soils than in uncontaminated soils Zn (total 92

  9. The Growing Awareness Inventory: Building Capacity for Culturally Responsive Science and Mathematics with a Structured Observation Protocol

    Brown, Julie C.; Crippen, Kent J.

    2016-01-01

    This study represents a first iteration in the design process of the Growing Awareness Inventory (GAIn), a structured observation protocol for building the awareness of preservice teachers (PSTs) for resources in mathematics and science classrooms that can be used for culturally responsive pedagogy (CRP). The GAIn is designed to develop awareness…

  10. Growing the urban forest: tree performance in response to biotic and abiotic land management

    Emily E. Oldfield; Alexander J. Felson; D. S. Novem Auyeung; Thomas W. Crowther; Nancy F. Sonti; Yoshiki Harada; Daniel S. Maynard; Noah W. Sokol; Mark S. Ashton; Robert J. Warren; Richard A. Hallett; Mark A. Bradford

    2015-01-01

    Forests are vital components of the urban landscape because they provide ecosystem services such as carbon sequestration, storm-water mitigation, and air-quality improvement. To enhance these services, cities are investing in programs to create urban forests. A major unknown, however, is whether planted trees will grow into the mature, closed-canopied forest on which...

  11. The Aesthetics of Association: Business, Education, and the Growing Discourse of Corporate Social Responsibility

    Manteaw, Bob Offei

    2009-01-01

    The last few decades have seen an unprecedented transformation in business involvement in education, particularly in Western industrialized societies where privatization, commercialization and neo-liberal discourses continue to dominate educational thinking and practice. This paper foregrounds the growing perception of math and science as…

  12. Measurements and signification of unbound cortisol in plasma

    Heyns, W.; Coolens, J.L.; Van Baelen, H.; De Moor, P.

    1984-01-01

    It is generally accepted that transcortin-bound cortisol in plasma has no direct hormonal activity. For that reason unbound cortisol, rather than total cortisol will reflect hormonal impregnation. In this communication we present a method to calculate unbound cortisol from total cortisol and from the concentration of transcortin based on the binding equilibrium. The results of this technique correlate very well with those obtained by centrifugal ultrafiltration at 37 0 C (R=0.988, y=0.986+0.862xX; n=20) showing the validity of this technique. The diurnal variation of transcortin and of total or unbound cortisol was studied in normal adult volunteers. No diurnal variation was observed for transcortin and the concentration of this protein was identical in normal men [38.3+-3.1(SD)mg/l, n=17] and women (38.9+-4.6 mg/l; n=5) but markedly higher (89.9+-14.6 mg/l, n=9) in estrogen-treated women. As expected both total and unbound cortisol showed marked diurnal variation with relatively high levels at 8 AM (total cortisol 23.5+-2.7 μg% in men and 25.8+-6.1 μg% in women); unbound cortisol 2.3+-0.5 μg% in men; 3.0+-1.6 μg% in women) and low levels at 10 PM (total cortisol 4.9+-3.3 μg% in men, 5.7+-2.8 μg% in women; unbound cortisol 0.2+-0.1 μg% in men; 0.3+-0.1μg% in women). In estrogen-treated women the levels of total cortisol were about twice as high at all timepoints, but the unbound cortisol concentrations were similar. These results indicate that the unbound cortisol is not affected by the changed concentration of transcortin. In patients with Cushing's disease, on the other hand, the unbound cortisol is relatively more elevated than the total cortisol due to a high degree of saturation of this protein, which is often present at relatively low concentrations [fr

  13. Grow, Baby, Grow

    Maybe you quit smoking during your pregnancy. Or maybe you struggled and weren’t able to stay quit. Now that your baby is here, trying to stay away from smoking is still important. That’s because the chemicals in smoke can make it harder for your baby to grow like he or she should.

  14. MMT HYPERVELOCITY STAR SURVEY. II. FIVE NEW UNBOUND STARS

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J., E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-05-20

    We present the discovery of five new unbound hypervelocity stars (HVSs) in the outer Milky Way halo. Using a conservative estimate of Galactic escape velocity, our targeted spectroscopic survey has now identified 16 unbound HVSs as well as a comparable number of HVSs ejected on bound trajectories. A Galactic center origin for the HVSs is supported by their unbound velocities, the observed number of unbound stars, their stellar nature, their ejection time distribution, and their Galactic latitude and longitude distribution. Other proposed origins for the unbound HVSs, such as runaway ejections from the disk or dwarf galaxy tidal debris, cannot be reconciled with the observations. An intriguing result is the spatial anisotropy of HVSs on the sky, which possibly reflects an anisotropic potential in the central 10-100 pc region of the Galaxy. Further progress requires measurement of the spatial distribution of HVSs over the southern sky. Our survey also identifies seven B supergiants associated with known star-forming galaxies; the absence of B supergiants elsewhere in the survey implies there are no new star-forming galaxies in our survey footprint to a depth of 1-2 Mpc.

  15. A high order solver for the unbounded Poisson equation

    Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Chatelain, Philippe

    In mesh-free particle methods a high order solution to the unbounded Poisson equation is usually achieved by constructing regularised integration kernels for the Biot-Savart law. Here the singular, point particles are regularised using smoothed particles to obtain an accurate solution with an order...... of convergence consistent with the moments conserved by the applied smoothing function. In the hybrid particle-mesh method of Hockney and Eastwood (HE) the particles are interpolated onto a regular mesh where the unbounded Poisson equation is solved by a discrete non-cyclic convolution of the mesh values...... and the integration kernel. In this work we show an implementation of high order regularised integration kernels in the HE algorithm for the unbounded Poisson equation to formally achieve an arbitrary high order convergence. We further present a quantitative study of the convergence rate to give further insight...

  16. Variations in Growing-Season NDVI and Its Response to Permafrost Degradation in Northeast China

    Jinting Guo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Permafrost is extremely sensitive to climate change. The degradation of permafrost has strong and profound effects on vegetation. The permafrost zone of northeastern China is the second largest region of permafrost in China and lies on the south edge of the Eurasian cryolithozone. This study analyzed the spatiotemporal variations of the growing-season Normalization Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI in the permafrost zone of northeastern China and analyzed the correlation between NDVI and ground surface temperatures (GST during the years 1981–2014. Mean growing-season NDVI (MGS-NDVI experienced a marked increase of 0.003 year−1 across the entire permafrost zone. The spatial dynamics of vegetation cover had a high degree of heterogeneity on a per pixel scale. The MGS-NDVI value increased significantly (5% significance level in 80.57%, and this increase was mostly distributed in permafrost zone except for the western steppe region. Only 7.72% experienced a significant decrease in NDVI, mainly in the cultivated and steppe portions. In addition, MGS-NDVI increased significantly with increasing growing-season mean ground surface temperature (GS-MGST. Our results suggest that a warming of GS-MGST (permafrost degradation in the permafrost region of northeastern China played a positive role in increasing plant growth and activities. Although increasing ground surface temperature resulted in increased vegetation cover and growth in the short time of permafrost degradation, from the long term point of view, permafrost degradation or disappearance may weaken or even hinder vegetation activities.

  17. Differential response of risedronate on tibial and mandibular bone quality in glucocorticoid-treated growing rats

    Fujita, Yuko

    2008-01-01

    Glucocorticoids induce bone loss and retard bone growth in children. In this study we investigated the effect of treatment with risedronate on glucocorticoid -prednisolone-induced decreases in bone density, quality, strength and growth of the tibia and mandible in growing rats. Trabecular and cortical bone structure was measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) and three-dimensional (3D) micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Indicators of bone strength were calculated from cortical bone density and the modulus of sections obtained from pQCT analysis. Tibial and mandibular bone sizes were also measured. Prednisolone decreased the bone growth of both tibia and mandible. It also caused deterioration of trabecular and cortical bone structure and strength in the mandible, and in cortical bone in the tibia, but had no effect on trabecular bone in the tibia. Risedronate inhibited the prednisolone-induced decreases in tibial width and mandibular length and height but did not improve the retardation of longitudinal bone growth. Risedronate prevented prednisolone-induced deterioration of trabecular and cortical bone architecture. In the mandible, this protective effect of risedronate was accompanied by an increase in cortical bone density and in bone strength. These findings show that risedronate inhibits prednisolone-induced loss of bone density, structure, decrease in bone strength, and retardation of bone growth in the mandible in young growing rats. (author)

  18. A high order solver for the unbounded Poisson equation

    Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Chatelain, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    This work improves upon Hockney and Eastwood's Fourier-based algorithm for the unbounded Poisson equation to formally achieve arbitrary high order of convergence without any additional computational cost. We assess the methodology on the kinematic relations between the velocity and vorticity fields....

  19. STABILITY OF STOCHASTIC DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH UNBOUNDED DELAY

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,we obtain suffcient conditions for the stability in p-th moment of the analytical solutions and the mean square stability of a stochastic differential equation with unbounded delay proposed in [6,10] using the explicit Euler method.

  20. Generation Unbound: Drifting into Sex and Parenthood without Marriage

    Sawhill, Isabel V.

    2014-01-01

    Over half of all births to young adults in the United States now occur outside of marriage, and many are unplanned. The result is increased poverty and inequality for children. The left argues for more social support for unmarried parents; the right argues for a return to traditional marriage. In "Generation Unbound," Isabel V. Sawhill…

  1. A Note on Dynamic Programming with Unbounded Rewards

    J.A.E.E. van Nunen (Jo); J. Wessels

    1978-01-01

    textabstractIn a recent paper, Lippman presents sufficient conditions for Denardo's N-stage contraction in discounted semi-Markov decision processes with unbounded rewards. In this note it is demonstrated that Lippman's conditions may be replaced by weaker conditions which even imply l-stage

  2. Static analysis of unbounded structures in object-oriented programs

    Grabe, Immo

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate different techniques and formalisms to address complexity introduced by unbounded structures in object-oriented programs. We give a representation of a weakest precondition calculus for abstract object creation in dynamic logic. Based on this calculus we define symbolic

  3. Physiological and Biochemical Responses of Growing Rats Fed Irradiated Full-Fat Rice Bran

    EL-Niely, H.F.G.

    2006-01-01

    Raw and irradiated full-fat rice bran at dose levels of 10, 15, 20 and 25 kGy were used in the diets of growing rats to evaluate their effect on plasma and liver lipid profile. Comparison was also done with the use of a standard casein diet. After 49 days of feeding trail, food intake and wt gain were found to be highest with rats received casein diet in comparison with those fed on rice bran diets. Raw and irradiated full-fat rice bran diets, fed to rats caused a significant reduction in the level of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), while a significant elevation in the level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) in plasma was recorded compared to those fed on casein diet. Also, similar changes were observed in liver. There was a significant increase in plasma and liver HDL-c/ TC ratio and LDL-c/ HDL-c ratio. Relative liver wt of rats fed on raw and irradiated full-fat rice brain up to 25 kGy was lower compared to those fed on control diet (casein diet). The casein group had the highest total plasma and liver total protein (TP) compared to the other experimental groups. Among the experimental groups, raw and processed full-fat rice brain up to 25 kGy, induced no significant effect on TP content of plasma and liver

  4. Present and future responses of growing degree days for Crete Island in Greece

    Paparrizos, Spyridon; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Climate affects practically all the physiological processes that determine plant life (IPCC, 2014). A major challenge and objective of the agricultural science is to predict the occurrences of specific physical or biological events. For this reason, flower phenology has been widely used to study the flowering in plant species of economic interest, and in this concept, temperature and heat units have been widely accepted as the most important factors affecting processes leading to flowering. The determination of heat requirements in the first developing phases of plants has been expressed as Growing Degree Days (GDD). Determination of GDD is useful for achieving a better understanding of the flowering season development in several plant species, and for forecasting when flowering will occur (Paparrizos and Matzarakis, 2017). Temperature and GDD represent two important spatially-dynamic climatic variables, as they both play vital roles in influencing forest development by directly affecting plant functions such as evapotranspiration, photosynthesis and plant transpiration. Understanding the spatial distribution of GDD is crucial to the practice of sustainable agricultural and forest management, as GDD relates to the integration of growth and provides precise point estimates (Hasan et al., 2007; Matzarakis et al., 2007). The aim of the current study was to estimate and map through downscaling spatial interpolation and multi-linear regression techniques, the future variation of GDD for the periods 2021-2050 and 2071-2100, under the A1B and B1 IPCC emission scenarios in relation with the reference periods for Crete Island in Greece. Future temperature data were obtained, validated and analysed from the ENSEMBLES European project. A combination of dynamical and statistical approach was conducted in order to downscale and perform the spatial interpolation of GDD through ArcGIS 10.2.1. The results indicated that in the future, GDD will be increased and the existing

  5. Phosphorus digestibility response of growing pigs to phytase supplementation of triticale distillers' dried grains with solubles.

    Xue, P C; Adeola, O

    2015-02-01

    An experiment was conducted in growing pigs to determine the true total-tract digestibility (TTTD) of P in triticale distillers' dried grains with solubles (DDGS) with or without phytase using the regression method. Six diets were formulated in a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement, including 3 levels of triticale DDGS (300, 400, or 500 g/kg) and phytase (0 or 500 phytase units [FTU]/kg of diet). A total of 48 barrows (initial BW 22.2 ± 1.3 kg) were assigned to the 6 diets in a randomized complete block design. There was a 5-d adjustment period followed by a 5-d total collection of feces. The results show that P intake, fecal P output, and digested P increased linearly ( phytase on apparent total-tract digestibility (ATTD) of P. In diets without added phytase, the ATTD of P in triticale DDGS was 65.0, 67.7, and 63.2% for the diets with 300, 400, and 500 g/kg triticale DDGS, respectively; the corresponding values for diets with added phytase were 77.3, 76.3, and 75.7%. By regressing daily digested P against daily P intake, the TTTD of P was estimated at 75.4% for triticale DDGS or 81.1% with added phytase, respectively. In conclusion, the TTTD of P in triticale DDGS without supplemental phytase was 75.4%, and it was 81.1% in the presence of phytase at 500 FTU/kg of the diet, but the difference was not statistically significant. For triticale DDGS, the supplementation of 500 FTU/kg phytase in diet could increase the ATTD of P ( < 0.001) but not the TTTD of P.

  6. A Growing Global Network’s Role in Outbreak Response: AFHSC-GEIS 2008-2009

    2011-01-01

    John Snow’s investigation of cholera and the Broad Street pump in 19th century London [1], effective outbreak response continues to be challenging... Mexico border [in colla- boration with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the County of San Diego Health Department]. The U.S...IHR (2005). The most common diseases investigated were influenza (47), cholera (four), dengue fever (four) and hepatitis (three). Human disease was

  7. Examining demand response, renewable energy and efficiencies to meet growing electricity needs

    Elliot, N.; Eldridge, M.; Shipley, A.M.; Laitner, J.S.; Nadel, S.; Silverstein, A.; Hedman, B.; Sloan, M.

    2007-01-01

    While Texas has already taken steps to improve its renewable energy portfolio (RPS), and its energy efficiency improvement program (EEIP), the level of savings that utilities can achieve through the EEIP can be greatly increased. This report estimated the size of energy efficiency and renewable energy resources in Texas, and suggested a range of policy options that might be adopted to further extend EEIP. Current forecasts suggest that peak demand in Texas will increase by 2.3 per cent annually from 2007-2012, a level of growth which is threatening the state's ability to maintain grid reliability at reasonable cost. Almost 70 per cent of installed generating capacity is fuelled by natural gas in Texas. Recent polling has suggested that over 70 per cent of Texans are willing support increased spending on energy efficiency. Demand response measures that may be implemented in the state include incentive-based programs that pay users to reduce their electricity consumption during specific times and pricing programs, where customers are given a price signal and are expected to moderate their electricity usage. By 2023, the widespread availability of time-varying retail electric rates and complementary communications and control methods will permanently change the nature of electricity demand in the state. At present, the integrated utilities in Texas offer a variety of direct load control and time-of-use, curtailable, and interruptible rates. However, with the advent of retail competition now available as a result of the structural unbundling of investor-owned utilities, there is less demand response available in Texas. It was concluded that energy efficiency, demand response, and renewable energy resources can meet the increasing demand for electricity in Texas over the next 15 years. 4 figs

  8. Morphometric evaluation of condylar cartilage of growing rats in response to mandibular retractive forces

    Milena Peixoto Nogueira de Sá

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The mandibular condylar surface is made up of four layers, i.e., an external layer composed of dense connective tissue, followed by a layer of undifferentiated cells, hyaline cartilage and bone. Few studies have demonstrated the behavior of the condylar cartilage when the mandible is positioned posteriorly, as in treatments for correcting functional Class III malocclusion. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the morphologic and histological aspects of rat condyles in response to posterior positioning of the mandible. METHODS: Thirty five-week-old male Wistar rats were selected and randomly divided into two groups: A control group (C and an experimental group (E which received devices for inducing mandibular retrusion. The animals were euthanized at time intervals of 7, 21 and 30 days after the experiment had began. For histological analysis, total condylar thickness was measured, including the proliferative, hyaline and hypertrophic layers, as well as each layer separately, totaling 30 measurements for each parameter of each animal. RESULTS: The greatest difference in cartilage thickness was observed in 21 days, although different levels were observed in the other periods. Group E showed an increase of 39.46% in the total layer, reflected by increases in the thickness of the hypertrophic (42.24%, hyaline (46.92% and proliferative (17.70% layers. CONCLUSIONS: Posteriorly repositioning the mandible produced a series of histological and morphological responses in the condyle, suggesting condylar and mandibular adaptation in rats.

  9. Morphometric evaluation of condylar cartilage of growing rats in response to mandibular retractive forces.

    de Sá, Milena Peixoto Nogueira; Zanoni, Jacqueline Nelisis; de Salles, Carlos Luiz Fernandes; de Souza, Fabrício Dias; Suga, Uhana Seifert Guimarães; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga

    2013-01-01

    The mandibular condylar surface is made up of four layers, i.e., an external layer composed of dense connective tissue, followed by a layer of undifferentiated cells, hyaline cartilage and bone. Few studies have demonstrated the behavior of the condylar cartilage when the mandible is positioned posteriorly, as in treatments for correcting functional Class III malocclusion. The aim of this study was to assess the morphologic and histological aspects of rat condyles in response to posterior positioning of the mandible. Thirty five-week-old male Wistar rats were selected and randomly divided into two groups: A control group (C) and an experimental group (E) which received devices for inducing mandibular retrusion. The animals were euthanized at time intervals of 7, 21 and 30 days after the experiment had began. For histological analysis, total condylar thickness was measured, including the proliferative, hyaline and hypertrophic layers, as well as each layer separately, totaling 30 measurements for each parameter of each animal. The greatest difference in cartilage thickness was observed in 21 days, although different levels were observed in the other periods. Group E showed an increase of 39.46% in the total layer, reflected by increases in the thickness of the hypertrophic (42.24%), hyaline (46.92%) and proliferative (17.70%) layers. Posteriorly repositioning the mandible produced a series of histological and morphological responses in the condyle, suggesting condylar and mandibular adaptation in rats.

  10. Observed and Projected Changes in Thermal Growing Degree-Days and Growing Season and Their Divergent Responses to Warming over China

    Deng, H.

    2017-12-01

    Vegetation growth and phenology are largely regulated by the growing degree-days (GDD) and growing season (GS). By choosing 0°C, 5°C and 10°C, three key based temperatures (Tb) for vegetation growth, the GDD and GS in China during the observed period (1960-2011) were developed using homogenized daily mean temperatures (Td) in 536 meteorological stations. In addition, the GDD10 and GS10 in China were projected under the representative concentration pathway scenarios (RCPs) during 1961-2099, using the Td (0.5°×0.5°) derived from five general circulation models (GCMs), after model evaluation. Advance in the start of the growing season (SOS; 4.86-6.71 days; SOS0 > SOS5 > SOS10) and delay in the end of the growing season (EOS; 4.32-6.19 days; EOS0 GDD5 > GDD10), in China as a whole. Each observed variation has a substantial acceleration mostly in 1987 or 1996, and a speed reduction or a trend reversal in the early 2000s. Increases in the GDD10 and GS10 would continue in the 21st century, causing northward shifts in the temperature zones. Finally in the long-term (2071-2099), the nationally average GDD10 and GS10 would be 279.1°C·d higher and 16.5 d longer for RCP 2.6, and 964.4°C·d higher and 50.3 d longer for RCP 8.5, relative to 1981-2010. Regionally, the GDD enhancement were stronger in the tropics, east, northeast and northwest China during the observed period, and tend to be in southern China in the future. The largest GS extensions are consistently in the eastern and southern parts of the Tibetan Alpine zone, particularly in the future. During the observed period, advance in SOS and delay in EOS drove the GS extensions in the eastern monsoon zone and northwest arid/semi-arid zone respectively. In the future, an advanced SOS drives the GS extension in the northern (> ca. 33°N) Tibetan Alpine zone, the mountainous areas in northeast China, and south of the Tropic of Cancer. The GDD and GS showed positive sensitivity to the temperature (GDD0 > GDD5 > GDD10

  11. Computationally efficient analytic representations of relativistic bound-bound, bound-unbound and unbound-unbound transition matrix elements of hydrogenic atoms

    Soldatov, A.; Seke, J.; Adam, G.; Polak, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A closed analytic form for relativistic transition matrix elements between bound-bound, bound-unbound and unbound-unbound relativistic eigenstates of hydrogenic atoms by using the plane-wave expansion for the electromagnetic-field vector potential was derived in a form convenient for large-scale numerical calculations in QED. By applying the obtained formulae, these transition matrix elements can be evaluated analytically and numerically. These exact matrix elements, which to our knowledge have not been calculated as yet, are of great importance in the analysis of various atom-field interaction processes where retardation effects cannot be ignored. The ultimate goal of the ongoing research is to develop a general universal calculation technique for Seke's approximation and renormalization method in QED, for which the usage of the plane vector expansion for the vector potential is a preferable choice. However, our primary interest lies in the Lamb-shift calculation. Our nearest objective is to carry out the plain-style relativistic calculations of the Lamb shift of the energy levels of hydrogen-like atoms and ions from first principles in the second and higher perturbative orders, using the corresponding convenient as well as novel expressions for the magnitude in question as they stand, i.e. without any additional approximations. Due to that there is no way to achieve all the above-declared goals without recourse to large-scale laborious and time-consuming high-precision numerical calculations, having the transition matrix elements of all possible types in an analytic, convenient for their efficient numerical evaluation form, would be highly advantageous and even unavoidable, especially for calculations of various QED effects in higher perturbative orders be it, equally, in traditional or novel approach. (author)

  12. Unbounded weighted composition operators in L²-spaces

    Budzyński, Piotr; Jung, Il Bong; Stochel, Jan

    2018-01-01

    This book establishes the foundations of the theory of bounded and unbounded weighted composition operators in L²-spaces. It develops the theory in full generality, meaning that the weighted composition operators under consideration are not regarded as products of multiplication and composition operators. A variety of seminormality properties are characterized and the first-ever criteria for subnormality of unbounded weighted composition operators is provided. The subtle interplay between the classical moment problem, graph theory and the injectivity problem is revealed and there is an investigation of the relationships between weighted composition operators and the corresponding multiplication and composition operators. The optimality of the obtained results is illustrated by a variety of examples, including those of discrete and continuous types. The book is primarily aimed at researchers in single or multivariable operator theory.

  13. Overcoming tyranny: love, truth and meaning in Shelley's "Prometheus Unbound"

    Jung, Sandro

    2006-01-01

    Shelley's Prometheus Unbound is a rewriting of Aeschylus's Bound Prometheus. As such, it is a work of Romantic Hellenism which, as so many Romantic texts, focuses on the ideas of Revolution and change, as well as the possibility of a better society. Prometheus, in his unenlightened state of primordial energy, provided mankind with the fire of enlightenment but, at the same time, angered Jupiter by his disobedience and the theft of the divine gift. Prometheus's defiant energy is described in t...

  14. The Existence and Application of Unbounded Connected Components

    Hua Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Let X be a Banach space and Cn a family of connected subsets of R×X. We prove the existence of unbounded components in superior limit of {Cn}, denoted by lim¯ Cn, which have prescribed shapes. As applications, we investigate the global behavior of the set of positive periodic solutions to nonlinear first-order differential equations with delay, which can be used for modeling physiological processes.

  15. Self-adjointness of unbounded derivations on C*-algebras

    Bratteli, Ola.

    1975-02-01

    Various criteria on an unbounded derivation on a C*-algebra which ensures that the derivation is the infinitesimal generator of a strongly continuous one-parameter group of *-automorphisms are discussed. Results obtained by R.T. Powers, D.W. Robinson, S. Sakai and the author during the last year are surveyed and systematized. A couple of new results are also included [fr

  16. Soft Space Planning in Cities unbound

    Olesen, Kristian

    This paper analyses contemporary experiments of building governance capacity in new soft spaces in Denmark through processes of spatial strategy-making. The paper argues that new soft spaces are emerging in Danish spatial planning, which set out to promote more effective forms of strategic spatial...... planning, and how their obsession with promoting economic development at the expense of wider planning responsibilities support contemporary neoliberal transformations of strategic spatial planning....... planning. The Danish case of soft space planning demonstrates how Danish soft spaces at subnational scales fail to fill in the gaps between formal planning structures and provide the glue that binds formal scales of planning together as promised in the soft space literature. This raises a number...

  17. Analysing PKCS#11 Key Management APIs with Unbounded Fresh Data

    Fröschle, Sibylle; Steel, Graham

    We extend Delaune, Kremer and Steel’s framework for analysis of PKCS#11-based APIs from bounded to unbounded fresh data. We achieve this by: formally defining the notion of an attribute policy; showing that a well-designed API should have a certain class of policy we call complete; showing that APIs with complete policies may be safely abstracted to APIs where the attributes are fixed; and proving that these static APIs can be analysed in a small bounded model such that security properties will hold for the unbounded case. We automate analysis in our framework using the SAT-based security protocol model checker SATMC. We show that a symmetric key management subset of the Eracom PKCS#11 API, used in their ProtectServer product, preserves the secrecy of sensitive keys for unbounded numbers of fresh keys and handles, i.e. pointers to keys. We also show that this API is not robust: if an encryption key is lost to the intruder, SATMC finds an attack whereby all the keys may be compromised.

  18. Zonal structure of unbounded external-flow and aerodynamics

    Liu, L Q; Kang, L L; Wu, J Z, E-mail: lqliu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Turbulence and Complex System, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2017-08-15

    This paper starts from the far-field behaviors of velocity field in externally unbounded flow. We find that the well-known algebraic decay of disturbance velocity as derived kinematically is too conservative. Once the kinetics are taken into account by working on the fundamental solutions of far-field linearized Navier–Stokes equations, it is proven that the furthest far-field zone adjacent to the uniform fluid at infinity must be unsteady, viscous and compressible, where all disturbances degenerate to sound waves that decay exponentially. But this optimal rate does not exist in some commonly used simplified flow models, such as steady flow, incompressible flow and inviscid flow, because they actually work in true subspaces of the unbounded free space, which are surrounded by further far fields of different nature. This finding naturally leads to a zonal structure of externally unbounded flow field. The significance of the zonal structure is demonstrated by its close relevance to existing theories of aerodynamic force and moment in external flows, including the removal of the difficulties or paradoxes inherent in the simplified models. (paper)

  19. Approximate Model Checking of PCTL Involving Unbounded Path Properties

    Basu, Samik; Ghosh, Arka P.; He, Ru

    We study the problem of applying statistical methods for approximate model checking of probabilistic systems against properties encoded as PCTL formulas. Such approximate methods have been proposed primarily to deal with state-space explosion that makes the exact model checking by numerical methods practically infeasible for large systems. However, the existing statistical methods either consider a restricted subset of PCTL, specifically, the subset that can only express bounded until properties; or rely on user-specified finite bound on the sample path length. We propose a new method that does not have such restrictions and can be effectively used to reason about unbounded until properties. We approximate probabilistic characteristics of an unbounded until property by that of a bounded until property for a suitably chosen value of the bound. In essence, our method is a two-phase process: (a) the first phase is concerned with identifying the bound k 0; (b) the second phase computes the probability of satisfying the k 0-bounded until property as an estimate for the probability of satisfying the corresponding unbounded until property. In both phases, it is sufficient to verify bounded until properties which can be effectively done using existing statistical techniques. We prove the correctness of our technique and present its prototype implementations. We empirically show the practical applicability of our method by considering different case studies including a simple infinite-state model, and large finite-state models such as IPv4 zeroconf protocol and dining philosopher protocol modeled as Discrete Time Markov chains.

  20. Forage production and growing goats’ response under silvopastoral systems based on Guazuma ulmifolia, Leucaena leucocephala and Crescentia cujete

    Gustavo Rodríguez Fernández

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Grass monoculture, besides being unnatural to goat’s natural eating habits, exhibits low forage production during the dry season, with negative impacts on animal productivity. This research aimed to determine the productive advantages of silvopastoral system arrangements in goat production. A completely randomized design with repeated measurements through time was used. Six treatments were evaluated: kikuyina grass monoculture (Bothriochloa pertusa and guinea grass monoculture (Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania as control groups; guacimo (Guazuma ulmifolia based silvopastoral arrangement; calabash (Crescentia cujete based silvopastoral arrangement; lead tree (Leucaena leucocephala based silvopastoral arrangement; and a mixed based silvopastoralarrangement (guacimo, calabash and leucaena. The information was processed with analysis of variance. The results showed increased forage production in silvopastoral arrangements vs. Bothriochloa pertusa monoculture. The greater increase in height (p <0.05 at 9-14 months of age, was obtained with the leucaena silvopastoral arrangement. All silvopastoral arrangements showed forage yield advantages compared to B. pertusa. The higher dry matter production of guinea grass is highlighted. Overall weight gain of the growing goats was low; nevertheless, a differential response between treatments was observed. Silvopastoral arrangements had the highest (p <0.05 weight gain (22.5 to 33.6 g/animal per day relative to the guinea grass monoculture (13.2 g/animal per day. The growing goats had higher percentages of estrus and pregnancy in the mixed system (66.7% and those based on guacimo (66.7% and on lead tree (55.6%.

  1. World oil demand's shift toward faster growing and less price-responsive products and regions

    Dargay, Joyce M. [Institute for Transport Studies, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Gately, Dermot [Dept. of Economics, New York University, 19W. 4 St., New York, NY 10012 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Using data for 1971-2008, we estimate the effects of changes in price and income on world oil demand, disaggregated by product - transport oil, fuel oil (residual and heating oil), and other oil - for six groups of countries. Most of the demand reductions since 1973-74 were due to fuel-switching away from fuel oil, especially in the OECD; in addition, the collapse of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) reduced their oil consumption substantially. Demand for transport and other oil was much less price-responsive, and has grown almost as rapidly as income, especially outside the OECD and FSU. World oil demand has shifted toward products and regions that are faster growing and less price-responsive. In contrast to projections to 2030 of declining per-capita demand for the world as a whole - by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), International Energy Agency (IEA) and OPEC - we project modest growth. Our projections for total world demand in 2030 are at least 20% higher than projections by those three institutions, using similar assumptions about income growth and oil prices, because we project rest-of-world growth that is consistent with historical patterns, in contrast to the dramatic slowdowns which they project. (author)

  2. Early life vitamin D depletion alters the postnatal response to skeletal loading in growing and mature bone

    Buckley, Harriet; Owen, Robert; Marin, Ana Campos; Lu, Yongtau; Eyles, Darryl; Lacroix, Damien; Reilly, Gwendolen C.; Skerry, Tim M.; Bishop, Nick J.

    2018-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of persistent effects of early life vitamin D exposure on later skeletal health; linking low levels in early life to smaller bone size in childhood as well as increased fracture risk later in adulthood, independently of later vitamin D status. A major determinant of bone mass acquisition across all ages is mechanical loading. We tested the hypothesis in an animal model system that early life vitamin D depletion results in abrogation of the response to mechanical loading, with consequent reduction in bone size, mass and strength during both childhood and adulthood. A murine model was created in which pregnant dams were either vitamin D deficient or replete, and their offspring moved to a vitamin D replete diet at weaning. Tibias of the offspring were mechanically loaded and bone structure, extrinsic strength and growth measured both during growth and after skeletal maturity. Offspring of vitamin D deplete mice demonstrated lower bone mass in the non loaded limb and reduced bone mass accrual in response to loading in both the growing skeleton and after skeletal maturity. Early life vitamin D depletion led to reduced bone strength and altered bone biomechanical properties. These findings suggest early life vitamin D status may, in part, determine the propensity to osteoporosis and fracture that blights later life in many individuals. PMID:29370213

  3. Functional differential equations with unbounded delay in extrapolation spaces

    Mostafa Adimy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We study the existence, regularity and stability of solutions for nonlinear partial neutral functional differential equations with unbounded delay and a Hille-Yosida operator on a Banach space X. We consider two nonlinear perturbations: the first one is a function taking its values in X and the second one is a function belonging to a space larger than X, an extrapolated space. We use the extrapolation techniques to prove the existence and regularity of solutions and we establish a linearization principle for the stability of the equilibria of our equation.

  4. Provably unbounded memory advantage in stochastic simulation using quantum mechanics

    Garner, Andrew J. P.; Liu, Qing; Thompson, Jayne; Vedral, Vlatko; Gu, mile

    2017-10-01

    Simulating the stochastic evolution of real quantities on a digital computer requires a trade-off between the precision to which these quantities are approximated, and the memory required to store them. The statistical accuracy of the simulation is thus generally limited by the internal memory available to the simulator. Here, using tools from computational mechanics, we show that quantum processors with a fixed finite memory can simulate stochastic processes of real variables to arbitrarily high precision. This demonstrates a provable, unbounded memory advantage that a quantum simulator can exhibit over its best possible classical counterpart.

  5. Provably unbounded memory advantage in stochastic simulation using quantum mechanics

    Garner, Andrew J P; Thompson, Jayne; Vedral, Vlatko; Gu, Mile; Liu, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Simulating the stochastic evolution of real quantities on a digital computer requires a trade-off between the precision to which these quantities are approximated, and the memory required to store them. The statistical accuracy of the simulation is thus generally limited by the internal memory available to the simulator. Here, using tools from computational mechanics, we show that quantum processors with a fixed finite memory can simulate stochastic processes of real variables to arbitrarily high precision. This demonstrates a provable, unbounded memory advantage that a quantum simulator can exhibit over its best possible classical counterpart. (paper)

  6. Leaf waxes of slow-growing alpine and fast-growing lowland Poa species: inherent differences and responses to UV-B radiation

    Pilon, J.J.; Lambers, H.; Baas, W.; Tosserams, M.; Rozema, J.; Atkin, O.K.

    1999-01-01

    We investigated whether alpine and lowland Poa species exhibit inherent differences in leaf cuticular waxes, leaf UV absorbing compounds and/or growth responses to UV-B treatment. All plants were grown hydroponically in a growth cabinet (constant 20°; 14 hr photoperiod; 520 μmol photons m −2 s −1 PAR). Two alpine (P. fawcettiae and P. costiniana), one sub-alpine (P. alpina) and three temperate lowland species (P. pratensis, P. compressa and P. trivialis) were grown under conditions without UV radiation for 36 days. In a subsequent experiment, four Poa species (P. costiniana, P. alpina, P. compressa and P. trivialis) were also exposed for 21 days to UV-B/(UV-A) radiation ('UV-B treatment') that resulted in daily UV-B radiation of 7.5 kJ m −2 day −1 , with control plants being grown without UV-B ('UV-A control treatment'). All treatments were carried out in the same growth cabinet. There was no altitudinal trend regarding wax concentrations per unit leaf area, when the six species grown under UV-less conditions, were compared at similar developmental stage (20–30 g shoot fresh mass). However, large differences in cuticular wax chemical composition were observed between the alpine and lowland species grown under UV-less conditions. For example, a single primary alcohol was present in the waxes of the lowland and sub-alpine species (C 26 H 53 OH), but was virtually absent in the alpine species. Although alkanes were present in all six species (primarily C 29 H 60 and C 31 H 64 ), the proportion of total wax present as alkanes was highest in the alpine species. Aldehydes were only present in the waxes of the alpine species. Conversely, substantial amounts of triterpenoids were mainly present in the three lowland species (squalene and lupeol were the dominant forms). The proportion of total wax present as long-chain esters (LCE-s) was similar in all six species grown in the absence of UV radiation. Acetates were observed only in the wax of

  7. Growing Pains

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Heat expands and cold contracts: it’s a simple thermodynamic rule. But when temperatures swing from 300 K to near-absolute zero, this rule can mean a contraction of more than 80 metres across the LHC’s 27-km-long cryogenic system. Keeping this growth in check are compensators (a.k.a. bellows), which shrink and stretch in response to thermodynamic changes. Leak tests and X-rays now underway in the tunnel have revealed that these “joints” might be suffering from growing pains…   This 25-μm weld crack is thought to be the cause of the helium leaks. Prior to the LS1 warm-up, CERN’s cryogenic experts knew of two points in the machine’s cryogenic distribution system that were leaking helium. Fortunately, these leaks were sufficiently small, confined to known sub-sectors of the cryogenic line and – with help from the vacuum team (TE-VSC) – could easily be compensated for. But as the machine warmed up f...

  8. [Responses of sap flow to natural rainfall and continuous drought of tree species growing on bedrock outcrops].

    Zhang, Hui Ling; Ding, Ya Li; Chen, Hong Song; Wang, Ke Lin; Nie, Yun Peng

    2018-04-01

    This study focused on bedrock outcrops, a very common habitat in karst region of southwest China. To reveal the responses of plant transpiration to natural rainfall and continuous drought, two tree species typical to this habitat, Radermachera sinica and Triadica rotundifolia, were selected as test materials. A rainout shelter was used to simulate continuous drought. The sap flow dynamics were monitored using the method of Granier's thermal dissipation probe (TDP). Our results showed that sap flow density increased to different degrees after rain in different stages of the growing season. Sap flow density of the deciduous species T. rotundifolia was always higher than that of the semi-deciduous species R. sinica. After two months without rainfall input, both species exhibited no obvious decrease in sap flow density, indicating that rainfall was not the dominant source for their water uptake, at least in the short-term. Based on the regression relationships between sap flow density and meteorological factors before and after rainfall, as well as at different stages of continuous drought, we found that the dynamics of meteorological factors contributed little to plant transpiration. The basic transpiration characteristics of both species were not changed in the circumstance of natural rainfall and short-term continuous drought, which would be closely related to the special water storage environments of bedrock outcrops and the reliance on deep water sources by tree species.

  9. The Growing Complexity of Cancer Cell Response to DNA-Damaging Agents: Caspase 3 Mediates Cell Death or Survival?

    Razmik Mirzayans

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is widely stated that wild-type p53 either mediates the activation of cell cycle checkpoints to facilitate DNA repair and promote cell survival, or orchestrates apoptotic cell death following exposure to cancer therapeutic agents. This reigning paradigm has been challenged by numerous discoveries with different human cell types, including solid tumor-derived cell lines. Thus, activation of the p53 signaling pathway by ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents hinders apoptosis and triggers growth arrest (e.g., through premature senescence in some genetic backgrounds; such growth arrested cells remain viable, secrete growth-promoting factors, and give rise to progeny with stem cell-like properties. In addition, caspase 3, which is best known for its role in the execution phase of apoptosis, has been recently reported to facilitate (rather than suppress DNA damage-induced genomic instability and carcinogenesis. This observation is consistent with an earlier report demonstrating that caspase 3 mediates secretion of the pro-survival factor prostaglandin E2, which in turn promotes enrichment of tumor repopulating cells. In this article, we review these and related discoveries and point out novel cancer therapeutic strategies. One of our objectives is to demonstrate the growing complexity of the DNA damage response beyond the conventional “repair and survive, or die” hypothesis.

  10. A Note on Using Unbounded Functions on Totally Bounded Sets in ...

    From a real-valued function f, unbounded on a totally bounded subset of a metric space, we construct a Cauchy sequence in S on which f is unbounded. Taking f to be a reciprocal Lebesgue number function, for an open cover of S, gives a rapid proof that S is compact when it is complete, without recourse to ...

  11. Asymptotic behaviour of unbounded trajectories for some non-autonomous systems in a Hilbert space

    Djafari Rouhani, B.

    1990-07-01

    The asymptotic behaviour of unbounded trajectories for non expansive mappings in a real Hilbert space and the extension to more general Banach spaces and to nonlinear contraction semi-group have been studied by many authors. In this paper we study the asymptotic behaviour of unbounded trajectories for a quasi non-autonomous dissipative systems. 26 refs

  12. A high order solver for the unbounded Poisson equation

    Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Chatelain, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    . The method is extended to directly solve the derivatives of the solution to Poissonʼs equation. In this way differential operators such as the divergence or curl of the solution field can be solved to the same high order convergence without additional computational effort. The method, is applied......A high order converging Poisson solver is presented, based on the Greenʼs function solution to Poissonʼs equation subject to free-space boundary conditions. The high order convergence is achieved by formulating regularised integration kernels, analogous to a smoothing of the solution field...... and validated, however not restricted, to the equations of fluid mechanics, and can be used in many applications to solve Poissonʼs equation on a rectangular unbounded domain....

  13. Response of needle dark respiration of Pinus koraiensis and Pinus sylvestriformis to elevated CO2 concentrations for four growing seasons' exposure

    ZHOU YuMei; HAN ShiJie; ZHANG HaiSen; XIN LiHua; ZHENG JunQiang

    2007-01-01

    The long-term effect of elevated CO2 concentrations on needle dark respiration of two coniferous species-Pinus koraiensis and Pinus sylvestriformis on the Changbai Mountain was investigated using open-top chambers. P. Koraiensis and P. Sylvestriformis were exposed to 700,500μmol·mol-1 CO2 and ambient CO2(approx.350 μmol·mol-1)for four growing seasons. Needle dark respiration was measurd during the second, third and fourth growing seasons' exposure to elevated CO2.The results showed that needle dark respiration rate increased for P. Koraiensis and P. Sylvestriformis grown at elevated CO2 concentrations during the second growing season, could be attributed to the change of carbohydrate and/or nitrogen content of needles. Needle dark respiration of P. Koraiensis was stimulated and that of P. Sylvestriformis was inhibited by elevated CO2 concentrations during the third growing season. Different response of the two tree species to elevated CO2 mainly resulted from the difference in the growth rate. Elevated CO2 concentrations inhibited needle dark respiration of both P. Koraiensis and P. Sylvestriformis during the fourth growing season. There was consistent trend between the short-term effect and the long-term effect of elevated CO2 on needle dark respiration in P. Sylvestriformis during the third growing season by changing measurement CO2 concentrations. However, the short-term effect was different from the long-term effect for P. Koraiensis. Response of dark respiration of P. Koraiensis and P. Sylvestriformis to elevated CO2 concentrations was related to the treatment time of CO2 and the stage of growth and development of plant. The change of dark respiration for the two tree species was determined by the direct effect of CO2 and long-term acclimation. The prediction of the long-term response of needle dark respiration to elevated CO2 concentration based on the short-term response is in dispute.

  14. Dietary Linoleic and a-Linolenic Acid Affect Anxiety-Related Responses and Exploratory Activity in Growing Pigs

    Clouard, C.M.; Gerrits, W.J.J.; Kerkhof, van I.; Smink, W.; Bolhuis, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Growing evidence suggests that the dietary ratio of linoleic acid (LA) to a-linolenic acid (ALA), the precursors of arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), respectively, may affect behavior in mammals. Objective: This study aimed at evaluating the impact of dietary LA and

  15. Newborn Jaundice Technologies: Unbound Bilirubin and Bilirubin Binding Capacity In Neonates

    Amin, Sanjiv B.; Lamola, Angelo A.

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal jaundice (hyperbilirubinemia), extremely common in neonates, can be associated with neurotoxicity. A safe level of bilirubin has not been defined in either premature or term infants. Emerging evidence suggest that the level of unbound (or “free”) bilirubin has a better sensitivity and specificity than total serum bilirubin for bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity. Although recent studies suggest the usefulness of free bilirubin measurements in managing high-risk neonates including premature infants, there currently exists no widely available method to assay the serum free bilirubin concentration. To keep pace with the growing demand, in addition to reevaluation of old methods, several promising new methods are being developed for sensitive, accurate, and rapid measurement of free bilirubin and bilirubin binding capacity. These innovative methods need to be validated before adopting for clinical use. We provide an overview of some promising methods for free bilirubin and binding capacity measurements with the goal to enhance research in this area of active interest and apparent need. PMID:21641486

  16. Athena unbound Athena Unbound

    Dagmar Heymann

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Eine „banale“ Geschichte: Frauen sind in den Natur- und Ingenieurwissenschaften immer noch eine Minderheit, auch in Zeiten von weitgehend durchgesetzter Gleichberichtigung? Von vielen, gerade auch Befürworter/-innen gleicher Teilhabe von Frauen an allen Lebens- und Arbeitsbereichen aber auch von jungen Frauen und Männern, wird diese Tatasche häufig geleugnet oder als inzwischen unbedeutend angesehen. Auf der anderen Seite gibt es immer noch (oder wieder? viele, die hierin die Folge des berühmten biologischen Unterschieds sehen: Frauen haben eine geringere Begabung für mathematisches Denken und Männern liegt auf der anderen Seite Soziales und Kontaktpflege weniger…Why are there so few women scientists? Persisting differences between women’s and men’s experiences in science make this question as relevant today as it ever was. This book sets out to answer this question, and to propose solutions for the future. By presenting women’s experiences at all key career stages from childhood to retirement—the authors reveal the hidden barriers, subtle exclusions and unwritten rules of the scientific workplace, and the effects, both professional and personal, that these have on the female scientist.

  17. Physiological and biochemical response to Omega-3 plus as a dietary supplement to growing goats under hot summer conditions

    Fatma Edrees Ibrahim Teama

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of dietary supplementation of Omega-3 plus on some the physiological and biochemical traits in growing Baladi goats under hot summer conditions. Thirty-four growing male goats (4-5 months old were randomly divided into two equal groups. Animals in group 1 were fed a concentrate feed mixture (CFM, which was the control group. Goats in group 2 (the experimental group were offered Omega-3 plus (1,000 mg/animal day-1 (30% fish oil, containing 18% eicosapentaenoic acid and 12% docosahexaenoic acid + 100 mg wheat germ oil (0.22% tocopherols daily in addition to the basal diet for four months (the experimental period during the hot summer season. Body weight (BW changes of both groups were recorded monthly during the experiment. Blood samples were collected monthly, and total protein, immunoglobulin G (IgG, total cholesterol, triglycerides, liver enzymes (AST and ALT, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, and thyroid hormones (T3 and T4 were estimated. A significant increase in the live BW of growing goats was recorded as a result of dietary supplementation of Omega-3 plus. Total protein, IgG, and T3 levels were higher than those obtained with control. In contrast, total cholesterol, triglycerides, urea, ALT, and AST levels were significantly reduced. The serum concentration of creatinine and T4 levels was indistinguishable from those of control. Addition of Omega-3 plus as a dietary supplement to growing goats under hot summer conditions increases their daily weight gain and improves their general physiological and biochemical status by decreasing total cholesterol, triglycerides, urea, ALT, and AST. It is thus suggested that Omega-3 plus should be used as a supplement in the growth period of goats.

  18. Bilirubin Albumin Binding and Unbound Unconjugated Hyperbilirubinemia in Premature Infants.

    Amin, Sanjiv B; Wang, Hongyue

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the associations between unbound bilirubin (UB) and total serum bilirubin (TSB), bilirubin:albumin molar ratio (BAMR), and bilirubin albumin binding affinity (Ka) as a function of gestational age (GA) in infants born at 24-33 weeks GA. In a prospective observational study, TSB and UB were measured twice daily at least 8 hours apart during the first postnatal week. Serum albumin was measured to calculate BAMR on each day. The highest UB on each day, corresponding TSB, and serum albumin were used to calculate the Ka on each day. For the 166 infants studied, peak UB significantly correlated with concomitant Ka (r = -0.44, P = .001) but not with concomitant TSB or BAMR after adjusting for GA. On multiple regression analyses, there was a significant association of concomitant Ka (-0.06, 95% CI -0.08 to -0.04, P = .0001), but not concomitant TSB or BAMR with peak UB after controlling for GA, birth weight, race, and sex. GA group was a significant effect modifier for the association between Ka and peak UB (0.03, 95% CI 0.02-0.04, P bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The spectral theorem for quaternionic unbounded normal operators based on the S-spectrum

    Alpay, Daniel, E-mail: dany@math.bgu.ac.il; Kimsey, David P., E-mail: dpkimsey@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Colombo, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.colombo@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Matematica, Via E. Bonardi, 9, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    In this paper we prove the spectral theorem for quaternionic unbounded normal operators using the notion of S-spectrum. The proof technique consists of first establishing a spectral theorem for quaternionic bounded normal operators and then using a transformation which maps a quaternionic unbounded normal operator to a quaternionic bounded normal operator. With this paper we complete the foundation of spectral analysis of quaternionic operators. The S-spectrum has been introduced to define the quaternionic functional calculus but it turns out to be the correct object also for the spectral theorem for quaternionic normal operators. The lack of a suitable notion of spectrum was a major obstruction to fully understand the spectral theorem for quaternionic normal operators. A prime motivation for studying the spectral theorem for quaternionic unbounded normal operators is given by the subclass of unbounded anti-self adjoint quaternionic operators which play a crucial role in the quaternionic quantum mechanics.

  20. On bounded and unbounded dynamics of the Hamiltonian system for unified scalar field cosmology

    Starkov, Konstantin E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the research of global dynamics for the Hamiltonian system formed by the unified scalar field cosmology. We prove that this system possesses only unbounded dynamics in the space of negative curvature. It is found the invariant domain filled only by unbounded dynamics for the space with positive curvature. Further, we construct a set of polytopes depending on the Hamiltonian level surface that contain all compact invariant sets. Besides, one invariant two dimensional plane is described. Finally, we establish nonchaoticity of dynamics in one special case. - Highlights: • Unbounded dynamics is stated in case of negative curvature. • Domain with unbounded dynamics is got in case of positive curvature. • Localization polytope for compact invariant sets is computed. • One two dimensional invariant plane is described. • Nonchaotic dynamics is stated in one special case.

  1. STABILITY THEOREM FOR A CLASS OF PERTURBED NONAUTONOMOUS NEUTRAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION WITH UNBOUNDED DELAY

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a one-dimensional nonautonomous neutral differential equation. We obtain sufficient conditions under which the zero solution to this equation with unbounded delay and perturbation is uniformly asymptotically stable.

  2. Measurement of seasonal changes and spatial variations in pavement unbound base and subgrade properties.

    2009-01-01

    Soils often undergo cyclic wetting/drying, but there is very limited research on unsaturated : soils subjected to variations in moisture content. More specifically, field moisture variation : over time in highway unbound bases and subgrade soils is a...

  3. Deformation from symmetry for Schrodinger equations of higher order on unbounded domains

    Addolorata Salvatore

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available By means of a perturbation method recently introduced by Bolle, we discuss the existence of infinitely many solutions for a class of perturbed symmetric higher order Schrodinger equations with non-homogeneous boundary data on unbounded domains.

  4. 21 CFR 862.1113 - Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system.

    2010-04-01

    ... levels of bilirubin (total and unbound) in the blood (serum) of newborn infants to aid in indicating the risk of bilirubin encephalopathy (kernicterus). (b) Classification. Class I. [54 FR 30206, July 19...

  5. On bounded and unbounded dynamics of the Hamiltonian system for unified scalar field cosmology

    Starkov, Konstantin E., E-mail: kstarkov@ipn.mx

    2016-05-27

    This paper is devoted to the research of global dynamics for the Hamiltonian system formed by the unified scalar field cosmology. We prove that this system possesses only unbounded dynamics in the space of negative curvature. It is found the invariant domain filled only by unbounded dynamics for the space with positive curvature. Further, we construct a set of polytopes depending on the Hamiltonian level surface that contain all compact invariant sets. Besides, one invariant two dimensional plane is described. Finally, we establish nonchaoticity of dynamics in one special case. - Highlights: • Unbounded dynamics is stated in case of negative curvature. • Domain with unbounded dynamics is got in case of positive curvature. • Localization polytope for compact invariant sets is computed. • One two dimensional invariant plane is described. • Nonchaotic dynamics is stated in one special case.

  6. The response of various muscle types to a restriction -re-alimentation feeding strategy in growing pigs.

    Lebret, B; Heyer, A; Gondret, F; Louveau, I

    2007-07-01

    Muscle lipid concentration is known to influence pork eating quality. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of a restriction-re-alimentation feeding strategy on intramuscular fat deposition in pigs. A total of 70 Duroc × (Large White × Landrace) pigs (castrated males and females) were used. Ten pigs were first slaughtered at 30 kg live weight (LW) to determine initial body and muscle composition. From 30 to 80 kg LW (growing period), pigs were either fed ad libitum (AL) or restricted to 70% of the ad libitum intake of AL pigs (RA). From 80 to 110 kg LW (finishing period), both AL and RA pigs were fed ad libitum. In each group, pigs were slaughtered at 80 kg (n = 10) and at 110 kg (n = 20) LW. During the growing period, the growth rate of RA pigs was reduced by 30% (P alimentation up to the level observed in AL pigs (P alimentation of RA pigs increased fat tissue deposition (+160% for females, P alimentation increased lipid (+62%, P alimentation. Therefore, an increased muscle lipid concentration at 110 kg LW could not be reached in RA pigs. Modifications of onset and/or duration of restriction and re-alimentation periods should be tested to optimise effects on muscle lipid deposition and thereby achieve improved pork quality.

  7. Inter- and intraspecific variation in the germination response to light quality and scarification in grasses growing in two-phase mosaics of the Chihuahuan Desert.

    Pezzani, Fabiana; Montaña, Carlos

    2006-06-01

    In many locations, plants are faced with adjacent, contrasting environments, and the between-species differential evolution of life history traits can be interpreted as an evolutionary response to this environmental heterogeneity. However, there has been little research on the intraspecific variability in these attributes as a possible evolutionary response of plants. In the two-phase mosaic of the Chihuahuan Desert (adjacent patches with contrasting resource availability), analyses were carried out of the germination response to the scarification and light quality to which grass seeds growing on these patches are exposed (open and closed habitats). Species that grow in open habitats exhibited a higher germination success than those from closed habitats after scarification. At both the inter- and intraspecific level, there were differences in the germination percentage and in the germination speed in response to light quality. Intraspecific variation in the species from the closed habitat (Pleuraphis mutica and Trichloris crinita) and in Chloris virgata (which grows in both habitats) was due to genetic variation (the family factor was significant), but there was no genetic variation in phenotypic plasticity (non-significant interaction between family and light quality). In contrast, for the species that grows only in the open habitat (Dasyochloa pulchella), the family did not have a significant effect, but there was genetic variation in the phenotypic plasticity (significant interaction between family and light quality). In C. virgata, P. mutica and T. crinita, natural selection could be favouring those genotypes that responded better in each light environment, but it is not possible that the natural selection resulted in different optimal phenotypes in each habitat. On the contrary, in D. pulchella, selection could have reduced the genetic variation, but there is the possibility of the evolution of reaction norms, resulting in the selection of alternative

  8. Response of needle dark respiration of Pinus koraiensis and Pinus sylvestriformis to elevated CO2 concentra-tions for four growing seasons’ exposure

    2007-01-01

    The long-term effect of elevated CO2 concentrations on needle dark respiration of two coniferous spe- cies—Pinus koraiensis and Pinus sylvestriformis on the Changbai Mountain was investigated using open-top chambers. P. koraiensis and P. sylvestriformis were exposed to 700, 500 μmol·mol-1 CO2 and ambient CO2 (approx. 350 μmol·mol-1) for four growing seasons. Needle dark respiration was meas- ured during the second, third and fourth growing seasons’ exposure to elevated CO2. The results showed that needle dark respiration rate increased for P. koraiensis and P. sylvestriformis grown at elevated CO2 concentrations during the second growing season, could be attributed to the change of carbohydrate and/or nitrogen content of needles. Needle dark respiration of P. koraiensis was stimu- lated and that of P. sylvestriformis was inhibited by elevated CO2 concentrations during the third growing season. Different response of the two tree species to elevated CO2 mainly resulted from the difference in the growth rate. Elevated CO2 concentrations inhibited needle dark respiration of both P. koraiensis and P. sylvestriformis during the fourth growing season. There was consistent trend be- tween the short-term effect and the long-term effect of elevated CO2 on needle dark respiration in P. sylvestriformis during the third growing season by changing measurement CO2 concentrations. How- ever, the short-term effect was different from the long-term effect for P. koraiensis. Response of dark respiration of P. koraiensis and P. sylvestriformis to elevated CO2 concentrations was related to the treatment time of CO2 and the stage of growth and development of plant. The change of dark respiration for the two tree species was determined by the direct effect of CO2 and long-term acclimation. The prediction of the long-term response of needle dark respiration to elevated CO2 concentration based on the short-term response is in dispute.

  9. The unbound isotopes {sup 9,10}He

    Johansson, H.T. [Fundamental Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, S-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Aksyutina, Yu. [Fundamental Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, S-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Aumann, T.; Boretzky, K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Borge, M.J.G. [Instituto Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Chatillon, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Chulkov, L.V. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kurchatov Institute, RU-123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Cortina-Gil, D. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); University of Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Datta Pramanik, U. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Emling, H. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Forssen, C. [Fundamental Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, S-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Fynbo, H.O.U. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Geissel, H.; Ickert, G. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Jonson, B., E-mail: Bjorn.Jonson@chalmers.s [Fundamental Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, S-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Kulessa, R. [Instytut Fizyki, Universytet Jagiellonski, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland); Langer, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lantz, M. [Fundamental Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, S-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); LeBleis, T.; Mahata, K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    The unbound nuclei {sup 9}He and {sup 10}He have been produced in proton-knockout reactions from a 280 MeV/u {sup 11}Li beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target at the ALADIN-LAND setup at GSI. Information on their nuclear structure has been obtained from the relative-energy spectra, {sup 8}He+n and {sup 8}He+2n, employing reaction models incorporating the structure of {sup 11}Li. The {sup 8}He+n relative-energy spectrum is dominated by a strong peak-like structure at low energy, which may be interpreted within the effective-range approximation as the result of an s-wave interaction with a neutron scattering length of -3.17(66) fm. This spectrum also shows evidence for resonance states at 1.33(8) MeV and at 2.4 MeV above the {sup 8}He+n threshold. It is argued that the s-state might not be the {sup 9}He ground state. For {sup 8}He+n+n, the analysis of the relative-energy spectrum gives two alternative possibilities for an interpretation: either a narrow resonance at 1.42(10) MeV ({Gamma}=1.11(76) MeV) superimposed on a correlated background, or two overlapping resonances, a ground state at 1.54(11) MeV ({Gamma}=1.91(41) MeV) together with an excited state at 3.99(26) MeV ({Gamma}=1.64(89) MeV). The two possible interpretations are discussed.

  10. Location-Unbound Color-Shape Binding Representations in Visual Working Memory.

    Saiki, Jun

    2016-02-01

    The mechanism by which nonspatial features, such as color and shape, are bound in visual working memory, and the role of those features' location in their binding, remains unknown. In the current study, I modified a redundancy-gain paradigm to investigate these issues. A set of features was presented in a two-object memory display, followed by a single object probe. Participants judged whether the probe contained any features of the memory display, regardless of its location. Response time distributions revealed feature coactivation only when both features of a single object in the memory display appeared together in the probe, regardless of the response time benefit from the probe and memory objects sharing the same location. This finding suggests that a shared location is necessary in the formation of bound representations but unnecessary in their maintenance. Electroencephalography data showed that amplitude modulations reflecting location-unbound feature coactivation were different from those reflecting the location-sharing benefit, consistent with the behavioral finding that feature-location binding is unnecessary in the maintenance of color-shape binding. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Transglycosylated Starch Improves Insulin Response and Alters Lipid and Amino Acid Metabolome in a Growing Pig Model.

    Newman, Monica A; Zebeli, Qendrim; Eberspächer, Eva; Grüll, Dietmar; Molnar, Timea; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U

    2017-03-16

    Due to the functional properties and physiological effects often associated with chemically modified starches, significant interest lies in their development for incorporation in processed foods. This study investigated the effect of transglycosylated cornstarch (TGS) on blood glucose, insulin, and serum metabolome in the pre- and postprandial phase in growing pigs. Eight jugular vein-catheterized barrows were fed two diets containing 72% purified starch (waxy cornstarch (CON) or TGS). A meal tolerance test (MTT) was performed with serial blood sampling for glucose, insulin, lipids, and metabolome profiling. TGS-fed pigs had reduced postprandial insulin ( p phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins were generally increased ( p phosphatidylcholines and lysophosphatidylcholines were decreased ( p insulin and glucose metabolism, which may have caused the alterations in serum amino acid and phospholipid metabolome profiles.

  12. Serodiagnosis of human neurocysticercosis using antigenic components of Taenia solium metacestodes derived from the unbound fraction from jacalin affinity chromatography

    Gleyce Alves Machado

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to analyse Taenia solium metacestode antigens that were derived from the unbound fraction of jacalin affinity chromatography and subsequent tert-octylphenoxy poly (oxyethylene ethanol Triton X-114 (TX-114 partitioning in the diagnosis of human neurocysticercosis (NCC. Immunoassays were designed to detect T. solium-specific IgG antibodies by ELISA and immunoblot. Serum samples were collected from 132 individuals who were categorised as follows: 40 had NCC, 62 presented Taenia spp or other parasitic diseases and 30 were healthy individuals. The jacalin-unbound (J unbound fraction presented higher sensitivity and specificity rates than the jacalin-bound fraction and only this fraction was subjected to subsequent TX-114 partitioning, resulting in detergent (DJ unbound and aqueous (AJ unbound fractions. The ELISA sensitivity and specificity were 85% and 84.8% for J unbound , 92.5% and 93.5% for DJ unbound and 82.5% and 82.6% for AJ unbound . By immunoblot, the DJ unbound fraction showed 100% sensitivity and specificity and only serum samples from patients with NCC recognised the 50-70 kDa T. solium-specific components. We conclude that the DJ unbound fraction can serve as a useful tool for the differential immunodiagnosis of NCC by immunoblot.

  13. Growth Performance, Meat Quality and Fatty Acid Metabolism Response of Growing Meat Rabbits to Dietary Linoleic Acid

    R. G. Li

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of different amounts of dietary linoleic acid (LA on growth performance, serum biochemical traits, meat quality, fatty acids composition of muscle and liver, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT 1 mRNA expression in the liver of 9 wks old to 13 wks old growing meat rabbits. One hundred and fifty 9 wks old meat rabbits were allocated to individual cages and randomly divided into five groups. Animals in each group were fed with a diet with the following LA addition concentrations: 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 g/kg diet (as-fed basis and LA concentrations were 0.84, 1.21, 1.34, 1.61 and 1.80% in the diet, respectively. The results showed as follows: the dietary LA levels significantly affected muscle color of LL included a* and b* of experimental rabbits (p<0.05. The linear effect of LA on serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol was obtained (p = 0.0119. The saturated fatty acids (SFAs and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs contents of LL decreased and the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs content of LL increased with dietary LA increase (p<0.0001. The PUFA n-6 content and PUFA n-3 content in the LL was significantly affected by the dietary LA levels (p<0.01, p<0.05. The MUFAs content in the liver decreased and the PUFAs contents in the liver increased with dietary LA increase (p<0.0001. The PUFA n-6 content and the PUFA n-6/n-3 ratio in the liver increased and PUFA n-3 content in the liver decreased with dietary LA increase (p<0.01. The linear effect of LA on CPT 1 mRNA expression in the liver was obtained (p = 0.0081. In summary, dietary LA addition had significant effects on liver and muscle fatty acid composition (increased PUFAs of 9 wks old to 13 wks old growing meat rabbits, but had little effects on growth performance, meat physical traits and mRNA expression of liver relative enzyme of experimental rabbits.

  14. Study of the unbound nuclei 7,9He and 10Li

    Al Falou, H.

    2007-07-01

    The unbound nuclei 7,9 He and 10 Li have been investigated via the high-energy breakup of beams of neutron-rich nuclei ( 8 He, 11 Be and 14 B). The decay-energy spectra were reconstructed from coincident measurements of the charged fragments ( 6,8 He and 9 Li) with a ΔE-E telescope (CHARISSA) and the neutrons with the DEMON array. A theoretical approach based on the sudden approximation was used to model the reactions populating the unbound final states. The calculated decay-energy spectra were convoluted with the response function of the experimental setup using a simulation developed specifically for the present study and compared with the experimental results. The 10 Li system was produced using an 11 Be beam and the results confirm the continuation of the inversion of the ν1s1/2 and ν0p1/2 levels in the N = 7 isotopic chain. The 9 He system was produced in two different ways with the breakup of 11 Be and 14 B, and was the most exotic system studied here. In this case, a structure was observed at very low decay energy which very probably corresponds to a virtual s state (a s ≅ -2 - 0 fm). This result suggests that the level inversion also occurs in 9 He, but with a much weaker core-neutron interaction than for 10 Li (a s equals -14 ± 2 fm). For the data acquired from the breakup of the 14 B beam, the decay energy spectrum exhibits a resonance around E r equals 1.2 MeV, which most probably corresponds to an excited 1/2 - state in 9 He. The 7 He system was investigated with three different beams ( 8 He, 11 Be and 14 B). No evidence for the existence of the proposed low-lying (E r ∼ 1 MeV) spin-orbit partner (1/2 - ) of the ground state (3/2 - ) could be found. (author)

  15. Transglycosylated Starch Improves Insulin Response and Alters Lipid and Amino Acid Metabolome in a Growing Pig Model

    Monica A. Newman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the functional properties and physiological effects often associated with chemically modified starches, significant interest lies in their development for incorporation in processed foods. This study investigated the effect of transglycosylated cornstarch (TGS on blood glucose, insulin, and serum metabolome in the pre- and postprandial phase in growing pigs. Eight jugular vein-catheterized barrows were fed two diets containing 72% purified starch (waxy cornstarch (CON or TGS. A meal tolerance test (MTT was performed with serial blood sampling for glucose, insulin, lipids, and metabolome profiling. TGS-fed pigs had reduced postprandial insulin (p < 0.05 and glucose (p < 0.10 peaks compared to CON-fed pigs. The MTT showed increased (p < 0.05 serum urea with TGS-fed pigs compared to CON, indicative of increased protein catabolism. Metabolome profiling showed reduced (p < 0.05 amino acids such as alanine and glutamine with TGS, suggesting increased gluconeogenesis compared to CON, probably due to a reduction in available glucose. Of all metabolites affected by dietary treatment, alkyl-acyl-phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins were generally increased (p < 0.05 preprandially, whereas diacyl-phosphatidylcholines and lysophosphatidylcholines were decreased (p < 0.05 postprandially in TGS-fed pigs compared to CON. In conclusion, TGS led to changes in postprandial insulin and glucose metabolism, which may have caused the alterations in serum amino acid and phospholipid metabolome profiles.

  16. Environmental Growing Conditions in Five Production Systems Induce Stress Response and Affect Chemical Composition of Cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) Beans.

    Niether, Wiebke; Smit, Inga; Armengot, Laura; Schneider, Monika; Gerold, Gerhard; Pawelzik, Elke

    2017-11-29

    Cocoa beans are produced all across the humid tropics under different environmental conditions provided by the region but also by the season and the type of production system. Agroforestry systems compared to monocultures buffer climate extremes and therefore provide a less stressful environment for the understory cocoa, especially under seasonally varying conditions. We measured the element concentration as well as abiotic stress indicators (polyamines and total phenolic content) in beans derived from five different production systems comparing monocultures and agroforestry systems and from two harvesting seasons. Concentrations of N, Mg, S, Fe, Mn, Na, and Zn were higher in beans produced in agroforestry systems with high stem density and leaf area index. In the dry season, the N, Fe, and Cu concentration of the beans increased. The total phenolic content increased with proceeding of the dry season while other abiotic stress indicators like spermine decreased, implying an effect of the water availability on the chemical composition of the beans. Agroforestry systems did not buffer the variability of stress indicators over the seasons compared to monocultures. The effect of environmental growing conditions on bean chemical composition was not strong but can contribute to variations in cocoa bean quality.

  17. Interactions between sire family and production environment (temperate vs. tropical) on performance and thermoregulation responses in growing pigs.

    Rosé, R; Gilbert, H; Loyau, T; Giorgi, M; Billon, Y; Riquet, J; Renaudeau, D; Gourdine, J-L

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 2 climatic environments (temperate [TEMP] vs. tropical humid [TROP]) on production and thermoregulation traits in growing pigs. A backcross design involving Large White (LW; heat sensitive) and Creole (CR; heat tolerant) pigs was studied. The same 10 F LW × CR boars were mated with related LW sows in each environment. A total of 1,298 backcross pigs ( = 634 pigs from 11 batches for the TEMP environment and = 664 pigs from 12 batches for the TROP environment) were phenotyped on BW (every 15 d from wk 11 to 23 of age), voluntary feed intake (ADFI, from wk 11 to 23), backfat thickness (BFT; at wk 19 and 23), skin temperature (ST; at wk 19 and 23), and rectal temperature (RT; at wk 19, 21, and 23). The feed conversion ratio was computed for the whole test period (11 to 23 wk). The calculation of the temperature-humidity index showed an average difference of 2.4°C between the TEMP and TROP environments. The ADG and ADFI were higher in the TEMP environment than in the TROP environment (834 vs. 754 g/d and 2.20 vs. 1.80 kg/d, respectively; environment than in the TEMP environment (35.9 vs. 34.8°C for ST and 39.5 vs. 39.3°C for RT, respectively; environment interactions ( environment interaction and to detect QTL related to heat tolerance.

  18. Responses of growing Japanese quails that received selenium from selenium enriched kale sprout (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra L.).

    Chantiratikul, Anut; Chinrasri, Orawan; Pakmaruek, Pornpan; Chantiratikul, Piyanete; Thosaikham, Withpol; Aengwanich, Worapol

    2011-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of selenium (Se) from Se-enriched kale sprout (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra L.) on the performance and Se concentrations in tissues of growing Japanese quails. Two hundred quails were divided into five treatments. Each treatment consisted of four replicates and each replicate contained ten quails in a completely randomize design. The experiment was conducted for 5 weeks. The treatments were T1, control diet; T2, control diet plus 0.2 mg Se/kg from sodium selenite; T3, T4, and T5, control diet plus 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 mg Se/kg from Se-enriched kale sprout. The results revealed that Se supplementation had no impact on feed intake, performance, and carcass characteristics of quails (p > 0.05). However, Se supplementation from both sodium selenite and Se-enriched kale sprout increased (p kale sprout. The results indicate that Se from Se-enriched kale sprout offers no advantage over Se from sodium selenite on tissue Se concentration.

  19. Age and puberty differences in stress responses during a public speaking task: do adolescents grow more sensitive to social evaluation

    Sumter, S.R.; Bokhorst, C.L.; Miers, A.C.; van Pelt, J.; Westerberg, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    During adolescence pubertal development is said to lead to an increase in general stress sensitivity which might create a vulnerability for the emergence of psychopathology during this period. However, the empirical evidence for increasing stress sensitivity is scarce and mixed. Biological responses

  20. Adaptation to social isolation - Acute and long-term stress responses of growing gilts with different coping characteristics

    Ruis, MAW; te Brake, JHA; Engel, B; Buist, WG; Blokhuis, HJ; Koolhaas, JM

    The present experiment studied the acute and long-term stress responses of reactive and proactive prepubertal gilts to social isolation. Gilts with either reactive or proactive features were identified according to behavioral resistance in a backtest at a young age (2-4 days), respectively being low

  1. Integrated Qs Al Mudatsir in the reality group counseling to grow the character of students academic responsibility

    Asroful Kadafi

    2017-11-01

    The emotional development of students in early teens showed a sensitive and recreative nature (critical, emotions are often negative and temperamental. This negative passion is evidenced by the findings in the field of Indonesian teenagers, such as Tawuran, promiscuity, students who dare to do nasty with school friends (Tirto, 2013. Many factors are the cause, one of which is still the weak character of academic responsibility that students have. This problem becomes a serious problem in the world of education Indonesia. Therefore, it is natural for educational practitioners to take solutive steps to overcome the problem. One education practitioner who has a strategic position to handle the case is Counselor. Counselors are deemed able to provide practical solutions through Reality Group Counseling services by integrating spiritual values (Islam to foster student academic responsibilities. Reality group counseling emphasizes the growth of personal responsibility. This advice is also in line with Islamic values that encourage individuals always to be responsible for every action as reflected in the QS. Al Muddassir: 38.

  2. The Growing Importance of the Practical Application of Corporate Social Responsibility in the Management of Companies in the Czech Republic

    Bris Petr

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is aimed at researching the issue of Corporate Social Responsibility (hereinafter “CSR” in the Czech Republic (hereinafter “CR”. Social responsibility is now an integral part of integrated business management. It has a long tradition in the Czech Republic, because one of the most prominent businessmen of the 20th century – a Czech entrepreneur, Tomas Bata - began to apply CSR in his plants around the world in the first half of the last century. Currently,the issue of CSR becomes increasingly important. There is an integration of positive attitudes, practices or programs into company’s business strategy at the top management level. We followa shift in management focus from the level of “profit only” to a wider view in the context of the three P’s - people - planet - profit. This involves the functioning of the organization with regardto the so called triple - bottom - line, when the company focuses not only on economic growth, but also on environmental and social aspects of its activities. The main objective of the paper is to analyze the current state of CSR in the Czech Republic on the basis of quantitative research (approx. 100 organizations were approached and compare it with an analysis from 2004. The conclusion summarizes the approaches of managers to the issue of CSR in the CR, including some trends.

  3. Partial rip scenario - a cosmology with a growing cosmological term

    Stefancic, H.

    2004-01-01

    A cosmology with the growing cosmological term is considered. If there is no exchange of energy between vacuum and matter components, the requirement of general covariance implies the time dependence of the gravitational constant G. Irrespectively of the exact functional form of the cosmological term growth, the universe ends in a de Sitter regime with a constant asymptotic Λ, but vanishing G. Although there is no divergence of the scale factor in finite time, such as in the 'Big Rip' scenario, gravitationally bound systems eventually become unbound. In the case of systems bound by non-gravitational forces, there is no unbounding effect, as the asymptotic Λ is insufficiently large to disturb these systems

  4. Separation and analysis techniques for bound and unbound alkyl ketene dimer (AKD in paper: A review

    Sunil Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Alkyl ketene dimer (AKD is the reactive synthetic sizing agent that is used in alkaline or neutral papermaking conditions to provide certain level of hydrophobicity to the paper and board. The sizing mechanism of AKD involves its reaction with the hydroxyl groups on cellulose. However, all of AKD does not chemically react with fibers; some of it may undergo hydrolysis in water to form unstable β-keto acids, which decarboxylate to the corresponding ketone. This portion of AKD remains non-reacted (unbound and adsorbs onto fibers. The sizing effect depends mainly on the quantity of chemically reacted (bound AKD in paper, while the role of unbound forms, that is ketone and oligomer, is still not clear. Both bound and unbound portions of AKD have their own effect on paper. It is important to know the proportion of bound and unbound form of AKD in paper. The different techniques have been adopted for the separation and analysis of bound and unbound AKD present in paper. The aim of this paper is to review and summarize the various techniques provided by the researchers to separate the different forms of AKD and highlight the most important aspects for their separation.

  5. Ionizing feedback from massive stars in massive clusters - III. Disruption of partially unbound clouds

    Dale, J. E.; Ercolano, B.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2013-03-01

    We extend our previous smoothed particle hydrodynamics parameter study of the effects of photoionization from O-stars on star-forming clouds to include initially unbound clouds. We generate a set of model clouds in the mass range 104-106 M⊙ with initial virial ratios Ekin/Epot = 2.3, allow them to form stars and study the impact of the photoionizing radiation produced by the massive stars. We find that, on the 3 Myr time-scale before supernovae are expected to begin detonating, the fraction of mass expelled by ionizing feedback is a very strong function of the cloud escape velocities. High-mass clouds are largely unaffected dynamically, while low-mass clouds have large fractions of their gas reserves expelled on this time-scale. However, the fractions of stellar mass unbound are modest and significant portions of the unbound stars are so only because the clouds themselves are initially partially unbound. We find that ionization is much more able to create well-cleared bubbles in the unbound clouds, owing to their intrinsic expansion, but that the presence of such bubbles does not necessarily indicate that a given cloud has been strongly influenced by feedback. We also find, in common with the bound clouds from our earlier work, that many of the systems simulated here are highly porous to photons and supernova ejecta, and that most of them will likely survive their first supernova explosions.

  6. Effect of protein binding on unbound atazanavir and darunavir cerebrospinal fluid concentrations.

    Delille, Cecile A; Pruett, Sarah T; Marconi, Vincent C; Lennox, Jeffrey L; Armstrong, Wendy S; Arrendale, Richard F; Sheth, Anandi N; Easley, Kirk A; Acosta, Edward P; Vunnava, Aswani; Ofotokun, Ighovwerha

    2014-09-01

    HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) exhibit different protein binding affinities and achieve variable plasma and tissue concentrations. Degree of plasma protein binding may impact central nervous system penetration. This cross-sectional study assessed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) unbound PI concentrations, HIV-1 RNA, and neopterin levels in subjects receiving either ritonavir-boosted darunavir (DRV), 95% plasma protein bound, or atazanavir (ATV), 86% bound. Unbound PI trough concentrations were measured using rapid equilibrium dialysis and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Plasma and CSF HIV-1 RNA and neopterin were measured by Ampliprep/COBAS® Taqman® 2.0 assay (Roche) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ALPCO), respectively. CSF/plasma unbound drug concentration ratio was higher for ATV, 0.09 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.06-0.12] than DRV, 0.04 (95%CI 0.03-0.06). Unbound CSF concentrations were lower than protein adjusted wild-type inhibitory concentration-50 (IC50 ) in all ATV and 1 DRV-treated subjects (P < 0.001). CSF HIV-1 RNA was detected in 2/15 ATV and 4/15 DRV subjects (P = 0.65). CSF neopterin levels were low and similar between arms. ATV relative to DRV had higher CSF/plasma unbound drug ratio. Low CSF HIV-1 RNA and neopterin suggest that both regimens resulted in CSF virologic suppression and controlled inflammation. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  7. A note on exponential convergence of neural networks with unbounded distributed delays

    Chu Tianguang [Intelligent Control Laboratory, Center for Systems and Control, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)]. E-mail: chutg@pku.edu.cn; Yang Haifeng [Intelligent Control Laboratory, Center for Systems and Control, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2007-12-15

    This note examines issues concerning global exponential convergence of neural networks with unbounded distributed delays. Sufficient conditions are derived by exploiting exponentially fading memory property of delay kernel functions. The method is based on comparison principle of delay differential equations and does not need the construction of any Lyapunov functionals. It is simple yet effective in deriving less conservative exponential convergence conditions and more detailed componentwise decay estimates. The results of this note and [Chu T. An exponential convergence estimate for analog neural networks with delay. Phys Lett A 2001;283:113-8] suggest a class of neural networks whose globally exponentially convergent dynamics is completely insensitive to a wide range of time delays from arbitrary bounded discrete type to certain unbounded distributed type. This is of practical interest in designing fast and reliable neural circuits. Finally, an open question is raised on the nature of delay kernels for attaining exponential convergence in an unbounded distributed delayed neural network.

  8. A note on exponential convergence of neural networks with unbounded distributed delays

    Chu Tianguang; Yang Haifeng

    2007-01-01

    This note examines issues concerning global exponential convergence of neural networks with unbounded distributed delays. Sufficient conditions are derived by exploiting exponentially fading memory property of delay kernel functions. The method is based on comparison principle of delay differential equations and does not need the construction of any Lyapunov functionals. It is simple yet effective in deriving less conservative exponential convergence conditions and more detailed componentwise decay estimates. The results of this note and [Chu T. An exponential convergence estimate for analog neural networks with delay. Phys Lett A 2001;283:113-8] suggest a class of neural networks whose globally exponentially convergent dynamics is completely insensitive to a wide range of time delays from arbitrary bounded discrete type to certain unbounded distributed type. This is of practical interest in designing fast and reliable neural circuits. Finally, an open question is raised on the nature of delay kernels for attaining exponential convergence in an unbounded distributed delayed neural network

  9. Regularization in Hilbert space under unbounded operators and general source conditions

    Hofmann, Bernd; Mathé, Peter; Von Weizsäcker, Heinrich

    2009-01-01

    The authors study ill-posed equations with unbounded operators in Hilbert space. This setup has important applications, but only a few theoretical studies are available. First, the question is addressed and answered whether every element satisfies some general source condition with respect to a given self-adjoint unbounded operator. This generalizes a previous result from Mathé and Hofmann (2008 Inverse Problems 24 015009). The analysis then proceeds to error bounds for regularization, emphasizing some specific points for regularization under unbounded operators. The study finally reviews two examples within the light of the present study, as these are fractional differentiation and some Cauchy problems for the Helmholtz equation, both studied previously and in more detail by U Tautenhahn and co-authors

  10. Unbounded dynamics and compact invariant sets of one Hamiltonian system defined by the minimally coupled field

    Starkov, Konstantin E., E-mail: kstarkov@ipn.mx

    2015-06-12

    In this paper we study some features of global dynamics for one Hamiltonian system arisen in cosmology which is formed by the minimally coupled field; this system was introduced by Maciejewski et al. in 2007. We establish that under some simple conditions imposed on parameters of this system all trajectories are unbounded in both of time directions. Further, we present other conditions for system parameters under which we localize the domain with unbounded dynamics; this domain is defined with help of bounds for values of the Hamiltonian level surface parameter. We describe the case when our system possesses periodic orbits which are found explicitly. In the rest of the cases we get some localization bounds for compact invariant sets. - Highlights: • Domain with unbounded dynamics is localized. • Equations for periodic orbits are given in one level set. • Localizations for compact invariant sets are got.

  11. Unbounding the mental number line – New evidence on children’s spatial representation of numbers

    Tanja eLink

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Number line estimation (i.e., indicating the position of a given number on a physical line is a standard assessment of children’s spatial representation of number magnitude. Importantly, there is an ongoing debate on the question in how far the bounded task version with start and endpoint given (e.g., 0 and 100 might induce specific estimation strategies and thus may not allow for unbiased inferences on the underlying representation. Recently, a new unbounded version of the task was suggested with only the start point and a unit fixed (e.g., the distance from 0 to 1. In adults this task provided a less biased index of the spatial representation of number magnitude. Yet, so far there are no children data available for the unbounded number line estimation task. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional study on primary school children performing both, the bounded and the unbounded version of the task. We observed clear evidence for systematic strategic influences (i.e., the consideration of reference points in the bounded number line estimation task for children older than grade two whereas there were no such indications for the unbounded version for any one of the age groups. In summary, the current data corroborate the unbounded number line estimation task to be a valuable tool for assessing children's spatial representation of number magnitude in a systematic and unbiased manner. Yet, similar results for the bounded and the unbounded version of the task for first- and second-graders may indicate that both versions of the task might assess the same underlying representation for relatively younger children - at least in number ranges familiar to the children assessed. This is of particular importance for inferences about the nature and development of children's magnitude representation.

  12. Impact of the Growing Healthy mHealth Program on Maternal Feeding Practices, Infant Food Preferences, and Satiety Responsiveness: Quasi-Experimental Study.

    Russell, Catherine Georgina; Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth; Laws, Rachel A; Abbott, Gavin; Zheng, Miaobing; Lymer, Sharyn J; Taki, Sarah; Litterbach, Eloise-Kate V; Ong, Kok-Leong; Campbell, Karen J

    2018-04-25

    Infancy is an important life stage for obesity prevention efforts. Parents' infant feeding practices influence the development of infants' food preferences and eating behaviors and subsequently diet and weight. Mobile health (mHealth) may provide a feasible medium through which to deliver programs to promote healthy infant feeding as it allows low cost and easy access to tailored content. The objective of this study was to describe the effects of an mHealth intervention on parental feeding practices, infant food preferences, and infant satiety responsiveness. A quasi-experimental study was conducted with an mHealth intervention group (Growing Healthy) and a nonrandomized comparison group ("Baby's First Food"). The intervention group received access to a free app with age-appropriate push notifications, a website, and an online forum that provided them with evidence-based advice on infant feeding for healthy growth from birth until 9 months of age. Behavior change techniques were selected using the Behaviour Change Wheel framework. Participants in both groups completed three Web-based surveys, first when their infants were less than 3 months old (baseline, T1), then at 6 months (time 2, T2), and 9 months of age (time 3, T3). Surveys included questions on infant feeding practices and beliefs (Infant Feeding Questionnaire, IFQ), satiety responsiveness (Baby Eating Behaviour Questionnaire), and infant's food exposure and liking. Multivariate linear regression models, estimated using maximum likelihood with bootstrapped standard errors, were fitted to compare continuous outcomes between the intervention groups, with adjustment for relevant covariates. Multivariate logistic regression adjusting for the same covariates was performed for categorical outcomes. A total of 645 parents (Growing Healthy: n=301, Baby's First Food: n=344) met the eligibility criteria and were included in the study, reducing to a sample size of 546 (Growing Healthy: n=234, Baby's First Food: n=312

  13. Impact of the Growing Healthy mHealth Program on Maternal Feeding Practices, Infant Food Preferences, and Satiety Responsiveness: Quasi-Experimental Study

    Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth; Laws, Rachel A; Abbott, Gavin; Zheng, Miaobing; Lymer, Sharyn J; Taki, Sarah; Litterbach, Eloise-Kate V; Ong, Kok-Leong; Campbell, Karen J

    2018-01-01

    Background Infancy is an important life stage for obesity prevention efforts. Parents’ infant feeding practices influence the development of infants’ food preferences and eating behaviors and subsequently diet and weight. Mobile health (mHealth) may provide a feasible medium through which to deliver programs to promote healthy infant feeding as it allows low cost and easy access to tailored content. Objective The objective of this study was to describe the effects of an mHealth intervention on parental feeding practices, infant food preferences, and infant satiety responsiveness. Methods A quasi-experimental study was conducted with an mHealth intervention group (Growing Healthy) and a nonrandomized comparison group (“Baby's First Food"). The intervention group received access to a free app with age-appropriate push notifications, a website, and an online forum that provided them with evidence-based advice on infant feeding for healthy growth from birth until 9 months of age. Behavior change techniques were selected using the Behaviour Change Wheel framework. Participants in both groups completed three Web-based surveys, first when their infants were less than 3 months old (baseline, T1), then at 6 months (time 2, T2), and 9 months of age (time 3, T3). Surveys included questions on infant feeding practices and beliefs (Infant Feeding Questionnaire, IFQ), satiety responsiveness (Baby Eating Behaviour Questionnaire), and infant’s food exposure and liking. Multivariate linear regression models, estimated using maximum likelihood with bootstrapped standard errors, were fitted to compare continuous outcomes between the intervention groups, with adjustment for relevant covariates. Multivariate logistic regression adjusting for the same covariates was performed for categorical outcomes. Results A total of 645 parents (Growing Healthy: n=301, Baby's First Food: n=344) met the eligibility criteria and were included in the study, reducing to a sample size of 546

  14. Improvement of Bearing Capacity in Recycled Aggregates Suitable for Use as Unbound Road Sub-Base

    Laura Garach

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recycled concrete aggregates and mixed recycled aggregates are specified as types of aggregates with lower densities, higher water absorption capacities, and lower mechanical strength than natural aggregates. In this paper, the mechanical behaviour and microstructural properties of natural aggregates, recycled concrete aggregates and mixed recycled aggregates were compared. Different specimens of unbound recycled mixtures demonstrated increased resistance properties. The formation of new cement hydrated particles was observed, and pozzolanic reactions were discovered by electronon microscopy in these novel materials. The properties of recycled concrete aggregates and mixed recycled aggregates suggest that these recycled materials can be used in unbound road layers to improve their mechanical behaviour in the long term.

  15. Observation of a low-lying neutron-unbound state in 19C

    Thoennessen, M.; Mosby, S.; Badger, N.S.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Bennett, M.; Brown, J.; Christian, G.; DeYoung, P.A.; Finck, J.E.; Gardner, M.; Hook, E.A.; Luther, B.; Meyer, D.A.; Mosby, M.; Rogers, W.F.

    2013-01-01

    Proton removal reactions from a secondary 22 N beam were utilized to populate unbound states in neutron-rich carbon isotopes. Neutrons were measured with the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) in coincidence with carbon fragments. A resonance with a decay energy of 76(14) keV was observed in the system 18 C+n corresponding to a state in 19 C at an excitation energy of 653(95) keV. This resonance could correspond to the first 5/2 + state which was recently speculated to be unbound in order to describe 1n and 2n removal cross section measurements from 20 C

  16. Computing continuous-time Markov chains as transformers of unbounded observables

    Danos, Vincent; Heindel, Tobias; Garnier, Ilias

    2017-01-01

    The paper studies continuous-time Markov chains (CTMCs) as transformers of real-valued functions on their state space, considered as generalised predicates and called observables. Markov chains are assumed to take values in a countable state space S; observables f: S → ℝ may be unbounded...

  17. Differentiable absorption of Hilbert C*-modules, connections and lifts of unbounded operators

    Kaad, Jens

    2017-01-01

    . The differentiable absorption theorem is then applied to construct densely defined connections (or correpondences) on Hilbert C∗C∗-modules. These connections can in turn be used to define selfadjoint and regular "lifts" of unbounded operators which act on an auxiliary Hilbert C∗C∗-module....

  18. Antibody response of growing German Holstein bulls to a vaccination against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is influenced by Fusarium toxin exposure in a non-linear fashion.

    Dänicke, Sven; Winkler, Janine; Meyer, Ulrich; Kersten, Susanne; Wernike, Kerstin; Beer, Martin; Frahm, Jana

    2018-05-01

    The Fusarium toxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a frequent contaminant of feedstuffs and is supposed to interfere with immune responses. As the relevance for growing bulls is less clear than for other livestock, the trial was designed according to the dose-response principal with a control group fed a diet with background contamination (CON, 0.36 mg DON per kilogram dry matter [DM]) and three groups with increasing concentrations of DON (mg/kg DM); FUS I, 3.01; FUS II, 5.66; FUS III, 8.31. Half of each treatment group was vaccinated against BVDV at days 1 and 21 of the 70 days lasting experiment. Sequential blood samples were collected for determination of antibody titers to BVDV and for hematological and clinical-chemical traits. Antibody response was strongest in group FUS II while group FUS III responded weakest. This group showed the lowest proportion of CD4+ T cells, but also the highest levels of liver lesion indicating enzyme activities in blood. BVDV-vaccination induced a pronounced decrease in red blood count indices, which occurred dose-dependently at a higher level in the FUS-fed groups. The obvious interactions between DON exposure and BVDV-vaccination require further elucidation.

  19. Structure of the Unbound Form of HIV-1 Subtype A Protease: Comparison with Unbound Forms of Proteases from other HIV Subtypes

    Robbins, Arthur H.; Coman, Roxana M.; Bracho-Sanchez, Edith; Fernandez, Marty A.; Gilliland, C.Taylor; Li, Mi; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dunn, Ben M.; McKenna, Robert (NCI); (Florida)

    2010-03-12

    The crystal structure of the unbound form of HIV-1 subtype A protease (PR) has been determined to 1.7 {angstrom} resolution and refined as a homodimer in the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1} to an R{sub cryst} of 20.5%. The structure is similar in overall shape and fold to the previously determined subtype B, C and F PRs. The major differences lie in the conformation of the flap region. The flaps in the crystal structures of the unbound subtype B and C PRs, which were crystallized in tetragonal space groups, are either semi-open or wide open. In the present structure of subtype A PR the flaps are found in the closed position, a conformation that would be more anticipated in the structure of HIV protease complexed with an inhibitor. The amino-acid differences between the subtypes and their respective crystal space groups are discussed in terms of the differences in the flap conformations.

  20. Dose-response relationships determined in growing rats for various platinum compounds administered with the food. Untersuchungen zu Dosis-Wirkungsbeziehungen verschiedener alimentaer zugefuehrter Platinverbindungen bei wachsenden Ratten

    Bader, R.

    1991-02-08

    Forming part of a research project entitled 'Emissions of Precious Metals', this study had the aim to describe dose-related responses that occur in growing rats following administration of platinum with the food. The oral intake of diets containing up to to 50 mg platinum/kg food had no detectable influence on the food consumption of the animals, nor were there any deviations from the normal growth curves that could be related to the addition of platinum. Comparisons with the control group pointed to a decline in erythrocytes from 5.88 {+-} 0.55 x 10{sup 6}/{mu}l to 5.11 {+-} 0.50 x 10{sup 6}/{mu}l following administration of 50 ppm PtCl{sub 4} over a period of four weeks. There were no other changes in hematological parameters that attained statistical significance. The treatment group receiving platinum amounts of 50 mg/kg with the diet showed a plasma creatinine value of 1.45 {+-} 0.19 {mu}g/dl, which significantly (p < 0.05) exceeded that of the control group, where creatinine levels remained at 0.70 {+-} 0.50 {mu}g/dl. This leads to the conclusion that the possibility of renal impairment after high oral doses of PtCl{sub 4} is not very remote. (orig./VT).

  1. Photosynthesis and biochemical responses to elevated O3 in Plantago major and Sonchus oleraceus growing in a lowland habitat of northern China.

    Su, Benying; Zhou, Meihua; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Xiujie; Li, Yonggeng; Su, Hua; Xiang, Bao

    2017-03-01

    A field experiment was carried out to compare the responses to ozone (O 3 ) in two common herbaceous plant species, Plantago major L. and Sonchus oleraceus L., by building open-top growth chambers in situ to simulate O 3 stress (+O 3 , 85±5ppb, 9hr/day for 30days) in a lowland habitat in Inner Mongolia, Northern China. Responses to O 3 of gas exchange, chlorophyll a fluorescence, leaf pigment content, antioxidant capability, soluble protein content, membrane lipid peroxidation and dark respiration (R d ) were analyzed. Results showed that elevated O 3 exposure significantly reduced the light-saturated net photosynthesis (P Nsat ), stomatal conductance (g s ) and transpiration rate (E) in both species. Although non-significant interactive effect between species and O 3 on P Nsat was analyzed, the reduction in P Nsat in S. oleraceus might be due primarily to the higher fraction of close PSII reaction centers and impaired activities of plant mesophyll cells as evidences by decreased maximum efficiency of PSII photochemistry after dark adapted state (F v /F m ) and unchanged intercellular CO 2 concentration (C i ). Besides, biochemical analysis showed that S. oleraceus had lower antioxidant ability compared to P. major. As a result, S. oleraceus was damaged to the larger extent in terms of lipid peroxidation and visible O 3 injury, indicating that S. oleraceus was more sensitive to O 3 than P. major. Our results indicated that wild herbaceous plant species growing in a lowland habitat in sandy grassland were sensitive to O 3 stress and S. oleraceus can be considered as one of the bio-indicators for high O 3 concentration in semi-arid grassland of northern China. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Two-phase flow models in unbounded two-phase critical flows

    Celata, G.P.; Cumo, M.; Farello, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    With reference to a Loss-of-Coolant Accident in Light Water Reactors, an analysis of the unbounded two-phase critical flow (i.e. the issuing two-phase jet) has been accomplished. Considering jets external shape, obtained by means of photographic pictures; pressure profiles inside the jet, obtained by means of a movable ''Pitot;'' and jet phases distribution information, obtained by means of X-rays pictures; a characterization of the flow pattern in the unbounded region of a two-phase critical flow is given. Jets X-ray pictures show the existence of a central high density ''core'' gradually evaporating all around, which gives place to a characteristic ''dartflow'' the length of which depends on stagnation thermodynamic conditions

  3. Population processes with unbounded extinction rate conditioned to non-extinction

    Champagnat, Nicolas; Villemonais, Denis

    2016-01-01

    This article studies the quasi-stationary behaviour of population processes with unbounded absorption rate, including one-dimensional birth and death processes with catastrophes and multi-dimensional birth and death processes, modeling biological populations in interaction. To handle this situation, we develop original non-linear Lyapunov criteria. We obtain the exponential convergence in total variation of the conditional distributions to a unique quasi-stationary distribution, uniformly wit...

  4. On incompressible limits for the Navier-Stokes system on unbounded domains under slip boundary conditions

    Donatelli, D.; Feireisl, Eduard; Novotný, A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2010), s. 783-798 ISSN 1531-3492 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06052; GA ČR GA201/08/0315 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Navier-Stokes equations * singular limits * low Mach number * compressible fluids * unbounded domains Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.874, year: 2010 http://www.aimsciences.org/journals/displayArticles.jsp?paperID=4976

  5. Studies of unbound states in isotopes at the N = 8 shell closure

    We propose to study low-lying resonances in the two unbound isotopes $^{13}$Be and $^{10}$Li as well as low-lying resonances in $^{12}$Be. This will be done using an $^{11}$Be beam impinging on a tritium target leading to one- or two-particle transfer reactions. The decay scheme of the resonances will be studied using the MINIBALL and differential cross sections will be determined using T-REX.

  6. Pinning-controlled synchronization of complex networks with bounded or unbounded synchronized regions

    Yan-Li, Zou; Guan-Rong, Chen

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies pinning-controlled synchronization of complex networks with bounded or unbounded synchronized regions. To study a state-feedback pinning-controlled network with N nodes, it first converts the controlled network to an extended network of N+1 nodes without controls. It is shown that the controlled synchronizability of the given network is determined by the real part of the smallest nonzero eigenvalue of the coupling matrix of its extended network when the synchronized region is unbounded; but it is determined by the ratio of the real parts of the largest and the smallest nonzero eigenvalues of the coupling matrix when the synchronized region is bounded. Both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation show that the portion of controlled nodes has no critical values when the synchronized region is unbounded, but it has a critical value when the synchronized region is bounded. In the former case, therefore, it is possible to control the network to achieve synchronization by pinning only one node. In the latter case, the network can achieve controlled synchronization only when the portion of controlled nodes is larger than the critical value. (general)

  7. Structure of the unbound systems: 10,12Li and 13Be

    Randisi, G.

    2011-12-01

    The unbound systems 10;12 Li and 13 Be have been studied via nucleon removal from a 14 B beam of 35 MeV/nucleon. The invariant mass (decay energy) spectra were reconstructed from the measured 9;11 Li-n and 12 Be-n coincidences. Simulations, taking into account the effects of the experimental setup and the reaction, were developed. The reconstructed decay energy spectra were interpreted using theoretical lineshapes folded with the experimental response, as well as uncorrelated distributions obtained from the data by event mixing. In the case of 10 Li, the data were reproduced with an s-wave virtual state of scattering length a s = [-10 -3 +1 (stat) ±3 (syst)] fm and l = 1 resonance with energy E r = [0.55 ± 0.02 (stat) ± 0.05 (syst)] MeV and with Γ 0 = [0.35 ± 0.05 (stat) ± 0.15 (syst)] MeV confirming the ν1p 1/2 - ν2s 1/2 inversion. For 12 Li, evidence was found for excited states between 0.2 and 0.8 MeV above the threshold. In the case of 13 Be, the decay energy, as well as the other observables, were reproduced assuming an l = 0 resonance with E r = [0.70 ± 0.05 (stat) ± 0.07 (syst)] MeV and Γ 0 = [1.7 ± 0.1 (stat) ± 0.1 (syst)] MeV and l = 2 resonance with E r = [2.4 ± 0.1(stat) ± 0.1 (syst)] MeV and Γ 0 = [0.6 ± 0.2 (stat) ± 0.1 (syst)] MeV. This hypothesis is supported by the selectivity of proton knockout, whereby the neutron configuration of the states populated in 13 Be should directly reflect that of 14 B. (author)

  8. Remarks on the Phragmen-Lindelof theorem for Lp-viscosity solutions of fully nonlinear PDEs with unbounded ingredients

    Kazushige Nakagawa

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The Phragmen-Lindelof theorem for Lp-viscosity solutions of fully nonlinear second order elliptic partial differential equations with unbounded coefficients and inhomogeneous terms is established.

  9. Fandom unbound: Otaku culture in a connected world, edited by Mizuko Ito, Daisuke Okabe, and Izumi Tsuji [book review

    Nele Noppe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Review of Mizuko Ito, Daisuke Okabe and Izumi Tsuji, eds. Fandom unbound: Otaku culture in a connected world. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2012, Kindle edition, $35; paperback, $38 (352p ISBN 978-0300158649.

  10. Periodic orbits and 10 cases of unbounded dynamics for one Hamiltonian system defined by the conformally coupled field

    Starkov, Konstantin E., E-mail: kstarkov@ipn.mx

    2015-07-03

    In this paper we study invariant domains with unbounded dynamics for one cosmological Hamiltonian system which is formed by the conformally coupled field; this system was introduced by Maciejewski et al. (2007). We find a few groups of conditions imposed on parameters of this system for which all trajectories are unbounded in both of time directions. Further, we present a few groups of other conditions imposed on system parameters under which we localize the invariant domain with unbounded dynamics; this domain is defined with help of bounds for values of the Hamiltonian level surface parameter. We describe one group of conditions when our system possesses two periodic orbits found explicitly. In some of rest cases we get localization bounds for compact invariant sets. - Highlights: • Equations for periodic orbits are got for many level sets. • Domains with unbounded dynamics are localized. • Localizations for compact invariant sets are obtained.

  11. Effective proton-neutron interaction near the drip line from unbound states in $^{25,26}$F

    Vandebrouck, M.; Lepailleur, A.; Sorlin, O.; Aumann, T.; Caesar, C.; Holl, M.; Panin, V.; Wamers, F.; Stroberg, S. R.; Holt, J. D.; Santos, F. De Oliveira; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Atar, L.; Avdeichikov, V.; Beceiro-Novo, S.

    2017-01-01

    14 pages, 7 figures, 3 tables, submitted to PRC; International audience; Background: Odd-odd nuclei, around doubly closed shells, have been extensively used to study proton-neutron interactions. However, the evolution of these interactions as a function of the binding energy, ultimately when nuclei become unbound, is poorly known. The $^{26}$F nucleus, composed of a deeply bound $\\pi0d_{5/2}$ proton and an unbound $\

  12. Search for unbound 15Be states in the 3 n +12Be channel

    Kuchera, A. N.; Spyrou, A.; Smith, J. K.; Baumann, T.; Christian, G.; DeYoung, P. A.; Finck, J. E.; Frank, N.; Jones, M. D.; Kohley, Z.; Mosby, S.; Peters, W. A.; Thoennessen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: 15Be is expected to have low-lying 3 /2+ and 5 /2+ states. A first search did not find the 3 /2+ [A. Spyrou et al., Phys. Rev. C 84, 044309 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevC.84.044309]; however, a resonance in 15Be was populated in a second attempt and determined to be unbound with respect to 14Be by 1.8(1) MeV with a tentative spin-parity assignment of 5 /2+ [J. Snyder et al., Phys. Rev. C 88, 031303(R) (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevC.88.031303]. Purpose: Search for the predicted 15Be 3 /2+ state in the three-neutron decay channel. Method: A two-proton removal reaction from a 55 MeV/u 17C beam was used to populate neutron-unbound states in 15Be. The two-, three-, and four-body decay energies of the 12Be + neutron(s) detected in coincidence were reconstructed using invariant mass spectroscopy. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extract the resonance and decay properties from the observed spectra. Results: The low-energy regions of the decay energy spectra can be described with the first excited unbound state of 14Be (Ex=1.54 MeV, Er=0.28 MeV). Including a state in 15Be that decays through the first excited 14Be state slightly improves the fit at higher energies though the cross section is small. Conclusions: A 15Be component is not needed to describe the data. If the 3 /2+ state in 15Be is populated, the decay by three-neutron emission through 14Be is weak, ≤11 % up to 4 MeV. In the best fit, 15Be is unbound with respect to 12Be by 1.4 MeV (unbound with respect to 14Be by 2.66 MeV) with a strength of 7 % .

  13. Growing media [Chapter 5

    Douglass F. Jacobs; Thomas D. Landis; Tara Luna

    2009-01-01

    Selecting the proper growing medium is one of the most important considerations in nursery plant production. A growing medium can be defined as a substance through which roots grow and extract water and nutrients. In native plant nurseries, a growing medium can consist of native soil but is more commonly an "artificial soil" composed of materials such as peat...

  14. Effects of ambient temperature and early open-field response on the behaviour, feed intake and growth of fast- and slow-growing broiler strains.

    Nielsen, B L

    2012-09-01

    Increased activity improves broiler leg health, but also increases the heat production of the bird. This experiment investigated the effects of early open-field activity and ambient temperature on the growth and feed intake of two strains of broiler chickens. On the basis of the level of activity in an open-field test on day 3 after hatching, fast-growing Ross 208 and slow-growing i657 chickens were allocated on day 13 to one of the 48 groups. Each group included either six active or six passive birds from each strain and the groups were housed in floor-pens littered with wood chips and fitted with two heat lamps. Each group was fed ad libitum and subjected to one of the three temperature treatments: two (HH; 26°C), one (HC; 16°C to 26°C) or no (CC; 16°C) heat lamps turned on. Production and behavioural data were collected every 2 weeks until day 57. For both strains, early open-field activity had no significant effects on their subsequent behaviour or on any of the production parameters measured, and overall, the slow-growing strain was more active than the fast-growing strain. Ambient temperature had significant effects on production measures for i657 broilers, with CC chickens eating and weighing more, and with a less efficient feed conversion than HH chickens, with HC birds intermediate. A similar effect was found for Ross 208 only for feed intake from 27 to 41 days of age. Ross 208 chickens distributed themselves in the pen with a preference for cooler areas in the hottest ambient temperature treatments. In contrast, the behaviour of the slow-growing strain appeared to be relatively unaffected by the ambient temperature. In conclusion, fast-growing broilers use behavioural changes when trying to adapt to warm environments, whereas slow-growing broilers use metabolic changes to adapt to cooler ambient temperatures.

  15. Unbounded Naturalism

    Andrew Taggart

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available nbsp;font face="Times, serif"font size="3"In the Anglo-American reception of John McDowellrsquo;s /font/fontfont face="Times, serif"font size="3"emMind and World/em/font/fontfont face="Times, serif"font size="3", there has been little attention paid to the developmental aspect of his lsquo;partially re-enchantedrsquo; naturalism. In lsquo;Naturalism Unboundedrsquo;, I argue that McDowellrsquo;s story of our normal upbringing (/font/fontfont face="Times, serif"font size="3"emBildung/em/font/fontfont face="Times, serif"font size="3" presents problems for his claim that we have a lsquo;standing obligationrsquo; to reflect on our perceptual experiences. I follow this critique up with a Hegelian-inspired attempt to retain and revise the vital points he makes about experience./font/font

  16. Mathematics unbound

    Parshall, Karen Hunger

    2002-01-01

    Although today's mathematical research community takes its international character very much for granted, this "global nature" is relatively recent, having evolved over a period of roughly 150 years-from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the middle of the twentieth century. During this time, the practice of mathematics changed from being centered on a collection of disparate national communities to being characterized by an international group of scholars for whom the goal of mathematical research and cooperation transcended national boundaries. Yet, the development of an international community was far from smooth and involved obstacles such as war, political upheaval, and national rivalries. Until now, this evolution has been largely overlooked by historians and mathematicians alike. This book addresses the issue by bringing together essays by twenty experts in the history of mathematics who have investigated the genesis of today's international mathematical community. This includes not only develo...

  17. Green’s Functions for an Anisotropic Medium: Part 1. Unbounded Case

    1993-12-01

    AA 2 - x • , - a or b (41a) td A -2 A-- ’ -L x " " - , -a or b (41b) 13 4. DISCUSSION Having now derived the DGF of the unbounded biaxially...B 2 A3 121/3 b s- - + (_ + )A + [ (_ L_1/ + - (A13) A - 1 (3q - b) (Al4a) (3q B - -L (-2b 3 + 9bq + 27r) (Al4b) q - Ac - 4d (Al5a) r - - Ad 2 + 4bd - C

  18. A regularization method for solving the Poisson equation for mixed unbounded-periodic domains

    Spietz, Henrik Juul; Mølholm Hejlesen, Mads; Walther, Jens Honoré

    2018-01-01

    the regularized unbounded-periodic Green's functions can be implemented in an FFT-based Poisson solver to obtain a convergence rate corresponding to the regularization order of the Green's function. The high order is achieved without any additional computational cost from the conventional FFT-based Poisson solver...... and enables the calculation of the derivative of the solution to the same high order by direct spectral differentiation. We illustrate an application of the FFT-based Poisson solver by using it with a vortex particle mesh method for the approximation of incompressible flow for a problem with a single periodic...

  19. Simple eigenvectors of unbounded operators of the type “normal plus compact”

    Michael Gil'

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with operators of the form \\(A=S+B\\, where \\(B\\ is a compact operator in a Hilbert space \\(H\\ and \\(S\\ is an unbounded normal one in \\(H\\, having a compact resolvent. We consider approximations of the eigenvectors of \\(A\\, corresponding to simple eigenvalues by the eigenvectors of the operators \\(A_n=S+B_n\\ (\\(n=1,2, \\ldots\\, where \\(B_n\\ is an \\(n\\-dimensional operator. In addition, we obtain the error estimate of the approximation.

  20. Simulations of a single vortex ring using an unbounded, regularized particle-mesh based vortex method

    Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Spietz, Henrik J.; Walther, Jens Honore

    2014-01-01

    , unbounded particle-mesh based vortex method is used to simulate the instability, transition to turbulence and eventual destruction of a single vortex ring. From the simulation data a novel method on analyzing the dynamics of the enstrophy is presented based on the alignment of the vorticity vector...... with the principal axis of the strain rate tensor. We find that the dynamics of the enstrophy density is dominated by the local flow deformation and axis of rotation, which is used to infer some concrete tendencies related to the topology of the vorticity field....

  1. On the unbounded behaviour for some non-autonomous systems in Banach spaces

    Djafari Rouhani, B.

    1991-09-01

    By modifying our previous methods and by using the notion of integral solution introduced by Benilan, we study the asymptotic behaviour of unbounded trajectories for the quasi-autonomous dissipative system: du/dt + Au is not an element of f where X is a real Banach space, A an accretive (possibly multivalued) operator in X x X, and f - f ∞ is an element of L p ((0, +∞);X) for some f ∞ is an element of X and 1 ≤ p < ∞. (author). 24 refs

  2. A University-Industry Collaborative Response to the Growing Global Demand for Student Talent: Using Interpretive Phenomenology to Discover Life-World Knowledge

    Vauterin, Johanna Julia; Linnanen, Lassi; Michelsen, Karl-Erik

    2013-01-01

    The supply of student talent is now taking on an increasingly global dimension and this has extended the breadth of university-industry interaction. Set in the context of a rapidly growing international student market, knowledge transfer between academia and business through global student talent supply is an emerging practice. This paper…

  3. Effect of racemic ibuprofen dose on the magnitude and duration of platelet cyclo-oxygenase inhibition: relationship between inhibition of thromboxane production and the plasma unbound concentration of S(+)-ibuprofen.

    Evans, A M; Nation, R L; Sansom, L N; Bochner, F; Somogyi, A A

    1991-02-01

    1. Four healthy male subjects received racemic ibuprofen (200, 400, 800 and 1200 mg), orally, on four occasions, 2 weeks apart, according to a four-way Latin-square design, in order to investigate the influence of increasing dose of ibuprofen on the magnitude and duration of its antiplatelet effect as well as on the relationship between such effect and drug concentration. 2. The antiplatelet effect of ibuprofen was assessed by measuring the inhibition of platelet thromboxane B2 (TXB2) generation during the controlled clotting of whole blood. The plasma unbound concentration of S(+)-ibuprofen, the enantiomer shown in an in vitro study to be responsible for the inhibitory effect of platelet TXB2 generation, was measured using an enantioselective method. 3. The maximum percentage inhibition of TXB2 generation increased significantly with dose from a mean +/- s.d. of 93.4 +/- 1.2% after the 200 mg dose to 98.8 +/- 0.3% after the 1200 mg dose, and there was an increase with dose in the duration of inhibition of TXB2 generation. The effect of ibuprofen on platelet TXB2 generation was transient and mirrored the time-course of unbound S(+)-ibuprofen in plasma; on all but one of the 16 occasions, serum TXB2 concentrations returned to at least within 10% of the pretreatment concentrations within 24 h of ibuprofen administration. 4. For each subject, the relationship between the percentage inhibition of TXB2 generation and the unbound concentration of S(+)-ibuprofen in plasma was modelled according to a sigmoidal Emax equation. The mean plasma unbound concentration of S(+)-ibuprofen required to inhibit platelet TXB2 generation by 50% (EC50) was 9.8 +/- 1.0 micrograms l-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Study of the Unbound Nuclei $^{10}$Li and $^{7}$He at REX ISOLDE

    2002-01-01

    % IS367\\\\ \\\\ We propose to study the two unbound nuclei $^{10}$Li and $^{7}$He produced in simple one-neutron pick-up reactions induced by intense beams of $^{9}$Li and $^{6}$He from REX ISOLDE in $^{9}$Be and CD$_{2}$ targets.\\\\ \\\\The unbound nucleus $^{10}$Li is a binary subsystem of the two-neutron halo nucleus $^{11}$Li and its structure is of key importance for theoretical investigations of the halo structure. We propose two different reactions, which together would give an unambiguous determination of lowest $\\textit{s-}$ and $\\textit{p-}$wave resonances in the ($^{9}$Li+n) system.\\\\ \\\\Similarly $^{7}$He plays an important role in the dissociation of $^{8}$He, a drip-line nucleus with an $\\alpha$+4n five-body structure. The aim of our investigation is to search for an excited 1/2$^{-}$ state above the $^{7}$He 3/2$^{-}$ ground state in order to investigate its cluster structure. \\\\ \\\\

  5. Measurement of cetuximab and panitumumab-unbound serum EGFR extracellular domain using an assay based on slow off-rate modified aptamer (SOMAmer reagents.

    Noh Jin Park

    Full Text Available Response to cetuximab (Erbitux® and panitumumab (Vectibix® varies among individuals, and even those who show response ultimately gain drug resistance. One possible etiologic factor is differential interaction between the drug and target. We describe the development of an assay based on Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamer (SOMAmer(™ reagents that can distinguish drug-bound from unbound epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR.This quantitative assay uses a SOMAmer reagent specific for EGFR extracellular domain (ECD as a capturing reagent. Captured SOMAmer is quantitated using PCR. Linearity and accuracy (recovery of the assay were assessed using normal sera and purified EGFR ECD.This EGFR ECD assay showed linearity between 2.5 and 600 ng/mL. Average recovery was 101%. The assay detected EGFR but showed little cross-reactivity to other ErbB proteins: 0.4% for ErbB2, 6.9% for ErbB3, and 1.3% for ErbB4. Preincubation of normal serum with either cetuximab or panitumumab resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in EGFR ECD levels measured using the SOMAmer assay; preincubation did not affect measurement with an ELISA.This SOMAmer-based serum EGFR ECD assay accurately and specifically measures EGFR in serum. Detection of significant amounts of drug-unbound EGFR in patients undergoing cetuximab or panitumumab treatment could be an indicator of poor drug response. Further studies are needed to evaluate the utility of the assay as an indicator of drug efficacy or as a guide to dosing.

  6. Anomalous transition strength in the proton-unbound nucleus {sup 109}{sub 53}I{sub 56}

    Procter, M.G., E-mail: mark.procter@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cullen, D.M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Scholey, C.; Ruotsalainen, P. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Angus, L. [University of The West of Scotland, High Street, Paisley PA1 2BE (United Kingdom); Baeck, T.; Cederwall, B. [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Dewald, A.; Fransen, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937, Koeln (Germany); Grahn, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Greenlees, P.T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Hackstein, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937, Koeln (Germany); Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Liotta, R. [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Lumley, N.M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-13

    A lifetime measurement has been made for the first excited 11/2{sup +} state in the proton-unbound nucleus {sup 109}{sub 53}I{sub 56} using the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method in conjunction with recoil-proton tagging. The experimental reduced transition probability is considerably smaller than the prediction of theoretical shell-model calculations using the CD-Bonn nucleon-nucleon potential. The discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental reduced transition strengths in this work most likely arises from the inability of the current shell-model calculations to accurately account for the behavior of the unbound nuclear states.

  7. The unbounded solution of a periodic mixed Sturm–Liouville problem in an infinite strip for the Laplacian

    M.G. Elsheikh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The unbounded solution, at the points where the boundary conditions change, for a mixed Sturm–Liouville problem of the Dirichlet–Neumann type can be obtained using the method of the integral equation formulation. Since this formulation is usually reduced to an infinite algebraic system in which the unknowns are the Fourier coefficients of the unknown unbounded entity, a study of ℓp-solutions imposes itself concerning the influence of the truncation on such systems. This study is achieved and the well-known theorem on the ℓ2-solutions of the infinite algebraic systems is generalized.

  8. Study of the unbound proton-rich nucleus $^{21}$Al with resonance elastic and inelastic scattering using an active target

    We intend to measure the structure of the unbound nucleus $^{21}$Al via resonance elastic and inelastic scattering with an active target. There are many goals: \\\\ a) to locate the 1/2$^{+}$ level in $^{21}$Al that brings information on the Thomas-Ehrman shift, \\\\ b) to measure the energy spectrum of $^{21}$Al which is a N=8 isotone with the resonance elastic scattering reaction, \\\\ c) to investigate via inelastic scattering the strength of core excitations in the existence of narrow unbound resonances beyond the proton drip-line.

  9. Effective proton-neutron interaction near the drip line from unbound states in 25,26 F

    Vandebrouck, M.; Lepailleur, A.; Sorlin, O; Aumann, T.; Caesar, C.; Holl, M.; Panin, V.; Wamers, F.; Stroberg, S. R.; Holt, J. D.; De Oliveira Santos, F.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Atar, L.; Avdeichikov, V.; Beceiro-Novo, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Odd-odd nuclei, around doubly closed shells, have been extensively used to study proton-neutron interactions. However, the evolution of these interactions as a function of the binding energy, ultimately when nuclei become unbound, is poorly known. The F26 nucleus, composed of a deeply bound π0d5/2 proton and an unbound ν0d3/2 neutron on top of an O24 core, is particularly adapted for this purpose. The coupling of this proton and neutron results in a Jπ=11+-41+ multiplet, whose ene...

  10. Effects of ambient temperature and early open-field response on the behaviour, feed intake and growth of fast- and slow-growing broiler strains

    Nielsen, Birte Lindstrøm

    2012-01-01

    Increased activity improves broiler leg health, but also increases the heat production of the bird. This experiment investigated the effects of early open-field activity and ambient temperature on the growth and feed intake of two strains of broiler chickens. On the basis of the level of activity...... in an open-field test on day 3 after hatching, fast-growing Ross 208 and slow-growing i657 chickens were allocated on day 13 to one of the 48 groups. Each group included either six active or six passive birds from each strain and the groups were housed in floor-pens littered with wood chips and fitted...... with two heat lamps. Each group was fed ad libitum and subjected to one of the three temperature treatments: two (HH; 268C), one (HC; 168C to 268C) or no (CC; 168C) heat lamps turned on. Production and behavioural data were collected every 2 weeks until day 57. For both strains, early open-field activity...

  11. Resilient modulus for unbound granular materials and subgrade soils in Egypt

    Mousa Rabah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanistic Empirical (ME pavement design methods started to gain attention especially the last couple of years in Egypt and the Middle East. One of the challenges facing the spread of these methods in Egypt is lack of advanced properties of local soil and asphalt, which are needed as input data in ME design. Resilient modulus (Mr for example is an important engineering property that expresses the elastic behavior of soil/unbound granular materials (UGMs under cyclic traffic loading for ME design. In order to overcome the scarcity of the resilient modulus data for soil/UGMs in Egypt, a comprehensive laboratory testing program was conducted to measure resilient modulus of typical UGMs and subgrade soils typically used in pavement construction in Egypt. The factors that affect the resilient modulus of soil/UGMs were reviewed, studied and discussed. Finally, the prediction accuracy of the most well-known Mr Prediction models for the locally investigated materials was investigated.

  12. Parabolic transformation cloaks for unbounded and bounded cloaking of matter waves

    Chang, Yu-Hsuan; Lin, De-Hone

    2014-01-01

    Parabolic quantum cloaks with unbounded and bounded invisible regions are presented with the method of transformation design. The mass parameters of particles for perfect cloaking are shown to be constant along the parabolic coordinate axes of the cloaking shells. The invisibility performance of the cloaks is inspected from the viewpoints of waves and probability currents. The latter shows the controllable characteristic of a probability current by a quantum cloak. It also provides us with a simpler and more efficient way of exhibiting the performance of a quantum cloak without the solutions of the transformed wave equation. Through quantitative analysis of streamline structures in the cloaking shell, one defines the efficiency of the presented quantum cloak in the situation of oblique incidence. The cloaking models presented here give us more choices for testing and applying quantum cloaking.

  13. A contribution to the numerical calculation of static electromagnetic fields in unbounded domains

    Krawczyk, F.

    1990-11-01

    The numerical calculation of static electromagnetic fields for arbitrarily shaped three-dimensional structures, especially in unbounded domains, is very memory and cpu-time consuming. In this thesis several schemes that reduce memory and cpu-time consumption have been developed or introduced. The memory needed can be reduced by a special simulation of boundaries towards open space and by the use of a scalar potential for the field description. Known disadvantages of the use of such a potential are avoided by an improved formulation of the used algorithms. The cpu-time for the calculations can be reduced remarkably in many cases by using a multigrid solution scheme including a defect-correction. A computer code has been written that uses these algorithms. With the help of this program it has been demonstrated that using these algorithms, distinct improvements in terms of computer memory, cpu-time consumption and accuracy can be achieved. (orig.) [de

  14. The Laplace equation boundary value problems on bounded and unbounded Lipschitz domains

    Medková, Dagmar

    2018-01-01

    This book is devoted to boundary value problems of the Laplace equation on bounded and unbounded Lipschitz domains. It studies the Dirichlet problem, the Neumann problem, the Robin problem, the derivative oblique problem, the transmission problem, the skip problem and mixed problems. It also examines different solutions - classical, in Sobolev spaces, in Besov spaces, in homogeneous Sobolev spaces and in the sense of non-tangential limit. It also explains relations between different solutions. The book has been written in a way that makes it as readable as possible for a wide mathematical audience, and includes all the fundamental definitions and propositions from other fields of mathematics. This book is of interest to research students, as well as experts in partial differential equations and numerical analysis.

  15. Unbounded representations of symmetry groups in gauge quantum field theory. Pt. 1

    Voelkel, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    Symmetry groups and especially the covariance (substitution rules) of the basic fields in a gauge quantum field theory of the Wightman-Garding type are investigated. By means of the continuity properties hidden in the substitution rules it is shown that every unbounded form-isometric representation U of a Lie group has a form-skew-symmetric differential deltaU with dense domain in the unphysical Hilbert space. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of the closures of U and deltaU as well as for the isometry of U are derived. It is proved that a class of representations of the transition group enforces a relativistic confinement mechanism, by which some or all basic fields are confined but certain mixed products of them are not. (orig.)

  16. Low-lying intruder state of the unbound nucleus {sup 13}Be

    Kondo, Y., E-mail: kondo@phys.titech.ac.j [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Oh-Okayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Nakamura, T.; Satou, Y. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Oh-Okayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Matsumoto, T.; Aoi, N. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Endo, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Fukuda, N.; Gomi, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hashimoto, Y. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Oh-Okayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ishihara, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kawai, S. [Department of Physics, Rikkyo University, 3-34-1 Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima, Tokyo 171-8501 (Japan); Kitayama, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Matsuda, Y. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Matsui, N. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Oh-Okayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Motobayashi, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nakabayashi, T.; Okumura, T. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Oh-Okayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ong, H.J.; Onishi, T.K. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2010-06-21

    An experimental study for the unbound nucleus {sup 13}Be has been performed by means of the invariant mass method via the one-neutron removal reaction {sup 1}H({sup 14}Be,{sup 12}Be+n). A resonance has been observed at 0.51(1) MeV in the relative energy (E{sub rel}) spectrum of the {sup 12}Be+n system. The transverse momentum distribution of the {sup 12}Be+n system as well as the resonance width of 0.45(3) MeV gives evidence for the p-wave nature of the resonance. A d-wave resonance has also been observed at 2.39(5) MeV in the E{sub rel} spectrum. The observation of the low-lying p-wave resonance indicates the disappearance of the N=8 magicity in the vicinity of the neutron drip line region.

  17. Unbounded representations of symmetry groups in gauge quantum field theory. II. Integration

    Voelkel, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    Within the gauge quantum field theory of the Wightman--Garding type, the integration of representations of Lie algebras is investigated. By means of the covariance condition (substitution rules) for the basic fields, it is shown that a form skew-symmetric representation of a Lie algebra can be integrated to a form isometric and in general unbounded representation of the universal covering group of a corresponding Lie group provided the conditions (Nelson, Sternheimer, etc.), which are well known for the case of Hilbert or Banach representations, hold. If a form isometric representation leaves the subspace from which the physical Hilbert space is obtained via factorization and completion invariant, then the same is proved to be true for its differential. Conversely, a necessary and sufficient condition is derived for the transmission of the invariance of this subspace under a form skew-symmetric representation of a Lie algebra to its integral

  18. A combined ADER-DG and PML approach for simulating wave propagation in unbounded domains

    Amler, Thomas

    2012-09-19

    In this work, we present a numerical approach for simulating wave propagation in unbounded domains which combines discontinuous Galerkin methods with arbitrary high order time integration (ADER-DG) and a stabilized modification of perfectly matched layers (PML). Here, the ADER-DG method is applied to Bérenger’s formulation of PML. The instabilities caused by the original PML formulation are treated by a fractional step method that allows to monitor whether waves are damped in PML region. In grid cells where waves are amplified by the PML, the contribution of damping terms is neglected and auxiliary variables are reset. Results of 2D simulations in acoustic media with constant and discontinuous material parameters are presented to illustrate the performance of the method.

  19. Inclusion of anti-phospholipase A2 antibody to backgrounding diets on performance, feed efficiency, in vitro fermentation, and the acute-phase response of growing beef calves.

    Mercadante, V R G; Waters, K M; Marquezini, G H L; Henry, D D; Ciriaco, F M; Arthington, J D; DiLorenzo, N; Lamb, G C

    2015-01-01

    In Exp. 1, individual performance and daily DMI was measured on 70 crossbred weaned calves during a 70-d period using a GrowSafe system (GrowSafe Systems Ltd., Airdrie, AB, Canada) at the University of Florida North Florida Research and Education Center Feed Efficiency Facility (FEF). Calves were fed a low-concentrate (LC) growing diet, blocked by weight and sex, and then randomly assigned to pens to receive either no additional supplement (CON; n = 35) or receive a supplement of anti-phospholipase A2 antibody (aPLA2) at an inclusion rate of 0.6% of the diet DM (n = 35). After the 70-d feed efficiency (FE) trial (Phase 1), calves were loaded into a commercial livestock trailer and were driven for approximately 1,600 km during 24 h. Upon return to the FEF (Phase 2), calves were relocated to the same pens and groups and received the same diets and treatments for 28 d. Blood samples from each calf were collected on d 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, 21, and 28 relative to initiation of transportation and were analyzed for determination of concentrations of plasma ceruloplasmin and haptoglobin. In Phase 1, initial BW (242.0 ± 3.7 kg; P = 0.92), BW at d 70 (313.0 ± 4.1 kg; P = 0.79), and ADG (1.01 ± 0.02 kg; P = 0.95) were similar between treatments. However, daily DMI was greater (P = 0.01) for CON (9.18 ± 0.15 kg) than aPLA2 (8.53 ± 0.15 kg). In addition, residual feed intake was greater (P = 0.002) for CON (0.389 ± 0.110 kg/d) than aPLA2 calves (-0.272 ± 0.110 kg/d). In Phase 2, after transportation, there were no differences between treatments on BW loss due to transportation shrink (26.0 ± 0.6 kg; P = 0.86), BW at d 28 (339.0 ± 4.1 kg; P = 0.72), ADG (1.28 ± 0.03 kg/d; P = 0.72), G:F (0.164 ± 0.004; P = 0.83), and concentrations of plasma haptoglobin (0.08 ± 0.02 mg/mL; P = 0.41). However, concentrations of plasma ceruloplasmin were greater (P calves (14.3 ± 0.3 mg/dL) compared to aPLA2 calves (13.0 ± 0.3 mg/dL). In Exp. 2, the effects of aPLA2 inclusion on LC and

  20. Unbounded boundaries and shifting baselines: Estuaries and coastal seas in a rapidly changing world

    Little, S.; Spencer, K. L.; Schuttelaars, H. M.; Millward, G. E.; Elliott, M.

    2017-11-01

    This Special Issue of Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science presents contributions from ECSA 55; an international symposium organised by the Estuarine and Coastal Sciences Association (ECSA) and Elsevier on the broad theme of estuaries and coastal seas in times of intense change. The objectives of the SI are to synthesise, hypothesise and illustrate the impacts of global change on estuaries and coastal seas through learning lessons from the past, discussing the current and forecasting for the future. It is highlighted here that establishing impacts and assigning cause to the many pressures of global change is and will continue to be a formidable challenge in estuaries and coastal seas, due in part to: (1) their complexity and unbounded nature; (2) difficulties distinguishing between human-induced changes and natural variations and; (3) multiple pressures and effects. The contributing authors have explored a number of these issues over a range of disciplines. The complexity and connectivity of estuaries and coastal seas have been investigated through studies of physicochemical and ecological components, whilst the human imprint on the environment has been identified through a series of predictive, contemporary, historical and palaeo approaches. The impact of human activities has been shown to occur over a range of spatial and temporal scales, requiring the development of integrated management approaches. These 30 articles provide an important contribution to our understanding and assessment of the impacts of global change. The authors highlight methods for essential management/mitigation of the consequences of global change and provide a set of directions, ideas and observations for future work. These include the need to consider: (1) the cumulative, synergistic and antagonistic effects of multiple pressures; (2) the importance of unbounded boundaries and connectivity across the aquatic continuum; (3) the value of combining cross-disciplinary palaeo, contemporary and

  1. The Challenge of Peat Substitution in Organic Seedling Production: Optimization of Growing Media Formulation through Mixture Design and Response Surface Analysis.

    Francesco Giovanni Ceglie

    Full Text Available Peat replacement is an increasing demand in containerized and transplant production, due to the environmental constraints associated to peat use. However, despite the wide information concerning the use of alternative materials as substrates, it is very complex to establish the best materials and mixtures. This work evaluates the use of mixture design and surface response methodology in a peat substitution experiment using two alternative materials (green compost and palm fibre trunk waste for transplant production of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.; melon, (Cucumis melo L.; and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. in organic farming conditions. In general, the substrates showed suitable properties for their use in seedling production, showing the best plant response the mixture of 20% green compost, 39% palm fibre and 31% peat. The mixture design and applied response surface methodology has shown to be an useful approach to optimize substrate formulations in peat substitution experiments to standardize plant responses.

  2. Strong solutions for the Navier-Stokes equations on bounded and unbounded domains with a moving boundary

    Juergen Saal

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available It is proved under mild regularity assumptions on the data that the Navier-Stokes equations in bounded and unbounded noncylindrical regions admit a unique local-in-time strong solution. The result is based on maximal regularity estimates for the in spatial regions with a moving boundary obtained in [16] and the contraction mapping principle.

  3. Beyond the neutron drip line: The unbound oxygen isotopes 25O and 26O

    Caesar, C.; Simonis, J.; Adachi, T.

    2013-01-01

    The very neutron-rich oxygen isotopes 25O and 26O are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The unbound states are populated in an experiment performed at the R3B-LAND setup at GSI via proton-knockout reactions from 26F and 27F at relativistic energies around 442 and 414 MeV/nucleon, res...

  4. Growing Safflower in Utah

    Pace, M. G.; Israelsen, C. E.; Creech, E.; Allen, N.

    2015-01-01

    This fact sheet provides information on growing safflower in Utah. It has become popular on dryland farms in rotation with winter wheat. Safflower seed provides three products, oil, meal, and birdseed.

  5. Study of the unbound systems {sup 16}B and {sup 13}Be; Etude des systemes non lies {sup 16}B et {sup 13}Be

    Lecouey, J.L

    2002-12-01

    A description of a study of the neutron-rich unbound systems {sup 16}B and {sup 13}Be is presented. The structure of these nuclei provides strong constraints on current models and vital information for a three-body description of the Borromean two-neutron halo nuclei {sup 17}B and {sup 14}Be. The experimental work was undertaken at GANIL. Single-proton removal reactions were employed to populate the nuclei of interest, starting with a secondary beam of {sup 17}C at 35 MeV/nucleon (for {sup 16}B) and {sup 14}B at 41 MeV/nucleon (for {sup 13}Be). The charged fragments were detected using a position-sensitive Si-Si-CsI telescope of the CHARISSA collaboration, and the neutron using the DEMON modular array. The decay energy spectra for {sup 16}B and {sup 13}Be were thus reconstructed from the measured {sup 15}B-n and {sup 12}Be-n coincidences. A theoretical description, based on the sudden approximation, of the population of unbound final states was developed. The predicted decay energy spectra were compared with the measurements after folding in the response of the experimental setup. This involved the use of simulations based on GEANT and a code, BELZEBUTH, developed specifically for the present work. In the case of {sup 15}B+n the data were best reproduced assuming the population of a narrow ({gamma} {<=} 100 keV), low-lying (E{sub r} = 85 keV) d-wave resonance(s). The {sup 12}Be+n data were consistent with the population of a very broad ({gamma} {approx_equal} 1-2 MeV) s-wave state at around 600-800 keV and a d-wave resonance at 2.5 MeV ({gamma} {approx} 400 keV). (author)

  6. Identification of p53 unbound to T-antigen in human cells transformed by simian virus 40 T-antigen.

    O'Neill, F J; Hu, Y; Chen, T; Carney, H

    1997-02-27

    In several clones of SV40-transformed human cells, we investigated the relative amounts of large T-Antigen (T-Ag) and p53 proteins, both unbound and associated within complexes, with the goal of identifying changes associated with transformation and immortalization. Cells were transformed by wild type (wt) T-Ag, a functionally temperature sensitive T-Ag (tsA58) and other T-Ag variants. Western analysis showed that while most of the T-Ag was ultimately bound by p53, most of the p53 remained unbound to T-Ag. Unbound p53 remained in the supernatant after a T-Ag immunoprecipitation and p53 was present in two to fourfold excess of T-Ag. In one transformant there was five to tenfold more p53 than T-Ag. p53 was present in transformants in amounts at least 200-fold greater than in untransformed human cells. In wt and variant T-Ag transformants, including those generated with tsA58 T-Ag, large amounts of unbound p53 were present in both pre-crisis and immortal cells and when the cells were grown at permissive or non-permissive temperatures. We also found that in transformants produced by tsA58, an SV40/JCV chimeric T-Ag and other variants, T-Ag appeared to form a complex with p53 slowly perhaps because one or both proteins matured slowly. The presence in transformed human cells of large amounts of unbound p53 and in excess of T-Ag suggests that sequestration of p53 by T-Ag, resulting from complex formation, is required neither for morphological transformation nor immortalization of human cells. Rather, these results support the proposal that high levels of p53, the T-Ag/p53 complexes, or other biochemical event(s), lead to transformation and immortalization of human cells by T-Ag.

  7. Impact of "Grassroots on Work" (GROW) Extension Program to the Bachelor of Arts in Political Science Students' Sense of Civic Responsibility

    Paga, Mark Leo Huit

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the medium term effect of service-learning program or "Grassroots on Work" extension program to civic responsibility of AB Political Science students. Methodology: This study employed an impact evaluation research design and both qualitative and quantitative. The data on goals and…

  8. Slow-release carbohydrates: growing evidence on metabolic responses and public health interest. Summary of the symposium held at the 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS 2015

    Sophie Vinoy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To draw attention to the necessity of considering differences in the digestibility of carbohydrates, and more specifically of starch, a symposium was held at the 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS, which took place in Berlin from October 20 to 23, 2015. The purpose of this session was to present the consolidated knowledge and recent advances regarding the relationship between slow-release carbohydrates, metabolic responses, and public health issues. Three main topics were presented: 1 the definition of, sources of, and recognised interest in the glycaemic response to slowly digestible starch (SDS; 2 clinical evidence regarding the physiological effects of slow-release carbohydrates from cereal foods; and 3 interest in reducing the postprandial glycaemic response to help prevent metabolic diseases. Foods with the highest SDS content induce the lowest glycaemic responses, as the starch is protected from gelatinisation during processing. In humans, high-SDS food consumption induces slower glucose release, lower postprandial insulinaemia, and stimulation of gut hormones. Moreover, postprandial hyperglycaemia is an independent risk factor for type two diabetes mellitus (T2DM and cardiovascular disease (CVD. Therefore, given the plausible aetiologic mechanisms, we argue that postprandial glucose levels are relevant for health and disease and represent a meaningful target for intervention, for example, through dietary factors. This symposium was organised by Mondelez International R&D.

  9. Slow-release carbohydrates: growing evidence on metabolic responses and public health interest. Summary of the symposium held at the 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS 2015).

    Vinoy, Sophie; Laville, Martine; Feskens, Edith J M

    2016-01-01

    To draw attention to the necessity of considering differences in the digestibility of carbohydrates, and more specifically of starch, a symposium was held at the 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS), which took place in Berlin from October 20 to 23, 2015. The purpose of this session was to present the consolidated knowledge and recent advances regarding the relationship between slow-release carbohydrates, metabolic responses, and public health issues. Three main topics were presented: 1) the definition of, sources of, and recognised interest in the glycaemic response to slowly digestible starch (SDS); 2) clinical evidence regarding the physiological effects of slow-release carbohydrates from cereal foods; and 3) interest in reducing the postprandial glycaemic response to help prevent metabolic diseases. Foods with the highest SDS content induce the lowest glycaemic responses, as the starch is protected from gelatinisation during processing. In humans, high-SDS food consumption induces slower glucose release, lower postprandial insulinaemia, and stimulation of gut hormones. Moreover, postprandial hyperglycaemia is an independent risk factor for type two diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, given the plausible aetiologic mechanisms, we argue that postprandial glucose levels are relevant for health and disease and represent a meaningful target for intervention, for example, through dietary factors. This symposium was organised by Mondelez International R&D.

  10. Response of Weeping Lantana (Lantana montevidensis to Compost-Based Growing Media and Electrical Conductivity Level in Soilless Culture: First Evidence

    Giuseppe Cristiano

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common substrate for potted ornamental plants is prepared with Sphagnum peat; however, the cost and declining availability of high-quality peat, due to environmental constraints, make it necessary to investigate for alternative organic materials. The present study aimed to determine the effects of partial compost replacement with peat and the optimum electrical conductivity (EC level of the nutrient solution in potted weeping lantana [L. montevidensis (Spreng. Briq.] under a recirculating soilless system. Three compost-based substrates were prepared by mixing peat (Pe with sewage sludge-based compost (Co. at a rate of 0% (Pe90Co0Pu10, control, 30% (Pe60Co30Pu10, or 60% (Pe30Co60Pu10, respectively. The soilless recirculated closed system was equipped with two different EC levels (high and low of nutrient solution. Growing media main characteristics and plant bio-morphometric parameters were evaluated. Our first evidence clearly demonstrates that the replacement of peat with compost at doses of 30% and 60% gave the poorest results for plant diameter, shoots, leaves, flowers, and fresh and dry mass, probably indicating that the physical characteristics of the compost based substrates may be the major factor governing plant growth rate. Compost media pH and EC values, too, showed negative effects on plant growth. Considering the effect of EC level, all morphological traits were significantly improved by high EC compared to low EC in weeping lantana. Thus, based on first evidence, further research is needed on organic materials for the establishment of ecological substrates with optimal physicochemical characteristics for the growth of weeping lantana.

  11. Probabilistic estimation of future emissions of isoprene and surface oxidant chemistry associated with land-use change in response to growing food needs

    C. J. Hardacre

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We quantify the impact of land-use change, determined by our growing demand for food and biofuel production, on isoprene emissions and subsequent atmospheric oxidant chemistry in 2015 and 2030, relative to 1990, ignoring compound climate change effects over that period. We estimate isoprene emissions from an ensemble (n = 1000 of land-use change realizations from 1990–2050, broadly guided by the IPCC AR4/SRES scenarios A1 and B1. We also superimpose land-use change required to address projected biofuel usage using two scenarios: (1 assuming that world governments make no changes to biofuel policy after 2009, and (2 assuming that world governments develop biofuel policy with the aim of keeping equivalent atmospheric CO2 at 450 ppm. We present the median and interquartile range (IQR statistics of the ensemble and show that land-use change between −1.50 × 1012 m2 to +6.06 × 1012 m2 was found to drive changes in the global isoprene burden of −3.5 to +2.8 Tg yr−1 in 2015 and −7.7 to +6.4 Tg yr−1 in 2030. We use land-use change realizations corresponding to the median and IQR of these emission estimates to drive the GEOS-Chem global 3-D chemistry transport model to investigate the perturbation to global and regional surface concentrations of isoprene, nitrogen oxides (NO+NO2, and the atmospheric concentration and deposition of ozone (O3. We show that across subcontinental regions the monthly surface O3 increases by 0.1–0.8 ppb, relative to a zero land-use change calculation, driven by increases (decreases in surface isoprene in high (low NOx environments. At the local scale (4° × 5° we find that surface O3 increases by 5–12 ppb over temperate North America, China and boreal Eurasia, driven by large increases in isoprene emissions from short-rotation coppice crop cultivation for biofuel production.

  12. No large population of unbound or wide-orbit Jupiter-mass planets.

    Mróz, Przemek; Udalski, Andrzej; Skowron, Jan; Poleski, Radosław; Kozłowski, Szymon; Szymański, Michał K; Soszyński, Igor; Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Pietrukowicz, Paweł; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Skowron, Dorota; Pawlak, Michał

    2017-08-10

    Planet formation theories predict that some planets may be ejected from their parent systems as result of dynamical interactions and other processes. Unbound planets can also be formed through gravitational collapse, in a way similar to that in which stars form. A handful of free-floating planetary-mass objects have been discovered by infrared surveys of young stellar clusters and star-forming regions as well as wide-field surveys, but these studies are incomplete for objects below five Jupiter masses. Gravitational microlensing is the only method capable of exploring the entire population of free-floating planets down to Mars-mass objects, because the microlensing signal does not depend on the brightness of the lensing object. A characteristic timescale of microlensing events depends on the mass of the lens: the less massive the lens, the shorter the microlensing event. A previous analysis of 474 microlensing events found an excess of ten very short events (1-2 days)-more than known stellar populations would suggest-indicating the existence of a large population of unbound or wide-orbit Jupiter-mass planets (reported to be almost twice as common as main-sequence stars). These results, however, do not match predictions of planet-formation theories and surveys of young clusters. Here we analyse a sample of microlensing events six times larger than that of ref. 11 discovered during the years 2010-15. Although our survey has very high sensitivity (detection efficiency) to short-timescale (1-2 days) microlensing events, we found no excess of events with timescales in this range, with a 95 per cent upper limit on the frequency of Jupiter-mass free-floating or wide-orbit planets of 0.25 planets per main-sequence star. We detected a few possible ultrashort-timescale events (with timescales of less than half a day), which may indicate the existence of Earth-mass and super-Earth-mass free-floating planets, as predicted by planet-formation theories.

  13. Growing Plants and Minds

    Presser, Ashley Lewis; Kamdar, Danae; Vidiksis, Regan; Goldstein, Marion; Dominguez, Ximena; Orr, Jillian

    2017-01-01

    Many preschool classrooms explore plant growth. However, because many plants take a long time to grow, it is often hard to facilitate engagement in some practices (i.e., since change is typically not observable from one day to another, children often forget their prior predictions or cannot recall what plants looked like days or weeks earlier).…

  14. Growing Backyard Textiles

    Nelson, Eleanor Hall

    1975-01-01

    For those involved in creative work with textiles, the degree of control possible in texture, finish, and color of fiber by growing and processing one's own (perhaps with students' help) can make the experience rewarding. The author describes the processes for flax and nettles and gives tips on necessary equipment. (Author/AJ)

  15. The dose-response relationship between the amount of straw provided on the floor and gastric ulceration of pars oesophagea in growing pigs

    Jensen, Karin Hjelholt; Jørgensen, Lisbeth; Haugegaard, Svend

    2017-01-01

    of straw provided affected stomach health in a curvilinear manner. Provision of up to approximately 300 g straw/pig/day progressively decreased the risk of oesophageal ulceration and scarring. At larger amounts of straw the ulceroprotective effect of straw was reduced which requires further investigation...... the structure of the stomach contents as revealed by the increased weight and dry matter content and decreased sedimentation of the digesta. Provision of approximately 300 g straw/pig/day on the floor may be a potential strategy to reduce, but not inevitably eliminate, oesophageal ulceration in pigs......The aim of the present study was (1) to determine the dose-response relationship between the amount of straw provided on the floor and oesophageal ulceration in pigs kept under typical Danish production conditions (18 pigs/pen, 0.7 m2/pig, partly slatted floor, ad libitum access to feed), (2...

  16. A spectral/B-spline method for the Navier-Stokes equations in unbounded domains

    Dufresne, L.; Dumas, G.

    2003-01-01

    The numerical method presented in this paper aims at solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in unbounded domains. The problem is formulated in cylindrical coordinates and the method is based on a Galerkin approximation scheme that makes use of vector expansions that exactly satisfy the continuity constraint. More specifically, the divergence-free basis vector functions are constructed with Fourier expansions in the θ and z directions while mapped B-splines are used in the semi-infinite radial direction. Special care has been taken to account for the particular analytical behaviors at both end points r=0 and r→∞. A modal reduction algorithm has also been implemented in the azimuthal direction, allowing for a relaxation of the CFL constraint on the timestep size and a possibly significant reduction of the number of DOF. The time marching is carried out using a mixed quasi-third order scheme. Besides the advantages of a divergence-free formulation and a quasi-spectral convergence, the local character of the B-splines allows for a great flexibility in node positioning while keeping narrow bandwidth matrices. Numerical tests show that the present method compares advantageously with other similar methodologies using purely global expansions

  17. Tunneling effects in resonant acoustic scattering of an air bubble in unbounded water

    ANDRÉ G. SIMÃO

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The problem of acoustic scattering of a gaseous spherical bubble immersed within unbounded liquid surrounding is considered in this work. The theory of partial wave expansion related to this problem is revisited. A physical model based on the analogy between acoustic scattering and potential scattering in quantum mechanics is proposed to describe and interpret the acoustical natural oscillation modes of the bubble, namely, the resonances. In this context, a physical model is devised in order to describe the air water interface and the implications of the high density contrast on the various regimes of the scattering resonances. The main results are presented in terms of resonance lifetime periods and quality factors. The explicit numerical calculations are undertaken through an asymptotic analysis considering typical bubble dimensions and underwater sound wavelengths. It is shown that the resonance periods are scaled according to the Minnaert’s period, which is the short lived resonance mode, called breathing mode of the bubble. As expected, resonances with longer lifetimes lead to impressive cavity quality Q-factor ranging from 1010 to 105. The present theoretical findings lead to a better understanding of the energy storage mechanism in a bubbly medium.

  18. Unbound motion on a Schwarzschild background: Practical approaches to frequency domain computations

    Hopper, Seth

    2018-03-01

    Gravitational perturbations due to a point particle moving on a static black hole background are naturally described in Regge-Wheeler gauge. The first-order field equations reduce to a single master wave equation for each radiative mode. The master function satisfying this wave equation is a linear combination of the metric perturbation amplitudes with a source term arising from the stress-energy tensor of the point particle. The original master functions were found by Regge and Wheeler (odd parity) and Zerilli (even parity). Subsequent work by Moncrief and then Cunningham, Price and Moncrief introduced new master variables which allow time domain reconstruction of the metric perturbation amplitudes. Here, I explore the relationship between these different functions and develop a general procedure for deriving new higher-order master functions from ones already known. The benefit of higher-order functions is that their source terms always converge faster at large distance than their lower-order counterparts. This makes for a dramatic improvement in both the speed and accuracy of frequency domain codes when analyzing unbound motion.

  19. Application of the Unbounded Probability Distribution of the Johnson System for Floods Estimation

    Campos-Aranda Daniel Francisco

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Floods designs constitute a key to estimate the sizing of new water works and to review the hydrological security of existing ones. The most reliable method for estimating their magnitudes associated with certain return periods is to fit a probabilistic model to available records of maximum annual flows. Since such model is at first unknown, several models need to be tested in order to select the most appropriate one according to an arbitrary statistical index, commonly the standard error of fit. Several probability distributions have shown versatility and consistency of results when processing floods records and therefore, its application has been established as a norm or precept. The Johnson System has three families of distributions, one of which is the Log–Normal model with three parameters of fit, which is also the border between the bounded distributions and those with no upper limit. These families of distributions have four adjustment parameters and converge to the standard normal distribution, so that their predictions are obtained with such a model. Having contrasted the three probability distributions established by precept in 31 historical records of hydrological events, the Johnson system is applied to such data. The results of the unbounded distribution of the Johnson system (SJU are compared to the optimal results from the three distributions. It was found that the predictions of the SJU distribution are similar to those obtained with the other models in the low return periods ( 1000 years. Because of its theoretical support, the SJU model is recommended in flood estimation.

  20. A spectral/B-spline method for the Navier-Stokes equations in unbounded domains

    Dufresne, L

    2003-01-01

    The numerical method presented in this paper aims at solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in unbounded domains. The problem is formulated in cylindrical coordinates and the method is based on a Galerkin approximation scheme that makes use of vector expansions that exactly satisfy the continuity constraint. More specifically, the divergence-free basis vector functions are constructed with Fourier expansions in the theta and z directions while mapped B-splines are used in the semi-infinite radial direction. Special care has been taken to account for the particular analytical behaviors at both end points r=0 and r-> infinity. A modal reduction algorithm has also been implemented in the azimuthal direction, allowing for a relaxation of the CFL constraint on the timestep size and a possibly significant reduction of the number of DOF. The time marching is carried out using a mixed quasi-third order scheme. Besides the advantages of a divergence-free formulation and a quasi-spectral convergence, the lo...

  1. Breakup-fusion analyses of light ion induced stripping reactions to both bound and unbound regions

    Lee, Y.J.

    1987-01-01

    The breakup-fusion theory developed recently by our group at the University of Texas has been very successful in explaining observed continuum spectra of particles emitted from breakup type reactions, such as (d,p), (h,p), (h,d), (α,p), and (α,t) reactions. The aim of the present work is to extend the breakup-fusion formalism to calculate the usual stripping reaction, in which a nucleon or a nucleon-cluster is transferred into abound orbit in the target nucleus. With this extension, it is now possible to calculate the spectra of particles emitted from stripping type reactions. We particularly explore the possibility of using the breakup-fusion theory as a spectroscopic tool to obtain information about single particle states in both bound and unbound regions. For this purpose, we extend the theory so as to include the spin-orbit interaction between the transferred particle and the target which has been neglected in all the breakup-fusion studies made in the past. We then apply the thus extended breakup-fusion theory to analyze data of (d,p) and (α,t) reactions. The results of the calculations fit the observed spectra very well and the BF method is shown indeed to be useful for extracting information about the single particle states observed as bumps in both the continuum and discrete regions

  2. Dynamical analysis of bounded and unbounded orbits in a generalized Hénon-Heiles system

    Dubeibe, F. L.; Riaño-Doncel, A.; Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    2018-04-01

    The Hénon-Heiles potential was first proposed as a simplified version of the gravitational potential experimented by a star in the presence of a galactic center. Currently, this system is considered a paradigm in dynamical systems because despite its simplicity exhibits a very complex dynamical behavior. In the present paper, we perform a series expansion up to the fifth-order of a potential with axial and reflection symmetries, which after some transformations, leads to a generalized Hénon-Heiles potential. Such new system is analyzed qualitatively in both regimes of bounded and unbounded motion via the Poincaré sections method and plotting the exit basins. On the other hand, the quantitative analysis is performed through the Lyapunov exponents and the basin entropy, respectively. We find that in both regimes the chaoticity of the system decreases as long as the test particle energy gets far from the critical energy. Additionally, we may conclude that despite the inclusion of higher order terms in the series expansion, the new system shows wider zones of regularity (islands) than the ones present in the Hénon-Heiles system.

  3. Unbounded oscillation of higher-order nonlinear delay dynamic equations of neutral type with oscillating coefficients

    Başak Karpuz

    2009-05-01

    where $n\\in[2,\\infty_{\\mathbb{Z}}$, $t_{0}\\in\\mathbb{T}$, $\\sup\\{\\mathbb{T}\\}=\\infty$, $A\\in\\rm{C_{rd}}([t_{0},\\infty_{\\mathbb{T}},\\mathbb{R}$ is allowed to alternate in sign infinitely many times, $B\\in\\rm{C_{rd}}([t_{0},\\infty_{\\mathbb{T}},\\mathbb{R}^{+}$, $F\\in\\rm{C_{rd}}(\\mathbb{R},\\mathbb{R}$ is nondecreasing, and $\\alpha,\\beta\\in\\rm{C_{rd}}([t_{0},\\infty_{\\mathbb{T}},\\mathbb{T}$ are unbounded increasing functions satisfying $\\alpha(t,\\beta(t\\leq t$ for all sufficiently large $t$. We give change of order formula for double(iterated integrals to prove our main result. Some simple examples are given to illustrate the applicability of our results too. In the literature, almost all of the results for \\eqref{asbeq1} with $\\mathbb{T}=\\mathbb{R}$ and $\\mathbb{T}=\\mathbb{Z}$ hold for bounded solutions. Our results are new and not stated in the literature even for the particular cases $\\mathbb{T}=\\mathbb{R}$ and/or $\\mathbb{T}=\\mathbb{Z}$.

  4. A comparative study of recycled aggregates from concrete and mixed debris as material for unbound road sub-base

    Jimenez, J. R.; Agrela, F.; Ayuso, J.; Lopez, M.

    2011-01-01

    Seven different types of recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste (CDW) have been evaluated as granular materials for unbound road sub bases construction. The results showed that recycled concrete aggregates complied with all specifications for using in the construction of unbound structural layers (sub-base) for T3 and T4 traffic categories according to the Spanish General Technical Specification for Road Construction (PG-3). Some mixed recycled aggregates fell short of some specifications due to a high content of sulphur compounds and poor fragmentation resistance. Sieving off the fine fraction prior to crushing the mixed CDW reduce the total sulphur content and improve the quality of the mixed recycled aggregates, by contrast, pre-sieving concrete CDW had no effect on the quality of the resulting aggregates. The results were compared with a crushed limestone as natural aggregate. (Author) 23 refs.

  5. Determination of the unbound fraction of R- and S-methadone in human brain

    Holm, Karen M D; Linnet, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    According to the free drug hypothesis, only the unbound fraction (f u ) of a given drug is biologically available in terms of its pharmacologic activity. Methadone shows large interpersonal variation in toxicity. The goal of the work presented here was to examine whether isolating the unbound...... fraction of the active R-methadone enantiomer from brain matter could be of value as a forensic tool. A method applying equilibrium dialysis to postmortem brain samples was validated and showed good reproducibility for the previously published f u values for eight common drugs (alprazolam, citalopram...... with multiple drugs, methadone poisoning, and deaths unrelated to methadone), but these are thought to be too low to be of any forensic value....

  6. DisA and c-di-AMP act at the intersection between DNA-damage response and stress homeostasis in exponentially growing Bacillus subtilis cells.

    Gándara, Carolina; Alonso, Juan C

    2015-03-01

    Bacillus subtilis contains two vegetative diadenylate cyclases, DisA and CdaA, which produce cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP), and one phosphodiesterase, GdpP, that degrades it into a linear di-AMP. We report here that DisA and CdaA contribute to elicit repair of DNA damage generated by alkyl groups and H2O2, respectively, during vegetative growth. disA forms an operon with radA (also termed sms) that encodes a protein distantly related to RecA. Among different DNA damage agents tested, only methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) affected disA null strain viability, while radA showed sensitivity to all of them. A strain lacking both disA and radA was as sensitive to MMS as the most sensitive single parent (epistasis). Low c-di-AMP levels (e.g. by over-expressing GdpP) decreased the ability of cells to repair DNA damage caused by MMS and in less extent by H2O2, while high levels of c-di-AMP (absence of GdpP or expression of sporulation-specific diadenylate cyclase, CdaS) increased cell survival. Taken together, our results support the idea that c-di-AMP is a crucial signalling molecule involved in DNA repair with DisA and CdaA contributing to modulate different DNA damage responses during exponential growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Unbound fraction of fluconazole and linezolid in human plasma as determined by ultrafiltration: Impact of membrane type.

    Kratzer, Alexander; Kees, Frieder; Dorn, Christoph

    2016-12-15

    Ultrafiltration is a rapid and convenient method to determine the free concentrations of drugs in plasma. Several ultrafiltration devices based on Eppendorf cups are commercially available, but are not validated for such use by the manufacturer. Plasma pH, temperature and relative centrifugal force as well as membrane type can influence the results. In the present work, we developed an ultrafiltration method in order to determine the free concentrations of linezolid or fluconazole, both neutral and moderately lipophilic antiinfective drugs for parenteral as well as oral administration, in plasma of patients. Whereas both substances behaved relatively insensitive in human plasma regarding variations in pH (7.0-8.5), temperature (5-37°C) or relative centrifugal force (1000-10.000xg), losses of linezolid were observed with the Nanosep Omega device due to adsorption onto the polyethersulfone membrane (unbound fraction 75% at 100mg/L and 45% at 0.1mg/L, respectively). No losses were observed with Vivacon which is equipped with a membrane of regenerated cellulose. With fluconazole no differences between Nanosep and Vivacon were observed. Applying standard conditions (pH 7.4/37°C/1000xg/20min), the mean unbound fraction of linezolid in pooled plasma from healthy volunteers was 81.5±2.8% using Vivacon, that of fluconazole was 87.9±3.5% using Nanosep or 89.4±3.3% using Vivacon. The unbound fraction of linezolid was 85.4±3.7% in plasma samples from surgical patients and 92.1±6.2% in ICU patients, respectively. The unbound fraction of fluconazole was 93.9±3.3% in plasma samples from ICU patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. On the energy inequality for weak solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations of compressible fluids on unbounded domains

    Dell'Oro, Filippo; Feireisl, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 128, November (2015), s. 136-148 ISSN 0362-546X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : compressible Navier-Stokes equations * unbounded domain * weak solutions * energy inequality Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.125, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0362546X15002692

  9. How to Grow Old

    Bertrand Russell

    2008-01-01

    <正>1. In spite of the title, this article will really be on how not to grow old, which, at my time of life, is a much more important subject. My first advice would be to choose your ancestors carefully. Although both my parents died young, I have done well in this respect as regards my other ancestors. My maternal grandfather, it is true, was cut off in the flower of his youth at the age of sixty-seven,

  10. A liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method for quantitating total and unbound ceritinib in patient plasma and brain tumor

    Xun Bao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A rapid, sensitive, and robust reversed-phase liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the determination of total and unbound ceritinib, a second-generation ALK inhibitor, in patient plasma and brain tumor tissue samples. Sample preparation involved simple protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Waters ACQUITY UPLC BEH C18 column using a 4-min gradient elution consisting of mobile phase A (0.1% formic acid in water and mobile phase B (0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile, at a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min. Ceritinib and the internal standard ([13C6]ceritinib were monitored using multiple reaction monitoring mode under positive electrospray ionization. The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ was 1 nM of ceritinib in plasma. The calibration curve was linear over ceritinib concentration range of 1–2000 nM in plasma. The intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy were within the generally accepted criteria for bioanalytical method (<15%. The method was successfully applied to assess ceritinib brain tumor penetration, as assessed by the unbound drug brain concentration to unbound drug plasma concentration ratio, in patients with brain tumors.

  11. Purification and biochemical characterization of ionically unbound polyphenol oxidase from Musa paradisiaca leaf.

    Diwakar, Sanjeev Kumar; Mishra, Sarad Kumar

    2011-01-01

    An ionically unbound and thermostable polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was extracted from the leaf of Musa paradisiaca. The enzyme was purified 2.54-fold with a total yield of 9.5% by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration chromatography. The purified enzyme exhibited a clear single band on native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) PAGE. It was found to be monomeric protein with molecular mass of about 40 kD. The zymographic study using crude extract as enzyme source showed a very clear band around 40 kD and a faint band at around 15 kD, which might be isozymes. The enzyme was optimally active at pH 7.0 and 50°C temperature. The enzyme was active in wide range of pH (4.0-9.0) and temperature (30-90°C). From the thermal inactivation studies in the range 60-75°C, the half-life (t(1/2)) values of the enzyme ranged from 17 to 77 min. The inactivation energy (Ea) value of PPO was estimated to be 91.3 kJ mol(-1). It showed higher specificity with catechol (K(m) = 8 mM) as compared to 4-methylcatechol (K(m) = 10 mM). Among metal ions and reagents tested, Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Hg(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), protocatechuic acid, and ferrulic acid enhanced the enzyme activity, while K(+), Na(+), Co(2+), kojic acid, ascorbic acid, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), sodium azide, β-mercaptoethanol, and L-cysteine inhibited the activity of the enzyme.

  12. Growing a market economy

    Basu, N.; Pryor, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    This report presents a microsimulation model of a transition economy. Transition is defined as the process of moving from a state-enterprise economy to a market economy. The emphasis is on growing a market economy starting from basic microprinciples. The model described in this report extends and modifies the capabilities of Aspen, a new agent-based model that is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories on a massively parallel Paragon computer. Aspen is significantly different from traditional models of the economy. Aspen`s emphasis on disequilibrium growth paths, its analysis based on evolution and emergent behavior rather than on a mechanistic view of society, and its use of learning algorithms to simulate the behavior of some agents rather than an assumption of perfect rationality make this model well-suited for analyzing economic variables of interest from transition economies. Preliminary results from several runs of the model are included.

  13. The growing fibroadenoma

    Sanders, Linda M; Sara, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Fibroadenomas (FAs) are the most common tumors of the breast clinically and pathologically in adolescent and young women but may be discovered at any age. With increasing use of core biopsy rather than excision for diagnosis, it is now commonplace to follow these lesions with imaging. To assess the incidence of epithelial abnormalities (atypia, in situ or invasive, ductal or lobular malignancies) in FAs diagnosed by core biopsy and to re-evaluate the management paradigm for any growing FA. A retrospective review of the senior author’s pathology results over 19 years identified 2062 nodular FAs (biopsied by ultrasound or stereotactic guidance). Eighty-three core biopsied FAs were identified which subsequently enlarged. Twelve of 2062 of core biopsied nodules demonstrated atypia, in situ, or invasive malignancy (ductal or lobular) within or adjacent to the FA (0.58%). Eighty-three FAs enlarged and underwent either surgical excision (n = 65), repeat core biopsy (n = 9), or imaging follow-up (n = 9). The incidence of atypia, in situ or invasive malignancy was 0/83 (0%). Two enlarging FAs were subsequently surgically diagnosed as benign phyllodes tumors (PT). Malignancy in or adjacent to a core biopsied FA is rare. The risk of cancer in a growing FA is even rarer; none were present in our series. FAs with abnormal epithelial abnormalities require excision. Otherwise, FAs without epithelial abnormality diagnosed by core biopsy need no specific follow-up considering the negligible incidence of conversion to malignancy. The breast interventionalist must know how to manage discordant pathology results

  14. Pharmacokinetics of total and unbound darunavir in HIV-1-infected pregnant women.

    Colbers, Angela; Moltó, José; Ivanovic, Jelena; Kabeya, Kabamba; Hawkins, David; Gingelmaier, Andrea; Taylor, Graham; Weizsäcker, Katharina; Sadiq, S Tariq; Van der Ende, Marchina; Giaquinto, Carlo; Burger, David

    2015-02-01

    To describe the pharmacokinetics of darunavir in pregnant HIV-infected women in the third trimester and post-partum. This was a non-randomized, open-label, multicentre, Phase IV study in HIV-infected pregnant women recruited from HIV treatment centres in Europe. HIV-infected pregnant women treated with darunavir (800/100 mg once daily or 600/100 mg twice daily) as part of their combination ART were included. Pharmacokinetic curves were recorded in the third trimester and post-partum. A cord blood sample and maternal sample were collected. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under number NCT00825929. Twenty-four women were included in the analysis [darunavir/ritonavir: 600/100 mg twice daily (n=6); 800/100 mg once daily (n=17); and 600/100 mg once daily (n=1)]. Geometric mean ratios of third trimester versus post-partum (90% CI) were 0.78 (0.60-1.00) for total darunavir AUC0-tau after 600/100 mg twice-daily dosing and 0.67 (0.56-0.82) for total darunavir AUC0-tau after 800/100 mg once-daily dosing. The unbound fraction of darunavir was not different during pregnancy (12%) compared with post-partum (10%). The median (range) ratio of darunavir cord blood/maternal blood was 0.13 (0.08-0.35). Viral load close to delivery was HIV-negative and no congenital abnormalities were reported. Darunavir AUC and Cmax were substantially decreased in pregnancy for both darunavir/ritonavir regimens. This decrease in exposure did not result in mother-to-child transmission. For antiretroviral-naive patients, who are adherent, take darunavir with food and are not using concomitant medication reducing darunavir concentrations, 800/100 mg of darunavir/ritonavir once daily is adequate in pregnancy. For all other patients 600/100 mg of darunavir/ritonavir twice daily is recommended during pregnancy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Melting ice, growing trade?

    Sami Bensassi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Large reductions in Arctic sea ice, most notably in summer, coupled with growing interest in Arctic shipping and resource exploitation have renewed interest in the economic potential of the Northern Sea Route (NSR. Two key constraints on the future viability of the NSR pertain to bathymetry and the future evolution of the sea ice cover. Climate model projections of future sea ice conditions throughout the rest of the century suggest that even under the most “aggressive” emission scenario, increases in international trade between Europe and Asia will be very low. The large inter-annual variability of weather and sea ice conditions in the route, the Russian toll imposed for transiting the NSR, together with high insurance costs and scarce loading/unloading opportunities, limit the use of the NSR. We show that even if these obstacles are removed, the duration of the opening of the NSR over the course of the century is not long enough to offer a consequent boost to international trade at the macroeconomic level.

  16. Orbital stability of standing waves for a class of Schrödinger equations with unbounded potential

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with an unbounded potential i ϕ t = − Δ ϕ + V ( x ϕ − μ | ϕ | p − 1 ϕ − λ | ϕ | q − 1 ϕ , x ∈ ℝ N , t ≥ 0 , where 0$"> μ > 0 , 0,$"> λ > 0 , and 1 < p < q < 1 + 4 / N . The potential V ( x is bounded from below and satisfies V ( x → ∞ as | x | → ∞ . From variational calculus and a compactness lemma, the existence of standing waves and their orbital stability are obtained.

  17. Numerical conformal mapping and its inverse of unbounded multiply connected regions onto logarithmic spiral slit regions and straight slit regions.

    Yunus, A A M; Murid, A H M; Nasser, M M S

    2014-02-08

    This paper presents a boundary integral equation method with the adjoint generalized Neumann kernel for computing conformal mapping of unbounded multiply connected regions and its inverse onto several classes of canonical regions. For each canonical region, two integral equations are solved before one can approximate the boundary values of the mapping function. Cauchy's-type integrals are used for computing the mapping function and its inverse for interior points. This method also works for regions with piecewise smooth boundaries. Three examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Growing Galaxies Gently

    2010-10-01

    New observations from ESO's Very Large Telescope have, for the first time, provided direct evidence that young galaxies can grow by sucking in the cool gas around them and using it as fuel for the formation of many new stars. In the first few billion years after the Big Bang the mass of a typical galaxy increased dramatically and understanding why this happened is one of the hottest problems in modern astrophysics. The results appear in the 14 October issue of the journal Nature. The first galaxies formed well before the Universe was one billion years old and were much smaller than the giant systems - including the Milky Way - that we see today. So somehow the average galaxy size has increased as the Universe has evolved. Galaxies often collide and then merge to form larger systems and this process is certainly an important growth mechanism. However, an additional, gentler way has been proposed. A European team of astronomers has used ESO's Very Large Telescope to test this very different idea - that young galaxies can also grow by sucking in cool streams of the hydrogen and helium gas that filled the early Universe and forming new stars from this primitive material. Just as a commercial company can expand either by merging with other companies, or by hiring more staff, young galaxies could perhaps also grow in two different ways - by merging with other galaxies or by accreting material. The team leader, Giovanni Cresci (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri) says: "The new results from the VLT are the first direct evidence that the accretion of pristine gas really happened and was enough to fuel vigorous star formation and the growth of massive galaxies in the young Universe." The discovery will have a major impact on our understanding of the evolution of the Universe from the Big Bang to the present day. Theories of galaxy formation and evolution may have to be re-written. The group began by selecting three very distant galaxies to see if they could find evidence

  19. Protein nutrition of growing cattle

    Chalupa, W.; Scott, G.C.

    1976-01-01

    In vitro studies on apparent degradation of amino acids by mixed and pure cultures of rumen bacteria demonstrated that (a) amino acids are degraded at differing rates (Arg, Thr>Lys, Phe, Leu, Ile>Val, Met); (b) certain amino acids (Met, Val, Try, Orn) are degraded to greater extents when fermented alone than in conjunction with other amino acids; (c) individual strains of rumen bacteria do not utilize all amino acids; and (d) total ruminal degradation of amino acids is the result of extensive bacterial interaction, and may vary greatly depending on the predominant types of micro-organisms present. Abomasal infusion of a mixture of 10 essential amino acids consistently increased nitrogen retention, but attempts to elucidate primary limiting amino acids were not conclusive. Our data suggested that supplementary methionine alone may not significantly increase nitrogen retention, but methionine must be present in order to obtain responses from other amino acids. Methionine plus lysine plus threonine usually increased nitrogen retention, but the magnitude of responses varied. The classical nitrogen balance technique may lack the sensitivity needed to detect small responses resulting from supplements of single amino acids, or growing cattle, unlike sheep used for wool growth, may not be suffering from specific amino acid deficiencies. Chemical suppression of ruminal degradation of amino acids produced significant increases in nitrogen retention and growth, and improved feed efficiencies. Productivity responses to rumen bypass techniques would seem to depend primarily upon (a) the degree to which dietary protein is degraded in the rumen, and (b) the quantity of absorbable amino acids supplied by the diet in relation to quantities required by the animal. (author)

  20. Effects of dietary energy level and intake of corn by-product-based diets on newly received growing cattle: antibody production, acute phase protein response, stress, and immunocompetency of healthy and morbid animals.

    Spore, Tyler J; Montgomery, Sean P; Titgemeyer, Evan C; Hanzlicek, Gregg A; Vahl, Chris I; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G; Cavalli, Kevin T; Hollenbeck, William R; Wahl, Ross A; Blasi, Dale A

    2018-04-14

    Effects of dietary energy level and intake of corn by-product-based diets on antibody production, acute phase protein response, stress, and immunocompetency of healthy and morbid newly received growing cattle were evaluated. Four dietary treatments were formulated to supply 0.99, 1.10, 1.21, and 1.32 Mcal NEg/ kg DM and were offered at 100%, 95%, 90%, and 85% of ad libitum based on 0.99/100 treatment intake, respectively. Thirty-two pens were utilized with approximately 12 animals/pen. Four animals from each pen (32/dietary treatment) were randomly selected and used to serve as a subset to monitor immune function and acute phase proteins following a split-plot design. In addition, two animals were randomly and independently selected from each pen (16/dietary treatment) and used to measure fecal cortisol metabolite. Additionally, animals removed from the pen one (M1), two (M2), or three (M3) times and classified as morbid were bled in conjunction with a healthy control (H) removed at the same time and the serum analyzed for the same parameters. A quadratic response to time (P bovine viral diarrhea type 1 (BVD-I) and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR; P levels by day 27. Titer levels for BVD-I and IBR were lowest on arrival, higher on day 14, and significantly higher on day 27. Titers for bovine viral diarrhea type 2 (BVD-II) responded linearly (P levels on arrival and highest levels on day 27. Haptoglobin was elevated in morbid animals compared to healthy pen mates (P levels for BVD-I and IBR were also higher in healthy animals compared to animals pulled for morbidity (P energy receiving diets based on fermentable fiber from by-products can be fed to newly received growing cattle without negative effects on antibody production toward vaccines, inflammation, or overall stress. In addition, haptoglobin concentrations and titer levels for BVD-I and IBR viruses are higher in healthy animals compared to sick animals.

  1. Formal Definitions of Unbounded Evolution and Innovation Reveal Universal Mechanisms for Open-Ended Evolution in Dynamical Systems.

    Adams, Alyssa; Zenil, Hector; Davies, Paul C W; Walker, Sara Imari

    2017-04-20

    Open-ended evolution (OEE) is relevant to a variety of biological, artificial and technological systems, but has been challenging to reproduce in silico. Most theoretical efforts focus on key aspects of open-ended evolution as it appears in biology. We recast the problem as a more general one in dynamical systems theory, providing simple criteria for open-ended evolution based on two hallmark features: unbounded evolution and innovation. We define unbounded evolution as patterns that are non-repeating within the expected Poincare recurrence time of an isolated system, and innovation as trajectories not observed in isolated systems. As a case study, we implement novel variants of cellular automata (CA) where the update rules are allowed to vary with time in three alternative ways. Each is capable of generating conditions for open-ended evolution, but vary in their ability to do so. We find that state-dependent dynamics, regarded as a hallmark of life, statistically out-performs other candidate mechanisms, and is the only mechanism to produce open-ended evolution in a scalable manner, essential to the notion of ongoing evolution. This analysis suggests a new framework for unifying mechanisms for generating OEE with features distinctive to life and its artifacts, with broad applicability to biological and artificial systems.

  2. Nonlinear diffusion equations as asymptotic limits of Cahn-Hilliard systems on unbounded domains via Cauchy's criterion

    Fukao, Takeshi; Kurima, Shunsuke; Yokota, Tomomi

    2018-05-01

    This paper develops an abstract theory for subdifferential operators to give existence and uniqueness of solutions to the initial-boundary problem (P) for the nonlinear diffusion equation in an unbounded domain $\\Omega\\subset\\mathbb{R}^N$ ($N\\in{\\mathbb N}$), written as \\[ \\frac{\\partial u}{\\partial t} + (-\\Delta+1)\\beta(u) = g \\quad \\mbox{in}\\ \\Omega\\times(0, T), \\] which represents the porous media, the fast diffusion equations, etc., where $\\beta$ is a single-valued maximal monotone function on $\\mathbb{R}$, and $T>0$. Existence and uniqueness for (P) were directly proved under a growth condition for $\\beta$ even though the Stefan problem was excluded from examples of (P). This paper completely removes the growth condition for $\\beta$ by confirming Cauchy's criterion for solutions of the following approximate problem (P)$_{\\varepsilon}$ with approximate parameter $\\varepsilon>0$: \\[ \\frac{\\partial u_{\\varepsilon}}{\\partial t} + (-\\Delta+1)(\\varepsilon(-\\Delta+1)u_{\\varepsilon} + \\beta(u_{\\varepsilon}) + \\pi_{\\varepsilon}(u_{\\varepsilon})) = g \\quad \\mbox{in}\\ \\Omega\\times(0, T), \\] which is called the Cahn--Hilliard system, even if $\\Omega \\subset \\mathbb{R}^N$ ($N \\in \\mathbb{N}$) is an unbounded domain. Moreover, it can be seen that the Stefan problem is covered in the framework of this paper.

  3. Determination of total and unbound warfarin and warfarin alcohols in human plasma by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    Lomonaco, Tommaso; Ghimenti, Silvia; Piga, Isabella; Onor, Massimo; Melai, Bernardo; Fuoco, Roger; Di Francesco, Fabio

    2013-11-01

    Two analytical procedures are presented for the determination of the total content and unbound fraction of both warfarin and warfarin alcohols in human plasma. Chromatographic separation was carried out in isocratic conditions at 25°C on a C-18 reversed-phase column with a mobile phase consisting of a 70% buffer phosphate 25mM at pH=7, 25% methanol and 5% acetonitrile at a flow rate of 1.2mL/min. Fluorescence detection was performed at 390nm (excitation wavelength 310nm). Neither method showed any detectable interference or matrix effect. Inter-day recovery of the total warfarin and warfarin alcohols at a concentration level of 1000ng/mL was 89±3% and 73±3%, respectively, whereas for their unbound fraction (at a concentration level of 10ng/mL) was 66±8% and 90±7%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precision (assessed as relative standard deviation) was alcohols, respectively. The methods were successfully applied to a pooled plasma sample obtained from 69 patients undergoing warfarin therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mass Modelling of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies: the Effect of Unbound Stars From Tidal Tails And the Milky Way

    Klimentowski, Jaroslaw; Lokas, Ewa L.; /Warsaw, Copernicus Astron. Ctr.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Prada, Francisco; /IAA, Granada; Mayer, Lucio; /Zurich,; Mamon, Gary A.; /Paris, Inst. Astrophys. /Meudon Observ.

    2006-11-14

    We study the origin and properties of the population of unbound stars in the kinematic samples of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. For this purpose we have run a high resolution N- body simulation of a two-component dwarf galaxy orbiting in a Milky Way potential. In agreement with the tidal stirring scenario of Mayer et al., the dwarf is placed on a highly eccentric orbit, its initial stellar component is in the form of an exponential disk and it has a NFW-like dark matter halo. After 10 Gyrs of evolution the dwarf produces a spheroidal stellar component and is strongly tidally stripped so that mass follows light and the stars are on almost isotropic orbits. From this final state, we create mock kinematic data sets for 200 stars by observing the dwarf in different directions.We find that when the dwarf is observed along the tidal tails the kinematic samples are strongly contaminated by unbound stars from the tails.We also study another source of possible contamination by adding stars from the Milky Way. We demonstrate that most of the unbound stars can be removed by the method of interloper rejection proposed by den Hartog & Katgert and recently tested on simulated dark matter haloes. We model the cleaned up kinematic samples using solutions of the Jeans equation with constant mass-to-light ratio and velocity anisotropy parameter. We show that even for such strongly stripped dwarf the Jeans analysis, when applied to cleaned samples, allows us to reproduce the mass and mass-to-light ratio of the dwarf with accuracy typically better than 25 percent and almost exactly in the case when the line of sight is perpendicular to the tidal tails. The analysis was applied to the new data for the Fornax dSph galaxy for which we find a mass-to-light ratio of 11 solar units and isotropic orbits. We demonstrate that most of the contamination in the kinematic sample of Fornax probably originates from the Milky Way.

  5. FUD - SALA. Stabilization of unbound layers on a road section; FUD - SALA. Provstraecka med stabilisering av obundna lager

    Svedberg, Bo; Ekdahl, Peter; Macsik, Josef; Maijala, Aino; Lahtinen, Pentti; Hermansson, Aake; Knutsson, Sven; Edeskaer, Tommy

    2008-06-15

    Stabilization of unbound layers is a method that enables the properties of road structures to be improved, for example the layer modulus of the sub base, by addition of binders. Traditional binders are cement, Merit 5000 (fine ground slag cement), lime and bitumen. The method is commonly in practice in Europe and has been also used occasionally for public roads in Sweden. Today there are examples where fly ashes (bio and coal based) have been used as binders in smaller roads for example in the counties of Uppsala, Soedermanland and also for other paved areas for heavy vehicles in the county of Vaestmanland and in Finland. These examples have mainly been carried out using an empirical approach. The objective of the project is to develop two applications as a base for full scale demonstration. One of them is a paved road and the other one is a private road with gravel as wearing course. The binders used are cement, Merit and fly-ash. Two sections of a road were used a reference. The work indicates that stabilization of unbound layers will improve the bearing capacity of the road construction significantly although the total depth of the structure is reduced. The design of the road structure was carried out in a conservative manner as there were no basis for a precise determination of the layer modulus. The developed applications are not frost lifting although their insulating properties are low and about the same as fine grained silt. The durability against frost and thaw cycles has been assessed and is expected to be acceptable. The fly ashes used will need addition of cement and Merit to perform well in frost and thaw tests. Applying both applications will result in a reduced depth of the structure and the sub-base layers can nearly be excluded. Life cycle cost calculations indicate that the cost of investment for a road construction using a stabilized layer are slightly higher than the cost of investment for the reference construction. This is probably due to the

  6. Sources of unbounded priority inversions in real-time systems and a comparative study of possible solutions

    Davari, Sadegh; Sha, Lui

    1992-01-01

    In the design of real-time systems, tasks are often assigned priorities. Preemptive priority driven schedulers are used to schedule tasks to meet the timing requirements. Priority inversion is the term used to describe the situation when a higher priority task's execution is delayed by lower priority tasks. Priority inversion can occur when there is contention for resources among tasks of different priorities. The duration of priority inversion could be long enough to cause tasks to miss their dead lines. Priority inversion cannot be completely eliminated. However, it is important to identify sources of priority inversion and minimize the duration of priority inversion. In this paper, a comprehensive review of the problem of and solutions to unbounded priority inversion is presented.

  7. Localized states in an unbounded neural field equation with smooth firing rate function: a multi-parameter analysis.

    Faye, Grégory; Rankin, James; Chossat, Pascal

    2013-05-01

    The existence of spatially localized solutions in neural networks is an important topic in neuroscience as these solutions are considered to characterize working (short-term) memory. We work with an unbounded neural network represented by the neural field equation with smooth firing rate function and a wizard hat spatial connectivity. Noting that stationary solutions of our neural field equation are equivalent to homoclinic orbits in a related fourth order ordinary differential equation, we apply normal form theory for a reversible Hopf bifurcation to prove the existence of localized solutions; further, we present results concerning their stability. Numerical continuation is used to compute branches of localized solution that exhibit snaking-type behaviour. We describe in terms of three parameters the exact regions for which localized solutions persist.

  8. Growing container seedlings: Three considerations

    Kas Dumroese; Thomas D. Landis

    2015-01-01

    The science of growing reforestation and conservation plants in containers has continually evolved, and three simple observations may greatly improve seedling quality. First, retaining stock in its original container for more than one growing season should be avoided. Second, strongly taprooted species now being grown as bareroot stock may be good candidates...

  9. Comparison of Species and Cell-Type Differences in Fraction Unbound of Liver Tissues, Hepatocytes, and Cell Lines.

    Riccardi, Keith; Ryu, Sangwoo; Lin, Jian; Yates, Phillip; Tess, David; Li, Rui; Singh, Dhirender; Holder, Brian R; Kapinos, Brendon; Chang, George; Di, Li

    2018-04-01

    Fraction unbound ( f u ) of liver tissue, hepatocytes, and other cell types is an essential parameter used to estimate unbound liver drug concentration and intracellular free drug concentration. f u,liver and f u,cell are frequently measured in multiple species and cell types in drug discovery and development for various applications. A comparison study of 12 matrices for f u,liver and f u,cell of hepatocytes in five different species (mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human), as well as f u,cell of Huh7 and human embryonic kidney 293 cell lines, was conducted for 22 structurally diverse compounds with the equilibrium dialysis method. Using an average bioequivalence approach, our results show that the average difference in binding to liver tissue, hepatocytes, or different cell types was within 2-fold of that of the rat f u,liver Therefore, we recommend using rat f u,liver as a surrogate for liver binding in other species and cell types in drug discovery. This strategy offers the potential to simplify binding studies and reduce cost, thereby enabling a more effective and practical determination of f u for liver tissues, hepatocytes, and other cell types. In addition, f u under hepatocyte stability incubation conditions should not be confused with f u,cell , as one is a diluted f u and the other is an undiluted f u Cell density also plays a critical role in the accurate measurement of f u,cell . Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  10. On structural properties of the value function for an unbounded jump Markov process with an application to a processor-sharing retrial queue

    Bhulai, S.; Brooms, A.C.; Spieksma, F.M.

    2014-01-01

    The derivation of structural properties for unbounded jump Markov processes cannot be done using standard mathematical tools, since the analysis is hindered due to the fact that the system is not uniformizable. We present a promising technique, a smoothed rate truncation method, to overcome the

  11. Structure of the unbound nucleus 13Be: One-neutron knockout reaction data from 14Be analyzed in a holistic approach

    Aksyutina, Yu; Aumann, T.; Boretzky, K.

    2013-01-01

    At the ALADIN-LAND setup at GSI the unbound nucleus 13Be has been produced in one-neutron knockout reactions from a 304 MeV/nucleon relativistic beam of 14Be ions impinging on a liquid hydrogen target. An analysis of the data including all available information about 13Be, and in particular recen...

  12. Organization of growing random networks

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Redner, S.

    2001-01-01

    The organizational development of growing random networks is investigated. These growing networks are built by adding nodes successively, and linking each to an earlier node of degree k with an attachment probability A k . When A k grows more slowly than linearly with k, the number of nodes with k links, N k (t), decays faster than a power law in k, while for A k growing faster than linearly in k, a single node emerges which connects to nearly all other nodes. When A k is asymptotically linear, N k (t)∼tk -ν , with ν dependent on details of the attachment probability, but in the range 2 -2 power-law tail, where s is the component size. The out component has a typical size of order lnt, and it provides basic insights into the genealogy of the network

  13. Type-checking Liveness for Collaborative Processes with Bounded and Unbounded Recursion

    Debois, Søren; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Slaats, Tijs

    2016-01-01

    a particular label is selected, a set of other labels, its responses, must eventually also be selected. We prove that these extended types are strictly more expressive than standard session types. We provide a type system for a process calculus similar to a subset of collaborative BPMN processes with internal...

  14. Growing media constituents determine the microbial nitrogen conversions in organic growing media for horticulture.

    Grunert, Oliver; Reheul, Dirk; Van Labeke, Marie-Christine; Perneel, Maaike; Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Boon, Nico

    2016-05-01

    Vegetables and fruits are an important part of a healthy food diet, however, the eco-sustainability of the production of these can still be significantly improved. European farmers and consumers spend an estimated €15.5 billion per year on inorganic fertilizers and the production of N-fertilizers results in a high carbon footprint. We investigated if fertilizer type and medium constituents determine microbial nitrogen conversions in organic growing media and can be used as a next step towards a more sustainable horticulture. We demonstrated that growing media constituents showed differences in urea hydrolysis, ammonia and nitrite oxidation and in carbon dioxide respiration rate. Interestingly, mixing of the growing media constituents resulted in a stimulation of the function of the microorganisms. The use of organic fertilizer resulted in an increase in amoA gene copy number by factor 100 compared to inorganic fertilizers. Our results support our hypothesis that the activity of the functional microbial community with respect to nitrogen turnover in an organic growing medium can be improved by selecting and mixing the appropriate growing media components with each other. These findings contribute to the understanding of the functional microbial community in growing media and its potential role towards a more responsible horticulture. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. A comparative study of recycled aggregates from concrete and mixed debris as material for unbound road sub-base

    Jiménez, J. R.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Seven different types of recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste (CDW have been evaluated as granular materials for unbound road sub-bases construction. The results showed that recycled concrete aggregates complied with all specifications for using in the construction of unbound structural layers (sub-base for T3 and T4 traffic categories according to the Spanish General Technical Specification for Road Construction (PG-3. Some mixed recycled aggregates fell short of some specifications due to a high content of sulphur compounds and poor fragmentation resistance. Sieving off the fine fraction prior to crushing the mixed CDW reduce the total sulphur content and improve the quality of the mixed recycled aggregates, by contrast, pre-sieving concrete CDW had no effect on the quality of the resulting aggregates. The results were compared with a crushed limestone as natural aggregate.

    Siete áridos reciclados de residuos de construcción y demolición (RCD se han evaluado como zahorras para la construcción de sub-bases de carreteras. Los resultados muestran que los áridos reciclados de hormigón cumplen todas las especificaciones del Pliego de Prescripciones Técnicas Generales para Obras de Carreteras de España (PG-3 para su uso en capas estructurales (sub-base de las categorías de tráfico T3 y T4. Algunos áridos reciclados mixtos no cumplen por escaso margen algunas de las especificaciones, debido a un alto contenido de compuestos de azufre y a una menor resistencia a la fragmentación. El precribado de la fracción fina antes de la trituración de los RCD mixtos reduce el contenido de azufre total y mejora la calidad, por el contrario, el precribado de los RCD de hormigón no tiene ningún efecto sobre la calidad de los áridos reciclados. Los resultados se compararon con una zahorra artificial caliza como árido natural.

  16. Growing Oppression, Growing Resistance : LGBT Activism and Europeanisation in Macedonia

    Miškovska Kajevska, A.; Bilić, B.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides one of the first socio-historical overviews of the LGBT groups in Macedonia and argues that an important impetus for the proliferation of LGBT activities has been the growing state-endorsed homophobia starting from 2008. The homophobic rhetoric of the ruling parties was clearly

  17. Cheap heat grows in fields

    Haluza, I.

    2006-01-01

    Slovak farmers resemble the peasants from the film T he Magnificent Seven . They keep complaining about their fate but consider any innovation as an interference. And that is why they still have not started growing fast-growing wood although the number of heating plants processing bio-mass from forests and fields is growing. Natural gas is expensive and coal creates pollution. Energy from biomass is becoming a good business and also creates new business opportunities - growing the raw material it needs. Such heating plants usually use waste from wood processing companies and Slovak Forests (Lesy SR) has also started deliveries of chip wood from old forests. There are plantations of fast growing wood suitable for heat production of over 500-thousand hectares throughout the EU. This is about 10% of Slovakian's area where the first plantations are also already being set up. The first promising plantation project was launched this spring. And this is not a project launched and backed by a big company but a starting up businessman, Miroslav Forgac from Kosice. He founded his company, Forgim, last winter. Without big money involved and thank to a new business idea he managed to persuade farmers to set up the first plantations. He supplied the seedlings and the business has started with 75 ha of plantations around Trnava, Sala, Komarno, Lucenec, Poprad and Kosice. He is gradually signing contracts with other landowners and next year the area of plantations is set to grow by 1500 ha. Plantations of fast growing trees such as willow, poplar and acacia regenerate by new trees growing out of the roots of the old and from cut trees so from one seedling and one investment there can be several harvests. Swedish willows from Forgim regenerate 20 to 25 years after the first planting. And only then new seedlings have to be purchased. Using special machines that even cut the wood to wood chips the plantations can be 'harvested' every three years. Unlike crops, the fields do not

  18. Engineering a wild fast-growing Mycoplasma bacterium to generate ...

    2018-01-12

    Jan 12, 2018 ... The CCPP bacterium causes sick animals to experience severe symptoms ... because antibiotic treatment does not eliminate the responsible bacterium. ... To develop a fast growing CCPP vaccine for cheaper production and ...

  19. Determination of protein-unbound rhynchiphylline brain distribution by microdialysis and ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Lee, Chia-Jung; Hsueh, Thomas Y; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2014-06-01

    The stem with hook of Uncaria rhynchophylla (Chinese herbal name Gou-Teng) is a traditional Chinese medicine that has been ethnopharmacologically used to extinguish wind and clean interior heat. Rhynchophylline (RHY), a tetracyclic oxindole alkaloid isolated from U. rhynchophylla, displays significant antineuroinflammatory effects. However, there is no evidence to indicate that rhynchophylline can cross the blood-brain barrier and be detected in the brain. In this study, an in vivo microdialysis sampling method coupled with UPLC/MS/MS was employed for the continuous simultaneous monitoring of unbound RHY in rat blood and brain. The precursor ion → product ion transition at m/z 385.2 → 160.0 for rhynchophylline was monitored. A calibration curve gave good linearity (r>0.996) over the concentration range from 0.5 to 1000 ng/mL. The results demonstrated that rhynchophylline could be detected in the brain and plasma from 15 min to 6 h after its administration (1 or 10 mg/kg, i.v.). All the pharmacokinetic parameters of rhynchophylline in the brain and plasma were obtained. These results show that rhynchophylline can cross the blood-brain barrier and they provide useful clinical information. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Blind Deconvolution for Distributed Parameter Systems with Unbounded Input and Output and Determining Blood Alcohol Concentration from Transdermal Biosensor Data.

    Rosen, I G; Luczak, Susan E; Weiss, Jordan

    2014-03-15

    We develop a blind deconvolution scheme for input-output systems described by distributed parameter systems with boundary input and output. An abstract functional analytic theory based on results for the linear quadratic control of infinite dimensional systems with unbounded input and output operators is presented. The blind deconvolution problem is then reformulated as a series of constrained linear and nonlinear optimization problems involving infinite dimensional dynamical systems. A finite dimensional approximation and convergence theory is developed. The theory is applied to the problem of estimating blood or breath alcohol concentration (respectively, BAC or BrAC) from biosensor-measured transdermal alcohol concentration (TAC) in the field. A distributed parameter model with boundary input and output is proposed for the transdermal transport of ethanol from the blood through the skin to the sensor. The problem of estimating BAC or BrAC from the TAC data is formulated as a blind deconvolution problem. A scheme to identify distinct drinking episodes in TAC data based on a Hodrick Prescott filter is discussed. Numerical results involving actual patient data are presented.

  1. High-order boundary integral equation solution of high frequency wave scattering from obstacles in an unbounded linearly stratified medium

    Barnett, Alex H.; Nelson, Bradley J.; Mahoney, J. Matthew

    2015-09-01

    We apply boundary integral equations for the first time to the two-dimensional scattering of time-harmonic waves from a smooth obstacle embedded in a continuously-graded unbounded medium. In the case we solve, the square of the wavenumber (refractive index) varies linearly in one coordinate, i.e. (Δ + E +x2) u (x1 ,x2) = 0 where E is a constant; this models quantum particles of fixed energy in a uniform gravitational field, and has broader applications to stratified media in acoustics, optics and seismology. We evaluate the fundamental solution efficiently with exponential accuracy via numerical saddle-point integration, using the truncated trapezoid rule with typically 102 nodes, with an effort that is independent of the frequency parameter E. By combining with a high-order Nyström quadrature, we are able to solve the scattering from obstacles 50 wavelengths across to 11 digits of accuracy in under a minute on a desktop or laptop.

  2. A multiscale approach to simulating the conformational properties of unbound multi-C₂H₂ zinc finger proteins.

    Liu, Lei; Wade, Rebecca C; Heermann, Dieter W

    2015-09-01

    The conformational properties of unbound multi-Cys2 His2 (mC2H2) zinc finger proteins, in which zinc finger domains are connected by flexible linkers, are studied by a multiscale approach. Three methods on different length scales are utilized. First, atomic detail molecular dynamics simulations of one zinc finger and its adjacent flexible linker confirmed that the zinc finger is more rigid than the flexible linker. Second, the end-to-end distance distributions of mC2H2 zinc finger proteins are computed using an efficient atomistic pivoting algorithm, which only takes excluded volume interactions into consideration. The end-to-end distance distribution gradually changes its profile, from left-tailed to right-tailed, as the number of zinc fingers increases. This is explained by using a worm-like chain model. For proteins of a few zinc fingers, an effective bending constraint favors an extended conformation. Only for proteins containing more than nine zinc fingers, is a somewhat compacted conformation preferred. Third, a mesoscale model is modified to study both the local and the global conformational properties of multi-C2H2 zinc finger proteins. Simulations of the CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), an important mC2H2 zinc finger protein for genome spatial organization, are presented. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. 67Ga in transferrin-unbound form is taken up by inflamed liver of mouse treated with CCl4

    Ohkubo, Yasuhito; Sasayama, Akio; Takegahara, Ikumi; Katoh, Shinsuke; Abe, Kenichi; Kohno, Hiroyuki; Kubodera, Akiko.

    1990-01-01

    In order to investigate whether or not transferrin is involved in the uptake of 67 Ga by inflamed liver (acute inflammatory tissues) the uptake of 67 Ga by the liver of mice treated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) was studied. The serum GPT value reached its maximum on the 1st day after the CCl 4 treatment. The uptake of 67 Ga by the liver also reached its maximum on the 1st day after the CCl-4 treatment and the amount uptake into inflamed liver was about 6 times that uptaken into normal liver. On the other hand, the uptake of 125 I-transferrin into inflamed liver on the 1st day after CCl 4 treatment was only about 1.6 times that into normal liver. Moreover, cold Fe 3+ decreased the uptake of 67 Ga by normal liver but increased the uptake of 67 Ga by inflamed liver. These results show that transferrin plays an important role in the uptake of 67 Ga by normal liver but not by inflamed liver, i.e. 67 Ga in the transferrin-unbound form is preferentially taken up by inflamed liver. (author)

  4. Exploring Classroom Hydroponics. Growing Ideas.

    National Gardening Association, Burlington, VT.

    Growing Ideas, the National Gardening Association's series for elementary, middle, and junior high school educators, helps teachers engage students in using plants and gardens as contexts for developing a deeper, richer understanding of the world around them. This volume's focus is on hydroponics. It presents basic hydroponics information along…

  5. Organization of growing random networks

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Redner, S.

    2001-06-01

    The organizational development of growing random networks is investigated. These growing networks are built by adding nodes successively, and linking each to an earlier node of degree k with an attachment probability A{sub k}. When A{sub k} grows more slowly than linearly with k, the number of nodes with k links, N{sub k}(t), decays faster than a power law in k, while for A{sub k} growing faster than linearly in k, a single node emerges which connects to nearly all other nodes. When A{sub k} is asymptotically linear, N{sub k}(t){similar_to}tk{sup {minus}{nu}}, with {nu} dependent on details of the attachment probability, but in the range 2{lt}{nu}{lt}{infinity}. The combined age and degree distribution of nodes shows that old nodes typically have a large degree. There is also a significant correlation in the degrees of neighboring nodes, so that nodes of similar degree are more likely to be connected. The size distributions of the in and out components of the network with respect to a given node{emdash}namely, its {open_quotes}descendants{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ancestors{close_quotes}{emdash}are also determined. The in component exhibits a robust s{sup {minus}2} power-law tail, where s is the component size. The out component has a typical size of order lnt, and it provides basic insights into the genealogy of the network.

  6. Growing an Emerging Research University

    Birx, Donald L.; Anderson-Fletcher, Elizabeth; Whitney, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The emerging research college or university is one of the most formidable resources a region has to reinvent and grow its economy. This paper is the first of two that outlines a process of building research universities that enhance regional technology development and facilitate flexible networks of collaboration and resource sharing. Although the…

  7. Growing Crystals on the Ceiling.

    Christman, Robert A.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a method of studying growing crystals in a classroom utilizing a carrousel projector standing vertically. A saturated salt solution is placed on a slide on the lens of the projector and the heat from the projector causes the water to evaporate and salt to crystalize. (Author/DS)

  8. Agglomerative clustering of growing squares

    Castermans, Thom; Speckmann, Bettina; Staals, Frank; Verbeek, Kevin; Bender, M.A.; Farach-Colton, M.; Mosteiro, M.A.

    2018-01-01

    We study an agglomerative clustering problem motivated by interactive glyphs in geo-visualization. Consider a set of disjoint square glyphs on an interactive map. When the user zooms out, the glyphs grow in size relative to the map, possibly with different speeds. When two glyphs intersect, we wish

  9. Inferences from growing trees backwards

    David W. Green; Kent A. McDonald

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to illustrate how longitudinal stress wave techniques can be useful in tracking the future quality of a growing tree. Monitoring the quality of selected trees in a plantation forest could provide early input to decisions on the effectiveness of management practices, or future utilization options, for trees in a plantation. There will...

  10. COFFEE GROWING AREAS OF ETHIOPIA"

    accelerated economic growth, part of which is hoped to be achieved via increased ... at the Fifth International Conference on the Ethiopian Economy held at the United ... Samuel and Ludi: Agricultural commercialisation in coffee growing areas. ... Ethiopia produces and exports one of the best fighland coffees in the world.

  11. Stabilization of the norm of the solution of a mixed problem in an unbounded domain for parabolic equations of orders 4 and 6

    Mukminov, F Kh; Bikkulov, I M

    2004-01-01

    The behaviour as t→∞ of the solution of a mixed problem for parabolic equations in an unbounded domain with two exits to infinity is studied. A certain class of domains is distinguished, in which an estimate characterizing the stabilization of solutions and determined by the geometry of the domain is established. This estimate is proved to be sharp in a certain sense for a broad class of domains with two exits to infinity.

  12. Observation and spectroscopy of new proton-unbound isotopes {sup 30}Ar and {sup 29}Cl - an interplay of prompt two-proton and sequential decay

    Mukha, Ivan [Helmholzzentrum GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Previously unknown isotopes {sup 30}Ar and {sup 29}Cl have been identified by measurement of the trajectories of their in-flight decay products {sup 28}S+p+p and {sup 28}S+p, respectively. The analysis of angular correlations of the fragments provided information on decay energies and structure of the parent states. The lowest states in {sup 30}Ar, {sup 29}Cl point to a violation of isobaric symmetry in structure of these unbound nuclei. The two-proton decay has been identified in a transition region between simultaneous two-proton and sequential proton emissions from the {sup 30}Ar ground state, which is characterized by an interplay of three-body and two-body decay mechanisms. Such a phenomenon, never observed before, may be common in 2p-unbound nuclei, and could be of interest for other disciplines dealing with few-body systems. In addition, the dramatic change of odd-even mass staggering in 2p-unbound nuclei and the fine structure in the 2p decay of the {sup 30}Ar*(2.9 MeV) state were indicated. An Optical Time-Projection Chamber was used in the same experiment to observe beta decays of stopped {sup 31}Ar ions, which passed the secondary target intact. With this detector, β-delayed 3p emission from {sup 31}Ar was observed.

  13. A computational model of amoeboid cell swimming in unbounded medium and through obstacles

    Campbell, Eric; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2017-11-01

    Pseudopod-driven motility is commonly observed in eukaryotic cells. Pseudopodia are actin-rich protrusions of the cellular membrane which extend, bifurcate, and retract in cycles resulting in amoeboid locomotion. While actin-myosin interactions are responsible for pseudopod generation, cell deformability is crucial concerning pseudopod dynamics. Because pseudopodia are highly dynamic, cells are capable of deforming into complex shapes over time. Pseudopod-driven motility represents a multiscale and complex process, coupling cell deformation, protein biochemistry, and cytoplasmic and extracellular fluid motion. In this work, we present a 3D computational model of amoeboid cell swimming in an extracellular medium (ECM). The ECM is represented as a fluid medium with or without obstacles. The model integrates full cell deformation, a coarse-grain reaction-diffusion system for protein dynamics, and fluid interaction. Our model generates pseudopodia which bifurcate and retract, showing remarkable similarity to experimental observations. Influence of cell deformation, protein diffusivity and cytoplasmic viscosity on the swimming speed is analyzed in terms of altered pseudopod dynamics. Insights into the role of matrix porosity and obstacle size on cell motility are also provided. Funded by NSF CBET 1438255.

  14. Stream Clustering of Growing Objects

    Siddiqui, Zaigham Faraz; Spiliopoulou, Myra

    We study incremental clustering of objects that grow and accumulate over time. The objects come from a multi-table stream e.g. streams of Customer and Transaction. As the Transactions stream accumulates, the Customers’ profiles grow. First, we use an incremental propositionalisation to convert the multi-table stream into a single-table stream upon which we apply clustering. For this purpose, we develop an online version of K-Means algorithm that can handle these swelling objects and any new objects that arrive. The algorithm also monitors the quality of the model and performs re-clustering when it deteriorates. We evaluate our method on the PKDD Challenge 1999 dataset.

  15. Millennium bim managing growing demand

    Lopes, Francisca Barbosa Malpique de Paiva

    2014-01-01

    Millennium bim, the Mozambican operation of Millennium bcp group, was the Company selected to serve as background for the development of a teaching case in Marketing. This case is followed by a teaching note, and is intended to be used as a pedagogical tool in undergraduate and/or graduate programs. Even though Mozambique is still characterized by high financial exclusion, the number of people entering within the banking industry has been growing at a fast pace. Actually, the demand for fi...

  16. How do normal faults grow?

    Blækkan, Ingvild; Bell, Rebecca; Rotevatn, Atle; Jackson, Christopher; Tvedt, Anette

    2018-01-01

    Faults grow via a sympathetic increase in their displacement and length (isolated fault model), or by rapid length establishment and subsequent displacement accrual (constant-length fault model). To test the significance and applicability of these two models, we use time-series displacement (D) and length (L) data extracted for faults from nature and experiments. We document a range of fault behaviours, from sympathetic D-L fault growth (isolated growth) to sub-vertical D-L growth trajectorie...

  17. Adaptive estimation of a time-varying phase with coherent states: Smoothing can give an unbounded improvement over filtering

    Laverick, Kiarn T.; Wiseman, Howard M.; Dinani, Hossein T.; Berry, Dominic W.

    2018-04-01

    The problem of measuring a time-varying phase, even when the statistics of the variation is known, is considerably harder than that of measuring a constant phase. In particular, the usual bounds on accuracy, such as the 1 /(4 n ¯) standard quantum limit with coherent states, do not apply. Here, by restricting to coherent states, we are able to analytically obtain the achievable accuracy, the equivalent of the standard quantum limit, for a wide class of phase variation. In particular, we consider the case where the phase has Gaussian statistics and a power-law spectrum equal to κp -1/|ω| p for large ω , for some p >1 . For coherent states with mean photon flux N , we give the quantum Cramér-Rao bound on the mean-square phase error as [psin(π /p ) ] -1(4N /κ ) -(p -1 )/p . Next, we consider whether the bound can be achieved by an adaptive homodyne measurement in the limit N /κ ≫1 , which allows the photocurrent to be linearized. Applying the optimal filtering for the resultant linear Gaussian system, we find the same scaling with N , but with a prefactor larger by a factor of p . By contrast, if we employ optimal smoothing we can exactly obtain the quantum Cramér-Rao bound. That is, contrary to previously considered (p =2 ) cases of phase estimation, here the improvement offered by smoothing over filtering is not limited to a factor of 2 but rather can be unbounded by a factor of p . We also study numerically the performance of these estimators for an adaptive measurement in the limit where N /κ is not large and find a more complicated picture.

  18. Tamsulosin shows a higher unbound drug fraction in human prostate than in plasma: a basis for uroselectivity?

    Korstanje, Cees; Krauwinkel, Walter; van Doesum-Wolters, Francisca L C

    2011-01-01

    AIM The aim of this small patient study was to investigate tamsulosin concentrations in prostate and plasma samples in order to identify potential differences in the pharmacokinetics (PK) in plasma and prostate contributing to its pharmacodynamic activity profile in patients. METHODS Forty-one patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) scheduled for open prostatectomy were given tamsulosin 0.4 mg for 6–21 days in order to reach steady-state PK. Patients were randomized over four groups to allow collection of plasma and tissue samples at different time points after last dose administration. Samples were collected during surgery and assayed for tamsulosin HCl. The free fraction (fu) of tamsulosin was determined by ultracentrifugation of plasma and prostate tissue spiked with 14C-tamsulosin. RESULTS Cmax in plasma at 4.4 h for total tamsulosin was 15.2 ng ml−1 and AUC(0,24 h) was 282 ng ml−1 h, while for prostate Cmax at 11.4 h post-dose was 5.4 ng ml−1 and AUC(0,24 h) was 120 ng ml−1 h. AUC(0,24 h) for total tamsulosin in prostate was 43% of the plasma AUC(0,24 h). fu was 0.4 % for plasma and 59.1% for prostate. Therefore calculated on unbound tamsulosin, a ratio of 63 resulted for prostate vs. plasma Cmax concentrations. CONCLUSIONS These data indicate that in patients with confirmed BPH the amount of tamsulosin freely available in the target tissue (prostate) is much higher than in plasma. PMID:21745239

  19. Determination of Unbound Partition Coefficient and in Vitro-in Vivo Extrapolation for SLC13A Transporter-Mediated Uptake.

    Riccardi, Keith; Li, Zhenhong; Brown, Janice A; Gorgoglione, Matthew F; Niosi, Mark; Gosset, James; Huard, Kim; Erion, Derek M; Di, Li

    2016-10-01

    Unbound partition coefficient (Kpuu) is important to an understanding of the asymmetric free drug distribution of a compound between cells and medium in vitro, as well as between tissue and plasma in vivo, especially for transporter-mediated processes. Kpuu was determined for a set of compounds from the SLC13A family that are inhibitors and substrates of transporters in hepatocytes and transporter-transfected cell lines. Enantioselectivity was observed, with (R)-enantiomers achieving much higher Kpuu (>4) than the (S)-enantiomers (<1) in human hepatocytes and SLC13A5-transfected human embryonic 293 cells. The intracellular free drug concentration correlated directly with in vitro pharmacological activity rather than the nominal concentration in the assay because of the high Kpuu mediated by SLC13A5 transporter uptake. Delivery of the diacid PF-06649298 directly or via hydrolysis of the ethyl ester prodrug PF-06757303 resulted in quite different Kpuu values in human hepatocytes (Kpuu of 3 for diacid versus 59 for prodrug), which was successfully modeled on the basis of passive diffusion, active uptake, and conversion rate from ester to diacid using a compartmental model. Kpuu values changed with drug concentrations; lower values were observed at higher concentrations possibly owing to a saturation of transporters. Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of SLC13A5 was estimated to be 24 μM for PF-06649298 in human hepatocytes. In vitro Kpuu obtained from rat suspension hepatocytes supplemented with 4% fatty acid free bovine serum albumin showed good correlation with in vivo Kpuu of liver-to-plasma, illustrating the potential of this approach to predict in vivo Kpuu from in vitro systems. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. Whole-field macro- and micro-deformation characteristic of unbound water-loss in dentin hard tissue.

    Chen, Zhenning; Nadeau, Bobby; Yu, Kevin; Shao, Xinxing; He, Xiaoyuan; Goh, M Cynthia; Kishen, Anil

    2018-04-06

    High-resolution deformation measurements in a functionally graded hard tissue such as human dentin are essential to understand the unbound water-loss mediated changes and their role in its mechanical integrity. Yet a whole-field, 3-dimensional (3D) measurement and characterization of fully hydrated dentin in both macro- and micro-scales remain to be a challenge. This study was conducted in 2 stages. In stage-1, a stereo-digital image correlation approach was utilized to determine the water-loss and load-induced 3D deformations of teeth in a sagittal section over consecutively acquired frames, from a fully hydrated state to nonhydrated conditions for a period up to 2 hours. The macroscale analysis revealed concentrated residual deformations at the dentin-enamel-junction and the apical regions of root in the direction perpendicular to the dentinal tubules. Significant difference in the localized deformation characteristics was observed between the inner and outer aspects of the root dentin. During quasi-static loadings, further increase in the residual deformation was observed in the dentin. In stage-2, dentin microstructural variations induced by dynamic water-loss were assessed with environmental scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM), showing that the dynamic water-loss induced distention of dentinal tubules with concave tubular edges, and concurrent contraction of intertubular dentin with convex profile. The findings from the current macro- and micro-scale analysis provided insight on the free-water-loss induced regional deformations and ultrastructural changes in human dentin. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Observation and investigation of the new proton-unbound nuclei {sup 30}Ar and {sup 29}Cl with in-flight decay spectroscopy

    Xu, Xiaodong

    2016-06-30

    , respectively. The ground state of {sup 30}Ar was found to be 2.45{sup +0.05}{sub -0.10} MeV above the 2p emission threshold. Due to a strong Thomas-Ehrman shift, the lowest states in {sup 30}Ar and {sup 29}Cl point to a violation of isobaric mirror symmetry in the structure of these unbound nuclei. Detailed theoretical calculations of the correlations between 2p decay products followed by the Monte Carlo simulations of the detector response to the 2p decay were performed in order to investigate the decay mechanism of the {sup 30}Ar ground state. Its decay is located in a transition region between simultaneous 2p decay and sequential emission of protons. Such an interplay between the true three-body and the sequential two-body decay mechanisms is the first-time observation in a nuclear ground state. The theoretical investigations of the transition dynamics demonstrated a surprisingly strong sensitivity of the decay correlation patterns to the 2p decay energy of the {sup 30}Ar ground state and the one-proton decay energy as well as the one-proton decay width of the {sup 29}Cl ground state. The first hint on so-called fine structure in the decay of {sup 30}Ar*(2{sup +}) was obtained by detecting two decay branches into both ground state and first excited state of {sup 28}S. The comparison of the experimental {sup 28}S-proton angular correlations with those resulting from the Monte Carlo simulations of the detector response illustrates that other observed {sup 30}Ar excited states decay by sequential emission of protons via intermediate resonances in {sup 29}Cl. The decay schemes of the observed states in {sup 30}Ar and {sup 29}Cl were constructed.

  2. Dental implants in growing children

    S K Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of teeth by implants is usually restricted to patients with completed craniofacial growth. The aim of this literature review is to discuss the use of dental implants in normal growing patients and in patients with ectodermal dysplasia and the influence of maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental growth on the stability of those implants. It is recommended that while deciding the optimal individual time point of implant insertion, the status of skeletal growth, the degree of hypodontia, and extension of related psychological stress should be taken into account, in addition to the status of existing dentition and dental compliance of a pediatric patient.

  3. Torsion of a growing shaft

    Alexander V. Manzhirov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The torsion of a shaft by rigid disks is considered. The shaft has the form of circular cylinder. Two rigid disks are attached to its end faces. The process of continuous growth of such shaft under the influence of twisting torques applied to the disks is studied. Dual series equations which reflect the mathematical content of the problem at the different stages of the growing process are derived and solved. Results of the numerical analysis and singularities of the qualitative mechanical behaviour of the fundamental characteristics are discussed.

  4. Growing energy demand - environmental impact

    Rama Rao, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Scientists can bring information, insights, and analytical skills to bear on matters of public concern. Often they can help the public and its representatives to understand the likely causes of events (such as natural and technological disasters) and to estimate the possible effects of projected policies. Often they can testify to what is not possible. Even so, scientists can seldom bring definitive answers to matters of public debate. Some issues are too complex to fit within the current scope of science, or there may be little reliable information available, or the values involved may lie outside of science. Scientists and technologists strive to find an answer to the growing energy demand

  5. How fast do eels grow

    Hansen, H.J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Not so very much about the growth pattern of the eel is known yet. Eels move about nearly all the time. They are thus very difficult to follow and we do not, for examble, yet know how long it actually takes for them to grow to maturity in the wild. So far, a macroscopic analysis of the number of bright and dark areas (growth rings) in the 'earstones' has been used to determine eel age, but this method was recently challenged. Use of radioisotopes has been suggested previously for this purpose. For this present study the rare earth elements, europium-152 and europium-155 are used. When incubated in artificial sea water, a satisfactory final radioactive label was achieved. Two experiments were planned in collaboration with the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency. 2000 Elvers were set out in 1982, in the cooling water outlet of the Oskarshamn nuclear power plant, each marked with europium-155. In 1984 another 10 000 elvers labelled with europium-152 were set out under similar conditions. The idea was mainly to see how fast the eels would grow, and to compare their known age with that determined by examining the earstones. Results showed that there was no clear-cut correlation between actual eel age and the biological age determination used so far. During four years, only 10 of the original 1300 eels were recaptured. It is thus hard to say anything definite from our results on the viability of setting out elvers in the environment

  6. Study of the unbound nuclei {sup 7,9}He and {sup 10}Li; Etude de la structure des noyaux non lies {sup 7,9}He et {sup 10}Li

    Al Falou, H

    2007-07-15

    The unbound nuclei {sup 7,9}He and {sup 10}Li have been investigated via the high-energy breakup of beams of neutron-rich nuclei ({sup 8}He, {sup 11}Be and {sup 14}B). The decay-energy spectra were reconstructed from coincident measurements of the charged fragments ({sup 6,8}He and {sup 9}Li) with a {delta}E-E telescope (CHARISSA) and the neutrons with the DEMON array. A theoretical approach based on the sudden approximation was used to model the reactions populating the unbound final states. The calculated decay-energy spectra were convoluted with the response function of the experimental setup using a simulation developed specifically for the present study and compared with the experimental results. The {sup 10}Li system was produced using an {sup 11}Be beam and the results confirm the continuation of the inversion of the {nu}1s1/2 and {nu}0p1/2 levels in the N = 7 isotopic chain. The {sup 9}He system was produced in two different ways with the breakup of {sup 11}Be and {sup 14}B, and was the most exotic system studied here. In this case, a structure was observed at very low decay energy which very probably corresponds to a virtual s state (a{sub s} {approx_equal} -2 - 0 fm). This result suggests that the level inversion also occurs in {sup 9}He, but with a much weaker core-neutron interaction than for {sup 10}Li (a{sub s} equals -14 {+-} 2 fm). For the data acquired from the breakup of the {sup 14}B beam, the decay energy spectrum exhibits a resonance around E{sub r} equals 1.2 MeV, which most probably corresponds to an excited 1/2{sup -} state in {sup 9}He. The {sup 7}He system was investigated with three different beams ({sup 8}He, {sup 11}Be and {sup 14}B). No evidence for the existence of the proposed low-lying (E{sub r} {approx} 1 MeV) spin-orbit partner (1/2{sup -}) of the ground state (3/2{sup -}) could be found. (author)

  7. Potentials Unbounded Below

    Curtright, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Continuous interpolates are described for classical dynamical systems defined by discrete time-steps. Functional conjugation methods play a central role in obtaining the interpolations. The interpolates corrrespond to particle motion in an underlying potential, V. Typically, V has no lower bound and can exhibit switchbacks wherein V changes form when turning points are encountered by the particle. The logistic map is used to illustrate these features.

  8. Gender Orders Unbound?

    During the last thirty years, the modernisation of gender relations has been dynamic and comprehensive, shaped by the conflicting forces of globalisation as well as women's movements around the world. As the patterns of segregation and discrimination of the classical industrial gender order erode......, new complexities and contentions in gender relations emerge at various sites such as politics, work and families. The main aim of the book is to trace formal as well as informal gender contracts as they emerge in everyday life and also in new norms and regulations set by state and enterprises. Core...... issues are the chances and the barriers for equality and new forms of gender reciprocity and solidarity....

  9. Viking Disruptions or Growing Integration?

    Sindbæk, Søren Michael

    2012-01-01

    Long-distance communication has emerged as a particular focus for archaeological exploration using network theory, analysis, and modelling. Initial attempts to adapt methods from social network analysis to archaeological data have, however, struggled to produce decisive results. This paper...... demonstrates how formal network analysis can be combined with a contextual reading of evidence relating to a long-distance communication network in the past. A study of the combined distributions of ten vessel types in 152 settlement sites from the 10th century suggests the outline of the core structure...... of the network. The model implies that 10th century long-distance exchange in the North Sea region featured long-distance links equal to those of the Carolingian emporia trade, and represented a growth in terms of new axes of integration, above all the growing links between the Scandinavian Peninsula...

  10. Growing the Blockchain information infrastructure

    Jabbar, Karim; Bjørn, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present ethnographic data that unpacks the everyday work of some of the many infrastructuring agents who contribute to creating, sustaining and growing the Blockchain information infrastructure. We argue that this infrastructuring work takes the form of entrepreneurial actions......, which are self-initiated and primarily directed at sustaining or increasing the initiator’s stake in the emerging information infrastructure. These entrepreneurial actions wrestle against the affordances of the installed base of the Blockchain infrastructure, and take the shape of engaging...... or circumventing activities. These activities purposefully aim at either influencing or working around the enablers and constraints afforded by the Blockchain information infrastructure, as its installed base is gaining inertia. This study contributes to our understanding of the purpose of infrastructuring, seen...

  11. Supplies should match growing demand

    Rasmusen, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The natural gas industry is currently enjoying healthy growth prospects. Not only is the demand for natural gas steadily growing; the outlook for increasing gas reserves is promising as well. The success of natural gas in the marketplace reflects, on one hand, continuous attention paid to public and customer requirements and, on the other hand, the ability of the gas industry to direct technological developments toward the increasing public demand for gas at competitive market prices supplied in a reliable, safe and environmentally friendly manner. In the past, the gas industry has been involved in the development of technologies for everything from gas production to the end user and from borehole to burner tip, and the author believes that the industry must continue or even increase its emphasis on technology in the future in order to capture new market opportunities. He explains this by looking at the supply side, the demand side and the structural side of the business

  12. How to grow great leaders.

    Ready, Douglas A

    2004-12-01

    Few leaders excel at both the unit and enterprise levels. More than ever, though, corporations need people capable of running business units, functions, or regions and focusing on broader company goals. It's up to organizations to develop leaders who can manage the inherent tensions between unit and enterprise priorities. Take the example of RBC Financial Group, one of the largest, most profitable companies in Canada. In the mid-1990's, RBC revamped its competitive strategy in a couple of ways. After the government announced that the Big Six banks in Canada could neither merge with nor acquire one another, RBC decided to grow through cross-border acquisitions. Additionally, because customers were starting to seek bundled products and services, RBC reached across its traditional stand-alone businesses to offer integrated solutions. These changes in strategy didn't elicit immediate companywide support. Instinctively, employees reacted against what would amount to a delicate balancing act: They would have to lift their focus out of their silos while continuing to meet unit goals. However, by communicating extensively with staff members, cross-fertilizing talent across unit boundaries, and targeting rewards to shape performance, RBC was able to cultivate rising leaders with the unit expertise and the enterprise vision to help the company fulfill its new aims. Growing such well-rounded leaders takes sustained effort because unit-enterprise tensions are quite real. Three common conditions reinforce these tensions. First, most organizational structures foster silo thinking and unimaginative career paths. Second, most companies lack venues for airing and resolving conflicts that arise when there are competing priorities. Third, many have misguided reward systems that pit unit performance against enterprise considerations. Such long-established patterns of organizational behavior are tough to break. Fortunately, as RBC discovered, people can be trained to think and work

  13. Stabilization of the solution of a two-dimensional system of Navier-Stokes equations in an unbounded domain with several exits to infinity

    Khisamutdinova, N A

    2003-01-01

    The behaviour as t→∞ of the solution of the mixed problem for the system of Navier-Stokes equations with a Dirichlet condition at the boundary is studied in an unbounded two-dimensional domain with several exits to infinity. A class of domains is distinguished in which an estimate characterizing the decay of solutions in terms of the geometry of the domain is proved for exponentially decreasing initial velocities. A similar estimate of the solution of the first mixed problem for the heat equation is sharp in a broad class of domains with several exits to infinity

  14. A Semi-linear Backward Parabolic Cauchy Problem with Unbounded Coefficients of Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman Type and Applications to Optimal Control

    Addona, Davide, E-mail: d.addona@campus.unimib.it [Università degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, (MILANO BICOCCA) Dipartimento di Matematica (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    We obtain weighted uniform estimates for the gradient of the solutions to a class of linear parabolic Cauchy problems with unbounded coefficients. Such estimates are then used to prove existence and uniqueness of the mild solution to a semi-linear backward parabolic Cauchy problem, where the differential equation is the Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman equation of a suitable optimal control problem. Via backward stochastic differential equations, we show that the mild solution is indeed the value function of the controlled equation and that the feedback law is verified.

  15. Strong γ-ray emission from neutron unbound states populated in β-decay: Impact on (n,γ) cross-section estimates

    Tain, J. L.; Guadilla, V.; Valencia, E.; Algora, A.

    2017-01-01

    Total absorption gamma-ray spectroscopy is used to measure accurately the intensity of γ emission from neutron-unbound states populated in the β-decay of delayed-neutron emitters. From the comparison of this intensity with the intensity of neutron emission one can deduce information on the (n,γ) cross section for unstable neutron-rich nuclei of interest in r process abundance calculations. A surprisingly large γ branching was observed for a number of isotopes. Here, the results are compared with Hauser-Feshbach calculations and discussed.

  16. Growing hairs in shorn cattle

    Cecília José Veríssimo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The shearing operation can provide double benefits to the cattle: they can become more heat tolerant and the tick infestation decreases. The cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus causes great losses to dairy cattle, especially to the Holstein cattle because they are very susceptible to this tick. Its control is becoming each day more difficult, owing to the increasing resistance to acaricides they are acquiring. The objective of this work was to study the growing of haircoat following shearing. We made our experiment with 17 animals, 7 females and 10 males. They were shaved on the anterior third (head, neck, dewlap, scapula and arm of one side, at random. The work was performed in two steps: they were shorn for the first time on August 2nd 2012, with a size 10 blade in a clipper Oster model GoldenA5, which left the fur coat 2 mm long. Then we evaluated the hair length growing by collecting fortnightly three sample of hairs in the middle of the scapula, with  electric pliers, modified for this purpose, in both sides of the animals, sheared and non-sheared, until 30 days after this shearing. The three hair samples were put inside a little plastic bag per animal. Meanwhile, as we thought that the animals shearing had to be done closer to the skin, we decided to shear them again (in the same side shorn before, on October 2nd 2012. We changed our procedure using the same machine, but now with a blade size 30, which left the fur coat 1mm thick. After that, we collected again, fortnightly, samples of hairs on both sides during 2 months. The 10 longest hairs in the plastig bag were measured using a graph paper and the average per animal was calculated in each data and blade. A random design was applied for statistical analysis, the hair length of both sides, sheared and non sheared were compared by a two related samples tests – Wilcoxon, in a non parametric test, using the SPSSP 12.0 program, in each data within each blade. Using blade size

  17. Case grows for climate change

    Hileman, B.

    1999-08-09

    In the four years since the IPCC stated that 'the balance of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climate', evidence for anomalous warming has become more compelling, and as a result scientists have become more concerned that human-induced climate change has already arrived. The article summarises recent extra evidence on global temperatures, carbon dioxide measurements, ice shelf breakup, coral bleaching, unstable climates and improved climate models. At the time of the Kyoto conference, the US became keen on the idea that enhancing forest and soil carbon sequestration was a good way to offset emissions reduction targets. Congress is however under the opinion on that the Kyoto protocol presents a threat to the US economy, and senate is very unlikely to ratify the protocol during the Clinton Administration. The debate as to whether the US government should mandate major emission reduction or wait for more scientific certainty may continue for a number of years, but, growing concern of scientists and the public for the harmful effects of climate change may cause a change. 4 figs., 8 photos.

  18. Morphological and physiological responses of two varieties of a highland species (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) growing under near-ambient and strongly reduced solar UV-B in a lowland location.

    González, Juan A; Rosa, Mariana; Parrado, María F; Hilal, Mirna; Prado, Fernando E

    2009-08-03

    Morphological and physiological responses of seedlings to different solar UV-B irradiances were evaluated in two varieties of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.), a crop species from Andean region of South America. Cristalina and Chucapaca varieties were grown at 1965m a.s.l in a glasshouse under natural light conditions for 18 days, and then transferred to outdoors under near-ambient (+UV-B) and strongly reduced (-UV-B) solar UV-B radiation. Exposition to -UV-B increased cotyledon area and seedling height in Cristalina variety whereas leaf number decreased compared to +UV-B. By contrast Chucapaca variety was not affected by UV-B treatments. Seedling fresh weight (FW), root length and leaf thickness did not show significant differences between +UV-B and -UV-B treatments. Mesophyll tissue was slightly affected by solar UV-B reduction. Chlorophyll content was differentially affected by UV-B treatments. Under +UV-B the highest value was observed in Cristalina variety, while in Chucapaca it was observed under -UV-B treatment. Chlorophyll content was slightly higher in leaves than in cotyledons, but there was no difference in the distribution pattern. Chlorophyll a/b ratio and carotenoid content did not show significant differences between UV-B treatments. Leaf UVB-absorbing compounds showed significant differences between UV-B treatments in Chucapaca only, while there were no significant differences in Cristalina variety. UVB-absorbing compounds of cotyledons did not show significant differences between +UV-B and -UV-B treatments. Sucrose, glucose and fructose showed different distribution patterns in cotyledons and leaves of the two varieties under near-ambient and strongly reduced UV-B. Results demonstrated that varieties of quinoa exhibit different morphological and physiological responses to changes in solar UV-B irradiance, but these responses cannot be used to predict the sensitivity to solar UV-B during a short-term exposition. Also, this study can be useful to

  19. Growing population causes of unemployment.

    1995-01-01

    At the March, 1995, International Meeting on Population and Social Development in Copenhagen, during the session on unemployment, underemployment, and population it was stated that the problem of employment was the extent to which a nation's labor supply was not matched by labor demand or job opportunities. Population was thus a supply factor, and the country's economic situation was a demand factor. The demographic variables that were considered important in the supply of labor were: a) the size and rate of growth of the population, which was a function of the birth rate, the death rate, and migration; and b) the age structure of the population, which was also a product of the rate of growth of the population and its distribution. An imbalance between the supply of labor and the demand for it gave rise to unemployment and underemployment. The vicious cycle generated by a high dependency burden associated with a young age-structure led to low savings and investments, which in turn led to low economic growth and a low standard of living. This produced high fertility rates, which in turn heightened the dependency burden perpetuating the cycle. This vicious cycle could be broken at only two points: at the high fertility stage, primarily by introducing family planning programs; and at the stage of low economic growth, by adopting policies to accelerate economic growth. To be successful, however, both actions had to be pursued simultaneously. Numerous participants emphasized the global nature of the issue of unemployment and underemployment; the effects of international competition and restrictive trade policies on employment opportunities. The growing disparity between North and South had created a social injustice between countries. Several participants called for more humane policies that favored democracy and promoted human development, and asked for assistance to help create an enabling environment for social and economic development.

  20. Bounded and unbounded boundaries - Untangling mechanisms for estuarine-marine ecological connectivity: Scales of m to 10,000 km - A review

    Wolanski, Eric

    2017-11-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the self-recruitment and connectivity of estuarine and coastal fauna and flora were made possible by an integration of physical oceanographic observations and modelling with results from studies of the behaviour of the seeds, eggs, larvae, propagules, juveniles and polyps, of population dynamics, microchemical tagging using natural and artificial markers, genetics and direct observations of trajectories. The species studied in those case studies were jellyfish in marine lakes, corals in acidified bays, seagrass, mangrove propagules, mussels and oysters, prawns, some estuarine fish larvae, the copepod Calanus finmarchius in the North Sea, sea turtles in the Coral Sea, and the ornate spiny lobster Panulirus ornatus in the Southeast Asia archipelago. The spatial scales for self-recruitment and connectivity vary with the species from a few m to 10,000 km, and the temporal scales vary from one to three generations. These studies suggest that, with increasing physical openness of a given site for a given species, self-recruiting increasingly relies on the behaviour of the species. Estuarine and coastal systems thus are simultaneously bounded and unbounded depending on the sites and the species considered and, although often ignored, the integration of oceanographic and behavioural understanding is increasingly required. This paper has shown the importance of understanding the hydrological and ecological dynamics with unbounded boundaries in creating the connectivity between parts of the aquatic continuum from the river catchment to the open seas.

  1. How Your Fetus Grows During Pregnancy

    ... Patients About ACOG How Your Fetus Grows During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs How Your Fetus ... 2018 PDF Format How Your Fetus Grows During Pregnancy Pregnancy How does pregnancy begin? What is the ...

  2. Menopausal women's positive experience of growing older

    Hvas, Lotte

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to describe menopausal women's positive experience of growing older and becoming middle-aged.......This paper aims to describe menopausal women's positive experience of growing older and becoming middle-aged....

  3. Summer-long grazing of high versus low endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum-infected tall fescue by growing beef steers results in distinct temporal blood analyte response patterns, with poor correlation to serum prolactin levels

    Joshua J. Jackson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we reported the effects of fescue toxicosis on developing Angus-cross steer growth, carcass, hepatic mRNA and protein expression profiles of selected serum proteins, and blood clinical and chemical profiles, after summer-long grazing (85 d of high (HE- vs low (LE-endophyte-infected fescue pastures. We now report the temporal development of acute, intermediate, and chronic responses of biochemical and clinical blood analytes determined at specified time intervals (period 1, d 0 to 36; period 2, d 37 to 58; and period 3, d 59 to 85. Throughout the trial, the alkaloid concentrations of the HE forage was consistently 19 to 25 times greater (P < 0.049 the concentration in the LE forage, and HE vs LE steers had continuously lower (P < 0.049 serum prolactin (85%, cholesterol (27%, and albumin (5%, but greater red blood cells (7%. The HE steers had decreased (P = 0.003 ADG only during period 1 (-0.05 vs 0.4 kg/d. For period 1, HE steers had reduced (P < 0.090 numbers of eosinophils (55% and lymphocytes (18%, serum triglyceride (27%, and an albumin/globulin ratio (9%, but an increased bilirubin concentration (20%. During period 2, serum LDH activities were 18% lower (P = 0.022 for HE vs LE steers. During period 3, serum levels of ALP (32%, ALT (16%, AST (15%, creatine kinase (35%, glucose (10%, and LDH (23% were lower (P < 0.040 for HE steers. Correlation analysis of serum prolactin and other blood analytes revealed that triglycerides (P = 0.042 and creatinine (P = 0.021 were moderately correlated (r < 0.433 with HE serum prolactin. In conclusion, three HE-induced blood analyte response patterns were identified: continually altered, initially altered and subsequently recovered, or altered only after long-term exposure. Blood analytes affected by length of grazing HE vs LE forages were either not, or poorly, correlated with serum prolactin. These data reveal important, temporal, data about how young cattle respond to the challenge of consuming

  4. Nutritional studies on growing rabbits

    Hassan, A.M.E.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    This work was carried out to study the effect of adding drinking water with either, copper sulfate, ascorbic acid or drinking cooled water on growth performance (live body weight,body weight gain, feed intake, feed conversion and water consumption), digestibility coefficients of nutrients, carcass traits, some physiological parameters and economical efficiency of growing NZW rabbits under Egyptian summer conditions. Ninety six weanling New Zealand White (NZW) male rabbits at five weeks of age and nearly similar average body weight (650.3 ±3.7 g) were randomly divided into eight treatment groups (twelve rabbits in each group), and then each group was subdivided into four replicates, each of three rabbits. The rabbits were assigned to drinking water as follow: the 1 st group was given fresh tap water without any additives as a control. The 2 n d, 3 r d and 4 t h groups were given tap fresh water supplemented with copper sulfate at levels of 40, 80 and 120 mg/L drinking water, respectively. The 5 t h, 6 t h and 7 t h groups were given tap fresh water supplemented with ascorbic acid at levels of 250, 500 and 750 mg/L drinking water, respectively. The 8 t h group was given cooled drinking water (CW) at 10-15 degree C. Results showed that supplementation of 40 or 80 mg copper sulfate/L or 500 mg ascorbic acid/L to heat-stressed rabbits drinking water improved final live body weight, body weight gain, daily water consumption, feed conversion ratio, performance index and economical efficiency. Hot carcass percentage was significantly (P<0.01) decreased with 80 mg/L copper sulfate and increased significantly (P<0.01) due to supplementation the drinking water with 250 mg ascorbic acid/L. Cooled water (10-15 degree C) improved significantly (P<0.01) each of final body weight, body weight gain, feed conversion ratio, performance index, economical efficiency and decreased significantly (P<0.01) each of hot carcass %, dressed weight %, heart %, total giblets %, rectal

  5. Comportamento celular e resposta antioxidante diferenciados de Saccharomyces cerevisiae e de Saccharomyces chevalieri ao metavanadato de amónio Different cellular behaviour and antioxidant response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces chevalieri growing in presence of ammonium metavanadate

    R. Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    conditions. In the cellular environment of aerobic organisms naturally reactive oxygen species (ROS occurs as by-products of mitochondrial respiration. The higher reactivity of these chemical species could cause molecular damages that in several cases induce cellular death. In common physiological conditions or as response to oxidative stress, the cell can generate adapted responses which involve antioxidants mechanisms as glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2 and catalase T (CAT T; EC 1.11.1.6 and A (CAT A; EC 1.11.1.6 enzymes. Vanadium, a heavy metal present in several pesticides could generate ROS changing the intracellular redox state and cause deleterious effects in yeasts exposed to higher levels of this element. The main objective of this work was to compare the effects of ammonium metavanadate (NH4VO3, a pentavalent salt of vanadium on cellular viability and GR, CAT T and CAT A activities of wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae UE-ME3 and Saccharomyces chevalieri UE-ME1. The results obtained show that S. chevalieri UE-ME1 has lower tolerance to NH4VO3 than S. cerevisiae UE-ME3, since S. chevalieri cultures do not survive to concentration values of ammonium metavanadate higher than 7,5 mM, whereas S. cerevisiae cells are still viable in the presence of 75 mM. S. chevalieri has an enzymatic activity lower than S. cerevisiae, although for both yeast species NH4VO3 could behave as oxidative stress inductor, causing a significant decrease of GR activity (P<0,01 and a significant increase of CAT A activity (P<0,01. The results show also an increase of CAT T activity in both yeast species, which can be interpreted as a protective response to oxidative stress. Differences on response to amonium metavanadate by both species of Saccharomyces could be partially justified by more efficient antioxidant systems in S. cerevisiae UE-ME3.

  6. Heterothermy in growing king penguins.

    Eichhorn, Götz; Groscolas, René; Le Glaunec, Gaële; Parisel, Camille; Arnold, Laurent; Medina, Patrice; Handrich, Yves

    2011-08-16

    A drop in body temperature allows significant energy savings in endotherms, but facultative heterothermy is usually restricted to small animals. Here we report that king penguin chicks (Aptenodytes patagonicus), which are able to fast for up to 5 months in winter, undergo marked seasonal heterothermy during this period of general food scarcity and slow-down of growth. They also experience short-term heterothermy below 20 °C in the lower abdomen during the intense (re)feeding period in spring, induced by cold meals and adverse weather. The heterothermic response involves reductions in peripheral temperature, reductions in thermal core volume and temporal abandonment of high core temperature. Among climate variables, air temperature and wind speed show the strongest effect on body temperature, but their effect size depends on physiological state. The observed heterothermy is remarkable for such a large bird (10 kg before fasting), which may account for its unrivalled fasting capacity among birds.

  7. Response

    Higgins, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

  8. Is the energy density of the ground state of the sine-Gordon model unbounded from below for β2 > 8π?

    Faber, M; Ivanov, A N

    2003-01-01

    We discuss Coleman's theorem concerning the energy density of the ground state of the sine-Gordon model proved in Coleman S (1975 Phys. Rev. D 11 2088). According to this theorem the energy density of the ground state of the sine-Gordon model should be unbounded from below for coupling constants β 2 > 8π. The consequence of this theorem would be the non-existence of the quantum ground state of the sine-Gordon model for β 2 > 8π. We show that the energy density of the ground state in the sine-Gordon model is bounded from below even for β 2 > 8π. This result is discussed in relation to Coleman's theorem (Coleman S 1973 Commun. Math. Phys. 31 259), particle mass spectra and soliton-soliton scattering in the sine-Gordon model

  9. A computational tool to predict the evolutionarily conserved protein-protein interaction hot-spot residues from the structure of the unbound protein.

    Agrawal, Neeraj J; Helk, Bernhard; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2014-01-21

    Identifying hot-spot residues - residues that are critical to protein-protein binding - can help to elucidate a protein's function and assist in designing therapeutic molecules to target those residues. We present a novel computational tool, termed spatial-interaction-map (SIM), to predict the hot-spot residues of an evolutionarily conserved protein-protein interaction from the structure of an unbound protein alone. SIM can predict the protein hot-spot residues with an accuracy of 36-57%. Thus, the SIM tool can be used to predict the yet unknown hot-spot residues for many proteins for which the structure of the protein-protein complexes are not available, thereby providing a clue to their functions and an opportunity to design therapeutic molecules to target these proteins. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular simulations and Markov state modeling reveal the structural diversity and dynamics of a theophylline-binding RNA aptamer in its unbound state.

    Becka M Warfield

    Full Text Available RNA aptamers are oligonucleotides that bind with high specificity and affinity to target ligands. In the absence of bound ligand, secondary structures of RNA aptamers are generally stable, but single-stranded and loop regions, including ligand binding sites, lack defined structures and exist as ensembles of conformations. For example, the well-characterized theophylline-binding aptamer forms a highly stable binding site when bound to theophylline, but the binding site is unstable and disordered when theophylline is absent. Experimental methods have not revealed at atomic resolution the conformations that the theophylline aptamer explores in its unbound state. Consequently, in the present study we applied 21 microseconds of molecular dynamics simulations to structurally characterize the ensemble of conformations that the aptamer adopts in the absence of theophylline. Moreover, we apply Markov state modeling to predict the kinetics of transitions between unbound conformational states. Our simulation results agree with experimental observations that the theophylline binding site is found in many distinct binding-incompetent states and show that these states lack a binding pocket that can accommodate theophylline. The binding-incompetent states interconvert with binding-competent states through structural rearrangement of the binding site on the nanosecond to microsecond timescale. Moreover, we have simulated the complete theophylline binding pathway. Our binding simulations supplement prior experimental observations of slow theophylline binding kinetics by showing that the binding site must undergo a large conformational rearrangement after the aptamer and theophylline form an initial complex, most notably, a major rearrangement of the C27 base from a buried to solvent-exposed orientation. Theophylline appears to bind by a combination of conformational selection and induced fit mechanisms. Finally, our modeling indicates that when Mg2+ ions are

  11. Haematological and serum biochemical response of growing rabbit ...

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-03

    Dec 3, 2008 ... white blood cells (WBC) of rabbits fed diet 2 and the control were similar to each other but both were ..... counts, PCV, plasma protein and glucose. In this study, .... sphingolipid biosynthesis in cultured neurons in situ. J. Biol.

  12. Accelerated testing for studying pavement design and performance (FY 2001) : evaluation of the performance of permeable and semi-permeable unbound granular bases under Portland Cement Concrete Pavement (PCCP) slabs and alternate load transfer devices for

    2003-11-01

    The objectives of this research are to determine the effect of unbound drainable base types on the performance of PCCP and the efficiency of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) dowels, compared to epoxy coated steel dowels, when retrofitted to re-establis...

  13. The effect of lumbosacral manipulation on growing pains

    Dawid de Beer

    2015-10-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether lumbosacral manipulations have an effect on growing pain symptoms. Methods: Thirty participants with growing pains between the ages of 4 and 12 years were recruited. The participants were placed into two groups of 15 participants each. Group 1 received lumbosacral manipulations to restricted joints as determined by motion palpation, while Group 2 never received any professional intervention. Often parent(s/guardian(s of children who suffer from growing pains will rub the child's legs and offer verbal reassurance in an attempt to console their children. Parent(s/guardian(s of both groups were encouraged to continue to do this throughout the duration of the trial. Instructions were given to the parents so that the same rubbing technique and rubbing cream (aqueous cream were used. Subjective changes were tracked using a pain diary that the parent(s/guardian(s were asked to complete, a six-week post-study follow-up question regarding children's growing pains and the Oucher self-report pain scale. Objective measures consisted of pressure algometer readings of the tibialis anterior muscle belly. Results: The statistical data was analysed using the Friedman test, Manne—Whitney test and the Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test. The results demonstrated that both groups responded favourably to their specific treatment over time. However, the group that received lumbosacral manipulations proved to show a quicker response to treatment; and the post study follow-up of this same group showed markedly more positive feedback than the group that did not receive the treatment. These results highlighted the positive effects of chiropractic manipulation on growing pain symptoms. Conclusion: The results from this study, specifically the feedback from parent(s/guardians(s and the pain diaries, indicated that spinal manipulation is beneficial in the treatment of growing pains. The results also showed that other methods of treating growing

  14. Growing Up of Autonomous Agents: an Emergent Phenomenon

    Morgavi, Giovanna; Marconi, Lucia

    2008-10-01

    A fundamental research challenge is the design of robust artifacts that are capable of operating under changing environments and noisy input, and yet exhibit the desired behavior and response time. These systems should be able to adapt and learn how to react to unforeseen scenarios as well as to display properties comparable to biological entities. The turn to nature has brought us many unforeseen great concepts. Biological systems are able to handle many of these challenges with an elegance and efficiency still far beyond current human artifacts. A living artifact grows up when its capabilities, abilities/knowledge, shift to a further level of complexity, i.e. the complexity rank of its internal capabilities performs a step forward. In the attempt to define an architecture for autonomous growing up agents [1]. We conducted an experiment on the abstraction process in children as natural parts of a cognitive system. We found that linguistic growing up involve a number of different trial processes. We identified a fixed number of distinct paths that were crossed by children. Once a given interpretation paths was discovered useless, they tried to follow another path, until the new meaning was emerging. This study generates suggestion about the evolutionary conditions conducive to the emergence of growing up in robots and provides guidelines for designing artificial evolutionary systems displaying spontaneous adaptation abilities. The importance of multi-sensor perception, motivation and emotional drives are underlined and, above all, the growing up insights shows similarities to emergent self-organized behaviors.

  15. Microsatellite Primers for Fungus-Growing Ants

    Villesen Fredsted, Palle; Gertsch, Pia J.; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan (Koos)

    2002-01-01

    We isolated five polymorphic microsatellite loci from a library of two thousand recombinant clones of two fungus-growing ant species, Cyphomyrmex longiscapus and Trachymyrmex cf. zeteki. Amplification and heterozygosity were tested in five species of higher attine ants using both the newly...... developed primers and earlier published primers that were developed for fungus-growing ants. A total of 20 variable microsatellite loci, developed for six different species of fungus-growing ants, are now available for studying the population genetics and colony kin-structure of these ants....

  16. Microsatellite primers for fungus-growing ants

    Villesen, Palle; Gertsch, P J; Boomsma, JJ

    2002-01-01

    We isolated five polymorphic microsatellite loci from a library of two thousand recombinant clones of two fungus-growing ant species, Cyphomyrmex longiscapus and Trachymyrmex cf. zeteki. Amplification and heterozygosity were tested in five species of higher attine ants using both the newly...... developed primers and earlier published primers that were developed for fungus-growing ants. A total of 20 variable microsatellite loci, developed for six different species of fungus-growing ants, are now available for studying the population genetics and colony kin-structure of these ants....

  17. Visualization of airflow growing soap bubbles

    Al Rahbi, Hamood; Bock, Matthew; Ryu, Sangjin

    2016-11-01

    Visualizing airflow inside growing soap bubbles can answer questions regarding the fluid dynamics of soap bubble blowing, which is a model system for flows with a gas-liquid-gas interface. Also, understanding the soap bubble blowing process is practical because it can contribute to controlling industrial processes similar to soap bubble blowing. In this study, we visualized airflow which grows soap bubbles using the smoke wire technique to understand how airflow blows soap bubbles. The soap bubble blower setup was built to mimic the human blowing process of soap bubbles, which consists of a blower, a nozzle and a bubble ring. The smoke wire was placed between the nozzle and the bubble ring, and smoke-visualized airflow was captured using a high speed camera. Our visualization shows how air jet flows into the growing soap bubble on the ring and how the airflow interacts with the soap film of growing bubble.

  18. Anticipated ethical challenges with growing molecular prenatal ...

    Anticipated ethical challenges with growing molecular prenatal diagnosis in Nigeria. ... Bayero Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences ... Ethical standards in medical laboratories are derived from medical ethics therefore, the four fundamental ...

  19. Growing America's Energy Future

    None

    2016-06-01

    The emerging U.S. bioenergy industry provides a secure and growing supply of transportation fuels, biopower, and bioproducts produced from a range of abundant, renewable biomass resources. Bioenergy can help ensure a secure, sustainable, and economically sound future by reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil, developing domestic clean energy sources, and generating domestic green jobs. Bioenergy can also help address growing concerns about climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions to create a healthier environment for current and future generations.

  20. Experiencing the "Growing Edge": Transformative Teacher Education to Foster Social Justice Perspectives

    Baily, Supriya; Stribling, Stacia M.; McGowan, Chandra L.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how teachers' perceptions of social justice issues are developed through experiential learning opportunities and maps their transformations in thinking onto the three levels of responsibility identified by Berger's "growing edge." The study looked at where teachers were on the growing edge and examples of how they…

  1. An Evaluation of the Resilient Modulus and Permanent Deformation of Unbound Mixtures of Granular Materials and Rubber Particles from Scrap Tyres to Be Used in Subballast Layers

    Hidalgo Sgnes, C.

    2016-07-01

    Over the last years rubber from scrap tyres has been reused in different civil works such as road embankments and railway platforms due to its resilient properties, low degradation and vibration attenuation. Unfortunately, this issue is still scarce. For instance, in Spain about 175.000 tonnes of scrap tyres were collected in 2014, of which only 0.6% were reused in civil works. Aiming to contribute to the reutilisation of large quantities of this waste material, this paper focuses on the analysis of unbound mixtures of granular materials with different percentages of rubber particles to be used as subballast layers. Mixtures are tested under cyclic triaxial tests so as to obtain their resilient modulus and evaluate their permanent deformations. It is found that as the rubber content increases, the resilient modulus decreases and the permanent deformation increases. Taking into account the usual loads transmitted to the subballast layer, the optimum rubber content that does not compromise the behaviour of the mixture is set in a range between 2.5% and 5% in terms of weight. (Author)

  2. A comparative study of recycled aggregates from concrete and mixed debris as material for unbound road sub-base; Estudio comparativo de los aridos reciclados de hormigon y mixtos como material para sub-bases de carreteras

    Jimenez, J. R.; Agrela, F.; Ayuso, J.; Lopez, M.

    2011-07-01

    Seven different types of recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste (CDW) have been evaluated as granular materials for unbound road sub bases construction. The results showed that recycled concrete aggregates complied with all specifications for using in the construction of unbound structural layers (sub-base) for T3 and T4 traffic categories according to the Spanish General Technical Specification for Road Construction (PG-3). Some mixed recycled aggregates fell short of some specifications due to a high content of sulphur compounds and poor fragmentation resistance. Sieving off the fine fraction prior to crushing the mixed CDW reduce the total sulphur content and improve the quality of the mixed recycled aggregates, by contrast, pre-sieving concrete CDW had no effect on the quality of the resulting aggregates. The results were compared with a crushed limestone as natural aggregate. (Author) 23 refs.

  3. Use of rubber shreds to enhance attenuation of railway sub-ballast layers made of unbound aggregates

    C. Hidalgo-Signes

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the approaches for solving the problem of induced vibrations in railways is by slightly modifying the materials that form the track. A study is presented of the attenuation capacity of mixes composed of granular soil and rubber shreds when used as sub-ballast (the layer located immediately below the ballast layer. Rubber shreds are obtained from scrap tyres, a troublesome waste material whose reuse and recycling is necessary. A series of mixes of granular soil and rubber shreds with rubber contents of between 1% and 10% are submitted to hammer impact tests to study their response to dynamic excitation. Results reveal that mixing rubber shreds with granular soil increases damping ratios, thus demonstrating the potential of the proposed mixes for attenuating vibration.

  4. Use of rubber shreds to enhance attenuation of railway sub-ballast layers made of unbound aggregates

    Hidalgo-Signes, C.; Garzón-Roca, J.; Grima-Palop, J.M.; Insa-Franco, R.

    2017-01-01

    One of the approaches for solving the problem of induced vibrations in railways is by slightly modifying the materials that form the track. A study is presented of the attenuation capacity of mixes composed of granular soil and rubber shreds when used as sub-ballast (the layer located immediately below the ballast layer). Rubber shreds are obtained from scrap tyres, a troublesome waste material whose reuse and recycling is necessary. A series of mixes of granular soil and rubber shreds with rubber contents of between 1% and 10% are submitted to hammer impact tests to study their response to dynamic excitation. Results reveal that mixing rubber shreds with granular soil increases damping ratios, thus demonstrating the potential of the proposed mixes for attenuating vibration. [es

  5. Coalescent models for developmental biology and the spatio-temporal dynamics of growing tissues.

    Smadbeck, Patrick; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2016-04-01

    Development is a process that needs to be tightly coordinated in both space and time. Cell tracking and lineage tracing have become important experimental techniques in developmental biology and allow us to map the fate of cells and their progeny. A generic feature of developing and homeostatic tissues that these analyses have revealed is that relatively few cells give rise to the bulk of the cells in a tissue; the lineages of most cells come to an end quickly. Computational and theoretical biologists/physicists have, in response, developed a range of modelling approaches, most notably agent-based modelling. These models seem to capture features observed in experiments, but can also become computationally expensive. Here, we develop complementary genealogical models of tissue development that trace the ancestry of cells in a tissue back to their most recent common ancestors. We show that with both bounded and unbounded growth simple, but universal scaling relationships allow us to connect coalescent theory with the fractal growth models extensively used in developmental biology. Using our genealogical perspective, it is possible to study bulk statistical properties of the processes that give rise to tissues of cells, without the need for large-scale simulations. © 2016 The Authors.

  6. A Little Salesmanship "Grows" a Long Way

    Montas, Leah

    2012-01-01

    Goshen Elementary PTA's membership shrank the first year the author was PTA president. In the back of her mind, she was bothered by the fact that their membership numbers had dropped. So, after she attended a regional session with her vice president on growing membership, she got the courage to propose something different. They discussed with…

  7. Growing Income Inequality Threatens American Education

    Duncan, Greg J.; Murnane, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The first of two articles in consecutive months describes the origins and nature of growing income inequality, and some of its consequences for American children. It documents the increased family income inequality that's occurred over the past 40 years and shows that the increased income disparity has been more than matched by an expanding…

  8. Level crossing analysis of growing surfaces

    Shahbazi, F; Sobhanian, S; Tabar, M Reza Rahimi; Khorram, S; Frootan, G R; Zahed, H

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the average frequency of positive slope ν + α , crossing the height α = h - h-bar in the surface growing processes. The exact level crossing analysis of the random deposition model and the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation in the strong coupling limit before creation of singularities is given

  9. The Growing Diversity of Work Schedules.

    Smith, Shirley J.

    1986-01-01

    The author highlights the predominance of the five-day, 40-hour workweek. Although finding little change in recent years in the proportion of workers on 40-hour schedules, Smith notes that there have been some changes in work patterns, with a still small but growing group of workers on "compressed" full-time weeks of less than five days.…

  10. Protect Your Health as You Grow Older

    ... you get older. It’s important to: Keep your body and mind active Choose healthy foods Get enough sleep Talk to your doctor ... Just like physical activity is good for your body, activities that challenge your ... your brain healthy. As you grow older, it's important to: Learn ...

  11. Cyber threat intelligence exchange: A growing requirement

    Veerasamy, Namosha

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Managing the rise of cyber-attacks has become a growing challenge. Cyber space has become a battleground of threats ranging from malware to phishing, spam and password theft. Cybersecurity solutions mainly try to take a defensive stance and build a...

  12. Growing a New Generation of Music Teachers

    Burrack, Frederick

    2009-01-01

    In many parts of the United States, there is a growing shortage of music teachers to take the place of the retiring teachers. This is most evident in rural areas. If music teachers are not available to fill openings, music positions are sometimes combined, spreading music teachers too thin and requiring them to possess multiple music…

  13. Pueblo Girls: Growing Up in Two Worlds.

    Keegan, Marcia

    This book portrays San Ildefonso Pueblo on the east bank of the Rio Grande river in New Mexico through the lives of Sonja, age 10, and her sister Desiree, age 8. Growing up in San Ildefonso Pueblo, the girls enjoy the same activities as other American girls, such as basketball, cheerleading, playing video games, and sending e-mail. But they also…

  14. IntelliGrow 2.0

    Markvart, Jakob; Aaslyng, Jesper Peter Mazanti; Kalita, Sebastian

    2008-01-01

    the system in full scale in five Danish commercial nurseries. The four steps to reach the goal are: 1) development of a demonstrator giving the grower advice on optimal climate control based on the IntelliGrow concept 2) testing the demonstrator at research facilities followed by tests at growers 3...

  15. Preliminary characterization of slow growing rhizobial strains ...

    In this paper, we did some preliminary characterization of six slow growing rhizobial strains, isolated from Retama monosperma (L.) Boiss. root nodules sampled from 3 sites along the coast of Oran (CapeFalcon, Bousfer and MersElHadjadj) in Northwestern Algeria. Results of this study showed that all strains had a very ...

  16. Early Observations of the Type Ia Supernova iPTF 16abc: A Case of Interaction with Nearby, Unbound Material and/or Strong Ejecta Mixing

    Miller, A. A.; Cao, Y.; Piro, A. L.; Blagorodnova, N.; Bue, B. D.; Cenko, S. B.; Dhawan, S.; Ferretti, R.; Fox, O. D.; Fremling, C.; Goobar, A.; Howell, D. A.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Laher, R. R.; Lunnan, R.; Masci, F. J.; McCully, C.; Nugent, P. E.; Sollerman, J.; Taddia, F.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2018-01-01

    Early observations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) provide a unique probe of their progenitor systems and explosion physics. Here we report the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) discovery of an extraordinarily young SN Ia, iPTF 16abc. By fitting a power law to our early light curve, we infer that first light for the SN, that is, when the SN could have first been detected by our survey, occurred only 0.15{+/- }0.070.15 days before our first detection. In the ∼24 hr after discovery, iPTF 16abc rose by ∼2 mag, featuring a near-linear rise in flux for ≳ 3 days. Early spectra show strong C II absorption, which disappears after ∼7 days. Unlike the extensively observed Type Ia SN 2011fe, the {(B-V)}0 colors of iPTF 16abc are blue and nearly constant in the days after explosion. We show that our early observations of iPTF 16abc cannot be explained by either SN shock breakout and the associated, subsequent cooling or the SN ejecta colliding with a stellar companion. Instead, we argue that the early characteristics of iPTF 16abc, including (i) the rapid, near-linear rise, (ii) the nonevolving blue colors, and (iii) the strong C II absorption, are the result of either ejecta interaction with nearby, unbound material or vigorous mixing of radioactive 56Ni in the SN ejecta, or a combination of the two. In the next few years, dozens of very young normal SNe Ia will be discovered, and observations similar to those presented here will constrain the white dwarf explosion mechanism.

  17. Growing electronic documents created by researchers

    Monika Weiss

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary world technology is an indispensable element, both in personal and professional sphere. Despite the fact, that we do not attach significance to it in our everyday lives, the technological development engulfed us and still reminds us about that. In the face of dynamically growing digitization there occurred a new form of document – an electronic document. The study concerns the growing electronic documentation among researchers working at the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń. The analysis of surveys and interviews resulted in thesis, that researchers use e-document more frequently than analog documentation. Flexibility and accessibility of this type of documents become a problem in personal papers which will be archived in the future – maybe in most part in the form of electronic documentation.

  18. Petroleum demand continues to grow but slowly

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    While it is always entertaining and intellectually stimulating to look at all the marvelous technological alternatives just around the corner for transport, the transport task in Australia continues to grow and so does petroleum consumption. Australia presently consumes more than 750,000 barrels per day of petroleum products. Latest figures are given for petroleum consumption up to the end of August 1998. They indicate that total demand for petrol has continued to grow, but very slowly. Growth in 1997-1998 compared with 1996-1997 was only 0.3%. This trend for very low growth has been continued into July and August, perhaps indicative of a slow down in the economy

  19. Shape of the growing front of biofilms

    Wang, Xin; Stone, Howard A.; Golestanian, Ramin

    2017-12-01

    The spatial organization of bacteria in dense biofilms is key to their collective behaviour, and understanding it will be important for medical and technological applications. Here we study the morphology of a compact biofilm that undergoes unidirectional growth, and determine the condition for the stability of the growing interface as a function of the nutrient concentration and mechanical tension. Our study suggests that transient behaviour may play an important role in shaping the structure of a biofilm.

  20. Australia: A Growing Market for Asean Exports?

    Tongzon, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Much has been written regarding South East Asian countries as growing markets for Australian exports particularly in the past decade. But nothing so far has been done to examine whether ASEAN exports have also experienced some redirection towards the Australian market. The findings confirm our a priori expectations: no significant general reorientation was observed for the ASEAN group of countries, and ASEAN’s country bias declined over the period under study. This is in contrast to the Austr...

  1. Growing Role of Retail in Distribution Channels

    Ishak Mesic

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to demonstrate the growing role of retail trade (retail) in the channels of distribution of goods both in domestic and international markets. Technical-technological development has provided great opportunities for all production of material goods, so that the focus of problem in the economic possibilities of playing shifted from production to sales opportunities, or consumption. The ultimate consumers and their needs and requirements have become a central area of study, bas...

  2. GRoW Buffalo Final Report

    Bohm, Martha [Univ. at Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2016-04-17

    This document provides final reporting on the GRoW Home, University at Buffalo's entry to the 2015 Solar Decathlon competition in Irvine, CA. The report summarizes fundraising efforts, documents media outreach, lists online presence, analyzes the organizer's communication, describes post-competition life of the house and future employment plans for student team members. Last, it suggests improvements for future decathlons.

  3. Exposure to vibrations in wine growing

    Domenico Pessina

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Apart the winter period, the activity in specialized agricultural cultivations (i.e. wine- and fruit-growing is distributed for a long period of the year. Some tasks, such as pesticide distribution, are repeated several times during the growing season. On the other hand, mechanization is one of the pillars on which is based the modern agriculture management. As a consequence, in wine growing the tractor driver has to be considered a worker potentially subjected to high level of vibrations, due to the poor machinery conditions often encountered, and sometimes to the rough soil surface of the vineyard combined with the high travelling speed adopted in carrying out many operations. About vibrations, the Italian Decree 81/08 basically refers to the European Directive 2002/44/CE, that provides some very strict limits of exposure, both for whole body and hand-arm districts. In Oltrepo pavese, a large hilly area located the south part of the Pavia province (Lombardy - Italy wine growing is the main agricultural activity; for this reason, a detailed survey on the vibration levels recorded at the tractor driver’s seat was carried out, in order to ascertain the real risk to which the operators are exposed. The activity in wine growing has been classified into 6 groups of similar tasks, as follows: 1. canopy management: pruning, trimming, binding, stripping, etc.; 2. soil management: harrowing, hoeing, subsoiling etc.; 3. inter-row management: chopping of pruning , pinching, grass mowing, etc.; 4. crop protection: pesticides and fungicides distribution, sulfidation, foliar fertilization, etc.; 5. grape harvesting: manual or mechanical; 6. transport: from the vineyard to the cellar. For each group of tasks, the vibration levels on 3 the traditional axes (x, y and z were recorded, and then an exposure time was calculated for each of them, in order to ascertain the risk level in comparison to what provided by the dedicated standard. Finally, a detailed

  4. Thin film growing by the laser ablation technique: possibilities for growing of dosimetric materials

    Rojas R, E.M.; Melo M, M.; Enriquez Z, E.; Fernandez G, M.; Haro P, E.; Hernandez P, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    In this talk we will present the basics about the laser ablation technique and how it is used for thin film growing, either as a single film or a stack of thin films, as well as some methods to characterize in real time the film thickness. Finally, we will discuss the possibilities of using laser ablation for growing thin films with applications to dosimetry. (Author)

  5. Cleaner Production: A Growing Movement in Brazilian Companies

    Oduvaldo Vendrametto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cleaner Production (CP is gaining emphasis in both world and Brazilian production sectors. Nature’s warnings indicating the exhaustion of any capacity to absorb and regenerate waste, stricter legislation regarding pollution emitters, market competitiveness associated with environmental and social responsibility cause concerns and lead to actions to reduce aggressions against the environment. This paper shows evidence of this concern and presents cases in which a large automotive industry, acting as a partner to suppliers, promotes changes in how it delivers its products, eliminating large cardboard, plastic and wood packaging. A small company had a similar initiative, reducing the use of cardboard and plastic packaging. More important is the revelation of a widely dispersed, yet growing and incremental movement of responsibilities among companies.The benefits of cleaner production implementation were evaluated by confronting environmental and financial assessment. For the ambient evaluation, it will be used methodology of Material Intensity (Wuppertal Institute, a.

  6. Cultural systems for growing potatoes in space

    Tibbitts, T.; Bula, R.; Corey, R.; Morrow, R.

    1988-01-01

    Higher plants are being evaluated for life support to provide needed food, oxygen and water as well as removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The successful utilization of plants in space will require the development of not only highly productive growing systems but also highly efficient bioregenerative systems. It will be necessary to recycle all inedible plant parts and all human wastes so that the entire complement of elemental compounds can be reused. Potatoes have been proposed as one of the desirable crops because they are 1) extremely productive, yielding more than 100 metric tons per hectare from field plantings, 2) the edible tubers are high in digestible starch (70%) and protein (10%) on a dry weight basis, 3) up to 80% of the total plant production is in tubers and thus edible, 4) the plants are easily propagated either from tubers or from tissue culture plantlets, 5) the tubers can be utilized with a minimum of processing, and 6) potatoes can be prepared in a variety of different forms for the human diet (Tibbitts et al., 1982). However potatoes have a growth pattern that complicates the development of growing the plants in controlled systems. Tubers are borne on underground stems that are botanically termed 'rhizomes', but in common usage termed 'stolons'. The stolons must be maintained in a dark, moist area with sufficient provision for enlargement of tubers. Stems rapidly terminate in flowers forcing extensive branching and spreading of plants so that individual plants will cover 0.2 m2 or more area. Thus the growing system must be developed to provide an area that is darkened for tuber and root growth and of sufficient size for plant spread. A system developed for growing potatoes, or any plants, in space will have certain requirements that must be met to make them a useful part of a life support system. The system must 1) be constructed of materials, and involve media, that can be reused for many successive cycles of plant growth, 2

  7. Nurturing a growing field: Computers & Geosciences

    Mariethoz, Gregoire; Pebesma, Edzer

    2017-10-01

    Computational issues are becoming increasingly critical for virtually all fields of geoscience. This includes the development of improved algorithms and models, strategies for implementing high-performance computing, or the management and visualization of the large datasets provided by an ever-growing number of environmental sensors. Such issues are central to scientific fields as diverse as geological modeling, Earth observation, geophysics or climatology, to name just a few. Related computational advances, across a range of geoscience disciplines, are the core focus of Computers & Geosciences, which is thus a truly multidisciplinary journal.

  8. Play Games to Grow up Bilingual

    Valente, Andrea; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2007-01-01

    A new kind of computer game is proposed, to support the linguistic development of primary school children, growing in multilingual environments: with it players will be able to simultaneously learn multiple languages. The novel idea is to treat words in different languages as physical items......, that the player can collect and exchange for other words or for concrete objects. A prototype is currently under development, and it will be tested in cooperation with local schools. By design this linguistic game will also be extensible, so parents and teachers can tailor it with respect to languages...... and learning contexts....

  9. Play Games to Grow up Bilingual

    Valente, Andrea; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2008-01-01

    A new kind of computer game is proposed, to support the linguistic development of primary school children, growing in multilingual environments: with it players will be able to simultaneously learn multiple languages. The novel idea is to treat words in different languages as physical items......, that the player can collect and exchange for other words or for concrete objects. A prototype is currently under development, and it will be tested in cooperation with local schools. By design this linguistic game will also be extensible, so parents and teachers can tailor it with respect to languages...... and learning contexts....

  10. Parallelized Seeded Region Growing Using CUDA

    Seongjin Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method for parallelizing the seeded region growing (SRG algorithm using Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA technology, with intention to overcome the theoretical weakness of SRG algorithm of its computation time being directly proportional to the size of a segmented region. The segmentation performance of the proposed CUDA-based SRG is compared with SRG implementations on single-core CPUs, quad-core CPUs, and shader language programming, using synthetic datasets and 20 body CT scans. Based on the experimental results, the CUDA-based SRG outperforms the other three implementations, advocating that it can substantially assist the segmentation during massive CT screening tests.

  11. Unbound states in quantum heterostructures

    Ferreira R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWe report in this review on the electronic continuum states of semiconductor Quantum Wells and Quantum Dots and highlight the decisive part played by the virtual bound states in the optical properties of these structures. The two particles continuum states of Quantum Dots control the decoherence of the excited electron – hole states. The part played by Auger scattering in Quantum Dots is also discussed.

  12. Paradoxes unbounded: Practising community making

    Tess Maginess

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The first section of this paper is a discussion of the paradoxes contained in definitionsof the word 'community' and deliberately foregrounds and makes problematicconflicting meanings before arguing for a third definition and practice of community.This third definition and practice celebrates and even transcends contradictions withinan active learning model of education in the community, aimed at tackling inequalityand prejudice. The second section offers an autocritical narrative account of aneducation in the community project that illustrates how such a practice of communitymaking can be achieved within an educational framework in which pupil is teacher andteacher is pupil and in which an imaginative, creative approach is deployed toconstruct a community making practice. The paper draws on understandings fromcommunity development, inclusive and creative education, emancipatory actionresearch, postcolonial and post-structuralist theory.

  13. Light colour preference of growing rabbits

    Zsolt Szendrő

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the experiment was to evaluate the light colour preference of growing rabbits placed in a free-choice cage. The experiment was carried out on 128 Pannon White growing rabbits weaned at the age of 5 weeks and placed into blocks (2m2 of four cages. The rabbits could move freely among the four cages (0.5m2 each through swing doors. The cages differed only in the colour of the light applied (white, yellow, green or blue. The lighting schedule was 16L: 8D. From 6 until 10 weeks of age, infrared video recording was performed once a week (24 hours. The number of rabbits in each cage was counted every 15 minutes. Feed consumption was measured weekly. Between 6 and 10 weeks of age the rabbits significantly preferred white light (28.0%. The preference order was the following: yellow (26.3%, blue (23.4% and green (22.3% (P<0.001. No significant differences were recorded in the feed consumption among the cages. In conclusion, the cage preference of the rabbits was slightly affected by the light colour.

  14. Mechanotransduction mechanisms in growing spherically structured tissues

    Littlejohns, Euan; Dunlop, Carina M.

    2018-04-01

    There is increasing experimental interest in mechanotransduction in multi-cellular tissues as opposed to single cells. This is driven by a growing awareness of the importance of physiologically relevant three-dimensional culture and of cell–cell and cell–gel interactions in directing growth and development. The paradigm biophysical technique for investigating tissue level mechanobiology in this context is to grow model tissues in artificial gels with well-defined mechanical properties. These studies often indicate that the stiffness of the encapsulating gel can significantly alter cellular behaviours. We demonstrate here potential mechanisms linking tissue growth with stiffness-mediated mechanotransduction. We show how tissue growth in gel systems generates points at which there is a significant qualitative change in the cellular stress and strain experienced. We show analytically how these potential switching points depend on the mechanical properties of the constraining gel and predict when they will occur. Significantly, we identify distinct mechanisms that act separately in each of the stress and strain fields at different times. These observations suggest growth as a potential physical mechanism coupling gel stiffness with cellular mechanotransduction in three-dimensional tissues. We additionally show that non-proliferating areas, in the case that the constraining gel is soft compared with the tissue, will expand and contract passively as a result of growth. Central compartment size is thus seen to not be a reliable indicator on its own for growth initiation or active behaviour.

  15. Tree immunity: growing old without antibodies.

    Tobias, Peri A; Guest, David I

    2014-06-01

    Perennial plants need to cope with changing environments and pathogens over their lifespan. Infections are compartmentalised by localised physiological responses, and multiple apical meristems enable repair and regrowth, but genes are another crucial component in the perception and response to pathogens. In this opinion article we suggest that the mechanism for dynamic pathogen-specific recognition in long-lived plants could be explained by extending our current understanding of plant defence genes. We propose that, in addition to physiological responses, tree defence uses a three-pronged genomic approach involving: (i) gene numbers, (ii) genomic architecture, and (iii) mutation loads accumulated over long lifespans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. In Vivo Evaluation of Immediately Loaded Stainless Steel and Titanium Orthodontic Screws in a Growing Bone

    Gritsch, Kerstin; Laroche, Norbert; Bonnet, Jeanne-Marie; Exbrayat, Patrick; Morgon, Laurent; Rabilloud, Muriel; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The present work intends to evaluate the use of immediate loaded orthodontic screws in a growing model, and to study the specific bone response. Thirty-two screws (half of stainless steel and half of titanium) were inserted in the alveolar bone of 8 growing pigs. The devices were immediately loaded with a 100 g orthodontic force. Two loading periods were assessed: 4 and 12 weeks. Both systems of screws were clinically assessed. Histological observations and histomorphometric analysis evaluate...

  17. Popularity versus similarity in growing networks

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Papadopoulos, Fragkiskos; Kitsak, Maksim; Serrano, Mariangeles; Boguna, Marian

    2012-02-01

    Preferential attachment is a powerful mechanism explaining the emergence of scaling in growing networks. If new connections are established preferentially to more popular nodes in a network, then the network is scale-free. Here we show that not only popularity but also similarity is a strong force shaping the network structure and dynamics. We develop a framework where new connections, instead of preferring popular nodes, optimize certain trade-offs between popularity and similarity. The framework admits a geometric interpretation, in which preferential attachment emerges from local optimization processes. As opposed to preferential attachment, the optimization framework accurately describes large-scale evolution of technological (Internet), social (web of trust), and biological (E.coli metabolic) networks, predicting the probability of new links in them with a remarkable precision. The developed framework can thus be used for predicting new links in evolving networks, and provides a different perspective on preferential attachment as an emergent phenomenon.

  18. THE FASTEST GROWING LEAST DEVELOPED COUNTRIES

    Wioletta NOWAK

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents trends in economic growth and development in twelve least developed countries from 2006 to 2015. The study is based on the data retrieved from the World Bank Database. During the analysed 10 years, seven Asian (Myanmar, Lao PDR, Bhutan, Cambodia, Timor-Leste, Bangladesh, and Afghanistan and five African (Ethiopia, Rwanda, Angola, Sudan, and Mozambique LDCs had average annual GDP per capita growth rates higher than 4.0%. GDP has been largely generated through the services and industry sectors. A few LDCs sustained strong growth mainly because of foreign assistance and in other countries remittances were a significant source of development finance. Resource rich countries recorded high inflows of foreign direct investment. In a few fast growing LDCs the state has been heavily engaged in economy. The analysed LDCs substantially improved their development indicators.

  19. Growing hierarchical probabilistic self-organizing graphs.

    López-Rubio, Ezequiel; Palomo, Esteban José

    2011-07-01

    Since the introduction of the growing hierarchical self-organizing map, much work has been done on self-organizing neural models with a dynamic structure. These models allow adjusting the layers of the model to the features of the input dataset. Here we propose a new self-organizing model which is based on a probabilistic mixture of multivariate Gaussian components. The learning rule is derived from the stochastic approximation framework, and a probabilistic criterion is used to control the growth of the model. Moreover, the model is able to adapt to the topology of each layer, so that a hierarchy of dynamic graphs is built. This overcomes the limitations of the self-organizing maps with a fixed topology, and gives rise to a faithful visualization method for high-dimensional data.

  20. Personal stories of growing up sexually.

    Beausang, C C

    2000-01-01

    Prevention of problems related to sexuality during adolescence continues to be a major public health challenge. Describing childhood perceptions of sexuality is an important step in understanding sexual issues during adolescence. However, there is a paucity of information about sexuality in early life. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe recurrent themes in personal stories of growing up sexually. A thematic analysis with a narrative perspective was applied using the method described by Miles and Huberman (1994). Four interrelated themes pervaded the stories: parents as teachers, sex is secret, learning by experience, and first intercourse as a turning point. These findings have major implications for sexual health education and counseling in addition to further research.

  1. Properties of acatalasic cells growing in vitro

    Krooth, R S; Howell, R R; Hamilton, H B

    1961-07-19

    Acatalasia, a disease due to homozygosity for a Mendelian gene, is characterized by the absence of the enzyme catalase from the tissues of the human body. Red cells from heterozygotes have enzyme activities about one-half normal. In this report, the development of cell lines from skin biopsies of an affected homozygote, a heterozygote and eight control patients is described. The cell type is the euploid fibroblast. It was found that acatalasic cells lacked the enzyme, even after growing for many months in a medium rich in catalase. The control lines all had mean catalase activity double or more that of the heterozygous line. Selection experiments, measuring growth of cells exposed for 20 minutes to varying concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, did not provide a system for preferentially eliminating acatalastic cells. Certain other experiments were performed bearing on the enzymatic defect in this disease. 23 references, 7 figures, 6 tables.

  2. Ion Frequency Landscape in Growing Plants.

    Mariusz Pietruszka

    Full Text Available It has been interesting that nearly all of the ion activities that have been analysed thus far have exhibited oscillations that are tightly coupled to growth. Here, we present discrete Fourier transform (DFT spectra with a finite sampling of tip-growing cells and organs that were obtained from voltage measurements of the elongating coleoptiles of maize in situ. The electromotive force (EMF oscillations (~ 0.1 μV were measured in a simple but highly sensitive resistor-inductor circuit (RL circuit, in which the solenoid was initially placed at the tip of the specimen and then was moved thus changing its position in relation to growth (EMF can be measured first at the tip, then at the sub-apical part and finally at the shank. The influx- and efflux-induced oscillations of Ca2+, along with H+, K+ and Cl- were densely sampled (preserving the Nyquist theorem in order to 'grasp the structure' of the pulse, the logarithmic amplitude of pulse spectrum was calculated, and the detected frequencies, which displayed a periodic sequence of pulses, were compared with the literature data. A band of life vital individual pulses was obtained in a single run of the experiment, which not only allowed the fundamental frequencies (and intensities of the processes to be determined but also permitted the phase relations of the various transport processes in the plasma membrane and tonoplast to be established. A discrete (quantised frequency spectrum was achieved for a growing plant for the first time, while all of the metabolic and enzymatic functions of the life cell cycle were preserved using this totally non-invasive treatment.

  3. Growing Up Gifted in the Soviet Union.

    Stevens, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the educational program for gifted students in the Soviet Union discusses student responsibilities, program admission, and specialized schools featuring foreign languages, mathematics and physics, music, ballet and arts, sports, and "little academics" (advanced studies). (CB)

  4. Growing Youth Growing Food: How Vegetable Gardening Influences Young People's Food Consciousness and Eating Habits

    Libman, Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    Much attention is currently being paid to rising rates of obesity, especially among youth. In this context, garden-based education can have a role in improving public health. A qualitative study conducted at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden (BBG) Children's Garden provides supporting evidence for the claim that growing vegetables can improve the…

  5. Access to capital--a growing concern.

    Carlson, Donald A

    2004-01-01

    Access to capital over the next ten years will be one of the biggest challenges healthcare organizations will face as they strive to remain competitive and serve their communities. Meeting the growing needs for capital will require a disciplined and honest assessment of the capital sources that will be available and the best ways of positioning an organization to maximize their uses. It is incumbent on chief executive officers and other senior leaders to create a disciplined process for allocating capital and conveying how that process will be linked to the organization's strategic plan. All of the credit constituencies "buying" healthcare need to fully understand how the organization is positioning itself for future growth and success, and detailed bond marketing plans need to be implemented well before the actual sale of a new bond issue. Large and small healthcare providers will have sufficient access to capital in the future if investors believe that senior hospital executives have a credible plan and are disciplined enough to execute it.

  6. High-purity germanium crystal growing

    Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.

    1982-10-01

    The germanium crystals used for the fabrication of nuclear radiation detectors are required to have a purity and crystalline perfection which is unsurpassed by any other solid material. These crystals should not have a net electrically active impurity concentration greater than 10 10 cm - 3 and be essentially free of charge trapping defects. Such perfect crystals of germanium can be grown only because of the highly favorable chemical and physical properties of this element. However, ten years of laboratory scale and commercial experience has still not made the production of such crystals routine. The origin and control of many impurities and electrically active defect complexes is now fairly well understood but regular production is often interrupted for long periods due to the difficulty of achieving the required high purity or to charge trapping in detectors made from crystals seemingly grown under the required conditions. The compromises involved in the selection of zone refining and crystal grower parts and ambients is discussed and the difficulty in controlling the purity of key elements in the process is emphasized. The consequences of growing in a hydrogen ambient are discussed in detail and it is shown how complexes of neutral defects produce electrically active centers

  7. Growing networks with mixed attachment mechanisms

    Shao Zhigang; Zou Xianwu; Tan Zhijie; Jin Zhunzhi

    2006-01-01

    Networks grow and evolve when new nodes and links are added in. There are two methods to add the links: uniform attachment and preferential attachment. We take account of the addition of links with mixed attachment between uniform attachment and preferential attachment in proportion. By using numerical simulations and analysis based on a continuum theory, we obtain that the degree distribution P(k) has an extended power-law form P(k) ∼ (k + k 0 ) -γ . When the number of edges k of a node is much larger than a certain value k 0 , the degree distribution reduces to the power-law form P(k) ∼ k -γ ; and when k is much smaller than k 0 , the degree distribution degenerates into the exponential form P(k)∼exp(-yk/k 0 ). It has been found that degree distribution possesses this extended power-law form for many real networks, such as the movie actor network, the citation network of scientific papers and diverse protein interaction networks

  8. Selective sweeps in growing microbial colonies

    Korolev, Kirill S; Müller, Melanie J I; Murray, Andrew W; Nelson, David R; Karahan, Nilay; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary experiments with microbes are a powerful tool to study mutations and natural selection. These experiments, however, are often limited to the well-mixed environments of a test tube or a chemostat. Since spatial organization can significantly affect evolutionary dynamics, the need is growing for evolutionary experiments in spatially structured environments. The surface of a Petri dish provides such an environment, but a more detailed understanding of microbial growth on Petri dishes is necessary to interpret such experiments. We formulate a simple deterministic reaction–diffusion model, which successfully predicts the spatial patterns created by two competing species during colony expansion. We also derive the shape of these patterns analytically without relying on microscopic details of the model. In particular, we find that the relative fitness of two microbial strains can be estimated from the logarithmic spirals created by selective sweeps. The theory is tested with strains of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for spatial competitions with different initial conditions and for a range of relative fitnesses. The reaction–diffusion model also connects the microscopic parameters like growth rates and diffusion constants with macroscopic spatial patterns and predicts the relationship between fitness in liquid cultures and on Petri dishes, which we confirmed experimentally. Spatial sector patterns therefore provide an alternative fitness assay to the commonly used liquid culture fitness assays. (paper)

  9. Growing markets to sustain oil sands development

    Wise, T.H.

    2003-01-01

    The utilization of Alberta bitumen for the clean fuels market depends on upgrading, transportation, and refining processes. Forecasts show that oil sands production, which includes synthetic crude oil (SCO), will surpass declining conventional production in Western Canada. Several issues pose a challenge to the oil sands processing industry. The producers' market is affected by crude oil prices, market expansion options, diluent availability/cost, supply cost competitiveness, and regional processing. The common market issues include light/heavy crude prices, oil sands crude qualities, prices of oil sands crudes, pipeline infrastructure, and competitive supplies. The issues facing the refiners are: refining margins, security of crude supply, refined product quality, and competitive product supply. A brief review of markets for Canadian crude oil, including synthetic crude, was provided. The share of the Midwest market by Alberta must be retained and increased. The market expansion options were reviewed for both downstream (refining) and upstream (upgrading) operations. To reach more distant markets such as Southern Midwest, Washington, and California, new pipeline capacity would be required. The market is nearly saturated for Canada's heavy oil supply. More upgrading will be required as bitumen production increases. Market growth is still possible for Canada's SCO but according to forecasts, the market could also become saturated. To increase demand and allow supplies to grow, SCO prices may fall below light crude prices. It was noted that a balance must be achieved in order for producers to increase production and for refiner/upgraders to expand their conversion capacity. tabs., figs

  10. Popularity versus similarity in growing networks.

    Papadopoulos, Fragkiskos; Kitsak, Maksim; Serrano, M Ángeles; Boguñá, Marián; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2012-09-27

    The principle that 'popularity is attractive' underlies preferential attachment, which is a common explanation for the emergence of scaling in growing networks. If new connections are made preferentially to more popular nodes, then the resulting distribution of the number of connections possessed by nodes follows power laws, as observed in many real networks. Preferential attachment has been directly validated for some real networks (including the Internet), and can be a consequence of different underlying processes based on node fitness, ranking, optimization, random walks or duplication. Here we show that popularity is just one dimension of attractiveness; another dimension is similarity. We develop a framework in which new connections optimize certain trade-offs between popularity and similarity, instead of simply preferring popular nodes. The framework has a geometric interpretation in which popularity preference emerges from local optimization. As opposed to preferential attachment, our optimization framework accurately describes the large-scale evolution of technological (the Internet), social (trust relationships between people) and biological (Escherichia coli metabolic) networks, predicting the probability of new links with high precision. The framework that we have developed can thus be used for predicting new links in evolving networks, and provides a different perspective on preferential attachment as an emergent phenomenon.

  11. Selective sweeps in growing microbial colonies

    Korolev, Kirill S.; Müller, Melanie J. I.; Karahan, Nilay; Murray, Andrew W.; Hallatschek, Oskar; Nelson, David R.

    2012-04-01

    Evolutionary experiments with microbes are a powerful tool to study mutations and natural selection. These experiments, however, are often limited to the well-mixed environments of a test tube or a chemostat. Since spatial organization can significantly affect evolutionary dynamics, the need is growing for evolutionary experiments in spatially structured environments. The surface of a Petri dish provides such an environment, but a more detailed understanding of microbial growth on Petri dishes is necessary to interpret such experiments. We formulate a simple deterministic reaction-diffusion model, which successfully predicts the spatial patterns created by two competing species during colony expansion. We also derive the shape of these patterns analytically without relying on microscopic details of the model. In particular, we find that the relative fitness of two microbial strains can be estimated from the logarithmic spirals created by selective sweeps. The theory is tested with strains of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for spatial competitions with different initial conditions and for a range of relative fitnesses. The reaction-diffusion model also connects the microscopic parameters like growth rates and diffusion constants with macroscopic spatial patterns and predicts the relationship between fitness in liquid cultures and on Petri dishes, which we confirmed experimentally. Spatial sector patterns therefore provide an alternative fitness assay to the commonly used liquid culture fitness assays.

  12. Great oak trees from small acorns grow

    Bogle, Sally.

    1997-01-01

    The history of Avalon Oil is briefly outlined. The company has become the first foreign company to sign a joint venture oil deal with Russia's Gazprom. Topics covered include new drilling skills, building relations face-to-face with Gazprom assigning responsibility to the venture partners, tax breaks and political risk. (UK)

  13. Carcass traits and meat quality of different slow growing and fast growing broiler chickens

    M. Oblakova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The experiment was conducted in the breeder farm of department Population genetics, reproduction and technologies of poultry and rabbits at the Agriculture Institute of Stara Zagora. Five lines from the National Gene Pool of Bulgaria: line Ss (Sussex, line E (Barred Plymouth Rock, line NG (New Hampshire, line F (NG x Red Rhode Island, line L (White Plymouth Rock were used as maternal forms in the crossing schedule and line M (Cornish as a paternal form for production of slow-growing broilers. The birds were grown to 84 days. Feeding was done with compound feeds according to the age: starter (1/14 days of age, grower (14/28 days of age, finisher (28/84 days of age. By the end of the experiment, slaughter analysis was performed with 3 female and 3 male broiler chickens per group with live weight corresponding to the average of each genotype. The live weight was determined, as well as the grill weight, the weights of cuts (breast, thighs, wings, edible offal (heart, liver, gizzard and abdominal fat. On the basis of these data, the slaughter yield and body parts ratios were calculated. The data for the live body weights of birds at slaughtering indicated the highest values for group V – 4040g, followed by groups ІV and ІІ – 3271.67g and 3186.67g, respectively (p<0.05. There was a statistically significant difference between the sexes with superiority of male birds (p<0.001. In the other 3 groups, breast meat percentage ranged from 19.48 to 19.84%. The share of thighs from the grill was the greatest in slow-growing chickens from group II – 33.01%, followed by group І – 32.35%, group IV – 32.18%, and the lowest- in groups ІІІ and V (31.91% and 31.18%, respectively. The analysis of data exhibited a significant effect of the genotype on water content of breast meat (resp. Dry matter, with lower values in slow-growing birds from group III – 73.19% (p<0.05, whereas in the other groups it ranged between 73.44 and 73.62%. The

  14. Non-Selective Evolution of Growing Populations.

    Karl Wienand

    Full Text Available Non-selective effects, like genetic drift, are an important factor in modern conceptions of evolution, and have been extensively studied for constant population sizes (Kimura, 1955; Otto and Whitlock, 1997. Here, we consider non-selective evolution in the case of growing populations that are of small size and have varying trait compositions (e.g. after a population bottleneck. We find that, in these conditions, populations never fixate to a trait, but tend to a random limit composition, and that the distribution of compositions "freezes" to a steady state. This final state is crucially influenced by the initial conditions. We obtain these findings from a combined theoretical and experimental approach, using multiple mixed subpopulations of two Pseudomonas putida strains in non-selective growth conditions (Matthijs et al, 2009 as model system. The experimental results for the population dynamics match the theoretical predictions based on the Pólya urn model (Eggenberger and Pólya, 1923 for all analyzed parameter regimes. In summary, we show that exponential growth stops genetic drift. This result contrasts with previous theoretical analyses of non-selective evolution (e.g. genetic drift, which investigated how traits spread and eventually take over populations (fixate (Kimura, 1955; Otto and Whitlock, 1997. Moreover, our work highlights how deeply growth influences non-selective evolution, and how it plays a key role in maintaining genetic variability. Consequently, it is of particular importance in life-cycles models (Melbinger et al, 2010; Cremer et al, 2011; Cremer et al, 2012 of periodically shrinking and expanding populations.

  15. Protein synthesis in the growing rat lung

    Kelley, J.; Chrin, L.

    1986-01-01

    Developmental control of protein synthesis in the postnatal growth of the lung has not been systematically studied. In male Fischer 344 rats, lung growth continues linearly as a function of body weight (from 75 to 450 g body weight). To study total protein synthesis in lungs of growing rats, we used the technique of constant intravenous infusion of tritiated leucine, an essential amino acid. Lungs of sacrificed animals were used to determine the leucine incorporation rate into newly synthesized protein. The specific radioactivity of the leucine associated with tRNA extracted from the same lungs served as an absolute index of the precursor leucine pool used for lung protein synthesis. On the basis of these measurements, we were able to calculate the fractional synthesis rate (the proportion of total protein destroyed and replaced each day) of pulmonary proteins for each rat. Under the conditions of isotope infusion, leucyl-tRNA very rapidly equilibrates with free leucine of the plasma and of the extracellular space of the lung. Infusions lasting 30 minutes or less yielded linear rates of protein synthesis without evidence of contamination of lung proteins by newly labeled intravascular albumin. The fractional synthesis rate is considerably higher in juvenile animals (55% per day) than in adult rats (20% per day). After approximately 12 weeks of age, the fractional synthesis rate remains extremely constant in spite of continued slow growth of the lung. It is apparent from these data that in both young and adult rats the bulk of total protein synthesis is devoted to rapidly turning over proteins and that less than 4 percent of newly made protein is committed to tissue growth

  16. The growing need for analytical quality control

    Suschny, O.; Richman, D.M.

    1974-01-01

    Technological development in a country is directly dependent upon its analytical chemistry or measurement capability, because it is impossible to achieve any level of technological sophistication without the ability to measure. Measurement capability is needed to determine both technological competence and technological consequence. But measurement itself is insufficient. There must be a standard or a reference for comparison. In the complicated world of chemistry the need for reference materials grows with successful technological development. The International Atomic Energy Agency has been distributing calibrated radioisotope solutions, standard reference materials and intercomparison materials since the early 1960's. The purpose of this activity has been to help laboratories in its Member States to assess and, if necessary, to improve the reliability of their analytical work. The value and continued need of this service has been demonstrated by the results of many intercomparisons which proved that without continuing analytical quality control activities, adequate reliability of analytical data could not be taken for granted. Analytical chemistry, lacking the glamour of other aspects of the physical sciences, has not attracted the attention it deserves, but in terms of practical importance, it warrants high priority in any developing technological scheme, because without it there is little chance to evaluate technological success or failure or opportunity to identify the reasons for success or failure. The scope and the size of the future programme of the IAEA in this field has been delineated by recommendations made by several Panels of Experts; all have agreed on the importance of this programme and made detailed recommendations in their areas of expertise. The Agency's resources are limited and it cannot on its own undertake the preparation and distribution of all the materials needed. It can, however, offer a focal point to bring together different

  17. Ultrastructural differences between wall apices of growing and non-growing hyphae of Schizophyllum commune

    Vermeulen, C.A.; Wessels, J.G.H.

    1984-01-01

    Newly synthesized chitin at the hyphal apex of Schizophyllum commune was shown to be highly susceptible to chitinase degradiation and solubilization by dilute mineral acid. With time this chitin became gradually more resistant to these treatments. With a combination of the shadow-cast technique and electron microscopic autoradiography it could be shown that this process occurred as the newly synthesized chitin moved into subapical parts of growing hyphae but also in non-growing apices which had ceased growth after incorporation of the N-acetyl[6- 3 H]glucosamine. These results are in agreement with a model which explains apical morphogenesis by assuming that the newly synthesized wall material at the apex is plastic due to the presence of individual polymer chains but becomes rigidified because of subsequent physical and chemical changes involving these polymers. (Author)

  18. Growth performance, haematology and cost benefit of growing ...

    Growing rabbits on 24-h feed access time (control) recorded a higher (p0.05) across the feed access time and restriction duration. White blood cell was higher in growing rabbits on 2-h feed access ...

  19. A growing danger: the risks posed by marihuana grow-ops

    Bradley, F. [Canadian Electricity Association (Canada)

    2005-02-01

    The proliferation of sophisticated illegal indoor multi-plant marihuana cultivation operations is discussed, focusing primarily on public health and safety issues. Public health issues arise from the high level of molds and pollens caused by high humidity, which can cause asthma, respiratory conditions and allergies, particularly among children, and the likelihood of deadly levels of carbon monoxide build-up resulting from faulty rerouting of the residence's ventilation system. Safety issues discussed are: fires and electrocutions associated with the use of electrical diversions or bipasses to circumvent utility meters, the chemical and electrical hazards involved in investigating and dismantling growing operations, the significant dangers to utility crews who must repair illegal electrical bypasses, injuries by the booby-traps planted to protect the operation from other criminals or law enforcement agents, and the physical danger from the violence, including homicide and assaults, carried out by operators to exert control over production and distribution. Although in general, there is a relaxed attitude towards marihuana use in Canada. there is growing evidence of increasing public concern over large-scale growing operations. Nevertheless, to date operators of grow-ops have been dealt with lightly by the justice system. For example, in British Columbia 11,733 cases have come to the attention of police during the 1997 to 2000 period. Of these about half were dealt with informally (i.e. 'no case' seizures) and 2,255 cases led to at least one offender being convicted. The majority of convictions did not result in custodial dispositions. Only 18 per cent of the cases resulted in prison sentences, the average term being only 4.5 months.

  20. Chemical composition of metapleural gland secretions of fungus-growing and non-fungus-growing ants.

    Vieira, Alexsandro S; Morgan, E David; Drijfhout, Falko P; Camargo-Mathias, Maria I

    2012-10-01

    The metapleural gland is exclusive to ants, and unusual among exocrine glands in having no mechanism for closure and retention of secretion. As yet, no clear conclusion has been reached as to the function of metapleural gland secretion. Metapleural gland secretions were investigated for fungus-growing ants representing the derived attines Trachymyrmex fuscus, Atta laevigata, and Acromyrmex coronatus, the basal attines Apterostigma pilosum and Mycetarotes parallelus, and non-fungus-growing ants of the tribes Ectatommini (Ectatomma brunneum) and Myrmicini (Pogonomyrmex naegeli). Our results showed that the secretions of leaf-cutting ants (A. laevigata and A. coronatus) and the derived attine, T. fuscus, contain a greater variety and larger quantities of volatile compounds than those of myrmicine and ectatommine ants. The most abundant compounds found in the metapleural glands of A. laevigata and A. coronatus were hydroxyacids, and phenylacetic acid (only in A. laevigata). Indole was present in all groups examined, while skatole was found in large quantities only in attines. Ketones and aldehydes are present in the secretion of some attines. Esters are present in the metapleural gland secretion of all species examined, although mainly in A. laevigata, A. coronatus, and T. fuscus. Compared with basal attines and non-fungus-growing ants, the metapleural glands of leaf-cutting ants produce more acidic compounds that may have an antibiotic or antifungal function.

  1. WSGB: A Web Service-Based Growing Book

    Dow, C. R.; Huang, L. H.; Chen, K. H.; Chiu, J. C.; Lin, C. M.

    2006-01-01

    Growing Book refers to an electronic textbook that is co-developed, and has the ability to be constantly maintained, by groups of independent authors, thus creating a rich and ever-growing learning environment that can be conveniently accessible from anywhere. This work designs and implements a Web Service-based Growing Book that has the merits of…

  2. Growing awareness of gender in urban policies.

    Macfarlane, L

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses issues from the Women in the City Conference held in October 1994 in Paris. The conference was organized by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's (OECD) Urban Affairs of the Territorial Development Service. An OECD report "Shaping Structural Change--The Role of Women" was published in 1991. This report argued that economies were not benefiting fully from women's contributions to economic growth and social development. Also, the "systemic nature of gender-based inequalities and the need for systemic solutions" was encouraged. The Secretary General urged OECD work groups to include the issue of the role of women. The conference was organized to this end. The conference demonstrated the progress made in women's international leadership and policy participation. However, the conference also indicated that the representation of women in urban decision making and planning groups was too low in member countries. Some urban changes involving urban women were a concern. 1) Women's participation in the labor force increased to 60%, and these women are required to provide the household budget. 2) Two parent households declined and single parent households, mostly women, increased. 3) Single person households increased and many were elderly and female. 4) OECD country populations were aging. These aforementioned trends place greater responsibilities on women. Urban policies impact on women's daily lives. Women are seeking policy changes related to women's transportation needs, access to affordable housing, improved house and community environments, security, more responsive services, economic development for women, and culture and leisure. Women's participation in public life can be improved through the expansion of child care facilities, legal changes, provision of gender-sensitive information, and new forms of urban governance that are more responsive and accessible to women.

  3. Impact of climate change on mid-twenty-first century growing seasons in Africa

    Cook, Kerry H.; Vizy, Edward K. [The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Geological Sciences, Jackson School of Geosciences, Austin, TX (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Changes in growing seasons for 2041-2060 across Africa are projected using a regional climate model at 90-km resolution, and confidence in the predictions is evaluated. The response is highly regional over West Africa, with decreases in growing season days up to 20% in the western Guinean coast and some regions to the east experiencing 5-10% increases. A longer growing season up to 30% in the central and eastern Sahel is predicted, with shorter seasons in parts of the western Sahel. In East Africa, the short rains (boreal fall) growing season is extended as the Indian Ocean warms, but anomalous mid-tropospheric moisture divergence and a northward shift of Sahel rainfall severely curtails the long rains (boreal spring) season. Enhanced rainfall in January and February increases the growing season in the Congo basin by 5-15% in association with enhanced southwesterly moisture transport from the tropical Atlantic. In Angola and the southern Congo basin, 40-80% reductions in austral spring growing season days are associated with reduced precipitation and increased evapotranspiration. Large simulated reductions in growing season over southeastern Africa are judged to be inaccurate because they occur due to a reduction in rainfall in winter which is over-produced in the model. Only small decreases in the actual growing season are simulated when evapotranspiration increases in the warmer climate. The continent-wide changes in growing season are primarily the result of increased evapotranspiration over the warmed land, changes in the intensity and seasonal cycle of the thermal low, and warming of the Indian Ocean. (orig.)

  4. Lipopolysaccharide significantly influences the hepatic triglyceride metabolism in growing pigs.

    Liu, Zhiqing; Liu, Weifeng; Huang, Yanping; Guo, Jun; Zhao, Ruqian; Yang, Xiaojing

    2015-06-30

    In the practical commercial pig farms, inflammation is a perennial problem, yet most of studies on inflammation are focused on immune response. Actually, inflammation can induce body metabolism disorder which will finally influence animals' growth. In this study, we investigated the effect of acute inflammation on the triglyceride (TG) metabolism in the liver of growing pigs and the possible underlying mechanisms. Twelve male growing pigs were randomly divided into two groups, a control group (received saline) and a LPS group (intramuscular injected with 15 μg/kg LPS). Six hours after LPS injection, the pigs were euthanized and sampled. Biochemical indexes, inflammation factors, lipid metabolism related parameters and mitochondrial function were evaluated. The relationship between glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the key enzymes of de novo lipogenesis were also investigated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay (ChIP). LPS induced a serious inflammation in the liver of growing pigs proved by liver morphologic changes, the up-regulated plasma cortisol, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) content and gene expression of inflammation related genes in liver. For de novo lipogenesis, LPS significantly decreased the gene expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS), Acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 (ACC-1) and Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1), and the protein expression of ACC-1 and SCD-1. For lipolysis, only the gene expression of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) was decreased. LPS did nothing to the gene expression of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and the lipolytic enzymes activities. For β-oxidation, LPS significantly increased the protein expression of CPT-1α, but the gene expression of mitochondrial DNA-encoded genes and the activities of mitochondrial complex IV and V demonstrated no obviously changes. Furthermore, ChIP results showed that LPS significantly decreased the level of GR binding to ACC-1 promoter. LPS infection has a profound impact on hepatic TG metabolism

  5. SWIMMING ENHANCES BONE MASS ACQUISITION IN GROWING FEMALE RATS

    Joanne McVeigh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Growing bones are most responsive to mechanical loading. We investigated bone mass acquisition patterns following a swimming or running exercise intervention of equal duration, in growing rats. We compared changes in bone mineral properties in female Sprague Dawley rats that were divided into three groups: sedentary controls (n = 10, runners (n = 8 and swimmers (n = 11. Runners and swimmers underwent a six week intervention, exercising five days per week, 30min per day. Running rats ran on an inclined treadmill at 0.33 m.s-1, while swimming rats swam in 25oC water. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scans measuring bone mineral content (BMC, bone mineral density (BMD and bone area at the femur, lumbar spine and whole body were recorded for all rats before and after the six week intervention. Bone and serum calcium and plasma parathyroid hormone (PTH concentrations were measured at the end of the 6 weeks. Swimming rats had greater BMC and bone area changes at the femur and lumbar spine (p < 0.05 than the running rats and a greater whole body BMC and bone area to that of control rats (p < 0.05. There were no differences in bone gain between running and sedentary control rats. There was no significant difference in serum or bone calcium or PTH concentrations between the groups of rats. A swimming intervention is able to produce greater beneficial effects on the rat skeleton than no exercise at all, suggesting that the strains associated with swimming may engender a unique mechanical load on the bone

  6. Antigovernment Groups. A Growing Threat to US Security

    Swift, Alicia L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-04-25

    Domestic terrorism is a growing threat in the United States, particularly from the 998 right-wing antigovernment (AG) groups in existence in 2015. In the years since the September 11, 2001 attacks in New York City, right-wing anti-government acts have oc- curred more often and killed more people in the United States than Muslim extremists. Such AG group members are often in uenced by racist, anti-Semitic, or anti-Islamic views, believe conspiracy theories about the government, and often refuse to pay taxes or participate in frivolous lawsuits in order to intentionally waste the government's time. There is, however, a violent element to these groups which participates in events ranging from the armed take-over of federal land in Oregon, to an armed stand-o with federal agents in Nevada, to the bombing of the Oklahoma City building which killed 168 people. Such acts may be conducted by a few individuals, as is the case of the Oklahoma City bombing, or an entire group. Such groups have a wide range of capabilities, with typical weapons including legal and illegal rearms, with a focus on purchasing fully automatic weapons; hand grenades, with some homemade; deadly tox- ins, like ricin (in multiple cases) and sodium cyanide (in one case); transportation, such as all-terrain vehicles (ATVs); arson, with the intent of destroying federal property; and explosives, often in large numbers and including pipe bombs, truck bombs, IEDs, and other homemade explosives. The growing acceptance of these violent methods by Republican congressmen and governors, however, only increases visibility of such groups and encourages their behavior. Coupled with the removal of the Department of Homeland Security's division responsible for monitoring such groups, the result could prove disastrous for the safety of United States citizens.

  7. A Growing Anticline in Tainan City, Taiwan

    Lee, C.; Lee, C.; Cheng, C.; Liao, C.; Wen, S.

    2001-12-01

    Tainan City has been known as an earthquake prone town since the early immigration of the ¡§Han¡" people from Mainland China about four hundred years ago. For the purpose of clarifying tectonic activity and paleo-earthquakes in the Tainan City area, we have finished the excavation of three trenches and the drilling of four holes at the so-called Houchiali Fault on the eastern margin of the Tainan tableland. We carefully observed the cores and exposures in the trenches, performed a detailed mapping, and took samples for C-14 dating and other types of analysis. The results show the trench sites are located at a flexure scarp without direct evidence of faulting. But, from the fact of tilting of Holocene sediments to about 50 degrees and the development of a fracture system in the sediments, one may realize that this is without doubt an active structure. We have tested many different models to interpret the observed geologic evidence in the trenches and outcrops, finally determined a growing fault-propagation fold model to be the best interpretation for the Tainan Anticline, while the Houchiali fault is a back-kink or a blind back-thrust type. A diapiric fold had been discussed as possible for a long time by many researchers, but a fault-propagation fold in origin does not contradict with a mud diapiric feature, which was formed during the folding. Field evidence shows that the main active phase of the Houchiali Fault and the Tainan Anticline would have been after the deposition of the Tainan Formation about two to three thousand years ago. During the active deformation phase, the Tawan Formation onlaped the Tainan Formation, as well as tilted during the folding, thus, beds on higher stratigraphic horizon show lower dip-angle. Estimated from a detailed geologic profile, the horizontal shortening of the anticline is estimated to be 30 meters. The vertical uplift of the Tainan Formation is also about 30 meters. This indicates that the deformation rate has been about 1

  8. On the mechanical stability of growing arteries

    Goriely, A.

    2010-04-22

    Arteries are modelled, within the framework of non-linear elasticity, as incompressible two-layer cylindrical structures that are residually stressed through differential growth. These structures are loaded by an axial force, internal pressure and have non-linear, anisotropic, hyperelastic response to stresses. Parameters for this model are directly related to experimental observations. The possible role of axial residual stress in regulating stress in arteries and preventing buckling instabilities is investigated. It is shown that axial residual stress lowers the critical internal pressure leading to buckling and that a reduction of axial loading may lead to a buckling instability which may eventually lead to arterial tortusity. © 2010 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.

  9. OA39 Digging a hole… planting a seed… water it and watch it start to grow, grow, grow.

    Lloyd, Rebecca; McLoughlin, Kathleen; McGloughlin, Carmelia; Macken, Caroline; Richardson, Marie; Rhatigan, Jim

    2015-04-01

    Milford Care Centre's Compassionate Communities Project uses a seed grant scheme to engage with communities around illness, dying, death and bereavement. The scheme, now in it's 3(rd) cycle strives to inspire and support the work of local groups, organisations and individuals who wish to mark in some tangible way their response to the universal realities of death, dying, loss and care as lived and experienced by those living within their communities. A key requirement for the receipt of a grant is that the level of funding must be matched either in cash or in kind. This presentation will report on the projects supported, describing the short and medium term impact they have had on the local community. A short film will showcase the projects. Qualitative interviews were conducted with all grant recipients to determine the impact of the seed grant at a community level. Seed grants were used in a variety of ways, for example: Supporting a community group to develop a reflection space Supporting a youth project to explore what death, dying, loss and care means to service users through the creative arts. Supporting a library to develop a bereavement information 'resource'. Supporting local groups to run a community event aimed at increasing awareness and knowledge about 'healthy' ways of coping with loss and grief. Supporting those seeking practical ways of providing support to other living with illness and loss. The seed grant scheme offers a low cost, high impact approach to working with communities. © 2015, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Crack Growth Monitoring by Embedded Optical Fibre Bragg Grating Sensors: Fibre Reinforced Plastic Crack Growing Detection

    Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard; McGugan, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a novel method to asses a crack growing/damage event in fibre reinforced plastic, or adhesive using Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors embedded in a host material. Different features of the crack mechanism that induce a change in the FBG response were identified. Double Canti...

  11. "I Hope Someone Castrates You, You Perverted Bastard": Martin Cole's Sex Education Film, "Growing Up"

    Limond, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper concerns the response to the sex education film "Growing Up", made in 1971 by Dr Martin Cole, which used a combination of animation and live action to offer a frank and uncompromising account of sexual reproduction. As part of this, both male and female masturbation and an unsimulated act of male-female coitus featured in the…

  12. Dynamic disease management in trachymyrmex fungus-growing ants (Attini: Formicidae)

    Fernández-Marín, Hermógenes; Bruner, Gaspar; Gomez, Ernesto B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Multipartner mutualisms have potentially complex dynamics, with compensatory responses when one partner is lost or relegated to a minor role. Fungus-growing ants (Attini) are mutualistic associates of basidiomycete fungi and antibiotic-producing actinomycete bacteria; the former are atta...

  13. Stabilization of Microtubule-Unbound Tau via Tau Phosphorylation at Ser262/356 by Par-1/MARK Contributes to Augmentation of AD-Related Phosphorylation and Aβ42-Induced Tau Toxicity.

    Kanae Ando

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal accumulation of the microtubule-interacting protein tau is associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD. β-amyloid (Aβ lies upstream of abnormal tau behavior, including detachment from microtubules, phosphorylation at several disease-specific sites, and self-aggregation into toxic tau species in AD brains. To prevent the cascade of events leading to neurodegeneration in AD, it is essential to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the initial events of tau mismetabolism. Currently, however, these mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, using transgenic Drosophila co-expressing human tau and Aβ, we found that tau phosphorylation at AD-related Ser262/356 stabilized microtubule-unbound tau in the early phase of tau mismetabolism, leading to neurodegeneration. Aβ increased the level of tau detached from microtubules, independent of the phosphorylation status at GSK3-targeted SP/TP sites. Such mislocalized tau proteins, especially the less phosphorylated species, were stabilized by phosphorylation at Ser262/356 via PAR-1/MARK. Levels of Ser262 phosphorylation were increased by Aβ42, and blocking this stabilization of tau suppressed Aβ42-mediated augmentation of tau toxicity and an increase in the levels of tau phosphorylation at the SP/TP site Thr231, suggesting that this process may be involved in AD pathogenesis. In contrast to PAR-1/MARK, blocking tau phosphorylation at SP/TP sites by knockdown of Sgg/GSK3 did not reduce tau levels, suppress tau mislocalization to the cytosol, or diminish Aβ-mediated augmentation of tau toxicity. These results suggest that stabilization of microtubule-unbound tau by phosphorylation at Ser262/356 via the PAR-1/MARK may act in the initial steps of tau mismetabolism in AD pathogenesis, and that such tau species may represent a potential therapeutic target for AD.

  14. A simple and highly sensitive on-line column extraction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of protein-unbound tacrolimus in human plasma samples.

    Bittersohl, Heike; Schniedewind, Björn; Christians, Uwe; Luppa, Peter B

    2018-04-27

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of the immunosuppressive drug tacrolimus is essential to avoid side effects and rejection of the allograft after transplantation. In the blood circulation, tacrolimus is largely located inside erythrocytes or bound to plasma proteins and less than 0.1% is protein-unbound (free). One basic principle of clinical pharmacology is that only free drug is pharmacologically active and monitoring this portion has the potential to better reflect the drug effect than conventional measurements of total tacrolimus in whole blood. To address this, a highly sensitive and straightforward on-line liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed, validated and applied to patient plasma samples. The sample preparation included ultracentrifugation and addition of the stable isotope labeled drug analogue D2,13C-tacrolimus, followed by on-line sample extraction and measurement using a Sciex QTRAP ® 6500 in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. Due to very low concentrations of protein-unbound tacrolimus, it was important to develop a highly sensitive, precise and accurate assay. Here, we first report the efficient formation of tacrolimus lithium adduct ions, which greatly increased assay sensitivity. A lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 1 pg/mL (10 fg on column) was achieved and the assay was linear between 1 and 200 pg/mL. There was no carry-over detected. The inaccuracy ranged from -9.8 to 7.4% and the greatest imprecision was 7.5%. The matrix factor was found to be smaller than 1.1%. In summary, this method represents a suitable tool to investigate the potential clinical value of free tacrolimus monitoring in organ transplant recipients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The one number you need to grow.

    Reichheld, Frederick F

    2003-12-01

    Companies spend lots of time and money on complex tools to assess customer satisfaction. But they're measuring the wrong thing. The best predictor of top-line growth can usually be captured in a single survey question: Would you recommend this company to a friend? This finding is based on two years of research in which a variety of survey questions were tested by linking the responses with actual customer behavior--purchasing patterns and referrals--and ultimately with company growth. Surprisingly, the most effective question wasn't about customer satisfaction or even loyalty per se. In most of the industries studied, the percentage of customers enthusiastic enough about a company to refer it to a friend or colleague directly correlated with growth rates among competitors. Willingness to talk up a company or product to friends, family, and colleagues is one of the best indicators of loyalty because of the customer's sacrifice in making the recommendation. When customers act as references, they do more than indicate they've received good economic value from a company; they put their own reputations on the line. And they will risk their reputations only if they feel intense loyalty. The findings point to a new, simpler approach to customer research, one directly linked to a company's results. By substituting a single question--blunt tool though it may appear to be--for the complex black box of the customer satisfaction survey, companies can actually put consumer survey results to use and focus employees on the task of stimulating growth.

  16. GrOW briefs: From research to policy | IDRC - International ...

    2017-10-17

    Oct 17, 2017 ... ​For access to more GrOW findings and literature, visit the GrOW Research Series. Learn more about the GrOW program. What we do · Funding · Resources · About IDRC. Knowledge. Innovation. Solutions. Careers · Contact Us · Site map. Sign up now for IDRC news and views sent directly to your inbox ...

  17. Fostering and sustaining innovation in a Fast Growing Agile Company

    Moe, NilsBrede; Barney, Sebastian; Aurum, Aybüe; Khurum, Mahvish; Wohlin, Claes; Barney, Hamish; Gorschek, Tony; Winata, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Sustaining innovation in a fast growing software development company is difficult. As organisations grow, peoples' focus often changes from the big picture of the product being developed to the specific role they fill. This paper presents two complementary approaches that were successfully used to support continued developer-driven innovation in a rapidly growing Australian agile software development company. The method "FedEx TM Day" gives developers one day to showcase a proof of concept th...

  18. Cell wall integrity signaling in plants: "To grow or not to grow that's the question".

    Voxeur, Aline; Höfte, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Plants, like yeast, have the ability to monitor alterations in the cell wall architecture that occur during normal growth or in changing environments and to trigger compensatory changes in the cell wall. We discuss how recent advances in our understanding of the cell wall architecture provide new insights into the role of cell wall integrity sensing in growth control. Next we review the properties of membrane receptor-like kinases that have roles in pH control, mechano-sensing and reactive oxygen species accumulation in growing cells and which may be the plant equivalents of the yeast cell wall integrity (CWI) sensors. Finally, we discuss recent findings showing an increasing role for CWI signaling in plant immunity and the adaptation to changes in the ionic environment of plant cells. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Incorporating Edge Information into Best Merge Region-Growing Segmentation

    Tilton, James C.; Pasolli, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously developed a best merge region-growing approach that integrates nonadjacent region object aggregation with the neighboring region merge process usually employed in region growing segmentation approaches. This approach has been named HSeg, because it provides a hierarchical set of image segmentation results. Up to this point, HSeg considered only global region feature information in the region growing decision process. We present here three new versions of HSeg that include local edge information into the region growing decision process at different levels of rigor. We then compare the effectiveness and processing times of these new versions HSeg with each other and with the original version of HSeg.

  20. Trend Analysis of Droughts during Crop Growing Seasons of Nigeria

    Mohammed Sanusi Shiru

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the impacts of recent climate changes on drought-affected areas and the occurrence of droughts during different cropping seasons of Nigeria using the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI. The crop growing seasons are considered because the droughts for those periods are more destructive to national agricultural production. The Mann–Kendall test and binary logistic regression were used to quantify the trends in drought-affected areas and the occurrence of crop droughts with different areal extents, respectively. Gauge-based gridded rainfall and temperature data for the period 1961–2010 with spatial resolutions of 0.5° were used. Results showed an increase in the areal extent of droughts during some of the cropping seasons. The occurrences of droughts, particularly moderate droughts with smaller areal extents, were found to increase for all of the seasons. The SPEI values calculated decreased mostly in the regions where rainfall was decreasing. That is, the recent changes in climate were responsible for the increase in the occurrences of droughts with smaller areal extents. These trends in climate indicate that the occurrence of larger areal extent droughts may happen more frequently in Nigeria in the future.

  1. Energy expenditure in growing preterm infants receiving massage therapy.

    Lahat, Sharon; Mimouni, Francis B; Ashbel, Gina; Dollberg, Shaul

    2007-08-01

    Massage therapy has been consistently shown to increase weight gain in preterm infants. The mechanism of this presumed improved metabolic efficiency is unknown. We conducted the following trial to test the hypothesis that massage therapy reduces energy expenditure in growing healthy preterm infants. A prospective, randomized, cross-over design study was conducted in 10 healthy, appropriate weights for gestational age, gavage fed preterm infants. Each infant was studied twice: after a period of either 5 days of massage therapy, or after a period of 5 days without massage therapy. Infants were randomized to 5 days of massage followed by 5 days of no massage (n = 5) or the opposite sequence (n = 5). During the massage therapy period, massage was provided daily for three 15 minute periods at the beginning of each 3 hour period every morning. Metabolic measurements were performed by indirect calorimetry, using the Deltatrac II Metabolic cart. Energy expenditure was significantly lower in infants after the 5 day massage therapy period (59.6 +/- 3.6 Kcal/Kg/ 24 hours) than after the period without (63.1 +/- 5.4 Kcal/Kg/ 24 hours) (p = 0.05). Energy expenditure is significantly lowered by 5 days of massage therapy in metabolically and thermally stable preterm infants. This decrease in energy expenditure may be in part responsible for the enhanced growth caused by massage therapy.

  2. Can Growing Degree Days and Photoperiod Predict Spring Wheat Phenology?

    Muhammad A. Aslam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Wheat (Triticum aestivum production in the rainfed area of Pothwar Pakistan is extremely vulnerable to high temperature. The expected increase in temperature due to global warming should result in shorter crop life cycles, and thus lower biomass and grain yield. Two major factors control wheat phenological development: temperature and photoperiod. To evaluate wheat development in response to these factors, we conducted experiments that created diverse temperature and daylength conditions by adjusting the crop sowing time. The study was conducted during 2013–14 and 2014–15 using five spring wheat genotypes, four sowing times, at three sites under rainfed management in Pothwar, Pakistan. Wheat crops experienced more cold days with early sowing, but later sowing dates resulted in higher temperatures, especially from anthesis to maturity. These treatments produced large differences in phenology, biomass production, and yield. To investigate whether growing degree days (GDD and photoperiod algorithms could predict wheat phenology under these changing conditions, GDD was calculated based on the method proposed by Wang and Engel while photoperiod followed the approach introduced in the APSIM crop growth model. GDD was calculated separately and in combination with photoperiod from germination to anthesis. For the grain filling period, only GDD was calculated. The observed and predicted number of days to anthesis and maturity were in good agreement, showing that the combination of GDD and photoperiod algorithms provided good estimations of spring wheat phenology under variable temperature and daylength conditions.

  3. Instant responsive web design

    Simmons, Cory

    2013-01-01

    A step-by-step tutorial approach which will teach the readers what responsive web design is and how it is used in designing a responsive web page.If you are a web-designer looking to expand your skill set by learning the quickly growing industry standard of responsive web design, this book is ideal for you. Knowledge of CSS is assumed.

  4. Temperature Sensitivity of Soil Respiration to Nitrogen Fertilization: Varying Effects between Growing and Non-Growing Seasons

    Liu, Qingfang; Wang, Rui; Li, Rujian; Hu, Yaxian; Guo, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization has a considerable effect on food production and carbon cycling in agro-ecosystems. However, the impacts of N fertilization rates on the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (Q10) were controversial. Five N rates (N0, N45, N90, N135, and N180) were applied to a continuous winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crop on the semi-arid Loess Plateau, and the in situ soil respiration was monitored during five consecutive years from 2008 to 2013. During the growing season, the mean soil respiration rates increased with increasing N fertilization rates, peaking at 1.53 μmol m−2s−1 in the N135 treatment. A similar dynamic pattern was observed during the non-growing season, yet on average with 7.3% greater soil respiration rates than the growing season. In general for all the N fertilization treatments, the mean Q10 value during the non-growing season was significantly greater than that during the growing season. As N fertilization rates increased, the Q10 values did not change significantly in the growing season but significantly decreased in the non-growing season. Overall, N fertilization markedly influenced soil respirations and Q10 values, in particular posing distinct effects on the Q10 values between the growing and non-growing seasons. PMID:27992576

  5. Performance Of Growing Pigs And Finisher Broilers Housed Together

    Growth performance and cost of feeding young growing pigs and finisher broilers under integrated broiler/pig production system were investigated. Four young growing pigs (the control) were housed in pen A and fed 4% of their body weight as commercial growers feed. Another 4 were housed in pen B with broilers in ...

  6. Evolution of Communicative Competence in Adolescents Growing up in Orphanages

    Ribakova, Laysan A.; Parfilova, Gulfia G.; Karimova, Lilya Sh.; Karimova, Raushan B.

    2015-01-01

    The article describes features of the communicative competence evolution in adolescents growing up in orphanages. The specificity is revealed and definition is given to key concept of the research, namely "communicative competence". Authors emphasize and demonstrate the evaluation peculiarities of the adolescents, growing up in…

  7. Growth and Economic Opportunities for Women (GrOW) Frequently ...

    Alejandra

    GrOW will take a broad perspective on the types of questions and evidence on ... question; (2) set the outcome in the broader context of the underlying programme theory, ... Communications from the GrOW team with applicants during the ... There are specific criteria and application processes for this call that should be.

  8. Temperature fields in a growing solar silicon crystal

    Kondrik A. I.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimal thermal terms for growing by Czochralski method Si single-crystals, suitable for making photoelectric energy converters, has been defined by the computer simulation method. Dependences of temperature fields character and crystallization front form on the diameter of the crystal, stage and speed of growing, and also on correlation between diameter and height of the crystal has been studied.

  9. Growing media alternatives for forest and native plant nurseries

    Thomas D. Landis; Nancy Morgan

    2009-01-01

    The choice of growing medium, along with container type, is one of the critical decisions that must be made when starting a nursery. The first growing medium was called "compost" and was developed in the 1930s at the John Innes Horticultural Institute in Great Britain. It consisted of a loam soil that was amended with peat moss, sand, and fertilizers (Bunt...

  10. The effect of lumbosacral manipulation on growing pains

    Dawid de Beer

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: The results from this study, specifically the feedback from parent(s/guardians(s and the pain diaries, indicated that spinal manipulation is beneficial in the treatment of growing pains. The results also showed that other methods of treating growing pains, such as simple leg rubs, may also bring relief.

  11. Assessment of drought during corn growing season in Northeast China

    Zhang, Qi; Hu, Zhenghua

    2018-04-01

    Northeast China has experienced extensive climate change during the past decades. Corn is the primary production crop in China and is sensitive to meteorological disasters, especially drought. Drought has thus greatly endangered crop production and the country's food security. The majority of previous studies has not highlighted farming adaptation activities undertaken within the changed climate, which should not be neglected. In this study, we assessed drought hazard in the corn vegetation growing period, the reproductive growing period, and the whole growing period based on data for yearly corn phenology, daily precipitation, and temperature gathered at 26 agro-meteorological stations across Northeast China from 1981 to 2009. The M-K trend test was used to detect trends in sowing date and drought. The standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI) was used to describe drought. Drought frequency and intensity were used to assess the drought hazard in the region. We found that the sowing date was delayed in the southern part of the study area, coupled with a trend towards a shorter and more humid vegetation growing period. In the northern part of the study area, an earlier sowing date increased the length of the vegetation growing period and the reproductive growing period, while drying trends occurred within the two corn growing periods. We assessed the drought hazard during each growing period: the reproductive growing period faced a more severe drought hazard and was also the period where corn was most sensitive to water stress. Drought hazard during the total growing period was closely related to corn yield.

  12. Highly polygenic variation in environmental perception determines dauer larvae formation in growing populations of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    James W M Green

    Full Text Available Determining how complex traits are genetically controlled is a requirement if we are to predict how they evolve and how they might respond to selection. This requires understanding how distinct, and often more simple, life history traits interact and change in response to environmental conditions. In order to begin addressing such issues, we have been analyzing the formation of the developmentally arrested dauer larvae of Caenorhabditis elegans under different conditions.We find that 18 of 22 previously identified quantitative trait loci (QTLs affecting dauer larvae formation in growing populations, assayed by determining the number of dauer larvae present at food patch exhaustion, can be recovered under various environmental conditions. We also show that food patch size affects both the ability to detect QTLs and estimates of effect size, and demonstrate that an allele of nath-10 affects dauer larvae formation in growing populations. To investigate the component traits that affect dauer larvae formation in growing populations we map, using the same introgression lines, QTLs that affect dauer larvae formation in response to defined amounts of pheromone. This identifies 36 QTLs, again demonstrating the highly polygenic nature of the genetic variation underlying dauer larvae formation.These data indicate that QTLs affecting the number of dauer larvae at food exhaustion in growing populations of C. elegans are highly reproducible, and that nearly all can be explained by variation affecting dauer larvae formation in response to defined amounts of pheromone. This suggests that most variation in dauer larvae formation in growing populations is a consequence of variation in the perception of the food and pheromone environment (i.e. chemosensory variation and in the integration of these cues.

  13. Growing Up Or Growing Old? Cellular Aging Linked With Testosterone Reactivity To Stress In Youth

    Drury, Stacy S.; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.; Shachet, Andrew; Phan, Jenny; Mabile, Emily; Brett, Zoë H.; Wren, Michael; Esteves, Kyle; Theall, Katherine P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Given the established relation between testosterone and aging in older adults, we tested whether buccal telomere length (TL), an established cellular biomarker of aging, was associated with testosterone levels in youth. Methods Children, mean age 10.2 years, were recruited from the greater New Orleans area and salivary testosterone was measured during both an acute stressor and diurnally. Buccal TL was measured using monochrome multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (MMQ-PCR). Testosterone and telomere length data was available on 77 individuals. The association between buccal TL and testosterone was tested using multivariate Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) to account for clustering of children within families. Results Greater peak testosterone levels (β=-0.87, p < 0.01) and slower recovery (β=-0.56, p < 0.01) and reactivity (β = -1.22, p < 0.01) following a social stressor were significantly associated with shorter buccal TL after controlling for parental age at conception, child age, sex, sociodemographic factors and puberty. No association was initially present between diurnal measurements of testosterone or morning basal testosterone levels and buccal TL. Sex significantly moderated the relation between testosterone reactivity and buccal TL. Conclusions The association between testosterone and buccal TL supports gonadal maturation as a developmentally sensitive biomarker of aging within youth. As stress levels of testosterone were significantly associated with buccal TL, these findings are consistent with the growing literature linking stress exposure and accelerated maturation. The lack of association of diurnal testosterone or morning basal levels with buccal TL bolsters the notion of a shared stress-related maturational mechanism between cellular stress and the hypothalamic pituitary gonadal (HPG) axis. These data provide novel evidence supporting the interaction of aging, physiologic stress and cellular processes as an underlying

  14. Growing talent as if your business depended on it.

    Cohn, Jeffrey M; Khurana, Rakesh; Reeves, Laura

    2005-10-01

    Traditionally, corporate boards have left leadership planning and development very much up to their CEOs and human resources departments-primarily because they don't perceive that a lack of leadership development in their companies poses the same kind of threat that accounting blunders or missed earnings do. That's a shortsighted view, the authors argue. Companies whose boards and senior executives fail to prioritize succession planning and leadership development end up experiencing a steady attrition in talent and becoming extremely vulnerable when they have to cope with inevitable upheavals- integrating an acquired company with a different operating style and culture, for instance, or reexamining basic operating assumptions when a competitor with a leaner cost structure emerges. Firms that haven't focused on their systems for building their bench strength will probably make wrong decisions in these situations. In this article, the authors explain what makes a successful leadership development program, based on their research over the past few years with companies in a range of industries. They describe how several forward-thinking companies (Tyson Foods, Starbucks, and Mellon Financial, in particular) are implementing smart, integrated, talent development initiatives. A leadership development program should not comprise stand-alone, ad hoc activities coordinated by the human resources department, the authors say. A company's leadership development processes should align with strategic priorities. From the board of directors on down, senior executives should be deeply involved in finding and growing talent, and line managers should be evaluated and promoted expressly for their contributions to the organization-wide effort. HR should be allowed to create development tools and facilitate their use, but the business units should take responsibility for development activities, and the board should ultimately oversee the whole system.

  15. Morphoelastic rods. Part I: A single growing elastic rod

    Moulton, D.E.

    2013-02-01

    A theory for the dynamics and statics of growing elastic rods is presented. First, a single growing rod is considered and the formalism of three-dimensional multiplicative decomposition of morphoelasticity is used to describe the bulk growth of Kirchhoff elastic rods. Possible constitutive laws for growth are discussed and analysed. Second, a rod constrained or glued to a rigid substrate is considered, with the mismatch between the attachment site and the growing rod inducing stress. This stress can eventually lead to instability, bifurcation, and buckling. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Growing older in the context of needing geriatric assessment

    Esbensen, Bente Appel; Hvitved, Ida; Andersen, Hanne Elkjær

    2016-01-01

    significant and (v) considerations about the end of life as a component of growing older. The essence was defined as: illness essential for the experience of growing older and pointed to the experience of growing older that highlighted that experiencing illnesses and limitations served as reminders...... methodology. RESULTS: The results led to an overall essence and five themes. The five themes were identified: (i) considerations to avoid weakness, (ii) compensation for the inability to perform certain activities, (iii) aides - a symbol of freedom or limitation, (iv) lifestyle considered being particularly...

  17. Morphoelastic rods. Part I: A single growing elastic rod

    Moulton, D.E.; Lessinnes, T.; Goriely, A.

    2013-01-01

    A theory for the dynamics and statics of growing elastic rods is presented. First, a single growing rod is considered and the formalism of three-dimensional multiplicative decomposition of morphoelasticity is used to describe the bulk growth of Kirchhoff elastic rods. Possible constitutive laws for growth are discussed and analysed. Second, a rod constrained or glued to a rigid substrate is considered, with the mismatch between the attachment site and the growing rod inducing stress. This stress can eventually lead to instability, bifurcation, and buckling. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. China's Soft Power and Growing Influence in Southeast Asia

    Hwang, Edward F

    2008-01-01

    .... By no means is China able to surpass the United States soft power capabilities. As China's economy and influence in the region continue to grow however, China as an alternative to the United States can become a reality...

  19. Climate Prediction Center Weekly Corn Growing Degree Days

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A corn growing degree day (GDD) is an index used to express crop maturity. The index is computed by subtracting a base temperature of 50?F from the average of the...

  20. Nursery growing of some apple varieties using different grafting ...

    Yomi

    2011-12-21

    Dec 21, 2011 ... conditions differences were been determinated according to rootstocks ... been grown since pre-historic times in Asia and Europe ... apple growing country after China and the USA. ... He also pointed out that high cost of work.

  1. Reasons for the Fast Growing Seawater Desalination Capacity in Algeria

    Drouiche, Nadjib; Ghaffour, NorEddine; Naceur, Mohamed Wahib; Mahmoudi, Hacè ne; Ouslimane, Tarik

    2011-01-01

    growing markets. Five desalination plants, including the Africa's largest seawater reverse osmosis project with a total capacity of 200,000 m3 per day, are already in operation and the remaining projects are either under construction or in commissioning

  2. Improving women and youth livelihoods through small and growing ...

    Small and growing businesses (SGBs) play an important role in lifting people out ... to advance business objectives and development goals simultaneously, thus ... impact of SGBs through a catalyst fund for partnerships between researchers ...

  3. Leadership Makes a Difference Growing Federal Civilian Leaders

    Muellerweiss, Alice

    2008-01-01

    .... Research indicates that currently our government does not grow effective leaders. Often those "rising to the top" are technical experts with minimal leadership experiences, mostly unacquainted with the fundamentals of leadership...

  4. Eucalypt pests and diseases: growing threats to plantation productivity

    Eucalypt pests and diseases: growing threats to plantation productivity. ... Southern Forests: a Journal of Forest Science ... plantations, it is clear that separation of the trees from their natural enemies has resulted in exceptional performance.

  5. Electronic Waste: A Growing Challenge In Nigeria | Ukem | Global ...

    Global Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences ... growing problem of electronic waste from the Nigerian perspective, and highlights factors that can militate ... equipment, electronic waste, recycling, environmental pollution, waste management.

  6. Growing axons analysis by using Granulometric Size Distribution

    Gonzalez, Mariela A; Ballarin, Virginia L; Rapacioli, Melina; CelIn, A R; Sanchez, V; Flores, V

    2011-01-01

    Neurite growth (neuritogenesis) in vitro is a common methodology in the field of developmental neurobiology. Morphological analyses of growing neurites are usually difficult because their thinness and low contrast usually prevent to observe clearly their shape, number, length and spatial orientation. This paper presents the use of the granulometric size distribution in order to automatically obtain information about the shape, size and spatial orientation of growing axons in tissue cultures. The results here presented show that the granulometric size distribution results in a very useful morphological tool since it allows the automatic detection of growing axons and the precise characterization of a relevant parameter indicative of the axonal growth spatial orientation such as the quantification of the angle of deviation of the growing direction. The developed algorithms automatically quantify this orientation by facilitating the analysis of these images, which is important given the large number of images that need to be processed for this type of study.

  7. But How Do You Grow Plants Without Dirt?

    Howells, Ronald F.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a class project on hydroponic farming (growing plants in water and in organic nutrients rather than dirt). Students formed a corporation to raise necessary funds and paid dividends from the proceeds earned selling the crop. (JMB)

  8. Modified methods for growing 3-D skin equivalents: an update.

    Lamb, Rebecca; Ambler, Carrie A

    2014-01-01

    Artificial epidermis can be reconstituted in vitro by seeding primary epidermal cells (keratinocytes) onto a supportive substrate and then growing the developing skin equivalent at the air-liquid interface. In vitro skin models are widely used to study skin biology and for industrial drug and cosmetic testing. Here, we describe updated methods for growing 3-dimensional skin equivalents using de-vitalized, de-epidermalized dermis (DED) substrates including methods for DED substrate preparation, cell seeding, growth conditions, and fixation procedures.

  9. Food-Growing, Air- And Water-Cleaning Module

    Sauer, R. L.; Scheld, H. W.; Mafnuson, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus produces fresh vegetables and removes pollutants from air. Hydroponic apparatus performs dual function of growing fresh vegetables and purifying air and water. Leafy vegetables rooted in granular growth medium grow in light of fluorescent lamps. Air flowing over leaves supplies carbon dioxide and receives fresh oxygen from them. Adaptable to production of food and cleaning of air and water in closed environments as in underwater research stations and submarines.

  10. Plasticity of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) wood-forming tissues during a growing season.

    Paiva, J A P; Garnier-Géré, P H; Rodrigues, J C; Alves, A; Santos, S; Graça, J; Le Provost, G; Chaumeil, G; Da Silva-Perez, D; Bosc, A; Fevereiro, P; Plomion, C

    2008-01-01

    The seasonal effect is the most significant external source of variation affecting vascular cambial activity and the development of newly divided cells, and hence wood properties. Here, the effect of edapho-climatic conditions on the phenotypic and molecular plasticity of differentiating secondary xylem during a growing season was investigated. Wood-forming tissues of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) were collected from the beginning to the end of the growing season in 2003. Data from examination of fibre morphology, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), analytical pyrolysis, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) were combined to characterize the samples. Strong variation was observed in response to changes in edapho-climatic conditions. A genomic approach was used to identify genes differentially expressed during this growing season. Out of 3512 studied genes, 19% showed a significant seasonal effect. These genes were clustered into five distinct groups, the largest two representing genes over-expressed in the early- or late-wood-forming tissues, respectively. The other three clusters were characterized by responses to specific edapho-climatic conditions. This work provides new insights into the plasticity of the molecular machinery involved in wood formation, and reveals candidate genes potentially responsible for the phenotypic differences found between early- and late-wood.

  11. Blueprint and Approach to Grow Revenue in Small Technology Companies

    Tony Bailetti

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This article examines a new approach to grow the revenue of small technology companies and technology startups. We name this new approach the business ecosystem approach. The article is organized into five sections. The first section provides a blueprint to grow revenue and an inventory of growth formulas that top management teams of small technology companies and founders of startups find useful. The second section briefly defines business ecosystems, keystones and platforms. The third section describes the business ecosystem approach to grow the revenue of small technology companies and technology startups. It compares the traditional and business ecosystem approaches to growing revenue; identifies when the business ecosystem approach works better than the traditional approach; explains what small companies and startups need to do to grow revenue using the business ecosystem approach; and describes the benefits and risks of implementing the business ecosystem approach. The fourth section compares three approaches to growing revenue and highlights the differences between i business ecosystems and development communities and ii the business ecosystem approach and outsourcing. The fifth section identifies the key decisions a small technology company or technology startup needs to make to become the keystone that anchors a business ecosystem.

  12. Growth of lowland broccoli coconut coir dust and peat based growing media using fertigation system

    Ahmad, Asiah; Abdul Rahman, Shyful Azizi; Nordin, Latiffah; Abdullah, Hazlina; Ruslan, Abdul Razak [Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research MINT, Bangi (Malaysia). Agrotechnology and Bioscineces Div.; Taib, Mohd Idris [Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research MINT, Bangi (Malaysia). Intelligent Group

    2004-07-01

    A study was carried out inside the greenhouse to determine the response of lowland broccoli (Brassica oleracea) plants grown in five mixtures of coconut coir dust and peat as the growing media. The growing mixes were prepared in the following ratios (% by vol): 100% coconut coir dust, 75% coconut coir dust + 25% peat, 50% coconut coir dust + 50% peat, 25% coconut coir dust + 75% peat and 100% peat. The plants were supplied with 200 mg 1-1 nitrogen using a computerized fertigation system developed at MINT Plants grown on 100% peat exhibited reduced plant growth and yield compared to plants grown on mixes containing coconut coir dust. Plants growth and yield were increased on growing media contained > 50% coconut coir dust; however, the highest total plant dry weight, plant height and yield were obtained from plants grown on 100% coconut coir dust. Total nitrogen concentration in the leaves and stems was not significantly different in all mixture of the growing media regardless of whether coconut coir dust or peat was used. In general, nitrate -nitrogen concentrations were lowest in the floret than in the leaves and stem tissues of plants grown on all growing media used in the study. However, nitrate-nitrogen concentrations in the leaves, stems and florets were lowest in the plants grown on 100% peat compared to the plants grown on growing media containing coconut coir dust. The concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen in the florets, which ranged from 290 to 450 mg N kg-l/dry weight, are considered to be under permissible levels by European standards. (Author)

  13. Growth of lowland broccoli coconut coir dust and peat based growing media using fertigation system

    Asiah Ahmad; Shyful Azizi Abdul Rahman; Latiffah Nordin; Hazlina Abdullah; Abdul Razak Ruslan; Mohd Idris Taib

    2004-01-01

    A study was carried out inside the greenhouse to determine the response of lowland broccoli (Brassica oleracea) plants grown in five mixtures of coconut coir dust and peat as the growing media. The growing mixes were prepared in the following ratios (% by vol): 100% coconut coir dust, 75% coconut coir dust + 25% peat, 50% coconut coir dust + 50% peat, 25% coconut coir dust + 75% peat and 100% peat. The plants were supplied with 200 mg 1-1 nitrogen using a computerized fertigation system developed at MINT Plants grown on 100% peat exhibited reduced plant growth and yield compared to plants grown on mixes containing coconut coir dust. Plants growth and yield were increased on growing media contained > 50% coconut coir dust; however, the highest total plant dry weight, plant height and yield were obtained from plants grown on 100% coconut coir dust. Total nitrogen concentration in the leaves and stems was not significantly different in all mixture of the growing media regardless of whether coconut coir dust or peat was used. In general, nitrate -nitrogen concentrations were lowest in the floret than in the leaves and stem tissues of plants grown on all growing media used in the study. However, nitrate-nitrogen concentrations in the leaves, stems and florets were lowest in the plants grown on 100% peat compared to the plants grown on growing media containing coconut coir dust. The concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen in the florets, which ranged from 290 to 450 mg N kg-l/dry weight, are considered to be under permissible levels by European standards. (Author)

  14. Lighting during grow-out and Salmonella in broiler flocks

    Bailey Richard H

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lighting is used during conventional broiler grow-out to modify bird behaviour to reach the goals of production and improve bird welfare. The protocols for lighting intensity vary. In a field study, we evaluated if the lighting practices impact the burden of Salmonella in broiler flocks. Methods Conventional grow-out flocks reared in the states of Alabama, Mississippi and Texas, USA in 2003 to 2006 were sampled 1 week before harvest (n = 58 and upon arrival for processing (n = 56 by collecting feathered carcass rinsate, crop and one cecum from each of 30 birds, and during processing by collecting rinsate of 30 carcasses at pre-chilling (n = 56 and post-chilling points (n = 54. Litter samples and drag swabs of litter were collected from the grow-out houses after bird harvest (n = 56. Lighting practices for these flocks were obtained with a questionnaire completed by the growers. Associations between the lighting practices and the burden of Salmonella in the flocks were tested while accounting for variation between the grow-out farms, their production complexes and companies. Results Longer relative duration of reduced lights during the grow-out period was associated with reduced detection of Salmonella on the exterior of birds 1 week before harvest and on the broiler carcasses at the post-chilling point of processing. In addition, starting reduced lights for ≥18 hours per day later in the grow-out period was associated with decreased detection of Salmonella on the exterior of broilers arriving for processing and in the post-harvest drag swabs of litter from the grow-out house. Conclusions The results of this field study show that lighting practices implemented during broiler rearing can impact the burden of Salmonella in the flock. The underlying mechanisms are likely to be interactive.

  15. The formation and growing properties of poly(ethylene terephthalate) fiber growing media after thermo-oxidative treatment

    Chang, C.P.; Lin, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    This research uses three kinds of recycled synthetic fibers that all possess excellent thermal plasticity property as raw material to develop a new firm cultivation media: polyethylene terephthalate, polyamide and polypropylene. One can not only freely control plants cultivation growing condition by changing bulk density of the media, but also solve disposal problem after usage by applying thermal oxidative treatment during manufacturing processes. The water content, air permeability and formation conditions of these fiber growing media that are required in plants growing habitat were discussed, and compared the fallout with rockwool (RW) growing media that is commonly used at present days. The results indicated that the polyethylene terephthalate fiber media could attain best formation characteristics among these fibers at the same bulk density range. Furthermore, the fiber media that were thermo-oxidative treated at 240-260 deg. C could obtained above 90% total porosity, 23-49% air capacity and 48-68% water availability, water contents raised from 1735-1094 to 2145-1156% under bulk densities of 0.03-0.09 g/cm 3 , which conforms to the common plant growing habitat conditions. Its performance well surpasses the rockwool growing media. We also discovered that the thermo-oxidative treated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fiber media could be easily broken down and become powdery by exerting pressure, thus greatly reduce its volume and effectively improve disposal processes that are difficult presently for the huge refuse create by rockwool

  16. Growing B Lymphocytes in a Three-Dimensional Culture System

    Wu, J. H. David; Bottaro, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) culture system for growing long-lived B lymphocytes has been invented. The capabilities afforded by the system can be expected to expand the range of options for immunological research and related activities, including testing of immunogenicity of vaccine candidates in vitro, generation of human monoclonal antibodies, and immunotherapy. Mature lymphocytes, which are the effectors of adaptive immune responses in vertebrates, are extremely susceptible to apoptotic death, and depend on continuous reception of survival-inducing stimulation (in the forms of cytokines, cell-to-cell contacts, and antigen receptor signaling) from the microenvironment. For this reason, efforts to develop systems for long-term culture of functional, non-transformed and non-activated mature lymphocytes have been unsuccessful until now. The bone-marrow microenvironment supports the growth and differentiation of many hematopoietic lineages, in addition to B-lymphocytes. Primary bone-marrow cell cultures designed to promote the development of specific cell types in vitro are highly desirable experimental systems, amenable to manipulation under controlled conditions. However, the dynamic and complex network of stromal cells and insoluble matrix proteins is disrupted in prior plate- and flask-based culture systems, wherein the microenvironments have a predominantly two-dimensional (2D) character. In 2D bone-marrow cultures, normal B-lymphoid cells become progressively skewed toward precursor B-cell populations that do not retain a normal immunophenotype, and such mature B-lymphocytes as those harvested from the spleen or lymph nodes do not survive beyond several days ex vivo in the absence of mitogenic stimulation. The present 3D culture system is a bioreactor that contains highly porous artificial scaffolding that supports the long-term culture of bone marrow, spleen, and lymph-node samples. In this system, unlike in 2D culture systems, B-cell subpopulations developing

  17. Marijuana growing operations in British Columbia revisited, 1997-2003

    Plecas, D.; Malm, A.; Kinney, B. [University College of the Fraser Valley, Abbotsford, BC (Canada). Dept. of Criminology and Criminal Justice]|[University College of the Fraser Valley, Abbotsford, BC (Canada). International Centre for Urban Research Studies

    2005-03-01

    The results of a comprehensive study of marihuana cultivation in British Columbia were presented. This report describes the incidents of marihuana grow operations coming to the attention of the police; the characteristics of marihuana growing operations; the suspects involved; the actions taken by the police and courts; and penalty. The study confirms that these operations which are dispersed throughout the province are increasing in both size and sophistication. The average number of kilograms of harvested marihuana seized per grow operation tripled from 1997 to 2003. In addition, the number of high intensity lights seized per operation also grew, leading to an associated increase in the average amount of electricity theft per operation. About 1 in 5 grow operations involved hydro theft. The average cost associated with hydro theft per operation was about $2,880 in 1997 and $3,740 in 2003. In 2003, it is estimated that growers stole more than $3,200,000 from BC Hydro. In addition to electricity by-passes, 15 per cent of indoor grow operations contained hazards such as weapons, explosives, and other drugs. 25 tabs., 34 figs.

  18. [Organization of mitochondria in the growing hyphae of Neurospora crassa].

    Potapova, T V; Boĭtsova, L Iu; Golyshev, S A; Popinako, A V

    2013-01-01

    In vivo fluorescent labeling of mitochondria in Neurospora crassa showed the concentration of filamentous mitochondria within 30 μm of apex in growing hyphae. These mitochondrial assemblies propagated forward with the elongation of hyphae, split and segregated as the growing tip bifurcated and formed de novo when new branches formed farther away from the apex. The efficiency of the mitochondria concentration in the apical 30 μm zone is related to the growth rate and identical in hyphae cultivated in glucose- and sorbitol-containing media. The obtained data are discussed in connection with the behavior of microtubules in growing hyphae as well as with the electric heterogeneity of N. crassa hyphal apex described previously.

  19. On the mechanics of thin films and growing surfaces

    Holland, M. A.

    2013-05-24

    Many living structures are coated by thin films, which have distinct mechanical properties from the bulk. In particular, these thin layers may grow faster or slower than the inner core. Differential growth creates a balanced interplay between tension and compression and plays a critical role in enhancing structural rigidity. Typical examples with a compressive outer surface and a tensile inner core are the petioles of celery, caladium, or rhubarb. While plant physiologists have studied the impact of tissue tension on plant rigidity for more than a century, the fundamental theory of growing surfaces remains poorly understood. Here, we establish a theoretical and computational framework for continua with growing surfaces and demonstrate its application to classical phenomena in plant growth. To allow the surface to grow independently of the bulk, we equip it with its own potential energy and its own surface stress. We derive the governing equations for growing surfaces of zero thickness and obtain their spatial discretization using the finite-element method. To illustrate the features of our new surface growth model we simulate the effects of growth-induced longitudinal tissue tension in a stalk of rhubarb. Our results demonstrate that different growth rates create a mechanical environment of axial tissue tension and residual stress, which can be released by peeling off the outer layer. Our novel framework for continua with growing surfaces has immediate biomedical applications beyond these classical model problems in botany: it can be easily extended to model and predict surface growth in asthma, gastritis, obstructive sleep apnoea, brain development, and tumor invasion. Beyond biology and medicine, surface growth models are valuable tools for material scientists when designing functionalized surfaces with distinct user-defined properties. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. The Fundamental Right To Grow Old With Dignity

    Camila Rabelo de Matos Silva Arruda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the years the role the growing old in society has been changing considerably, the population is aging and increasing life expectancy. Law No. 10741/03, which established the Statute of the Elderly, where the legislator sought to ensure the right to grow old with dignity. The increase in the number of retirees and unemployment generated changing the demand in the social security system, which is being processed at the national congress. This article examines how society has been treating the elderly and preparing to deal with the aging population.

  1. On Li Zhi's Theory of Growing up in Spirit

    Wang Junjiang

    2006-01-01

    The theory of growing up in spirit is the core of Li Zhi's thought.The theory attempts to get rid of the limit of the rigid ethical doctrine of Confucianismand to encourage growth in a helpful person for the benefit of the country,which demands both a free environment of society and enough courage and insight of the individual.At the same time,the criterion of growing up in spirit indicates the limitation of Li Zhi's thought.His free exploration,however,provides various revelations for us.

  2. Problems of growing forests in estrangement and population relocation areas

    Khudolij, V.N.; Podkur, P.N.; Davydov, N.N.; Mikhalkov, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    It has been concluded that the process of growth and normal development of single-stratum pine tress at the age from 20 to 40 depends on their density. Under conditions of thick forest interspecific competition and fight for space sharpen. Within the estrangement area unfavorable trends in growth and evolution have been disclosed at the age above 30. Growing of pines without care results in suppression of growth; some morphological changes in the trunk form have been observed. Such an uncontrolled mode of growing can lead to physiological weakening of the tress. 8 refs.; 4 tabs

  3. Fungus-Growing Termites Originated in African Rain Forest

    Aanen, Duur Kornelis; Eggleton, Paul

    2005-01-01

    are consumed (cf. [ [1] and [2] ]). Fungus-growing termites are found throughout the Old World tropics, in rain forests and savannas, but are ecologically dominant in savannas [ 3 ]. Here, we reconstruct the ancestral habitat and geographical origin of fungus-growing termites. We used a statistical model...... of habitat switching [ 4 ] repeated over all phylogenetic trees sampled in a Bayesian analysis of molecular data [ 5 ]. Our reconstructions provide strong evidence that termite agriculture originated in African rain forest and that the main radiation leading to the extant genera occurred there. Because...

  4. A Maze Game on Android Using Growing Tree Method

    Hendrawan, Y. F.

    2018-01-01

    A maze is a type of puzzle games where a player moves in complex and branched passages to find a particular target or location. One method to create a maze is the Growing Tree method. The method creates a tree that has branches which are the paths of a maze. This research explored three types of Growing Tree method implementations for maze generation on Android mobile devices. The layouts produced could be played in first and third-person perspectives. The experiment results showed that it took 17.3 seconds on average to generate 20 cells x 20 cells dynamic maze layouts.

  5. Cyber-physical attacks a growing invisible threat

    Loukas, George

    2015-01-01

    Cyber-Physical Attacks: A Growing Invisible Threat presents the growing list of harmful uses of computers and their ability to disable cameras, turn off a building's lights, make a car veer off the road,  or a drone land in enemy hands. In essence, it details the ways cyber-physical attacks are replacing physical attacks in crime, warfare, and terrorism. The book explores how attacks using computers affect the physical world in ways that were previously only possible through physical means. Perpetrators can now cause damage without the same risk, and without the political, social, or moral

  6. Clinical Challenges in the Growing Medical Marijuana Field.

    Barker, Jonathan

    2018-02-02

    Unique clinical challenges arise with the growing number of patients who possess medical marijuana cards. Medical marijuana patients with mental disorders can have worsening symptoms with marijuana use. Often there is sparse continuity of care between the patient and the medical marijuana practitioner. Lack of communication between the patient's treating practitioners and the practitioner who has authorized the medical marijuana can be problematic. This article is a discussion of the new clinical challenges practitioners are likely to encounter with the growing number of medical marijuana patients. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2018-02.asp].

  7. Cluster growing process and a sequence of magic numbers

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2003-01-01

    demonstrate that in this way all known global minimum structures of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic number sequence for the clusters of noble gas atoms......We present a new theoretical framework for modeling the cluster growing process. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system, and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing paths up to the cluster sizes of more than 100 atoms. We...

  8. Estimating the Sensitivity of CLM-Crop to Plant Date and Growing Season Length

    Drewniak, B. A.; Kotamarthi, V. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM), the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM), is designed to estimate the land surface response to climate through simulated vegetation phenology and soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics. Since human influences play a significant role shaping the land surface, the vegetation has been expanded to include agriculture (CLM-Crop) for three crop types: corn, soybean, and spring wheat. CLM-Crop parameters, which define crop phenology, are optimized against AmeriFlux observations of gross primary productivity, net ecosystem exchange, and stored biomass and carbon, for two sites in the U.S. growing corn and soybean. However, there is uncertainty in the measurements and using a small subset of data to determine model parameters makes validation difficult. In order to account for the differences in plant behavior across climate zones, an input dataset is used to define the planting dates and the length of the growing season. In order to improve model performance, and to understand the impacts of uncertainty from the input data, we evaluate the sensitivity of crop productivity and production against planting date and the length of the growing season. First, CLM-Crop is modified to establish plant date based on temperature trends for the previous 10-day period, constrained against the range of observed planting dates. This new climate-based model is compared with the standard fixed plant dates to determine how sensitive the model is to when seeding occurs, and how comparable the climate calculated plant dates are to the fixed dates. Next, the length of the growing season will be revised to account for an alternative climate. Finally, both the climate-based planting and new growth season will be simulated together. Results of the different model runs will be compared to the standard model and to observations to determine the importance of planting date and growing season length on crop productivity and yield.

  9. Influence of Soil Based Growing Media on Vegetative Propagation of Selected Cultivars of Olea Europaea

    Ahmed, M. I.; Ashraf, M. I.; Malik, S. U.; Husaain, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Pothwar region of Pakistan is a natural habitat of Olea spp. There is a high demand of certified olive plants to establish olive orchids in the region, because native wild species are non-fruit bearing. Plants of certified fruit bearing olive (Olea europaea L.) cultivars are rarely available. Vegetative propagation of olive is highly responsive to texture of soil based growing media. This study examined the effect of growing media composition (soil texture and nutrients) on vegetative propagation of five cultivars of olive. The experiment was carried out in randomized complete block design (RCBD) with two factors factorial having 25 repeats of each four treatments. Plant growth and survival data were collected and analyzed for the influence of soil attributes. In sandy loam soil, cv. Bari-1 had 82 percent plant survival, highest number of roots per plant (3.5), and longest root length (13.01 cm). Highest number of shoots per plant (4.25) and maximum shoot length (15.64 cm) were also recorded for Bari-1 with sandy loam growing media. Silt loam soil is least suitable growing media for vegetative propagation of olive. In the silt loam soil, plants survival rate was 59 percent for cv. Gemlik, number of roots per plant was 1.5 for cv. Ottobrattica, minimum root length 5.65 cm, minimum number of shoots per plant one, and minimum shoot length 7.42 cm were recorded for cv. Pendolino with silt loam soil. Results suggested that sandy loam growing media is better than the others for vegetative propagation of olive. Cultivar Bari-1 performed better than the others examined in this study by indicating highest (1) survival percentage, (2) root and shoot length, and (3) number of roots and shoots produced within a specific period of time. (author)

  10. Modeling mechanical interactions in growing populations of rod-shaped bacteria

    Winkle, James J.; Igoshin, Oleg A.; Bennett, Matthew R.; Josić, Krešimir; Ott, William

    2017-10-01

    Advances in synthetic biology allow us to engineer bacterial collectives with pre-specified characteristics. However, the behavior of these collectives is difficult to understand, as cellular growth and division as well as extra-cellular fluid flow lead to complex, changing arrangements of cells within the population. To rationally engineer and control the behavior of cell collectives we need theoretical and computational tools to understand their emergent spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we present an agent-based model that allows growing cells to detect and respond to mechanical interactions. Crucially, our model couples the dynamics of cell growth to the cell’s environment: Mechanical constraints can affect cellular growth rate and a cell may alter its behavior in response to these constraints. This coupling links the mechanical forces that influence cell growth and emergent behaviors in cell assemblies. We illustrate our approach by showing how mechanical interactions can impact the dynamics of bacterial collectives growing in microfluidic traps.

  11. Performance of growing Yankasa rams Fed graded levels of ...

    A feeding trial which lasted eight (8) weeks was carried out to determine the intake and nutrient digestibility by growing Yankasa rams fed graded levels of Tamarindus indica leaves. Twelve Yankasa rams with average liveweight of 17.40kg were randomly allocated to three treatments of four replicates in a Randomized ...

  12. Overcrowding of accident & emergency units: is it a growing concern ...

    Overcrowding of accident & emergency units: is it a growing concern in Nigeria? ... of the Nigeria's Accident and Emergency Departments (AED) to meet current ... The data supporting perceptions of insufficient capacity are limited. ... better organized and diligent discharge planning, and reducing access block should be a ...

  13. Systems design methodology to develop chrysanthemum growing systems

    Blok, C.; Vermeulen, T.

    2012-01-01

    When chrysanthemum growers change soil for a soilless growing system they aim for labour cost reduction, quality and yield improvement and reduced emissions of nutrients. Because many attempts to come up with a viable soilless system failed, improvements and systemizations of the design process were

  14. Growing Sugarcane for Bioenergy – Effects on the Soil

    Hartemink, A.E.

    2010-01-01

    An increasing area of sugarcane is being growing for the production of bioenergy. Sugarcane puts a high demands on the soil due to the use of heavy machinery and because large amounts of nutrients are removed with the harvest. Biocides and inorganic fertilizers introduces risks of groundwater

  15. Assessment of the Growing Season Regime Region of Tanzania ...

    The growing period for most crops continues beyond the rainy season and, to a greater or lesser extent, crops often mature on moisture reserves stored in the soil profile. When the rains start early the season is likely to be· longer, however, early rainfall (November) over unimodal areas is variable (Mhita and Nassib, 1988).

  16. Temperature and humidity control in growing of greenhouse muskmelon

    Suzuki, Tetsuji; Nakamura, shin' ichi; Toda, Mikihiko; Ozawa, Akihito

    1986-12-25

    At the Shizuoka Agricultural Experiment Station, a control test of muskmelon was carried out wherein the controlled night temperature was automatically lowered by 2 or 4 /sup 0/C from the present temperature when the sunlight level was below the standard, and the humidity was controlled either individually or in combination with the temperature. Concerning the influence of temperature, no bad effect was observed in the constant early half of midnight temperature (18 /sup 0/C) section which was tested from the viewpoint of energy saving. For the test range of 22 - 18 /sup 0/C (winter growing) and 24 - 18 /sup 0/C (autumn growing), there was no significant difference on the fruit weight and shape;but the content of suger was found better in the complex modified temperature section of 22 - 18 /sup 0/C (winter growing) and 24 - 22 /sup 0/C (autumn growing). As for the humidity-added section, the fruit grew bigger, but the sugar content was significantly reduced. Optimal target value of control was estimated at 80 +-5 % daytime and 90 % night-time. (2 figs, 11 tabs, 10 refs

  17. Food security status among cocoa growing households in Ondo and ...

    Food security status among cocoa growing households in Ondo and Kwara states of ... A simple purposive random sampling technique was used to select 100 cocoa ... from the information were analysed with Descriptive Statistics, Food Security ... taken per day (p<0.05) would improve the food security status of households ...

  18. Genomic and proteomic analysis with dynamically growing self ...

    The system proposed here is a tree structure, a new hierarchical clustering algorithm called a dynamically growing self-organizing tree (DGSOT) algorithm, which overcomes drawbacks of traditional hierarchical clustering algorithms. The DGSOT algorithm combines horizontal and vertical growth to construct a mutlifurcating ...

  19. Growing Better Cities: Urban Agriculture for Sustainable Development

    As the cities grow, so does the number of urban poor. ... Case studies: ... It describes the growth of city networks in Africa and Latin America that focus on ... partners will showcase critical work on adaptation and resilience in hot spot regions.

  20. Positive Teacher Leadership: Building Mindsets and Capacities to Grow Wellbeing

    Cherkowski, Sabre

    2018-01-01

    Linking theory and research on positive psychology and positive organisational scholarship, with a focus on positive leadership, this article provides a conceptualisation of teacher leadership as an intentional reflective process of learning to grow wellbeing for self and others. Aligned with increasing international research on the importance of…

  1. Nursery growing of some apple varieties using different grafting ...

    This study was carried out at the Eğirdir Horticultural Research Institute, between the years 2006 and 2007. The aim of this study was to investigate the advantages of apple nursery growing greenhouse rather than outdoor medium. Scions of Red Chief (dwarf), Braeburn (semi dwarf) and Mondial Gala (vigorous) apple ...

  2. The Influence of seed treatments and growing media on seedling ...

    JOHN

    These are available in June-. September when other fruits are scarce, and people cherished eating the succulent seeds. As documented by Irvine (1990) the plant which is a perennial is also a climber requiring support of woody sticks to climb, grow and survive. The plant start flowering between 1.5 to 2 years after planting.

  3. Growing up with short stature : Psychosocial consequences of hormone treatment

    Visser-van Balen, J.

    2007-01-01

    Growing up with short stature. Psychosocial consequences of hormone treatment To enhance height in children with short stature, growth hormone (GH) can be used. In short children without a detectable pathology underlying their short stature, there is no medical rationale for growth hormone

  4. Freezing tolerance of wheat cultivars at the early growing season ...

    Cold stress is a worldwide abiotic stress in temperate regions that affects plant development and yield of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars and other winter crops. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of freezing stress at the early growing season on survival and also the relationship between resistances ...

  5. The growth performance of growing pigs during feed restriction and ...

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-19

    Jan 19, 2009 ... Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJB ... the best feed cost/kg gain values at restriction and re-alimentation. It is concluded that restricting growing pigs at 80% of the ad libitum intake of the control yields best performance and ... largely proved not to be very effective due to availability.

  6. Growing Disparities in Life Expectancy. Economic and Budget Issue Brief

    Manchester, Joyce; Topoleski, Julie

    2008-01-01

    In a continuation of long-term trends, life expectancy has been steadily increasing in the United States for the past several decades. Accompanying the recent increases, however, is a growing disparity in life expectancy between individuals with high and low income and between those with more and less education. The difference in life expectancy…

  7. Play School: Where Children and Families Learn and Grow Together

    McDermott, Lori Berger

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of national research confirms that significant levels of learning and growth occur during early childhood, and that it is important, from a public policy perspective, to increase access to quality programs and services that support the development of skills and attitudes children need to succeed. Clearly, no one-size-fits-all…

  8. Contact zoonosis related to aquaculture: a growing concern

    Aquaculture develops fast worldwide, with new cultured species and increased global transport of live aquaculture products. There is a growing recognition of zoonotic disease agents causing epidemics and carrier states in cultured fish and shellfish, especially from warm water systems, transmitted t...

  9. The suitability evaluation of lignocellulosic substrate as growing ...

    The use of peat moss (PM) as a growing media is decreasing due to high costs and environmental considerations. Therefore, diverse waste products are being used as organic amendments in certain soils before afforestation. The main objective of this work was to identify and evaluate possible substrate alternatives or ...

  10. America's Growing Dilemma: Pesticides in Food and Water.

    Strauss, Valerie; Sullivan, Monica, Ed.

    Public concern about the safety of continued reliance on pesticides in agricultural production is widespread and growing. The lack of understanding of how food is grown, the role of pesticides in food production, the risk assessment and regulatory processes and alternatives to pesticide use limits citizen participation in food safety debates and…

  11. Effect Of Different Protein Levels on The Performance Of Growing ...

    T4 was superior to other treatments in terms of feed to gain ratio, efficiency of feed utilization and reproductive performance. Snails in T1 with 10% CP failed to lay eggs and had the least developed reproductive system. A diet of 15-20% C. P is therefore recommended for growing snails. Key words: Protein levels, snails, ...

  12. 7 CFR 319.37-8 - Growing media.

    2010-01-01

    ... plants) established solely on tree fern slabs, coconut husks, coconut fiber, new clay pots, or new wooden...) Approved growing media are baked expanded clay pellets, coal cinder, coir, cork, glass wool, organic and... this section; (ii) Grown solely in a greenhouse in which sanitary procedures adequate to exclude plant...

  13. Antileishmanial activity of some plants growing in Algeria: Juglans ...

    The current study was undertaken to evaluate in vitro the antileishmanial activity of three plants growing wild in Algeria : Juglans regia, Lawsonia inermis and Salvia officinalis. The hydroalcoholic extracts of these plants were tested on the growth of the promastigotes of Leishmania major. The plant extract effects were ...

  14. I'm Positive: Growing Up with Self-Esteem.

    Kansas State Univ., Manhattan. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This document presents "I'm Positive: Growing Up With Self-Esteem," an informal, personal study course designed to strengthen the reader's ability to nurture self-esteem in children from birth through adolescence. Special emphasis is given to four parenting skills: acceptance, encouragement, empowerment, and love. Weekly activities are provided…

  15. Closed soilless growing systems in the Netherlands: the finishing touch

    Os, van E.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the latest developments in closed soilless growing systems in the Netherlands, where growers are obliged to invest in environmently friendly cropping systems, in order to comply with new legislation. Subjects of discussion will be the reasons for regulation, the

  16. Growing with EASE: Eating, Activity, and Self-Esteem

    Huettig, Carol; Rich, Shannon; Engelbrecht, Jo Ann; Sanborn, Charlotte; Essery, Eve; DiMarco, Nancy; Velez, Luisa; Levy, Luba

    2006-01-01

    A diverse group of professionals associated with Texas Woman's University's Institute for Women's Health, working collaboratively with school administrators, teachers, family support teams, and family members, developed Growing with EASE: Eating, Activity, and Self-Esteem, a nutrition program for young children and their families. In tracking the…

  17. Crop Growing Periods and Irrigation Needs in Bahia State North ...

    Markov chain probabilities of days with dry and wet soil were computed for each decade of the year. Soil moisture averages and probabilities were used to determine the optimum crop growing periods at the stations. The amounts of supplementary irrigation necessary to maintain the soil moisture above selected levels ...

  18. "Growing trees backwards": Description of a stand reconstruction model

    Jonathan D. Bakker; Andrew J. Sanchez Meador; Peter Z. Fule; David W. Huffman; Margaret M. Moore

    2008-01-01

    We describe an individual-tree model that uses contemporary measurements to "grow trees backward" and reconstruct past tree diameters and stand structure in ponderosa pine dominated stands of the Southwest. Model inputs are contemporary structural measurements of all snags, logs, stumps, and living trees, and radial growth measurements, if available. Key...

  19. Helping Educators Grow: Strategies and Practices for Leadership Development

    Drago-Severson, Eleanor

    2012-01-01

    How can we prepare practicing and aspiring education leaders for the complex, adaptive challenges they face? In "Helping Educators Grow," Eleanor Drago-Severson presents a new approach to leadership development. Too often, she argues, we teach leadership development the same way we teach world history: just the facts. Instead, we need to…

  20. South-South Collaboration in Health Biotechnology: Growing ...

    2012-01-01

    Jan 1, 2012 ... South-South Collaboration in Health Biotechnology: Growing Partnerships amongst Developing ... the availability of more affordable health products and services. ... of Health Research, New Principal Investigator Award (2007-2012). ... water management: Innovative solutions from the Global South”.

  1. Sugar as an energy source for growing ducklings | Olver | South ...

    South African Journal of Animal Science. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 19, No 2 (1989) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Sugar as an energy source for growing ducklings.

  2. Math and Science Gateways to California's Fastest Growing Careers

    EdSource, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Some students--and parents--think math and science are not too important for their future. As everyday life becomes more dependent on technology, most people will need a better background in math and science to succeed in today's global economy. To get high-paying jobs in some of California's fastest-growing occupations, a strong background in…

  3. Possibility of Predicting Serotonin Transporter Occupancy From the In Vitro Inhibition Constant for Serotonin Transporter, the Clinically Relevant Plasma Concentration of Unbound Drugs, and Their Profiles for Substrates of Transporters.

    Yahata, Masahiro; Chiba, Koji; Watanabe, Takao; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2017-09-01

    Accurate prediction of target occupancy facilitates central nervous system drug development. In this review, we discuss the predictability of serotonin transporter (SERT) occupancy in human brain estimated from in vitro K i values for human SERT and plasma concentrations of unbound drug (C u,plasma ), as well as the impact of drug transporters in the blood-brain barrier. First, the geometric means of in vitro K i values were compared with the means of in vivo K i values (K i,u,plasma ) which were calculated as C u,plasma values at 50% occupancy of SERT obtained from previous clinical positron emission tomography/single photon emission computed tomography imaging studies for 6 selective serotonin transporter reuptake inhibitors and 3 serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. The in vitro K i values for 7 drugs were comparable to their in vivo K i,u,plasma values within 3-fold difference. SERT occupancy was overestimated for 5 drugs (P-glycoprotein substrates) and underestimated for 2 drugs (presumably uptake transporter substrates, although no evidence exists as yet). In conclusion, prediction of human SERT occupancy from in vitro K i values and C u,plasma was successful for drugs that are not transporter substrates and will become possible in future even for transporter substrates, once the transporter activities will be accurately estimated from in vitro experiments. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Antibiotic inclusion in the diet did not alter the standardized ileal digestible tryptophan to lysine ratio for growing pigs

    Two 21-d experiments were conducted to determine the optimum standard ileal digestible (SID) Trp:Lys ratio in growing pigs fed diets supplemented with or without an antibiotic. The primary response variables in both experiments were ADG, ADFI, G:F and plasma urea N (PUN) concentrations with the opti...

  5. Cell physiology of plants growing in cold environments.

    Lütz, Cornelius

    2010-08-01

    The life of plants growing in cold extreme environments has been well investigated in terms of morphological, anatomical, and ecophysiological adaptations. In contrast, long-term cellular or metabolic studies have been performed by only a few groups. Moreover, a number of single reports exist, which often represent just a glimpse of plant behavior. The review draws together the literature which has focused on tissue and cellular adaptations mainly to low temperatures and high light. Most studies have been done with European alpine plants; comparably well studied are only two phanerogams found in the coastal Antarctic. Plant adaptation in northern polar regions has always been of interest in terms of ecophysiology and plant propagation, but nowadays, this interest extends to the effects of global warming. More recently, metabolic and cellular investigations have included cold and UV resistance mechanisms. Low-temperature stress resistance in plants from cold environments reflects the climate conditions at the growth sites. It is now a matter of molecular analyses to find the induced genes and their products such as chaperones or dehydrins responsible for this resistance. Development of plants under snow or pollen tube growth at 0 degrees C shows that cell biology is needed to explain the stability and function of the cytoskeleton. Many results in this field are based on laboratory studies, but several publications show that it is not difficult to study cellular mechanisms with the plants adapted to a natural stress. Studies on high light and UV loads may be split in two parts. Many reports describe natural UV as harmful for the plants, but these studies were mainly conducted by shielding off natural UV (as controls). Other experiments apply additional UV in the field and have had practically no negative impact on metabolism. The latter group is supported by the observations that green overwintering plants increase their flavonoids under snow even in the absence of

  6. Comparison of hydrogen-production capability of four different Enterobacteriaceae strains under growing and non-growing conditions

    Seol, Eunhee; Kim, Seohyoung; Raj, S. Mohan; Park, Sunghoon [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea)

    2008-10-15

    Non-growing cells can function as whole-cell biocatalysts for hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production, a process that has recently drawn much attention. In order to evaluate their potential as whole-cell biocatalysts, we compared the H{sub 2}-production capability of four Enterobacteriaceae strains (Citrobacter amalonaticus Y19, Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655, Escherichia coli DJT135, and Enterobacter aerogenes) under growing and non-growing conditions. We evaluated their H{sub 2}-production activity at varying temperatures (25-45 C) and pH conditions (6.0-8.0) using glucose or formate as the carbon source. Under growing conditions with 10 mM glucose as a substrate, E. aerogenes exhibited the highest H{sub 2}-production activity (17.0 {+-} 0.2 {mu}mol H{sub 2} mg cell{sup -1} h{sup -1}) among the four strains, but the final H{sub 2} yield was similar (1.7-1.8 mol H{sub 2} mol{sup -1} glucose) in all four strains. H{sub 2} production in the four strains proceeded through a formate-dependent pathway that involved the formate hydrogen lyase (FHL) complex. Under non-growing conditions with 20 mM formate as a substrate, we obtained high H{sub 2}-production activities, in the range of 95.5-195.2 {mu}mol H{sub 2} mg cell{sup -1} h{sup -1}, with E. coli DJT135 exhibiting the highest activity (195.2 {mu}mol H{sub 2} mg{sup -1} h{sup -1}) at pH 6.0 and 45 C. In contrast, using glucose as the carbon substrate in non-growing cell experiments greatly reduced the H{sub 2}-production activity to 6.1-7.7 {mu}mol H{sub 2} mg cell{sup -1} h{sup -1}. This study indicated that formate is a better substrate than glucose for H{sub 2} production by non-growing cells, and that the H{sub 2}-production performance among the strains did not vary significantly, with the exception of E. coli K-12 MG1655. (author)

  7. Response of Saw Palmetto to Three Herbicides During the First Growing Season

    J.L. Michael

    1980-01-01

    Trimec 881 and 823 (mixture of 2,4-D; MCPP and dicamba in 2:1:0.l and 1:1:0.25 ratio respectively) and trichlopyr ester were evaluated for effectiveness against saw palmetto, Serenoa repens (Bartram) Small, when they were applied at three rates in April, June, and August. Herbicides were most effective with April applicatiorr, least effective in...

  8. Metabolic and hormonal responses of growing modern meat type chickens to fasting

    The present study compared the effects of fasting on circulating concentrations of glucose, insulin and glucagon in male and female modern meat-type chickens (Ross 708) at three ages (19 d, 33 d and 47 d). Plasma concentrations of glucose were reduced by fasting with reductions of 24.9% (19-d-old),...

  9. Crop Breeding for Low Input Agriculture: A Sustainable Response to Feed a Growing World Population

    Vagner A. Benedito

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available World population is projected to reach its maximum (~10 billion people by the year 2050. This 45% increase of the current world population (approaching seven billion people will boost the demand for food and raw materials. However, we live in a historical moment when supply of phosphate, water, and oil are at their peaks. Modern agriculture is fundamentally based on varieties bred for high performance under high input systems (fertilizers, water, oil, pesticides, which generally do not perform well under low-input situations. We propose a shift of research goals and plant breeding objectives from high-performance agriculture at high-energy input to those with an improved rationalization between yield and energy input. Crop breeding programs that are more focused on nutrient economy and local environmental fitness will help reduce energy demands for crop production while still providing adequate amounts of high quality food as global resources decline and population is projected to increase.

  10. When growing tall is not an option : contrasting shade avoidance responses in two wild Geranium species

    Gommers, C.M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Plants can deal with shade in different ways. Sun-adapted species express a set of growth traits to reach for light; the so-called shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). However, shade-tolerant species from the forest understory are not able to outgrow surrounding trees and adopt a tolerance strategy

  11. Responses to Growing Unemployment and Mismatch between Skills and Job Openings in EU Member States

    Andersen, Søren Kaj

    Kina tager i disse år en række skridt for at etablere og udbygge beskæftigelsespolitiske tiltag. Det drejer sig bl.a. om at hæve niveauet for den eksisterende arbejdsløshedsunderstøttelse samt at udbygge understøttelsesordningerne, så langt større grupper bliver omfattet af dem. Udfordringerne he...

  12. Libraries and the Changing Face of Academia. Responses to Growing Multicultural Populations.

    Martin, Rebecca R.

    The impact of a changing college-student population on educational programs and services is being felt throughout American higher-education circles. This book provides an overview for librarians and educators of multicultural issues in higher education and existing library programs that is related to multicultural and international students. The…

  13. The Growing Acknowledgement of Wrongful Conviction – The Australian Response Within an International Context

    Lynne Weathered

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The wrongful conviction of innocent people is being acknowledged in an increasing number of countries around the world. The problem of wrongful conviction is now framed as an international human rights issue. More attention is being given to whether criminal justice systems are providing sufficient measures for the effective review and rectification of wrongful convictions and whether international obligations in that regard are being met. England, Wales, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Norway, Canada and the United States have substantial new mechanisms in place to better identify and correct wrongful convictions but Australia has been slower to respond. While some Australian states have introduced reforms such as DNA innocence testing and a new appeal avenue, many issues remain as highlighted in recent debates as to whether Australia should establish a Criminal Cases Review Commission.

  14. Slow-release carbohydrates: growing evidence on metabolic responses and public health interest

    Vinoy, S.; Laville, M.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    To draw attention to the necessity of considering differences in the digestibility of carbohydrates, and more specifically of starch, a symposium was held at the 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS), which took place in Berlin from October 20 to 23, 2015. The purpose of this session was to

  15. Crack Tip Parameters for Growing Cracks in Linear Viscoelastic Materials

    Brincker, Rune

    In this paper the problem of describing the asymptotic fields around a slowly growing crack in a linearly viscoelastic material is considered. It is shown that for plane mixed mode problems the asymptotic fields must be described by 6 parameters: 2 stress intensity factors and 4 deformation...... intensity factors. In the special case of a constant Poisson ratio only 2 deformation intensity factors are needed. Closed form solutions are given both for a slowly growing crack and for a crack that is suddenly arrested at a point at the crack extension path. Two examples are studied; a stress boundary...... value problem, and a displacement boundary value problem. The results show that the stress intensity factors and the displacement intensity factors do not depend explicitly upon the velocity of the crack tip....

  16. SAR Imagery Segmentation by Statistical Region Growing and Hierarchical Merging

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Carvalho, E.A.; Medeiros, F.N.S.; Martins, C.I.O.; Marques, R.C.P.; Oliveira, I.N.S.

    2010-05-22

    This paper presents an approach to accomplish synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image segmentation, which are corrupted by speckle noise. Some ordinary segmentation techniques may require speckle filtering previously. Our approach performs radar image segmentation using the original noisy pixels as input data, eliminating preprocessing steps, an advantage over most of the current methods. The algorithm comprises a statistical region growing procedure combined with hierarchical region merging to extract regions of interest from SAR images. The region growing step over-segments the input image to enable region aggregation by employing a combination of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test with a hierarchical stepwise optimization (HSWO) algorithm for the process coordination. We have tested and assessed the proposed technique on artificially speckled image and real SAR data containing different types of targets.

  17. Natural ingredients for darker skin types: growing options for hyperpigmentation.

    Alexis, Andrew F; Blackcloud, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Dyschromia is one of the most common dermatological concerns in patients with darker skin.1 Disorders of hyperpigmentation, including postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, melasma, solar lentigines, and miscellaneous causes of facial hyperpigmentation, are the most frequently treated dyschromias and can have a considerable psychosocial impact. Given the high prevalence of hyperpigmentation and the considerable demand for an even complexion, newer treatment options for hyperpigmentation are of growing interest among consumers, manufacturers, and dermatologists. Blinded, controlled studies demonstrating skin lightening effects in soy, niacinamide, n-acetylglucosamine, licorice extract, arbutin, vitamin c, kojic acid, emblica extract, lignin peroxidase, and glutathione have led to the development of a growing list of non-prescription skin care products that can be incorporated (mostly as adjuncts) in the management of hyperpigmentation.

  18. Sperm length evolution in the fungus-growing ants

    Baer, B.; Dijkstra, M. B.; Mueller, U. G.

    2009-01-01

    -growing ants, representing 9 of the 12 recognized genera, and mapped these onto the ant phylogeny. We show that average sperm length across species is highly variable and decreases with mature colony size in basal genera with singly mated queens, suggesting that sperm production or storage constraints affect...... the evolution of sperm length. Sperm length does not decrease further in multiply mating leaf-cutting ants, despite substantial further increases in colony size. In a combined analysis, sexual dimorphism explained 63.1% of the variance in sperm length between species. As colony size was not a significant...... predictor in this analysis, we conclude that sperm production trade-offs in males have been the major selective force affecting sperm length across the fungus-growing ants, rather than storage constraints in females. The relationship between sperm length and sexual dimorphism remained robust...

  19. MELNIK VINE-GROWING REGION – HISTORY AND TRADITIONS

    Radoslava Ganeva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The region of Melnik (Southwest Bulgaria has exclusively appropriate climate for wine growing. Its borders are defined by the dissemination of the wide Melnik grape vine, revealed by experts as an old local variety. Few are the wine-growing centers that carry such an effective ampelographic tradition. A few are the viticulture centers, bearing such effective tradition. The vine is grown here from the Thracian antiquity and is the basis for a livelihood, preserved and retransmitted for many generations. It is characterized by a specialization in the production and marketing of high quality red dry wines. The article deals with the development of the Melnik vineyard as a result of different political and economic conditions in the course of historical development. Various archival materials, specialized studies and personal fieldwork research have been used.

  20. Nanoscale interfacial defect shedding in a growing nematic droplet.

    Gurevich, Sebastian; Provatas, Nikolas; Rey, Alejandro

    2017-08-01

    Interfacial defect shedding is the most recent known mechanism for defect formation in a thermally driven isotropic-to-nematic phase transition. It manifests in nematic-isotropic interfaces going through an anchoring switch. Numerical computations in planar geometry established that a growing nematic droplet can undergo interfacial defect shedding, nucleating interfacial defect structures that shed into the bulk as +1/2 point defects. By extending the study of interfacial defect shedding in a growing nematic droplet to larger length and time scales, and to three dimensions, we unveil an oscillatory growth mode involving shape and anchoring transitions that results in a controllable regular distributions of point defects in planar geometry, and complex structures of disclination lines in three dimensions.

  1. Circumferential buckling instability of a growing cylindrical tube

    Moulton, D.E.

    2011-03-01

    A cylindrical elastic tube under uniform radial external pressure will buckle circumferentially to a non-circular cross-section at a critical pressure. The buckling represents an instability of the inner or outer edge of the tube. This is a common phenomenon in biological tissues, where it is referred to as mucosal folding. Here, we investigate this buckling instability in a growing elastic tube. A change in thickness due to growth can have a dramatic impact on circumferential buckling, both in the critical pressure and the buckling pattern. We consider both single- and bi-layer tubes and multiple boundary conditions. We highlight the competition between geometric effects, i.e. the change in tube dimensions, and mechanical effects, i.e. the effect of residual stress, due to differential growth. This competition can lead to non-intuitive results, such as a tube growing to be thinner and yet buckle at a higher pressure. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Onsite greywater treatment using pilot scale grow technology

    Rajput, M.U.

    2015-01-01

    The GROW Technology for greywater treatment was installed at the MUET (Mehran University of Engineering and Technology), hostel and run under continuous flow conditions with hydraulic loading rate of 0.15m.d-1. The monitoring and analysis of influent and effluent water were carried out during January-December, 2010. Local plants species such as water hyacinth, Pennywort (duck weed), Mint and Cattail were used in the GROW rig as a mixed mode. Coarse Gravels were filled in the troughs as a medium. The collected samples were analyzed for BOD5 (Biochemical Oxygen Demand), COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand), TSS (Total Suspended Solids), pH, and DO (Dissolved Oxygen). Removal efficiencies of BOD5, COD and TSS were calculated as 83.0,69.0 and 84.0% respectively. DO was found increased from 0.6-3.5 mg.dm-3 while pH was observed between 6.5-7.8. (author)

  3. Growing quasi-modes in dynamics of supersonic collapse

    Malkin, V.M.; Khudik, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    The hypothesis of globally stable self-similar regimes existence for supersonic Langmuir collapse plays a significant role in the attempts to construct a theory of strong Langmuir turbulence. A possibility for destruction of the stable against infinitely small perturbations self-similar regime of supersonic collapse by growing quasi-modes is demonstrated via the numerical solution of Cauchi problem for Zakharov equations. The quantitative criterion for the destruction of self-similar regimes is formulated. 9 refs.; 5 figs

  4. Civil conflict sensitivity to growing-season drought

    von Uexkull, Nina; Croicu, Mihai; Fjelde, Hanne; Buhaug, Halvard

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the conflict potential of drought is critical for dealing effectively with the societal implications of climate change. Using new georeferenced ethnicity and conflict data for Asia and Africa since 1989, we present an actor-oriented analysis of growing-season drought and conflict involvement among ethnic groups. Results from naive models common in previous research suggest that drought generally has little impact. However, context-sensitive models accounting for the groups’ leve...

  5. QUALITY PREMIUMS FOR AUSTRALIAN WHEAT IN THE GROWING ASIAN MARKETS

    Ahmadi-Esfahani, Fredoun Z.; Stanmore, Roland G.

    1994-01-01

    An hedonic price function is applied to Australia's wheat exports to the growing Asian markets. The values for the quality characteristics in the wheat markets of Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand are estimated. The data base for the study is from the Australian Wheat Board shipments over the period 1984 to 1991. The sample is divided into two separate time periods to test the consistency in demand for export wheat and to trace recent trends in quality premiums. The im...

  6. SCIENTIFIC SUPPORT OF VEGETABLE, MELON, AND POTATO GROWING IN RUSSIA

    I. V. Savchenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The summary report of research investigations of the institutes of the Russian Academy of Agricultural Science, the Russian Academy of Science, and the Institutions of Higher Education in 2013 on the project «Development of new varieties and high-precision sustainable zonal technologies of vegetable and cucurbits crops growing with the use of new varieties and hybrids, high'quality seeds, advanced approaches of agro-techniques, plant protection, and mechanical equipments» is represented.

  7. How Cloud Computing can help SMEs to grow faster?

    Hasan, Ahmed Anwar

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, Cloud computing has successfully created hype and lots of people think that cloud computing might be the next big thing. The cloud platform is growing rapidly and lots of cloud service provider companies are coming up with huge number of innovative ideas where they are addressing specific needs of different organisations. The cloud computing is based on a service model architecture which is highly customisable and can fit into a specific or unique business process. Cloud comp...

  8. From Kennedy, to Beyond: Growing Plants in Space

    Flemming, Cedric, II; Seck, Sokhana A.; Massa, Gioia D.; Hummerick, Mary E.; Wheeler, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Astronauts cannot have their cake and eat it too, but what about growing a salad and eating it? As NASA continues to push the envelope on Space exploration and inhabitance the need for a fresh food source becomes more vital. The Life Support team at NASA is using a system developed by ORBITEC the VEGGIE, in which astronauts aboard the ISS, and potentially the Moon and Mars, will be capable of growing food. The introduction of plants not only gives astronauts a means of independently supplying food, but also recreation, oxygen replenishment and psychological benefits. The plants were grown in "pillows", the system used for growing plants within the VEGGIE. This test included 4 types of media mixtures that are composed of a clay based media called Arcilite and Fafard #2, which is a peat moss-based media ( <1 mm Arcilite, 1-2 mm of Arcilite, 1:1 <1 mm & 1-2 mm mixture and 1:1 Arcilite & Fafard mixture). Currently, 3 lettuce cultivars are being grown in 4 mixtures of media. Tests were being conducted to see which form of media has the ratio of best growth and least amount of microbes that are harmful. That is essential because a person's body becomes more susceptible to illness when they leave Earth. As a result, test must be conducted on the "pillow" system to assess the levels of microbial activity. The cultivars were tested at different stages during their growing process for microbes. Datum show that the mix of Fafard and Arcilite had the best growth, but also the most microbes. This was due to the fact that Fafard is an organic substance so it contains material necessary for microbes to live. Data suggest that the <1 mm Arcilite has an acceptable amount of growth and a lower level of microbes, because it is non-organic.

  9. Scattering of light at the growing solid-melt interface

    Gontijo, I.

    1987-12-01

    The scattering of light at the growing solid-melt interface of biphenyl and naphthalene was studied using the Photon Correlation Spectroscopy technique. The origin of this light scattering remained without a satisfactory explanation since its discovery at the ice-water interface in 1978. Recently, a model based on the segregation of gaseous impurities at the interface and subsequent precipitation of microbubbles was proposed to explain this phenomenon. We report here the first experimental results that confirm the microbbubles hypothesis. (author)

  10. Phishing - A Growing Threat to E-Commerce

    Banday, M. Tariq; Qadri, Jameel A.

    2011-01-01

    In today's business environment, it is difficult to imagine a workplace without access to the web, yet a variety of email born viruses, spyware, adware, Trojan horses, phishing attacks, directory harvest attacks, DoS attacks, and other threats combine to attack businesses and customers. This paper is an attempt to review phishing - a constantly growing and evolving threat to Internet based commercial transactions. Various phishing approaches that include vishing, spear phishng, pharming, keyl...

  11. Czochralski method of growing single crystals. State-of-art

    Bukowski, A.; Zabierowski, P.

    1999-01-01

    Modern Czochralski method of single crystal growing has been described. The example of Czochralski process is given. The advantages that caused the rapid progress of the method have been presented. The method limitations that motivated the further research and new solutions are also presented. As the example two different ways of the technique development has been described: silicon single crystals growth in the magnetic field; continuous liquid feed of silicon crystals growth. (author)

  12. Bactericidal effects of antibiotics on slowly growing and nongrowing bacteria.

    Eng, R H; Padberg, F T; Smith, S M; Tan, E N; Cherubin, C E

    1991-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents are most often tested against bacteria in the log phase of multiplication to produce the maximum bactericidal effect. In an infection, bacteria may multiply less optimally. We examined the effects of several classes of antimicrobial agents to determine their actions on gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria during nongrowing and slowly growing phases. Only ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin exhibited bactericidal activity against nongrowing gram-negative bacteria, and no antib...

  13. Effects of alfalfa meal on the intestinal microbial diversity and immunity of growing ducks.

    Jiang, J F; Song, X M; Wu, J L; Jiang, Y Q

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of alfalfa meal diets on the intestinal microbial diversity and immunity of growing egg-type ducks. A total of 128 healthy 7-week-old female egg-type Shaoxing ducks were selected and randomly assigned into four dietary treatments: 0%, 3%, 6% and 9% alfalfa meal for 8 weeks. Each treatment consisted of four replicates of eight ducks each. Polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was used to characterize the microbiota. The results showed that the DGGE fingerprints of the V6-V8 fragments of the 16S rRNA from the caeca and faeces of ducks fed 3%, 6% and 9% alfalfa meal had significantly higher microbiota species richness than those fed 0% alfalfa meal (p ducks fed 3%, 6% and 9% alfalfa meal was significantly higher than those fed 0% alfalfa meal (p 0.05), and the 3-9% alfalfa meal did not affect the growth performance of the growing egg-type ducks. The proliferation of T and B lymphocytes was significantly greater (p ducks. Dietary alfalfa meal supplementation increases intestinal microbial community diversity and improves of the immune response growing egg-type ducks. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Macleaya cordata Extract Decreased Diarrhea Score and Enhanced Intestinal Barrier Function in Growing Piglets

    Gang Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Macleaya cordata extract is of great scientific and practical interest to researchers, due to its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory responses within experimental animals. This study was designed to determine the diarrhea score and innate immunity of growing piglets after they had received Macleaya cordata extract supplements. A total of 240 growing pigs were randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatments, with 8 replicates per treatment and 10 piglets per replicate. All pigs received a basal diet containing similar amounts of nutrients. The three treatments were a control (no additive, an antibiotic (200 mg/kg colistin, and the Macleaya cordata extract supplement group (40 mg/kg Macleaya cordata extract. The diarrhea score was calculated after D 28. The jejunal samples were obtained from five piglets selected randomly from each treatment on D 28. In comparison with the control group, the dietary Macleaya cordata extract and colistin group demonstrated a substantially decreased diarrhea score. The introduction of Macleaya cordata extract supplements to the diet significantly increased volumes of ZO-1 and claudin-1, particularly in comparison with the pigs in the control group (P<0.05. The findings indicate that Macleaya cordata extract does enhance intestinal barrier function in growing piglets and that it could be used as a viable substitute for antibiotics.

  15. Hazard Monitoring of Growing Lava Flow Fields Using Seismic Tremor

    Eibl, E. P. S.; Bean, C. J.; Jónsdottir, I.; Hoskuldsson, A.; Thordarson, T.; Coppola, D.; Witt, T.; Walter, T. R.

    2017-12-01

    An effusive eruption in 2014/15 created a 85 km2 large lava flow field in a remote location in the Icelandic highlands. The lava flows did not threaten any settlements or paved roads but they were nevertheless interdisciplinarily monitored in detail. Images from satellites and aircraft, ground based video monitoring, GPS and seismic recordings allowed the monitoring and reconstruction of a detailed time series of the growing lava flow field. While the use of satellite images and probabilistic modelling of lava flows are quite common tools to monitor the current and forecast the future growth direction, here we show that seismic recordings can be of use too. We installed a cluster of seismometers at 15 km from the vents and recorded the ground vibrations associated with the eruption. This seismic tremor was not only generated below the vents, but also at the edges of the growing lava flow field and indicated the parts of the lava flow field that were most actively growing. Whilst the time resolution is in the range of days for satellites, seismic stations easily sample continuously at 100 Hz and could therefore provide a much better resolution and estimate of the lava flow hazard in real-time.

  16. Effect of Cobalt Supplementation on Performance of growing Calves

    V.Nagabhushana

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to study the effect of critical supplementation of wheat straw with cobalt on fibre utilization and nutrient utilization in growing cross-bred male calves. Twenty-one crossbred (HF X Local male growing calves of 3-4 months age were fed with wheat straw based diet consisting without (Co0 and with 1 (Co1 and 6 (Co6 ppm cobalt as cobaltous chloride. There was no significant difference in intake of wheat straw, concentrate and DMI between the three groups and the ratio between concentrate and wheat straw was maintained at 40:60 irrespective of dietary level of cobalt. Similarly, average cumulative body weight, net gain in body weight or feed efficiency did not differ significantly between treatments. No significant effect was observed on the digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, ether extract and fibre constituents like NDF, ADF, hemicellulose or cellulose by supplementation of 1 and 6 ppm Co to the diet of growing calves. Balance of nutrients such as Nitrogen, Calcium and Phosphorus was similar and positive in all the treatment groups. TDN and DCP values of the experimental diets remained almost similar irrespective of dietary level of cobalt. [Veterinary World 2008; 1(10.000: 299-302

  17. Biorock Electric Reefs Grow Back Severely Eroded Beaches in Months

    Thomas J. F. Goreau

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Severely eroded beaches on low lying islands in Indonesia were grown back in a few months—believed to be a record—using an innovative method of shore protection, Biorock electric reef technology. Biorock shore protection reefs are growing limestone structures that get stronger with age and repair themselves, are cheaper than concrete or rock sea walls and breakwaters, and are much more effective at shore protection and beach growth. Biorock reefs are permeable, porous, growing, self-repairing structures of any size or shape, which dissipate wave energy by internal refraction, diffraction, and frictional dissipation. They do not cause reflection of waves like hard sea walls and breakwaters, which erodes the sand in front of, and then underneath, such structures, until they collapse. Biorock reefs stimulate settlement, growth, survival, and resistance to the environmental stress of all forms of marine life, restoring coral reefs, sea grasses, biological sand production, and fisheries habitat. Biorock reefs can grow back eroded beaches and islands faster than the rate of sea level rise, and are the most cost-effective method of shore protection and adaptation to global sea level rise for low lying islands and coasts.

  18. Abscisic Acid Accumulates at Positive Turgor Potential in Excised Soybean Seedling Growing Zones 1

    Creelman, Robert A.; Mullet, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) accumulated in soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Williams) hypocotyl elongating regions when seedlings were transferred to low water potential vermiculite (Ψ = −0.3 megapascals) even though positive turgor is retained in this tissue. Accumulation of ABA in growing zones could occur from de novo biosynthesis within this tissue or transport from adjacent nongrowing zones. Both growing and nongrowing hypocotyl and root tissues accumulated significant levels of ABA when excised and dehydrated to reduce turgor. Surprisingly, excised growing zones (which experienced no water loss) also accumulated ABA when incubated in darkness for 4 hours at 100% relative humidity and 29°C. Induction of ABA accumulation in the excised elongating region of the hypocotyl was not caused by disruption of root pressure or wounding. While excision of hypocotyl elongating regions induced ABA accumulation, no change in either extensin or p33 mRNA levels was observed. Accumulation of extensin or p33 mRNA required more severe wounding. This suggests that ABA is not involved in the response of these genes in wounded tissue and that wound signals are not causing ABA accumulation in excised tissue. Accumulation of ABA in excised elongating regions was correlated with growth inhibition and a decline in turgor to the yield threshold (Ψ;p = 0.37 megapascals; R Matyssek, S Maruyama, JS Boyer [1988] Plant Physiol 86: 1163-1167). Inhibiting hypocotyl growth by transferring seedlings to lower temperatures or light did not cause ABA accumulation. We conclude that induction of ABA accumulation in growing zones is more sensitive to changes in turgor than the induction which occurs in mature tissues. Images Figure 2 PMID:16668113

  19. Abscisic Acid accumulates at positive turgor potential in excised soybean seedling growing zones.

    Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E

    1991-04-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) accumulated in soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Williams) hypocotyl elongating regions when seedlings were transferred to low water potential vermiculite (Psi = -0.3 megapascals) even though positive turgor is retained in this tissue. Accumulation of ABA in growing zones could occur from de novo biosynthesis within this tissue or transport from adjacent nongrowing zones. Both growing and nongrowing hypocotyl and root tissues accumulated significant levels of ABA when excised and dehydrated to reduce turgor. Surprisingly, excised growing zones (which experienced no water loss) also accumulated ABA when incubated in darkness for 4 hours at 100% relative humidity and 29 degrees C. Induction of ABA accumulation in the excised elongating region of the hypocotyl was not caused by disruption of root pressure or wounding. While excision of hypocotyl elongating regions induced ABA accumulation, no change in either extensin or p33 mRNA levels was observed. Accumulation of extensin or p33 mRNA required more severe wounding. This suggests that ABA is not involved in the response of these genes in wounded tissue and that wound signals are not causing ABA accumulation in excised tissue. Accumulation of ABA in excised elongating regions was correlated with growth inhibition and a decline in turgor to the yield threshold (Psi;(p) = 0.37 megapascals; R Matyssek, S Maruyama, JS Boyer [1988] Plant Physiol 86: 1163-1167). Inhibiting hypocotyl growth by transferring seedlings to lower temperatures or light did not cause ABA accumulation. We conclude that induction of ABA accumulation in growing zones is more sensitive to changes in turgor than the induction which occurs in mature tissues.

  20. Utilization of unbound aggregates for road construction

    Fladvad, Marit

    2017-01-01

    Crushed rock aggregate is a non-renewable resource of great interest in road construction and other branches of the construction industry. To prevent resource scarcity, utilization of aggregates should be considered carefully. © 2016 Norsk Bergforening