WorldWideScience

Sample records for response ddr signaling

  1. Novel cross-talk between IGF-IR and DDR1 regulates IGF-IR trafficking, signaling and biological responses

    Sacco, Antonella; Morcavallo, Alaide; Vella, Veronica; Voci, Concetta; Spatuzza, Michela; Xu, Shi-Qiong; Iozzo, Renato V.; Vigneri, Riccardo; Morrione, Andrea; Belfiore, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR), plays a key role in regulating mammalian development and growth, and is frequently deregulated in cancer contributing to tumor initiation and progression. Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen receptor tyrosine-kinase, is as well frequently overexpressed in cancer and implicated in cancer progression. Thus, we investigated whether a functional cross-talk between the IGF-IR and DDR1 exists and plays any role in cancer progression. Using human breast cancer cells we found that DDR1 constitutively associated with the IGF-IR. However, this interaction was enhanced by IGF-I stimulation, which promoted rapid DDR1 tyrosine-phosphorylation and co-internalization with the IGF-IR. Significantly, DDR1 was critical for IGF-IR endocytosis and trafficking into early endosomes, IGF-IR protein expression and IGF-I intracellular signaling and biological effects, including cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. These biological responses were inhibited by DDR1 silencing and enhanced by DDR1 overexpression. Experiments in mouse fibroblasts co-transfected with the human IGF-IR and DDR1 gave similar results and indicated that, in the absence of IGF-IR, collagen-dependent phosphorylation of DDR1 is impaired. These results demonstrate a critical role of DDR1 in the regulation of IGF-IR action, and identify DDR1 as a novel important target for breast cancers that overexpress IGF-IR. PMID:25840417

  2. Large-signal characterization of DDR silicon IMPATTs operating in millimeter-wave and terahertz regime

    Acharyya, Aritra; Banerjee, J. P.; Chakraborty, Jit; Das, Kausik; Datta, Subir; De, Pritam; Banerjee, Suranjana

    2013-01-01

    The authors have carried out the large-signal characterization of silicon-based double-drift region (DDR) impact avalanche transit time (IMPATT) devices designed to operate up to 0.5 THz using a large-signal simulation method developed by the authors based on non-sinusoidal voltage excitation. The effect of band-to-band tunneling as well as parasitic series resistance on the large-signal properties of DDR Si IMPATTs have also been studied at different mm-wave and THz frequencies. Large-signal simulation results show that DDR Si IMPATT is capable of delivering peak RF power of 633.69 mW with 7.95% conversion efficiency at 94 GHz for 50% voltage modulation, whereas peak RF power output and efficiency fall to 81.08 mW and 2.01% respectively at 0.5 THz for same voltage modulation. The simulation results are compared with the experimental results and are found to be in close agreement. (semiconductor devices)

  3. Lovastatin prevents cisplatin-induced activation of pro-apoptotic DNA damage response (DDR) of renal tubular epithelial cells

    Krüger, Katharina; Ziegler, Verena; Hartmann, Christina; Henninger, Christian [Institute of Toxicology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Thomale, Jürgen [Institute of Cell Biology, University Duisburg-Essen, 45122 Essen (Germany); Schupp, Nicole [Institute of Toxicology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Fritz, Gerhard, E-mail: fritz@uni-duesseldorf.de [Institute of Toxicology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    The platinating agent cisplatin (CisPt) is commonly used in the therapy of various types of solid tumors. The anticancer efficacy of CisPt largely depends on the formation of bivalent DNA intrastrand crosslinks, which stimulate mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR), thereby triggering checkpoint activation, gene expression and cell death. The clinically most relevant adverse effect associated with CisPt treatment is nephrotoxicity that results from damage to renal tubular epithelial cells. Here, we addressed the question whether the HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitor lovastatin affects the DDR of renal cells by employing rat renal proximal tubular epithelial (NRK-52E) cells as in vitro model. The data show that lovastatin has extensive inhibitory effects on CisPt-stimulated DDR of NRK-52E cells as reflected on the levels of phosphorylated ATM, Chk1, Chk2, p53 and Kap1. Mitigation of CisPt-induced DDR by lovastatin was independent of the formation of DNA damage as demonstrated by (i) the analysis of Pt-(GpG) intrastrand crosslink formation by Southwestern blot analyses and (ii) the generation of DNA strand breaks as analyzed on the level of nuclear γH2AX foci and employing the alkaline comet assay. Lovastatin protected NRK-52E cells from the cytotoxicity of high CisPt doses as shown by measuring cell viability, cellular impedance and flow cytometry-based analyses of cell death. Importantly, the statin also reduced the level of kidney DNA damage and apoptosis triggered by CisPt treatment of mice. The data show that the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin extensively counteracts pro-apoptotic signal mechanisms of the DDR of tubular epithelial cells following CisPt injury. - Highlights: • Lovastatin blocks ATM/ATR-regulated DDR of tubular cells following CisPt treatment. • Lovastatin attenuates CisPt-induced activation of protein kinase ATM in vitro. • Statin-mediated DDR inhibition is independent of initial DNA damage formation. • Statin-mediated blockage of Cis

  4. Lovastatin prevents cisplatin-induced activation of pro-apoptotic DNA damage response (DDR) of renal tubular epithelial cells

    Krüger, Katharina; Ziegler, Verena; Hartmann, Christina; Henninger, Christian; Thomale, Jürgen; Schupp, Nicole; Fritz, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The platinating agent cisplatin (CisPt) is commonly used in the therapy of various types of solid tumors. The anticancer efficacy of CisPt largely depends on the formation of bivalent DNA intrastrand crosslinks, which stimulate mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR), thereby triggering checkpoint activation, gene expression and cell death. The clinically most relevant adverse effect associated with CisPt treatment is nephrotoxicity that results from damage to renal tubular epithelial cells. Here, we addressed the question whether the HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitor lovastatin affects the DDR of renal cells by employing rat renal proximal tubular epithelial (NRK-52E) cells as in vitro model. The data show that lovastatin has extensive inhibitory effects on CisPt-stimulated DDR of NRK-52E cells as reflected on the levels of phosphorylated ATM, Chk1, Chk2, p53 and Kap1. Mitigation of CisPt-induced DDR by lovastatin was independent of the formation of DNA damage as demonstrated by (i) the analysis of Pt-(GpG) intrastrand crosslink formation by Southwestern blot analyses and (ii) the generation of DNA strand breaks as analyzed on the level of nuclear γH2AX foci and employing the alkaline comet assay. Lovastatin protected NRK-52E cells from the cytotoxicity of high CisPt doses as shown by measuring cell viability, cellular impedance and flow cytometry-based analyses of cell death. Importantly, the statin also reduced the level of kidney DNA damage and apoptosis triggered by CisPt treatment of mice. The data show that the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin extensively counteracts pro-apoptotic signal mechanisms of the DDR of tubular epithelial cells following CisPt injury. - Highlights: • Lovastatin blocks ATM/ATR-regulated DDR of tubular cells following CisPt treatment. • Lovastatin attenuates CisPt-induced activation of protein kinase ATM in vitro. • Statin-mediated DDR inhibition is independent of initial DNA damage formation. • Statin-mediated blockage of Cis

  5. The Candida albicans Ddr48 protein is essential for filamentation, stress response, and confers partial antifungal drug resistance.

    Dib, Leila; Hayek, Peter; Sadek, Helen; Beyrouthy, Berna; Khalaf, Roy A

    2008-06-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic pathogenic fungus that causes mucosal and systemic infections. C. albicans pathogenicity is attributed to its ability to exist in different morphologic states and to respond to stress by up regulating several key genes. DDR48 is a stress-associated gene involved in DNA repair and in response to antifungal drug exposure. One allele of DDR48 was knocked out by homologous recombination that inserted a marker cassette in its position. Furthermore, reintroducing DDR48 on a plasmid created a revertant strain. Strains were grown on filamentation inducing and noninducing media, subjected to an oxidative stress challenge, injected into mice to assess virulence, and assayed for antifungal susceptibility by the E-test method. DDR48 was found to be haploid insufficient and possibly essential, since only a heterozygote, but not a homozygous, null mutant was generated. The mutant was filamentation defective on all hyphal media tested including serum and corn meal agar. Discrepancies in drug resistance profiles also were present: compared with the parental strain, DDR48/ddr48 heterozygote strain was susceptible in a dose-dependent manner to itraconazole and fluconazole and susceptible to ketoconazole. The mutant also appeared to be hypersensitive to a potentially lethal hydrogen peroxide challenge. However, no reduction in virulence of the mutant was observed. The present findings provide evidence that DDR48 is essential for filamentation, stress response, and possibly viability of C. albicans, making it a prime target for antifungal drug design.

  6. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) regulates proliferation of endochondral cells in mice

    Kawai, Ikuma; Hisaki, Tomoka; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko; Kano, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase. ► DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. ► We produced in vitro and in vivo model to better understand the role of DDR2. ► DDR2 might play an inhibitory role in the proliferation of chondrocyte. -- Abstract: Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by fibrillar collagens. DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. The decrement of endogenous DDR2 represses osteoblastic marker gene expression and osteogenic differentiation in murine preosteoblastic cells, but the functions of DDR2 in chondrogenic cellular proliferation remain unclear. To better understand the role of DDR2 signaling in cellular proliferation in endochondral ossification, we inhibited Ddr2 expression via the inhibitory effect of miRNA on Ddr2 mRNA (miDdr2) and analyzed the cellular proliferation and differentiation in the prechondrocyte ATDC5 cell lines. To investigate DDR2’s molecular role in endochondral cellular proliferation in vivo, we also produced transgenic mice in which the expression of truncated, kinase dead (KD) DDR2 protein is induced, and evaluated the DDR2 function in cellular proliferation in chondrocytes. Although the miDdr2-transfected ATDC5 cell lines retained normal differentiation ability, DDR2 reduction finally promoted cellular proliferation in proportion to the decreasing ratio of Ddr2 expression, and it also promoted earlier differentiation to cartilage cells by insulin induction. The layer of hypertrophic chondrocytes in KD Ddr2 transgenic mice was not significantly thicker than that of normal littermates, but the layer of proliferative chondrocytes in KD-Ddr2 transgenic mice was significantly thicker than that of normal littermates. Taken together, our data demonstrated that DDR2 might play a local and essential role in the

  7. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) regulates proliferation of endochondral cells in mice

    Kawai, Ikuma; Hisaki, Tomoka; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko [Laboratory of Applied Genetics, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Kano, Kiyoshi, E-mail: kanokiyo@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Developmental Biology, Joint Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan. (Japan); Biomedical Science Center for Translational Research (BSCTR), The United Graduate School of Veterinary Science, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753-8515 (Japan)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We produced in vitro and in vivo model to better understand the role of DDR2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DDR2 might play an inhibitory role in the proliferation of chondrocyte. -- Abstract: Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by fibrillar collagens. DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. The decrement of endogenous DDR2 represses osteoblastic marker gene expression and osteogenic differentiation in murine preosteoblastic cells, but the functions of DDR2 in chondrogenic cellular proliferation remain unclear. To better understand the role of DDR2 signaling in cellular proliferation in endochondral ossification, we inhibited Ddr2 expression via the inhibitory effect of miRNA on Ddr2 mRNA (miDdr2) and analyzed the cellular proliferation and differentiation in the prechondrocyte ATDC5 cell lines. To investigate DDR2's molecular role in endochondral cellular proliferation in vivo, we also produced transgenic mice in which the expression of truncated, kinase dead (KD) DDR2 protein is induced, and evaluated the DDR2 function in cellular proliferation in chondrocytes. Although the miDdr2-transfected ATDC5 cell lines retained normal differentiation ability, DDR2 reduction finally promoted cellular proliferation in proportion to the decreasing ratio of Ddr2 expression, and it also promoted earlier differentiation to cartilage cells by insulin induction. The layer of hypertrophic chondrocytes in KD Ddr2 transgenic mice was not significantly thicker than that of normal littermates, but the layer of proliferative chondrocytes in KD-Ddr2 transgenic mice was significantly thicker than that of normal littermates

  8. JNK inhibition sensitizes tumor cells to radiation-induced premature senescence via Bcl-2/ROS/DDR signaling pathway

    Lee, Jae Seon; Lee, Je Jung

    2009-01-01

    Premature senescence is considered as a cellular defense mechanism to prevent tumorigenesis. Although recent evidences demonstrate that c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is involved in the senescence process, the target and exact mechanism of JNK signaling in the regulation of cell proliferation has yet to be defined. In this study, we investigated the role of JNK in premature senescence and demonstrated JNK inhibition sensitized tumor cells to radiation-induced premature senescence

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Induced DDR2 Mediates Stromal-Breast Cancer Interactions and Metastasis Growth

    Maria E. Gonzalez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased collagen deposition by breast cancer (BC-associated mesenchymal stem/multipotent stromal cells (MSC promotes metastasis, but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we report that the collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2 is essential for stromal-BC communication. In human BC metastasis, DDR2 is concordantly upregulated in metastatic cancer and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. In MSCs isolated from human BC metastasis, DDR2 maintains a fibroblastic phenotype with collagen deposition and induces pathological activation of DDR2 signaling in BC cells. Loss of DDR2 in MSCs impairs their ability to promote DDR2 phosphorylation in BC cells, as well as BC cell alignment, migration, and metastasis. Female ddr2-deficient mice homozygous for the slie mutation show inefficient spontaneous BC metastasis. These results point to a role for mesenchymal stem cell DDR2 in metastasis and suggest a therapeutic approach for metastatic BC.

  10. Opposing roles of RNF8/RNF168 and deubiquitinating enzymes in ubiquitination-dependent DNA double-strand break response signaling and DNA-repair pathway choice

    Nakada, Shinichiro

    2016-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligases ring finger protein (RNF) 8 and RNF168 transduce the DNA double-strand break (DSB) response (DDR) signal by ubiquitinating DSB sites. The depletion of RNF8 or RNF168 suppresses the accumulation of DNA-repair regulating factors such as 53BP1 and RAP80 at DSB sites, suggesting roles for RNF8- and RNF168-mediated ubiquitination in DSB repair. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the RNF8- and RNF168-dependent DDR-signaling and DNA-repair pathways. The choice of DNA-repair pathway when RNF8- and RNF168-mediated ubiquitination-dependent DDR signaling is negatively regulated by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) is reviewed to clarify how the opposing roles of RNF8/RNF168 and DUBs regulate ubiquitination-dependent DDR signaling and the choice of DNA-repair pathway

  11. Partial sleep deprivation activates the DNA damage response (DDR) and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in aged adult humans.

    Carroll, Judith E; Cole, Steven W; Seeman, Teresa E; Breen, Elizabeth C; Witarama, Tuff; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Ma, Jeffrey; Irwin, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Age-related disease risk has been linked to short sleep duration and sleep disturbances; however, the specific molecular pathways linking sleep loss with diseases of aging are poorly defined. Key cellular events seen with aging, which are thought to contribute to disease, may be particularly sensitive to sleep loss. We tested whether one night of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) would increase leukocyte gene expression indicative of DNA damage responses (DDR), the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), and senescence indicator p16(INK4a) in older adult humans, who are at increased risk for cellular senescence. Community-dwelling older adults aged 61-86years (n=29; 48% male) underwent an experimental partial sleep deprivation (PSD) protocol over 4 nights, including adaptation, an uninterrupted night of sleep, partial sleep deprivation (sleep restricted 3-7AM), and a subsequent full night of sleep. Blood samples were obtained each morning to assess peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) gene expression using Illumina HT-12 arrays. Analyses of microarray results revealed that SASP (psleep deprivation activates PBMC gene expression patterns consistent with biological aging in this older adult sample. PSD enhanced the SASP and increased the accumulation of damage that initiates cell cycle arrest and promotes cellular senescence. These findings causally link sleep deprivation to the molecular processes associated with biological aging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The DNA damage response during mitosis

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Malgorzata; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.

    2013-01-01

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance

  13. DNA-Damage Response RNA-Binding Proteins (DDRBPs): Perspectives from a New Class of Proteins and Their RNA Targets.

    Dutertre, Martin; Vagner, Stéphan

    2017-10-27

    Upon DNA damage, cells trigger an early DNA-damage response (DDR) involving DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints, and late responses involving gene expression regulation that determine cell fate. Screens for genes involved in the DDR have found many RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), while screens for novel RBPs have identified DDR proteins. An increasing number of RBPs are involved in early and/or late DDR. We propose to call this new class of actors of the DDR, which contain an RNA-binding activity, DNA-damage response RNA-binding proteins (DDRBPs). We then discuss how DDRBPs contribute not only to gene expression regulation in the late DDR but also to early DDR signaling, DNA repair, and chromatin modifications at DNA-damage sites through interactions with both long and short noncoding RNAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. TGF-β1 accelerates the DNA damage response in epithelial cells via Smad signaling

    Lee, Jeeyong; Kim, Mi-Ra; Kim, Hyun-Ji; An, You Sun; Yi, Jae Youn, E-mail: yjy_71@kcch.re.kr

    2016-08-05

    The evidence suggests that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) regulates the DNA-damage response (DDR) upon irradiation, and we previously reported that TGF-β1 induced DNA ligase IV (Lig4) expression and enhanced the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway in irradiated cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of TGF-β1 on the irradiation-induced DDRs of A431 and HaCaT cells. Cells were pretreated with or without TGF-β1 and irradiated. At 30 min post-irradiation, DDRs were detected by immunoblotting of phospho-ATM, phospho-Chk2, and the presence of histone foci (γH2AX). The levels of all three factors were similar right after irradiation regardless of TGF-β1 pretreatment. However, they soon thereafter exhibited downregulation in TGF-β1-pretreated cells, indicating the acceleration of the DDR. Treatment with a TGF-β type I receptor inhibitor (SB431542) or transfections with siRNAs against Smad2/3 or DNA ligase IV (Lig4) reversed this acceleration of the DDR. Furthermore, the frequency of irradiation-induced apoptosis was decreased by TGF-β1 pretreatment in vivo, but this effect was abrogated by SB431542. These results collectively suggest that TGF-β1 could enhance cell survival by accelerating the DDR via Smad signaling and Lig4 expression. -- Highlights: •TGF-β1 pretreatment accelerates γ-radiation-induced DNA damage response. •TGF-β1-accelerated DNA damage response is dependent on Smad signaling and DNA Ligase IV. •TGF-β1 pretreatment protects epithelial cells from γ-radiation in vivo.

  15. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defence: Links and Mechanisms

    Björn Schumacher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signalling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signalling. We highlight evidence gained into (i which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signalling, (ii how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans.

  16. Estrogen signalling and the DNA damage response in hormone dependent breast cancers

    C Elizabeth Caldon

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen is necessary for the normal growth and development of breast tissue, but high levels of estrogen are a major risk factor for breast cancer. One mechanism by which estrogen could contribute to breast cancer is via the induction of DNA damage. This perspective discusses the mechanisms by which estrogen alters the DNA damage response (DDR and DNA repair through the regulation of key effector proteins including ATM, ATR, CHK1, BRCA1 and p53 and the feedback on estrogen receptor signalling from these proteins. We put forward the hypothesis that estrogen receptor signalling converges to suppress effective DNA repair and apoptosis in favour of proliferation. This is important in hormone-dependent breast cancer as it will affect processing of estrogen-induced DNA damage, as well as other genotoxic insults. DDR and DNA repair proteins are frequently mutated or altered in estrogen responsive breast cancer which will further change the processing of DNA damage. Finally the action of estrogen signalling on DNA damage is also relevant to the therapeutic setting as the suppression of a DNA damage response by estrogen has the potential to alter the response of cancers to anti-hormone treatment or chemotherapy that induces DNA damage.

  17. Use of Commercial FPGA-Based Evaluation Boards for Single-Event Testing of DDR2 and DDR3 SDRAMs

    Ladbury, R. L.; Berg, M. D.; Wilcox, E. P.; LaBel, K. A.; Kim, H. S.; Phan, A. M.; Seidleck, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the use of commercial FPGA based evaluation boards for radiation testing DDR2 and DDR3 SDRAMs. We evaluate the resulting data quality and the tradeoffs involved in the use of these boards.

  18. Targeting Oxidatively Induced DNA Damage Response in Cancer: Opportunities for Novel Cancer Therapies

    Pierpaola Davalli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a death cause in economically developed countries that results growing also in developing countries. Improved outcome through targeted interventions faces the scarce selectivity of the therapies and the development of resistance to them that compromise the therapeutic effects. Genomic instability is a typical cancer hallmark due to DNA damage by genetic mutations, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, ionizing radiation, and chemotherapeutic agents. DNA lesions can induce and/or support various diseases, including cancer. The DNA damage response (DDR is a crucial signaling-transduction network that promotes cell cycle arrest or cell death to repair DNA lesions. DDR dysregulation favors tumor growth as downregulated or defective DDR generates genomic instability, while upregulated DDR may confer treatment resistance. Redox homeostasis deeply and capillary affects DDR as ROS activate/inhibit proteins and enzymes integral to DDR both in healthy and cancer cells, although by different routes. DDR regulation through modulating ROS homeostasis is under investigation as anticancer opportunity, also in combination with other treatments since ROS affect DDR differently in the patients during cancer development and treatment. Here, we highlight ROS-sensitive proteins whose regulation in oxidatively induced DDR might allow for selective strategies against cancer that are better tailored to the patients.

  19. The DNA damage response during mitosis

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; Vugt, Marcel A.T.M. van

    2013-01-01

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed

  20. The DNA damage response during mitosis

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; Vugt, Marcel A.T.M. van, E-mail: m.vugt@umcg.nl

    2013-10-15

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed.

  1. The DNA damage response during mitosis.

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2013-10-01

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Acetylation dynamics of human nuclear proteins during the ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage response

    Bennetzen, Martin; Andersen, J.S.; Lasen, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    Genotoxic insults, such as ionizing radiation (IR), cause DNA damage that evokes a multifaceted cellular DNA damage response (DDR). DNA damage signaling events that control protein activity, subcellular localization, DNA binding, protein-protein interactions, etc. rely heavily on time...

  3. Epstein-Barr Virus Hijacks DNA Damage Response Transducers to Orchestrate Its Life Cycle.

    Hau, Pok Man; Tsao, Sai Wah

    2017-11-16

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous virus that infects most of the human population. EBV infection is associated with multiple human cancers, including Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, a subset of gastric carcinomas, and almost all undifferentiated non-keratinizing nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Intensive research has shown that EBV triggers a DNA damage response (DDR) during primary infection and lytic reactivation. The EBV-encoded viral proteins have been implicated in deregulating the DDR signaling pathways. The consequences of DDR inactivation lead to genomic instability and promote cellular transformation. This review summarizes the current understanding of the relationship between EBV infection and the DDR transducers, including ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated), ATR (ATM and Rad3-related), and DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase), and discusses how EBV manipulates the DDR signaling pathways to complete the replication process of viral DNA during lytic reactivation.

  4. DNA damage response in nephrotoxic and ischemic kidney injury

    Yan, Mingjuan; Tang, Chengyuan [Department of Nephrology, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410011 (China); Ma, Zhengwei [Department of Cellular Biology & Anatomy, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University and Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States); Huang, Shuang [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Dong, Zheng, E-mail: zdong@augusta.edu [Department of Nephrology, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410011 (China); Department of Cellular Biology & Anatomy, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University and Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    DNA damage activates specific cell signaling cascades for DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, senescence, and/or cell death. Recent studies have demonstrated DNA damage response (DDR) in experimental models of acute kidney injury (AKI). In cisplatin-induced AKI or nephrotoxicity, the DDR pathway of ATR/Chk2/p53 is activated and contributes to renal tubular cell apoptosis. In ischemic AKI, DDR seems more complex and involves at least the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family, and p53; however, while ATM may promote DNA repair, p53 may trigger cell death. Targeting DDR for kidney protection in AKI therefore relies on a thorough elucidation of the DDR pathways in various forms of AKI.

  5. Genetic Variability as a Regulator of TLR4 and NOD Signaling in Response to Bacterial Driven DNA Damage Response (DDR and Inflammation: Focus on the Gastrointestinal (GI Tract

    Evagelia Spanou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental role of human Toll-like receptors (TLRs and NOD-like receptors (NLRs, the two most studied pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs, is the protection against pathogens and excessive tissue injury. Recent evidence supports the association between TLR/NLR gene mutations and susceptibility to inflammatory, autoimmune, and malignant diseases. PRRs also interfere with several cellular processes, such as cell growth, apoptosis, cell proliferation, differentiation, autophagy, angiogenesis, cell motility and migration, and DNA repair mechanisms. We briefly review the impact of TLR4 and NOD1/NOD2 and their genetic variability in the process of inflammation, tumorigenesis and DNA repair, focusing in the gastrointestinal tract. We also review the available data on new therapeutic strategies utilizing TLR/NLR agonists and antagonists for cancer, allergic diseases, viral infections and vaccine development against both infectious diseases and cancer.

  6. Connecting Community Security and DDR: Experiences from Burundi

    Willems, R.C.; Kleingeld, J.; van Leeuwen, M.

    2010-01-01

    The report is based on 10 weeks of field research in Burundi between April and June 2010, and looks at the linkages between community security and DDR. It opens with a discussion of local experiences with DDR programmes, analyzing the impact of its different components, and analyzing the local

  7. Variable reflectivity signal mirrors and signal response measurements

    Vine, Glenn de; Shaddock, Daniel A; McClelland, David E

    2002-01-01

    Future gravitational wave detectors will include some form of signal mirror in order to alter the signal response of the device. We introduce interferometer configurations which utilize a variable reflectivity signal mirror allowing a tunable peak frequency and variable signal bandwidth. A detector configured with a Fabry-Perot cavity as the signal mirror is compared theoretically with one using a Michelson interferometer for a signal mirror. A system for the measurement of the interferometer signal responses is introduced. This technique is applied to a power-recycled Michelson interferometer with resonant sideband extraction. We present broadband measurements of the benchtop prototype's signal response for a range of signal cavity detunings. This technique is also applicable to most other gravitational wave detector configurations

  8. Variable reflectivity signal mirrors and signal response measurements

    Vine, G D; McClelland, D E

    2002-01-01

    Future gravitational wave detectors will include some form of signal mirror in order to alter the signal response of the device. We introduce interferometer configurations which utilize a variable reflectivity signal mirror allowing a tunable peak frequency and variable signal bandwidth. A detector configured with a Fabry-Perot cavity as the signal mirror is compared theoretically with one using a Michelson interferometer for a signal mirror. A system for the measurement of the interferometer signal responses is introduced. This technique is applied to a power-recycled Michelson interferometer with resonant sideband extraction. We present broadband measurements of the benchtop prototype's signal response for a range of signal cavity detunings. This technique is also applicable to most other gravitational wave detector configurations.

  9. Image acquisition in general radiography: The utilisation of DDR

    Hayre, C.M.; Eyden, A.; Blackman, S.; Carlton, K.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This article explores image acquisition with DDR. General radiographic technology continues to advance therefore it remains paramount to continually reflect on DDR hardware and software amongst radiographers in an imaging modality that constitutes approximately 90% of all radiological examinations. Method: This article reports findings from a wider ethnographic study of two general radiography environments in the United Kingdom (UK). Participant observation and semi-structured interviews were the methods used to uncover original data. Results: Two key themes are discussed. Firstly, ‘the extent of DDR knowledge’ amongst radiographers is examined. The findings uncover that not all radiographers have an adequate knowledge base with DDR technology. Secondly, ‘pitfalls and near misses with DDR’ is discussed. This theme highlights the potential danger of radiographers ‘over-repeating’ X-ray examinations, coincided with the occurrence of radiological incidents whereby a patient is exposed to ionising radiation with no added benefit. Conclusion: This paper concludes by challenging the current ‘skill base’ to operate DDR equipment. In addition, new pitfalls and near misses are highlighted, which may help forestall radiation incidents in the future. Dose and image optimisation remain central tenets to the role of the radiographer. Advances in knowledge: Few studies have challenged image acquisition with DDR. This study adds to existing knowledge by uncovering original phenomena that may initiate discussions within the radiography community and continually enhance healthcare delivery. - Highlights: • Radiographers may not have appropriate knowledge of DDR technology. • Suggests DDR may facilitate a ‘hit and miss’ approach to image acquisition. • Identifies radiographic errors with DDR, leading to radiological incidents.

  10. The immune receptor Trem1 cooperates with diminished DNA damage response to induce preleukemic stem cell expansion.

    Du, W; Amarachintha, S; Wilson, A; Pang, Q

    2017-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome with extremely high risk of leukemic transformation. Here we investigate the relationship between DNA damage response (DDR) and leukemogenesis using the Fanca knockout mouse model. We found that chronic exposure of the Fanca -/- hematopoietic stem cells to DNA crosslinking agent mitomycin C in vivo leads to diminished DDR, and the emergence/expansion of pre-leukemia stem cells (pre-LSCs). Surprisingly, although genetic correction of Fanca deficiency in the pre-LSCs restores DDR and reduces genomic instability, but fails to prevent pre-LSC expansion or delay leukemia development in irradiated recipients. Furthermore, we identified transcription program underlying dysregulated DDR and cell migration, myeloid proliferation, and immune response in the Fanca -/- pre-LSCs. Forced expression of the downregulated DNA repair genes, Rad51c or Trp53i13, in the Fanca -/- pre-LSCs partially rescues DDR but has no effect on leukemia, whereas shRNA knockdown of the upregulated immune receptor genes Trem1 or Pilrb improves leukemia-related survival, but not DDR or genomic instability. Furthermore, Trem1 cooperates with diminished DDR in vivo to promote Fanca -/- pre-LSC expansion and leukemia development. Our study implicates diminishing DDR as a root cause of FA leukemogenesis, which subsequently collaborates with other signaling pathways for leukemogenic transformation.

  11. Patterns of DNA damage response in intracranial germ cell tumors versus glioblastomas reflect cell of origin rather than brain environment

    Bartkova, Jirina; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Krizova, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) machinery becomes commonly activated in response to oncogenes and during early stages of development of solid malignancies, with an exception of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). The active DDR signaling evokes cell death or senescence but this anti-tumor barrier ...... checkpoints in intracranial tumorigenesis, with implications for the differential biological responses of diverse tumor types to endogenous stress as well as to genotoxic treatments such as ionizing radiation or chemotherapy....

  12. The nucleosome: orchestrating DNA damage signaling and repair within chromatin.

    Agarwal, Poonam; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-10-01

    DNA damage occurs within the chromatin environment, which ultimately participates in regulating DNA damage response (DDR) pathways and repair of the lesion. DNA damage activates a cascade of signaling events that extensively modulates chromatin structure and organization to coordinate DDR factor recruitment to the break and repair, whilst also promoting the maintenance of normal chromatin functions within the damaged region. For example, DDR pathways must avoid conflicts between other DNA-based processes that function within the context of chromatin, including transcription and replication. The molecular mechanisms governing the recognition, target specificity, and recruitment of DDR factors and enzymes to the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin, i.e., the nucleosome, are poorly understood. Here we present our current view of how chromatin recognition by DDR factors is achieved at the level of the nucleosome. Emerging evidence suggests that the nucleosome surface, including the nucleosome acidic patch, promotes the binding and activity of several DNA damage factors on chromatin. Thus, in addition to interactions with damaged DNA and histone modifications, nucleosome recognition by DDR factors plays a key role in orchestrating the requisite chromatin response to maintain both genome and epigenome integrity.

  13. Monopoly of Force: The Nexus of DDR and SSR

    2011-01-01

    Washington, DC, May 4, 2010. 52 Vanessa Farr, Albrecht Schnabel, and Henri Myrttinen, eds., Sexed Pistols: Gendered Impacts of Small Arms and...discussion of various lessons learned see Edward Bell and Charlotte Watson, DDR: Sup- porting Security and Development: The EU’s Added Value, London...45 Specker, The R-Phase of DDR Processes, 4. 46 This distinction has been made by many authors. See, for example, Ball and van de Goor, 2–3; Mark

  14. Channel Analysis for a 6.4 Gb s-1 DDR5 Data Buffer Receiver Front-End

    Lehmann, Stefanie; Gerfers, Friedel

    2017-09-01

    In this contribution, the channel characteristic of the next generation DDR5-SDRAM architecture and possible approaches to overcome channel impairments are analysed. Because modern enterprise server applications and networks demand higher memory bandwidth, throughput and capacity, the DDR5-SDRAM specification is currently under development as a follow-up of DDR4-SDRAM technology. In this specification, the data rate is doubled to DDR5-6400 per IO as compared to the former DDR4-3200 architecture, resulting in a total per DIMM data rate of up to 409.6 Gb s-1. The single-ended multi-point-to-point CPU channel architecture in DDRX technology remains the same for DDR5 systems. At the specified target data rate, insertion loss, reflections, cross-talk as well as power supply noise become more severe and have to be considered. Using the data buffer receiver front-end of a load-reduced memory module, sophisticated equalisation techniques can be applied to ensure target BER at the increased data rate. In this work, the worst case CPU back-plane channel is analysed to derive requirements for receiver-side equalisation from the channel response characteristics. First, channel impairments such as inter-symbol-interference, reflections from the multi-point channel structure, and crosstalk from neighboring lines are analysed in detail. Based on these results, different correction methods for DDR5 data buffer front-ends are discussed. An architecture with 1-tap FFE in combination with a multi-tap DFE is proposed. Simulation of the architecture using a random input data stream is used to reveal the required DFE tap filter depth to effectively eliminate the dominant ISI and reflection based error components.

  15. Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage and repair responses: The activations of NHEJ, BER and NER via ATM-p53 signaling axis

    Dong, Hui; Shi, Qiong; Song, Xiufang; Fu, Juanli; Hu, Lihua; Xu, Demei; Su, Chuanyang; Xia, Xiaomin; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang, E-mail: songyangwenrong@hotmail.com

    2015-07-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) quinone induced oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. To promote genomic integrity, DNA damage response (DDR) coordinates cell-cycle transitions, DNA repair and apoptosis. PCB quinone-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis have been documented, however, whether PCB quinone insult induce DNA repair signaling is still unknown. In this study, we identified the activation of DDR and corresponding signaling events in HepG2 cells upon the exposure to a synthetic PCB quinone, PCB29-pQ. Our data illustrated that PCB29-pQ induces the phosphorylation of p53, which was mediated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase. The observed phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci and the elevation of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) indicated that DDR was stimulated by PCB29-pQ treatment. Additionally, we found PCB29-pQ activates non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) signalings. However, these repair pathways are not error-free processes and aberrant repair of DNA damage may cause the potential risk of carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. - Highlights: • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. • The elevation of γ-H2AX and 8-OHdG indicates the activation of DNA damage response. • ATM-p53 signaling acts as the DNA damage sensor and effector. • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone activates NHEJ, BER and NER signalings.

  16. Noncanonical ATM Activation and Signaling in Response to Transcription-Blocking DNA Damage.

    Marteijn, Jurgen A; Vermeulen, Wim; Tresini, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Environmental genotoxins and metabolic byproducts generate DNA lesions that can cause genomic instability and disrupt tissue homeostasis. To ensure genomic integrity, cells employ mechanisms that convert signals generated by stochastic DNA damage into organized responses, including activation of repair systems, cell cycle checkpoints, and apoptotic mechanisms. DNA damage response (DDR) signaling pathways coordinate these responses and determine cellular fates in part, by transducing signals that modulate RNA metabolism. One of the master DDR coordinators, the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) kinase, has a fundamental role in mediating DNA damage-induced changes in mRNA synthesis. ATM acts by modulating a variety of RNA metabolic pathways including nascent RNA splicing, a process catalyzed by the spliceosome. Interestingly, ATM and the spliceosome influence each other's activity in a reciprocal manner by a pathway that initiates when transcribing RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) encounters DNA lesions that prohibit forward translocation. In response to stalling of RNAPII assembly of late-stage spliceosomes is disrupted resulting in increased splicing factor mobility. Displacement of spliceosomes from lesion-arrested RNA polymerases facilitates formation of R-loops between the nascent RNA and DNA adjacent to the transcription bubble. R-loops signal for noncanonical ATM activation which in quiescent cells occurs in absence of detectable dsDNA breaks. In turn, activated ATM signals to regulate spliceosome dynamics and AS genome wide.This chapter describes the use of fluorescence microscopy methods that can be used to evaluate noncanonical ATM activation by transcription-blocking DNA damage. First, we present an immunofluorescence-detection method that can be used to evaluate ATM activation by autophosphorylation, in fixed cells. Second, we present a protocol for Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) of GFP-tagged splicing factors, a highly sensitive and

  17. DNA Damage Signaling Is Induced in the Absence of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Lytic DNA Replication and in Response to Expression of ZEBRA.

    Wang'ondu, Ruth; Teal, Stuart; Park, Richard; Heston, Lee; Delecluse, Henri; Miller, George

    2015-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV), like other oncogenic viruses, modulates the activity of cellular DNA damage responses (DDR) during its life cycle. Our aim was to characterize the role of early lytic proteins and viral lytic DNA replication in activation of DNA damage signaling during the EBV lytic cycle. Our data challenge the prevalent hypothesis that activation of DDR pathways during the EBV lytic cycle occurs solely in response to large amounts of exogenous double stranded DNA products generated during lytic viral DNA replication. In immunofluorescence or immunoblot assays, DDR activation markers, specifically phosphorylated ATM (pATM), H2AX (γH2AX), or 53BP1 (p53BP1), were induced in the presence or absence of viral DNA amplification or replication compartments during the EBV lytic cycle. In assays with an ATM inhibitor and DNA damaging reagents in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines, γH2AX induction was necessary for optimal expression of early EBV genes, but not sufficient for lytic reactivation. Studies in lytically reactivated EBV-positive cells in which early EBV proteins, BGLF4, BGLF5, or BALF2, were not expressed showed that these proteins were not necessary for DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle. Expression of ZEBRA, a viral protein that is necessary for EBV entry into the lytic phase, induced pATM foci and γH2AX independent of other EBV gene products. ZEBRA mutants deficient in DNA binding, Z(R183E) and Z(S186E), did not induce foci of pATM. ZEBRA co-localized with HP1β, a heterochromatin associated protein involved in DNA damage signaling. We propose a model of DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle in which ZEBRA induces ATM kinase phosphorylation, in a DNA binding dependent manner, to modulate gene expression. ATM and H2AX phosphorylation induced prior to EBV replication may be critical for creating a microenvironment of viral and cellular gene expression that enables lytic cycle progression.

  18. Non coding RNA: sequence-specific guide for chromatin modification and DNA damage signaling

    Sofia eFrancia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin conformation shapes the environment in which our genome is transcribed into RNA. Transcription is a source of DNA damage, thus it often occurs concomitantly to DNA damage signaling. Growing amounts of evidence suggest that different types of RNAs can, independently from their protein-coding properties, directly affect chromatin conformation, transcription and splicing, as well as promote the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR and DNA repair. Therefore, transcription paradoxically functions to both threaten and safeguard genome integrity. On the other hand, DNA damage signaling is known to modulate chromatin to suppress transcription of the surrounding genetic unit. It is thus intriguing to understand how transcription can modulate DDR signaling while, in turn, DDR signaling represses transcription of chromatin around the DNA lesion. An unexpected player in this field is the RNA interference (RNAi machinery, which play roles in transcription, splicing and chromatin modulation in several organisms. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs and several protein factors involved in the RNAi pathway are well known master regulators of chromatin while only recent reports suggest that ncRNAs are involved in DDR signaling and homology-mediated DNA repair. Here, we discuss the experimental evidence supporting the idea that ncRNAs act at the genomic loci from which they are transcribed to modulate chromatin, DDR signaling and DNA repair.

  19. Response to DNA damage: why do we need to focus on protein phosphatases?

    Midori eShimada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells are continuously threatened by unavoidable errors during normal DNA replication or various sources of genotoxic stresses that cause DNA damage or stalled replication. To maintain genomic integrity, cells have developed a coordinated signaling network, known as the DNA damage response (DDR. Following DNA damage, sensor molecules detect the presence of DNA damage and transmit signals to downstream transducer molecules. This in turn conveys the signals to numerous effectors, which initiate a large number of specific biological responses, including transient cell cycle arrest mediated by checkpoints, DNA repair, and apoptosis. It is recently becoming clear that dephosphorylation events are involved in keeping DDR factors inactive during normal cell growth. Moreover, dephosphorylation is required to shut off checkpoint arrest following DNA damage and has been implicated in the activation of the DDR. Spatial and temporal regulation of phosphorylation events is essential for the DDR, and fine-tuning of phosphorylation is partly mediated by protein phosphatases. While the role of kinases in the DDR has been well documented, the complex roles of protein dephosphorylation have only recently begun to be investigated. Therefore, it is important to focus on the role of phosphatases and to determine how their activity is regulated upon DNA damage. In this work, we summarize current knowledge on the involvement of serine/threonine phosphatases, especially the protein phosphatase 1, protein phosphatase 2A, and protein phosphatase Mg2+/Mn2+-dependent families, in the DDR.

  20. From DDR to Security Promotion: Connecting national programs to community initiatives

    Verkoren, W.; Willems, R.C.; Kleingeld, J.; Rouw, H.

    2010-01-01

    Disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR) is a set of activities that forms part of strategies for peacebuilding after civil war. DDR has become the standard way of addressing security threats in immediate post-conflict situations. However, DDR is designed to promote national security,

  1. Microarray data reveal relationship between Jag1 and Ddr1 in mouse liver.

    Lara A Underkoffler

    Full Text Available Alagille syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder involving bile duct paucity and cholestasis in addition to cardiac, skeletal, ophthalmologic, renal and vascular manifestations. Mutations in JAG1, encoding a ligand in the Notch signaling pathway, are found in 95% of patients meeting clinical criteria for Alagille syndrome. In order to define the role of Jag1 in the bile duct developmental abnormalities seen in ALGS, we previously created a Jag1 conditional knockout mouse model. Mice heterozygous for the Jag1 conditional and null alleles demonstrate abnormalities in postnatal bile duct growth and remodeling, with portal expansion and increased numbers of malformed bile ducts. In this study we report the results of microarray analysis and identify genes and pathways differentially expressed in the Jag1 conditional/null livers as compared with littermate controls. In the initial microarray analysis, we found that many of the genes up-regulated in the Jag1 conditional/null mutant livers were related to extracellular matrix (ECM interactions, cell adhesion and cell migration. One of the most highly up-regulated genes was Ddr1, encoding a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK belonging to a large RTK family. We have found extensive co-localization of Jag1 and Ddr1 in bile ducts and blood vessels in postnatal liver. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation data provide evidence for a novel protein interaction between Jag1 and Ddr1. Further studies will be required to define the nature of this interaction and its functional consequences, which may have significant implications for bile duct remodeling and repair of liver injury.

  2. Diamond Based DDR IMPATTs: Prospects and Potentiality as Millimeter-Wave Source at 94 GHz Atmospheric Window

    A. Acharyya

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Large-signal simulation is carried out in this paper to investigate the prospects and potentiality of Double-Drift Region (DDR Impact Avalanche Transit Time (IMPATT device based on semiconducting type-IIb diamond as millimeter-wave source operating at 94 GHz atmospheric window frequency. Large-signal simulation method developed by the authors and presented in this paper is based on non-sinusoidal voltage excitation. The simulation is carried out to obtain the large-signal characteristics such as RF power output, DC to RF conversion efficiency etc. of DDR diamond IMPATT device designed to operate at 94 GHz. The results show that the device is capable of delivering a peak RF power output of 7.01 W with 10.18% DC to RF conversion efficiency for a bias current density of 6.0×10^8 A m^-2 and voltage modulation of 60% at 94 GHz; whereas for the same voltage modulation 94 GHz DDR Si IMPATT can deliver only 693.82 mW RF power with 8.74 efficiency for the bias current density of 3.4×10^8 A m^-2.

  3. Pharmacodynamic Assay Panel for Monitoring Phospho-Signaling Networks | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a highly regulated signal transduction network that orchestrates the temporal and spatial organization of protein complexes required to repair (or tolerate) DNA damage (e.g., nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, homologous recombination, non-homologous end joining, post-replication repair).

  4. The ATM signaling network in development and disease

    Stracker, Travis H.; Roig, Ignasi; Knobel, Philip A.; Marjanović, Marko

    2013-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) rapidly recognizes DNA lesions and initiates the appropriate cellular programs to maintain genome integrity. This includes the coordination of cell cycle checkpoints, transcription, translation, DNA repair, metabolism, and cell fate decisions, such as apoptosis or senescence (Jackson and Bartek, 2009). DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent one of the most cytotoxic DNA lesions and defects in their metabolism underlie many human hereditary diseases characterized by genomic instability (Stracker and Petrini, 2011; McKinnon, 2012). Patients with hereditary defects in the DDR display defects in development, particularly affecting the central nervous system, the immune system and the germline, as well as aberrant metabolic regulation and cancer predisposition. Central to the DDR to DSBs is the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase, a master controller of signal transduction. Understanding how ATM signaling regulates various aspects of the DDR and its roles in vivo is critical for our understanding of human disease, its diagnosis and its treatment. This review will describe the general roles of ATM signaling and highlight some recent advances that have shed light on the diverse roles of ATM and related proteins in human disease. PMID:23532176

  5. The ATM signaling network in development and disease

    Travis H. Stracker

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The DNA damage response (DDR rapidly recognizes DNA lesions and initiates the appropriate cellular programs to maintain genome integrity. This includes the coordination of cell cycle checkpoints, transcription, translation, DNA repair, metabolism and cell fate decisions, such as apoptosis or senescence(Jackson and Bartek, 2009. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs represent one of the most cytotoxic DNA lesions and defects in their metabolism underlie many human hereditary diseases characterized by genomic instability(Stracker and Petrini, 2011;McKinnon, 2012. Patients with hereditary defects in the DDR display defects in development, particularly affecting the central nervous system (CNS, the immune system and the germline, as well as aberrant metabolic regulation and cancer predisposition. Central to the DDR to DSBs is the ATM kinase, a master controller of signal transduction. Understanding how ATM signaling regulates various aspects of the DDR and its roles in vivo is critical for our understanding of human disease, its diagnosis and its treatment. This review will describe the general roles of ATM signaling and highlight some recent advances that have shed light on the diverse roles of ATM and related proteins in human disease.

  6. Estimation of Most Favorable Optical Window Position Subject to Achieve Finest Optical Control of Lateral DDR IMPATT Diode Designed to Operate at W-Band

    A. Acharyya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimum position of the optical window (OW of illuminated lateral double-drift region (DDR impact avalanche transit time (IMPATT device has been determined subject to achieve the finest optical control of both DC and RF properties of the device. The OW is a tiny hole that has to be created on the oxide layer through which the light energy of appropriate wavelength can be coupled to the space charge region of the device. A non-sinusoidal voltage is assumed to be applied across the diode and the corresponding terminal current response is obtained from a two-dimensional (2-D large-signal (L-S simulation technique developed by the authors for illuminated lateral DDR IMPATT diode. Both the DC and L-S properties of the illuminated device based on Si, designed to operate at W-band frequencies (75 – 110 GHz are obtained from the said L-S simulation. Simulation is carried out for different incident optical power levels of different wavelengths (600 – 1000 nm by varying the position of the fixed sized OW on the oxide layer along the direction of electrical conduction of the device. Results show that, the most favorable optical tuning can be achieved when the OW is entirely created over the p-type depletion layer, i.e. when the photocurrent is purely electron dominated. Also the 700 nm wavelength is found to be most suitable wavelength for obtaining the maximum optical modulation of both DC and RF properties of the device.

  7. Retinoblastoma loss modulates DNA damage response favoring tumor progression.

    Marcos Seoane

    Full Text Available Senescence is one of the main barriers against tumor progression. Oncogenic signals in primary cells result in oncogene-induced senescence (OIS, crucial for protection against cancer development. It has been described in premalignant lesions that OIS requires DNA damage response (DDR activation, safeguard of the integrity of the genome. Here we demonstrate how the cellular mechanisms involved in oncogenic transformation in a model of glioma uncouple OIS and DDR. We use this tumor type as a paradigm of oncogenic transformation. In human gliomas most of the genetic alterations that have been previously identified result in abnormal activation of cell growth signaling pathways and deregulation of cell cycle, features recapitulated in our model by oncogenic Ras expression and retinoblastoma (Rb inactivation respectively. In this scenario, the absence of pRb confers a proliferative advantage and activates DDR to a greater extent in a DNA lesion-independent fashion than cells that express only HRas(V12. Moreover, Rb loss inactivates the stress kinase DDR-associated p38MAPK by specific Wip1-dependent dephosphorylation. Thus, Rb loss acts as a switch mediating the transition between premalignant lesions and cancer through DDR modulation. These findings may have important implications for the understanding the biology of gliomas and anticipate a new target, Wip1 phosphatase, for novel therapeutic strategies.

  8. Linear ubiquitination signals in adaptive immune responses.

    Ikeda, Fumiyo

    2015-07-01

    Ubiquitin can form eight different linkage types of chains using the intrinsic Met 1 residue or one of the seven intrinsic Lys residues. Each linkage type of ubiquitin chain has a distinct three-dimensional topology, functioning as a tag to attract specific signaling molecules, which are so-called ubiquitin readers, and regulates various biological functions. Ubiquitin chains linked via Met 1 in a head-to-tail manner are called linear ubiquitin chains. Linear ubiquitination plays an important role in the regulation of cellular signaling, including the best-characterized tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. Linear ubiquitin chains are specifically generated by an E3 ligase complex called the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) and hydrolyzed by a deubiquitinase (DUB) called ovarian tumor (OTU) DUB with linear linkage specificity (OTULIN). LUBAC linearly ubiquitinates critical molecules in the TNF pathway, such as NEMO and RIPK1. The linear ubiquitin chains are then recognized by the ubiquitin readers, including NEMO, which control the TNF pathway. Accumulating evidence indicates an importance of the LUBAC complex in the regulation of apoptosis, development, and inflammation in mice. In this article, I focus on the role of linear ubiquitin chains in adaptive immune responses with an emphasis on the TNF-induced signaling pathways. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Replication stress and oxidative damage contribute to aberrant constitutive activation of DNA damage signalling in human gliomas

    Bartkova, J; Hamerlik, P; Stockhausen, Marie

    2010-01-01

    brain and grade II astrocytomas, despite the degree of DDR activation was higher in grade II tumors. Markers indicative of ongoing DNA replication stress (Chk1 activation, Rad17 phosphorylation, replication protein A foci and single-stranded DNA) were present in GBM cells under high- or low...... and indicate that replication stress, rather than oxidative stress, fuels the DNA damage signalling in early stages of astrocytoma development.......Malignant gliomas, the deadliest of brain neoplasms, show rampant genetic instability and resistance to genotoxic therapies, implicating potentially aberrant DNA damage response (DDR) in glioma pathogenesis and treatment failure. Here, we report on gross, aberrant constitutive activation of DNA...

  10. The Struggle after Combat. The role of NGOs in DDR processes: Afganistan Case Study

    Frerks, G.E.; Gompelman, G.; Laar, van de S.; Klem, B.

    2008-01-01

    It has come to be well-recognised that effective DDR (Disarmant, Demobilisation and Reinregration of ex-combatants) is crucial for building durable peace and preventing a relapse into conflict. It has also become clear that DDR is difficult and that it is intertwined with other war to peace

  11. Long Non-coding RNAs in Response to Genotoxic Stress

    Xiaoman Li; Dong Pan; Baoquan Zhao; Burong Hu

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs(lncRNAs) are increasingly involved in diverse biological processes.Upon DNA damage,the DNA damage response(DDR) elicits a complex signaling cascade,which includes the induction of lncRNAs.LncRNA-mediated DDR is involved in non-canonical and canonical manners.DNA-damage induced lncRNAs contribute to the regulation of cell cycle,apoptosis,and DNA repair,thereby playing a key role in maintaining genome stability.This review summarizes the emerging role of lncRNAs in DNA damage and repair.

  12. A pilot of a video game (DDR) to promote physical activity and decrease sedentary screen time.

    Maloney, Ann E; Bethea, T Carter; Kelsey, Kristine S; Marks, Julie T; Paez, Sadye; Rosenberg, Angela M; Catellier, Diane J; Hamer, Robert M; Sikich, Linmarie

    2008-09-01

    We examined the feasibility of Dance Dance Revolution (DDR), a dance video game, in participants' homes, to increase physical activity (PA) and to decrease sedentary screen time (SST). Sixty children (7.5 +/- 0.5 years) were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to DDR or to wait-list control (10-week delay). DDR use was logged, PA was measured objectively by accelerometry. SST was self-reported at weeks 0 and 10. At week 28, after both groups had access to DDR, accelerometry and SST were repeated. Mean use of DDR was 89 +/- 82 (range 0-660 min) min per week (mpw). The DDR group showed increased vigorous PA and a reduction in light PA; the control group showed no increase in moderate and/or vigorous PA (MVPA) although they also had a reduction in light PA. Differences between the groups were not observed. The DDR group also reported a decrease in SST of -1.2 +/- 3.7 h per week (hpw) (P increase of +3.0 +/- 7.7 hpw (nonsignificant). The difference in SST between the groups was significant, with less SST in the DDR group. Between weeks 10 and 28, numeric reductions in SST were reported in both groups. In the DDR group, SST at week 28 (8.8 +/- 6.0 hpw) was lower than baseline (10.5 +/- 5.5 hpw; P increases in vigorous PA. Further study is needed to better characterize children and contexts in which DDR may promote a healthy lifestyle.

  13. Distinct patterns of DNA damage response and apoptosis correlate with Jak/Stat and PI3kinase response profiles in human acute myelogenous leukemia.

    David B Rosen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Single cell network profiling (SCNP utilizing flow cytometry measures alterations in intracellular signaling responses. Here SCNP was used to characterize Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML disease subtypes based on survival, DNA damage response and apoptosis pathways. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty four diagnostic non-M3 AML samples from patients with known clinical outcome were treated with a panel of myeloid growth factors and cytokines, as well as with apoptosis-inducing agents. Analysis of induced Jak/Stat and PI3K pathway responses in blasts from individual patient samples identified subgroups with distinct signaling profiles that were not seen in the absence of a modulator. In vitro exposure of patient samples to etoposide, a DNA damaging agent, revealed three distinct "DNA damage response (DDR/apoptosis" profiles: 1 AML blasts with a defective DDR and failure to undergo apoptosis; 2 AML blasts with proficient DDR and failure to undergo apoptosis; 3 AML blasts with proficiency in both DDR and apoptosis pathways. Notably, AML samples from clinical responders fell within the "DDR/apoptosis" proficient profile and, as well, had low PI3K and Jak/Stat signaling responses. In contrast, samples from clinical non responders had variable signaling profiles often with in vitro apoptotic failure and elevated PI3K pathway activity. Individual patient samples often harbored multiple, distinct, leukemia-associated cell populations identifiable by their surface marker expression, functional performance of signaling pathway in the face of cytokine or growth factor stimulation, as well as their response to apoptosis-inducing agents. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Characterizing and tracking changes in intracellular pathway profiles in cell subpopulations both at baseline and under therapeutic pressure will likely have important clinical applications, potentially informing the selection of beneficial targeted agents, used either alone or in

  14. DDR and the Internal Organization of Non-State Armed Groups

    Brian McQuinn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that demobilization, disarmament and reintegration (DDR trajectories of non-state armed groups are shaped by a group’s internal organization. Extensive research by political scientists has demonstrated a correlation between internal features of armed groups and their behaviour (e.g. extent of violence used against local communities. I extend this analysis to DDR outcomes by illustrating how two features of an armed group’s internal organization – command profile and financing architecture – influence post-conflict DDR trajectories. To substantiate the theory, four case studies from Colombia, Nepal and Libya are reviewed. The article concludes with the limitations and opportunities of this approach, including the potential of predicting DDR challenges.

  15. Dynamics of the transcriptome response of cultured human embryonic stem cells to ionizing radiation exposure

    Sokolov, Mykyta V., E-mail: sokolovm@mail.nih.gov [Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Panyutin, Irina V., E-mail: ipanyutinv@mail.nih.gov [Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Panyutin, Igor G., E-mail: igorp@helix.nih.gov [Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Neumann, Ronald D., E-mail: rneumann@mail.nih.gov [Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2011-05-10

    One of the key consequences of exposure of human cells to genotoxic agents is the activation of DNA damage responses (DDR). While the mechanisms underpinning DDR in fully differentiated somatic human cells have been studied extensively, molecular signaling events and pathways involved in DDR in pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESC) remain largely unexplored. We studied changes in the human genome-wide transcriptome of H9 hESC line following exposures to 1 Gy of gamma-radiation at 2 h and 16 h post-irradiation. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to verify the expression data for a subset of genes. In parallel, the cell growth, DDR kinetics, and expression of pluripotency markers in irradiated hESC were monitored. The changes in gene expression in hESC after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) are substantially different from those observed in somatic human cell lines. Gene expression patterns at 2 h post-IR showed almost an exclusively p53-dependent, predominantly pro-apoptotic, signature with a total of only 30 up-regulated genes. In contrast, the gene expression patterns at 16 h post-IR showed 354 differentially expressed genes, mostly involved in pro-survival pathways, such as increased expression of metallothioneins, ubiquitin cycle, and general metabolism signaling. Cell growth data paralleled trends in gene expression changes. DDR in hESC followed the kinetics reported for human somatic differentiated cells. The expression of pluripotency markers characteristic of undifferentiated hESC was not affected by exposure to IR during the time course of our analysis. Our data on dynamics of transcriptome response of irradiated hESCs may provide a valuable tool to screen for markers of IR exposure of human cells in their most naive state; thus unmasking the key elements of DDR; at the same time, avoiding the complexity of interpreting distinct cell type-dependent genotoxic stress responses of terminally differentiated cells.

  16. Dynamics of the transcriptome response of cultured human embryonic stem cells to ionizing radiation exposure

    Sokolov, Mykyta V.; Panyutin, Irina V.; Panyutin, Igor G.; Neumann, Ronald D.

    2011-01-01

    One of the key consequences of exposure of human cells to genotoxic agents is the activation of DNA damage responses (DDR). While the mechanisms underpinning DDR in fully differentiated somatic human cells have been studied extensively, molecular signaling events and pathways involved in DDR in pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESC) remain largely unexplored. We studied changes in the human genome-wide transcriptome of H9 hESC line following exposures to 1 Gy of gamma-radiation at 2 h and 16 h post-irradiation. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to verify the expression data for a subset of genes. In parallel, the cell growth, DDR kinetics, and expression of pluripotency markers in irradiated hESC were monitored. The changes in gene expression in hESC after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) are substantially different from those observed in somatic human cell lines. Gene expression patterns at 2 h post-IR showed almost an exclusively p53-dependent, predominantly pro-apoptotic, signature with a total of only 30 up-regulated genes. In contrast, the gene expression patterns at 16 h post-IR showed 354 differentially expressed genes, mostly involved in pro-survival pathways, such as increased expression of metallothioneins, ubiquitin cycle, and general metabolism signaling. Cell growth data paralleled trends in gene expression changes. DDR in hESC followed the kinetics reported for human somatic differentiated cells. The expression of pluripotency markers characteristic of undifferentiated hESC was not affected by exposure to IR during the time course of our analysis. Our data on dynamics of transcriptome response of irradiated hESCs may provide a valuable tool to screen for markers of IR exposure of human cells in their most naive state; thus unmasking the key elements of DDR; at the same time, avoiding the complexity of interpreting distinct cell type-dependent genotoxic stress responses of terminally differentiated cells.

  17. ABA signaling in stress-response and seed development.

    Nakashima, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2013-07-01

    KEY MESSAGE : We review the recent progress on ABA signaling, especially ABA signaling for ABA-dependent gene expression, including the AREB/ABF regulon, SnRK2 protein kinase, 2C-type protein phosphatases and ABA receptors. Drought negatively impacts plant growth and the productivity of crops. Drought causes osmotic stress to organisms, and the osmotic stress causes dehydration in plant cells. Abscisic acid (ABA) is produced under osmotic stress conditions, and it plays an important role in the stress response and tolerance of plants. ABA regulates many genes under osmotic stress conditions. It also regulates gene expression during seed development and germination. The ABA-responsive element (ABRE) is the major cis-element for ABA-responsive gene expression. ABRE-binding protein (AREB)/ABRE-binding factor (ABF) transcription factors (TFs) regulate ABRE-dependent gene expression. Other TFs are also involved in ABA-responsive gene expression. SNF1-related protein kinases 2 are the key regulators of ABA signaling including the AREB/ABF regulon. Recently, ABA receptors and group A 2C-type protein phosphatases were shown to govern the ABA signaling pathway. Moreover, recent studies have suggested that there are interactions between the major ABA signaling pathway and other signaling factors in stress-response and seed development. The control of the expression of ABA signaling factors may improve tolerance to environmental stresses.

  18. 3D PLUS HI-REL DDR2 Termination Regulator Module- A Building Block Function for High Reliability SDRAM DDR2 System Architecture

    Perrot, Nicolas; Dubus, Patrick; Garcia-Sanchez, Esther

    2015-09-01

    Memory system architectures using DDR2 technology need to be compliant with JEDEC JESD8-15A standard [1]. Therefore a bus termination regulator able to sink and source current while regulating VTT voltage is used for this purpose. Such module has been developed by 3D PLUS and is the first space qualified DDR Termination Regulator (DDR2-TR) available on the market. It is based on an innovative Bang-Bang regulation principle, chosen for its speed performance and to guarantee an output voltage that remains within the predefined limits regardless of any output current transients. The output filter type is selected to make the module rugged to any overload condition without complex protection circuits. The module has been specifically designed for low input voltage, low noise and high reliability systems where space is a key consideration. The module uses the 3D PLUS SIP (System-In-Package) technology embedding 3 stacked PCBs. No external filters or decoupling capacitors are needed.

  19. Response of resonant gravitational wave detectors to damped sinusoid signals

    Pai, A; Celsi, C; Pallottino, G V; D'Antonio, S; Astone, P

    2007-01-01

    Till date, the search for burst signals with resonant gravitational wave (GW) detectors has been done using the δ-function approximation for the signal, which was reasonable due to the very small bandwidth of these detectors. However, now with increased bandwidth (of the order of 10 or more Hz) and with the possibility of comparing results with interferometric GW detectors (broad-band), it is very important to exploit the resonant detectors' capability to detect also signals with specific wave shapes. As a first step, we present a study of the response of resonant GW detectors to damped sinusoids with given frequency and decay time and report on the development of a filter matched to these signals. This study is a preliminary step towards the comprehension of the detector response and of the filtering for signals such as the excitation of stellar quasi-normal modes

  20. Agrobacterium tumefaciens responses to plant-derived signaling molecules

    Subramoni, Sujatha; Nathoo, Naeem; Klimov, Eugene; Yuan, Ze-Chun

    2014-01-01

    As a special phytopathogen, Agrobacterium tumefaciens infects a wide range of plant hosts and causes plant tumors also known as crown galls. The complexity of Agrobacterium–plant interaction has been studied for several decades. Agrobacterium pathogenicity is largely attributed to its evolved capabilities of precise recognition and response to plant-derived chemical signals. Agrobacterium perceives plant-derived signals to activate its virulence genes, which are responsible for transferring and integrating its Transferred DNA (T-DNA) from its Tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid into the plant nucleus. The expression of T-DNA in plant hosts leads to the production of a large amount of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), cytokinin (CK), and opines. IAA and CK stimulate plant growth, resulting in tumor formation. Agrobacterium utilizes opines as nutrient sources as well as signals in order to activate its quorum sensing (QS) to further promote virulence and opine metabolism. Intriguingly, Agrobacterium also recognizes plant-derived signals including γ-amino butyric acid and salicylic acid (SA) to activate quorum quenching that reduces the level of QS signals, thereby avoiding the elicitation of plant defense and preserving energy. In addition, Agrobacterium hijacks plant-derived signals including SA, IAA, and ethylene to down-regulate its virulence genes located on the Ti plasmid. Moreover, certain metabolites from corn (Zea mays) also inhibit the expression of Agrobacterium virulence genes. Here we outline the responses of Agrobacterium to major plant-derived signals that impact Agrobacterium–plant interactions. PMID:25071805

  1. Agrobacterium tumefaciens responses to plant-derived signaling molecules

    Sujatha eSubramoni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As a special phytopathogen, Agrobacterium tumefaciens infects a wide range of plant hosts and causes plant tumors also known as crown galls. The complexity of Agrobacterium-plant interaction has been studied for several decades. Agrobacterium pathogenicity is largely attributed to its evolved capabilities of precise recognition and response to plant-derived chemical signals. Agrobacterium perceives plant-derived signals to activate its virulence genes, which are responsible for transferring and integrating its T-DNA (Transferred DNA from its Tumour-inducing (Ti plasmid into the plant nucleus. The expression of T-DNA in plant hosts leads to the production of a large amount of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, cytokinin (CK and opines. IAA and CK stimulate plant growth, resulting in tumor formation. Agrobacterium utilizes opines as nutrient sources as well as signals in order to activate its quorum sensing (QS to further promote virulence and opine metabolism. Intriguingly, Agrobacterium also recognizes plant-derived signals including -amino butyric acid (GABA and salicylic acid (SA to activate quorum quenching that reduces the level of QS signals, thereby avoiding the elicitation of plant defense and preserving energy. In addition, Agrobacterium hijacks plant-derived signals including SA, IAA, and ethylene (ET to down-regulate its virulence genes located on the Ti plasmid. Moreover, certain metabolites from corn (Zea mays also inhibit the expression of Agrobacterium virulence genes. Here we outline the responses of Agrobacterium to major plant-derived signals that impact Agrobacterium-plant interactions.

  2. DDR: Efficient computational method to predict drug–target interactions using graph mining and machine learning approaches

    Olayan, Rawan S.; Ashoor, Haitham; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2017-01-01

    but not all DTIs between them are not known. Using independent sources of evidence, we verify as correct 22 out of the top 25 DDR novel predictions. This suggests that DDR can be used as an efficient method to identify correct DTIs.

  3. DDR: Efficient computational method to predict drug–target interactions using graph mining and machine learning approaches

    Olayan, Rawan S.

    2017-11-23

    Motivation Finding computationally drug-target interactions (DTIs) is a convenient strategy to identify new DTIs at low cost with reasonable accuracy. However, the current DTI prediction methods suffer the high false positive prediction rate. Results We developed DDR, a novel method that improves the DTI prediction accuracy. DDR is based on the use of a heterogeneous graph that contains known DTIs with multiple similarities between drugs and multiple similarities between target proteins. DDR applies non-linear similarity fusion method to combine different similarities. Before fusion, DDR performs a pre-processing step where a subset of similarities is selected in a heuristic process to obtain an optimized combination of similarities. Then, DDR applies a random forest model using different graph-based features extracted from the DTI heterogeneous graph. Using five repeats of 10-fold cross-validation, three testing setups, and the weighted average of area under the precision-recall curve (AUPR) scores, we show that DDR significantly reduces the AUPR score error relative to the next best start-of-the-art method for predicting DTIs by 34% when the drugs are new, by 23% when targets are new, and by 34% when the drugs and the targets are known but not all DTIs between them are not known. Using independent sources of evidence, we verify as correct 22 out of the top 25 DDR novel predictions. This suggests that DDR can be used as an efficient method to identify correct DTIs.

  4. Schriftstellerinnen der DDR und feministisches Bewußtsein im Staatssozialismus

    Eva Kaufmann

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Seit den 1960er Jahren produzierten Schriftstellerinnen in der DDR wie Christa Wolf, Irmtraud Morgner, Sarah Kirsch, Brigitte Reimann, Charlotte Worgitzky, Lia Pirskawetz, und Maya Wiens eine vielfältige Literatur zu frauenrelevanten Themen. Den Obertitel „The Promised Land“ (das gelobte Land hat Lorna Martens Irmtraud Morgner entlehnt, der Autorin, die sie neben Christa Wolf als wichtigste Zeugin für „feminist writing“ in der DDR betrachtet. In Morgners Roman Leben und Abenteuer der Trobadora Beatriz steht der Begriff „gelobtes Land“ bezogen auf die DDR in einem ironischen Zusammenhang. Mit simplem Jaja oder Neinnein ist diesem „Ort des Wunderbaren“ (Morgner nicht beizukommen. Vergleichbares signalisiert auch das Fragezeichen, das Martens hinter den Begriff „Promised Land“ setzt. Der anspielungsreiche Verweis auf das Land erscheint auch insofern nützlich, als die Eigenart feministischen Schreibens genauer zu fassen ist, wenn über das Land selbst, namentlich seine Frauenpolitik, Auskünfte gegeben werden. Lorna Martens möchte herausfinden, wie Schriftstellerinnen in der DDR feministisches Bewusstsein artikuliert haben, d.h. feministisches Bewusstsein unter den vom Staatssozialismus geschaffenen Bedingungen.

  5. Crosstalk between mitochondrial stress signals regulates yeast chronological lifespan.

    Schroeder, Elizabeth A; Shadel, Gerald S

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) exists in multiple copies per cell and is essential for oxidative phosphorylation. Depleted or mutated mtDNA promotes numerous human diseases and may contribute to aging. Reduced TORC1 signaling in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, extends chronological lifespan (CLS) in part by generating a mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) signal that epigenetically alters nuclear gene expression. To address the potential requirement for mtDNA maintenance in this response, we analyzed strains lacking the mitochondrial base-excision repair enzyme Ntg1p. Extension of CLS by mtROS signaling and reduced TORC1 activity, but not caloric restriction, was abrogated in ntg1Δ strains that exhibited mtDNA depletion without defects in respiration. The DNA damage response (DDR) kinase Rad53p, which transduces pro-longevity mtROS signals, is also activated in ntg1Δ strains. Restoring mtDNA copy number alleviated Rad53p activation and re-established CLS extension following mtROS signaling, indicating that Rad53p senses mtDNA depletion directly. Finally, DDR kinases regulate nucleus-mitochondria localization dynamics of Ntg1p. From these results, we conclude that the DDR pathway senses and may regulate Ntg1p-dependent mtDNA stability. Furthermore, Rad53p senses multiple mitochondrial stresses in a hierarchical manner to elicit specific physiological outcomes, exemplified by mtDNA depletion overriding the ability of Rad53p to transduce an adaptive mtROS longevity signal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ionic signaling in plant responses to gravity and touch

    Fasano, Jeremiah M.; Massa, Gioia D.; Gilroy, Simon

    2002-01-01

    Touch and gravity are two of the many stimuli that plants must integrate to generate an appropriate growth response. Due to the mechanical nature of both of these signals, shared signal transduction elements could well form the basis of the cross-talk between these two sensory systems. However, touch stimulation must elicit signaling events across the plasma membrane whereas gravity sensing is thought to represent transformation of an internal force, amyloplast sedimentation, to signal transduction events. In addition, factors such as turgor pressure and presence of the cell wall may also place unique constraints on these plant mechanosensory systems. Even so, the candidate signal transduction elements in both plant touch and gravity sensing, changes in Ca2+, pH and membrane potential, do mirror the known ionic basis of signaling in animal mechanosensory cells. Distinct spatial and temporal signatures of Ca2+ ions may encode information about the different mechanosignaling stimuli. Signals such as Ca2+ waves or action potentials may also rapidly transfer information perceived in one cell throughout a tissue or organ leading to the systemic reactions characteristic of plant touch and gravity responses. Longer-term growth responses are likely sustained via changes in gene expression and asymmetries in compounds such as inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and calmodulin. Thus, it seems likely that plant mechanoperception involves both spatial and temporal encoding of information at all levels, from the cell to the whole plant. Defining this patterning will be a critical step towards understanding how plants integrate information from multiple mechanical stimuli to an appropriate growth response.

  7. Danger Signals Activating the Immune Response after Trauma

    Stefanie Hirsiger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sterile injury can cause a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS that resembles the host response during sepsis. The inflammatory response following trauma comprises various systems of the human body which are cross-linked with each other within a highly complex network of inflammation. Endogenous danger signals (danger-associated molecular patterns; DAMPs; alarmins as well as exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs play a crucial role in the initiation of the immune response. With popularization of the “danger theory,” numerous DAMPs and PAMPs and their corresponding pathogen-recognition receptors have been identified. In this paper, we highlight the role of the DAMPs high-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1, interleukin-1α (IL-1α, and interleukin-33 (IL-33 as unique dual-function mediators as well as mitochondrial danger signals released upon cellular trauma and necrosis.

  8. Signalling through C-type lectin receptors: shaping immune responses

    Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Gringhuis, Sonja I.

    2009-01-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) expressed by dendritic cells are crucial for tailoring immune responses to pathogens. Following pathogen binding, CLRs trigger distinct signalling pathways that induce the expression of specific cytokines which determine T cell polarization fates. Some CLRs can induce

  9. Investigations into the bystander effect: signal versus response

    Vines, A.M.; Seymour, C.B.; Mothersill, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    The bystander effect is the general term used to describe the effects seen in cells or tissue that have never been directly irradiated, but display similar symptoms to those that have. Some of these symptoms include reduced cell survival, chromosomal aberrations, and increased apoptosis. This investigation aims to explore the signal produced by certain cell and tissue types, and the relationship this has with the subsequent response. The goal is to elucidate whether the reduction in cell survival frequently seen in response to the bystander effect is determined by the signal produced or the response of the cell type. Firstly, a matrix design experiment was set up using 3 cell lines. Each cell line was irradiated to produce ICCM (Irradiated Cell Conditioned Medium), which was in turn used to treat all cell lines in the study. Medium transfer is carried out within cell lines, (ICCM from CHO onto CHO cells) and between cell lines (ICCM from CHO onto HPV-G cells). In the second set of experiments, tissue samples from male Wister rats were used to generate ITCM (Irradiated Tissue Conditioned Medium). This medium was then tested on a cell line with an established response to the bystander effect. As an extension to these two experimental protocols, both ICCM and ITCM were used to investigate if there is calcium flux in the cells as a response to the bystander medium. This has recently been shown to be an early response to the bystander signal. Results indicate that it is the signal produced by the irradiated cells that determine the overall effect of the bystander signal, and not the response of the cells expose to it. CHO-K1 cells treated with autologous ICCM show a 16.2% drop in cell survival. However, when this cell line is treated with HPV-G ICCM, it shows a 36.5% drop in survival. HPV-G cells treated with autologous medium display a similar response to this, with a 41.1% drop in survival, though when treated with CHO-K1 ICCM, the drop in survival is 22.9%. This

  10. The Possible Crosstalk of MOB2 With NDR1/2 Kinases in Cell Cycle and DNA Damage Signaling.

    Gundogdu, Ramazan; Hergovich, Alexander

    2016-09-06

    This article is the authors' opinion of the roles of the signal transducer Mps one binder 2 (MOB2) in the control of cell cycle progression and the DNA Damage Response (DDR). We recently found that endogenous MOB2 is required to prevent the accumulation of endogenous DNA damage in order to prevent the undesired, and possibly detrimental, activation of cell cycle checkpoints. In this regard, it is noteworthy that MOB2 has been linked biochemically to the regulation of the NDR1/2 (aka STK38/STK38L) protein kinases, which themselves have functions at different steps of the cell cycle. Therefore, we are speculating in this article about the possible connections of MOB2 with NDR1/2 kinases in cell cycle and DDR Signaling.

  11. Signalling network construction for modelling plant defence response.

    Dragana Miljkovic

    Full Text Available Plant defence signalling response against various pathogens, including viruses, is a complex phenomenon. In resistant interaction a plant cell perceives the pathogen signal, transduces it within the cell and performs a reprogramming of the cell metabolism leading to the pathogen replication arrest. This work focuses on signalling pathways crucial for the plant defence response, i.e., the salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene signal transduction pathways, in the Arabidopsis thaliana model plant. The initial signalling network topology was constructed manually by defining the representation formalism, encoding the information from public databases and literature, and composing a pathway diagram. The manually constructed network structure consists of 175 components and 387 reactions. In order to complement the network topology with possibly missing relations, a new approach to automated information extraction from biological literature was developed. This approach, named Bio3graph, allows for automated extraction of biological relations from the literature, resulting in a set of (component1, reaction, component2 triplets and composing a graph structure which can be visualised, compared to the manually constructed topology and examined by the experts. Using a plant defence response vocabulary of components and reaction types, Bio3graph was applied to a set of 9,586 relevant full text articles, resulting in 137 newly detected reactions between the components. Finally, the manually constructed topology and the new reactions were merged to form a network structure consisting of 175 components and 524 reactions. The resulting pathway diagram of plant defence signalling represents a valuable source for further computational modelling and interpretation of omics data. The developed Bio3graph approach, implemented as an executable language processing and graph visualisation workflow, is publically available at http://ropot.ijs.si/bio3graph/and can be

  12. Spectral responses of gravel beaches to tidal signals

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C.

    2017-01-01

    Tides have been recognized as a major driving forcing affecting coastal aquifer system, and deterministic modeling has been very effective in elucidating mechanisms caused by tides. However, such modeling does not lend itself to capture embedded information in the signal, and rather focuses on the primary processes. Here, using yearlong data sets measured at beaches in Alaska Prince William Sound, we performed spectral and correlation analyses to identify temporal behavior of pore-water pressure, temperature and salinity. We found that the response of the beach system was characterized by fluctuations of embedded diurnal, semidiurnal, terdiurnal and quarterdiurnal tidal components. Hydrodynamic dispersion of salinity and temperature, and the thermal conductivity greatly affected pore water signals. Spectral analyses revealed a faster dissipation of the semi-diurnal component with respect to the diurnal components. Correlation functions showed that salinity had a relatively short memory of the tidal signal when inland freshwater recharge was large. In contrast, the signature of the tidal signal on pore-water temperature persisted for longer times, up to a week. We also found that heterogeneity greatly affected beach response. The response varied from a simple linear mapping in the frequency domain to complete modulation and masking of the input frequencies.

  13. Response inhibition signals and miscoding of direction in dorsomedial striatum

    Daniel W Bryden

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability to inhibit action is critical for everyday behavior and is affected by a variety of disorders. Behavioral control and response inhibition is thought to depend on a neural circuit that includes the dorsal striatum, yet the neural signals that lead to response inhibition and its failure are unclear. To address this issue, we recorded from neurons in rat dorsomedial striatum (mDS in a novel task in which rats responded to a spatial cue that signaled that reward would be delivered either to the left or to the right. On 80% of trials rats were instructed to respond in the direction cued by the light (GO. On 20% of trials a second light illuminated instructing the rat to refrain from making the cued movement and move in the opposite direction (STOP. Many neurons in mDS encoded direction, firing more or less strongly for GO movements made ipsilateral or contralateral to the recording electrode. Neurons that fired more strongly for contralateral GO responses were more active when rats were faster, showed reduced activity on STOP trials, and miscoded direction on errors, suggesting that when these neurons were overly active, response inhibition failed. Neurons that decreased firing for contralateral movement were excited during trials in which the rat was required to stop the ipsilateral movement. For these neurons activity was reduced when errors were made and was negatively correlated with movement time suggesting that when these neurons were less active on STOP trials, response inhibition failed. Finally, the activity of a significant number of neurons represented a global inhibitory signal, firing more strongly during response inhibition regardless of response direction. Breakdown by cell type suggests that putative medium spiny neurons tended to fire more strongly under STOP trials, whereas putative interneurons exhibited both activity patterns. 

  14. Reproducibility and signal response linearity of Alanine gel dosimeter

    Silva, Cleber Feijo Silva; Campos, Leticia Lucente

    2008-01-01

    Gel Dosimetry has been studied mainly for medical applications, because it presents signal response in the dose range used in radiotherapy treatments and it can be applied for three dimensional dosimetry. Alanine gel dosimeter is a new gel material developed at IPEN that presents significant improvement on previous alanine systems developed by Costa (1994). The DL-Alanine (C 3 H 7 NO 2 ) is an amino acid tissue equivalent that improves the production of ferric ions in the solution. These ferric ions concentration can be measured by spectrophotometry technique. This work aims to study the reproducibility of the alanine gel solutions and the signal response as a function of gamma radiation dose, considering that these two properties are very important for characterizing and standardizing any dosimeter. (author)

  15. Radiation-induced adaptive response and intracellular signal transduction pathways

    Tachibana, Akira

    2009-01-01

    As an essential biological function, cells can sense the radiation even at low dose and respond to it, and which is one of bases of the radiation-induced adaptive response (AR) where effects caused by high dose radiation are reduced by prior exposure to low dose radiation (LDR). Here described are studies of AR in well established m5S cells on the intracellular signal transduction that involves sensing of LDR and transmitting of its signal within the cell network. The first signal for AR yielded by LDR on the cell membrane is exactly unknown though hydrogen peroxide and phorbol ester (PMA) can reportedly cause AR. As PMA activates protein kinase C (PKC) and its inhibitors suppress AR, participation of PKC in AR has been suggested and supported by studies showing PKCα activation by LDR. In addition, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is shown to participate in AR by those facts that the enzyme is activated by LDR, a p38 MAPK inhibitor suppresses AR, and PKC inhibitors suppress the enzyme activation, which also suggesting that the signaling from PKC to p38 MAPK can become operative by LDR. However, the possible reverse signaling is also suggested, and thus the activation of positive feedback mechanism is postulated in PKC/p38 MAPK/phospholipase δ1/ PKC pathway. Cells introduced with siRNA against Prkca gene (coding PKCs) produce reduced amount of the enzyme, particularly, of PKCα. In those cells, AR by 5 Gy X-ray is not observed and thereby PKCα is involved in AR. The signaling in AR is only partly elucidated at present as above, and more detailed studies including identification of more PKC subtypes and signaling to DNA repair system are considered necessary. (K.T.)

  16. Filter frequency response of time dependent signal using Laplace transform

    Shestakov, Aleksei I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-16

    We analyze the effect a filter has on a time dependent signal x(t). If X(s) is the Laplace transform of x and H (s) is the filter Transfer function, the response in frequency space is X (s) H (s). Consequently, in real space, the response is the convolution (x*h) (t), where hi is the Laplace inverse of H. Effects are analyzed and analytically for functions such as (t/tc)2 e-t/t$_c$, where tc = const. We consider lowpass, highpass and bandpass filters.

  17. DC response of dust to low frequency AC signals

    McKinlay, Michael; Konopka, Uwe; Thomas, Edward

    2017-10-01

    Macroscopic changes in the shape and equilibrium position of clouds of charged microparticles suspended in a plasma have been observed in response to low frequency AC signals. In these experiments, dusty plasmas consisting of 2-micron diameter silica microspheres suspended between an anode and cathode in an argon, DC glow discharge plasma are produced in a grounded, 6-way cross vacuum chamber. An AC signal, produced by a function generator and amplified by a bipolar op-amp, is superimposed onto the potential from the cathode. The frequencies of the applied AC signals, ranging from tens to hundreds of kHz, are comparable to the ion-neutral collision frequency; well below the ion/electron plasma frequencies, but also considerably higher than the dust plasma frequency. This presentation will detail the experimental setup, present documentation and categorization of observations of the dust response, and present an initial model of the response. This work is supported by funding from the US Dept. of Energy, Grant Number DE-SC0016330, and by the National Science Foundation, Grant Number PHY-1613087.

  18. DNA damage response is hijacked by human papillomaviruses to complete their life cycle

    Hong, Shi-yuan

    2017-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is activated when DNA is altered by intrinsic or extrinsic agents. This pathway is a complex signaling network and plays important roles in genome stability, tumor transformation, and cell cycle regulation. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the main etiological agents of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer ranks as the fourth most common cancer among women and the second most frequent cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Over 200 types of HPVs have been identifi...

  19. Interaction Dynamics Determine Signaling and Output Pathway Responses

    Klement Stojanovski

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of interaction dynamics in signaling pathways can shed light on pathway architecture and provide insights into targets for intervention. Here, we explored the relevance of kinetic rate constants of a key upstream osmosensor in the yeast high-osmolarity glycerol-mitogen-activated protein kinase (HOG-MAPK pathway to signaling output responses. We created mutant pairs of the Sln1-Ypd1 complex interface that caused major compensating changes in the association (kon and dissociation (koff rate constants (kinetic perturbations but only moderate changes in the overall complex affinity (Kd. Yeast cells carrying a Sln1-Ypd1 mutant pair with moderate increases in kon and koff displayed a lower threshold of HOG pathway activation than wild-type cells. Mutants with higher kon and koff rates gave rise to higher basal signaling and gene expression but impaired osmoadaptation. Thus, the kon and koff rates of the components in the Sln1 osmosensor determine proper signaling dynamics and osmoadaptation.

  20. Yeast signaling pathways in the oxidative stress response

    Ikner, Aminah [Section of Microbiology, Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Shiozaki, Kazuhiro [Section of Microbiology, Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)]. E-mail: kshiozaki@ucdavis.edu

    2005-01-06

    Oxidative stress that generates the reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the major causes of DNA damage and mutations. The 'DNA damage checkpoint' that arrests cell cycle and repairs damaged DNA has been a focus of recent studies, and the genetically amenable model systems provided by yeasts have been playing a leading role in the eukaryotic checkpoint research. However, means to eliminate ROS are likely to be as important as the DNA repair mechanisms in order to suppress mutations in the chromosomal DNA, and yeasts also serve as excellent models to understand how eukaryotes combat oxidative stress. In this article, we present an overview of the signaling pathways that sense oxidative stress and induce expression of various anti-oxidant genes in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Three conserved signaling modules have been identified in the oxidative stress response of these diverse yeast species: the stress-responsive MAP kinase cascade, the multistep phosphorelay and the AP-1-like transcription factor. The structure and function of these signaling modules are discussed.

  1. Yeast signaling pathways in the oxidative stress response

    Ikner, Aminah; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative stress that generates the reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the major causes of DNA damage and mutations. The 'DNA damage checkpoint' that arrests cell cycle and repairs damaged DNA has been a focus of recent studies, and the genetically amenable model systems provided by yeasts have been playing a leading role in the eukaryotic checkpoint research. However, means to eliminate ROS are likely to be as important as the DNA repair mechanisms in order to suppress mutations in the chromosomal DNA, and yeasts also serve as excellent models to understand how eukaryotes combat oxidative stress. In this article, we present an overview of the signaling pathways that sense oxidative stress and induce expression of various anti-oxidant genes in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Three conserved signaling modules have been identified in the oxidative stress response of these diverse yeast species: the stress-responsive MAP kinase cascade, the multistep phosphorelay and the AP-1-like transcription factor. The structure and function of these signaling modules are discussed

  2. Cell responses to FGFR3 signalling: growth, differentiation and apoptosis

    L'Hote, Corine G.M.; Knowles, Margaret A.

    2005-01-01

    FGFR3 is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) of the FGF receptor family, known to have a negative regulatory effect on long bone growth. Fgfr3 knockout mice display longer bones and, accordingly, most germline-activating mutations in man are associated with dwarfism. Somatically, some of the same activating mutations are associated with the human cancers multiple myeloma, cervical carcinoma and carcinoma of the bladder. How signalling through FGFR3 can lead to either chondrocyte apoptosis or cancer cell proliferation is not fully understood. Although FGFR3 can be expressed as two main splice isoforms (IIIb or IIIc), there is no apparent link with specific cell responses, which may rather be associated with the cell type or its differentiation status. Depending on cell type, differential activation of STAT proteins has been observed. STAT1 phosphorylation seems to be involved in inhibition of chondrocyte proliferation while activation of the ERK pathway inhibits chondrocyte differentiation and B-cell proliferation (as in multiple myeloma). The role of FGFR3 in epithelial cancers (bladder and cervix) is not known. Some of the cell specificity may arise via modulation of signalling by crosstalk with other signalling pathways. Recently, inhibition of the ERK pathway in achondroplastic mice has provided hope for an approach to the treatment of dwarfism. Further understanding of the ability of FGFR3 to trigger different responses depending on cell type and cellular context may lead to treatments for both skeletal dysplasias and cancer

  3. Mechanisms and pharmacogenetic signals underlying thiazide diuretics blood pressure response.

    Shahin, Mohamed H; Johnson, Julie A

    2016-04-01

    Thiazide (TZD) diuretics are among the most commonly prescribed antihypertensives globally; however their chronic blood pressure (BP) lowering mechanism remains unclear. Herein we discuss the current evidence regarding specific mechanisms regulating the antihypertensive effects of TZDs, suggesting that TZDs act via multiple complex and interacting mechanisms, including natriuresis with short term use and direct vasodilatory effects chronically. Additionally, we review pharmacogenomics signals that have been associated with TZDs BP-response in several cohorts (i.e. NEDD4L, PRKCA, EDNRA-GNAS, and YEATS4) and discuss how these genes might be related to TZD BP-response mechanism. Understanding the association between these genes and TZD BP mechanism might facilitate the development of new drugs and therapeutic approaches based on a deeper understanding of the determinants of BP-response. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Systems biology approach identifies the kinase Csnk1a1 as a regulator of the DNA damage response in embryonic stem cells.

    Carreras Puigvert, Jordi; von Stechow, Louise; Siddappa, Ramakrishnaiah; Pines, Alex; Bahjat, Mahnoush; Haazen, Lizette C J M; Olsen, Jesper V; Vrieling, Harry; Meerman, John H N; Mullenders, Leon H F; van de Water, Bob; Danen, Erik H J

    2013-01-22

    In pluripotent stem cells, DNA damage triggers loss of pluripotency and apoptosis as a safeguard to exclude damaged DNA from the lineage. An intricate DNA damage response (DDR) signaling network ensures that the response is proportional to the severity of the damage. We combined an RNA interference screen targeting all kinases, phosphatases, and transcription factors with global transcriptomics and phosphoproteomics to map the DDR in mouse embryonic stem cells treated with the DNA cross-linker cisplatin. Networks derived from canonical pathways shared in all three data sets were implicated in DNA damage repair, cell cycle and survival, and differentiation. Experimental probing of these networks identified a mode of DNA damage-induced Wnt signaling that limited apoptosis. Silencing or deleting the p53 gene demonstrated that genotoxic stress elicited Wnt signaling in a p53-independent manner. Instead, this response occurred through reduced abundance of Csnk1a1 (CK1α), a kinase that inhibits β-catenin. Together, our findings reveal a balance between p53-mediated elimination of stem cells (through loss of pluripotency and apoptosis) and Wnt signaling that attenuates this response to tune the outcome of the DDR.

  5. Purinergic signaling to terminate TLR responses in macrophages

    Kajal eHamidzadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages undergo profound physiological alterations when they encounter pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. These alterations can result in the elaboration of cytokines and mediators that promote immune responses and contribute to the clearance of pathogens. These innate immune responses by myeloid cells are transient. The termination of these secretory responses is not due to the dilution of stimuli, but rather to the active down-regulation of innate responses induced by the very PAMPs that initiated them. Here we describe a purinergic autoregulatory program whereby TLR-stimulated macrophages control their activation state. In this program, TLR stimulated macrophages undergo metabolic alterations that result in the production of ATP and its release through membrane pannexin channels. This purine nucleotide is rapidly hydrolyzed to adenosine by ectoenzymes on the macrophage surface, CD39 and CD73. Adenosine then signals through the P1 class of seven transmembrane receptors to induce a regulatory state that is characterized by the down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. This purinergic autoregulatory system mitigates the collateral damage that would be caused by the prolonged activation of macrophages, and rather allows the macrophage to maintain homeostasis. The transient activation of macrophages can be prolonged by treating macrophages with IFN-γ. IFN-γ treated macrophages become less sensitive to the regulatory effects of adenosine, allowing them to sustain macrophage activation for the duration of an adaptive immune response.

  6. Escape response of planktonic protists to fluid mechanical signals

    Jakobsen, Hans Henrik

    2001-01-01

    The escape response to fluid mechanical signals was examined in 6 protists, 4 ciliates and 2 dinoflagellates. When exposed to a siphon flow. 3 species of ciliates, Balanion comatum, Strobilidium sp., and Mesodinium pulex, responded with escape jumps. The threshold deformation rates required...... times lower than that of a non-jumping similar sized protist when the predator was Temora longicornis, which captures prey entrained in a feeding current. However, when the predator was the ambush- feeding copepod Acartia tonsa, the predation mortalities of jumping and non-jumping protists were...... of similar magnitude. Escape responses may thus be advantageous in some situations. However, jumping behaviour may also enhance susceptibility to some predators, explaining the different predator avoidance strategies (jumping or not) that have evolved in planktonic protists....

  7. Technical basis for the ITER detailed design report, cost review and safety analysis (DDR)

    1997-01-01

    The ITER Detailed Design Report (DDR), Cost Review and Safety Analysis is the 3rd major milestone representing the progress made in the ITER Engineering Design Activities. With the approval of the Interim Design Report (IDR), it has been possible to freeze the main concepts and system approaches for ITER and to develop the design in more detail for the individual components and sub-systems. This report, although designed to be fully understandable as a separate document, focusses particularly on the main changes since the IDR

  8. Technical basis for the ITER detailed design report, cost review and safety analysis (DDR)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The ITER Detailed Design Report (DDR), Cost Review and Safety Analysis is the 3rd major milestone representing the progress made in the ITER Engineering Design Activities. With the approval of the Interim Design Report (IDR), it has been possible to freeze the main concepts and system approaches for ITER and to develop the design in more detail for the individual components and sub-systems. This report, although designed to be fully understandable as a separate document, focusses particularly on the main changes since the IDR. Refs, figs, tabs

  9. Experimental study on heavy-ion single event effect on nanometer DDR SRAM

    Luo Yinhong; Zhang Fengqi; Guo Hongxia; Zhou Hui; Wang Yanping; Zhang Keying

    2013-01-01

    Single event effect experimental study on 90 nm and 65 nm DDR SRAM were carried out, single event upset (SEU) cross section was discussed as a function of several parameters such as feature size, test pattern, incidence angle, supply voltage. Key influence factors and effect rule were analyzed. Feasibility of the current test method was discussed. Results indicate that, SEU cross section reduces as technologies scale down; the influence of test pattern and power supply on SEU cross section is small; tilt angle increases SEU cross section due to multiple upset increasement. The applicability of cosine tilt test method is correlative to ion species and linear energy transfer (LET) values. (authors)

  10. UV/Fenton photo-oxidation of Drimarene Dark Red (DDR) containing textile-dye wastewater

    Hudaya, T.; Anthonios, J.; Septianto, E.

    2016-11-01

    Textile dye wastewater contains organic pollutants which are non-biodegradable, characterized by low BOD/COD ratio of typically Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs). One of the AOPs method which is the UV/H2O2/Fe2+ (or UV/Fenton) offers not only relatively low cost but also quite effective (in terms of color removal and reaction time) treatment. This particular research aimed to optimize the conditions of UV/Fenton photo-oxidation process for Drimarene Dark Red containing textile- dye wastewater. The two main operating conditions to be optimized were the initial concentration of H2O2 ranged between 0.022-0.078 %-w and the mol ratio of Fe2+: H2O2 was varied from 1: 13 up to 1: 45, using the Central Composite Design experimental matrix. The photo-oxidation was carried out at the optimum pH of 3 from some previous experiments. The best processing conditions of the photo-oxidation of Drimarene Dark Red (DDR) were found at the initial concentration of H2O2 at 0.050%-w and the mole ratio Fe2+: H2O2 of 1: 22. Under these conditions, the measured 2nd order pseudo-rate constantwas 0.021 M-1.min-1. The DDR color removal of 90% was surprisingly achievable within only 10 minutes reaction time.

  11. DMPD: Innate immune responses: crosstalk of signaling and regulation of genetranscription. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Full Text Available 16753195 Innate immune responses: crosstalk of signaling and regulation of genetran...l) (.csml) Show Innate immune responses: crosstalk of signaling and regulation of genetranscription. PubmedI...D 16753195 Title Innate immune responses: crosstalk of signaling and regulation o

  12. SU-F-SPS-08: Measuring the Interaction Of DDR Cell Receptors and Extracellular Matrix Collagen in Prostate Cells

    Dong, J; Sarkar, A; Hoffmann, P [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Suhail, A; Fridman, R [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Discoidin domain receptors (DDR) have recently been recognized as important players in cancer progression. DDRs are cell receptors that interact with collagen, an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein. However the detailed mechanism of their interaction is unclear. Here we attempted to examine their interaction in terms of structural (surface topography), mechanical (rupture force), and kinetic (binding probability) information on the single molecular scale with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Methods: The Quantitative Nano-mechanical property Mapping (QNM) mode of AFM allowed to assess the cells in liquid growth media at their optimal physiological while being viable. Human benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH-1) cell line was genetically regulated to suppress DDR expression (DDR- cells) and was compared with naturally DDR expressing cells (DDR+). Results: Binding force measurements (n = 1000) were obtained before and after the two groups were treated with fibronectin (FN), an integrin-inhibiting antibody to block the binding of integrin. The quantification indicates that cells containing DDR bind with collagen at a most probable force of 80.3–83.0 ±7.6 pN. The probability of them binding is 0.167 when other interactions (mainly due to integrin-collagen binding) are minimized. Conclusion: Together with further force measurements at different pulling speeds will determine dissociation rate, binding distance and activation barrier. These parameters in benign cells provides some groundwork in understanding DDR’s behavior in various cell microenvironments such as in malignant tumor cells. Funding supported by Richard Barber Interdisciplinary Research Program of Wayne State University.

  13. SU-F-SPS-08: Measuring the Interaction Of DDR Cell Receptors and Extracellular Matrix Collagen in Prostate Cells

    Dong, J; Sarkar, A; Hoffmann, P; Suhail, A; Fridman, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Discoidin domain receptors (DDR) have recently been recognized as important players in cancer progression. DDRs are cell receptors that interact with collagen, an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein. However the detailed mechanism of their interaction is unclear. Here we attempted to examine their interaction in terms of structural (surface topography), mechanical (rupture force), and kinetic (binding probability) information on the single molecular scale with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Methods: The Quantitative Nano-mechanical property Mapping (QNM) mode of AFM allowed to assess the cells in liquid growth media at their optimal physiological while being viable. Human benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH-1) cell line was genetically regulated to suppress DDR expression (DDR- cells) and was compared with naturally DDR expressing cells (DDR+). Results: Binding force measurements (n = 1000) were obtained before and after the two groups were treated with fibronectin (FN), an integrin-inhibiting antibody to block the binding of integrin. The quantification indicates that cells containing DDR bind with collagen at a most probable force of 80.3–83.0 ±7.6 pN. The probability of them binding is 0.167 when other interactions (mainly due to integrin-collagen binding) are minimized. Conclusion: Together with further force measurements at different pulling speeds will determine dissociation rate, binding distance and activation barrier. These parameters in benign cells provides some groundwork in understanding DDR’s behavior in various cell microenvironments such as in malignant tumor cells. Funding supported by Richard Barber Interdisciplinary Research Program of Wayne State University

  14. Age-related modifications of type I collagen impair DDR1-induced apoptosis in non-invasive breast carcinoma cells.

    Charles, Saby; Hassan, Rammal; Kevin, Magnien; Emilie, Buache; Sylvie, Brassart-Pasco; Laurence, Van-Gulick; Pierre, Jeannesson; Erik, Maquoi; Hamid, Morjani

    2018-05-07

    Type I collagen and DDR1 axis has been described to decrease cell proliferation and to initiate apoptosis in non-invasive breast carcinoma in three-dimensional cell culture matrices. Moreover, MT1-MMP down-regulates these effects. Here, we address the effect of type I collagen aging and MT1-MMP expression on cell proliferation suppression and induced-apoptosis in non-invasive MCF-7 and ZR-75-1 breast carcinoma. We provide evidence for a decrease in cell growth and an increase in apoptosis in the presence of adult collagen when compared to old collagen. This effect involves a differential activation of DDR1, as evidenced by a higher DDR1 phosphorylation level in adult collagen. In adult collagen, inhibition of DDR1 expression and kinase function induced an increase in cell growth to a level similar to that observed in old collagen. The impact of aging on the sensitivity of collagen to MT1-MMP has been reported recently. We used the MT1-MMP expression strategy to verify whether, by degrading adult type I collagen, it could lead to the same phenotype observed in old collagen 3D matrix. MT1-MMP overexpression abrogated the proliferation suppression and induced-apoptosis effects only in the presence of adult collagen. This suggests that differential collagen degradation by MT1-MMP induced a structural disorganization of adult collagen and inhibits DDR1 activation. This could in turn impair DDR1-induced cell growth suppression and apoptosis. Taken together, our data suggest that modifications of collagen structural organization, due to aging, contribute to the loss of the growth suppression and induced apoptosis effect of collagen in luminal breast carcinoma. MT1-MMP-dependent degradation and aging of collagen have no additive effects on these processes.

  15. Weibliche Arbeitserfahrungen in der DDR Women’s Work experiences in the GDR

    Albrecht Wiesener

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Annegret Schüle kommt in ihrer Untersuchung zu dem Ergebnis, dass die DDR-Diktatur das Leben von Frauen mehr veränderte als das der Männer. Ihre auf Interviews basierende Untersuchung fokussiert den (Berufs-Alltag von Frauen in der Leipziger Baumwollspinnerei. Anhand der drei Kategorien „Generation“, „Frauenarbeit“ und „Vergemeinschaftung im Betrieb“ diskutiert sie die geführten Interviews , die Förderung weiblicher Erwerbstätiger einerseits und das Negativimage des Textilbetriebs andererseits. Die Autorin legt eine überzeugende Studie zur Erfahrungsgeschichte weiblicher Industriearbeit vor und zeigt am konkreten Beispiel, wie die DDR-Gesellschaft in einer von Frauen getragenen familiarisierten Betriebskultur nicht aufgebrochen, sondern in einer eigentümlichen Verbindung von Geborgenheit und Unterordnung reproduziert wurde.Schüle argues that the Eastern German dictatorship had a greater impact on the lives of women than on those of their male counterparts. Her research, based on interviews with female workers in a in a cotton-spinning factory in Leipzig, portrays women’s everyday-life and work, and offers a convincing study of the experience of female industrial workers. Using the three categories “cohort,” “women’s work,” and a discourse of “factory-as-community,” Schüle discusses her interviews with respect to the promotion of female textile workers on the one hand and the negative stereotypes associated with working in the textile industry on the other hand. Using concrete examples, Schüle demonstrates how a factory organised by women did not undermine the patriarchal frame in which it was embedded but how existing power differentials were reproduced as part of a discourse of family, security, and subordination.

  16. L'interconnexion entre la sécurité des communautés et les programmes de DDR: Un étude de terrain au Burundi

    Willems, R.C.; Kleingeld, J.; van Leeuwen, M

    2010-01-01

    The report is based on 10 weeks of field research in Burundi between April and June 2010, and looks at the linkages between community security and DDR. It opens with a discussion of local experiences with DDR programmes, analyzing the impact of its different components, and analyzing the local

  17. Comparative gel-based phosphoproteomics in response to signaling molecules

    Marondedze, Claudius; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Thomas, Ludivine

    2013-01-01

    The gel-based proteomics approach is a valuable technique for studying the characteristics of proteins. This technique has diverse applications ranging from analysis of a single protein to the study of the total cellular proteins. Further, protein quality and to some extent distribution can be first assessed by means of one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and then more informatively, for comparative analysis, using the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis technique. Here, we describe how to take advantage of the availability of fluorescent dyes to stain for a selective class of proteins on the same gel for the detection of both phospho- and total proteomes. This enables the co-detection of phosphoproteins as well as total proteins from the same gel and is accomplished by utilizing two different fluorescent stains, the ProQ-Diamond, which stains only phosphorylated proteins, and Sypro Ruby, which stains the entire subset of proteins. This workflow can be applied to gain insights into the regulatory mechanisms induced by signaling molecules such as cyclic nucleotides through the quantification and subsequent identification of responsive phospho- and total proteins. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  18. Comparative gel-based phosphoproteomics in response to signaling molecules

    Marondedze, Claudius

    2013-09-03

    The gel-based proteomics approach is a valuable technique for studying the characteristics of proteins. This technique has diverse applications ranging from analysis of a single protein to the study of the total cellular proteins. Further, protein quality and to some extent distribution can be first assessed by means of one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and then more informatively, for comparative analysis, using the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis technique. Here, we describe how to take advantage of the availability of fluorescent dyes to stain for a selective class of proteins on the same gel for the detection of both phospho- and total proteomes. This enables the co-detection of phosphoproteins as well as total proteins from the same gel and is accomplished by utilizing two different fluorescent stains, the ProQ-Diamond, which stains only phosphorylated proteins, and Sypro Ruby, which stains the entire subset of proteins. This workflow can be applied to gain insights into the regulatory mechanisms induced by signaling molecules such as cyclic nucleotides through the quantification and subsequent identification of responsive phospho- and total proteins. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  19. Improving OCD time to solution using Signal Response Metrology

    Fang, Fang; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Vaid, Alok; Pandev, Stilian; Sanko, Dimitry; Ramanathan, Vidya; Venkataraman, Kartik; Haupt, Ronny

    2016-03-01

    In recent technology nodes, advanced process and novel integration scheme have challenged the precision limits of conventional metrology; with critical dimensions (CD) of device reduce to sub-nanometer region. Optical metrology has proved its capability to precisely detect intricate details on the complex structures, however, conventional RCWA-based (rigorous coupled wave analysis) scatterometry has the limitations of long time-to-results and lack of flexibility to adapt to wide process variations. Signal Response Metrology (SRM) is a new metrology technique targeted to alleviate the consumption of engineering and computation resources by eliminating geometric/dispersion modeling and spectral simulation from the workflow. This is achieved by directly correlating the spectra acquired from a set of wafers with known process variations encoded. In SPIE 2015, we presented the results of SRM application in lithography metrology and control [1], accomplished the mission of setting up a new measurement recipe of focus/dose monitoring in hours. This work will demonstrate our recent field exploration of SRM implementation in 20nm technology and beyond, including focus metrology for scanner control; post etch geometric profile measurement, and actual device profile metrology.

  20. 48 CFR 242.771-3 - Responsibilities.

    2010-10-01

    ....771-3 Responsibilities. (a) The cognizant administrative contracting officer (ACO) or corporate ACO... (OUSD(AT&L)DDR&E), is responsible for establishing a regular method for communication— (1) From DoD to...

  1. Chance-constrained optimization of demand response to price signals

    Dorini, Gianluca Fabio; Pinson, Pierre; Madsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    within a recursive least squares (RLS) framework using data measurable at the grid level, in an adaptive fashion. Optimal price signals are generated by embedding the FIR models within a chance-constrained optimization framework. The objective is to keep the price signal as unchanged as possible from...

  2. DNA damage assessment by visualization and quantification of DNA damage response

    Matsuda, Shun; Matsuda, Tomonari; Ikura, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) carries out signal transduction for DNA repair, activation of cell cycle checkpoint, and apoptosis to maintain genome integrity, in response to DNA damage. Many proteins and their post-translational modifications participate in the process. Especially, S139-phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), which is formed by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), is an important factor to bring and retain other DDR proteins to DSB sites, Thus, γH2AX is used as a good indicator of DSBs in clinical study and pharmacology for efficacy evaluation of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, detection of precancerous regions, and others. In regulatory science, γH2AX is also a useful biomarker of genotoxicity of chemicals, since a wide range of genotoxic chemicals induce γH2AX. However, conventional detection methods of γH2AX absolutely require anti-γH2AX antibody whose staining is burdensome and time-consuming, and some of these methods are not so superior in quantitativity. In this review, we introduce two new methods to overcome these limitations, involving an easy-to-use genotoxicity assay using DDR-visualizing cells and an absolute quantification method of γH2AX using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). (author)

  3. Genetic analysis identifies DDR2 as a novel gene affecting bone mineral density and osteoporotic fractures in Chinese population.

    Yan Guo

    Full Text Available DDR2 gene, playing an essential role in regulating osteoblast differentiation and chondrocyte maturation, may influence bone mineral density (BMD and osteoporosis, but the genetic variations actually leading to the association remain to be elucidated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the genetic variants in DDR2 are associated with BMD and fracture risk. This study was performed in three samples from two ethnicities, including 1,300 Chinese Han subjects, 700 Chinese Han subjects (350 with osteoporotic hip fractures and 350 healthy controls and 2,286 US white subjects. Twenty-eight SNPs in DDR2 were genotyped and tested for associations with hip BMD and fractures. We identified 3 SNPs in DDR2 significantly associated with hip BMD in the Chinese population after multiple testing adjustments, which were rs7521233 (P = 1.06×10-4, β: -0.018 for allele C, rs7553831 (P = 1.30×10-4, β: -0.018 for allele T, and rs6697469 (P = 1.59×10-3, β: -0.015 for allele C, separately. These three SNPs were in high linkage disequilibrium. Haplotype analyses detected two significantly associated haplotypes, including one haplotype in block 2 (P = 9.54×10-4, β: -0.016 where these three SNPs located. SNP rs6697469 was also associated with hip fractures (P = 0.043, OR: 1.42 in the Chinese population. The effect on fracture risk was consistent with its association with lower BMD. However, in the white population, we didn't observe significant associations with hip BMD. eQTL analyses revealed that SNPs associated with BMD also affected DDR2 mRNA expression levels in Chinese. Our findings, together with the prior biological evidence, suggest that DDR2 could be a new candidate for osteoporosis in Chinese population. Our results also reveal an ethnic difference, which highlights the need for further genetic studies in each ethnic group.

  4. Identification of novel driver mutations of the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) gene in squamous cell lung cancer of Chinese patients

    Miao, Liyun; Zhang, Deping; Liu, Hongbing; Song, Yong; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhu, Suhua; Shi, Minke; Li, Yan; Ding, Jingjing; Yang, Jun; Ye, Qing; Cai, Hourong

    2014-01-01

    Although many of the recently approved genomically targeted therapies have improved outcomes for patients in non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with lung adenocarcinoma, little is known about the genomic alterations that drive lung squamous cell cancer (SCC) and development of effective targeted therapies in lung SCC is a promising area to be further investigated. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), is a novel receptor tyrosine kinases that respond to several collagens and involved in tissue repair, primary and metastatic cancer progression. Expression of DDR2 mRNA was analyzed in 54 lung SCC tissues by qRT-PCR. Over-expression approaches were used to investigate the biological functions of DDR2 and its’ mutations in lung SCC cells. Conventional Sanger sequencing was used to investigate the mutations of DDR2 gene in 86 samples. The effect of DDR2 and its’ mutations on proliferation was evaluated by MTT and colony formation assays; cell migration and invasion was evaluated by trasnwell assays. Lung SCC cells stably transfected with pEGFP-DDR2 WT, pEGFP-DDR2-S131C or empty vector were injection into nude mice to study the effect of DDR2 and its’ mutation on tumorigenesis in vivo. Protein and mRNA expression levels of E-cadherin and MMP2 were determined by qRT-PCR and western blot analysis. Differences between groups were tested for significance using Student’s t-test (two-tailed). In this study, we found that DDR2 mRNA levels were significantly decreased in 54 lung SCC tissues compared with normal lung tissues. Moreover, there were 3 novel DDR2 mutations (G531V, S131C, T681I) in 4 patients and provide the mutation rate of 4.6% in the 86 patients with lung SCC. The mutation of S131C in DDR2 could promote lung SCC cells proliferation, migration and invasion via inducing MMP-2, but reducing E-cadherin expression. These data indicated that the novel DDR2 mutation may contribute to the development and progression of lung SCC and this effect may be associated

  5. Postural Response Signal Characteristics Identified by Method of Developed Statokinesigram

    Barbolyas Boris

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human postural system is taken as complex biological system with specific input and output time characteristics, in this study. Evaluation of measured output characteristics is useful in medical diagnostics or in describing postural system disorders. System theory principle provide suitable basis for postural signals analysis. Participating volunteers were instructed to maintain quiet upright stance posture on firm support surface of stabilometric platform for 60s. Postural system actuation was realized by vibration stimuli applied bilaterally on Achilles tendons for 20s. Postural reaction signal, its time profile and static and dynamic characteristics were evaluated by Method of Developed Statokinesigram Trajectory (MDST.

  6. ATM signaling and genomic stability in response to DNA damage

    Lavin, Martin F.; Birrell, Geoff; Chen, Philip; Kozlov, Sergei; Scott, Shaun; Gueven, Nuri

    2005-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks represent the most threatening lesion to the integrity of the genome in cells exposed to ionizing radiation and radiomimetic chemicals. Those breaks are recognized, signaled to cell cycle checkpoints and repaired by protein complexes. The product of the gene (ATM) mutated in the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) plays a central role in the recognition and signaling of DNA damage. ATM is one of an ever growing number of proteins which when mutated compromise the stability of the genome and predispose to tumour development. Mechanisms for recognising double strand breaks in DNA, maintaining genome stability and minimizing risk of cancer are discussed

  7. Male Diaphorina citri searching responses to vibrational communication signals

    Prototype devices have been developed that mimic D. citri female replies to male communication signals and lure males to a trap. The objective is to trap a high proportion of males that have landed on a host tree and have begun searching for females. This presentation describes the construction and ...

  8. Waste Management Plan for the Drilling Within the Chromium Plume West of 100-D/DR Reactors

    R.E. Peterson

    1997-01-01

    This waste management plan provides guidance for managing drilling spoils generated during the installation of groundwater wells in the 100-D/DR Area, which is part of the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. The wells are being installed to meet two objectives: (1) better define the nature and extent of a previously identified chromium plume in the area, and (2) act as groundwater extraction wells if the contamination warrants

  9. Development of BOLD signal hemodynamic responses in the human brain

    Arichi, T.; Varela, M.; Melendez-Calderon, A.; Allievi, A.; Merchant, N.; Tusor, N.; Counsell, S.J.; Burdet, E.; Beckmann, Christian; Edwards, A.D.

    2012-01-01

    In the rodent brain the hemodynamic response to a brief external stimulus changes significantly during development. Analogous changes in human infants would complicate the determination and use of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in developing

  10. Ethylene signaling renders the jasmonate response of Arabidopsis insensitive to future suppression by salicylic acid

    Leon Reyes, H.A.; Du, Y.; Koornneef, A.; Proietti, S.; Körbes, A.P.; Memelink, J.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Ritsema, T.

    2010-01-01

    Cross-talk between jasmonate (JA), ethylene (ET), and Salicylic acid (SA) signaling is thought to operate as a mechanism to fine-tune induced defenses that are activated in response to multiple attackers. Here, 43 Arabidopsis genotypes impaired in hormone signaling or defense-related processes were screened for their ability to express SA-mediated suppression of JA-responsive gene expression. Mutant cev1, which displays constitutive expression of JA and ET responses, appeared to be insensitiv...

  11. Differential Cellular Responses to Hedgehog Signalling in Vertebrates—What is the Role of Competence?

    Clemens Kiecker; Anthony Graham; Malcolm Logan

    2016-01-01

    A surprisingly small number of signalling pathways generate a plethora of cellular responses ranging from the acquisition of multiple cell fates to proliferation, differentiation, morphogenesis and cell death. These diverse responses may be due to the dose-dependent activities of signalling factors, or to intrinsic differences in the response of cells to a given signal—a phenomenon called differential cellular competence. In this review, we focus on temporal and spatial differences in compete...

  12. Male responses to conspecific advertisement signals in the field cricket Gryllus rubens (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    Jang, Yikweon

    2011-01-20

    In many species males aggregate and produce long-range advertisement signals to attract conspecific females. The majority of the receivers of these signals are probably other males most of the time, and male responses to competitors' signals can structure the spatial and temporal organization of the breeding aggregation and affect male mating tactics. I quantified male responses to a conspecific advertisement stimulus repeatedly over three age classes in Gryllus rubens (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) in order to estimate the type and frequency of male responses to the broadcast stimulus and to determine the factors affecting them. Factors tested included body size, wing dimorphism, age, and intensity of the broadcast stimulus. Overall, males employed acoustic response more often than positive phonotactic response. As males aged, the frequency of positive phonotactic response decreased but that of the acoustic response increased. That is, males may use positive phonotaxis in the early stages of their adult lives, possibly to find suitable calling sites or parasitize calling males, and then later in life switch to acoustic responses in response to conspecific advertisement signals. Males with smaller body size more frequently exhibited acoustic responses. This study suggests that individual variation, more than any factors measured, is critical for age-dependent male responses to conspecific advertisement signals.

  13. Measuring long impulse responses with pseudorandom sequences and sweep signals

    Torras Rosell, Antoni; Jacobsen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    In architectural acoustics, background noise, loudspeaker nonlinearities, and time variances are the most common disturbances that can compromise a measurement. The effects of such disturbances on measurement of long impulse responses with pseudorandom sequences (maximum-length sequences (MLS) an...

  14. Physiological responses to taste signals of functional food components.

    Narukawa, Masataka

    2018-02-01

    The functions of food have three categories: nutrition, palatability, and bioregulation. As the onset of lifestyle-related diseases has increased, many people have shown interest in functional foods that are beneficial to bioregulation. We believe that functional foods should be highly palatable for increased acceptance from consumers. In order to design functional foods with a high palatability, we have investigated about the palatability, especially in relation to the taste of food. In this review, we discuss (1) the identification of taste receptors that respond to functional food components; (2) an analysis of the peripheral taste transduction system; and (3) the investigation of the relationship between physiological functions and taste signals.

  15. Brushless DC motor control system responsive to control signals generated by a computer or the like

    Packard, Douglas T. (Inventor); Schmitt, Donald E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A control system for a brushless DC motor responsive to digital control signals is disclosed. The motor includes a multiphase wound stator and a permanent magnet rotor. The rotor is arranged so that each phase winding, when energized from a DC source, will drive the rotor through a predetermined angular position or step. A commutation signal generator responsive to the shaft position provides a commutation signal for each winding. A programmable control signal generator such as a computer or microprocessor produces individual digital control signals for each phase winding. The control signals and commutation signals associated with each winding are applied to an AND gate for that phase winding. Each gate controls a switch connected in series with the associated phase winding and the DC source so that each phase winding is energized only when the commutation signal and the control signal associated with that phase winding are present. The motor shaft may be advanced one step at a time to a desired position by applying a predetermined number of control signals in the proper sequence to the AND gates and the torque generated by the motor may be regulated by applying a separate control signal to each AND gate which is pulse width modulated to control the total time that each switch connects its associated winding to the DC source during each commutation period.

  16. Inter-donor variation in cell subset specific immune signaling responses in healthy individuals.

    Longo, Diane M; Louie, Brent; Wang, Ena; Pos, Zoltan; Marincola, Francesco M; Hawtin, Rachael E; Cesano, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Single cell network profiling (SCNP) is a multi-parameter flow cytometry based approach that allows for the simultaneous interrogation of intracellular signaling pathways in multiple cell subpopulations within heterogeneous tissues, without the need for individual cell subset isolation. Thus, the technology is extremely well-suited for characterizing the multitude of interconnected signaling pathways and immune cell subpopulations that regulate the function of the immune system. Recently, SCNP was applied to generate a functional map of the healthy human immune cell signaling network by profiling immune signaling pathways downstream of 12 immunomodulators in 7 distinct immune cell subsets within peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 60 healthy donors. In the study reported here, the degree of inter-donor variation in the magnitude of the immune signaling responses was analyzed. The highest inter-donor differences in immune signaling pathway activity occurred following perturbation of the immune signaling network, rather than in basal signaling. When examining the full panel of immune signaling responses, as one may expect, the overall degree of inter-donor variation was positively correlated (r = 0.727) with the magnitude of node response (i.e. a larger median signaling response was associated with greater inter-donor variation). However, when examining the degree of heterogeneity across cell subpopulations for individual signaling nodes, cell subset specificity in the degree of inter-donor variation was observed for several nodes. For such nodes, relatively weak correlations between inter-donor variation and the magnitude of the response were observed. Further, within the phenotypically distinct subpopulations, a fraction of the immune signaling responses had bimodal response profiles in which (a) only a portion of the cells had elevated phospho-protein levels following modulation and (b) the proportion of responsive cells varied by donor. These data

  17. Review of Signal Crosstalk in Plant Stress Responses

    This book was prepared to summarize the current understanding of the dynamics of plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses. The preface of the book sets the stage for the contents of the different chapters by outlining that plants defend themselves from various environmental stresses through a v...

  18. Differential Cellular Responses to Hedgehog Signalling in Vertebrates—What is the Role of Competence?

    Kiecker, Clemens; Graham, Anthony; Logan, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    A surprisingly small number of signalling pathways generate a plethora of cellular responses ranging from the acquisition of multiple cell fates to proliferation, differentiation, morphogenesis and cell death. These diverse responses may be due to the dose-dependent activities of signalling factors, or to intrinsic differences in the response of cells to a given signal—a phenomenon called differential cellular competence. In this review, we focus on temporal and spatial differences in competence for Hedgehog (HH) signalling, a signalling pathway that is reiteratively employed in embryos and adult organisms. We discuss the upstream signals and mechanisms that may establish differential competence for HHs in a range of different tissues. We argue that the changing competence for HH signalling provides a four-dimensional framework for the interpretation of the signal that is essential for the emergence of functional anatomy. A number of diseases—including several types of cancer—are caused by malfunctions of the HH pathway. A better understanding of what provides differential competence for this signal may reveal HH-related disease mechanisms and equip us with more specific tools to manipulate HH signalling in the clinic. PMID:29615599

  19. Differential Cellular Responses to Hedgehog Signalling in Vertebrates—What is the Role of Competence?

    Clemens Kiecker

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A surprisingly small number of signalling pathways generate a plethora of cellular responses ranging from the acquisition of multiple cell fates to proliferation, differentiation, morphogenesis and cell death. These diverse responses may be due to the dose-dependent activities of signalling factors, or to intrinsic differences in the response of cells to a given signal—a phenomenon called differential cellular competence. In this review, we focus on temporal and spatial differences in competence for Hedgehog (HH signalling, a signalling pathway that is reiteratively employed in embryos and adult organisms. We discuss the upstream signals and mechanisms that may establish differential competence for HHs in a range of different tissues. We argue that the changing competence for HH signalling provides a four-dimensional framework for the interpretation of the signal that is essential for the emergence of functional anatomy. A number of diseases—including several types of cancer—are caused by malfunctions of the HH pathway. A better understanding of what provides differential competence for this signal may reveal HH-related disease mechanisms and equip us with more specific tools to manipulate HH signalling in the clinic.

  20. Ethylene signaling renders the jasmonate response of Arabidopsis insensitive to future suppression by salicylic acid

    Leon Reyes, H.A.; Du, Y.; Koornneef, A.; Proietti, S.; Körbes, A.P.; Memelink, J.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Ritsema, T.

    2010-01-01

    Cross-talk between jasmonate (JA), ethylene (ET), and Salicylic acid (SA) signaling is thought to operate as a mechanism to fine-tune induced defenses that are activated in response to multiple attackers. Here, 43 Arabidopsis genotypes impaired in hormone signaling or defense-related processes were

  1. Ethylene signaling renders the jasmonate response of Arabidopsis insensitive to future suppression by salicylic Acid.

    Leon-Reyes, Antonio; Du, Yujuan; Koornneef, Annemart; Proietti, Silvia; Körbes, Ana P; Memelink, Johan; Pieterse, Corné M J; Ritsema, Tita

    2010-02-01

    Cross-talk between jasmonate (JA), ethylene (ET), and Salicylic acid (SA) signaling is thought to operate as a mechanism to fine-tune induced defenses that are activated in response to multiple attackers. Here, 43 Arabidopsis genotypes impaired in hormone signaling or defense-related processes were screened for their ability to express SA-mediated suppression of JA-responsive gene expression. Mutant cev1, which displays constitutive expression of JA and ET responses, appeared to be insensitive to SA-mediated suppression of the JA-responsive marker genes PDF1.2 and VSP2. Accordingly, strong activation of JA and ET responses by the necrotrophic pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola prior to SA treatment counteracted the ability of SA to suppress the JA response. Pharmacological assays, mutant analysis, and studies with the ET-signaling inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene revealed that ET signaling renders the JA response insensitive to subsequent suppression by SA. The APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR transcription factor ORA59, which regulates JA/ET-responsive genes such as PDF1.2, emerged as a potential mediator in this process. Collectively, our results point to a model in which simultaneous induction of the JA and ET pathway renders the plant insensitive to future SA-mediated suppression of JA-dependent defenses, which may prioritize the JA/ET pathway over the SA pathway during multi-attacker interactions.

  2. Neural responses to multimodal ostensive signals in 5-month-old infants.

    Eugenio Parise

    Full Text Available Infants' sensitivity to ostensive signals, such as direct eye contact and infant-directed speech, is well documented in the literature. We investigated how infants interpret such signals by assessing common processing mechanisms devoted to them and by measuring neural responses to their compounds. In Experiment 1, we found that ostensive signals from different modalities display overlapping electrophysiological activity in 5-month-old infants, suggesting that these signals share neural processing mechanisms independently of their modality. In Experiment 2, we found that the activation to ostensive signals from different modalities is not additive to each other, but rather reflects the presence of ostension in either stimulus stream. These data support the thesis that ostensive signals obligatorily indicate to young infants that communication is directed to them.

  3. Description of work for the drilling within the chromium plume west of 100-D/DR Reactors

    Peterson, R.E.; Walker, L.D.

    1997-07-01

    This document describes the work scope associated with installing four new monitoring wells in the 100-D/DR Area (100-HR-3 Operable Unit). The strategy relies on estimates for flow paths that might have existed during operation of the 100-D Reactor and on experience gained during the recent installation of well 199-D4-1. A Data Quality Objectives (DQO) workshop was held to evaluate data collection needs during well installation. The workshop included input from key project team members and the lead regulatory agency. Decisions concerning data resulting from the DQO process have been incorporated into this document

  4. Schriftstellerinnen der DDR und feministisches Bewußtsein im Staatssozialismus GDR Women Authors and Feminist Consciousness During State Socialism

    Eva Kaufmann

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Seit den 1960er Jahren produzierten Schriftstellerinnen in der DDR wie Christa Wolf, Irmtraud Morgner, Sarah Kirsch, Brigitte Reimann, Charlotte Worgitzky, Lia Pirskawetz, und Maya Wiens eine vielfältige Literatur zu frauenrelevanten Themen. Den Obertitel „The Promised Land“ (das gelobte Land hat Lorna Martens Irmtraud Morgner entlehnt, der Autorin, die sie neben Christa Wolf als wichtigste Zeugin für „feminist writing“ in der DDR betrachtet. In Morgners Roman Leben und Abenteuer der Trobadora Beatriz steht der Begriff „gelobtes Land“ bezogen auf die DDR in einem ironischen Zusammenhang. Mit simplem Jaja oder Neinnein ist diesem „Ort des Wunderbaren“ (Morgner nicht beizukommen. Vergleichbares signalisiert auch das Fragezeichen, das Martens hinter den Begriff „Promised Land“ setzt. Der anspielungsreiche Verweis auf das Land erscheint auch insofern nützlich, als die Eigenart feministischen Schreibens genauer zu fassen ist, wenn über das Land selbst, namentlich seine Frauenpolitik, Auskünfte gegeben werden. Lorna Martens möchte herausfinden, wie Schriftstellerinnen in der DDR feministisches Bewusstsein artikuliert haben, d.h. feministisches Bewusstsein unter den vom Staatssozialismus geschaffenen Bedingungen.From the 1960s on, women writers in the German Democratic Republic (GDR, including Christa Wolf, Irmtraud Morgner, Sarah Kirsch, Brigitte Reimann, Charlotte Worgitzky, Lia Pirskawetz, and Maya Wiens, produced a large body of writing on women’s issues. Martens wants to investigate how these women authors in the GDR have articulated their feminist consciousness under the conditions of state socialism. Martens’ use of the title The Promised Land is an allusion to a book by Irmtraud Morgner, an author whom, along with Christa Wolf, Martens considers one of the most important witnesses of feminist writing in the GDR. In Morgner’s book The Life and Adventures of Troubadour Beatriz the term “promised land” is being

  5. Toll-like receptor 2 signaling in response to brain injury: an innate bridge to neuroinflammation

    Babcock, Alicia; Wirenfeldt, Martin; Holm, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    -mutant mice. Consistent with the fact that responses in knock-out mice had all returned to wild-type levels by 8 d, there was no evidence for effects on neuronal plasticity at 20 d. These results identify a role for TLR2 signaling in the early glial response to brain injury, acting as an innate bridge...

  6. Stat5 signaling specifies basal versus stress erythropoietic responses through distinct binary and graded dynamic modalities.

    Ermelinda Porpiglia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (Epo-induced Stat5 phosphorylation (p-Stat5 is essential for both basal erythropoiesis and for its acceleration during hypoxic stress. A key challenge lies in understanding how Stat5 signaling elicits distinct functions during basal and stress erythropoiesis. Here we asked whether these distinct functions might be specified by the dynamic behavior of the Stat5 signal. We used flow cytometry to analyze Stat5 phosphorylation dynamics in primary erythropoietic tissue in vivo and in vitro, identifying two signaling modalities. In later (basophilic erythroblasts, Epo stimulation triggers a low intensity but decisive, binary (digital p-Stat5 signal. In early erythroblasts the binary signal is superseded by a high-intensity graded (analog p-Stat5 response. We elucidated the biological functions of binary and graded Stat5 signaling using the EpoR-HM mice, which express a "knocked-in" EpoR mutant lacking cytoplasmic phosphotyrosines. Strikingly, EpoR-HM mice are restricted to the binary signaling mode, which rescues these mice from fatal perinatal anemia by promoting binary survival decisions in erythroblasts. However, the absence of the graded p-Stat5 response in the EpoR-HM mice prevents them from accelerating red cell production in response to stress, including a failure to upregulate the transferrin receptor, which we show is a novel stress target. We found that Stat5 protein levels decline with erythroblast differentiation, governing the transition from high-intensity graded signaling in early erythroblasts to low-intensity binary signaling in later erythroblasts. Thus, using exogenous Stat5, we converted later erythroblasts into high-intensity graded signal transducers capable of eliciting a downstream stress response. Unlike the Stat5 protein, EpoR expression in erythroblasts does not limit the Stat5 signaling response, a non-Michaelian paradigm with therapeutic implications in myeloproliferative disease. Our findings show how the

  7. Luminance and chromatic signals interact differently with melanopsin activation to control the pupil light response.

    Barrionuevo, Pablo A; Cao, Dingcai

    2016-09-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) express the photopigment melanopsin. These cells receive afferent inputs from rods and cones, which provide inputs to the postreceptoral visual pathways. It is unknown, however, how melanopsin activation is integrated with postreceptoral signals to control the pupillary light reflex. This study reports human flicker pupillary responses measured using stimuli generated with a five-primary photostimulator that selectively modulated melanopsin, rod, S-, M-, and L-cone excitations in isolation, or in combination to produce postreceptoral signals. We first analyzed the light adaptation behavior of melanopsin activation and rod and cones signals. Second, we determined how melanopsin is integrated with postreceptoral signals by testing with cone luminance, chromatic blue-yellow, and chromatic red-green stimuli that were processed by magnocellular (MC), koniocellular (KC), and parvocellular (PC) pathways, respectively. A combined rod and melanopsin response was also measured. The relative phase of the postreceptoral signals was varied with respect to the melanopsin phase. The results showed that light adaptation behavior for all conditions was weaker than typical Weber adaptation. Melanopsin activation combined linearly with luminance, S-cone, and rod inputs, suggesting the locus of integration with MC and KC signals was retinal. The melanopsin contribution to phasic pupil responses was lower than luminance contributions, but much higher than S-cone contributions. Chromatic red-green modulation interacted with melanopsin activation nonlinearly as described by a "winner-takes-all" process, suggesting the integration with PC signals might be mediated by a postretinal site.

  8. Equivalent dose determination in foraminifera: analytical description of the CO2--signal dose-response curve

    Hoffmann, D.; Woda, C.; Mangini, A.

    2003-01-01

    The dose-response of the CO 2 - signal (g=2.0006) in foraminifera with ages between 19 and 300 ka is investigated. The sum of two exponential saturation functions is an adequate function to describe the dose-response curve up to an additional dose of 8000 Gy. It yields excellent dating results but requires an artificial doses of at least 5000 Gy. For small additional doses of about 500 Gy the single exponential saturation function can be used to calculate a reliable equivalent dose D E , although it does not describ the dose-response for higher doses. The CO 2 - -signal dose-response indicates that the signal has two components of which one is less stable than the other

  9. Volatile-Mediated within-Plant Signaling in Hybrid Aspen: Required for Systemic Responses.

    Li, Tao; Blande, James D

    2017-04-01

    Plant volatiles play crucial roles in signaling between plants and their associated community members, but their role in within-plant signaling remains largely unexplored, particularly under field conditions. Using a system comprising the hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x tremuloides) and the specialized herbivorous leaf beetle (Phratora laticollis) and, combining field, greenhouse and laboratory experiments, we examined whether local damage triggered systemic responses in undamaged branches that lack vascular connection to the damaged branches, and to what extent this was caused by airborne volatile signals versus internal signals. An experiment tracing dye through the vasculature of saplings revealed no downward movement of the dye from upper to lower branches, suggesting a lack of vascular connectivity among branches. However, we found under both field and laboratory conditions that herbivore feeding on upper branches elicited volatile emissions by undamaged lower branches. Greenhouse experiments manipulating air contact between damaged and undamaged branches showed that systemic induction of volatiles was almost eliminated when air contact was interrupted. Our findings clearly demonstrate that herbivore-induced volatiles overcome vascular constraints and mediate within-plant signaling. Further, we found that volatile signaling led to induction of different classes of volatiles under field and environment controlled conditions, with a weaker response observed in the field. This difference not only reflects the dose- and time-dependent nature of volatile signaling, but also points out that future studies should focus more on field observations to better understand the ecological role of volatile-mediated within-plant signaling.

  10. Implementing DDR in Settings of Ongoing Conflict: The Organization and Fragmentation of Armed Groups in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC

    Joanne Richards

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although it is common for armed groups to splinter (or “fragment” during contexts of multi-party civil war, current guidance on Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration (DDR does not address the challenges that arise when recalcitrant fighters, unwilling to report to DDR, break ranks and form new armed groups. This Practice Note addresses this issue, drawing lessons from the multi-party context of the DRC and from the experiences of former members of three armed groups: the Rally for Congolese Democracy-Goma (RCD-Goma, the National Congress for the Defense of the People (CNDP, and the DRC national army (FARDC. While the findings indicate that the fragmentation of armed groups may encourage desertion and subsequent participation in DDR, they also show that active armed groups may monitor DDR programs and track those who demobilize. Remobilization may follow, either as active armed groups target ex-combatants for forced re-recruitment or as ex-combatants remobilize in armed groups of their own choice. Given these dynamics, practitioners in settings of partial peace may find it useful to consider non-traditional methods of DDR such as the use of mobile patrols and mobile disarmament units. The temporary relocation of ex-combatants to safe areas free from armed groups, or to protected transitional assistance camps, may also help to minimize remobilization during the reintegration phase.

  11. Comparison of signaling interactions determining annual and perennial plant growth in response to low temperature

    Astrid eWingler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature inhibits plant growth despite the fact that considerable rates of photosynthetic activity can be maintained. Instead of lower rates of photosynthesis, active inhibition of cell division and expansion is primarily responsible for reduced growth. This results in sink limitation and enables plants to accumulate carbohydrates that act as compatible solutes or are stored throughout the winter to enable re-growth in spring. Regulation of growth in response to temperature therefore requires coordination with carbon metabolism, e.g. via the signaling metabolite trehalose-6-phosphate. The phytohormones gibberellins (GA and jasmonate (JA play an important role in regulating growth in response to temperature. Growth restriction at low temperature is mainly mediated by DELLA proteins, whose degradation is promoted by GA. For annual plants, it has been shown that the GA/DELLA pathway interacts with JA signaling and C-repeat binding factor (CBF dependent cold acclimation, but these interactions have not been explored in detail for perennials. Growth regulation in response to seasonal factors is, however, particularly important in perennials, especially at high latitudes. In autumn, growth cessation in trees is caused by shortening of the daylength in interaction with phytohormone signaling. In perennial grasses seasonal differences in the sensitivity to GA may enable enhanced growth in spring. This review provides an overview of the signaling interactions that determine plant growth at low temperature and highlights gaps in our knowledge, especially concerning the seasonality of signaling responses in perennial plants.

  12. Whole Genome Analyses of a Well-Differentiated Liposarcoma Reveals Novel SYT1 and DDR2 Rearrangements

    Egan, Jan B.; Barrett, Michael T.; Champion, Mia D.; Middha, Sumit; Lenkiewicz, Elizabeth; Evers, Lisa; Francis, Princy; Schmidt, Jessica; Shi, Chang-Xin; Van Wier, Scott; Badar, Sandra; Ahmann, Gregory; Kortuem, K. Martin; Boczek, Nicole J.; Fonseca, Rafael; Craig, David W.; Carpten, John D.; Borad, Mitesh J.; Stewart, A. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Liposarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma, but little is known about the genomic basis of this disease. Given the low cell content of this tumor type, we utilized flow cytometry to isolate the diploid normal and aneuploid tumor populations from a well-differentiated liposarcoma prior to array comparative genomic hybridization and whole genome sequencing. This work revealed massive highly focal amplifications throughout the aneuploid tumor genome including MDM2, a gene that has previously been found to be amplified in well-differentiated liposarcoma. Structural analysis revealed massive rearrangement of chromosome 12 and 11 gene fusions, some of which may be part of double minute chromosomes commonly present in well-differentiated liposarcoma. We identified a hotspot of genomic instability localized to a region of chromosome 12 that includes a highly conserved, putative L1 retrotransposon element, LOC100507498 which resides within a gene cluster (NAV3, SYT1, PAWR) where 6 of the 11 fusion events occurred. Interestingly, a potential gene fusion was also identified in amplified DDR2, which is a potential therapeutic target of kinase inhibitors such as dastinib, that are not routinely used in the treatment of patients with liposarcoma. Furthermore, 7 somatic, damaging single nucleotide variants have also been identified, including D125N in the PTPRQ protein. In conclusion, this work is the first to report the entire genome of a well-differentiated liposarcoma with novel chromosomal rearrangements associated with amplification of therapeutically targetable genes such as MDM2 and DDR2. PMID:24505276

  13. Whole genome analyses of a well-differentiated liposarcoma reveals novel SYT1 and DDR2 rearrangements.

    Jan B Egan

    Full Text Available Liposarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma, but little is known about the genomic basis of this disease. Given the low cell content of this tumor type, we utilized flow cytometry to isolate the diploid normal and aneuploid tumor populations from a well-differentiated liposarcoma prior to array comparative genomic hybridization and whole genome sequencing. This work revealed massive highly focal amplifications throughout the aneuploid tumor genome including MDM2, a gene that has previously been found to be amplified in well-differentiated liposarcoma. Structural analysis revealed massive rearrangement of chromosome 12 and 11 gene fusions, some of which may be part of double minute chromosomes commonly present in well-differentiated liposarcoma. We identified a hotspot of genomic instability localized to a region of chromosome 12 that includes a highly conserved, putative L1 retrotransposon element, LOC100507498 which resides within a gene cluster (NAV3, SYT1, PAWR where 6 of the 11 fusion events occurred. Interestingly, a potential gene fusion was also identified in amplified DDR2, which is a potential therapeutic target of kinase inhibitors such as dastinib, that are not routinely used in the treatment of patients with liposarcoma. Furthermore, 7 somatic, damaging single nucleotide variants have also been identified, including D125N in the PTPRQ protein. In conclusion, this work is the first to report the entire genome of a well-differentiated liposarcoma with novel chromosomal rearrangements associated with amplification of therapeutically targetable genes such as MDM2 and DDR2.

  14. Reward acts as a signal to control delay-period activity in delayed-response tasks.

    Ichihara-Takeda, Satoe; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Funahashi, Shintaro

    2010-03-31

    Prefrontal delay-period activity represents a neural mechanism for the active maintenance of information and needs to be controlled by some signal to appropriately operate working memory. To examine whether reward-delivery acts as this signal, the effects of delay-period activity in response to unexpected reward-delivery were examined by analyzing single-neuron activity recorded in the primate dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Among neurons that showed delay-period activity, 34% showed inhibition of this activity in response to unexpected reward-delivery. The delay-period activity of these neurons was affected by the expectation of reward-delivery. The strength of the reward signal in controlling the delay-period activity is related to the strength of the effect of reward information on the delay-period activity. These results indicate that reward-delivery acts as a signal to control delay-period activity.

  15. The Yeast Retrograde Response as a Model of Intracellular Signaling of Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    S. Michal eJazwinski

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction activates intracellular signaling pathways that impact yeast longevity, and the best known of these pathways is the retrograde response. More recently, similar responses have been discerned in other systems, from invertebrates to human cells. However, the identity of the signal transducers is either unknown or apparently diverse, contrasting with the well-established signaling module of the yeast retrograde response. On the other hand, it has become equally clear that several other pathways and processes interact with the retrograde response, embedding it in a network responsive to a variety of cellular states. An examination of this network supports the notion that the master regulator NFkB aggregated a variety of mitochondria-related cellular responses at some point in evolution and has become the retrograde transcription factor. This has significant consequences for how we view some of the deficits associated with aging, such as inflammation. The support for NFkB as the retrograde response transcription factor is not only based on functional analyses. It is bolstered by the fact that NFkB can regulate Myc-Max, which is activated in human cells with dysfunctional mitochondria and impacts cellular metabolism. Myc-Max is homologous to the yeast retrograde response transcription factor Rtg1-Rtg3. Further research will be needed to disentangle the pro-aging from the anti-aging effects of NFkB. Interestingly, this is also a challenge for the complete understanding of the yeast retrograde response.

  16. The response of a linear monostable system and its application in parameters estimation for PSK signals

    Duan, Chaowei; Zhan, Yafeng

    2016-01-01

    The output characteristics of a linear monostable system driven with a periodic signal and an additive white Gaussian noise are studied in this paper. Theoretical analysis shows that the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases monotonously with the increasing noise intensity but the output SNR-gain is stable. Inspired by this high SNR-gain phenomenon, this paper applies the linear monostable system in the parameters estimation algorithm for phase shift keying (PSK) signals and improves the estimation performance. - Highlights: • The response of a linear monostable system driven with a periodic signal and an additive white Gaussian noise is analyzed. • The optimal parameter of this linear monostable system to maximum the output SNR-gain is obtained. • Application of this linear monostable system in parameters estimation algorithm for PSK signals obtains performance improvement.

  17. Primary cilia modulate Ihh signal transduction in response to hydrostatic loading of growth plate chondrocytes.

    Shao, Yvonne Y; Wang, Lai; Welter, Jean F; Ballock, R Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Indian hedgehog (Ihh) is a key component of the regulatory apparatus governing chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation in the growth plate. Recent studies have demonstrated that the primary cilium is the site of Ihh signaling within the cell, and that primary cilia are essential for bone and cartilage formation. Primary cilia are also postulated to act as mechanosensory organelles that transduce mechanical forces acting on the cell into biological signals. In this study, we used a hydrostatic compression system to examine Ihh signal transduction under the influence of mechanical load. Our results demonstrate that hydrostatic compression increased both Ihh gene expression and Ihh-responsive Gli-luciferase activity. These increases were aborted by disrupting the primary cilia structure with chloral hydrate. These results suggest that growth plate chondrocytes respond to hydrostatic loading by increasing Ihh signaling, and that the primary cilium is required for this mechano-biological signal transduction to occur. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sensor response time calculation with no stationary signals from a Nuclear Power Plant

    Vela, O.; Vallejo, I.

    1998-01-01

    Protection systems in a Nuclear Power Plant have to response in a specific time fixed by design requirements. This time includes the event detection (sensor delay) and the actuation time system. This time is obtained in refuel simulating the physics event, which trigger the protection system, with an electric signal and measuring the protection system actuation time. Nowadays sensor delay is calculated with noise analysis techniques. The signals are measured in Control Room during the normal operation of the Plant, decreasing both the cost in time and personal radioactive exposure. The noise analysis techniques require stationary signals but normally the data collected are mixed with process signals that are no stationary. This work shows the signals processing to avoid no-stationary components using conventional filters and new wavelets analysis. (Author) 2 refs

  19. Primary Cilia Modulate IHH Signal Transduction in Response to Hydrostatic Loading of Growth Plate Chondrocytes

    Shao, Y, Yvonne Y.; Wang, Lai; Welter, J, Jean F.; Ballock, R. Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Indian Hedgehog (Ihh) is a key component of the regulatory apparatus governing chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation in the growth plate. Recent studies have demonstrated that the primary cilium is the site of Ihh signaling within the cell, and that primary cilia are essential for bone and cartilage formation. Primary cilia are also postulated to act as mechanosensory organelles that transduce mechanical forces acting on the cell into biological signals. In this study, we used a hydrostatic compression system to examine Ihh signal transduction under the influence of mechanical load. Our results demonstrate that hydrostatic compression increased both Ihh gene expression and Ihh-responsive Gli-luciferase activity. These increases were aborted by disrupting the primary cilia structure with chloral hydrate. These results suggest that growth plate chondrocytes respond to hydrostatic loading by increasing Ihh signaling, and that the primary cilium is required for this mechano-biological signal transduction to occur. PMID:21930256

  20. Parvovirus infection-induced DNA damage response

    Luo, Yong; Qiu, Jianming

    2014-01-01

    Parvoviruses are a group of small DNA viruses with ssDNA genomes flanked by two inverted terminal structures. Due to a limited genetic resource they require host cellular factors and sometimes a helper virus for efficient viral replication. Recent studies have shown that parvoviruses interact with the DNA damage machinery, which has a significant impact on the life cycle of the virus as well as the fate of infected cells. In addition, due to special DNA structures of the viral genomes, parvoviruses are useful tools for the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying viral infection-induced DNA damage response (DDR). This review aims to summarize recent advances in parvovirus-induced DDR, with a focus on the diverse DDR pathways triggered by different parvoviruses and the consequences of DDR on the viral life cycle as well as the fate of infected cells. PMID:25429305

  1. Small Signal Stability Improvement of Power Systems Using Optimal Load Responses in Competitive Electricity Markets

    Hu, Weihao; Su, Chi; Chen, Zhe

    2011-01-01

    Since the hourly spot market price is available one day ahead in Denmark, the price could be transferred to the consumers and they may shift some of their loads from high price periods to the low price periods in order to save their energy costs. The optimal load response to an electricity price...... price is proposed. A 17-bus power system with high wind power penetrations, which resembles the Eastern Danish power system, is chosen as the study case. Simulation results show that the optimal load response to electricity prices is an effective measure to improve the small signal stability of power...... for demand side management generates different load profiles and may provide an opportunity to improve the small signal stability of power systems with high wind power penetrations. In this paper, the idea of power system small signal stability improvement by using optimal load response to the electricity...

  2. Hormone response element binding proteins: novel regulators of vitamin D and estrogen signaling.

    Lisse, Thomas S; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S

    2011-03-01

    Insights from vitamin D-resistant New World primates and their human homologues as models of natural and pathological insensitivity to sterol/steroid action have uncovered a family of novel intracellular vitamin D and estrogen regulatory proteins involved in hormone action. The proteins, known as "vitamin D or estrogen response element-binding proteins", behave as potent cis-acting, transdominant regulators to inhibit steroid receptor binding to DNA response elements and is responsible for vitamin D and estrogen resistances. This set of interactors belongs to the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) family of previously known pre-mRNA-interacting proteins. This review provides new insights into the mechanism by which these novel regulators of signaling and metabolism can act to regulate responses to vitamin D and estrogen. In addition the review also describes other molecules that are known to influence nuclear receptor signaling through interaction with hormone response elements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A transfer function approach to the small-signal response of saturated semiconductor optical amplifiers

    Nielsen, Mads Lønstrup; Blumenthal, D. J.; Mørk, Jesper

    2000-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the small-signal frequency response (SSFR) of a wavelength converter based on cross-gain modulation in a semiconductor optical amplifier with a finite waveguide loss is presented. We use a transfer function formalism to explain the resonant behavior of the frequency...... response. The limitations to the magnitude of the spectral overshoot are also accounted for. Operating with the data and CW signals in a co-propagating configuration, we End that the resonance only exists for a finite waveguide loss. In a counter-propagating scheme, a resonance can exist regardless...

  4. Astrocyte-to-neuron signaling in response to photostimulation with a femtosecond laser

    Zhao, Yuan; Liu, Xiuli; Zhou, Wei; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2010-08-01

    Conventional stimulation techniques used in studies of astrocyte-to-neuron signaling are invasive or dependent on additional electrical devices or chemicals. Here, we applied photostimulation with a femtosecond laser to selectively stimulate astrocytes in the hippocampal neural network, and the neuronal responses were examined. The results showed that, after photostimulation, cell-specific astrocyte-to-neuron signaling was triggered; sometimes the neuronal responses were even synchronous. Since photostimulation with a femtosecond laser is noninvasive, agent-free, and highly precise, this method has been proved to be efficient in activating astrocytes for investigations of astrocytic functions in neural networks.

  5. The duration of response inhibition in the stop-signal paradigm varies with response force

    van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.; van Boxtel, G.J.M.; van der Molen, M.

    2003-01-01

    In a previous study, we have found that the speed of stopping a response is delayed when response readiness is reduced by cuing the probability of no-go trials [Acta Psychol. 111 (2002) 155]. Other investigators observed that responses are more forceful when the probability to respond is low than

  6. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Regulates Myogenic Responsiveness in Human Resistance Arteries.

    Sonya Hui

    Full Text Available We recently identified sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P signaling and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR as prominent regulators of myogenic responsiveness in rodent resistance arteries. However, since rodent models frequently exhibit limitations with respect to human applicability, translation is necessary to validate the relevance of this signaling network for clinical application. We therefore investigated the significance of these regulatory elements in human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries. Mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries were isolated from patient tissue specimens collected during colonic or cardiac bypass surgery. Pressure myography assessments confirmed endothelial integrity, as well as stable phenylephrine and myogenic responses. Both human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries (i express critical S1P signaling elements, (ii constrict in response to S1P and (iii lose myogenic responsiveness following S1P receptor antagonism (JTE013. However, while human mesenteric arteries express CFTR, human skeletal muscle resistance arteries do not express detectable levels of CFTR protein. Consequently, modulating CFTR activity enhances myogenic responsiveness only in human mesenteric resistance arteries. We conclude that human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries are a reliable and consistent model for translational studies. We demonstrate that the core elements of an S1P-dependent signaling network translate to human mesenteric resistance arteries. Clear species and vascular bed variations are evident, reinforcing the critical need for further translational study.

  7. ROS signaling and stomatal movement in plant responses to drought stress and pathogen attack.

    Qi, Junsheng; Song, Chun-Peng; Wang, Baoshan; Zhou, Jianmin; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Gong, Zhizhong

    2018-04-16

    Stomata, the pores formed by a pair of guard cells, are the main gateways for water transpiration and photosynthetic CO 2 exchange, as well as pathogen invasion in land plants. Guard cell movement is regulated by a combination of environmental factors including water status, light, CO 2 levels and pathogen attack, as well as endogenous signals such as abscisic acid and apoplastic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Under abiotic and biotic stress conditions, extracellular ROS are mainly produced by plasma membrane-localized NADPH oxidases, whereas intracellular ROS are produced in multiple organelles. These ROS form a sophisticated cellular signaling network, with the accumulation of apoplastic ROS an early hallmark of stomatal movement. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of the ROS signaling network, primarily during drought stress and pathogen attack. We summarize the roles of apoplastic ROS in regulating stomatal movement, ABA and CO 2 signaling, and immunity responses. Finally, we discuss ROS accumulation and communication between organelles and cells. This information provides a conceptual framework for understanding how ROS signaling is integrated with various signaling pathways during plant responses to abiotic and biotic stress stimuli. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. The Arabidopsis mutant cev1 links cell wall signaling to jasmonate and ethylene responses.

    Ellis, Christine; Karafyllidis, Ioannis; Wasternack, Claus; Turner, John G

    2002-07-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses stimulate the synthesis of jasmonates and ethylene, which, in turn, induce the expression of genes involved in stress response and enhance defense responses. The cev1 mutant has constitutive expression of stress response genes and has enhanced resistance to fungal pathogens. Here, we show that cev1 plants have increased production of jasmonate and ethylene and that its phenotype is suppressed by mutations that interrupt jasmonate and ethylene signaling. Genetic mapping, complementation analysis, and sequence analysis revealed that CEV1 is the cellulose synthase CeSA3. CEV1 was expressed predominantly in root tissues, and cev1 roots contained less cellulose than wild-type roots. Significantly, the cev1 mutant phenotype could be reproduced by treating wild-type plants with cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors, and the cellulose synthase mutant rsw1 also had constitutive expression of VSP. We propose that the cell wall can signal stress responses in plants.

  9. Evoked responses of the superior olive to amplitude-modulated signals.

    Andreeva, N G; Lang, T T

    1977-01-01

    Evoked potentials of some auditory centers of Rhinolophidae bats to amplitude-modulated signals were studied. A synchronization response was found in the cochlear nuclei (with respect to the fast component of the response) and in the superior olivary complex (with respect to both fast and slow components of the response) within the range of frequency modulation from 50 to 2000 Hz. In the inferior colliculus a synchronized response was recorded at modulation frequencies below 150 Hz, but in the medial geniculate bodies no such response was found. Evoked responses of the superior olivary complex were investigated in detail. The lowest frequencies of synchronization were recorded within the carrier frequency range of 15-30 and 80-86 kHz. The amplitude of the synchronized response is a function of the frequency and coefficient of modulation and also of the angle of stimulus presentation.

  10. The yeast Sks1p kinase signaling network regulates pseudohyphal growth and glucose response.

    Cole Johnson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes a dramatic growth transition from its unicellular form to a filamentous state, marked by the formation of pseudohyphal filaments of elongated and connected cells. Yeast pseudohyphal growth is regulated by signaling pathways responsive to reductions in the availability of nitrogen and glucose, but the molecular link between pseudohyphal filamentation and glucose signaling is not fully understood. Here, we identify the glucose-responsive Sks1p kinase as a signaling protein required for pseudohyphal growth induced by nitrogen limitation and coupled nitrogen/glucose limitation. To identify the Sks1p signaling network, we applied mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics, profiling over 900 phosphosites for phosphorylation changes dependent upon Sks1p kinase activity. From this analysis, we report a set of novel phosphorylation sites and highlight Sks1p-dependent phosphorylation in Bud6p, Itr1p, Lrg1p, Npr3p, and Pda1p. In particular, we analyzed the Y309 and S313 phosphosites in the pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit Pda1p; these residues are required for pseudohyphal growth, and Y309A mutants exhibit phenotypes indicative of impaired aerobic respiration and decreased mitochondrial number. Epistasis studies place SKS1 downstream of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR1 and the G-protein RAS2 but upstream of or at the level of cAMP-dependent PKA. The pseudohyphal growth and glucose signaling transcription factors Flo8p, Mss11p, and Rgt1p are required to achieve wild-type SKS1 transcript levels. SKS1 is conserved, and deletion of the SKS1 ortholog SHA3 in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans results in abnormal colony morphology. Collectively, these results identify Sks1p as an important regulator of filamentation and glucose signaling, with additional relevance towards understanding stress-responsive signaling in C. albicans.

  11. Ebola Virus Altered Innate and Adaptive Immune Response Signalling Pathways: Implications for Novel Therapeutic Approaches.

    Kumar, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) arise attention for their impressive lethality by the poor immune response and high inflammatory reaction in the patients. It causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with case fatality rates of up to 90%. The mechanism underlying this lethal outcome is poorly understood. In 2014, a major outbreak of Ebola virus spread amongst several African countries, including Leone, Sierra, and Guinea. Although infections only occur frequently in Central Africa, but the virus has the potential to spread globally. Presently, there is no vaccine or treatment is available to counteract Ebola virus infections due to poor understanding of its interaction with the immune system. Accumulating evidence indicates that the virus actively alters both innate and adaptive immune responses and triggers harmful inflammatory responses. In the literature, some reports have shown that alteration of immune signaling pathways could be due to the ability of EBOV to interfere with dendritic cells (DCs), which link innate and adaptive immune responses. On the other hand, some reports have demonstrated that EBOV, VP35 proteins act as interferon antagonists. So, how the Ebola virus altered the innate and adaptive immune response signaling pathways is still an open question for the researcher to be explored. Thus, in this review, I try to summarize the mechanisms of the alteration of innate and adaptive immune response signaling pathways by Ebola virus which will be helpful for designing effective drugs or vaccines against this lethal infection. Further, potential targets, current treatment and novel therapeutic approaches have also been discussed.

  12. Mechanisms Underlying the Antidepressant Response of Acupuncture via PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway.

    Jiang, Huili; Zhang, Xuhui; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Huimin; Li, Jing; Yang, Xinjing; Zhao, Bingcong; Zhang, Chuntao; Yu, Miao; Xu, Mingmin; Yu, Qiuyun; Liang, Xingchen; Li, Xiang; Shi, Peng; Bao, Tuya

    2017-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA)/cAMP response element-binding (CREB) protein signaling pathway, contributing to impaired neurogenesis parallel to depressive-like behaviors, has been identified as the crucial factor involved in the antidepressant response of acupuncture. However, the molecular mechanisms associated with antidepressant response of acupuncture, neurogenesis, and depressive-like behaviors ameliorating remain unexplored. The objective was to identify the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant response of acupuncture through PKA signaling pathway in depression rats by employing the PKA signaling pathway inhibitor H89 in in vivo experiments. Our results indicated that the expression of hippocampal PKA- α and p-CREB was significantly downregulated by chronic unpredicted mild stress (CUMS) procedures. Importantly, acupuncture reversed the downregulation of PKA- α and p-CREB. The expression of PKA- α was upregulated by fluoxetine, but not p-CREB. No significant difference was found between Acu and FLX groups on the expression of PKA- α and p-CREB. Interestingly, H89 inhibited the effects of acupuncture or fluoxetine on upregulating the expression of p-CREB, but not PKA- α . There was no significant difference in expression of CREB among the groups. Conclusively, our findings further support the hypothesis that acupuncture could ameliorate depressive-like behaviors by regulating PKA/CREB signaling pathway, which might be mainly mediated by regulating the phosphorylation level of CREB.

  13. Mitochondrial correlates of signaling processes involved with the cellular response to eimeria infection in broiler chickens

    Host cellular responses to coccidiosis infection are consistent with elements of apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis. These processes are enhanced in the cell through cell-directed signaling or repressed through parasite-derived inhibitors of these processes favoring the survival of the parasite. Acr...

  14. Adaptive and innate immune reactions regulating mast cell activation: from receptor-mediated signaling to responses

    Tkaczyk, Christine; Jensen, Bettina M; Iwaki, Shoko

    2006-01-01

    differentially activate multiple signaling pathways within the mast cells required for the generation and/or release of inflammatory mediators. Thus, the composition of the suite of mediators released and the physiologic ramifications of these responses are dependent on the stimuli and the microenvironment...

  15. Injury-Induced Type I IFN Signaling Regulates Inflammatory Responses in the Central Nervous System

    Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Innate glial response is critical for the induction of inflammatory mediators and recruitment of leukocytes to sites of the injury in the CNS. We have examined the involvement of type I IFN signaling in the mouse hippocampus following sterile injury (transection of entorhinal afferents). Type I I...

  16. Hypothalamic response to the chemo-signal androstadienone in gender dysphoric children and adolescents

    Burke, S.M.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.; Veltman, D.J.; Klink, D.T.; Bakker, J.

    2014-01-01

    The odorous steroid androstadienone, a putative male chemo-signal, was previously reported to evoke sex differences in hypothalamic activation in adult heterosexual men and women. In order to investigate whether puberty modulated this sex difference in response to androstadienone, we measured the

  17. FTIR spectroscopic studies of bacterial cellular responses to environmental factors, plant-bacterial interactions and signalling

    Kamnev, Alexander A.

    2008-01-01

    Modern spectroscopic techniques are highly useful in studying diverse processes in microbial cells related to or incited by environmental factors. Spectroscopic data for whole cells, supramolecular structures or isolated cellular constituents can reflect structural and/or compositional changes occurring in the course of cellular metabolic responses to the effects of pollutants, environmental conditions (stress factors); nutrients, signalling molecules (communication factors), etc. This inform...

  18. Artificial Neural Network-Based Early-Age Concrete Strength Monitoring Using Dynamic Response Signals.

    Kim, Junkyeong; Lee, Chaggil; Park, Seunghee

    2017-06-07

    Concrete is one of the most common materials used to construct a variety of civil infrastructures. However, since concrete might be susceptible to brittle fracture, it is essential to confirm the strength of concrete at the early-age stage of the curing process to prevent unexpected collapse. To address this issue, this study proposes a novel method to estimate the early-age strength of concrete, by integrating an artificial neural network algorithm with a dynamic response measurement of the concrete material. The dynamic response signals of the concrete, including both electromechanical impedances and guided ultrasonic waves, are obtained from an embedded piezoelectric sensor module. The cross-correlation coefficient of the electromechanical impedance signals and the amplitude of the guided ultrasonic wave signals are selected to quantify the variation in dynamic responses according to the strength of the concrete. Furthermore, an artificial neural network algorithm is used to verify a relationship between the variation in dynamic response signals and concrete strength. The results of an experimental study confirm that the proposed approach can be effectively applied to estimate the strength of concrete material from the early-age stage of the curing process.

  19. Nucleosome acidic patch promotes RNF168- and RING1B/BMI1-dependent H2AX and H2A ubiquitination and DNA damage signaling.

    Justin W Leung

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Histone ubiquitinations are critical for the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR. In particular, RNF168 and RING1B/BMI1 function in the DDR by ubiquitinating H2A/H2AX on Lys-13/15 and Lys-118/119, respectively. However, it remains to be defined how the ubiquitin pathway engages chromatin to provide regulation of ubiquitin targeting of specific histone residues. Here we identify the nucleosome acid patch as a critical chromatin mediator of H2A/H2AX ubiquitination (ub. The acidic patch is required for RNF168- and RING1B/BMI1-dependent H2A/H2AXub in vivo. The acidic patch functions within the nucleosome as nucleosomes containing a mutated acidic patch exhibit defective H2A/H2AXub by RNF168 and RING1B/BMI1 in vitro. Furthermore, direct perturbation of the nucleosome acidic patch in vivo by the expression of an engineered acidic patch interacting viral peptide, LANA, results in defective H2AXub and RNF168-dependent DNA damage responses including 53BP1 and BRCA1 recruitment to DNA damage. The acidic patch therefore is a critical nucleosome feature that may serve as a scaffold to integrate multiple ubiquitin signals on chromatin to compose selective ubiquitinations on histones for DNA damage signaling.

  20. Transcriptional Profiling of the Oral Pathogen Streptococcus mutans in Response to Competence Signaling Peptide XIP.

    Wenderska, Iwona B; Latos, Andrew; Pruitt, Benjamin; Palmer, Sara; Spatafora, Grace; Senadheera, Dilani B; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G

    2017-01-01

    In the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans , competence development is regulated by the ComRS signaling system comprised of the ComR regulator and the ComS prepeptide to the competence signaling peptide XIP (ComX-inducing peptide). Aside from competence development, XIP signaling has been demonstrated to regulate cell lysis, and recently, the expression of bacteriocins, small antimicrobial peptides used by bacteria to inhibit closely related species. Our study further explores the effect of XIP signaling on the S. mutans transcriptome. RNA sequencing revealed that XIP induction resulted in a global change in gene expression that was consistent with a stress response. An increase in several membrane-bound regulators, including HdrRM and BrsRM, involved in bacteriocin production, and the VicRKX system, involved in acid tolerance and biofilm formation, was observed. Furthermore, global changes in gene expression corresponded to changes observed during the stringent response to amino acid starvation. Effects were also observed on genes involved in sugar transport and carbon catabolite repression and included the levQRST and levDEFG operons. Finally, our work identified a novel heat shock-responsive intergenic region, encoding a small RNA, with a potential role in competence shutoff. IMPORTANCE Genetic competence provides bacteria with an opportunity to increase genetic diversity or acquire novel traits conferring a survival advantage. In the cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans , DNA transformation is regulated by the competence stimulating peptide XIP (ComX-inducing peptide). The present study utilizes high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNAseq) to provide a greater understanding of how global gene expression patterns change in response to XIP. Overall, our work demonstrates that in S. mutans , XIP signaling induces a response that resembles the stringent response to amino acid starvation. We further identify a novel heat shock-responsive intergenic region with a

  1. Stimulus-Responsive Plasmonic Chiral Signals of Gold Nanorods Organized on DNA Origami.

    Jiang, Qiao; Liu, Qing; Shi, Yuefeng; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Zhan, Pengfei; Liu, Jianbing; Liu, Chao; Wang, Hui; Shi, Xinghua; Zhang, Li; Sun, Jiashu; Ding, Baoquan; Liu, Minghua

    2017-11-08

    In response to environmental variations, living cells need to arrange the conformational changes of macromolecules to achieve the specific biofunctions. Inspired by natural molecular machines, artificial macromolecular assemblies with controllable nanostructures and environmentally responsive functions can be designed. By assembling macromolecular nanostructures with noble metal nanoparticles, environmental information could be significantly amplified and modulated. However, manufacturing dynamic plasmonic nanostructures that are efficiently responsive to different stimuli is still a challenging task. Here we demonstrate a stimulus-responsive plasmonic nanosystem based on DNA origami-organized gold nanorods (GNRs). L-shaped GNR dimers were assembled on rhombus-shaped DNA origami templates. The geometry and chiral signals of the GNR nanoarchitectures respond to multiple stimuli, including glutathione reduction, restriction enzyme action, pH change, or photoirradiation. While the glutathione reduction or restriction enzyme caused irreversible changes in the plasmonic circular dichroism (CD) signals, both pH and light irradiation triggered reversible changes in the plasmonic CD. Our system transduces external stimuli into conformational changes and circular dichroism responses in near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. By this approach, programmable optical reporters for essential biological signals can be fabricated.

  2. Mitochondria, Energetics, Epigenetics, and Cellular Responses to Stress

    McAllister, Kimberly; Worth, Leroy; Haugen, Astrid C.; Meyer, Joel N.; Domann, Frederick E.; Van Houten, Bennett; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Bultman, Scott J.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Begley, Thomas J.; Sobol, Robert W.; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Ideker, Trey; Santos, Janine H.; Copeland, William C.; Tice, Raymond R.; Balshaw, David M.; Tyson, Frederick L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cells respond to environmental stressors through several key pathways, including response to reactive oxygen species (ROS), nutrient and ATP sensing, DNA damage response (DDR), and epigenetic alterations. Mitochondria play a central role in these pathways not only through energetics and ATP production but also through metabolites generated in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, as well as mitochondria–nuclear signaling related to mitochondria morphology, biogenesis, fission/fusion, mitophagy, apoptosis, and epigenetic regulation. Objectives: We investigated the concept of bidirectional interactions between mitochondria and cellular pathways in response to environmental stress with a focus on epigenetic regulation, and we examined DNA repair and DDR pathways as examples of biological processes that respond to exogenous insults through changes in homeostasis and altered mitochondrial function. Methods: The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences sponsored the Workshop on Mitochondria, Energetics, Epigenetics, Environment, and DNA Damage Response on 25–26 March 2013. Here, we summarize key points and ideas emerging from this meeting. Discussion: A more comprehensive understanding of signaling mechanisms (cross-talk) between the mitochondria and nucleus is central to elucidating the integration of mitochondrial functions with other cellular response pathways in modulating the effects of environmental agents. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of mitochondrial functions in epigenetic regulation and DDR with environmental stress. Development and application of novel technologies, enhanced experimental models, and a systems-type research approach will help to discern how environmentally induced mitochondrial dysfunction affects key mechanistic pathways. Conclusions: Understanding mitochondria–cell signaling will provide insight into individual responses to environmental hazards, improving prediction of hazard and susceptibility to

  3. The octadecanoid signalling pathway in plants mediates a response to ultraviolet radiation

    Conconi, A.; Smerdon, M.J.; Howe, G.A.; Ryan, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Many plant genes that respond to environmental and developmental changes are regulated by jasmonic acid, which is derived from linolenic acid via the octadecanoid pathway. Linolenic acid is an important fatty-acid constituent of membranes in most plant species and its intracellular levels increase in response to certain signals. Here we report that irradiation of tomato leaves with ultraviolet light induces the expression of several plant defensive genes that are normally activated through the octadecanoid pathway after wounding. The response to ultraviolet light is blocked by an inhibitor of the octadecanoid pathway and it does not occur in a tomato mutant defective in this pathway. The ultraviolet irradiation maximally induces the defence genes at levels where cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation, an indicator of DNA damage, is less than 0.2 dimers per gene. Our evidence indicates that this plant defence response to certain wavelengths of ultraviolet radiation requires the activation of the octadecanoid defence signalling pathway. (author)

  4. EXO1 is critical for embryogenesis and the DNA damage response in mice with a hypomorphic Nbs1 allele.

    Rein, Katrin; Yanez, Diana A; Terré, Berta; Palenzuela, Lluís; Aivio, Suvi; Wei, Kaichun; Edelmann, Winfried; Stark, Jeremy M; Stracker, Travis H

    2015-09-03

    The maintenance of genome stability is critical for the suppression of diverse human pathologies that include developmental disorders, premature aging, infertility and predisposition to cancer. The DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates the appropriate cellular responses following the detection of lesions to prevent genomic instability. The MRE11 complex is a sensor of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and plays key roles in multiple aspects of the DDR, including DNA end resection that is critical for signaling and DNA repair. The MRE11 complex has been shown to function both upstream and in concert with the 5'-3' exonuclease EXO1 in DNA resection, but it remains unclear to what extent EXO1 influences DSB responses independently of the MRE11 complex. Here we examine the genetic relationship of the MRE11 complex and EXO1 during mammalian development and in response to DNA damage. Deletion of Exo1 in mice expressing a hypomorphic allele of Nbs1 leads to severe developmental impairment, embryonic death and chromosomal instability. While EXO1 plays a minimal role in normal cells, its loss strongly influences DNA replication, DNA repair, checkpoint signaling and damage sensitivity in NBS1 hypomorphic cells. Collectively, our results establish a key role for EXO1 in modulating the severity of hypomorphic MRE11 complex mutations. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. WRKY proteins: signaling and regulation of expression during abiotic stress responses.

    Banerjee, Aditya; Roychoudhury, Aryadeep

    2015-01-01

    WRKY proteins are emerging players in plant signaling and have been thoroughly reported to play important roles in plants under biotic stress like pathogen attack. However, recent advances in this field do reveal the enormous significance of these proteins in eliciting responses induced by abiotic stresses. WRKY proteins act as major transcription factors, either as positive or negative regulators. Specific WRKY factors which help in the expression of a cluster of stress-responsive genes are being targeted and genetically modified to induce improved abiotic stress tolerance in plants. The knowledge regarding the signaling cascade leading to the activation of the WRKY proteins, their interaction with other proteins of the signaling pathway, and the downstream genes activated by them are altogether vital for justified targeting of the WRKY genes. WRKY proteins have also been considered to generate tolerance against multiple abiotic stresses with possible roles in mediating a cross talk between abiotic and biotic stress responses. In this review, we have reckoned the diverse signaling pattern and biological functions of WRKY proteins throughout the plant kingdom along with the growing prospects in this field of research.

  6. Target of Rapamycin (TOR) Regulates Growth in Response to Nutritional Signals.

    Weisman, Ronit

    2016-10-01

    All organisms can respond to the availability of nutrients by regulating their metabolism, growth, and cell division. Central to the regulation of growth in response to nutrient availability is the target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling that is composed of two structurally distinct complexes: TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR complex 2 (TORC2). The TOR genes were first identified in yeast as target of rapamycin, a natural product of a soil bacterium, which proved beneficial as an immunosuppressive and anticancer drug and is currently being tested for a handful of other pathological conditions including diabetes, neurodegeneration, and age-related diseases. Studies of the TOR pathway unraveled a complex growth-regulating network. TOR regulates nutrient uptake, transcription, protein synthesis and degradation, as well as metabolic pathways, in a coordinated manner that ensures that cells grow or cease growth in response to nutrient availability. The identification of specific signals and mechanisms that stimulate TOR signaling is an active and exciting field of research that has already identified nitrogen and amino acids as key regulators of TORC1 activity. The signals, as well as the cellular functions of TORC2, are far less well understood. Additional open questions in the field concern the relationships between TORC1 and TORC2, as well as the links with other nutrient-responsive pathways. Here I review the main features of TORC1 and TORC2, with a particular focus on yeasts as model organisms.

  7. Visible light communications using predistortion signal to enhance the response of passive optical receiver

    Liu, Yang; Chen, Hung-Yu; Liang, Kevin; Wei, Liang-Yu; Chow, Chi-Wai; Yeh, Chien-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Traditional visible light communication (VLC) uses positive-intrinsic-negative photodiode (PD) or avalanche PD as the optical receivers (Rx). We demonstrate using a solar cell as the VLC Rx. The solar cell is flexible and low cost and converts the optical signal into an electrical signal directly without the need of external power supply. In addition to acting as the VLC passive Rx, the converted electrical signal from the solar cell can charge up the battery of the Rx nodes. Hence, the proposed scheme can be a promising candidate for the future Internet of Things network. However, a solar cell acting as a VLC Rx is very challenging, since the response of the solar cell is limited. Here, we propose and demonstrate using predistortion to significantly enhance the solar cell Rx response for the first time up to the authors' knowledge. Experimental results show that the response of the solar cell Rx is significantly enhanced; and the original 2-kHz detection bandwidth of the solar cell can be enhanced by 250 times for receiving 500-kbit/s VLC signal at a transmission distance of 1 m. The operation principle, the generated voltage by the solar cell, and the maximum data rates achieved at different transmission distances are also studied.

  8. A novel Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) system for in-home training of stepping ability: basic parameters of system use by older adults.

    Smith, S.T.; Sherrington, C.; Studenski, S.A.; Schoene, D.; Lord, S.R.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This series of studies was conducted to develop and establish characteristics of exercise videogame play in older adults. The videogame was a modified version of the popular Dance Dance Revolution (DDR; Konomi). METHODS: Participants aged >/=70 were asked to make simple step movements in

  9. Fuz regulates craniofacial development through tissue specific responses to signaling factors.

    Zichao Zhang

    Full Text Available The planar cell polarity effector gene Fuz regulates ciliogenesis and Fuz loss of function studies reveal an array of embryonic phenotypes. However, cilia defects can affect many signaling pathways and, in humans, cilia defects underlie several craniofacial anomalies. To address this, we analyzed the craniofacial phenotype and signaling responses of the Fuz(-/- mice. We demonstrate a unique role for Fuz in regulating both Hedgehog (Hh and Wnt/β-catenin signaling during craniofacial development. Fuz expression first appears in the dorsal tissues and later in ventral tissues and craniofacial regions during embryonic development coincident with cilia development. The Fuz(-/- mice exhibit severe craniofacial deformities including anophthalmia, agenesis of the tongue and incisors, a hypoplastic mandible, cleft palate, ossification/skeletal defects and hyperplastic malformed Meckel's cartilage. Hh signaling is down-regulated in the Fuz null mice, while canonical Wnt signaling is up-regulated revealing the antagonistic relationship of these two pathways. Meckel's cartilage is expanded in the Fuz(-/- mice due to increased cell proliferation associated with the up-regulation of Wnt canonical target genes and decreased non-canonical pathway genes. Interestingly, cilia development was decreased in the mandible mesenchyme of Fuz null mice, suggesting that cilia may antagonize Wnt signaling in this tissue. Furthermore, expression of Fuz decreased expression of Wnt pathway genes as well as a Wnt-dependent reporter. Finally, chromatin IP experiments demonstrate that β-catenin/TCF-binding directly regulates Fuz expression. These data demonstrate a new model for coordination of Hh and Wnt signaling and reveal a Fuz-dependent negative feedback loop controlling Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  10. Proteomics insights into DNA damage response and translating this knowledge to clinical strategies

    von Stechow, Louise; Olsen, Jesper V

    2017-01-01

    Genomic instability is a critical driver in the process of cancer formation. At the same time, inducing DNA damage by irradiation or genotoxic compounds constitutes a key therapeutic strategy to kill fast-dividing cancer cells. Sensing of DNA lesions initiates a complex set of signalling pathways......) in the DDR. Finally, we provide an outlook on how proteomics studies of the DDR could aid clinical developments on multiple levels. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  11. Macrophage CGI-58 Attenuates Inflammatory Responsiveness via Promotion of PPARγ Signaling

    Dan Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58, an adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL coactivator, strongly promotes ATGL-mediated triglyceride (TG catabolism. Beyond its function in promoting lipolysis, other features of CGI-58 have been proposed. Here, we investigated the role of CGI-58 in the regulation of inflammatory responsiveness in macrophages. Methods: Macrophage-specific GCI-58 transgenic mice (TG and wild type mice (WT were fed a high fat diet (HFD, and RAW264.7 cells were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR signaling was detected. The inflammatory responsiveness and mitochondrial function were examined. Results: TG mice showed lower serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines and better mitochondrial function in macrophages compared with WT control. Knockdown of CGI-58 in RAW264.7 cells aggravated LPS-induced inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction. CGI-58 overexpression and silencing in macrophages induced and inhibited PPARγ expression and activity, respectively. Most importantly, the PPARγ-specific agonist rosiglitazone significantly suppressed inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by CGI-58 deficiency. Furthermore, knockdown of PPARγ in macrophages significantly dampened the role of CGI-58 in suppression of inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Interestingly, CGI-58 inhibited histone deacetylation and the recruitment of histone deacetylase (HDAC to the PPARγ promoter. Finally, ATGL deficiency did not affect inflammatory responsiveness and PPARγ signaling in macrophages. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that macrophage CGI-58 enhances PPARγ signaling and thus suppresses inflammatory responsiveness and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  12. Induction of the unfolded protein response by constitutive G-protein signaling in rod photoreceptor cells.

    Wang, Tian; Chen, Jeannie

    2014-10-17

    Phototransduction is a G-protein signal transduction cascade that converts photon absorption to a change in current at the plasma membrane. Certain genetic mutations affecting the proteins in the phototransduction cascade cause blinding disorders in humans. Some of these mutations serve as a genetic source of "equivalent light" that activates the cascade, whereas other mutations lead to amplification of the light response. How constitutive phototransduction causes photoreceptor cell death is poorly understood. We showed that persistent G-protein signaling, which occurs in rod arrestin and rhodopsin kinase knock-out mice, caused a rapid and specific induction of the PERK pathway of the unfolded protein response. These changes were not observed in the cGMP-gated channel knock-out rods, an equivalent light condition that mimics light-stimulated channel closure. Thus transducin signaling, but not channel closure, triggers rapid cell death in light damage caused by constitutive phototransduction. Additionally, we show that in the albino light damage model cell death was not associated with increase in global protein ubiquitination or unfolded protein response induction. Taken together, these observations provide novel mechanistic insights into the cell death pathway caused by constitutive phototransduction and identify the unfolded protein response as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Perturbations in carotenoid and porphyrin status result in differential photooxidative stress signaling and antioxidant responses.

    Park, Joon-Heum; Jung, Sunyo

    2018-02-12

    We examined differential photooxidative stress signaling and antioxidant responses in rice plants treated with norflurazon (NF) and oxyfluorfen (OF), which are inhibitors of carotenoid and porphyrin biosynthesis, respectively. Plants treated with OF markedly increased levels of cellular leakage and malondialdehyde, compared with NF-treated plants, showing that OF plants suffered greater oxidative damage with respect to membrane integrity. The enhanced production of H 2 O 2 in response to OF, but not NF, indicates the important role of H 2 O 2 in activation of photooxidative stress signaling in OF plants. In response to NF and OF, the increased levels of free salicylic acid as well as maintenance of the redox ratio of ascorbate and glutathione pools to a certain level are considered to be crucial factors in the protection against photooxidation. Plants treated with OF greatly up-regulated catalase (CAT) activity and Cat transcript levels, compared with NF-treated plants. Interestingly, NF plants showed no noticeable increase in oxidative metabolism, although they did show considerable increases in ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and peroxidase activities and transcript levels of APX, as in OF plants. Our results suggest that perturbations in carotenoid and porphyrin status by NF and OF can be sensed by differential photooxidative stress signaling, such as that involving H 2 O 2 , redox state of ascorbate and glutathione, and salicylic acid, which may be responsible for at least part of the induction of ROS-scavenging enzymes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A signal detection-item response theory model for evaluating neuropsychological measures.

    Thomas, Michael L; Brown, Gregory G; Gur, Ruben C; Moore, Tyler M; Patt, Virginie M; Risbrough, Victoria B; Baker, Dewleen G

    2018-02-05

    Models from signal detection theory are commonly used to score neuropsychological test data, especially tests of recognition memory. Here we show that certain item response theory models can be formulated as signal detection theory models, thus linking two complementary but distinct methodologies. We then use the approach to evaluate the validity (construct representation) of commonly used research measures, demonstrate the impact of conditional error on neuropsychological outcomes, and evaluate measurement bias. Signal detection-item response theory (SD-IRT) models were fitted to recognition memory data for words, faces, and objects. The sample consisted of U.S. Infantry Marines and Navy Corpsmen participating in the Marine Resiliency Study. Data comprised item responses to the Penn Face Memory Test (PFMT; N = 1,338), Penn Word Memory Test (PWMT; N = 1,331), and Visual Object Learning Test (VOLT; N = 1,249), and self-report of past head injury with loss of consciousness. SD-IRT models adequately fitted recognition memory item data across all modalities. Error varied systematically with ability estimates, and distributions of residuals from the regression of memory discrimination onto self-report of past head injury were positively skewed towards regions of larger measurement error. Analyses of differential item functioning revealed little evidence of systematic bias by level of education. SD-IRT models benefit from the measurement rigor of item response theory-which permits the modeling of item difficulty and examinee ability-and from signal detection theory-which provides an interpretive framework encompassing the experimentally validated constructs of memory discrimination and response bias. We used this approach to validate the construct representation of commonly used research measures and to demonstrate how nonoptimized item parameters can lead to erroneous conclusions when interpreting neuropsychological test data. Future work might include the

  15. Model-based synthesis of locally contingent responses to global market signals

    Magliocca, N. R.

    2015-12-01

    Rural livelihoods and the land systems on which they depend are increasingly influenced by distant markets through economic globalization. Place-based analyses of land and livelihood system sustainability must then consider both proximate and distant influences on local decision-making. Thus, advancing land change theory in the context of economic globalization calls for a systematic understanding of the general processes as well as local contingencies shaping local responses to global signals. Synthesis of insights from place-based case studies of land and livelihood change is a path forward for developing such systematic knowledge. This paper introduces a model-based synthesis approach to investigating the influence of local socio-environmental and agent-level factors in mediating land-use and livelihood responses to changing global market signals. A generalized agent-based modeling framework is applied to six case-study sites that differ in environmental conditions, market access and influence, and livelihood settings. The largest modeled land conversions and livelihood transitions to market-oriented production occurred in sties with relatively productive agricultural land and/or with limited livelihood options. Experimental shifts in the distributions of agents' risk tolerances generally acted to attenuate or amplify responses to changes in global market signals. Importantly, however, responses of agents at different points in the risk tolerance distribution varied widely, with the wealth gap growing wider between agents with higher or lower risk tolerance. These results demonstrate model-based synthesis is a promising approach to overcome many of the challenges of current synthesis methods in land change science, and to identify generalized as well as locally contingent responses to global market signals.

  16. Transcriptional regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals configures the early response mechanisms of japonica rice to chilling stress

    Yun, Kil-Young; Park, Myoung Ryoul; Mohanty, Bijayalaxmi; Herath, Venura; Xu, Fuyu; Mauleon, Ramil; Wijaya, Edward; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Bruskiewich, Richard; de los Reyes, Benildo G

    2010-01-01

    -plant level analyses established a holistic view of chilling stress response mechanism of japonica rice. Early response regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals is critical for prolonged survival under sub-optimal temperature. Integration of stress

  17. Gene expression profiling of PBL in response to ionising radiation and modeled microgravity

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — BACKGROUND: Ionizing radiation (IR) can be extremely harmful for human cells since an improper DNA-damage response (DDR) to IR can contribute to carcinogenesis...

  18. Identification of miRNAs involved in cell response to ionising radiation and modeled microgravity

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — BACKGROUND: Ionizing radiation (IR) can be extremely harmful for human cells since an improper DNA-damage response (DDR) to IR can contribute to carcinogenesis...

  19. The UVR8 UV-B Photoreceptor: Perception, Signaling and Response

    Tilbrook, Kimberley; Arongaus, Adriana B.; Binkert, Melanie; Heijde, Marc; Yin, Ruohe; Ulm, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) is an intrinsic part of sunlight that is accompanied by significant biological effects. Plants are able to perceive UV-B using the UV-B photoreceptor UVR8 which is linked to a specific molecular signaling pathway and leads to UV-B acclimation. Herein we review the biological process in plants from initial UV-B perception and signal transduction through to the known UV-B responses that promote survival in sunlight. The UVR8 UV-B photoreceptor exists as a homodimer that instantly monomerises upon UV-B absorption via specific intrinsic tryptophans which act as UV-B chromophores. The UVR8 monomer interacts with COP1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, initiating a molecular signaling pathway that leads to gene expression changes. This signaling output leads to UVR8-dependent responses including UV-B-induced photomorphogenesis and the accumulation of UV-B-absorbing flavonols. Negative feedback regulation of the pathway is provided by the WD40-repeat proteins RUP1 and RUP2, which facilitate UVR8 redimerization, disrupting the UVR8-COP1 interaction. Despite rapid advancements in the field of recent years, further components of UVR8 UV-B signaling are constantly emerging, and the precise interplay of these and the established players UVR8, COP1, RUP1, RUP2 and HY5 needs to be defined. UVR8 UV-B signaling represents our further understanding of how plants are able to sense their light environment and adjust their growth accordingly. PMID:23864838

  20. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Elmets, Craig A.; Robbins, David J.; Matalon, Sadis; Deshane, Jessy S.; Afaq, Farrukh; Bickers, David R.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions

  1. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Ballestas, Mary E. [Department of Pediatrics Infectious Disease, Children' s of Alabama, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Robbins, David J. [Department of Surgery, Molecular Oncology Program, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami (United States); Matalon, Sadis [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Deshane, Jessy S. [Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Afaq, Farrukh [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bickers, David R. [Department of Dermatology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  2. Friend or foe? Reactive oxygen species production, scavenging and signaling in plant response to environmental stresses.

    Czarnocka, Weronika; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2018-01-10

    In the natural environment, plants are exposed to a variety of biotic and abiotic stress conditions that trigger rapid changes in the production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The production and scavenging of ROS is compartmentalized, which means that, depending on stimuli type, they can be generated and eliminated in different cellular compartments such as the apoplast, plasma membrane, chloroplasts, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and endoplasmic reticulum. Although the accumulation of ROS is generally harmful to cells, ROS play an important role in signaling pathways that regulate acclimatory and defense responses in plants, such as systemic acquired acclimation (SAA) and systemic acquired resistance (SAR). However, high accumulations of ROS can also trigger redox homeostasis disturbance which can lead to cell death, and in consequence, to a limitation in biomass and yield production. Different ROS have various half-lifetimes and degrees of reactivity toward molecular components such as lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Thus, they play different roles in intra- and extra-cellular signaling. Despite their possible damaging effect, ROS should mainly be considered as signaling molecules that regulate local and systemic acclimatory and defense responses. Over the past two decades it has been proven that ROS together with non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), hormones, Ca 2+ waves, and electrical signals are the main players in SAA and SAR, two physiological processes essential for plant survival and productivity in unfavorable conditions. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. [Response of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal lipid metabolism to symbiotic signals in mycorrhiza].

    Tian, Lei; Li, Yuanjing; Tian, Chunjie

    2016-01-04

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi play an important role in energy flow and nutrient cycling, besides their wide distribution in the cosystem. With a long co-evolution, AM fungi and host plant have formed a symbiotic relationship, and fungal lipid metabolism may be the key point to find the symbiotic mechanism in arbusculart mycorrhiza. Here, we reviewed the most recent progress on the interaction between AM fungal lipid metabolism and symbiotic signaling networks, especially the response of AM fungal lipid metabolism to symbiotic signals. Furthermore, we discussed the response of AM fungal lipid storage and release to symbiotic or non-symbiotic status, and the correlation between fungal lipid metabolism and nutrient transfer in mycorrhiza. In addition, we explored the feedback of the lipolysis process to molecular signals during the establishment of symbiosis, and the corresponding material conversion and energy metabolism besides the crosstalk of fungal lipid metabolism and signaling networks. This review will help understand symbiotic mechanism of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi and further application in ecosystem.

  4. ZAP-70 and p72syk are signaling response elements through MHC class II molecules

    Kanner, S B; Grosmaire, L S; Blake, J

    1995-01-01

    Ligation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens expressed on antigen-activated human CD4+ T-lymphocytes induces early signal transduction events including the activation of tyrosine kinases, the tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase-C gamma 1 and the mobilization...... of intracellular calcium. Similar responses have been observed in B-cells following stimulation of MHC class II molecules, including the increased production of intracellular cAMP. In this report, we demonstrate that the ZAP-70 tyrosine kinase is a responsive signaling element following cross-linking of HLA...... by herbimycin A. MHC class II ligation on B-lymphocytes resulted in cell death, which was both qualitatively distinct from Fas-induced apoptosis and partially protected by herbimycin A pretreatment. Thus, ligation of MHC class II molecules expressed on human lymphocytes stimulates the ZAP-70/p72syk family...

  5. Frequency response testing at Experimental Breeder Reactor II using discrete-level periodic signals

    Rhodes, W.D.; Larson, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 (EBR-2) reactivity-to-power frequency-response function was measured with pseudo-random, discrete-level, periodic signals. The reactor power deviation was small with insignificant perturbation of normal operation and in-place irradiation experiments. Comparison of results with measured rod oscillator data and with theoretical predictions show good agreement. Moreover, measures of input signal quality (autocorrelation function and energy spectra) confirm the ability to enable this type of frequency response determination at EBR-2. Measurements were made with the pseudo-random binary sequence, quadratic residue binary sequence, pseudo-random ternary sequence, and the multifrequency binary sequence. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Brassinosteroid signaling-dependent root responses to prolonged elevated ambient temperature.

    Martins, Sara; Montiel-Jorda, Alvaro; Cayrel, Anne; Huguet, Stéphanie; Roux, Christine Paysant-Le; Ljung, Karin; Vert, Grégory

    2017-08-21

    Due to their sessile nature, plants have to cope with and adjust to their fluctuating environment. Temperature elevation stimulates the growth of Arabidopsis aerial parts. This process is mediated by increased biosynthesis of the growth-promoting hormone auxin. How plant roots respond to elevated ambient temperature is however still elusive. Here we present strong evidence that temperature elevation impinges on brassinosteroid hormone signaling to alter root growth. We show that elevated temperature leads to increased root elongation, independently of auxin or factors known to drive temperature-mediated shoot growth. We further demonstrate that brassinosteroid signaling regulates root responses to elevated ambient temperature. Increased growth temperature specifically impacts on the level of the brassinosteroid receptor BRI1 to downregulate brassinosteroid signaling and mediate root elongation. Our results establish that BRI1 integrates temperature and brassinosteroid signaling to regulate root growth upon long-term changes in environmental conditions associated with global warming.Moderate heat stimulates the growth of Arabidopsis shoots in an auxin-dependent manner. Here, Martins et al. show that elevated ambient temperature modifies root growth by reducing the BRI1 brassinosteroid-receptor protein level and downregulating brassinosteroid signaling.

  7. Activation of Brain Somatostatin Signaling Suppresses CRF Receptor-Mediated Stress Response

    Andreas Stengel; Yvette F. Taché; Yvette F. Taché

    2017-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is the hallmark brain peptide triggering the response to stress and mediates—in addition to the stimulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis—other hormonal, behavioral, autonomic and visceral components. Earlier reports indicate that somatostatin-28 injected intracerebroventricularly counteracts the acute stress-induced ACTH and catecholamine release. Mounting evidence now supports that activation of brain somatostatin signaling exerts a br...

  8. Activation of Brain Somatostatin Signaling Suppresses CRF Receptor-Mediated Stress Response

    Andreas Stengel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF is the hallmark brain peptide triggering the response to stress and mediates—in addition to the stimulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis—other hormonal, behavioral, autonomic and visceral components. Earlier reports indicate that somatostatin-28 injected intracerebroventricularly counteracts the acute stress-induced ACTH and catecholamine release. Mounting evidence now supports that activation of brain somatostatin signaling exerts a broader anti-stress effect by blunting the endocrine, autonomic, behavioral (with a focus on food intake and visceral gastrointestinal motor responses through the involvement of distinct somatostatin receptor subtypes.

  9. Activation of Brain Somatostatin Signaling Suppresses CRF Receptor-Mediated Stress Response.

    Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette F

    2017-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is the hallmark brain peptide triggering the response to stress and mediates-in addition to the stimulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis-other hormonal, behavioral, autonomic and visceral components. Earlier reports indicate that somatostatin-28 injected intracerebroventricularly counteracts the acute stress-induced ACTH and catecholamine release. Mounting evidence now supports that activation of brain somatostatin signaling exerts a broader anti-stress effect by blunting the endocrine, autonomic, behavioral (with a focus on food intake) and visceral gastrointestinal motor responses through the involvement of distinct somatostatin receptor subtypes.

  10. Indirect macrophage responses to ionizing radiation: implications for genotype-dependent bystander signaling.

    Coates, Philip J; Rundle, Jana K; Lorimore, Sally A; Wright, Eric G

    2008-01-15

    In addition to the directly mutagenic effects of energy deposition in DNA, ionizing radiation is associated with a variety of untargeted and delayed effects that result in ongoing bone marrow damage. Delayed effects are genotype dependent with CBA/Ca mice, but not C57BL/6 mice, susceptible to the induction of damage and also radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia. Because macrophages are a potential source of ongoing damaging signals, we have determined their gene expression profiles and we show that bone marrow-derived macrophages show widely different intrinsic expression patterns. The profiles classify macrophages derived from CBA/Ca mice as M1-like (pro-inflammatory) and those from C57BL/6 mice as M2-like (anti-inflammatory); measurements of NOS2 and arginase activity in normal bone marrow macrophages confirm these findings. After irradiation in vivo, but not in vitro, C57BL/6 macrophages show a reduction in NOS2 and an increase in arginase activities, indicating a further M2 response, whereas CBA/Ca macrophages retain an M1 phenotype. Activation of specific signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling pathways in irradiated hemopoietic tissues supports these observations. The data indicate that macrophage activation is not a direct effect of radiation but a tissue response, secondary to the initial radiation exposure, and have important implications for understanding genotype-dependent responses and the mechanisms of the hemotoxic and leukemogenic consequences of radiation exposure.

  11. Responses to olfactory signals reflect network structure of flower-visitor interactions.

    Junker, Robert R; Höcherl, Nicole; Blüthgen, Nico

    2010-07-01

    1. Network analyses provide insights into the diversity and complexity of ecological interactions and have motivated conclusions about community stability and co-evolution. However, biological traits and mechanisms such as chemical signals regulating the interactions between individual species--the microstructure of a network--are poorly understood. 2. We linked the responses of receivers (flower visitors) towards signals (flower scent) to the structure of a highly diverse natural flower-insect network. For each interaction, we define link temperature--a newly developed metric--as the deviation of the observed interaction strength from neutrality, assuming that animals randomly interact with flowers. 3. Link temperature was positively correlated to the specific visitors' responses to floral scents, experimentally examined in a mobile olfactometer. Thus, communication between plants and consumers via phytochemical signals reflects a significant part of the microstructure in a complex network. Negative as well as positive responses towards floral scents contributed to these results, where individual experience was important apart from innate behaviour. 4. Our results indicate that: (1) biological mechanisms have a profound impact on the microstructure of complex networks that underlies the outcome of aggregate statistics, and (2) floral scents act as a filter, promoting the visitation of some flower visitors, but also inhibiting the visitation of others.

  12. Assessing signal-driven mechanism in neonates: brain responses to temporally and spectrally different sounds

    Yasuyo eMinagawa-Kawai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Past studies have found that in adults that acoustic properties of sound signals (such as fast vs. slow temporal features differentially activate the left and right hemispheres, and some have hypothesized that left-lateralization for speech processing may follow from left-lateralization to rapidly changing signals. Here, we tested whether newborns’ brains show some evidence of signal-specific lateralization responses using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS and auditory stimuli that elicits lateralized responses in adults, composed of segments that vary in duration and spectral diversity. We found significantly greater bilateral responses of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb in the temporal areas for stimuli with a minimum segment duration of 21 ms, than stimuli with a minimum segment duration of 667 ms. However, we found no evidence for hemispheric asymmetries dependent on the stimulus characteristics. We hypothesize that acoustic-based functional brain asymmetries may develop throughout early infancy, and discuss their possible relationship with brain asymmetries for language.

  13. Cyber Physical System Modelling of Distribution Power Systems for Dynamic Demand Response

    Chu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Rongxiang; Tang, Maosen; Huang, Haoyi; Zhang, Lei

    2018-01-01

    Dynamic demand response (DDR) is a package of control methods to enhance power system security. A CPS modelling and simulation platform for DDR in distribution power systems is presented in this paper. CPS modelling requirements of distribution power systems are analyzed. A coupled CPS modelling platform is built for assessing DDR in the distribution power system, which combines seamlessly modelling tools of physical power networks and cyber communication networks. Simulations results of IEEE 13-node test system demonstrate the effectiveness of the modelling and simulation platform.

  14. Ethylene Receptors Signal via a Noncanonical Pathway to Regulate Abscisic Acid Responses1[OPEN

    Bakshi, Arkadipta; Fernandez, Jessica C.

    2018-01-01

    Ethylene is a gaseous plant hormone perceived by a family of receptors in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) including ETHYLENE RESPONSE1 (ETR1) and ETR2. Previously we showed that etr1-6 loss-of-function plants germinate better and etr2-3 loss-of-function plants germinate worse than wild-type under NaCl stress and in response to abscisic acid (ABA). In this study, we expanded these results by showing that ETR1 and ETR2 have contrasting roles in the control of germination under a variety of inhibitory conditions for seed germination such as treatment with KCl, CuSO4, ZnSO4, and ethanol. Pharmacological and molecular biology results support a model where ETR1 and ETR2 are indirectly affecting the expression of genes encoding ABA signaling proteins to affect ABA sensitivity. The receiver domain of ETR1 is involved in this function in germination under these conditions and controlling the expression of genes encoding ABA signaling proteins. Epistasis analysis demonstrated that these contrasting roles of ETR1 and ETR2 do not require the canonical ethylene signaling pathway. To explore the importance of receptor-protein interactions, we conducted yeast two-hybrid screens using the cytosolic domains of ETR1 and ETR2 as bait. Unique interacting partners with either ETR1 or ETR2 were identified. We focused on three of these proteins and confirmed the interactions with receptors. Loss of these proteins led to faster germination in response to ABA, showing that they are involved in ABA responses. Thus, ETR1 and ETR2 have both ethylene-dependent and -independent roles in plant cells that affect responses to ABA. PMID:29158332

  15. PKA catalytic subunit compartmentation regulates contractile and hypertrophic responses to β-adrenergic signaling

    Yang, Jason H.; Polanowska-Grabowska, Renata K.; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Shields, Charles W.; Saucerman, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    β-adrenergic signaling is spatiotemporally heterogeneous in the cardiac myocyte, conferring exquisite control to sympathetic stimulation. Such heterogeneity drives the formation of protein kinase A (PKA) signaling microdomains, which regulate Ca2+ handling and contractility. Here, we test the hypothesis that the nucleus independently comprises a PKA signaling microdomain regulating myocyte hypertrophy. Spatially-targeted FRET reporters for PKA activity identified slower PKA activation and lower isoproterenol sensitivity in the nucleus (t50 = 10.60±0.68 min; EC50 = 89.00 nmol/L) than in the cytosol (t50 = 3.71±0.25 min; EC50 = 1.22 nmol/L). These differences were not explained by cAMP or AKAP-based compartmentation. A computational model of cytosolic and nuclear PKA activity was developed and predicted that differences in nuclear PKA dynamics and magnitude are regulated by slow PKA catalytic subunit diffusion, while differences in isoproterenol sensitivity are regulated by nuclear expression of protein kinase inhibitor (PKI). These were validated by FRET and immunofluorescence. The model also predicted differential phosphorylation of PKA substrates regulating cell contractility and hypertrophy. Ca2+ and cell hypertrophy measurements validated these predictions and identified higher isoproterenol sensitivity for contractile enhancements (EC50 = 1.84 nmol/L) over cell hypertrophy (EC50 = 85.88 nmol/L). Over-expression of spatially targeted PKA catalytic subunit to the cytosol or nucleus enhanced contractile and hypertrophic responses, respectively. We conclude that restricted PKA catalytic subunit diffusion is an important PKA compartmentation mechanism and the nucleus comprises a novel PKA signaling microdomain, insulating hypertrophic from contractile β-adrenergic signaling responses. PMID:24225179

  16. DNA-damage response during mitosis induces whole-chromosome missegregation.

    Bakhoum, Samuel F; Kabeche, Lilian; Murnane, John P; Zaki, Bassem I; Compton, Duane A

    2014-11-01

    Many cancers display both structural (s-CIN) and numerical (w-CIN) chromosomal instabilities. Defective chromosome segregation during mitosis has been shown to cause DNA damage that induces structural rearrangements of chromosomes (s-CIN). In contrast, whether DNA damage can disrupt mitotic processes to generate whole chromosomal instability (w-CIN) is unknown. Here, we show that activation of the DNA-damage response (DDR) during mitosis selectively stabilizes kinetochore-microtubule (k-MT) attachments to chromosomes through Aurora-A and PLK1 kinases, thereby increasing the frequency of lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Inhibition of DDR proteins, ATM or CHK2, abolishes the effect of DNA damage on k-MTs and chromosome segregation, whereas activation of the DDR in the absence of DNA damage is sufficient to induce chromosome segregation errors. Finally, inhibiting the DDR during mitosis in cancer cells with persistent DNA damage suppresses inherent chromosome segregation defects. Thus, the DDR during mitosis inappropriately stabilizes k-MTs, creating a link between s-CIN and w-CIN. The genome-protective role of the DDR depends on its ability to delay cell division until damaged DNA can be fully repaired. Here, we show that when DNA damage is induced during mitosis, the DDR unexpectedly induces errors in the segregation of entire chromosomes, thus linking structural and numerical chromosomal instabilities. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Deficiency in DNA damage response of enterocytes accelerates intestinal stem cell aging in Drosophila.

    Park, Joung-Sun; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Pyo, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Shin; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2018-03-07

    Stem cell dysfunction is closely linked to tissue and organismal aging and age-related diseases, and heavily influenced by the niche cells' environment. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a key pathway for tissue degeneration and organismal aging; however, the precise protective role of DDR in stem cell/niche aging is unclear. The Drosophila midgut is an excellent model to study the biology of stem cell/niche aging because of its easy genetic manipulation and its short lifespan. Here, we showed that deficiency of DDR in Drosophila enterocytes (ECs) accelerates intestinal stem cell (ISC) aging. We generated flies with knockdown of Mre11 , Rad50 , Nbs1 , ATM , ATR , Chk1 , and Chk2 , which decrease the DDR system in ECs. EC-specific DDR depletion induced EC death, accelerated the aging of ISCs, as evidenced by ISC hyperproliferation, DNA damage accumulation, and increased centrosome amplification, and affected the adult fly's survival. Our data indicated a distinct effect of DDR depletion in stem or niche cells on tissue-resident stem cell proliferation. Our findings provide evidence of the essential role of DDR in protecting EC against ISC aging, thus providing a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of stem cell/niche aging.

  18. Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction

    Baker, Anna W.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Morales, Neydis Moreno; Forest, Katrina T. (UW)

    2016-02-01

    ABSTRACT

    Bacteriophytochrome photoreceptors (BphPs) and their cognate response regulators make up two-component signal transduction systems which direct bacteria to mount phenotypic responses to changes in environmental light quality. Most of these systems utilize single-domain response regulators to transduce signals through unknown pathways and mechanisms. Here we describe the photocycle and autophosphorylation kinetics of RtBphP1, a red light-regulated histidine kinase from the desert bacteriumRamlibacter tataouinensis. RtBphP1 undergoes red to far-red photoconversion with rapid thermal reversion to the dark state. RtBphP1 is autophosphorylated in the dark; this activity is inhibited under red light. The RtBphP1 cognate response regulator, theR. tataouinensisbacteriophytochrome response regulator (RtBRR), and a homolog, AtBRR fromAgrobacterium tumefaciens, crystallize unexpectedly as arm-in-arm dimers, reliant on a conserved hydrophobic motif, hFWAhL (where h is a hydrophobic M, V, L, or I residue). RtBRR and AtBRR dimerize distinctly from four structurally characterized phytochrome response regulators found in photosynthetic organisms and from all other receiver domain homodimers in the Protein Data Bank. A unique cacodylate-zinc-histidine tag metal organic framework yielded single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phases and may be of general interest. Examination of the effect of the BRR stoichiometry on signal transduction showed that phosphorylated RtBRR is accumulated more efficiently than the engineered monomeric RtBRR (RtBRRmon) in phosphotransfer reactions. Thus, we conclude that arm-in-arm dimers are a relevant signaling intermediate in this class of two-component regulatory systems.

  19. microRNA-124 negatively regulates TLR signaling in alveolar macrophages in response to mycobacterial infection.

    Ma, Chunyan; Li, Yong; Li, Min; Deng, Guangcun; Wu, Xiaoling; Zeng, Jin; Hao, Xiujing; Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Jing; Cho, William C S; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2014-11-01

    The emerging roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating immune responses have attracted increasing attention in recent years; and the alveolar macrophages (AMs) are the main targets of mycobacterial infection, which play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. However, the immunoregulatory role of miRNAs in AMs has not been fully demonstrated. In this study, we find that miR-124 is up-regulated in the peripheral leukocytes of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis; furthermore, the expression miR-124 can be induced upon Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) infection in both RAW264.7 AM cells in vitro and murine AMs in vivo. Mechanistically, miR-124 is able to modulate toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling activity in RAW264.7 cells in response to BCG infection. In this regard, multiple components of TLR signaling cascade, including the TLR6, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), TNFR-associated factor 6 and tumor necrosis factor-α are directly targeted by miR-124. In addition, both overexpression of TLR signaling adaptor MyD88 and BCG infection are able to augment miR-124 transcription, while MyD88 expression silenced by small interfering RNA dramatically suppresses miR-124 expression in AMs in vitro. Moreover, the abundance of miR-124 transcript in murine AMs of MyD88 deficient mice is significantly less than that of their wild-type or heterozygous littermates; and the BCG infection fails to induce miR-124 expression in the lung of MyD88 deficient mouse. These results indicate a negative regulatory role of miR-124 in fine-tuning inflammatory response in AMs upon mycobacterial infection, in part through a mechanism by directly targeting TLR signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Electrical signaling, stomatal conductance, ABA and Ethylene content in avocado trees in response to root hypoxia

    Gurovich, Luis; Schaffer, Bruce; García, Nicolás; Iturriaga, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) trees are among the most sensitive of fruit tree species to root hypoxia as a result of flooded or poorly drained soil. Similar to drought stress, an early physiological response to root hypoxia in avocado is a reduction of stomatal conductance. It has been previously determined in avocado trees that an extracellular electrical signal between the base of stem and leaves is produced and related to reductions in stomatal conductance in response to drought stress. The current study was designed to determine if changes in the extracellular electrical potential between the base of the stem and leaves in avocado trees could also be detected in response to short-term (min) or long-term (days) root hypoxia, and if these signals could be related to stomatal conductance (gs), root and leaf ABA and ACC concentrations, ethylene emission from leaves and leaf abscission. In contrast to previous observations for drought-stressed trees, short-term or long-term root hypoxia did not stimulate an electrical potential difference between the base of the stem and leaves. Short-term hypoxia did not result in a significant decrease in gs compared with plants in the control treatment, and no differences in ABA concentration were found between plants subjected to hypoxia and control plants. Long-term hypoxia in the root zone resulted in a significant decrease in gs, increased leaf ethylene and increased leaf abscission. The results indicate that for avocado trees exposed to root hypoxia, electrical signals do not appear to be the primary root-to-shoot communication mechanism involved in signaling for stomatal closure as a result of hypoxia in the root zone. PMID:19649181

  1. Regulation of fruit and seed response to heat and drought by sugars as nutrients and signals

    Yong-Hua eLiu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A large body of evidence shows that sugars function both as nutrients and signals to regulate fruit and seed set under normal and stress conditions including heat and drought. Inadequate sucrose import to, and its degradation within, reproductive organs cause fruit and seed abortion under heat and drought. As nutrients, sucrose-derived hexoses provide carbon skeletons and energy for growth and development of fruits and seeds. Sugar metabolism can also alleviate the impact of stress on fruit and seed through facilitating biosynthesis of heat shock proteins (Hsps and non-enzymic antioxidants (e.g. glutathione, ascorbic acid, which collectively maintain the integrity of membranes and prevent programmed cell death (PCD through protecting proteins and scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS. In parallel, sugars (sucrose, glucose and fructose, also exert signalling roles through cross-talk with hormone and ROS signalling pathways and by mediating cell division and PCD. At the same time, emerging data indicate that sugar-derived signalling systems, including trehalose-6 phosphate (T6P, sucrose non-fermenting related kinase-1 (SnRK and the target of rapamycin (TOR kinase complex also play important roles in regulating plant development through modulating nutrient and energy signalling and metabolic processes, especially under abiotic stresses where sugar availability is low. This review aims to evaluate recent progress of research on abiotic stress responses of reproductive organs focusing on roles of sugar metabolism and signalling and addressing the possible biochemical and molecular mechanism by which sugars regulate fruit and seed set under heat and drought.

  2. A Decline in Response Variability Improves Neural Signal Detection during Auditory Task Performance.

    von Trapp, Gardiner; Buran, Bradley N; Sen, Kamal; Semple, Malcolm N; Sanes, Dan H

    2016-10-26

    The detection of a sensory stimulus arises from a significant change in neural activity, but a sensory neuron's response is rarely identical to successive presentations of the same stimulus. Large trial-to-trial variability would limit the central nervous system's ability to reliably detect a stimulus, presumably affecting perceptual performance. However, if response variability were to decrease while firing rate remained constant, then neural sensitivity could improve. Here, we asked whether engagement in an auditory detection task can modulate response variability, thereby increasing neural sensitivity. We recorded telemetrically from the core auditory cortex of gerbils, both while they engaged in an amplitude-modulation detection task and while they sat quietly listening to the identical stimuli. Using a signal detection theory framework, we found that neural sensitivity was improved during task performance, and this improvement was closely associated with a decrease in response variability. Moreover, units with the greatest change in response variability had absolute neural thresholds most closely aligned with simultaneously measured perceptual thresholds. Our findings suggest that the limitations imposed by response variability diminish during task performance, thereby improving the sensitivity of neural encoding and potentially leading to better perceptual sensitivity. The detection of a sensory stimulus arises from a significant change in neural activity. However, trial-to-trial variability of the neural response may limit perceptual performance. If the neural response to a stimulus is quite variable, then the response on a given trial could be confused with the pattern of neural activity generated when the stimulus is absent. Therefore, a neural mechanism that served to reduce response variability would allow for better stimulus detection. By recording from the cortex of freely moving animals engaged in an auditory detection task, we found that variability

  3. Milton Hydro's Energy Drill Program : demand response based on behavioural responses to price signals

    Thorne, D.; Heeney, D.

    2006-01-01

    The Energy Drill Program is a demand response tool and economic instrument based on a fire drill protocol. The aim of the program is to reduce peak demand and emissions and improve system reliability and price volatility. This presentation provided details of an Energy Drill pilot program, conducted in Milton, Ontario. Customized approaches were used in the buildings partaking in the drill, which included the Milton Hydro Headquarters, the Robert Baldwin Public School, and a leisure centre. Building assessments inventoried building systems and equipment usage patterns. Pilot monitoring and evaluation was conducted through the use of checklists completed by marshals and building coordinators. Energy use data was tracked by Milton Hydro, and report cards were sent after each drill. A short-term drop in demand was observed in all the buildings, as well as overall reductions in peak period demand. Energy consumption data for all the buildings were provided. Results of the pilot program suggested that rotating the drills among participating buildings may prove to be a more effective strategy for the program to adopt in future. A greater emphasis on energy efficiency was also recommended. It was concluded that the eventual roll-out strategy should carefully consider the number and types of buildings involved in the program; internal commitment to the program; available resources; and timing for implementation. refs., tabs., figs

  4. Hypothalamic response to the chemo-signal androstadienone in gender dysphoric children and adolescents

    Sarah M Burke

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The odorous steroid androstadienone, a putative male chemo-signal, was previously reported to evoke sex differences in hypothalamic activation in adult heterosexual men and women. In order to investigate whether puberty modulated this sex difference in response to androstadienone we measured the hypothalamic responsiveness to this chemo-signal in 39 prepubertal and 41 adolescent boys and girls by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging. We then investigated whether 36 prepubertal children and 38 adolescents diagnosed with Gender Dysphoria (GD; DSM-5 exhibited sex-atypical (in accordance with their experienced gender, rather than sex-typical (in accordance with their natal sex hypothalamic activations during olfactory stimulation with androstadienone. We found that the sex difference in responsiveness to androstadienone was already present in prepubertal control children and thus likely developed during early perinatal development instead of during sexual maturation. Adolescent girls and boys with GD both responded remarkably like their experienced gender, thus sex-atypical. In contrast, prepubertal girls with GD showed neither a typically male nor female hypothalamic activation pattern and prepubertal boys with GD had hypothalamic activations in response to androstadienone that were similar to control boys, thus sex-typical. We present here a unique data set of boys and girls diagnosed with GD at two different developmental stages, showing that these children possess certain sex-atypical functional brain characteristics and may have undergone atypical sexual differentiation of the brain.

  5. Serotonergic Chemosensory Neurons Modify the C. elegans Immune Response by Regulating G-Protein Signaling in Epithelial Cells

    Anderson, Alexandra; Laurenson-Schafer, Henry; Partridge, Frederick A.; Hodgkin, Jonathan; McMullan, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The nervous and immune systems influence each other, allowing animals to rapidly protect themselves from changes in their internal and external environment. However, the complex nature of these systems in mammals makes it difficult to determine how neuronal signaling influences the immune response. Here we show that serotonin, synthesized in Caenorhabditis elegans chemosensory neurons, modulates the immune response. Serotonin released from these cells acts, directly or indirectly, to regulate G-protein signaling in epithelial cells. Signaling in these cells is required for the immune response to infection by the natural pathogen Microbacterium nematophilum. Here we show that serotonin signaling suppresses the innate immune response and limits the rate of pathogen clearance. We show that C. elegans uses classical neurotransmitters to alter the immune response. Serotonin released from sensory neurons may function to modify the immune system in response to changes in the animal's external environment such as the availability, or quality, of food. PMID:24348250

  6. Nuclear and cytoplasmic signalling in the cellular response to ionising radiation

    Szumiel, Irena

    2001-01-01

    DNA is the universal primary target for ionising radiation; however, the cellular response is highly diversified not only by differential DNA repair ability. The monitoring system for the ionising radiation-inflicted DNA damage consists of 3 apparently independently acting enzymes which are activated by DNA breaks: two protein kinases, ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase) and a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, PARP-1. These 3 enzymes are the source of alarm signals, which affect to various extents DNA repair, progression through the cell cycle and eventually the pathway to cell death. Their functions probably are partly overlapping. On the side of DNA repair their role consists in recruiting and/or activating the repair enzymes, as well as preventing illegitimate recombination of the damaged sites. A large part of the nuclear signalling pathway, including the integrating role of TP53 has been revealed. Two main signalling pathways start at the plasma membrane: the MAPK/ERK (mitogen and extracellular signal regulated protein kinase family) 'survival pathway' and the SAPK/JNK (stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase) 'cell death pathway'. The balance between them is likely to determine the cell's fate. An additional important 'survival pathway' starts at the insulin-like growth factor type I receptor (IGF-IR), involves phosphoinositide- 3 kinase and Akt kinase and is targeted at inactivation of the pro-apoptotic BAD protein. Interestingly, over-expression of IGF-IR almost entirely abrogates the extreme radiation sensitivity of ataxia telangiectasia cells. When DNA break rejoining is impaired, the cell is unconditionally radiation sensitive. The fate of a repair-competent cell is determined by the time factor: the cell cycle arrest should be long enough to ensure the completion of repair. Incomplete repair or misrepair may be tolerated, when generation of the death signal is prevented. So, the character and timing

  7. How Do Parameters of Motor Response Influence Selective Inhibition? Evidence from the Stop-Signal Paradigm

    Chien Hui Tang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to selectively inhibit the execution of an action while performing other ones is crucial in humans' multitasking daily life. The current study aims to compare selective inhibition for choice reaction involving two effectors or response directions. We adopted a variation of the stop-signal paradigm to examine how selective inhibition is modulated by the way potential motor responses are combined and inhibited. Experiment 1 investigated selective inhibition under different combinations of effectors, namely “index and middle fingers” versus “hand and foot”. The results showed SSRT of the index finger was longer when the other response option was the foot than the middle finger. Experiment 2 examined how selective inhibition differs between selective stopping of effectors and movement directions, and that for most of the situations SSRT is longer for stopping a response based on its direction than effector. After equating complexity of response mapping between direction and effector conditions in Experiment 2, Experiment 3 still showed that SSRT differs between selecting direction or effectors. To summarize, SSRT varies depending on the way response effectors are paired and selectively stopped. Selective inhibition is thus likely not amodal and may involve different inhibitory mechanisms depending on parameters specifying the motor response.

  8. Insulin secretion and signaling in response to dietary restriction and subsequent re-alimentation in cattle.

    Keogh, Kate; Kenny, David A; Kelly, Alan K; Waters, Sinéad M

    2015-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine systemic insulin response to a glucose tolerance test (GTT) and transcript abundance of genes of the insulin signaling pathway in skeletal muscle, during both dietary restriction and re-alimentation-induced compensatory growth. Holstein Friesian bulls were blocked to one of two groups: 1) restricted feed allowance for 125 days (period 1) (RES, n = 15) followed by ad libitum feeding for 55 days (period 2) or 2) ad libitum access to feed throughout (periods 1 and 2) (ADLIB, n = 15). On days 90 and 36 of periods 1 and 2, respectively, a GTT was performed. M. longissimus dorsi biopsies were harvested from all bulls on days 120 and 15 of periods 1 and 2, respectively, and RNA-Seq analysis was performed. RES displayed a lower growth rate during period 1 (RES: 0.6 kg/day, ADLIB: 1.9 kg/day; P alimentation (RES: 2.5 kg/day, ADLIB: 1.4 kg/day; P alimentation (P > 0.05). Genes differentially expressed in the insulin signaling pathway suggested a greater sensitivity to insulin in skeletal muscle, with pleiotropic effects of insulin signaling interrupted during dietary restriction. Collectively, these results indicate increased sensitivity to glucose clearance and skeletal muscle insulin signaling during dietary restriction; however, no overall role for insulin was apparent in expressing compensatory growth. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. The cell envelope stress response of Bacillus subtilis: from static signaling devices to dynamic regulatory network.

    Radeck, Jara; Fritz, Georg; Mascher, Thorsten

    2017-02-01

    The cell envelope stress response (CESR) encompasses all regulatory events that enable a cell to protect the integrity of its envelope, an essential structure of any bacterial cell. The underlying signaling network is particularly well understood in the Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis. It consists of a number of two-component systems (2CS) and extracytoplasmic function σ factors that together regulate the production of both specific resistance determinants and general mechanisms to protect the envelope against antimicrobial peptides targeting the biogenesis of the cell wall. Here, we summarize the current picture of the B. subtilis CESR network, from the initial identification of the corresponding signaling devices to unraveling their interdependence and the underlying regulatory hierarchy within the network. In the course of detailed mechanistic studies, a number of novel signaling features could be described for the 2CSs involved in mediating CESR. This includes a novel class of so-called intramembrane-sensing histidine kinases (IM-HKs), which-instead of acting as stress sensors themselves-are activated via interprotein signal transfer. Some of these IM-HKs are involved in sensing the flux of antibiotic resistance transporters, a unique mechanism of responding to extracellular antibiotic challenge.

  10. Electrical signalling along the phloem and its physiological responses in the maize leaf

    Joerg eFromm

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate the role of electrical signalling in the phloem of maize the tips of attached leaves were stimulated by chilling and wounding. Two different signals were detected in the phloem at the middle of the leaf using the aphid stylet technique: (i action potentials (AP arose in the phloem after chilling; and (ii variation potentials (VP were evoked after wounding the leaf tip. Combined electric potential and gas exchange measurements showed that while the wound-induced VP moved rapidly towards the middle of the leaf to induce a reduction in both the net-CO2 uptake rate and the stomatal conductance, there was no response in the gas exchange to the cold-induced AP. To determine if electrical signalling had any impact on assimilate transport the middle of the leaf was exposed to 14CO2. Autoradiography of labelled assimilates provided evidence that phloem and intercellular transport of assimilates from mesophyll to bundle sheath cells was strongly reduced while the cold-induced AP moved through. In contrast, wound-induced VP did not inhibit assimilate translocation but did reduce the amount of the labelled assimilate in phloem and bundle sheath cells. Biochemical analysis revealed that callose content increased significantly in chilled leaves while starch increased in chilled but decreased in wounded leaves. The results led to the conclusion that different stimulation types incite characteristic phloem-transmitted electrical signals, each with a specific influence on gas exchange and assimilate transport.

  11. Molecular hydrogen is involved in phytohormone signaling and stress responses in plants.

    Jiqing Zeng

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen (H2 metabolism in bacteria and algae has been well studied from an industrial perspective because H2 is viewed as a potential future energy source. A number of clinical trials have recently reported that H2 is a therapeutic antioxidant and signaling molecule. Although H2 metabolism in higher plants was reported in some early studies, its biological effects remain unclear. In this report, the biological effects of H2 and its involvement in plant hormone signaling pathways and stress responses were determined. Antioxidant enzyme activity was found to be increased and the transcription of corresponding genes altered when the effects of H2 on the germination of mung bean seeds treated with phytohormones was investigated. In addition, upregulation of several phytohormone receptor genes and genes that encode a few key factors involved in plant signaling pathways was detected in rice seedlings treated with HW. The transcription of putative rice hydrogenase genes, hydrogenase activity, and endogenous H2 production were also determined. H2 production was found to be induced by abscisic acid, ethylene, and jasmonate acid, salt, and drought stress and was consistent with hydrogenase activity and the expression of putative hydrogenase genes in rice seedlings. Together, these results suggest that H2 may have an effect on rice stress tolerance by modulating the output of hormone signaling pathways.

  12. One pair of hands is not like another: caudate BOLD response in dogs depends on signal source and canine temperament

    Peter F. Cook

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Having previously used functional MRI to map the response to a reward signal in the ventral caudate in awake unrestrained dogs, here we examined the importance of signal source to canine caudate activation. Hand signals representing either incipient reward or no reward were presented by a familiar human (each dog’s respective handler, an unfamiliar human, and via illustrated images of hands on a computer screen to 13 dogs undergoing voluntary fMRI. All dogs had received extensive training with the reward and no-reward signals from their handlers and with the computer images and had minimal exposure to the signals from strangers. All dogs showed differentially higher BOLD response in the ventral caudate to the reward versus no reward signals, and there was a robust effect at the group level. Further, differential response to the signal source had a highly significant interaction with a dog’s general aggressivity as measured by the C-BARQ canine personality assessment. Dogs with greater aggressivity showed a higher differential response to the reward signal versus no-reward signal presented by the unfamiliar human and computer, while dogs with lower aggressivity showed a higher differential response to the reward signal versus no-reward signal from their handler. This suggests that specific facets of canine temperament bear more strongly on the perceived reward value of relevant communication signals than does reinforcement history, as each of the dogs were reinforced similarly for each signal, regardless of the source (familiar human, unfamiliar human, or computer. A group-level psychophysiological interaction (PPI connectivity analysis showed increased functional coupling between the caudate and a region of cortex associated with visual discrimination and learning on reward versus no-reward trials. Our findings emphasize the sensitivity of the domestic dog to human social interaction, and may have other implications and applications

  13. Dual expression of Epstein-Barr virus, latent membrane protein-1 and human papillomavirus-16 E6 transform primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts through NF-κB signaling.

    Shimabuku, Tetsuya; Tamanaha, Ayumi; Kitamura, Bunta; Tanabe, Yasuka; Tawata, Natsumi; Ikehara, Fukino; Arakaki, Kazunari; Kinjo, Takao

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) infections in patients with oral cancer in Okinawa, southwest islands of Japan, has led to the hypothesis that carcinogenesis is related to EBV and HPV co-infection. To explore the mechanisms of transformation induced by EBV and HPV co-infection, we analyzed the transformation of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) expressing EBV and HPV-16 genes, alone or in combination. Expression of EBV latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) alone or in combination with HPV-16 E6 increased cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis, whereas single expression of EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1), or HPV-16 E6 did not. Co-expression of LMP-1 and E6 induced anchorage-independent growth and tumor formation in nude mice, whereas expression of LMP-1 alone did not. Although the singular expression of these viral genes showed increased DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR), co-expression of LMP-1 and E6 did not induce DDR, which is frequently seen in cancer cells. Furthermore, co-expression of LMP-1 with E6 increased NF-κB signaling, and the knockdown of LMP-1 or E6 in co-expressing cells decreased cell proliferation, anchorage independent growth, and NF-κB activation. These data suggested that expression of individual viral genes is insufficient for inducing transformation and that co-expression of LMP-1 and E6, which is associated with suppression of DDR and increased NF-κB activity, lead to transformation. Our findings demonstrate the synergistic effect by the interaction of oncogenes from different viruses on the transformation of primary MEFs.

  14. Distinction of the memory B cell response to cognate antigen versus bystander inflammatory signals.

    Benson, Micah J; Elgueta, Raul; Schpero, William; Molloy, Michael; Zhang, Weijun; Usherwood, Edward; Noelle, Randolph J

    2009-08-31

    The hypothesis that bystander inflammatory signals promote memory B cell (B(MEM)) self-renewal and differentiation in an antigen-independent manner is critically evaluated herein. To comprehensively address this hypothesis, a detailed analysis is presented examining the response profiles of B-2 lineage B220(+)IgG(+) B(MEM) toward cognate protein antigen in comparison to bystander inflammatory signals. After in vivo antigen encounter, quiescent B(MEM) clonally expand. Surprisingly, proliferating B(MEM) do not acquire germinal center (GC) B cell markers before generating daughter B(MEM) and differentiating into plasma cells or form structurally identifiable GCs. In striking contrast to cognate antigen, inflammatory stimuli, including Toll-like receptor agonists or bystander T cell activation, fail to induce even low levels of B(MEM) proliferation or differentiation in vivo. Under the extreme conditions of adjuvanted protein vaccination or acute viral infection, no detectable bystander proliferation or differentiation of B(MEM) occurred. The absence of a B(MEM) response to nonspecific inflammatory signals clearly shows that B(MEM) proliferation and differentiation is a process tightly controlled by the availability of cognate antigen.

  15. Unique responsiveness of angiosperm stomata to elevated CO2 explained by calcium signalling.

    Timothy J Brodribb

    Full Text Available Angiosperm and conifer tree species respond differently when exposed to elevated CO2, with angiosperms found to dynamically reduce water loss while conifers appear insensitive. Such distinct responses are likely to affect competition between these tree groups as atmospheric CO2 concentration rises. Seeking the mechanism behind this globally important phenomenon we targeted the Ca(2+-dependent signalling pathway, a mediator of stomatal closure in response to elevated CO2, as a possible explanation for the differentiation of stomatal behaviours. Sampling across the diversity of vascular plants including lycophytes, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms we show that only angiosperms possess the stomatal behaviour and prerequisite genetic coding, linked to Ca(2+-dependent stomatal signalling. We conclude that the evolution of Ca(2+-dependent stomatal signalling gives angiosperms adaptive benefits in terms of highly efficient water use, but that stomatal sensitivity to high CO2 may penalise angiosperm productivity relative to other plant groups in the current era of soaring atmospheric CO2.

  16. Jasmonate signaling is activated in the very early stages of iron deficiency responses in rice roots.

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Senoura, Takeshi; Oikawa, Takaya; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Ueda, Minoru; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2016-07-01

    Under low iron availability, plants induce the expression of various genes involved in iron uptake and translocation at the transcriptional level. This iron deficiency response is affected by various plant hormones, but the roles of jasmonates in this response are not well-known. We investigated the involvement of jasmonates in rice iron deficiency responses. High rates of jasmonate-inducible genes were induced during the very early stages of iron deficiency treatment in rice roots. Many jasmonate-inducible genes were also negatively regulated by the ubiquitin ligases OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 and positively regulated by the transcription factor IDEF1. Ten out of 35 genes involved in jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling were rapidly induced at 3 h of iron deficiency treatment, and this induction preceded that of known iron deficiency-inducible genes involved in iron uptake and translocation. Twelve genes involved in jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling were also upregulated in HRZ-knockdown roots. Endogenous concentrations of jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl isoleucine tended to be rapidly increased in roots in response to iron deficiency treatment, whereas these concentrations were higher in HRZ-knockdown roots under iron-sufficient conditions. Analysis of the jasmonate-deficient cpm2 mutant revealed that jasmonates repress the expression of many iron deficiency-inducible genes involved in iron uptake and translocation under iron sufficiency, but this repression is partly canceled under an early stage of iron deficiency. These results indicate that jasmonate signaling is activated during the very early stages of iron deficiency, which is partly regulated by IDEF1 and OsHRZs.

  17. Early Flood Detection for Rapid Humanitarian Response: Harnessing Near Real-Time Satellite and Twitter Signals

    Brenden Jongman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Humanitarian organizations have a crucial role in response and relief efforts after floods. The effectiveness of disaster response is contingent on accurate and timely information regarding the location, timing and impacts of the event. Here we show how two near-real-time data sources, satellite observations of water coverage and flood-related social media activity from Twitter, can be used to support rapid disaster response, using case-studies in the Philippines and Pakistan. For these countries we analyze information from disaster response organizations, the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS satellite flood signal, and flood-related Twitter activity analysis. The results demonstrate that these sources of near-real-time information can be used to gain a quicker understanding of the location, the timing, as well as the causes and impacts of floods. In terms of location, we produce daily impact maps based on both satellite information and social media, which can dynamically and rapidly outline the affected area during a disaster. In terms of timing, the results show that GFDS and/or Twitter signals flagging ongoing or upcoming flooding are regularly available one to several days before the event was reported to humanitarian organizations. In terms of event understanding, we show that both GFDS and social media can be used to detect and understand unexpected or controversial flood events, for example due to the sudden opening of hydropower dams or the breaching of flood protection. The performance of the GFDS and Twitter data for early detection and location mapping is mixed, depending on specific hydrological circumstances (GFDS and social media penetration (Twitter. Further research is needed to improve the interpretation of the GFDS signal in different situations, and to improve the pre-processing of social media data for operational use.

  18. Investigation on the role of IGF-1 signal transduction in the biological radiation responses

    Jung, U Hee; Jo, Sung Kee; Park, Hae Ran; Oh, Soo Jin; Cho, Eun Hee; Eom, Hyun Soo; Ju, Eun Jin

    2009-05-15

    Effects of {gamma}-irradiation on the IGF-1 related gene expressions and activations in various cell lines - Various expression patterns of IGF-1 and IGF-1R following {gamma}-irradiation were observed according to the cell lines - The increased expressions of IGF-1 and IGF-1R were observed in Balb/3T3 and NIH/3T3 cells - Among the IGF-1 downstream signaling molecules, the phosphorylated ERK5 were not changed by {gamma}-irradiation in all three examined cell lines, whereas the phosphorylated p65 were increased by {gamma} -irradiation in all cell lines. The role of IGF-1 and p38 signaling in {gamma}-irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells - In MEF cells, IGF-1 signaling molecules were decreased and p21/phosphorylated p38 were increased by {gamma}-irradiation - The experiments with IGF-1R inhibitor (AG1024) and p38 inhibitor (SB203580) revealed that IGF-1 signaling is involved but not essential in radiation-induced cell growth arrest and senescence and that p38 MAP kinase play a important role in this cellular radiation response. The role of IGF-1 and p38 signaling in {gamma}-irradiated mouse fibroblast (NIH/3T3) cell - In NIH/3T3 cells, IGF-1 signaling molecules and p21/phosphorylated p38 were increased by {gamma} -irradiation. - However, the experiments with IGF-1R inhibitor (AG1024) and p38 inhibitor (SB203580) revealed that IGF-1 and p38 signaling do not play a crucial role in radiation-induced cell growth arrest and senescence in NIH/3T3 cells. Effects of {gamma}-irradiation on the expressions and activations on the genes related to the IGF-1 signaling in mouse tissues - In {gamma}-irradiated mice, the increased expressions of IGF-1 and IGF-1R were observed in the lung and kidney at 2 months after irradiation, and in all the tissues examined (lung, liver and kidney) at 6 months after irradiation. - In the lung of {gamma}-irradiated mice at 6 months after irradiation, the increases of IGF-1R, phosphorylated FOXO3a, p65, p38, p21 were observed. - The

  19. Investigation on the role of IGF-1 signal transduction in the biological radiation responses

    Jung, U Hee; Jo, Sung Kee; Park, Hae Ran; Oh, Soo Jin; Cho, Eun Hee; Eom, Hyun Soo; Ju, Eun Jin

    2009-05-01

    Effects of γ-irradiation on the IGF-1 related gene expressions and activations in various cell lines - Various expression patterns of IGF-1 and IGF-1R following γ-irradiation were observed according to the cell lines - The increased expressions of IGF-1 and IGF-1R were observed in Balb/3T3 and NIH/3T3 cells - Among the IGF-1 downstream signaling molecules, the phosphorylated ERK5 were not changed by γ-irradiation in all three examined cell lines, whereas the phosphorylated p65 were increased by γ -irradiation in all cell lines. The role of IGF-1 and p38 signaling in γ-irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells - In MEF cells, IGF-1 signaling molecules were decreased and p21/phosphorylated p38 were increased by γ-irradiation - The experiments with IGF-1R inhibitor (AG1024) and p38 inhibitor (SB203580) revealed that IGF-1 signaling is involved but not essential in radiation-induced cell growth arrest and senescence and that p38 MAP kinase play a important role in this cellular radiation response. The role of IGF-1 and p38 signaling in γ-irradiated mouse fibroblast (NIH/3T3) cell - In NIH/3T3 cells, IGF-1 signaling molecules and p21/phosphorylated p38 were increased by γ -irradiation. - However, the experiments with IGF-1R inhibitor (AG1024) and p38 inhibitor (SB203580) revealed that IGF-1 and p38 signaling do not play a crucial role in radiation-induced cell growth arrest and senescence in NIH/3T3 cells. Effects of γ-irradiation on the expressions and activations on the genes related to the IGF-1 signaling in mouse tissues - In γ-irradiated mice, the increased expressions of IGF-1 and IGF-1R were observed in the lung and kidney at 2 months after irradiation, and in all the tissues examined (lung, liver and kidney) at 6 months after irradiation. - In the lung of γ-irradiated mice at 6 months after irradiation, the increases of IGF-1R, phosphorylated FOXO3a, p65, p38, p21 were observed. - The patterns of altered expressions showed significant

  20. C-Jun N-terminal kinase signalling pathway in response to cisplatin.

    Yan, Dong; An, GuangYu; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2016-11-01

    Cisplatin (cis diamminedichloroplatinum II, cDDP) is one of the most effective cancer chemotherapeutic agents and is used in the treatment of many types of human malignancies. However, inherent tumour resistance is a major barrier to effective cisplatin therapy. So far, the mechanism of cDDP resistance has not been well defined. In general, cisplatin is considered to be a cytotoxic drug, for damaging DNA and inhibiting DNA synthesis, resulting in apoptosis via the mitochondrial death pathway or plasma membrane disruption. cDDP-induced DNA damage triggers signalling pathways that will eventually decide between cell life and death. As a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinases family, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is a signalling pathway in response to extracellular stimuli, especially drug treatment, to modify the activity of numerous proteins locating in the mitochondria or the nucleus. Recent studies suggest that JNK signalling pathway plays a major role in deciding the fate of the cell and inducing resistance to cDDP-induced apoptosis in human tumours. c-Jun N-terminal kinase regulates several important cellular functions including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival and apoptosis while activating and inhibiting substrates for phosphorylation transcription factors (c-Jun, ATF2: Activating transcription factor 2, p53 and so on), which subsequently induce pro-apoptosis and pro-survival factors expression. Therefore, it is suggested that JNK signal pathway is a double-edged sword in cDDP treatment, simultaneously being a significant pro-apoptosis factor but also being associated with increased resistance to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. This review focuses on current knowledge concerning the role of JNK in cell response to cDDP, as well as their role in cisplatin resistance. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  1. PARP-1 modulation of mTOR signaling in response to a DNA alkylating agent.

    Chantal Ethier

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 is widely involved in cell death responses. Depending on the degree of injury and on cell type, PARP activation may lead to autophagy, apoptosis or necrosis. In HEK293 cells exposed to the alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N'-nitrosoguanine (MNNG, we show that PARP-1 activation triggers a necrotic cell death response. The massive poly(ADP-ribose (PAR synthesis following PARP-1 activation leads to the modulation of mTORC1 pathway. Shortly after MNNG exposure, NAD⁺ and ATP levels decrease, while AMP levels drastically increase. We characterized at the molecular level the consequences of these altered nucleotide levels. First, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is activated and the mTORC1 pathway is inhibited by the phosphorylation of Raptor, in an attempt to preserve cellular energy. Phosphorylation of the mTORC1 target S6 is decreased as well as the phosphorylation of the mTORC2 component Rictor on Thr1135. Finally, Akt phosphorylation on Ser473 is lost and then, cell death by necrosis occurs. Inhibition of PARP-1 with the potent PARP inhibitor AG14361 prevents all of these events. Moreover, the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC can also abrogate all the signaling events caused by MNNG exposure suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS production is involved in PARP-1 activation and modulation of mTOR signaling. In this study, we show that PARP-1 activation and PAR synthesis affect the energetic status of cells, inhibit the mTORC1 signaling pathway and possibly modulate the mTORC2 complex affecting cell fate. These results provide new evidence that cell death by necrosis is orchestrated by the balance between several signaling pathways, and that PARP-1 and PAR take part in these events.

  2. Role of signaling lymphocytic activation molecule in T helper cell responses

    Jan E. de Vries

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM; CDw150 is a 70 kDa glycoprotein. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule is constitutively expressed on memory T cells, CD56+ T cells, a subset of T cell receptor γδ+ cells, immature thymocytes and, at low levels, on a proportion of peripheral blood B cells. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule is rapidly upregulated on all T and B cells after activation. Engagement of SLAM by F(ab’2 fragments of an anti-SLAM monoclonal antibody (mAb A12 enhances antigen-specific T cell proliferation. In addition, mAb A12 was directly mitogenic for T cell clones and activated T cells. T cell proliferation induced by mAb A12 is independent of interleukin (IL-2, IL-4, IL-12 and IL-15, but is cyclosporin A sensitive. Ligation of SLAM during antigen-specific T cell proliferation resulted in upregulation of interferon (IFN-γ production, even by allergen-specific T helper cell (Th 2 clones, whereas the levels of IL-4 and IL-5 production were only marginally affected. The mAb A12 was unable to induce IL-4 and IL-5 production by Th1 clones. Co-stimulation of skin-derived Der P1-specific Th2 cells from patients with atopic dermatitis via SLAM resulted in the generation of a population of IFN-γ-producing cells, thereby reverting their phenotype to a Th0 pattern. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule is a high-affinity self ligand mediating homophilic cell interaction. In addition, soluble SLAM enhances both T and B cell proliferation. Collectively, these data indicate that SLAM molecules act both as receptors and ligands that are not only involved in T cell expansion but also drive the expanding T cells during immune responses into the Th0/Th1 pathway. This suggests that signaling through SLAM plays a role in directing Th0/Th1 development.

  3. Oxidative Stressors Modify the Response of Streptococcus mutans to Its Competence Signal Peptides.

    De Furio, Matthew; Ahn, Sang Joon; Burne, Robert A; Hagen, Stephen J

    2017-11-15

    The dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans is continually exposed to several types of stress in the oral biofilm environment. Oxidative stress generated by reactive oxygen species has a major impact on the establishment, persistence, and virulence of S. mutans Here, we combined fluorescent reporter-promoter fusions with single-cell imaging to study the effects of reactive oxygen species on activation of genetic competence in S. mutans Exposure to paraquat, which generates superoxide anion, produced a qualitatively different effect on activation of expression of the gene for the master competence regulator, ComX, than did treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), which can yield hydroxyl radical. Paraquat suppressed peptide-mediated induction of comX in a progressive and cumulative fashion, whereas the response to H 2 O 2 displayed a strong threshold behavior. Low concentrations of H 2 O 2 had little effect on induction of comX or the bacteriocin gene cipB , but expression of these genes declined sharply if extracellular H 2 O 2 exceeded a threshold concentration. These effects were not due to decreased reporter gene fluorescence. Two different threshold concentrations were observed in the response to H 2 O 2 , depending on the gene promoter that was analyzed and the pathway by which the competence regulon was stimulated. The results show that paraquat and H 2 O 2 affect the S. mutans competence signaling pathway differently, and that some portions of the competence signaling pathway are more sensitive to oxidative stress than others. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus mutans inhabits the oral biofilm, where it plays an important role in the development of dental caries. Environmental stresses such as oxidative stress influence the growth of S. mutans and its important virulence-associated behaviors, such as genetic competence. S. mutans competence development is a complex behavior that involves two different signaling peptides and can exhibit cell

  4. Well Completion Report for the Fiscal Year 1999 Drilling Within the Chromium Plume West of the 100-D/DR Reactors

    Ford, B. H.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the fiscal year (FY) 1999 field activities associated with installing 12 groundwater monitoring wells in the vicinity of the 100-D Area chromium plume west of the 100-D/DR Reactors (100-HR-3 Operable Unit [OU]). The wells were installed to further investigate the extent of the hexavalent chromium hot spot west of the 100-D/DR Reactors and to support future remedial action decisions associated with the 100-HR-3 OU. These wells were designed for multi-purpose use (i.e., monitoring, extraction, and injection). In addition, one of the wells was installed to support the initial deployment of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology to remediate the chromium plume

  5. A DESIGN FRAMEWORK FOR HUMAN EMOTION RECOGNITION USING ELECTROCARDIOGRAM AND SKIN CONDUCTANCE RESPONSE SIGNALS

    KHAIRUN NISA’ MINHAD

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Identification of human emotional state while driving a vehicle can help in understanding the human behaviour. Based on this identification, a response system can be developed in order to mitigate the impact that may be resulted from the behavioural changes. However, the adaptation of emotions to the environment at most scenarios is subjective to an individual’s perspective. Many factors, mainly cultural and geography, gender, age, life style and history, level of education and professional status, can affect the detection of human emotional affective states. This work investigated sympathetic responses toward human emotions defined by using electrocardiography (ECG and skin conductance response (SCR signals recorded simultaneously. This work aimed to recognize ECG and SCR patterns of the investigated emotions measured using selected sensor. A pilot study was conducted to evaluate the proposed framework. Initial results demonstrated the importance of suitability of the stimuli used to evoke the emotions and high opportunity for the ECG and SCR signals to be used in the automotive real-time emotion recognition systems.

  6. Relating climate change signals and physiographic catchment properties to clustered hydrological response types

    N. Köplin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose an approach to reduce a comprehensive set of 186 mesoscale catchments in Switzerland to fewer response types to climate change and to name sensitive regions as well as catchment characteristics that govern hydrological change. We classified the hydrological responses of our study catchments through an agglomerative-hierarchical cluster analysis, and we related the dominant explanatory variables, i.e. the determining catchment properties and climate change signals, to the catchments' hydrological responses by means of redundancy analysis. All clusters except for one exhibit clearly decreasing summer runoff and increasing winter runoff. This seasonal shift was observed for the near future period (2025–2046 but is particularly obvious in the far future period (2074–2095. Within a certain elevation range (between 1000 and 2500 m a.s.l., the hydrological change is basically a function of elevation, because the latter governs the dominant hydro-climatological processes associated with temperature, e.g. the ratio of liquid to solid precipitation and snow melt processes. For catchments below the stated range, hydrological change is mainly a function of precipitation change, which is not as pronounced as the temperature signal is. Future impact studies in Switzerland can be conducted on a reduced sample of catchments representing the sensitive regions or covering a range of altitudes.

  7. Streptozotocin induced activation of oxidative stress responsive splenic cell signaling pathways: Protective role of arjunolic acid

    Manna, Prasenjit; Ghosh, Jyotirmoy; Das, Joydeep; Sil, Parames C.

    2010-01-01

    Present study investigates the beneficial role of arjunolic acid (AA) against the alteration in the cytokine levels and simultaneous activation of oxidative stress responsive signaling pathways in spleen under hyperglycemic condition. Diabetes was induced by injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (at a dose of 70 mg/kg body weight, injected in the tail vain). STZ administration elevated the levels of IL-2 as well as IFN-γ and attenuated the level of TNF-α in the sera of diabetic animals. In addition, hyperglycemia is also associated with the increased production of intracellular reactive intermediates resulting with the elevation in lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and reduction in intracellular antioxidant defense. Investigating the oxidative stress responsive cell signaling pathways, increased expressions (immunoreactive concentrations) of phosphorylated p65 as well as its inhibitor protein phospho IκBα and phosphorylated mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been observed in diabetic spleen tissue. Studies on isolated splenocytes revealed that hyperglycemia caused disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation in the concentration of cytosolic cytochrome c as well as activation of caspase 3 leading to apoptotic cell death. Histological examination revealed that diabetic induction depleted the white pulp scoring which is in agreement with the reduced immunological response. Treatment with AA prevented the hyperglycemia and its associated pathogenesis in spleen tissue. Results suggest that AA might act as an anti-diabetic and immunomodulatory agent against hyperglycemia.

  8. Chronic social isolation suppresses proplastic response and promotes proapoptotic signalling in prefrontal cortex of Wistar rats.

    Djordjevic, Ana; Adzic, Miroslav; Djordjevic, Jelena; Radojcic, Marija B

    2010-08-15

    Successful adaptation to stress involves synergized actions of glucocorticoids and catecholamines at several levels of the CNS, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Inside the PFC, hormonal signals trigger concerted actions of transcriptional factors, such as glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB), culminating in a balanced, proadaptive expression of their common genes, such as proplastic NCAM and/or apoptotic Bax and Bcl-2. In the present study, we hypothesized that chronic stress may compromise the balance between GR and NFkappaB signals and lead to an altered/maladaptive expression of their cognate genes in the PFC. Our results obtained with Wistar rats exposed to chronic social isolation indicated alterations of the GR relative to the NFkappaB, in favor of the GR, in both the cytoplasmic and the nuclear compartments of the PFC. Although these alterations did not affect the induction of proplastic NCAM gene, they decreased the NCAM sialylation necessary for plastic response and caused marked relocation of the mitochondrial membrane antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein to its cytoplasmic form. Moreover, the compromised PSA-NCAM plastic response found under chronic stress was sustained after exposure of animals to the subsequent acute stress, whereas the proapoptotic signals were further emphasized. It is concluded that chronic social isolation of Wistar animals leads to a maladaptive response of the PFC, considering the diminishment of its plastic potential and potentiating of apoptosis. Such conditions in the PFC are likely to compromise its ability to interact with other CNS structures, such as the hippocampus, which is necessary for successful adaptation to stress. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. The Neural Feedback Response to Error As a Teaching Signal for the Motor Learning System

    Shadmehr, Reza

    2016-01-01

    When we experience an error during a movement, we update our motor commands to partially correct for this error on the next trial. How does experience of error produce the improvement in the subsequent motor commands? During the course of an erroneous reaching movement, proprioceptive and visual sensory pathways not only sense the error, but also engage feedback mechanisms, resulting in corrective motor responses that continue until the hand arrives at its goal. One possibility is that this feedback response is co-opted by the learning system and used as a template to improve performance on the next attempt. Here we used electromyography (EMG) to compare neural correlates of learning and feedback to test the hypothesis that the feedback response to error acts as a template for learning. We designed a task in which mixtures of error-clamp and force-field perturbation trials were used to deconstruct EMG time courses into error-feedback and learning components. We observed that the error-feedback response was composed of excitation of some muscles, and inhibition of others, producing a complex activation/deactivation pattern during the reach. Despite this complexity, across muscles the learning response was consistently a scaled version of the error-feedback response, but shifted 125 ms earlier in time. Across people, individuals who produced a greater feedback response to error, also learned more from error. This suggests that the feedback response to error serves as a teaching signal for the brain. Individuals who learn faster have a better teacher in their feedback control system. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our sensory organs transduce errors in behavior. To improve performance, we must generate better motor commands. How does the nervous system transform an error in sensory coordinates into better motor commands in muscle coordinates? Here we show that when an error occurs during a movement, the reflexes transform the sensory representation of error into motor

  10. Novel DDR Processing of Corn Stover Achieves High Monomeric Sugar Concentrations from Enzymatic Hydrolysis (230 g/L) and High Ethanol Concentration (10% v/v) During Fermentation

    Chen, Xiaowen; Jennings, Ed; Shekiro, Joe; Kuhn, Erik M.; O' Brien, Marykate; Wang, Wei; Schell, Daniel J.; Himmel, Mike; Elander, Richard T.; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2015-04-03

    Distilling and purifying ethanol, butanol, and other products from second and later generation lignocellulosic biorefineries adds significant capital and operating cost for biofuels production. The energy costs associated with distillation affects plant gate and life cycle analysis costs. Lower titers in fermentation due to lower sugar concentrations from pretreatment increase both energy and production costs. In addition, higher titers decrease the volumes required for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation vessels. Therefore, increasing biofuels titers has been a research focus in renewable biofuels production for several decades. In this work, we achieved over 200 g/L of monomeric sugars after high solids enzymatic hydrolysis using the novel deacetylation and disc refining (DDR) process on corn stover. The high sugar concentrations and low chemical inhibitor concentrations from the DDR process allowed ethanol titers as high as 82 g/L in 22 hours, which translates into approximately 10 vol% ethanol. To our knowledge, this is the first time that 10 vol% ethanol in fermentation derived from corn stover without any sugar concentration or purification steps has been reported. Techno-economic analysis shows the higher titer ethanol achieved from the DDR process could significantly reduce the minimum ethanol selling price from cellulosic biomass.

  11. Preserving genome integrity: the DdrA protein of Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    Harris, Dennis R; Tanaka, Masashi; Saveliev, Sergei V; Jolivet, Edmond; Earl, Ashlee M; Cox, Michael M; Battista, John R

    2004-10-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans can withstand extraordinary levels of ionizing radiation, reflecting an equally extraordinary capacity for DNA repair. The hypothetical gene product DR0423 has been implicated in the recovery of this organism from DNA damage, indicating that this protein is a novel component of the D. radiodurans DNA repair system. DR0423 is a homologue of the eukaryotic Rad52 protein. Following exposure to ionizing radiation, DR0423 expression is induced relative to an untreated control, and strains carrying a deletion of the DR0423 gene exhibit increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. When recovering from ionizing-radiation-induced DNA damage in the absence of nutrients, wild-type D. radiodurans reassembles its genome while the mutant lacking DR0423 function does not. In vitro, the purified DR0423 protein binds to single-stranded DNA with an apparent affinity for 3' ends, and protects those ends from nuclease degradation. We propose that DR0423 is part of a DNA end-protection system that helps to preserve genome integrity following exposure to ionizing radiation. We designate the DR0423 protein as DNA damage response A protein.

  12. Preserving genome integrity: the DdrA protein of Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    Dennis R Harris

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans can withstand extraordinary levels of ionizing radiation, reflecting an equally extraordinary capacity for DNA repair. The hypothetical gene product DR0423 has been implicated in the recovery of this organism from DNA damage, indicating that this protein is a novel component of the D. radiodurans DNA repair system. DR0423 is a homologue of the eukaryotic Rad52 protein. Following exposure to ionizing radiation, DR0423 expression is induced relative to an untreated control, and strains carrying a deletion of the DR0423 gene exhibit increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. When recovering from ionizing-radiation-induced DNA damage in the absence of nutrients, wild-type D. radiodurans reassembles its genome while the mutant lacking DR0423 function does not. In vitro, the purified DR0423 protein binds to single-stranded DNA with an apparent affinity for 3' ends, and protects those ends from nuclease degradation. We propose that DR0423 is part of a DNA end-protection system that helps to preserve genome integrity following exposure to ionizing radiation. We designate the DR0423 protein as DNA damage response A protein.

  13. Integration of growth factor signals at the c-fos serum response element.

    Price, M A; Hill, C; Treisman, R

    1996-04-29

    A transcription factor ternary complex composed of serum response factor (SRF) and a second factor, ternary complex factor (TCF), mediates the response of the c-fos Serum Response Element to growth factors and mitogens. In NIH3T3 fibroblasts, TCF binding is required for transcriptional activation by the SRE in response to activation of the Ras-Raf-ERK pathway. We compared the properties of three members of the TCF family, Elk-1, SAP-1 and SAP-2 (ERP/NET). Although all the proteins contain sequences required for ternary complex formation with SRF, only Elk-1 and SAP-1 appear to interact with the c-fos SRE efficiently in vivo. Each TCF contains a C-terminal activation domain capable of transcriptional activation in response to activation of the Ras-Raf-ERK pathway, and this is dependent on the integrity of S/T-P motifs conserved between all the TCF family members. In contrast, activation of the SRE by whole serum and the mitogenic phospholipid LPA requires SRF binding alone. Constitutively activated members of the Rho subfamily of Ras-like GTPases are also capable of inducing activation of the SRE in the absence of TCF; unlike activated Ras itself, these proteins do not activate the TCFs in NIH3T3 cells. At the SRE, SRF- and TCF-linked signalling pathways act synergistically to potentiate transcription.

  14. The roles of DNA damage-dependent signals and MAPK cascades in tributyltin-induced germline apoptosis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Wang, Yun; Wang, Shunchang; Luo, Xun; Yang, Yanan; Jian, Fenglei; Wang, Xuemin; Xie, Lucheng

    2014-08-01

    The induction of apoptosis is recognized to be a major mechanism of tributyltin (TBT) toxicity. However, the underlying signaling pathways for TBT-induced apoptosis remain unclear. In this study, using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we examined whether DNA damage response (DDR) pathway and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades are involved in TBT-induced germline apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Our results demonstrated that exposing worms to TBT at the dose of 10nM for 6h significantly increased germline apoptosis in N2 strain. Germline apoptosis was absent in strains that carried ced-3 or ced-4 loss-of-function alleles, indicating that both caspase protein CED-3 and Apaf-1 protein CED-4 were required for TBT-induced apoptosis. TBT-induced apoptosis was blocked in the Bcl-2 gain-of-function strain ced-9(n1950), whereas TBT induced a minor increase in the BH3-only protein EGL-1 mutated strain egl-1(n1084n3082). Checkpoint proteins HUS-1 and CLK-2 exerted proapoptotic effects, and the null mutation of cep-1, the homologue of tumor suppressor gene p53, significantly inhibited TBT-induced apoptosis. Apoptosis in the loss-of-function strains of ERK, JNK and p38 MAPK signaling pathways were completely or mildly suppressed under TBT stress. These results were supported by the results of mRNA expression levels of corresponding genes. The present study indicated that TBT-induced apoptosis required the core apoptotic machinery, and that DDR genes and MAPK pathways played essential roles in signaling the processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Signaling Product Quality Information in Supply Chains via Corporate Social Responsibility Choices

    Yuhui Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on how an upstream supplier signals the private information of its product quality with corporate social responsibility (CSR choices to a downstream retailer and uninformed consumers in the final market. We build a signaling model to: capture the strategic interactions among the supplier, the retailer, and the final consumers in the supply chain; characterize completely the set of all separating perfect Bayesian equilibriums (PBEs; and finally, select a unique equilibrium that satisfies the intuitive criterion for exploring some comparative statics. The equilibrium results show that under some technical conditions: (1 a set of moderate levels of CSR conduct signal the upstream supplier’s high quality in the sense of separating PBEs; (2 the unique separating PBE satisfying the intuitive criterion is the one with the lowest CSR level that separates a high-quality supplier from a low-quality supplier; (3 the lowest CSR level decreases in the proportion of informed consumers and the low-quality supplier’s marginal CSR cost, but is independent of the high-quality supplier’s marginal CSR cost; (4 the profits of the high-quality supplier increase in proportion to the number of informed consumers and the low-quality supplier’s marginal cost CSR, but decrease in proportion to the high-quality supplier’s marginal CSR cost. Managerial insights are also discussed.

  16. Evidence for some signal transduction elements involved in UV-light-dependent responses in parsley protoplasts

    Frohnmeyer, H.; Bowler, C.; Schäfer, E.

    1997-01-01

    The signalling pathways used by UV-light are largely unknown. Using protoplasts from a heterotrophic parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) cell culture that exclusively respond to UV-B light between 300 and 350 nm with a fast induction of genes encoding flavonoid biosynthetic enzymes, information was obtained about the UV-light signal transduction pathway for chalcone synthase (CHS) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) gene expression. Pharmacological effectors which influence intracellular calcium levels, calmodulin and the activity of serine/threonine kinases also changed the UV-light-dependent expression of these genes. This evaluation indicated the participation of these components on the UV-B-mediated signal transduction cascade to CHS. In contrast, neither membrane-permeable cyclic GMP nor the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein affected CHS or PAL expression. Similar results were obtained in protoplasts, which have been transiently transformed with CHS-promoter/GUS (β-glucuronidase) reporter fusion constructs. The involvement of calcium and calmodulin was further indicated in a cell-free light-responsive in vitro transcription system from evacuolated parsley protoplasts. In conclusion, there is evidence now that components of the UV-light-dependent pathway leading to the CHS-promoter are different from the previously characterized cGMP-dependent pathway to CHS utilized by phytochrome in soybean (Glycine max) and tomato seedlings (Lycopersicon esculentum). (author)

  17. Response Analysis on Electrical Pulses under Severe Nuclear Accident Temperature Conditions Using an Abnormal Signal Simulation Analysis Module

    Kil-Mo Koo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike design basis accidents, some inherent uncertainties of the reliability of instrumentations are expected while subjected to harsh environments (e.g., high temperature and pressure, high humidity, and high radioactivity occurring in severe nuclear accident conditions. Even under such conditions, an electrical signal should be within its expected range so that some mitigating actions can be taken based on the signal in the control room. For example, an industrial process control standard requires that the normal signal level for pressure, flow, and resistance temperature detector sensors be in the range of 4~20 mA for most instruments. Whereas, in the case that an abnormal signal is expected from an instrument, such a signal should be refined through a signal validation process so that the refined signal could be available in the control room. For some abnormal signals expected under severe accident conditions, to date, diagnostics and response analysis have been evaluated with an equivalent circuit model of real instruments, which is regarded as the best method. The main objective of this paper is to introduce a program designed to implement a diagnostic and response analysis for equivalent circuit modeling. The program links signal analysis tool code to abnormal signal simulation engine code not only as a one body order system, but also as a part of functions of a PC-based ASSA (abnormal signal simulation analysis module developed to obtain a varying range of the R-C circuit elements in high temperature conditions. As a result, a special function for abnormal pulse signal patterns can be obtained through the program, which in turn makes it possible to analyze the abnormal output pulse signals through a response characteristic of a 4~20 mA circuit model and a range of the elements changing with temperature under an accident condition.

  18. Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators: Final Report

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wang, Zhiguo; Prange, Micah P.; Wu, Dangxin

    2014-12-01

    This Final Report presents work carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators” (Project number: PL10-Scin-theor-PD2Jf) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project was divided into four tasks: 1) Electronic response functions (ab initio data model) 2) Electron-hole yield, variance, and spatial distribution 3) Ab initio calculations of information carrier properties 4) Transport of electron-hole pairs and scintillation efficiency Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the four tasks is provided in this Final Report. Furthermore, published peer-reviewed articles based on the work carried under this project are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  19. Cauliflower mosaic virus protein P6 inhibits signaling responses to salicylic acid and regulates innate immunity.

    Andrew J Love

    Full Text Available Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV encodes a multifunctional protein P6 that is required for translation of the 35S RNA and also acts as a suppressor of RNA silencing. Here we demonstrate that P6 additionally acts as a pathogenicity effector of an unique and novel type, modifying NPR1 (a key regulator of salicylic acid (SA- and jasmonic acid (JA-dependent signaling and inhibiting SA-dependent defence responses We find that that transgene-mediated expression of P6 in Arabidopsis and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana has profound effects on defence signaling, suppressing expression of representative SA-responsive genes and increasing expression of representative JA-responsive genes. Relative to wild-type Arabidopsis P6-expressing transgenics had greatly reduced expression of PR-1 following SA-treatment, infection by CaMV or inoculation with an avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst. Similarly transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana of P6 (including a mutant form defective in translational transactivation activity suppressed PR-1a transcript accumulation in response to Agrobacterium infiltration and following SA-treatment. As well as suppressing the expression of representative SA-regulated genes, P6-transgenic Arabidopsis showed greatly enhanced susceptibility to both virulent and avirulent Pst (titres elevated 10 to 30-fold compared to non-transgenic controls but reduced susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Necrosis following SA-treatment or inoculation with avirulent Pst was reduced and delayed in P6-transgenics. NPR1 an important regulator of SA/JA crosstalk, was more highly expressed in the presence of P6 and introduction of the P6 transgene into a transgenic line expressing an NPR1:GFP fusion resulted in greatly increased fluorescence in nuclei even in the absence of SA. Thus in the presence of P6 an inactive form of NPR1 is mislocalized in the nucleus even in uninduced plants

  20. Neural Responses to Injury: Prevention, Protection and Repair; Volume 7: Role Growth Factors and Cell Signaling in the Response of Brain and Retina to Injury

    Bazan, Nicolas

    1996-01-01

    ...: Prevention, Protection, and Repair, Subproject: Role of Growth Factors and Cell Signaling in the Response of Brain and Retina to Injury, are as follows: Species Rat(Albino Wistar), Number Allowed...

  1. Estimation of demand response to energy price signals in energy consumption behaviour in Beijing, China

    He, Y.X.; Liu, Y.Y.; Xia, T.; Zhou, B.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Demand response to energy price signals in energy consumption in Beijing is studied. • The electricity price is of great importance to Beijing’s energy market stability. • Industrial sectors have a large electricity self-elasticity and cross-elasticity. • When consuming electricity, customers pay more attention to natural gas price. • Analysis of demand response to energy price can provide guidance to energy policies. - Abstract: The energy price system in Beijing has not fully exploited customers’ price elasticity, and has a negative impact on achieving the goals of energy saving. This paper analyses the response behaviours of different customers to typical energy prices. As for electricity self-elasticity, the range of the primary, secondary, tertiary industry and residents are −0.026 to −0.033, −0.045 to −0.059, −0.035 to −0.047 and −0.024 to −0.032, respectively. As regards self-elasticity on coal, the range of the primary, secondary, tertiary industry and residents are −0.030 to −0.037, −0.066 to −0.093, −0.055 to −0.072 and −0.034 to −0.051, respectively. The self-elasticities on oil and natural gas are very weak. As for cross-elasticity, when consuming electricity and oil, customers mainly focus on the prices of natural gas, which are 0.185 and 0.112. When consuming coal and natural gas, customers are concerned about the electricity prices, and their cross-elasticities are 0.03 and 0.36, respectively. The estimation of demand response to energy price signals in energy consumption behaviours can provide a decision support for formulating rational energy price policies

  2. Electric signalling in fruit trees in response to water applications and light-darkness conditions.

    Gurovich, Luis A; Hermosilla, Paulo

    2009-02-15

    A fundamental property of all living organisms is the generation and conduction of electrochemical impulses throughout their different tissues and organs, resulting from abiotic and biotic changes in environmental conditions. In plants and animals, signal transmission can occur over long and short distances, and it can correspond to intra- and inter-cellular communication mechanisms that determine the physiological behaviour of the organism. Rapid plant and animal responses to environmental changes are associated with electrical excitability and signalling. The same molecules and pathways are used to drive physiological responses, which are characterized by movement (physical displacement) in animals and by continuous growth in plants. In the field of environmental plant electrophysiology, automatic and continuous measurements of electrical potential differences (DeltaEP) between plant tissues can be effectively used to study information transport mechanisms and physiological responses that result from external stimuli on plants. A critical mass of data on electrical behaviour in higher plants has accumulated in the last 5 years, establishing plant neurobiology as the most recent discipline of plant science. In this work, electrical potential differences were monitored continuously using Ag/AgCl microelectrodes, which were inserted 15mm deep into sapwood at various positions in the trunks of several fruit-bearing trees. Electrodes were referenced to an unpolarisable Ag/AgCl microelectrode, which was installed 5cm deep in the soil. Systematic patterns of DeltaEP during day-night cycles and at different conditions of soil water availability are discussed as alternative tools to assess early plant stress conditions. This research relates to the adaptive response of trees to soil water availability and light-darkness cycles.

  3. Signaling network of dendritic cells in response to pathogens: a community-input supported knowledgebase

    Nudelman Irina

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells that play an essential role in linking the innate and adaptive immune systems. Much research has focused on the signaling pathways triggered upon infection of dendritic cells by various pathogens. The high level of activity in the field makes it desirable to have a pathway-based resource to access the information in the literature. Current pathway diagrams lack either comprehensiveness, or an open-access editorial interface. Hence, there is a need for a dependable, expertly curated knowledgebase that integrates this information into a map of signaling networks. Description We have built a detailed diagram of the dendritic cell signaling network, with the goal of providing researchers with a valuable resource and a facile method for community input. Network construction has relied on comprehensive review of the literature and regular updates. The diagram includes detailed depictions of pathways activated downstream of different pathogen recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors. Initially assembled using CellDesigner software, it provides an annotated graphical representation of interactions stored in Systems Biology Mark-up Language. The network, which comprises 249 nodes and 213 edges, has been web-published through the Biological Pathway Publisher software suite. Nodes are annotated with PubMed references and gene-related information, and linked to a public wiki, providing a discussion forum for updates and corrections. To gain more insight into regulatory patterns of dendritic cell signaling, we analyzed the network using graph-theory methods: bifan, feedforward and multi-input convergence motifs were enriched. This emphasis on activating control mechanisms is consonant with a network that subserves persistent and coordinated responses to

  4. Signaling network of dendritic cells in response to pathogens: a community-input supported knowledgebase.

    Patil, Sonali; Pincas, Hanna; Seto, Jeremy; Nudelman, German; Nudelman, Irina; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2010-10-07

    Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells that play an essential role in linking the innate and adaptive immune systems. Much research has focused on the signaling pathways triggered upon infection of dendritic cells by various pathogens. The high level of activity in the field makes it desirable to have a pathway-based resource to access the information in the literature. Current pathway diagrams lack either comprehensiveness, or an open-access editorial interface. Hence, there is a need for a dependable, expertly curated knowledgebase that integrates this information into a map of signaling networks. We have built a detailed diagram of the dendritic cell signaling network, with the goal of providing researchers with a valuable resource and a facile method for community input. Network construction has relied on comprehensive review of the literature and regular updates. The diagram includes detailed depictions of pathways activated downstream of different pathogen recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors. Initially assembled using CellDesigner software, it provides an annotated graphical representation of interactions stored in Systems Biology Mark-up Language. The network, which comprises 249 nodes and 213 edges, has been web-published through the Biological Pathway Publisher software suite. Nodes are annotated with PubMed references and gene-related information, and linked to a public wiki, providing a discussion forum for updates and corrections. To gain more insight into regulatory patterns of dendritic cell signaling, we analyzed the network using graph-theory methods: bifan, feedforward and multi-input convergence motifs were enriched. This emphasis on activating control mechanisms is consonant with a network that subserves persistent and coordinated responses to pathogen detection. This map represents a navigable

  5. Signaling beyond Punching Holes: Modulation of Cellular Responses by Vibrio cholerae Cytolysin

    Barkha Khilwani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pore-forming toxins (PFTs are a distinct class of membrane-damaging cytolytic proteins that contribute significantly towards the virulence processes employed by various pathogenic bacteria. Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC is a prominent member of the beta-barrel PFT (beta-PFT family. It is secreted by most of the pathogenic strains of the intestinal pathogen V. cholerae. Owing to its potent membrane-damaging cell-killing activity, VCC is believed to play critical roles in V. cholerae pathogenesis, particularly in those strains that lack the cholera toxin. Large numbers of studies have explored the mechanistic basis of the cell-killing activity of VCC. Consistent with the beta-PFT mode of action, VCC has been shown to act on the target cells by forming transmembrane oligomeric beta-barrel pores, thereby leading to permeabilization of the target cell membranes. Apart from the pore-formation-induced direct cell-killing action, VCC exhibits the potential to initiate a plethora of signal transduction pathways that may lead to apoptosis, or may act to enhance the cell survival/activation responses, depending on the type of target cells. In this review, we will present a concise view of our current understanding regarding the multiple aspects of these cellular responses, and their underlying signaling mechanisms, evoked by VCC.

  6. From signal to form: Nod factor as a morhogenetic signal molecule to induce symbiotic responses in legume root hairs

    Esseling, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, research is presented which contributes to a better understanding of nod factor (NF) induced signalling in Iegume root hairs, leading to a successful symbiosis. We mainly use root hairs of the model Iegume Medicago truncatula ('barrel medic') as an experimental system. In the

  7. Somatic insulin signaling regulates a germline starvation response in Drosophila egg chambers

    Burn, K. Mahala; Shimada, Yuko; Ayers, Kathleen; Lu, Feiyue; Hudson, Andrew M.; Cooley, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Egg chambers from starved Drosophila females contain large aggregates of processing (P) bodies and cortically enriched microtubules. As this response to starvation is rapidly reversed upon re-feeding females or culturing egg chambers with exogenous bovine insulin, we examined the role of endogenous insulin signaling in mediating the starvation response. We found that systemic Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) activate the insulin pathway in follicle cells, which then regulate both microtubule and P body organization in the underlying germline cells. This organization is modulated by the motor proteins Dynein and Kinesin. Dynein activity is required for microtubule and P body organization during starvation, while Kinesin activity is required during nutrient-rich conditions. Blocking the ability of egg chambers to form P body aggregates in response to starvation correlated with reduced progeny survival. These data suggest a potential mechanism to maximize fecundity even during periods of poor nutrient availability, by mounting a protective response in immature egg chambers. PMID:25481758

  8. SCF(KMD) controls cytokinin signaling by regulating the degradation of type-B response regulators.

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Chiang, Yi-Hsuan; Kieber, Joseph J; Schaller, G Eric

    2013-06-11

    Cytokinins are plant hormones that play critical roles in growth and development. In Arabidopsis, the transcriptional response to cytokinin is regulated by action of type-B Arabidopsis response regulators (ARRs). Although central elements in the cytokinin signal transduction pathway have been identified, mechanisms controlling output remain to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that a family of F-box proteins, called the kiss me deadly (KMD) family, targets type-B ARR proteins for degradation. KMD proteins form an S-phase kinase-associated PROTEIN1 (SKP1)/Cullin/F-box protein (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and directly interact with type-B ARR proteins. Loss-of-function KMD mutants stabilize type-B ARRs and exhibit an enhanced cytokinin response. In contrast, plants with elevated KMD expression destabilize type-B ARR proteins leading to cytokinin insensitivity. Our results support a model in which an SCF(KMD) complex negatively regulates cytokinin responses by controlling levels of a key family of transcription factors.

  9. Plasticity of the MAPK signaling network in response to mechanical stress.

    Andrea M Pereira

    Full Text Available Cells display versatile responses to mechanical inputs and recent studies have identified the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades mediating the biological effects observed upon mechanical stimulation. Although, MAPK pathways can act insulated from each other, several mechanisms facilitate the crosstalk between the components of these cascades. Yet, the combinatorial complexity of potential molecular interactions between these elements have prevented the understanding of their concerted functions. To analyze the plasticity of the MAPK signaling network in response to mechanical stress we performed a non-saturating epistatic screen in resting and stretched conditions employing as readout a JNK responsive dJun-FRET biosensor. By knocking down MAPKs, and JNK pathway regulators, singly or in pairs in Drosophila S2R+ cells, we have uncovered unexpected regulatory links between JNK cascade kinases, Rho GTPases, MAPKs and the JNK phosphatase Puc. These relationships have been integrated in a system network model at equilibrium accounting for all experimentally validated interactions. This model allows predicting the global reaction of the network to its modulation in response to mechanical stress. It also highlights its context-dependent sensitivity.

  10. A Fasting-Responsive Signaling Pathway that Extends Life Span in C. elegans

    Masaharu Uno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent fasting is one of the most effective dietary restriction regimens that extend life span in C. elegans and mammals. Fasting-stimulus responses are key to the longevity response; however, the mechanisms that sense and transduce the fasting stimulus remain largely unknown. Through a comprehensive transcriptome analysis in C. elegans, we find that along with the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16, AP-1 (JUN-1/FOS-1 plays a central role in fasting-induced transcriptional changes. KGB-1, one of the C. elegans JNKs, acts as an activator of AP-1 and is activated in response to fasting. KGB-1 and AP-1 are involved in intermittent fasting-induced longevity. Fasting-induced upregulation of the components of the SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase complex via AP-1 and DAF-16 enhances protein ubiquitination and reduces protein carbonylation. Our results thus identify a fasting-responsive KGB-1/AP-1 signaling pathway, which, together with DAF-16, causes transcriptional changes that mediate longevity, partly through regulating proteostasis.

  11. Inhibition of TGFbeta1 Signaling Attenutates ATM Activity inResponse to Genotoxic Stress

    Kirshner, Julia; Jobling, Michael F.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Glick, Adam B.; Lavin, Martin J.; Koslov, Sergei; Shiloh, Yosef; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2006-09-15

    Ionizing radiation causes DNA damage that elicits a cellular program of damage control coordinated by the kinase activity of ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM). Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}), which is activated by radiation, is a potent and pleiotropic mediator of physiological and pathological processes. Here we show that TGF{beta} inhibition impedes the canonical cellular DNA damage stress response. Irradiated Tgf{beta}1 null murine epithelial cells or human epithelial cells treated with a small molecule inhibitor of TGF{beta} type I receptor kinase exhibit decreased phosphorylation of Chk2, Rad17 and p53, reduced {gamma}H2AX radiation-induced foci, and increased radiosensitivity compared to TGF{beta} competent cells. We determined that loss of TGF{beta} signaling in epithelial cells truncated ATM autophosphorylation and significantly reduced its kinase activity, without affecting protein abundance. Addition of TGF{beta} restored functional ATM and downstream DNA damage responses. These data reveal a heretofore undetected critical link between the microenvironment and ATM that directs epithelial cell stress responses, cell fate and tissue integrity. Thus, TGF{beta}1, in addition to its role in homoeostatic growth control, plays a complex role in regulating responses to genotoxic stress, the failure of which would contribute to the development of cancer; conversely, inhibiting TGF{beta} may be used to advantage in cancer therapy.

  12. Dynamics of response-conflict monitoring and individual differences in response control and behavioral control: an electrophysiological investigation using a stop-signal task.

    Stahl, Jutta; Gibbons, Henning

    2007-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional significance of error (related) negativity Ne/ERN and individual differences in human action monitoring. A response-conflict model of Ne/ERN should be tested applying a stop-signal paradigm. After a few modifications of Ne/ERN response-conflict theory (Yeung N, Botvinick MM, Cohen JD. The neural basis of error detection: conflict monitoring and the error-related negativity. Psychological Review 2004:111(4);931-959), strength and time course of response conflict could be modeled as a function of stop-signal delay. In Experiment 1, 35 participants performed a visual two-choice response-time task but tried to withhold the response if an auditory stop signal was presented. Probability of stopping errors was held at 50% using variable delays between visual and auditory stimuli. Experiment 2 (n=10) employed both auditory go and stop signals and confirmed that Ne/ERN effects are due to conflict induced by the auditory stop signal, and not the mere presence or absence of an additional stimulus. As predicted, amplitudes of both the stimulus-locked and response-locked Ne/ERN were largest for non-stopped responses, followed by successfully stopped and go responses. However, independently of response type Ne/ERN also increased with increasing stop-signal delay. Since longer delay invokes stronger response conflict, results specifically support the notion of Ne/ERN reflecting response-conflict monitoring. Furthermore, individual differences related to measures of response control and behavioral control were observed. Both low response control estimated from stop-task performance and high psychometric impulsivity were accompanied by smaller Ne/ERN amplitude on stop trials, suggesting reduced response-conflict monitoring. The present study supported the response-conflict view of Ne/ERN. Furthermore, the observed relationship between impulsivity and Ne/ERN amplitude suggested that individuals with low behavioral

  13. Pathogenic Leptospires Modulate Protein Expression and Post-translational Modifications in Response to Mammalian Host Signals.

    Nally, Jarlath E; Grassmann, Andre A; Planchon, Sébastien; Sergeant, Kjell; Renaut, Jenny; Seshu, Janakiram; McBride, Alan J; Caimano, Melissa J

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenic species of Leptospira cause leptospirosis, a bacterial zoonotic disease with a global distribution affecting over one million people annually. Reservoir hosts of leptospirosis, including rodents, dogs, and cattle, exhibit little to no signs of disease but shed large numbers of organisms in their urine. Transmission occurs when mucosal surfaces or abraded skin come into contact with infected urine or urine-contaminated water or soil. Whilst little is known about how Leptospira adapt to and persist within a reservoir host, in vitro studies suggest that leptospires alter their transcriptomic and proteomic profiles in response to environmental signals encountered during mammalian infection. We applied the dialysis membrane chamber (DMC) peritoneal implant model to compare the whole cell proteome of in vivo derived leptospires with that of leptospires cultivated in vitro at 30°C and 37°C by 2-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE). Of 1,735 protein spots aligned across 9 2-D DIGE gels, 202 protein spots were differentially expressed ( p 1.25 or expressed proteins were excised for identification by mass spectrometry. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD006995. The greatest differences were detected when DMC-cultivated leptospires were compared with IV30- or IV37-cultivated leptospires, including the increased expression of multiple isoforms of Loa22, a known virulence factor. Unexpectedly, 20 protein isoforms of LipL32 and 7 isoforms of LipL41 were uniformly identified by DIGE as differentially expressed, suggesting that unique post-translational modifications (PTMs) are operative in response to mammalian host conditions. To test this hypothesis, a rat model of persistent renal colonization was used to isolate leptospires directly from the urine of experimentally infected rats. Comparison of urinary derived leptospires to IV30 leptospires by 2-D immunoblotting confirmed that modification of proteins with

  14. Pathogenic Leptospires Modulate Protein Expression and Post-translational Modifications in Response to Mammalian Host Signals

    Jarlath E. Nally

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic species of Leptospira cause leptospirosis, a bacterial zoonotic disease with a global distribution affecting over one million people annually. Reservoir hosts of leptospirosis, including rodents, dogs, and cattle, exhibit little to no signs of disease but shed large numbers of organisms in their urine. Transmission occurs when mucosal surfaces or abraded skin come into contact with infected urine or urine-contaminated water or soil. Whilst little is known about how Leptospira adapt to and persist within a reservoir host, in vitro studies suggest that leptospires alter their transcriptomic and proteomic profiles in response to environmental signals encountered during mammalian infection. We applied the dialysis membrane chamber (DMC peritoneal implant model to compare the whole cell proteome of in vivo derived leptospires with that of leptospires cultivated in vitro at 30°C and 37°C by 2-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE. Of 1,735 protein spots aligned across 9 2-D DIGE gels, 202 protein spots were differentially expressed (p < 0.05, fold change >1.25 or < −1.25 across all three conditions. Differentially expressed proteins were excised for identification by mass spectrometry. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD006995. The greatest differences were detected when DMC-cultivated leptospires were compared with IV30- or IV37-cultivated leptospires, including the increased expression of multiple isoforms of Loa22, a known virulence factor. Unexpectedly, 20 protein isoforms of LipL32 and 7 isoforms of LipL41 were uniformly identified by DIGE as differentially expressed, suggesting that unique post-translational modifications (PTMs are operative in response to mammalian host conditions. To test this hypothesis, a rat model of persistent renal colonization was used to isolate leptospires directly from the urine of experimentally infected rats. Comparison of urinary derived leptospires to IV30

  15. Heterochromatin marks HP1γ, HP1α and H3K9me3, and DNA damage response activation in human testis development and germ cell tumours

    Bartkova, J; Moudry, P; Hodny, Z

    2011-01-01

    activation in CIS; and enhanced HP1α in teratoma structures with epithelial and neuronal differentiation. Differential expression of the three heterochromatin markers suggests their partly non-overlapping roles, and separation of heterochromatinization from DDR activation highlights distinct responses...

  16. Adrenergic Signaling: A Targetable Checkpoint Limiting Development of the Antitumor Immune Response

    Qiao, Guanxi; Chen, Minhui; Bucsek, Mark J.; Repasky, Elizabeth A.; Hylander, Bonnie L.

    2018-01-01

    An immune response must be tightly controlled so that it will be commensurate with the level of response needed to protect the organism without damaging normal tissue. The roles of cytokines and chemokines in orchestrating these processes are well known, but although stress has long been thought to also affect immune responses, the underlying mechanisms were not as well understood. Recently, the role of nerves and, specifically, the sympathetic nervous system, in regulating immune responses is being revealed. Generally, an acute stress response is beneficial but chronic stress is detrimental because it suppresses the activities of effector immune cells while increasing the activities of immunosuppressive cells. In this review, we first discuss the underlying biology of adrenergic signaling in cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system. We then focus on the effects of chronic adrenergic stress in promoting tumor growth, giving examples of effects on tumor cells and immune cells, explaining the methods commonly used to induce stress in preclinical mouse models. We highlight how this relates to our observations that mandated housing conditions impose baseline chronic stress on mouse models, which is sufficient to cause chronic immunosuppression. This problem is not commonly recognized, but it has been shown to impact conclusions of several studies of mouse physiology and mouse models of disease. Moreover, the fact that preclinical mouse models are chronically immunosuppressed has critical ramifications for analysis of any experiments with an immune component. Our group has found that reducing adrenergic stress by housing mice at thermoneutrality or treating mice housed at cooler temperatures with β-blockers reverses immunosuppression and significantly improves responses to checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy. These observations are clinically relevant because there are numerous retrospective epidemiological studies concluding that cancer patients who were

  17. Modeling the response of small myelinated axons in a compound nerve to kilohertz frequency signals.

    Pelot, N A; Behrend, C E; Grill, W M

    2017-08-01

    There is growing interest in electrical neuromodulation of peripheral nerves, particularly autonomic nerves, to treat various diseases. Electrical signals in the kilohertz frequency (KHF) range can produce different responses, including conduction block. For example, EnteroMedics' vBloc ® therapy for obesity delivers 5 kHz stimulation to block the abdominal vagus nerves, but the mechanisms of action are unclear. We developed a two-part computational model, coupling a 3D finite element model of a cuff electrode around the human abdominal vagus nerve with biophysically-realistic electrical circuit equivalent (cable) model axons (1, 2, and 5.7 µm in diameter). We developed an automated algorithm to classify conduction responses as subthreshold (transmission), KHF-evoked activity (excitation), or block. We quantified neural responses across kilohertz frequencies (5-20 kHz), amplitudes (1-8 mA), and electrode designs. We found heterogeneous conduction responses across the modeled nerve trunk, both for a given parameter set and across parameter sets, although most suprathreshold responses were excitation, rather than block. The firing patterns were irregular near transmission and block boundaries, but otherwise regular, and mean firing rates varied with electrode-fibre distance. Further, we identified excitation responses at amplitudes above block threshold, termed 're-excitation', arising from action potentials initiated at virtual cathodes. Excitation and block thresholds decreased with smaller electrode-fibre distances, larger fibre diameters, and lower kilohertz frequencies. A point source model predicted a larger fraction of blocked fibres and greater change of threshold with distance as compared to the realistic cuff and nerve model. Our findings of widespread asynchronous KHF-evoked activity suggest that conduction block in the abdominal vagus nerves is unlikely with current clinical parameters. Our results indicate that compound neural or downstream muscle

  18. Modeling the response of small myelinated axons in a compound nerve to kilohertz frequency signals

    Pelot, N. A.; Behrend, C. E.; Grill, W. M.

    2017-08-01

    Objective. There is growing interest in electrical neuromodulation of peripheral nerves, particularly autonomic nerves, to treat various diseases. Electrical signals in the kilohertz frequency (KHF) range can produce different responses, including conduction block. For example, EnteroMedics’ vBloc® therapy for obesity delivers 5 kHz stimulation to block the abdominal vagus nerves, but the mechanisms of action are unclear. Approach. We developed a two-part computational model, coupling a 3D finite element model of a cuff electrode around the human abdominal vagus nerve with biophysically-realistic electrical circuit equivalent (cable) model axons (1, 2, and 5.7 µm in diameter). We developed an automated algorithm to classify conduction responses as subthreshold (transmission), KHF-evoked activity (excitation), or block. We quantified neural responses across kilohertz frequencies (5-20 kHz), amplitudes (1-8 mA), and electrode designs. Main results. We found heterogeneous conduction responses across the modeled nerve trunk, both for a given parameter set and across parameter sets, although most suprathreshold responses were excitation, rather than block. The firing patterns were irregular near transmission and block boundaries, but otherwise regular, and mean firing rates varied with electrode-fibre distance. Further, we identified excitation responses at amplitudes above block threshold, termed ‘re-excitation’, arising from action potentials initiated at virtual cathodes. Excitation and block thresholds decreased with smaller electrode-fibre distances, larger fibre diameters, and lower kilohertz frequencies. A point source model predicted a larger fraction of blocked fibres and greater change of threshold with distance as compared to the realistic cuff and nerve model. Significance. Our findings of widespread asynchronous KHF-evoked activity suggest that conduction block in the abdominal vagus nerves is unlikely with current clinical parameters. Our

  19. Larger Neural Responses Produce BOLD Signals That Begin Earlier in Time

    Serena eThompson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI analyses commonly rely on the assumption that the temporal dynamics of hemodynamic response functions (HRFs are independent of the amplitude of the neural signals that give rise to them. The validity of this assumption is particularly important for techniques that use fMRI to resolve sub-second timing distinctions between responses, in order to make inferences about the ordering of neural processes. Whether or not the detailed shape of the HRF is independent of neural response amplitude remains an open question, however. We performed experiments in which we measured responses in primary visual cortex (V1 to large, contrast-reversing checkerboards at a range of contrast levels, which should produce varying amounts of neural activity. Ten subjects (ages 22-52 were studied in each of two experiments using 3 Tesla scanners. We used rapid, 250 msec, temporal sampling (repetition time, or TR and both short and long inter-stimulus interval (ISI stimulus presentations. We tested for a systematic relationship between the onset of the HRF and its amplitude across conditions, and found a strong negative correlation between the two measures when stimuli were separated in time (long- and medium-ISI experiments, but not the short-ISI experiment. Thus, stimuli that produce larger neural responses, as indexed by HRF amplitude, also produced HRFs with shorter onsets. The relationship between amplitude and latency was strongest in voxels with lowest mean-normalized variance (i.e., parenchymal voxels. The onset differences observed in the longer-ISI experiments are likely attributable to mechanisms of neurovascular coupling, since they are substantially larger than reported differences in the onset of action potentials in V1 as a function of response amplitude.

  20. Progesterone production is affected by unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling during the luteal phase in mice.

    Park, Hyo-Jin; Park, Sun-Ji; Koo, Deog-Bon; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kong, Il-Keun; Ryoo, Jae-Woong; Park, Young-Il; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Lee, Dong-Seok

    2014-09-15

    We examined whether the three unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathways, which are activated in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress, are involved in progesterone production in the luteal cells of the corpus luteum (CL) during the mouse estrous cycle. The luteal phase of C57BL/6 female mice (8 weeks old) was divided into two stages: the functional stage (16, 24, and 48 h) and the regression stage (72 and 96 h). Western blotting and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR were performed to analyze UPR protein/gene expression levels in each stage. We investigated whether ER stress affects the progesterone production by using Tm (0.5 μg/g BW) or TUDCA (0.5 μg/g BW) through intra-peritoneal injection. Our results indicate that expressions of Grp78/Bip, p-eIF2α/ATF4, p50ATF6, and p-IRE1/sXBP1 induced by UPR activation were predominantly maintained in functional and early regression stages of the CL. Furthermore, the expression of p-JNK, CHOP, and cleaved caspase3 as ER-stress mediated apoptotic factors increased during the regression stage. Cleaved caspase3 levels increased in the late-regression stage after p-JNK and CHOP expression in the early-regression stage. Additionally, although progesterone secretion and levels of steroidogenic enzymes decreased following intra-peritoneal injection of Tunicamycin, an ER stress inducer, the expression of Grp78/Bip, p50ATF6, and CHOP dramatically increased. These results suggest that the UPR signaling pathways activated in response to ER stress may play important roles in the regulation of the CL function. Furthermore, our findings enhance the understanding of the basic mechanisms affecting the CL life span. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. MicroRNAs, the DNA damage response and cancer

    Wouters, Maikel D.; Gent, Dik C. van; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Pothof, Joris

    2011-01-01

    Many carcinogenic agents such as ultra-violet light from the sun and various natural and man-made chemicals act by damaging the DNA. To deal with these potentially detrimental effects of DNA damage, cells induce a complex DNA damage response (DDR) that includes DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, damage tolerance systems and apoptosis. This DDR is a potent barrier against carcinogenesis and defects within this response are observed in many, if not all, human tumors. DDR defects fuel the evolution of precancerous cells to malignant tumors, but can also induce sensitivity to DNA damaging agents in cancer cells, which can be therapeutically exploited by the use of DNA damaging treatment modalities. Regulation of and coordination between sub-pathways within the DDR is important for maintaining genome stability. Although regulation of the DDR has been extensively studied at the transcriptional and post-translational level, less is known about post-transcriptional gene regulation by microRNAs, the topic of this review. More specifically, we highlight current knowledge about DNA damage responsive microRNAs and microRNAs that regulate DNA damage response genes. We end by discussing the role of DNA damage response microRNAs in cancer etiology and sensitivity to ionizing radiation and other DNA damaging therapeutic agents.

  2. A comparative analysis of signal processing methods for motion-based rate responsive pacing.

    Greenhut, S E; Shreve, E A; Lau, C P

    1996-08-01

    Pacemakers that augment heart rate (HR) by sensing body motion have been the most frequently prescribed rate responsive pacemakers. Many comparisons between motion-based rate responsive pacemaker models have been published. However, conclusions regarding specific signal processing methods used for rate response (e.g., filters and algorithms) can be affected by device-specific features. To objectively compare commonly used motion sensing filters and algorithms, acceleration and ECG signals were recorded from 16 normal subjects performing exercise and daily living activities. Acceleration signals were filtered (1-4 or 15-Hz band-pass), then processed using threshold crossing (TC) or integration (IN) algorithms creating four filter/algorithm combinations. Data were converted to an acceleration indicated rate and compared to intrinsic HR using root mean square difference (RMSd) and signed RMSd. Overall, the filters and algorithms performed similarly for most activities. The only differences between filters were for walking at an increasing grade (1-4 Hz superior to 15-Hz) and for rocking in a chair (15-Hz superior to 1-4 Hz). The only differences between algorithms were for bicycling (TC superior to IN), walking at an increasing grade (IN superior to TC), and holding a drill (IN superior to TC). Performance of the four filter/algorithm combinations was also similar over most activities. The 1-4/IN (filter [Hz]/algorithm) combination performed best for walking at a grade, while the 15/TC combination was best for bicycling. However, the 15/TC combination tended to be most sensitive to higher frequency artifact, such as automobile driving, downstairs walking, and hand drilling. Chair rocking artifact was highest for 1-4/IN. The RMSd for bicycling and upstairs walking were large for all combinations, reflecting the nonphysiological nature of the sensor. The 1-4/TC combination demonstrated the least intersubject variability, was the only filter/algorithm combination

  3. Fructose downregulates miR-330 to induce renal inflammatory response and insulin signaling impairment: Attenuation by morin.

    Gu, Ting-Ting; Song, Lin; Chen, Tian-Yu; Wang, Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Juan; Ding, Xiao-Qin; Yang, Yan-Zi; Pan, Ying; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2017-08-01

    Fructose induces insulin resistance with kidney inflammation and injury. MicroRNAs are emerged as key regulators of insulin signaling. Morin has insulin-mimetic effect with the improvement of insulin resistance and kidney injury. This study investigated the protective mechanisms of morin against fructose-induced kidney injury, with particular focus on miR-330 expression change, inflammatory response, and insulin signaling impairment. miR-330, sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1)/sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor (S1PR)1/3 signaling, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)/NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, and insulin signaling were detected in kidney cortex of fructose-fed rats and fructose-exposed HK-2 cells, respectively. Whether miR-330 mediated inflammatory response to affect insulin signaling was examined using SphK1 inhibitor, S1PR1/3 short interfering RNA, or miR-330 mimic/inhibitor, respectively. Fructose was found to downregulate miR-330 expression to increase SphK1/S1P/S1PR1/3 signaling, and then activate NF-κB/NLRP3 inflammasome to produce IL-1β, causing insulin signaling impairment. Moreover, morin upregulated miR-330 and partly attenuated inflammatory response and insulin signaling impairment to alleviate kidney injury. These findings suggest that morin protects against fructose-induced kidney insulin signaling impairment by upregulating miR-330 to reduce inflammatory response. Morin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of kidney injury associated with fructose-induced inflammation and insulin signaling impairment. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. HIF-mediated innate immune responses: cell signaling and therapeutic implications

    Harris AJ

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Alison J Harris, AA Roger Thompson, Moira KB Whyte, Sarah R Walmsley Academic Unit of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Infection and Immunity, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Abstract: Leukocytes recruited to infected, damaged, or inflamed tissues during an immune response must adapt to oxygen levels much lower than those in the circulation. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs are key mediators of cellular responses to hypoxia and, as in other cell types, HIFs are critical for the upregulation of glycolysis, which enables innate immune cells to produce adenosine triphosphate anaerobically. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that hypoxia also regulates many other innate immunological functions, including cell migration, apoptosis, phagocytosis of pathogens, antigen presentation and production of cytokines, chemokines, and angiogenic and antimicrobial factors. Many of these functions are mediated by HIFs, which are not only stabilized posttranslationally by hypoxia, but also transcriptionally upregulated by inflammatory signals. Here, we review the role of HIFs in the responses of innate immune cells to hypoxia, both in vitro and in vivo, with a particular focus on myeloid cells, on which the majority of studies have so far been carried out. Keywords: hypoxia, neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages

  5. Cross Talk between H2O2 and Interacting Signal Molecules under Plant Stress Response

    Saxena, Ina; Srikanth, Sandhya; Chen, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that oxidative stress is an important cause of cellular damage. During stress conditions, plants have evolved regulatory mechanisms to adapt to various environmental stresses. One of the consequences of stress is an increase in the cellular concentration of reactive oxygen species, which is subsequently converted to H2O2. H2O2 is continuously produced as the byproduct of oxidative plant aerobic metabolism. Organelles with a high oxidizing metabolic activity or with an intense rate of electron flow, such as chloroplasts, mitochondria, or peroxisomes are major sources of H2O2 production. H2O2 acts as a versatile molecule because of its dual role in cells. Under normal conditions, H2O2 immerges as an important factor during many biological processes. It has been established that it acts as a secondary messenger in signal transduction networks. In this review, we discuss potential roles of H2O2 and other signaling molecules during various stress responses. PMID:27200043

  6. Chemical signals of fish skin for the attachment response of Acanthostomum brauni cercariae.

    Haas, W; de Nuñez, M O

    1988-01-01

    The chemical signals of the skin surface of fish, which stimulate the attachment responses of Acanthostomum brauni cercariae, were identified by offering chemicals and fish-skin extracts in agarose substrates to the cercariae. Smaller molecules such as amino acids, fatty acids, monosaccharides, electrolytes, urea, and carbonate solutions did not stimulate attachments, but hyaluronic acid had some effects. Bovine submaxillary glycoproteins had a strong stimulating activity that disappeared after neuraminidase digestion. The stimulating components of the skin surface of fish were hydrophilic substances with molecular weights of more than 10,000. They were sensitive to neuraminidase digestion but not to hyaluronidase digestion and thus can be identified as glycoproteins. A. brauni cercariae respond only to the complete glycoprotein molecules and not to their monosaccharide components. The known attachment triggers of other cercariae are small molecules. Large glycoproteins as host signals for A. brauni cercariae may be an adaptation to muddy habitats, where various substances with low molecular weights may interfere with the host identification.

  7. Best response game of traffic on road network of non-signalized intersections

    Yao, Wang; Jia, Ning; Zhong, Shiquan; Li, Liying

    2018-01-01

    This paper studies the traffic flow in a grid road network with non-signalized intersections. The nature of the drivers in the network is simulated such that they play an iterative snowdrift game with other drivers. A cellular automata model is applied to study the characteristics of the traffic flow and the evolution of the behaviour of the drivers during the game. The drivers use best-response as their strategy to update rules. Three major findings are revealed. First, the cooperation rate in simulation experiences staircase-shaped drop as cost to benefit ratio r increases, and cooperation rate can be derived analytically as a function of cost to benefit ratio r. Second, we find that higher cooperation rate corresponds to higher average speed, lower density and higher flow. This reveals that defectors deteriorate the efficiency of traffic on non-signalized intersections. Third, the system experiences more randomness when the density is low because the drivers will not have much opportunity to update strategy when the density is low. These findings help to show how the strategy of drivers in a traffic network evolves and how their interactions influence the overall performance of the traffic system.

  8. Signal perception, transduction, and response in gravity resistance. Another graviresponse in plants

    Hoson, T.; Saito, Y.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.

    Resistance to the gravitational force is a serious problem that plants have had to solve to survive on land. Mechanical resistance to the pull of gravity is thus a principal graviresponse in plants, comparable to gravitropism. Nevertheless, only limited information has been obtained for this gravity response. We have examined the mechanism of gravity-induced mechanical resistance using hypergravity conditions produced by centrifugation. As a result, we have clarified the outline of the sequence of events leading to the development of mechanical resistance. The gravity signal may be perceived by mechanoreceptors (mechanosensitive ion channels) on the plasma membrane and it appears that amyloplast sedimentation in statocytes is not involved. Transformation and transduction of the perceived signal may be mediated by the structural or physiological continuum of microtubule-cell membrane-cell wall. As the final step in the development of mechanical resistance, plants construct a tough body by increasing cell wall rigidity. The increase in cell wall rigidity is brought about by modification of the metabolism of certain wall constituents and modification of the cell wall environment, especially pH. We need to clarify the details of each step by future space and ground-based experiments.

  9. Mechanistic Basis for Plant Responses to Drought Stress : Regulatory Mechanism of Abscisic Acid Signaling

    Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a key role in the rapid adaptation of plants to environmental stresses such as drought and high salinity. Accumulated ABA in plant cells promotes stomatal closure in guard cells and transcription of stress-tolerant genes. Our understanding of ABA responses dramatically improved by the discovery of both PYR/PYL/RCAR as a soluble ABA receptor and inhibitory complex of a protein phospatase PP2C and a protein kinase SnRK2. Moreover, several structural analyses of PYR/PYL/RCAR revealed the mechanistic basis for the regulatory mechanism of ABA signaling, which provides a rational framework for the design of alternative agonists in future.

  10. Yeast as a Tool to Study Signaling Pathways in Mitochondrial Stress Response and Cytoprotection

    Maša Ždralević

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell homeostasis results from the balance between cell capability to adapt or succumb to environmental stress. Mitochondria, in addition to supplying cellular energy, are involved in a range of processes deciding about cellular life or death. The crucial role of mitochondria in cell death is well recognized. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with the death process and the onset of numerous diseases. Yet, mitochondrial involvement in cellular adaptation to stress is still largely unexplored. Strong interest exists in pharmacological manipulation of mitochondrial metabolism and signaling. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven a valuable model organism in which several intracellular processes have been characterized in great detail, including the retrograde response to mitochondrial dysfunction and, more recently, programmed cell death. In this paper we review experimental evidences of mitochondrial involvement in cytoprotection and propose yeast as a model system to investigate the role of mitochondria in the cross-talk between prosurvival and prodeath pathways.

  11. Life in a changing world: TCH gene regulation of expression and responses to environmental signals

    Braam, J.; Sistrunk, M. L.; Polisensky, D. H.; Xu, W.; Purugganan, M. M.; Antosiewicz, D. M.; Campbell, P.; Johnson, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    The Arabidopsis TCH genes were discovered as a consequence of their marked upregulation of expression in response to seemingly innocuous stimuli such as touch. Further analyses have indicated that these genes are upregulated by a variety of diverse stimuli. Understanding the mechanism(s) and factors that control TCH gene regulation will shed light on the signaling pathways that enable plants to respond to changing environmental conditions. The TCH proteins include calmodulin, calmodulin-related proteins and a xyloglucan endotransglycosylase. Expression analyses and localization of protein accumulation indicate that the potential sites of TCH protein function include expanding cells and tissues under mechanical strain. We hypothesize that the TCH proteins may collaborate in cell wall biogenesis.

  12. Identification of inhomogenous optical absorptive response by chaotic photonic signals in Au nanoparticles

    Muñoz-César, J C; Torres-Torres, C; Urriolagoitia-Sosa, G; Moreno-Valenzuela, J; Torres-Torres, D; Trejo-Valdez, M

    2013-01-01

    A chaotic circuit allows us to identify with a high sensitivity the optical absorption associated with a highly transparent sample with Au nanoparticles embedded in a TiO 2 thin film prepared by a sol–gel method. The measurements are based on a comparison of the correlation between a controlled optical irradiance that propagates through different zones of the sample. Nanosecond nonlinear optical measurements were obtained by monitoring the transmittance and the amplitude modification for the vectorial components of the electric fields in a two-wave mixing interaction. In addition, we theoretically study chaotic physical behavior exhibited by optical signals under nonlinear optical absorption. Our numerical results point out that small intensity fluctuations related to excitations of the absorptive nonlinearity can be described using a simple fractal model. Potential applications for developing sensors and instrumentation of the optical response of advanced materials are contemplated. (paper)

  13. Innate immune responses: Crosstalk of signaling and regulation of gene transcription

    Zhong Bo; Tien Po; Shu Hongbing

    2006-01-01

    Innate immune responses to pathogens such as bacteria and viruses are triggered by recognition of specific structures of invading pathogens called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by cellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that are located at plasma membrane or inside cells. Stimulation of different PAMPs activates Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent and -independent signaling pathways that lead to activation of transcription factors nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF3/7) and/or activator protein-1 (AP-1), which collaborate to induce transcription of a large number of downstream genes. This review focuses on the rapid progress that has recently improved our understanding of the crosstalk among the pathways and the precise regulation of transcription of the downstream genes

  14. Genetic and epigenetic features in radiation sensitivity. Part I: Cell signalling in radiation response

    Bourguignon, Michel H.; Gisone, Pablo A.; Perez, Maria R.; Michelin, Severino; Dubner, Diana; Giorgio, Marina di; Carosella, Edgardo D.

    2005-01-01

    Recent progress especially in the field of gene identification and expression has attracted greater attention to genetic and epigenetic susceptibility to cancer, possibly enhanced by ionising radiation. It has been proposed that the occurrence and severity of the adverse reactions to radiation therapy are also influenced by such genetic susceptibility. This issue is especially important for radiation therapists since hypersensitive patients may suffer from adverse effects in normal tissues following standard radiation therapy, while normally sensitive patients could receive higher doses of radiation offering a better likelihood of cure for malignant tumours. This paper, the first of two parts, reviews the main mechanisms involved in cell response to ionising radiation. DNA repair machinery and cell signalling pathways are considered and their role in radiosensitivity is analysed. The implication of non-targeted and delayed effects in radiosensitivity is also discussed. (orig.)

  15. The complete genome sequence of Trueperella pyogenes UFV1 reveals a processing system involved in the quorumsensing signal response

    Duarte, Vinicius da Silva; Treu, Laura; Campanaro, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    We present here the complete genome sequence of Trueperella pyogenes UFV1. The 2.3-Mbp genome contains an extremely interesting AI-2 transporter and processing system related to the quorum-sensing signal response. This specific feature is described in this species for the first time and might be ...... be responsible for a new pathogenic behavior.......We present here the complete genome sequence of Trueperella pyogenes UFV1. The 2.3-Mbp genome contains an extremely interesting AI-2 transporter and processing system related to the quorum-sensing signal response. This specific feature is described in this species for the first time and might...

  16. Ectopic Fgf signaling induces the intercalary response in developing chicken limb buds.

    Makanae, Aki; Satoh, Akira

    2018-01-01

    Intercalary pattern formation is an important regulatory step in amphibian limb regeneration. Amphibian limb regeneration is composed of multiple steps, including wounding, blastema formation, and intercalary pattern formation. Attempts have been made to transfer insights from regeneration-competent animals to regeneration-incompetent animalsat each step in the regeneration process. In the present study, we focused on the intercalary mechanism in chick limb buds. In amphibian limb regeneration, a proximodistal axis is organized as soon as a regenerating blastema is induced. Intermediate structures are subsequently induced (intercalated) between the established proximal and distal identities. Intercalary tissues are derived from proximal tissues. Fgf signaling mediates the intercalary response in amphibian limb regeneration. We attempted to transfer insights into intercalary regeneration from amphibian models to the chick limb bud. The zeugopodial part was dissected out, and the distal and proximal parts were conjunct at st. 24. Delivering ectopic Fgf2 + Fgf8 between the distal and proximal parts resulted in induction of zeugopodial elements. Examination of HoxA11 expression, apoptosis, and cell proliferation provides insights to compare with those in the intercalary mechanism of amphibian limb regeneration. Furthermore, the cellular contribution was investigated in both the chicken intercalary response and that of axolotl limb regeneration. We developed new insights into cellular contribution in amphibian intercalary regeneration, and found consistency between axolotl and chicken intercalary responses. Our findings demonstrate that the same principal of limb regeneration functions between regeneration-competent and -incompetent animals. In this context, we propose the feasibility of the induction of the regeneration response in amniotes.

  17. Morphogen and community effects determine cell fates in response to BMP4 signaling in human embryonic stem cells.

    Nemashkalo, Anastasiia; Ruzo, Albert; Heemskerk, Idse; Warmflash, Aryeh

    2017-09-01

    Paracrine signals maintain developmental states and create cell fate patterns in vivo and influence differentiation outcomes in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in vitro Systematic investigation of morphogen signaling is hampered by the difficulty of disentangling endogenous signaling from experimentally applied ligands. Here, we grow hESCs in micropatterned colonies of 1-8 cells ('µColonies') to quantitatively investigate paracrine signaling and the response to external stimuli. We examine BMP4-mediated differentiation in µColonies and standard culture conditions and find that in µColonies, above a threshold concentration, BMP4 gives rise to only a single cell fate, contrary to its role as a morphogen in other developmental systems. Under standard culture conditions BMP4 acts as a morphogen but this requires secondary signals and particular cell densities. We find that a 'community effect' enforces a common fate within µColonies, both in the state of pluripotency and when cells are differentiated, and that this effect allows a more precise response to external signals. Using live cell imaging to correlate signaling histories with cell fates, we demonstrate that interactions between neighbors result in sustained, homogenous signaling necessary for differentiation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Autophagy in DNA Damage Response

    Piotr Czarny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage response (DDR involves DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, but autophagy is also suggested to play a role in DDR. Autophagy can be activated in response to DNA-damaging agents, but the exact mechanism underlying this activation is not fully understood, although it is suggested that it involves the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1. mTORC1 represses autophagy via phosphorylation of the ULK1/2–Atg13–FIP200 complex thus preventing maturation of pre-autophagosomal structures. When DNA damage occurs, it is recognized by some proteins or their complexes, such as poly(ADPribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1, Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 (MRN complex or FOXO3, which activate repressors of mTORC1. SQSTM1/p62 is one of the proteins whose levels are regulated via autophagic degradation. Inhibition of autophagy by knockout of FIP200 results in upregulation of SQSTM1/p62, enhanced DNA damage and less efficient damage repair. Mitophagy, one form of autophagy involved in the selective degradation of mitochondria, may also play role in DDR. It degrades abnormal mitochondria and can either repress or activate apoptosis, but the exact mechanism remains unknown. There is a need to clarify the role of autophagy in DDR, as this process may possess several important biomedical applications, involving also cancer therapy.

  19. The Adenovirus E1A C Terminus Suppresses a Delayed Antiviral Response and Modulates RAS Signaling.

    Zemke, Nathan R; Berk, Arnold J

    2017-12-13

    The N-terminal half of adenovirus e1a assembles multimeric complexes with host proteins that repress innate immune responses and force host cells into S-phase. In contrast, the functions of e1a's C-terminal interactions with FOXK, DCAF7, and CtBP are unknown. We found that these interactions modulate RAS signaling, and that a single e1a molecule must bind all three of these host proteins to suppress activation of a subset of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). These ISGs were otherwise induced in primary respiratory epithelial cells at 12 hr p.i. This delayed activation of ISGs required IRF3 and coincided with an ∼10-fold increase in IRF3 from protein stabilization. The induced IRF3 bound to chromatin and localized to the promoters of activated ISGs. While IRF3, STAT1/2, and IRF9 all greatly increased in concentration, there were no corresponding mRNA increases, suggesting that e1a regulates the stabilities of these key activators of innate immune responses, as shown directly for IRF3. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Fractional Modeling of the AC Large-Signal Frequency Response in Magnetoresistive Current Sensors

    Sergio Iván Ravelo Arias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fractional calculus is considered when derivatives and integrals of non-integer order are applied over a specific function. In the electrical and electronic domain, the transfer function dependence of a fractional filter not only by the filter order n, but additionally, of the fractional order α is an example of a great number of systems where its input-output behavior could be more exactly modeled by a fractional behavior. Following this aim, the present work shows the experimental ac large-signal frequency response of a family of electrical current sensors based in different spintronic conduction mechanisms. Using an ac characterization set-up the sensor transimpedance function  is obtained considering it as the relationship between sensor output voltage and input sensing current,[PLEASE CHECK FORMULA IN THE PDF]. The study has been extended to various magnetoresistance sensors based in different technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR, giant magnetoresistance (GMR, spin-valve (GMR-SV and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR. The resulting modeling shows two predominant behaviors, the low-pass and the inverse low-pass with fractional index different from the classical integer response. The TMR technology with internal magnetization offers the best dynamic and sensitivity properties opening the way to develop actual industrial applications.

  1. Molecular signal for induction of the adaptive response to alkylating agents in E. coli

    Lindahl, T.; Sedgwick, B.; Teo, I.; Kilpatrick, M.; McCarthy, T.; Hughes, S.

    1986-05-01

    Exposure of E. coli to simple alkylating agents such as methylnitrosourea causes the induction of at least three DNA repair functions, which are under the control of the ada gene. The intracellular signal for switching on the response has been identified as one of the two stereoisomers of methyl phosphotriesters generated in DNA by alkylation. The methyl group is transferred from the phosphotriester moiety to a specific cysteine residue within the regulatory Ada protein in a self-methylation reaction. This protein also corrects the mutagenic lesion O/sup 6/-methylguanine by transfer of its methyl group to a separate cysteine residue in the Ada protein. Methylation of the protein from repair of a DNA phosphotriester residue, but not from O/sup 6/-methylguanine, converts it to an activator of transcription of genes involved in the adaptive response. The activated form of the Ada protein enhances transcription by binding specifically to a sequence d(AAA--AAAGCGCA), located immediately upstream of the RNA polymerase binding site in relevant promoter regions.

  2. Reactive Transformation and Increased BDNF Signaling by Hippocampal Astrocytes in Response to MK-801.

    Wenjuan Yu

    Full Text Available MK-801, also known as dizocilpine, is a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptor antagonist that induces schizophrenia-like symptoms. While astrocytes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, astrocytic responses to MK-801 and their significance to schizotypic symptoms are unclear. Changes in the expression levels of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP, a marker of astrocyte activation in response to a variety of pathogenic stimuli, were examined in the hippocampus of rats treated with the repeated MK-801 injection (0.5 mg/10 ml/kg body weight for 6 days and in primary cultured hippocampal astrocytes incubated with MK-801 (5 or 20 μM for 24 h. Moreover, the expression levels of BDNF and its receptors TrkB and p75 were examined in MK-801-treated astrocyte cultures. MK-801 treatment enhanced GFAP expression in the rat hippocampus and also increased the levels of GFAP protein and mRNA in hippocampal astrocytes in vitro. Treatment of cultured hippocampal astrocytes with MK-801 enhanced protein and mRNA levels of BDNF, TrkB, and p75. Collectively, our results suggest that hippocampal astrocytes may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia symptoms associated with NMDA receptor hypofunction by reactive transformation and altered BDNF signaling.

  3. Organotypic Cultures of Intervertebral Disc Cells: Responses to Growth Factors and Signaling Pathways Involved

    Harris Pratsinis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration is strongly associated with low back pain, a major cause of disability worldwide. An in-depth understanding of IVD cell physiology is required for the design of novel regenerative therapies. Accordingly, aim of this work was the study of IVD cell responses to mitogenic growth factors in a three-dimensional (3D organotypic milieu, comprising characteristic molecules of IVD’s extracellular matrix. In particular, annulus fibrosus (AF cells were cultured inside collagen type-I gels, while nucleus pulposus (NP cells in chondroitin sulfate A (CSA supplemented collagen gels, and the effects of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF, basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF, and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I were assessed. All three growth factors stimulated DNA synthesis in both AF and NP 3D cell cultures, with potencies similar to those observed previously in monolayers. CSA supplementation inhibited basal DNA synthesis rates, without affecting the response to growth factors. ERK and Akt were found to be phosphorylated following growth factor stimulation. Blockade of these two signaling pathways using pharmacologic inhibitors significantly, though not completely, inhibited growth factor-induced DNA synthesis. The proposed culture systems may prove useful for further in vitro studies aiming at future interventions for IVD regeneration.

  4. Reactive Transformation and Increased BDNF Signaling by Hippocampal Astrocytes in Response to MK-801

    Wang, Yueming; Li, Guanjun; Wang, Lihua; Li, Huafang

    2015-01-01

    MK-801, also known as dizocilpine, is a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist that induces schizophrenia-like symptoms. While astrocytes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, astrocytic responses to MK-801 and their significance to schizotypic symptoms are unclear. Changes in the expression levels of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP), a marker of astrocyte activation in response to a variety of pathogenic stimuli, were examined in the hippocampus of rats treated with the repeated MK-801 injection (0.5 mg/10ml/kg body weight for 6 days) and in primary cultured hippocampal astrocytes incubated with MK-801 (5 or 20 μM for 24 h). Moreover, the expression levels of BDNF and its receptors TrkB and p75 were examined in MK-801-treated astrocyte cultures. MK-801 treatment enhanced GFAP expression in the rat hippocampus and also increased the levels of GFAP protein and mRNA in hippocampal astrocytes in vitro. Treatment of cultured hippocampal astrocytes with MK-801 enhanced protein and mRNA levels of BDNF, TrkB, and p75. Collectively, our results suggest that hippocampal astrocytes may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia symptoms associated with NMDA receptor hypofunction by reactive transformation and altered BDNF signaling. PMID:26700309

  5. Correlating behavioral responses to FMRI signals from human prefrontal cortex: examining cognitive processes using task analysis.

    DeSouza, Joseph F X; Ovaysikia, Shima; Pynn, Laura

    2012-06-20

    The aim of this methods paper is to describe how to implement a neuroimaging technique to examine complementary brain processes engaged by two similar tasks. Participants' behavior during task performance in an fMRI scanner can then be correlated to the brain activity using the blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal. We measure behavior to be able to sort correct trials, where the subject performed the task correctly and then be able to examine the brain signals related to correct performance. Conversely, if subjects do not perform the task correctly, and these trials are included in the same analysis with the correct trials we would introduce trials that were not only for correct performance. Thus, in many cases these errors can be used themselves to then correlate brain activity to them. We describe two complementary tasks that are used in our lab to examine the brain during suppression of an automatic responses: the stroop(1) and anti-saccade tasks. The emotional stroop paradigm instructs participants to either report the superimposed emotional 'word' across the affective faces or the facial 'expressions' of the face stimuli(1,2). When the word and the facial expression refer to different emotions, a conflict between what must be said and what is automatically read occurs. The participant has to resolve the conflict between two simultaneously competing processes of word reading and facial expression. Our urge to read out a word leads to strong 'stimulus-response (SR)' associations; hence inhibiting these strong SR's is difficult and participants are prone to making errors. Overcoming this conflict and directing attention away from the face or the word requires the subject to inhibit bottom up processes which typically directs attention to the more salient stimulus. Similarly, in the anti-saccade task(3,4,5,6), where an instruction cue is used to direct only attention to a peripheral stimulus location but then the eye movement is made to the mirror opposite position

  6. Promiscuous Diffusible Signal Factor Production and Responsiveness of the Xylella fastidiosa Rpf System.

    Ionescu, Michael; Yokota, Kenji; Antonova, Elena; Garcia, Angelica; Beaulieu, Ellen; Hayes, Terry; Iavarone, Anthony T; Lindow, Steven E

    2016-07-19

    Cell density-dependent regulation of gene expression in Xylella fastidiosa that is crucial to its switching between plant hosts and insect vectors is dependent on RpfF and its production of 2-enoic acids known as diffusible signal factor (DSF). We show that X. fastidiosa produces a particularly large variety of similar, relatively long-chain-length 2-enoic acids that are active in modulating gene expression. Both X. fastidiosa itself and a Pantoea agglomerans surrogate host harboring X. fastidiosa RpfF (XfRpfF) is capable of producing a variety of both saturated and unsaturated free fatty acids. However, only 2-cis unsaturated acids were found to be biologically active in X. fastidiosa X. fastidiosa produces, and is particularly responsive to, a novel DSF species, 2-cis-hexadecanoic acid that we term XfDSF2. It is also responsive to other, even longer 2-enoic acids to which other taxa such as Xanthomonas campestris are unresponsive. The 2-enoic acids that are produced by X. fastidiosa are strongly affected by the cellular growth environment, with XfDSF2 not detected in culture media in which 2-tetradecenoic acid (XfDSF1) had previously been found. X. fastidiosa is responsive to much lower concentrations of XfDSF2 than XfDSF1. Apparently competitive interactions can occur between various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids that block the function of those agonistic 2-enoic fatty acids. By altering the particular 2-enoic acids produced and the relative balance of free enoic and saturated fatty acids, X. fastidiosa might modulate the extent of DSF-mediated quorum sensing. X. fastidiosa, having a complicated lifestyle in which it moves and multiplies within plants but also must be vectored by insects, utilizes DSF-based quorum sensing to partition the expression of traits needed for these two processes within different cells in this population based on local cellular density. The finding that it can produce a variety of DSF species in a strongly

  7. Wnt and β-Catenin Signaling and Skeletal Muscle Myogenesis in Response to Muscle Damage and Resistance Exercise and Training

    Dan Newmire

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The factors that regulate skeletal muscle hypertrophy in human adults in response to resistance training (RT has largely focused on endogenous endocrine responses. However, the endocrine response to RT as having an obligatory role in muscle hypertrophy has come under scrutiny, as other mechanisms and pathways seem to also be involved in up-regulating muscle protein synthesis (MPS. Skeletal muscle myogenesis is a multifactorial process of tissue growth and repair in response to resistance training is regulated by many factors.  As a result, satellite cell-fused myogenesis is a possible factor in skeletal muscle regeneration and hypertrophy in response to RT.  The Wnt family ligands interact with various receptors and activate different downstream signaling pathways and have been classified as either canonical (β-catenin dependent or non-canonical (β-catenin independent.  Wnt is secreted from numerous tissues in a paracrine fashion. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is a highly-regulated and intricate pathway that is essential to skeletal muscle myogenesis.  The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway may influence satellite cells to myogenic commitment, differentiation, and fusion into muscle fibers in response to injury or trauma, self-renewal, and normal basal turnover.  The current literature has shown that, in response mechanical overload from acute resistance exercise and chronic resistance training, that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is stimulated which may actuate the process of muscle repair and hypertrophy in response to exercise-induced muscle damage. The purpose of this review is to elaborate on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling  pathway, the current literature investigating the relationship of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and its effects on myogenesis is response to muscle damage and resistance exercise and training.      Keywords: skeletal muscle, hypertrophy, myogenesis, cell signaling, protein synthesis, resistance

  8. ESR signal features of 60Co γ-ray irradiated bone tissue and its dose response relationship

    Wu Ke; Sun Zunpu; Shi Yuanming

    1993-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) technique was used to study the radiation-induced ESR signal features of different paramagnetic species of 60 Co γ-ray irradiated bone tissue. The results showed that the intensity of an ESR signal at that the intensity of an ESR signal at g 2.0022 of human bones exposed to a dose range of 0-50 Gy had linear dose response relationships. The lower limit of detectable dose was about 2 Gy and the detecting error was about 10%. The signal was stable at room temperature during 60 days, and the effect of radiation dose rate of 0.5-8.0 Gy/min could be neglected. This signal was insensitive to microwave power and temperature, which was suitable for rapid and direct detection with ESR technique. These features suggest that human bones could be used for radiation accident dose evaluation by ESR

  9. Promiscuous Diffusible Signal Factor Production and Responsiveness of the Xylella fastidiosa Rpf System

    Michael Ionescu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell density-dependent regulation of gene expression in Xylella fastidiosa that is crucial to its switching between plant hosts and insect vectors is dependent on RpfF and its production of 2-enoic acids known as diffusible signal factor (DSF. We show that X. fastidiosa produces a particularly large variety of similar, relatively long-chain-length 2-enoic acids that are active in modulating gene expression. Both X. fastidiosa itself and a Pantoea agglomerans surrogate host harboring X. fastidiosa RpfF (XfRpfF is capable of producing a variety of both saturated and unsaturated free fatty acids. However, only 2-cis unsaturated acids were found to be biologically active in X. fastidiosa. X. fastidiosa produces, and is particularly responsive to, a novel DSF species, 2-cis-hexadecanoic acid that we term XfDSF2. It is also responsive to other, even longer 2-enoic acids to which other taxa such as Xanthomonas campestris are unresponsive. The 2-enoic acids that are produced by X. fastidiosa are strongly affected by the cellular growth environment, with XfDSF2 not detected in culture media in which 2-tetradecenoic acid (XfDSF1 had previously been found. X. fastidiosa is responsive to much lower concentrations of XfDSF2 than XfDSF1. Apparently competitive interactions can occur between various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids that block the function of those agonistic 2-enoic fatty acids. By altering the particular 2-enoic acids produced and the relative balance of free enoic and saturated fatty acids, X. fastidiosa might modulate the extent of DSF-mediated quorum sensing.

  10. Discordant signaling and autophagy response to fasting in hearts of obese mice: Implications for ischemia tolerance.

    Andres, Allen M; Kooren, Joel A; Parker, Sarah J; Tucker, Kyle C; Ravindran, Nandini; Ito, Bruce R; Huang, Chengqun; Venkatraman, Vidya; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Mentzer, Robert M

    2016-07-01

    Autophagy is regulated by nutrient and energy status and plays an adaptive role during nutrient deprivation and ischemic stress. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a hypernutritive state characterized by obesity, dyslipidemia, elevated fasting blood glucose levels, and insulin resistance. It has also been associated with impaired autophagic flux and larger-sized infarcts. We hypothesized that diet-induced obesity (DIO) affects nutrient sensing, explaining the observed cardiac impaired autophagy. We subjected male friend virus B NIH (FVBN) mice to a high-fat diet, which resulted in increased weight gain, fat deposition, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and larger infarcts after myocardial ischemia-reperfusion. Autophagic flux was impaired after 4 wk on a high-fat diet. To interrogate nutrient-sensing pathways, DIO mice were subjected to overnight fasting, and hearts were processed for biochemical and proteomic analysis. Obese mice failed to upregulate LC3-II or to clear p62/SQSTM1 after fasting, although mRNA for LC3B and p62/SQSTM1 were appropriately upregulated in both groups, demonstrating an intact transcriptional response to fasting. Energy- and nutrient-sensing signal transduction pathways [AMPK and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)] also responded appropriately to fasting, although mTOR was more profoundly suppressed in obese mice. Proteomic quantitative analysis of the hearts under fed and fasted conditions revealed broad changes in protein networks involved in oxidative phosphorylation, autophagy, oxidative stress, protein homeostasis, and contractile machinery. In many instances, the fasting response was quite discordant between lean and DIO mice. Network analysis implicated the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor and mTOR regulatory nodes. Hearts of obese mice exhibited impaired autophagy, altered proteome, and discordant response to nutrient deprivation. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Iron is a signal for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia biofilm formation, oxidative stress response, OMPs expression and virulence

    Carlos Adrian Garcia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging nosocomial pathogen. In many bacteria iron availability regulates, trough the Fur system, not only iron homeostasis but also virulence. The aim of this work was to assess the role of iron on S. maltophilia biofilm formation, EPS production, oxidative stress response, OMPs regulation, quorum sensing (QS, and virulence. Studies were done on K279 and its isogenic fur mutant F60 cultured in the presence or absence of dipyridyl. This is the first report of spontaneous fur mutants obtained in S. maltophilia. F60 produced higher amounts of biofilms than K279a and CLSM analysis demonstrated improved adherence and biofilm organization. Under iron restricted conditions, K279a produced biofilms with more biomass and enhanced thickness. In addition, F60 produced higher amounts of EPS than K279a but with a similar composition, as revealed by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. With respect to the oxidative stress response, MnSOD was the only SOD isoenzyme detected in K279a. F60 presented higher SOD activity than the wt strain in planktonic and biofilm cultures, and iron deprivation increased K279a SOD activity. Under iron starvation, SDS-PAGE profile from K279a presented two iron-repressed proteins. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed homology with FepA and another putative TonB-dependent siderophore receptor of K279a. In silico analysis allowed the detection of potential Fur boxes in the respective coding genes. K279a encodes the QS diffusible signal factor (DSF. Under iron restriction K279a produced higher amounts of DSF than under iron rich condition. Finally, F60 was more virulent than K279a in the Galleria mellonella killing assay. These results put in evidence that iron levels regulate, likely through the Fur system, S. maltophilia biofilm formation, oxidative stress response, OMPs expression, DSF production and virulence.

  12. Frequency analysis of the visual steady-state response measured with the fast optical signal in younger and older adults

    Tse, Chun-Yu; Gordon, Brian A.; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele

    2010-01-01

    Relatively high frequency activity (>4 Hz) carries important information about the state of the brain or its response to high frequency events. The electroencephalogram (EEG) is commonly used to study these changes because it possesses high temporal resolution and a good signal-to-noise ratio. However, it provides limited spatial information. Non-invasive fast optical signals (FOS) have been proposed as a neuroimaging tool combining spatial and temporal resolution. Yet, this technique has not...

  13. The estimation of hemodynamic signals measured by fNIRS response to cold pressor test

    Ansari, M. A.; Fazliazar, E.

    2018-04-01

    The estimation of cerebral hemodynamic signals has an important role for monitoring the stage of neurological diseases. Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) can be used for monitoring of brain activities. fNIRS utilizes light in the near-infrared spectrum (650-1000 nm) to study the response of the brain vasculature to the changes in neural activities, called neurovascular coupling, within the cortex when cognitive activation occurs. The neurovascular coupling may be disrupted in the brain pathological condition. Therefore, we can also use fNIRS to diagnosis brain pathological conditions or to monitor the efficacy of related treatments. The Cold pressor test (CPT), followed by immersion of dominant hand or foot in the ice water, can induce cortical activities. The perception of pain induced by CPT can be related to cortical neurovascular coupling. Hence, the variation of cortical hemodynamic signals during CPT can be an indicator for studying neurovascular coupling. Here, we study the effect of pain induced by CPT on the temporal variation of concentration of oxyhemoglobin [HbO2] and deoxyhemoglobin [Hb] in the healthy brains. We use fNIRS data collected on forehead during a CPT from 11 healthy subjects, and the average data are compared with post-stimulus pain rating scores. The results show that the variation of [Hb] and [HbO2] are positively correlated with self-reported scores during the CPT. These results depict that fNIRS can be potentially applied to study the decoupling of neurovascular process in brain pathological conditions.

  14. CDH1 regulates E2F1 degradation in response to differentiation signals in keratinocytes.

    Singh, Randeep K; Dagnino, Lina

    2017-01-17

    The E2F1 transcription factor plays key roles in skin homeostasis. In the epidermis, E2F1 expression is essential for normal proliferation of undifferentiated keratinocytes, regeneration after injury and DNA repair following UV radiation-induced photodamage. Abnormal E2F1 expression promotes nonmelanoma skin carcinoma. In addition, E2F1 must be downregulated for proper keratinocyte differentiation, but the relevant mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. We show that differentiation signals induce a series of post-translational modifications in E2F1 that are jointly required for its downregulation. Analysis of the structural determinants that govern these processes revealed a central role for S403 and T433. In particular, substitution of these two amino acid residues with non-phosphorylatable alanine (E2F1 ST/A) interferes with E2F1 nuclear export, K11- and K48-linked polyubiquitylation and degradation in differentiated keratinocytes. In contrast, replacement of S403 and T433 with phosphomimetic aspartic acid to generate a pseudophosphorylated E2F1 mutant protein (E2F1 ST/D) generates a protein that is regulated in a manner indistinguishable from that of wild type E2F1. Cdh1 is an activating cofactor that interacts with the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin E3 ligase, promoting proteasomal degradation of various substrates. We found that Cdh1 associates with E2F1 in keratinocytes. Inhibition or RNAi-mediated silencing of Cdh1 prevents E2F1 degradation in response to differentiation signals. Our results reveal novel regulatory mechanisms that jointly modulate post-translational modifications and downregulation of E2F1, which are necessary for proper epidermal keratinocyte differentiation.

  15. The cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factors requires co-ordinated signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis.

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-08-18

    VEGFs (vascular endothelial growth factors) are a family of conserved disulfide-linked soluble secretory glycoproteins found in higher eukaryotes. VEGFs mediate a wide range of responses in different tissues including metabolic homoeostasis, cell proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis. Such responses are initiated by VEGF binding to soluble and membrane-bound VEGFRs (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases) and co-receptors. VEGF and receptor splice isoform diversity further enhances complexity of membrane protein assembly and function in signal transduction pathways that control multiple cellular responses. Different signal transduction pathways are simultaneously activated by VEGFR-VEGF complexes with membrane trafficking along the endosome-lysosome network further modulating signal output from multiple enzymatic events associated with such pathways. Balancing VEGFR-VEGF signal transduction with trafficking and proteolysis is essential in controlling the intensity and duration of different intracellular signalling events. Dysfunction in VEGF-regulated signal transduction is important in chronic disease states including cancer, atherosclerosis and blindness. This family of growth factors and receptors is an important model system for understanding human disease pathology and developing new therapeutics for treating such ailments. © 2015 Authors.

  16. JAK/STAT signaling pathway-mediated immune response in silkworm (Bombyx mori) challenged by Beauveria bassiana.

    Geng, Tao; Lv, Ding-Ding; Huang, Yu-Xia; Hou, Cheng-Xiang; Qin, Guang-Xing; Guo, Xi-Jie

    2016-12-20

    Innate immunity was critical in insects defensive system and able to be induced by Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription cascade transduction (JAK/STAT) signaling pathway. Currently, it had been identified many JAK/STAT signaling pathway-related genes in silkworm, but little function was known on insect innate immunity. To explore the roles of JAK/STAT pathway in antifungal immune response in silkworm (Bombyx mori) against Beauveria bassiana infection, the expression patterns of B. mori C-type lectin 5 (BmCTL5) and genes encoding 6 components of JAK/STAT signaling pathway in silkworm challenged by B. bassiana were analyzed using quantitative real time PCR. Meanwhile the activation of JAK/STAT signaling pathway by various pathogenic micro-organisms and the affect of JAK/STAT signaling pathway inhibitors on antifungal activity in silkworm hemolymph was also detected. Moreover, RNAi assay of BmCTL5 and the affect on expression levels of signaling factors were also analyzed. We found that JAK/STAT pathway could be obviously activated in silkworm challenged with B. bassiana and had no response to bacteria and B. mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV). However, the temporal expression patterns of JAK/STAT signaling pathway related genes were significantly different. B. mori downstream receptor kinase (BmDRK) might be a positive regulator of JAK/STAT signaling pathway in silkworm against B. bassiana infection. Moreover, antifungal activity assay showed that the suppression of JAK/STAT signaling pathway by inhibitors could significantly inhibit the antifungal activity in hemolymph and resulted in increased sensitivity of silkworm to B. bassiana infection, indicating that JAK/STAT signaling pathway might be involved in the synthesis and secretion of antifungal substances. The results of RNAi assays suggested that BmCTL5 might be one pattern recognition receptors for JAK/STAT signaling pathway in silkworm. These findings yield insights for better

  17. Global mapping of protein phosphorylation events identifies novel signalling hubs mediating fatty acid starvation responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Pultz, Dennis; Bennetzen, Martin; Rødkær, Steven Vestergaard

    2011-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) extends the life span of multiple species, ranging from single-celled organisms like yeast to mammals. This increase in longevity by dietary restriction is coupled to profound beneficial effects on age-related pathology. Despite the number of studies on DR...... and the physiological changes DR induces, only little is known about the genetics and signalling networks, which regulate the DR response. We have recently shown that inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae induces autophagy mediated by TORC1 signalling and affects life span. In the present study...... in a temporal manner in response to inhibition of fatty acid synthesis by cerulenin. By in silico analysis of these phosphorylation events, we have identified the major downstream regulated processes and signalling networks mediating the cellular response to fatty acid starvation. The analysis further...

  18. Food restriction promotes signaling effort in response to social challenge in a short-lived electric fish.

    Gavassa, Sat; Stoddard, Philip K

    2012-09-01

    Vertebrates exposed to stressful conditions release glucocorticoids to sustain energy expenditure. In most species elevated glucocorticoids inhibit reproduction. However individuals with limited remaining reproductive opportunities cannot afford to forgo reproduction and should resist glucocorticoid-mediated inhibition of reproductive behavior. The electric fish Brachyhypopomus gauderio has a single breeding season in its lifetime, thus we expect males to resist glucocorticoid-mediated inhibition of their sexual advertisement signals. We studied stress resistance in male B. gauderio (i) by examining the effect of exogenous cortisol administration on the signal waveform and (ii) by investigating the effect of food limitation on androgen and cortisol levels, the amplitude of the electric signal waveform, the responsiveness of the electric signal waveform to social challenge, and the amount of feeding activity. Exogenous cortisol administration did reduce signal amplitude and pulse duration, but endogenous cortisol levels did not rise with food limitation or social challenge. Despite food limitation, males responded to social challenges by further increasing androgen levels and enhancing the amplitude and duration of their electric signal waveforms. Food-restricted males increased androgen levels and signal pulse duration more than males fed ad libitum. Socially challenged fish increased food consumption, probably to compensate for their elevated energy expenditure. Previous studies showed that socially challenged males of this species simultaneously elevate testosterone and cortisol in proportion to signal amplitude. Thus, B. gauderio appears to protect its cortisol-sensitive electric advertisement signal by increasing food intake, limiting cortisol release, and offsetting signal reduction from cortisol with signal-enhancing androgens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulation of early signaling and gene expression in the α-particle and bystander response of IMR-90 human fibroblasts

    Hei Tom K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The existence of a radiation bystander effect, in which non-irradiated cells respond to signals from irradiated cells, is well established. To understand early signaling and gene regulation in bystander cells, we used a bio-informatics approach, measuring global gene expression at 30 minutes and signaling pathways between 30 minutes and 4 hours after exposure to α-particles in IMR-90 fibroblasts. Methods We used whole human genome microarrays and real time quantitative PCR to measure and validate gene expression. Microarray analysis was done using BRB-Array Tools; pathway and ontology analyses were done using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and PANTHER, respectively. We studied signaling in irradiated and bystander cells using immunoblotting and semi-quantitative image analysis. Results Gene ontology suggested signal transduction and transcriptional regulation responding 30 minutes after treatment affected cell structure, motility and adhesion, and interleukin synthesis. We measured time-dependent expression of genes controlled by the NF-κB pathway; matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3; chemokine ligands 2, 3 and 5 and interleukins 1β, 6 and 33. There was an increased response of this set of genes 30 minutes after treatment and another wave of induction at 4 hours. We investigated AKT-GSK3β signaling and found both AKT and GSK3β are hyper-phosphorylated 30 minutes after irradiation and this effect is maintained through 4 hours. In bystander cells, a similar response was seen with a delay of 30 minutes. We proposed a network model where the observed decrease in phosphorylation of β-catenin protein after GSK3β dependent inactivation can trigger target gene expression at later times after radiation exposure Conclusions These results are the first to show that the radiation induced bystander signal induces a widespread gene expression response at 30 minutes after treatment and these changes are accompanied by modification of

  20. ZTF-8 interacts with the 9-1-1 complex and is required for DNA damage response and double-strand break repair in the C. elegans germline.

    Hyun-Min Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in DNA repair genes are linked to tumor progression. Furthermore, failure in either activating a DNA damage checkpoint or repairing programmed meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs can impair chromosome segregation. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis for DNA damage response (DDR and DSB repair (DSBR within the germline is highly important. Here we define ZTF-8, a previously uncharacterized protein conserved from worms to humans, as a novel factor involved in the repair of both mitotic and meiotic DSBs as well as in meiotic DNA damage checkpoint activation in the C. elegans germline. ztf-8 mutants exhibit specific sensitivity to γ-irradiation and hydroxyurea, mitotic nuclear arrest at S-phase accompanied by activation of the ATL-1 and CHK-1 DNA damage checkpoint kinases, as well as accumulation of both mitotic and meiotic recombination intermediates, indicating that ZTF-8 functions in DSBR. However, impaired meiotic DSBR progression partially fails to trigger the CEP-1/p53-dependent DNA damage checkpoint in late pachytene, also supporting a role for ZTF-8 in meiotic DDR. ZTF-8 partially co-localizes with the 9-1-1 DDR complex and interacts with MRT-2/Rad1, a component of this complex. The human RHINO protein rescues the phenotypes observed in ztf-8 mutants, suggesting functional conservation across species. We propose that ZTF-8 is involved in promoting repair at stalled replication forks and meiotic DSBs by transducing DNA damage checkpoint signaling via the 9-1-1 pathway. Our findings define a conserved function for ZTF-8/RHINO in promoting genomic stability in the germline.

  1. Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling mediates aldosterone-induced profibrotic responses in kidney

    Sheng, Lili; Yang, Min; Ding, Wei [Department of Nephrology, Shanghai Fifth People' s Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang, Minmin [Department of Nephrology, Shanghai Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Niu, Jianying [Department of Nephrology, Shanghai Fifth People' s Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Qiao, Zhongdong [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Gu, Yong, E-mail: yonggu@vip.163.com [Department of Nephrology, Shanghai Fifth People' s Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Department of Nephrology, Shanghai Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-08-01

    Aldosterone has been recognized as a risk factor for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Studies have indicated that enhanced activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with the development and progression of renal fibrosis. But if EGFR is involved in aldosterone-induced renal fibrosis is less investigated. In the present study, we examined the effect of erlotinib, an inhibitor of EGFR tyrosine kinase activity, on the progression of aldosterone-induced renal profibrotic responses in a murine model underwent uninephrectomy. Erlotinib-treated rats exhibited relieved structural lesion comparing with rats treated with aldosterone alone, as characterized by glomerular hypertrophy, mesangial cell proliferation and expansion. Also, erlotinib inhibited the expression of TGF-β, α-SMA and mesangial matrix proteins such as collagen Ⅳ and fibronectin. In cultured mesangial cells, inhibition of EGFR also abrogated aldosterone-induced expression of extracellular matrix proteins, cell proliferation and migration. We also demonstrated that aldosterone induced the phosphorylation of EGFR through generation of ROS. And the activation of EGFR resulted in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, leading to the activation of profibrotic pathways. Taken together, we concluded that aldosterone-mediated tissue fibrosis relies on ROS induced EGFR/ERK activation, highlighting EGFR as a potential therapeutic target for modulating renal fibrosis. - Highlights: • EGFR was involved in aldosterone-induced renal profibrotic responses. • Aldosterone-induced EGFR activation was mediated by MR-dependent ROS generation. • EGFR activated the MAPK/ERK1/2 signaling to promote renal fibrosis.

  2. Blockade of PD-1 Signaling Enhances Th2 Cell Responses and Aggravates Liver Immunopathology in Mice with Schistosomiasis japonica.

    Sha Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available More than 220 million people worldwide are chronically infected with schistosomes, causing severe disease or even death. The major pathological damage occurring in schistosomiasis is attributable to the granulomatous inflammatory response and liver fibrosis induced by schistosome eggs. The inflammatory response is tightly controlled and parallels immunosuppressive regulation, constantly maintaining immune homeostasis and limiting excessive immunopathologic damage in important host organs. It is well known that the activation of programmed death 1 (PD-1 signaling causes a significant suppression of T cell function. However, the roles of PD-1 signaling in modulating CD4+ T cell responses and immunopathology during schistosome infection, have yet to be defined.Here, we show that PD-1 is upregulated in CD4+ T cells in Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum-infected patients. We also show the upregulation of PD-1 expression in CD4+ T cells in the spleens, mesenteric lymph nodes, and livers of mice with S. japonicum infection. Finally, we found that the blockade of PD-1 signaling enhanced CD4+ T helper 2 (Th2 cell responses and led to more severe liver immunopathology in mice with S. japonicum infection, without a reduction of egg production or deposition in the host liver.Overall, our study suggests that PD-1 signaling is specifically induced to control Th2-associated inflammatory responses during schistosome infection and is beneficial to the development of PD-1-based control of liver immunopathology.

  3. Neonatal overfeeding disrupts pituitary ghrelin signalling in female rats long-term; Implications for the stress response.

    Sominsky, Luba; Ziko, Ilvana; Spencer, Sarah J

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responses to psychological stress are exacerbated in adult female but not male rats made obese due to overfeeding in early life. Ghrelin, traditionally known for its role in energy homeostasis, has been recently recognised for its role in coordinating the HPA responses to stress, particularly by acting directly at the anterior pituitary where the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), the receptor for acyl ghrelin, is abundantly expressed. We therefore hypothesised that neonatal overfeeding in female rats would compromise pituitary responsiveness to ghrelin, contributing to a hyperactive central stress responsiveness. Unlike in males where hypothalamic ghrelin signalling is compromised by neonatal overfeeding, there was no effect of early life diet on circulating ghrelin or hypothalamic ghrelin signalling in females, indicating hypothalamic feeding and metabolic ghrelin circuitry remains intact. However, neonatal overfeeding did lead to long-term alterations in the pituitary ghrelin system. The neonatally overfed females had increased neonatal and reduced adult expression of GHSR and ghrelin-O-acyl transferase (GOAT) in the pituitary as well as reduced pituitary responsiveness to exogenous acyl ghrelin-induced adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release in vitro. These data suggest that neonatal overfeeding dysregulates pituitary ghrelin signalling long-term in females, potentially accounting for the hyper-responsive HPA axis in these animals. These findings have implications for how females may respond to stress throughout life, suggesting the way ghrelin modifies the stress response at the level of the pituitary may be less efficient in the neonatally overfed.

  4. NANOG Expression as a Responsive Biomarker during Treatment with Hedgehog Signal Inhibitor in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Seiji Kakiuchi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway is involved in the maintenance of leukemic stem cell (LSCs populations. PF-0444913 (PF-913 is a novel inhibitor that selectively targets Smoothened (SMO, which regulates the Hh pathway. Treatment with PF-913 has shown promising results in an early phase study of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. However, a detailed mode of action for PF-913 and relevant biomarkers remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined bone marrow samples derived from AML patients under PF-913 monotherapy. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA revealed that PF-913 treatment affected the self-renewal signature and cell-cycle regulation associated with LSC-like properties. We then focused on the expression of a pluripotency factor, NANOG, because previous reports showed that a downstream effector in the Hh pathway, GLI, directly binds to the NANOG promoter and that the GLI-NANOG axis promotes stemness and growth in several cancers. In this study, we found that a change in NANOG transcripts was closely associated with GLI-target genes and NANOG transcripts can be a responsive biomarker during PF-913 therapy. Additionally, the treatment of AML with PF-913 holds promise, possibly through inducing quiescent leukemia stem cells toward cell cycling.

  5. DNA damage response signaling in lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells following gamma and carbon beam irradiation.

    Ghosh, Somnath; Narang, Himanshi; Sarma, Asitikantha; Krishna, Malini

    2011-11-01

    Carbon beams (5.16MeV/u, LET=290keV/μm) are high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation characterized by higher relative biological effectiveness than low LET radiation. The aim of the current study was to determine the signaling differences between γ-rays and carbon ion-irradiation. A549 cells were irradiated with 1Gy carbon or γ-rays. Carbon beam was found to be three times more cytotoxic than γ-rays despite the fact that the numbers of γ-H2AX foci were same. Percentage of cells showing ATM/ATR foci were more with γ-rays however number of foci per cell were more in case of carbon irradiation. Large BRCA1 foci were found in all carbon irradiated cells unlike γ-rays irradiated cells and prosurvival ERK pathway was activated after γ-rays irradiation but not carbon. The noteworthy finding of this study is the early phase apoptosis induction by carbon ions. In the present study in A549 lung adenocarcinoma, authors conclude that despite activation of same repair molecules such as ATM and BRCA1, differences in low and high LET damage responses might be due to their distinct macromolecular complexes rather than their individual activation and the activation of cytoplasmic pathways such as ERK, whether it applies to all the cell lines need to be further explored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Membrane transporters mediating root signalling and adaptive responses to oxygen deprivation and soil flooding.

    Shabala, Sergey; Shabala, Lana; Barcelo, Juan; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2014-10-01

    This review provides a comprehensive assessment of a previously unexplored topic: elucidating the role that plasma- and organelle-based membrane transporters play in plant-adaptive responses to flooding. We show that energy availability and metabolic shifts under hypoxia and anoxia are critical in regulating membrane-transport activity. We illustrate the high tissue and time dependence of this regulation, reveal the molecular identity of transporters involved and discuss the modes of their regulation. We show that both reduced oxygen availability and accumulation of transition metals in flooded roots result in a reduction in the cytosolic K(+) pool, ultimately determining the cell's fate and transition to programmed cell death (PCD). This process can be strongly affected by hypoxia-induced changes in the amino acid pool profile and, specifically, ϒ-amino butyric acid (GABA) accumulation. It is suggested that GABA plays an important regulatory role, allowing plants to proceed with H2 O2 signalling to activate a cascade of genes that mediate plant adaptation to flooding while at the same time, preventing the cell from entering a 'suicide program'. We conclude that progress in crop breeding for flooding tolerance can only be achieved by pyramiding the numerous physiological traits that confer efficient energy maintenance, cytosolic ion homeostasis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) control and detoxification. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Simulated hypogravity impairs the angiogenic response of endothelium by up-regulating apoptotic signals

    Morbidelli, Lucia; Monici, Monica; Marziliano, Nicola; Cogoli, Augusto; Fusi, Franco; Waltenberger, Johannes; Ziche, Marina

    2005-01-01

    Health hazards in astronauts are represented by cardiovascular problems and impaired bone healing. These disturbances are characterized by a common event, the loss of function by vascular endothelium, leading to impaired angiogenesis. We investigated whether the exposure of cultured endothelial cells to hypogravity condition could affect their behaviour in terms of functional activity, biochemical responses, morphology, and gene expression. Simulated hypogravity conditions for 72 h produced a reduction of cell number. Genomic analysis of endothelial cells exposed to hypogravity revealed that proapoptotic signals increased, while antiapoptotic and proliferation/survival genes were down-regulated by modelled low gravity. Activation of apoptosis was accompanied by morphological changes with mitochondrial disassembly and organelles/cytoplasmic NAD(P)H redistribution, as evidenced by autofluorescence analysis. In this condition cells were not able to respond to angiogenic stimuli in terms of migration and proliferation. Our study documents functional, morphological, and transcription alterations in vascular endothelium exposed to simulated low gravity conditions, thus providing insights on the occurrence of vascular tissue dysregulation in crewmen during prolonged space flights. Moreover, the alteration of vascular endothelium can intervene as a concause in other systemic effects, like bone remodelling, observed in weightlessness

  8. Transcriptional Responses in the Hemiparasitic Plant Triphysaria versicolor to Host Plant Signals1[w

    Matvienko, Marta; Torres, Manuel J.; Yoder, John I.

    2001-01-01

    Parasitic plants in the Scrophulariaceae use chemicals released by host plant roots to signal developmental processes critical for heterotrophy. Haustoria, parasitic plant structures that attach to and invade host roots, develop on roots of the hemiparasitic plant Triphysaria versicolor within a few hours of exposure to either maize (Zea mays) root exudate or purified haustoria-inducing factors. We prepared a normalized, subtractive cDNA library enriched for transcripts differentially abundant in T. versicolor root tips treated with the allelopathic quinone 2,6-dimethoxybenzoquinone (DMBQ). Northern analyses estimated that about 10% of the cDNAs represent transcripts strongly up-regulated in roots exposed to DMBQ. Northern and reverse northern analyses demonstrated that most DMBQ-responsive messages were similarly up-regulated in T. versicolor roots exposed to maize root exudates. From the cDNA sequences we assembled a unigene set of 137 distinct transcripts and assigned functions by homology comparisons. Many of the proteins encoded by the transcripts are predicted to function in quinone detoxification, whereas others are more likely associated with haustorium development. The identification of genes transcriptionally regulated by haustorium-inducing factors provides a framework for dissecting genetic pathways recruited by parasitic plants during the transition to heterotrophic growth. PMID:11553755

  9. Lipopolysaccharides with acylation defects potentiate TLR4 signaling and shape T cell responses.

    Anna Martirosyan

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharides or endotoxins are components of Gram-negative enterobacteria that cause septic shock in mammals. However, a LPS carrying hexa-acyl lipid A moieties is highly endotoxic compared to a tetra-acyl LPS and the latter has been considered as an antagonist of hexa-acyl LPS-mediated TLR4 signaling. We investigated the relationship between the structure and the function of bacterial LPS in the context of human and mouse dendritic cell activation. Strikingly, LPS with acylation defects were capable of triggering a strong and early TLR4-dependent DC activation, which in turn led to the activation of the proteasome machinery dampening the pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Upon activation with tetra-acyl LPS both mouse and human dendritic cells triggered CD4(+ T and CD8(+ T cell responses and, importantly, human myeloid dendritic cells favored the induction of regulatory T cells. Altogether, our data suggest that LPS acylation controlled by pathogenic bacteria might be an important strategy to subvert adaptive immunity.

  10. Optical signal response pf the alanine gel solution for photons and electrons clinical beams

    Silva, Cleber Feijo; Campos, Leticia Lucente

    2009-01-01

    Alanine gel dosimeter is a new gel material developed at IPEN that presents significant improvement on previous alanine systems developed by Costa (1994). The measure technique is based on the transformation of ferrous ions (Fe 2+ ) in ferric ions (Fe 3+ ) after irradiation. The DL-Alanine (C 3 H 7 NO 2 ) is an aminoacid tissue equivalent that improves the production of ferric ions in the solution. This work aims to study the comparison of optical signal response of the alanine gel solution for photons and electrons clinical beams. It was observed that the calibration factor can be considered independent of quality of the radiation for photons and electrons clinical beams. Therefore, it can be used the same calibration factor for evaluating the absorbed dose in photons and electrons fields in the energy of 6 MeV. Alanine Gel Dosimeter presents good performance and can be useful as alternative dosimeter in the radiotherapy area using MRI technique for 3D dose distribution evaluation. (author)

  11. Development of full sweet, umami, and bitter taste responsiveness requires Regulator of G protein Signaling-21 (RGS21).

    Schroer, Adam B; Gross, Joshua D; Kaski, Shane W; Wix, Kim; Siderovski, David P; Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Setola, Vincent

    2018-04-26

    The mammalian tastes of sweet, umami, and bitter are initiated by activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) of the T1R and T2R families on taste receptor cells. GPCRs signal via nucleotide exchange and hydrolysis, the latter hastened by GTPase-accelerating proteins (GAPs) that include the Regulators of G protein Signaling (RGS) protein family. We previously reported that RGS21, uniquely expressed in Type II taste receptor cells, decreases the potency of bitter-stimulated T2R signaling in cultured cells, consistent with its in vitro GAP activity. However, the role of RGS21 in organismal responses to GPCR-mediated tastants was not established. Here, we characterized mice lacking the Rgs21 fifth exon. Eliminating Rgs21 expression had no effect on body mass accumulation (a measure of alimentation), fungiform papillae number and morphology, circumvallate papillae morphology, and taste bud number. Two-bottle preference tests, however, revealed that Rgs21-null mice have blunted aversion to quinine and denatonium, and blunted preference for monosodium glutamate, the sweeteners sucrose and SC45647, and (surprisingly) NaCl. Observed reductions in GPCR-mediated tastant responses upon Rgs21 loss are opposite to original expectations, given that loss of RGS21 -- a GPCR signaling negative regulator -- should lead to increased responsiveness to tastant-mediated GPCR signaling (all else being equal). Yet, reduced organismal tastant responses are consistent with observations of reduced chorda tympani nerve recordings in Rgs21-null mice. Reduced tastant-mediated responses and behaviors exhibited by adult mice lacking Rgs21 expression since birth have thus revealed an underappreciated requirement for a GPCR GAP to establish the full character of tastant signaling.

  12. Cognitive and physiological responses in humans exposed to a TETRA base station signal in relation to perceived electromagnetic hypersensitivity.

    Wallace, Denise; Eltiti, Stacy; Ridgewell, Anna; Garner, Kelly; Russo, Riccardo; Sepulveda, Francisco; Walker, Stuart; Quinlan, Terence; Dudley, Sandra; Maung, Sithu; Deeble, Roger; Fox, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial Trunked Radio (TETRA) technology ("Airwave") has led to public concern because of its potential interference with electrical activity in the brain. The present study is the first to examine whether acute exposure to a TETRA base station signal has an impact on cognitive functioning and physiological responses. Participants were exposed to a 420 MHz TETRA signal at a power flux density of 10 mW/m(2) as well as sham (no signal) under double-blind conditions. Fifty-one people who reported a perceived sensitivity to electromagnetic fields as well as 132 controls participated in a double-blind provocation study. Forty-eight sensitive and 132 control participants completed all three sessions. Measures of short-term memory, working memory, and attention were administered while physiological responses (blood volume pulse, heart rate, skin conductance) were monitored. After applying exclusion criteria based on task performance for each aforementioned cognitive measure, data were analyzed for 36, 43, and 48 sensitive participants for these respective tasks and, likewise, 107,125, and 129 controls. We observed no differences in cognitive performance between sham and TETRA exposure in either group; physiological response also did not differ between the exposure conditions. These findings are similar to previous double-blind studies with other mobile phone signals (900-2100 MHz), which could not establish any clear evidence that mobile phone signals affect health or cognitive function. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Signal transduction-related responses to phytohormones and environmental challenges in sugarcane

    Hemerly Adriana S

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sugarcane is an increasingly economically and environmentally important C4 grass, used for the production of sugar and bioethanol, a low-carbon emission fuel. Sugarcane originated from crosses of Saccharum species and is noted for its unique capacity to accumulate high amounts of sucrose in its stems. Environmental stresses limit enormously sugarcane productivity worldwide. To investigate transcriptome changes in response to environmental inputs that alter yield we used cDNA microarrays to profile expression of 1,545 genes in plants submitted to drought, phosphate starvation, herbivory and N2-fixing endophytic bacteria. We also investigated the response to phytohormones (abscisic acid and methyl jasmonate. The arrayed elements correspond mostly to genes involved in signal transduction, hormone biosynthesis, transcription factors, novel genes and genes corresponding to unknown proteins. Results Adopting an outliers searching method 179 genes with strikingly different expression levels were identified as differentially expressed in at least one of the treatments analysed. Self Organizing Maps were used to cluster the expression profiles of 695 genes that showed a highly correlated expression pattern among replicates. The expression data for 22 genes was evaluated for 36 experimental data points by quantitative RT-PCR indicating a validation rate of 80.5% using three biological experimental replicates. The SUCAST Database was created that provides public access to the data described in this work, linked to tissue expression profiling and the SUCAST gene category and sequence analysis. The SUCAST database also includes a categorization of the sugarcane kinome based on a phylogenetic grouping that included 182 undefined kinases. Conclusion An extensive study on the sugarcane transcriptome was performed. Sugarcane genes responsive to phytohormones and to challenges sugarcane commonly deals with in the field were identified

  14. [Zinc signaling : a novel regulatory system on bone homeostasis, and immune and allergic responses].

    Fukada, Toshiyuki; Nishida, Keigo; Yamasaki, Satoru; Hojyo, Shintaro

    2012-11-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace element that is required for proliferation, differentiation, and variety of cellular functions, and unbalanced homeostasis of Zn ion (Zn(2 + )) results in health problems such as abnormal bone formation and immunodeficiency. Recent studies have shed light on important roles of Zn(2 + )as a signaling mediator, called Zn signal. Zn(2 + )homeostasis is regulated through Zn transporters and cation channels. Advances of genetic and molecular approaches have revealed that Zn signal regulates mammalian physiology and pathogenesis. We will address that Zn signal undoubtedly contributes to our health, by highlighting it in bone homeostasis and immune regulation, and discuss that the "Zn signal axis" selectively controls intracellular signal transduction to fine-tune cellular functions.

  15. FPGA-based electrocardiography (ECG signal analysis system using least-square linear phase finite impulse response (FIR filter

    Mohamed G. Egila

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a proposed design for analyzing electrocardiography (ECG signals. This methodology employs highpass least-square linear phase Finite Impulse Response (FIR filtering technique to filter out the baseline wander noise embedded in the input ECG signal to the system. Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT was utilized as a feature extraction methodology to extract the reduced feature set from the input ECG signal. The design uses back propagation neural network classifier to classify the input ECG signal. The system is implemented on Xilinx 3AN-XC3S700AN Field Programming Gate Array (FPGA board. A system simulation has been done. The design is compared with some other designs achieving total accuracy of 97.8%, and achieving reduction in utilizing resources on FPGA implementation.

  16. Sonic hedgehog promotes somitic chondrogenesis by altering the cellular response to BMP signaling

    Murtaugh, L. Charles; Chyung, Jay H.; Lassar, Andrew B.

    1999-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that signals from the floor plate and notochord promote chondrogenesis of the somitic mesoderm. These tissues, acting through the secreted signaling molecule Sonic hedgehog (Shh), appear to be critical for the formation of the sclerotome. Later steps in the differentiation of sclerotome into cartilage may be independent of the influence of these axial tissues. Although the signals involved in these later steps have not yet been pinpointed, there is substantial evid...

  17. The response of a linear monostable system and its application in parameters estimation for PSK signals

    Duan, Chaowei; Zhan, Yafeng

    2016-03-01

    The output characteristics of a linear monostable system driven with a periodic signal and an additive white Gaussian noise are studied in this paper. Theoretical analysis shows that the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases monotonously with the increasing noise intensity but the output SNR-gain is stable. Inspired by this high SNR-gain phenomenon, this paper applies the linear monostable system in the parameters estimation algorithm for phase shift keying (PSK) signals and improves the estimation performance.

  18. Polyclonal immune responses to antigens associated with cancer signaling pathways and new strategies to enhance cancer vaccines.

    Clay, Timothy M; Osada, Takuya; Hartman, Zachary C; Hobeika, Amy; Devi, Gayathri; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2011-04-01

    Aberrant signaling pathways are a hallmark of cancer. A variety of strategies for inhibiting signaling pathways have been developed, but monoclonal antibodies against receptor tyrosine kinases have been among the most successful. A challenge for these therapies is therapeutic unresponsiveness and acquired resistance due to mutations in the receptors, upregulation of alternate growth and survival pathways, or inadequate function of the monoclonal antibodies. Vaccines are able to induce polyclonal responses that can have a multitude of affects against the target molecule. We began to explore therapeutic vaccine development to antigens associated with these signaling pathways. We provide an illustrative example in developing therapeutic cancer vaccines inducing polyclonal adaptive immune responses targeting the ErbB family member HER2. Further, we will discuss new strategies to augment the clinical efficacy of cancer vaccines by enhancing vaccine immunogenicity and reversing the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment.

  19. Role of Ethylene and Its Cross Talk with Other Signaling Molecules in Plant Responses to Heavy Metal Stress1

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Khan, M. Iqbal R.; Thu, Nguyen Binh Anh; Hoang, Xuan Lan Thi; Asgher, Mohd; Khan, Nafees A.; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2015-01-01

    Excessive heavy metals (HMs) in agricultural lands cause toxicities to plants, resulting in declines in crop productivity. Recent advances in ethylene biology research have established that ethylene is not only responsible for many important physiological activities in plants but also plays a pivotal role in HM stress tolerance. The manipulation of ethylene in plants to cope with HM stress through various approaches targeting either ethylene biosynthesis or the ethylene signaling pathway has brought promising outcomes. This review covers ethylene production and signal transduction in plant responses to HM stress, cross talk between ethylene and other signaling molecules under adverse HM stress conditions, and approaches to modify ethylene action to improve HM tolerance. From our current understanding about ethylene and its regulatory activities, it is believed that the optimization of endogenous ethylene levels in plants under HM stress would pave the way for developing transgenic crops with improved HM tolerance. PMID:26246451

  20. Analysis of sensor impulse response effects on Cramèr–Rao lower bounds for signal parameter estimators

    Ephraim S. Gower

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a generic analysis of sensor impulse response effects on linearly filtered channel noise is presented to illustrate the resulting variations to the Cramèr–Rao lower bounds (CRLBs of signal parameter estimators in signal processing and communication applications. The authors start by deriving the density function of a filtered signal, which is shown to be a mixture density, and hence the exact expressions for the mean and variance. Simulation results are used to confirm the derivations, which are then used to investigate the effects of impulse response length and variance, as well as channel noise length and variance effects on the resulting CRLBs. Results indicate that for non-zero-mean channel noise and impulse responses, the resulting mean of filtered noise can be relatively large causing adverse deviations to parameter estimations. The filtered noise variance is shown to be proportional to the impulse response energy, where for long duration of signal capture the CRLB is significantly increased.

  1. Differential response of skeletal muscles to mTORC1 signaling during atrophy and hypertrophy

    2013-01-01

    Background Skeletal muscle mass is determined by the balance between protein synthesis and degradation. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of protein translation and has been implicated in the control of muscle mass. Inactivation of mTORC1 by skeletal muscle-specific deletion of its obligatory component raptor results in smaller muscles and a lethal dystrophy. Moreover, raptor-deficient muscles are less oxidative through changes in the expression PGC-1α, a critical determinant of mitochondrial biogenesis. These results suggest that activation of mTORC1 might be beneficial to skeletal muscle by providing resistance to muscle atrophy and increasing oxidative function. Here, we tested this hypothesis by deletion of the mTORC1 inhibitor tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in muscle fibers. Method Skeletal muscles of mice with an acute or a permanent deletion of raptor or TSC1 were examined using histological, biochemical and molecular biological methods. Response of the muscles to changes in mechanical load and nerve input was investigated by ablation of synergistic muscles or by denervation . Results Genetic deletion or knockdown of raptor, causing inactivation of mTORC1, was sufficient to prevent muscle growth and enhance muscle atrophy. Conversely, short-term activation of mTORC1 by knockdown of TSC induced muscle fiber hypertrophy and atrophy-resistance upon denervation, in both fast tibialis anterior (TA) and slow soleus muscles. Surprisingly, however, sustained activation of mTORC1 by genetic deletion of Tsc1 caused muscle atrophy in all but soleus muscles. In contrast, oxidative capacity was increased in all muscles examined. Consistently, TSC1-deficient soleus muscle was atrophy-resistant whereas TA underwent normal atrophy upon denervation. Moreover, upon overloading, plantaris muscle did not display enhanced hypertrophy compared to controls. Biochemical analysis indicated that the atrophy response of muscles was based on the

  2. Morin Attenuates Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation by Modulating Oxidative Stress-Responsive MAPK Signaling

    Yuan Ma

    2016-01-01

    abolished by morin, implying that ROS/MAPK signaling contributes to the relief of airway inflammation. Our findings indicate for the first time that morin alleviates airway inflammation in chronic asthma, which probably occurs via the oxidative stress-responsive MAPK pathway, highlighting a novel profile of morin as a potent agent for asthma management.

  3. GID1 modulates stomatal response and submergence tolerance involving abscisic acid and gibberellic acid signaling in rice.

    Du, Hao; Chang, Yu; Huang, Fei; Xiong, Lizhong

    2015-11-01

    Plant responses to abiotic stresses are coordinated by arrays of growth and developmental programs. Gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) play critical roles in the developmental programs and environmental responses, respectively, through complex signaling and metabolism networks. However, crosstalk between the two phytohormones in stress responses remains largely unknown. In this study, we report that GIBBERELLIN-INSENSITIVE DWARF 1 (GID1), a soluble receptor for GA, regulates stomatal development and patterning in rice (Oryza sativa L.). The gid1 mutant showed impaired biosynthesis of endogenous ABA under drought stress conditions, but it exhibited enhanced sensitivity to exogenous ABA. Scanning electron microscope and infrared thermal image analysis indicated an increase in the stomatal conductance in the gid1 mutant under drought conditions. Interestingly, the gid1 mutant had increased levels of chlorophyll and carbohydrates under submergence conditions, and showed enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging ability and submergence tolerance compared with the wild-type. Further analyses suggested that the function of GID1 in submergence responses is partially dependent on ABA, and GA signaling by GID1 is involved in submergence tolerance by modulating carbohydrate consumption. Taken together, these findings suggest GID1 plays distinct roles in stomatal response and submergence tolerance through both the ABA and GA signaling pathways in rice. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  4. Natural and laboratory TT-OSL dose response curves: Testing the lifetime of the TT-OSL signal in nature

    Chapot, M.S.; Roberts, H.M.; Duller, G.A.T.; Lai, Z.P.

    2016-01-01

    This study compares natural and laboratory generated thermally transferred optically stimulated luminescence (TT-OSL) dose response curves (DRCs) for fine-grain quartz extracts from the Luochuan loess section in central China. Both DRCs saturate at high doses relative to the quartz OSL signal; the natural TT-OSL DRC saturates at about 2200 Gy and laboratory DRCs saturate at about 2700 Gy. However, the natural and laboratory TT-OSL DRCs deviate from one another at circa 150 Gy resulting in TT-OSL equivalent dose underestimation relative to palaeodoses expected from dose rates and independent age control. The lifetime of the TT-OSL signal at 10 °C, calculated from values of trap parameters E and s, is compared against the value for lifetime of the TT-OSL signal in nature at average burial temperature as determined from the age underestimation caused by deviation of the natural and laboratory generated DRCs. These two independent assessments of TT-OSL signal lifetime at Luochuan give similar values, suggesting that laboratory measurements of thermal stability reflect natural burial lifetimes and can potentially be used to correct TT-OSL ages for the difference between natural and laboratory dose response curves. - Highlights: • Natural and laboratory TT-OSL DRCs deviate at ∼150 Gy but saturate at higher doses. • TT-OSL signal lifetime at 10 °C calculated from measured E and s values is ∼180 ka. • TT-OSL signal lifetime at Luochuan estimated from the DRCs' deviation is ∼175 ka. • Natural and laboratory TT-OSL DRC deviation may be caused by low thermal stability. • Laboratory measurements of signal lifetime may be able to correct old TT-OSL ages.

  5. Transcriptional response of Hoxb genes to retinoid signalling is regionally restricted along the neural tube rostrocaudal axis.

    Carucci, Nicoletta; Cacci, Emanuele; Nisi, Paola S; Licursi, Valerio; Paul, Yu-Lee; Biagioni, Stefano; Negri, Rodolfo; Rugg-Gunn, Peter J; Lupo, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    During vertebrate neural development, positional information is largely specified by extracellular morphogens. Their distribution, however, is very dynamic due to the multiple roles played by the same signals in the developing and adult neural tissue. This suggests that neural progenitors are able to modify their competence to respond to morphogen signalling and autonomously maintain positional identities after their initial specification. In this work, we take advantage of in vitro culture systems of mouse neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) to show that NSPCs isolated from rostral or caudal regions of the mouse neural tube are differentially responsive to retinoic acid (RA), a pivotal morphogen for the specification of posterior neural fates. Hoxb genes are among the best known RA direct targets in the neural tissue, yet we found that RA could promote their transcription only in caudal but not in rostral NSPCs. Correlating with these effects, key RA-responsive regulatory regions in the Hoxb cluster displayed opposite enrichment of activating or repressing histone marks in rostral and caudal NSPCs. Finally, RA was able to strengthen Hoxb chromatin activation in caudal NSPCs, but was ineffective on the repressed Hoxb chromatin of rostral NSPCs. These results suggest that the response of NSPCs to morphogen signalling across the rostrocaudal axis of the neural tube may be gated by the epigenetic configuration of target patterning genes, allowing long-term maintenance of intrinsic positional values in spite of continuously changing extrinsic signals.

  6. Serotonin 2A Receptor Signaling Underlies LSD-induced Alteration of the Neural Response to Dynamic Changes in Music.

    Barrett, Frederick S; Preller, Katrin H; Herdener, Marcus; Janata, Petr; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2017-09-28

    Classic psychedelic drugs (serotonin 2A, or 5HT2A, receptor agonists) have notable effects on music listening. In the current report, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal was collected during music listening in 25 healthy adults after administration of placebo, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), and LSD pretreated with the 5HT2A antagonist ketanserin, to investigate the role of 5HT2A receptor signaling in the neural response to the time-varying tonal structure of music. Tonality-tracking analysis of BOLD data revealed that 5HT2A receptor signaling alters the neural response to music in brain regions supporting basic and higher-level musical and auditory processing, and areas involved in memory, emotion, and self-referential processing. This suggests a critical role of 5HT2A receptor signaling in supporting the neural tracking of dynamic tonal structure in music, as well as in supporting the associated increases in emotionality, connectedness, and meaningfulness in response to music that are commonly observed after the administration of LSD and other psychedelics. Together, these findings inform the neuropsychopharmacology of music perception and cognition, meaningful music listening experiences, and altered perception of music during psychedelic experiences. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Unfolding Role of a Danger Molecule Adenosine Signaling in Modulation of Microbial Infection and Host Cell Response

    Jaden S. Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73, specific nucleotide metabolizing enzymes located on the surface of the host, can convert a pro-inflammatory environment driven by a danger molecule extracellular-ATP to an adenosine-mediated anti-inflammatory milieu. Accordingly, CD39/CD73 signaling has been strongly implicated in modulating the intensity, duration, and composition of purinergic danger signals delivered to host. Recent studies have eluted potential roles for CD39 and CD73 in selective triggering of a variety of host immune cells and molecules in the presence of pathogenic microorganisms or microbial virulence molecules. Growing evidence also suggests that CD39 and CD73 present complimentary, but likely differential, actions against pathogens to shape the course and severity of microbial infection as well as the associated immune response. Similarly, adenosine receptors A2A and A2B have been proposed to be major immunomodulators of adenosine signaling during chronic inflammatory conditions induced by opportunistic pathogens, such as oral colonizer Porphyromonas gingivalis. Therefore, we here review the recent studies that demonstrate how complex network of molecules in the extracellular adenosine signaling machinery and their interactions can reshape immune responses and may also be targeted by opportunistic pathogens to establish successful colonization in human mucosal tissues and modulate the host immune response.

  8. Novel processing of Barkhausen noise signal for assessment of residual stress in surface ground components exhibiting poor magnetic response

    Vashista, M.; Paul, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Barkhausen Noise Analysis (BNA) technique has been utilised to assess surface integrity of steels. But the BNA technique is not very successful in evaluating surface integrity of ground steels that exhibit poor micro-magnetic response. A new approach has been proposed for the processing of BN signal and two newly proposed parameters, namely 'count' and 'event', have been shown to correlate linearly with the residual stress upon grinding, with judicious choice of user defined 'threshold', even when the micro-magnetic response of the work material is poor. In the present study, residual stress induced upon conventional plunge surface grinding of hardened bearing steel has been investigated along with unhardened bearing steel for benchmarking. Moreover, similar correlation has been established, when primarily compressive stress is induced upon high speed grinding using cBN wheel with moderately deep cut suppressing the micro-magnetic response from the ground medium carbon steel as the work material. - Highlights: → The problem of work materials exhibiting poor BN response and poor Barkhausen Noise response is identified. → A novel signal processing strategy is introduced to address the issue of poor micro-magnetic response of some ferromagnetic material. → Potential of newly introduced BN parameters has been studied. → These two BN parameters exhibited linear correlation with residual stress for work material with poor micro-magnetic response.

  9. 30 CFR 75.352 - Actions in response to AMS malfunction, alert, or alarm signals.

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation..., or alarm signal is received at the designated surface location, the sensor(s) that are activated must...

  10. A Dual Stage Linear Prediction Approach Towards Wideband FM Demodulation With Multilevel and Partial Response Signaling

    2018-01-19

    attributed to the inherent interpolation process in the MFT demodulation approach, which is more error-sensitive to discontinuous waveforms, such as...Multirate Frequency Transformations In the author’s recent work, frequency transformations enacted via multirate signal processing were used for wideband...FM to narrowband FM conversion to enable a wider range of wideband FM signals [9, 11]. The goal of the multirate processing module is to compress the

  11. Interacting signal pathways control defense gene expression in Arabidopsis in response to cell wall-degrading enzymes from Erwinia carotovora.

    Norman-Setterblad, C; Vidal, S; Palva, E T

    2000-04-01

    We have characterized the role of salicylic acid (SA)-independent defense signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana in response to the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora. Use of pathway-specific target genes as well as signal mutants allowed us to elucidate the role and interactions of ethylene, jasmonic acid (JA), and SA signal pathways in this response. Gene expression studies suggest a central role for both ethylene and JA pathways in the regulation of defense gene expression triggered by the pathogen or by plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (CF) secreted by the pathogen. Our results suggest that ethylene and JA act in concert in this regulation. In addition, CF triggers another, strictly JA-mediated response inhibited by ethylene and SA. SA does not appear to have a major role in activating defense gene expression in response to CF. However, SA may have a dual role in controlling CF-induced gene expression, by enhancing the expression of genes synergistically induced by ethylene and JA and repressing genes induced by JA alone.

  12. DNA damage response and DNA repair – dog as a model?

    Grosse, Nicole; Loon, Barbara van; Rohrer Bley, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Companion animals like dogs frequently develop tumors with age and similarly to human malignancies, display interpatient tumoral heterogeneity. Tumors are frequently characterized with regard to their mutation spectra, changes in gene expression or protein levels. Among others, these changes affect proteins involved in the DNA damage response (DDR), which served as a basis for the development of numerous clinically relevant cancer therapies. Even though the effects of different DNA damaging agents, as well as DDR kinetics, have been well characterized in mammalian cells in vitro, very little is so far known about the kinetics of DDR in tumor and normal tissues in vivo. Due to (i) the similarities between human and canine genomes, (ii) the course of spontaneous tumor development, as well as (iii) common exposure to environmental agents, canine tumors are potentially an excellent model to study DDR in vivo. This is further supported by the fact that dogs show approximately the same rate of tumor development with age as humans. Though similarities between human and dog osteosarcoma, as well as mammary tumors have been well established, only few studies using canine tumor samples addressed the importance of affected DDR pathways in tumor progression, thus leaving many questions unanswered. Studies in humans showed that misregulated DDR pathways play an important role during tumor development, as well as in treatment response. Since dogs are proposed to be a good tumor model in many aspects of cancer research, we herein critically investigate the current knowledge of canine DDR and discuss (i) its future potential for studies on the in vivo level, as well as (ii) its possible translation to veterinary and human medicine

  13. Within-Subject Testing of the Signaled-Reinforcement Effect on Operant Responding as Measured by Response Rate and Resistance to Change

    Reed, Phil; Doughty, Adam H.

    2005-01-01

    Response rates under random-interval schedules are lower when a brief (500 ms) signal accompanies reinforcement than when there is no signal. The present study examined this signaled-reinforcement effect and its relation to resistance to change. In Experiment 1, rats responded on a multiple random-interval 60-s random-interval 60-s schedule, with…

  14. HSV-I and the cellular DNA damage response.

    Smith, Samantha; Weller, Sandra K

    2015-04-01

    Peter Wildy first observed genetic recombination between strains of HSV in 1955. At the time, knowledge of DNA repair mechanisms was limited, and it has only been in the last decade that particular DNA damage response (DDR) pathways have been examined in the context of viral infections. One of the first reports addressing the interaction between a cellular DDR protein and HSV-1 was the observation by Lees-Miller et al . that DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit levels were depleted in an ICP0-dependent manner during Herpes simplex virus 1 infection. Since then, there have been numerous reports describing the interactions between HSV infection and cellular DDR pathways. Due to space limitations, this review will focus predominantly on the most recent observations regarding how HSV navigates a potentially hostile environment to replicate its genome.

  15. Temporal Regulation of Natural Killer T Cell Interferon Gamma Responses by β-Catenin-Dependent and -Independent Wnt Signaling.

    Kling, Jessica C; Jordan, Margaret A; Pitt, Lauren A; Meiners, Jana; Thanh-Tran, Thao; Tran, Le Son; Nguyen, Tam T K; Mittal, Deepak; Villani, Rehan; Steptoe, Raymond J; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Berzins, Stuart P; Baxter, Alan G; Godfrey, Dale I; Blumenthal, Antje

    2018-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are prominent innate-like lymphocytes in the liver with critical roles in immune responses during infection, cancer, and autoimmunity. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and IL-4 are key cytokines rapidly produced by NKT cells upon recognition of glycolipid antigens presented by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). It has previously been reported that the transcriptional coactivator β-catenin regulates NKT cell differentiation and functionally biases NKT cell responses toward IL-4, at the expense of IFN-γ production. β-Catenin is not only a central effector of Wnt signaling but also contributes to other signaling networks. It is currently unknown whether Wnt ligands regulate NKT cell functions. We thus investigated how Wnt ligands and β-catenin activity shape liver NKT cell functions in vivo in response to the glycolipid antigen, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) using a mouse model. Pharmacologic targeting of β-catenin activity with ICG001, as well as myeloid-specific genetic ablation of Wntless (Wls) , to specifically target Wnt protein release by APCs, enhanced early IFN-γ responses. By contrast, within several hours of α-GalCer challenge, myeloid-specific Wls deficiency, as well as pharmacologic targeting of Wnt release using the small molecule inhibitor IWP-2 impaired α-GalCer-induced IFN-γ responses, independent of β-catenin activity. These data suggest that myeloid cell-derived Wnt ligands drive early Wnt/β-catenin signaling that curbs IFN-γ responses, but that, subsequently, Wnt ligands sustain IFN-γ expression independent of β-catenin activity. Our analyses in ICG001-treated mice confirmed a role for β-catenin activity in driving early IL-4 responses by liver NKT cells. However, neither pharmacologic nor genetic perturbation of Wnt production affected the IL-4 response, suggesting that IL-4 production by NKT cells in response to α-GalCer is not driven by released Wnt ligands. Collectively, these data reveal complex temporal

  16. Temporal Regulation of Natural Killer T Cell Interferon Gamma Responses by β-Catenin-Dependent and -Independent Wnt Signaling

    Jessica C. Kling

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells are prominent innate-like lymphocytes in the liver with critical roles in immune responses during infection, cancer, and autoimmunity. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ and IL-4 are key cytokines rapidly produced by NKT cells upon recognition of glycolipid antigens presented by antigen-presenting cells (APCs. It has previously been reported that the transcriptional coactivator β-catenin regulates NKT cell differentiation and functionally biases NKT cell responses toward IL-4, at the expense of IFN-γ production. β-Catenin is not only a central effector of Wnt signaling but also contributes to other signaling networks. It is currently unknown whether Wnt ligands regulate NKT cell functions. We thus investigated how Wnt ligands and β-catenin activity shape liver NKT cell functions in vivo in response to the glycolipid antigen, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer using a mouse model. Pharmacologic targeting of β-catenin activity with ICG001, as well as myeloid-specific genetic ablation of Wntless (Wls, to specifically target Wnt protein release by APCs, enhanced early IFN-γ responses. By contrast, within several hours of α-GalCer challenge, myeloid-specific Wls deficiency, as well as pharmacologic targeting of Wnt release using the small molecule inhibitor IWP-2 impaired α-GalCer-induced IFN-γ responses, independent of β-catenin activity. These data suggest that myeloid cell-derived Wnt ligands drive early Wnt/β-catenin signaling that curbs IFN-γ responses, but that, subsequently, Wnt ligands sustain IFN-γ expression independent of β-catenin activity. Our analyses in ICG001-treated mice confirmed a role for β-catenin activity in driving early IL-4 responses by liver NKT cells. However, neither pharmacologic nor genetic perturbation of Wnt production affected the IL-4 response, suggesting that IL-4 production by NKT cells in response to α-GalCer is not driven by released Wnt ligands. Collectively, these data reveal

  17. Canonical and Non-Canonical Aspects of JAK-STAT Signaling: Lessons from Interferons for Cytokine Responses.

    Majoros, Andrea; Platanitis, Ekaterini; Kernbauer-Hölzl, Elisabeth; Rosebrock, Felix; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signal transduction mediates cytokine responses. Canonical signaling is based on STAT tyrosine phosphorylation by activated JAKs. Downstream of interferon (IFN) receptors, activated JAKs cause the formation of the transcription factors IFN-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3), a heterotrimer of STAT1, STAT2 and interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) subunits, and gamma interferon-activated factor (GAF), a STAT1 homodimer. In recent years, several deviations from this paradigm were reported. These include kinase-independent JAK functions as well as extra- and intranuclear activities of U-STATs without phosphotyrosines. Additionally, transcriptional control by STAT complexes resembling neither GAF nor ISGF3 contributes to transcriptome changes in IFN-treated cells. Our review summarizes the contribution of non-canonical JAK-STAT signaling to the innate antimicrobial immunity imparted by IFN. Moreover, we touch upon functions of IFN pathway proteins beyond the IFN response. These include metabolic functions of IRF9 as well as the regulation of natural killer cell activity by kinase-dead TYK2 and different phosphorylation isoforms of STAT1.

  18. Canonical and Non-Canonical Aspects of JAK–STAT Signaling: Lessons from Interferons for Cytokine Responses

    Majoros, Andrea; Platanitis, Ekaterini; Kernbauer-Hölzl, Elisabeth; Rosebrock, Felix; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Janus kinase (JAK)–signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signal transduction mediates cytokine responses. Canonical signaling is based on STAT tyrosine phosphorylation by activated JAKs. Downstream of interferon (IFN) receptors, activated JAKs cause the formation of the transcription factors IFN-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3), a heterotrimer of STAT1, STAT2 and interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) subunits, and gamma interferon-activated factor (GAF), a STAT1 homodimer. In recent years, several deviations from this paradigm were reported. These include kinase-independent JAK functions as well as extra- and intranuclear activities of U-STATs without phosphotyrosines. Additionally, transcriptional control by STAT complexes resembling neither GAF nor ISGF3 contributes to transcriptome changes in IFN-treated cells. Our review summarizes the contribution of non-canonical JAK–STAT signaling to the innate antimicrobial immunity imparted by IFN. Moreover, we touch upon functions of IFN pathway proteins beyond the IFN response. These include metabolic functions of IRF9 as well as the regulation of natural killer cell activity by kinase-dead TYK2 and different phosphorylation isoforms of STAT1. PMID:28184222

  19. The Interplay between Cyclic AMP, MAPK, and NF-κB Pathways in Response to Proinflammatory Signals in Microglia

    Mousumi Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP is an important intracellular regulator of microglial cell homeostasis and its negative perturbation through proinflammatory signaling results in microglial cell activation. Though cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1β, decrease intracellular cyclic AMP, the mechanism by which this occurs is poorly understood. The current study examined which signaling pathways are responsible for decreasing cyclic AMP in microglia following TNF-α stimulation and sought to identify the role cyclic AMP plays in regulating these pathways. In EOC2 microglia, TNF-α produced a dramatic reduction in cyclic AMP and increased cyclic AMP-dependent PDE activity that could be antagonized by Rolipram, myristoylated-PKI, PD98059, or JSH-23, implicating a role for PDE4, PKA, MEK, and NF-κB in this regulation. Following TNF-α there were significant increases in iNOS and COX-2 immunoreactivity, phosphorylated ERK1/2 and NF-κB-p65, IκB degradation, and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, which were reduced in the presence of high levels of cyclic AMP, indicating that reductions in cyclic AMP during cytokine stimulation are important for removing its inhibitory action on NF-κB activation and subsequent proinflammatory gene expression. Further elucidation of the signaling crosstalk involved in decreasing cyclic AMP in response to inflammatory signals may provide novel therapeutic targets for modulating microglial cell activation during neurological injury and disease.

  20. Signaling dynamics of palmitate-induced ER stress responses mediated by ATF4 in HepG2 cells

    Cho Hyunju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Palmitic acid, the most common saturated free fatty acid, has been implicated in ER (endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis. This lipoapotosis is dependent, in part, on the upregulation of the activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4. To better understand the mechanisms by which palmitate upregulates the expression level of ATF4, we integrated literature information on palmitate-induced ER stress signaling into a discrete dynamic model. The model provides an in silico framework that enables simulations and predictions. The model predictions were confirmed through further experiments in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 cells and the results were used to update the model and our current understanding of the signaling induced by palmitate. Results The three key things from the in silico simulation and experimental results are: 1 palmitate induces different signaling pathways (PKR (double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase, PERK (PKR-like ER kinase, PKA (cyclic AMP (cAMP-dependent protein kinase A in a time dependent-manner, 2 both ATF4 and CREB1 (cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 1 interact with the Atf4 promoter to contribute to a prolonged accumulation of ATF4, and 3 CREB1 is involved in ER-stress induced apoptosis upon palmitate treatment, by regulating ATF4 expression and possibly Ca2+ dependent-CaM (calmodulin signaling pathway. Conclusion The in silico model helped to delineate the essential signaling pathways in palmitate-mediated apoptosis.

  1. Inter-regulation of the unfolded protein response and auxin signaling

    Chen, Y.N.; Aung, K.; Rolčík, Jakub; Walicki, K.; Friml, J.; Brandizzi, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 1 (2014), s. 97-107 ISSN 0960-7412 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : endoplasmic reticulum stress * unfolded protein response * auxin response Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 5.972, year: 2014

  2. Constant versus variable response signal delays in speed accuracy trade-offs : Effects of advance preparation for processing time

    Miller, Jeff; Sproesser, Gudrun; Ulrich, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    In two experiments, we used response signals (RSs) to control processing time and trace out speed accuracy trade-off (SAT) functions in a difficult perceptual discrimination task. Each experiment compared performance in blocks of trials with constant and, hence, temporally predictable RS lags against performance in blocks with variable, unpredictable RS lags. In both experiments, essentially equivalent SAT functions were observed with constant and variable RS lags. We conclude that there is l...

  3. Responses of the insulin signaling pathways in the brown adipose tissue of rats following cold exposure.

    Wang, Xiaofei; Wahl, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The insulin signaling pathway is critical for the control of blood glucose levels. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has also been implicated as important in glucose homeostasis. The effect of short-term cold exposure on this pathway in BAT has not been explored. We evaluated the effect of 4 hours of cold exposure on the insulin pathway in the BAT of rats. Whole genomic microarray chips were used to examine the transcripts of the pathway in BAT of rats exposed to 4°C and 22°C for 4 hours. The 4 most significantly altered pathways following 4 hours of cold exposure were the insulin signaling pathway, protein kinase A, PI3K/AKT and ERK/MAPK signaling. The insulin signaling pathway was the most affected. In the documented 142 genes of the insulin pathway, 42 transcripts (29.6%) responded significantly to this cold exposure with the least false discovery rate (Benjamini-Hochberg Multiple Testing: -log10 (p-value)  = 7.18). Twenty-seven genes (64%) were up-regulated, including the insulin receptor (Insr), insulin substrates 1 and 2 (Irs1 and Irs2). Fifteen transcripts (36%) were down-regulated. Multiple transcripts of the primary target and secondary effector targets for the insulin signaling were also up-regulated, including those for carbohydrate metabolism. Using western blotting, we demonstrated that the cold induced higher Irs2, Irs1, and Akt-p protein levels in the BAT than in the BAT of controls maintained at room temperature, and higher Akt-p protein level in the muscle. this study demonstrated that 4 hours of cold exposure stimulated the insulin signaling pathway in the BAT and muscle of overnight fasted rats. This raises the possibility that acute cold stimulation may have potential to improve glucose clearance and insulin sensitivity.

  4. A note on errors and signal to noise ratio of binary cross-correlation measurements of system impulse response

    Cummins, J.D.

    1964-02-01

    The sources of error in the measurement of system impulse response using test signals of a discrete interval binary nature are considered. Methods of correcting for the errors due to theoretical imperfections are given and the variance of the estimate of the system impulse response due to random noise is determined. Several topics related to the main topic are considered e.g. determination of a theoretical model from experimental results. General conclusions about the magnitude of the errors due to the theoretical imperfections are made. (author)

  5. A note on errors and signal to noise ratio of binary cross-correlation measurements of system impulse response

    Cummins, J D [Dynamics Group, Control and Instrumentation Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1964-02-15

    The sources of error in the measurement of system impulse response using test signals of a discrete interval binary nature are considered. Methods of correcting for the errors due to theoretical imperfections are given and the variance of the estimate of the system impulse response due to random noise is determined. Several topics related to the main topic are considered e.g. determination of a theoretical model from experimental results. General conclusions about the magnitude of the errors due to the theoretical imperfections are made. (author)

  6. Purinergic signalling - a possible mechanism for KCNQ1 channel response to cell volume challenges

    Bomholtz, Sofia Hammami; Willumsen, Niels J.; Meinild, A.-K.

    2013-01-01

    AIM: A number of K(+) channels are regulated by small, fast changes in cell volume. The mechanisms underlying cell volume sensitivity are not known, but one possible mechanism could be purinergic signalling. Volume activated ATP release could trigger signalling pathways that subsequently lead...... stimuli. Basal ATP release was approx. three times higher in the KCNQ1 + AQP1 and KCNQ1 injected oocytes compared to the non-injected ones. Exogenously added ATP (0.1 mm) did not have any substantial effect on volume-induced KCNQ1 currents. Nevertheless, apyrase decreased all currents by about 50...

  7. Wie te laat komt! : het denken en handelen van de leden van het Politbüro en de regering van de DDR met betrekking tot het binnen- en buitenlands beleid gedurende de jaren 1985-1989

    Vogel, Pieter Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Met toepassing van de sociaal-constructivistische theorie van Wendt en de neo-institutionele theorie van Sabatier e.a. onderzocht Peter Vogel de situatie binnen het Politbüro en de regering in de nadagen (1985- 1989) van de DDR. Hij keek daarbij in hoeverre en in welke mate mentale constructies,

  8. Phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid in plant defence response: from protein–protein and lipid–protein interactions to hormone signalling

    Zhao, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase Ds (PLDs) and PLD-derived phosphatidic acids (PAs) play vital roles in plant hormonal and environmental responses and various cellular dynamics. Recent studies have further expanded the functions of PLDs and PAs into plant–microbe interaction. The molecular diversities and redundant functions make PLD–PA an important signalling complex regulating lipid metabolism, cytoskeleton dynamics, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling in plant defence through protein–protein and protein–lipid interactions or hormone signalling. Different PLD–PA signalling complexes and their targets have emerged as fast-growing research topics for understanding their numerous but not yet established roles in modifying pathogen perception, signal transduction, and downstream defence responses. Meanwhile, advanced lipidomics tools have allowed researchers to reveal further the mechanisms of PLD–PA signalling complexes in regulating lipid metabolism and signalling, and their impacts on jasmonic acid/oxylipins, salicylic acid, and other hormone signalling pathways that essentially mediate plant defence responses. This review attempts to summarize the progress made in spatial and temporal PLD/PA signalling as well as PLD/PA-mediated modification of plant defence. It presents an in-depth discussion on the functions and potential mechanisms of PLD–PA complexes in regulating actin filament/microtubule cytoskeleton, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling, and in influencing lipid metabolism-derived metabolites as critical signalling components in plant defence responses. The discussion puts PLD–PA in a broader context in order to guide future research. PMID:25680793

  9. Frequency analysis of the visual steady-state response measured with the fast optical signal in younger and older adults.

    Tse, Chun-Yu; Gordon, Brian A; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele

    2010-09-01

    Relatively high frequency activity (>4Hz) carries important information about the state of the brain or its response to high frequency events. The electroencephalogram (EEG) is commonly used to study these changes because it possesses high temporal resolution and a good signal-to-noise ratio. However, it provides limited spatial information. Non-invasive fast optical signals (FOS) have been proposed as a neuroimaging tool combining spatial and temporal resolution. Yet, this technique has not been applied to study high frequency brain oscillations because of its relatively low signal-to-noise ratio. Here we investigate the sensitivity of FOS to relatively high-frequency brain oscillations. We measured the steady-state optical response elicited in medial and lateral occipital cortex by checkerboard reversals occurring at 4, 6, and 8Hz in younger and older adults. Stimulus-dependent oscillations were observed at the predicted stimulation frequency. In addition, in the younger adults the FOS steady-state response was smaller in lateral than medial areas, whereas in the older adults it was reversed in these two cortical regions. This may reflect diminished top-down inhibitory control in the older adults. The results indicate that FOS can be used to study the modulation of relatively high-frequency brain oscillations in adjacent cortical regions. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of bovine leukemia virus tax function associated with host cell transcription, signaling, stress response and immune response pathway by microarray-based gene expression analysis

    Arainga Mariluz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis and is closely related to human T-cell leukemia virus type I. The Tax protein of BLV is a transcriptional activator of viral replication and a key contributor to oncogenic potential. We previously identified interesting mutant forms of Tax with elevated (TaxD247G or reduced (TaxS240P transactivation effects on BLV replication and propagation. However, the effects of these mutations on functions other than transcriptional activation are unknown. In this study, to identify genes that play a role in the cascade of signal events regulated by wild-type and mutant Tax proteins, we used a large-scale host cell gene-profiling approach. Results Using a microarray containing approximately 18,400 human mRNA transcripts, we found several alterations after the expression of Tax proteins in genes involved in many cellular functions such as transcription, signal transduction, cell growth, apoptosis, stress response, and immune response, indicating that Tax protein has multiple biological effects on various cellular environments. We also found that TaxD247G strongly regulated more genes involved in transcription, signal transduction, and cell growth functions, contrary to TaxS240P, which regulated fewer genes. In addition, the expression of genes related to stress response significantly increased in the presence of TaxS240P as compared to wild-type Tax and TaxD247G. By contrast, the largest group of downregulated genes was related to immune response, and the majority of these genes belonged to the interferon family. However, no significant difference in the expression level of downregulated genes was observed among the Tax proteins. Finally, the expression of important cellular factors obtained from the human microarray results were validated at the RNA and protein levels by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting

  11. 3S2: Behavioral Response Studies of Cetaceans to Navy Sonar Signals in Norwegian Waters

    2015-09-30

    Sonar Signals in Norwegian Waters Peter L. Tyack University of St Andrews School of Biology Scottish Oceans Institute East Sands St Andrews...with a tagged minke whale. Data in the top 4 panels were derived from observations from the trackboat (‘ MOB ’). Note the strong change in diving

  12. Brain signaling and behavioral responses induced by exposure to (56)Fe-particle radiation

    Denisova, N. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Previous experiments have demonstrated that exposure to 56Fe-particle irradiation (1.5 Gy, 1 GeV) produced aging-like accelerations in neuronal and behavioral deficits. Astronauts on long-term space flights will be exposed to similar heavy-particle radiations that might have similar deleterious effects on neuronal signaling and cognitive behavior. Therefore, the present study evaluated whether radiation-induced spatial learning and memory behavioral deficits are associated with region-specific brain signaling deficits by measuring signaling molecules previously found to be essential for behavior [pre-synaptic vesicle proteins, synaptobrevin and synaptophysin, and protein kinases, calcium-dependent PRKCs (also known as PKCs) and PRKA (PRKA RIIbeta)]. The results demonstrated a significant radiation-induced increase in reference memory errors. The increases in reference memory errors were significantly negatively correlated with striatal synaptobrevin and frontal cortical synaptophysin expression. Both synaptophysin and synaptobrevin are synaptic vesicle proteins that are important in cognition. Striatal PRKA, a memory signaling molecule, was also significantly negatively correlated with reference memory errors. Overall, our findings suggest that radiation-induced pre-synaptic facilitation may contribute to some previously reported radiation-induced decrease in striatal dopamine release and for the disruption of the central dopaminergic system integrity and dopamine-mediated behavior.

  13. Revisiting the slow force response: the role of the PKG signaling pathway in the normal and the ischemic heart.

    Castro-Ferreira, Ricardo; Neves, João Sérgio; Ladeiras-Lopes, Ricardo; Leite-Moreira, André M; Neiva-Sousa, Manuel; Almeida-Coelho, João; Ferreira-Martins, João; F Leite-Moreira, Adelino

    2014-09-01

    The myocardial response to acute stretch consists of a two-phase increase in contractility: an acute increase by the Frank-Starling mechanism and a gradual and time-dependent increase in force generated known as the slow force response (SFR). The SFR is actively modulated by different signaling pathways, but the role of protein kinase G (PKG) signaling is unknown. In this study we aim to characterize the role of the PKG signaling pathway in the SFR under normal and ischemic conditions. Rabbit papillary muscles were stretched from 92 to 100% of maximum length (Lmax) under basal conditions, in the absence (1) or presence of: a PKG agonist (2) and a PKG inhibitor (3); under ischemic conditions in the absence (4) or presence of: a PKG agonist (5); a nitric oxide (NO) donor (6) and a phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitor (7). Under normoxia, the SFR was significantly attenuated by inhibition of PKG and remained unaltered with PKG activation. Ischemia induced a progressive decrease in myocardial contractility after stretch. Neither the PKG agonist nor the NO donor altered the myocardial response to stretch under ischemic conditions. However, the use of a PDE5 inhibitor in ischemia partially reversed the progressive deterioration in contractility. PKG activity is essential for the SFR. During ischemia, a progressive decline in the force is observed in response to acute myocardial stretch. This dysfunctional response can be partially reversed by the use of PDE5 inhibitors. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of Transcriptional Signatures in Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection Reveals Temporal Changes That Result from Type I Interferon Signaling

    Potempa, Krzysztof; Graham, Christine M.; Moreira-Teixeira, Lucia; McNab, Finlay W.; Howes, Ashleigh; Stavropoulos, Evangelos; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; O’Garra, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the mouse transcriptional response to Listeria monocytogenes infection reveals that a large set of genes are perturbed in both blood and tissue and that these transcriptional responses are enriched for pathways of the immune response. Further we identified enrichment for both type I and type II interferon (IFN) signaling molecules in the blood and tissues upon infection. Since type I IFN signaling has been reported widely to impair bacterial clearance we examined gene expression from blood and tissues of wild type (WT) and type I IFNαβ receptor-deficient (Ifnar1-/-) mice at the basal level and upon infection with L. monocytogenes. Measurement of the fold change response upon infection in the absence of type I IFN signaling demonstrated an upregulation of specific genes at day 1 post infection. A less marked reduction of the global gene expression signature in blood or tissues from infected Ifnar1-/- as compared to WT mice was observed at days 2 and 3 after infection, with marked reduction in key genes such as Oasg1 and Stat2. Moreover, on in depth analysis, changes in gene expression in uninfected mice of key IFN regulatory genes including Irf9, Irf7, Stat1 and others were identified, and although induced by an equivalent degree upon infection this resulted in significantly lower final gene expression levels upon infection of Ifnar1-/- mice. These data highlight how dysregulation of this network in the steady state and temporally upon infection may determine the outcome of this bacterial infection and how basal levels of type I IFN-inducible genes may perturb an optimal host immune response to control intracellular bacterial infections such as L. monocytogenes. PMID:26918359

  15. Computation of restoration of ligand response in the random kinetics of a prostate cancer cell signaling pathway.

    Dana, Saswati; Nakakuki, Takashi; Hatakeyama, Mariko; Kimura, Shuhei; Raha, Soumyendu

    2011-01-01

    Mutation and/or dysfunction of signaling proteins in the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathway are frequently observed in various kinds of human cancer. Consistent with this fact, in the present study, we experimentally observe that the epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced activation profile of MAP kinase signaling is not straightforward dose-dependent in the PC3 prostate cancer cells. To find out what parameters and reactions in the pathway are involved in this departure from the normal dose-dependency, a model-based pathway analysis is performed. The pathway is mathematically modeled with 28 rate equations yielding those many ordinary differential equations (ODE) with kinetic rate constants that have been reported to take random values in the existing literature. This has led to us treating the ODE model of the pathways kinetics as a random differential equations (RDE) system in which the parameters are random variables. We show that our RDE model captures the uncertainty in the kinetic rate constants as seen in the behavior of the experimental data and more importantly, upon simulation, exhibits the abnormal EGF dose-dependency of the activation profile of MAP kinase signaling in PC3 prostate cancer cells. The most likely set of values of the kinetic rate constants obtained from fitting the RDE model into the experimental data is then used in a direct transcription based dynamic optimization method for computing the changes needed in these kinetic rate constant values for the restoration of the normal EGF dose response. The last computation identifies the parameters, i.e., the kinetic rate constants in the RDE model, that are the most sensitive to the change in the EGF dose response behavior in the PC3 prostate cancer cells. The reactions in which these most sensitive parameters participate emerge as candidate drug targets on the signaling pathway. 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Response of brown anoles Anolis sagrei to multimodal signals from a native and novel predator

    Omar L. ELMASRI, Marcus S. MORENO, Courtney A. NEUMANN, Daniel T. BLUMSTEIN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple studies have focused on the importance of single modalities (visual, auditory, olfactory in eliciting anti-predator behavior, however multiple channels are often engaged simultaneously. While examining responses to multiple cues can potentially reveal more complex behavioral responses, little is known about how multimodal processing evolves. By contrasting response to familiar and novel predators, insights can be gained into the evolution of multimodal responses. We studied brown anoles’ (Anolis sagrei response to acoustic and visual predatory cues of a common potential predator, the great-tailed grackle Quiscalus mexicanus and to the American kestrel Falco sparverius, a species found in other populations but not present in our study population. We observed anole behavior before and after a stimulus and quantified rates of looking, display, and locomotion. Anoles increased their rate of locomotion in response to grackle models, an effect modulated by grackle vocalizations. No such response or modulation was seen when anoles were presented with kestrel stimuli. This suggests that the degree of sophistication of anole response to predators is experience dependent and that relaxed selection can result in reduced anti-predator response following loss of predators [Current Zoology 58 (6: 791–796, 2012].

  17. Bridging Plant and Human Radiation Response and DNA Repair through an In Silico Approach

    Zacharenia Nikitaki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of response to radiation exposure are conserved in plants and animals. The DNA damage response (DDR pathways are the predominant molecular pathways activated upon exposure to radiation, both in plants and animals. The conserved features of DDR in plants and animals might facilitate interdisciplinary studies that cross traditional boundaries between animal and plant biology in order to expand the collection of biomarkers currently used for radiation exposure monitoring (REM in environmental and biomedical settings. Genes implicated in trans-kingdom conserved DDR networks often triggered by ionizing radiation (IR and UV light are deposited into biological databases. In this study, we have applied an innovative approach utilizing data pertinent to plant and human genes from publicly available databases towards the design of a ‘plant radiation biodosimeter’, that is, a plant and DDR gene-based platform that could serve as a REM reliable biomarker for assessing environmental radiation exposure and associated risk. From our analysis, in addition to REM biomarkers, a significant number of genes, both in human and Arabidopsis thaliana, not yet characterized as DDR, are suggested as possible DNA repair players. Last but not least, we provide an example on the applicability of an Arabidopsis thaliana—based plant system monitoring the role of cancer-related DNA repair genes BRCA1, BARD1 and PARP1 in processing DNA lesions.

  18. Transcriptional regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals configures the early response mechanisms of japonica rice to chilling stress

    Wijaya Edward

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcriptional regulatory network involved in low temperature response leading to acclimation has been established in Arabidopsis. In japonica rice, which can only withstand transient exposure to milder cold stress (10°C, an oxidative-mediated network has been proposed to play a key role in configuring early responses and short-term defenses. The components, hierarchical organization and physiological consequences of this network were further dissected by a systems-level approach. Results Regulatory clusters responding directly to oxidative signals were prominent during the initial 6 to 12 hours at 10°C. Early events mirrored a typical oxidative response based on striking similarities of the transcriptome to disease, elicitor and wounding induced processes. Targets of oxidative-mediated mechanisms are likely regulated by several classes of bZIP factors acting on as1/ocs/TGA-like element enriched clusters, ERF factors acting on GCC-box/JAre-like element enriched clusters and R2R3-MYB factors acting on MYB2-like element enriched clusters. Temporal induction of several H2O2-induced bZIP, ERF and MYB genes coincided with the transient H2O2 spikes within the initial 6 to 12 hours. Oxidative-independent responses involve DREB/CBF, RAP2 and RAV1 factors acting on DRE/CRT/rav1-like enriched clusters and bZIP factors acting on ABRE-like enriched clusters. Oxidative-mediated clusters were activated earlier than ABA-mediated clusters. Conclusion Genome-wide, physiological and whole-plant level analyses established a holistic view of chilling stress response mechanism of japonica rice. Early response regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals is critical for prolonged survival under sub-optimal temperature. Integration of stress and developmental responses leads to modulated growth and vigor maintenance contributing to a delay of plastic injuries.

  19. Transcriptional regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals configures the early response mechanisms of japonica rice to chilling stress

    Yun, Kil-Young

    2010-01-25

    Background: The transcriptional regulatory network involved in low temperature response leading to acclimation has been established in Arabidopsis. In japonica rice, which can only withstand transient exposure to milder cold stress (10C), an oxidative-mediated network has been proposed to play a key role in configuring early responses and short-term defenses. The components, hierarchical organization and physiological consequences of this network were further dissected by a systems-level approach.Results: Regulatory clusters responding directly to oxidative signals were prominent during the initial 6 to 12 hours at 10C. Early events mirrored a typical oxidative response based on striking similarities of the transcriptome to disease, elicitor and wounding induced processes. Targets of oxidative-mediated mechanisms are likely regulated by several classes of bZIP factors acting on as1/ocs/TGA-like element enriched clusters, ERF factors acting on GCC-box/JAre-like element enriched clusters and R2R3-MYB factors acting on MYB2-like element enriched clusters.Temporal induction of several H2O2-induced bZIP, ERF and MYB genes coincided with the transient H2O2spikes within the initial 6 to 12 hours. Oxidative-independent responses involve DREB/CBF, RAP2 and RAV1 factors acting on DRE/CRT/rav1-like enriched clusters and bZIP factors acting on ABRE-like enriched clusters. Oxidative-mediated clusters were activated earlier than ABA-mediated clusters.Conclusion: Genome-wide, physiological and whole-plant level analyses established a holistic view of chilling stress response mechanism of japonica rice. Early response regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals is critical for prolonged survival under sub-optimal temperature. Integration of stress and developmental responses leads to modulated growth and vigor maintenance contributing to a delay of plastic injuries. 2010 Yun et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  20. Response of tobacco to the Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato DC3000 is mainly dependent on salicylic acid signaling pathway.

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Li; Cai, Guohua; Jiang, Shanshan; Sun, Liping; Li, Dequan

    2013-07-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000) was the first pathogen to be demonstrated to infect Arabidopsis and to cause disease symptoms in the laboratory setting. However, the defense response to Pst DC3000 was unclear in tobacco. In this report, the expression profiles of twelve defense response-related genes were analyzed after treatment with salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and pathogen Pst DC3000 by qRT-PCR. According to our results, it could be presented that the genes primarily induced by SA were also induced to higher levels after Pst DC3000 infection. SA accumulation could be induced to a higher level than that of JA after Pst DC3000 infection. In addition, SA could result in hypersensitive response (HR), which did not completely depend on accumulation of reactive oxygen species. These results indicated that tobacco mainly depended on SA signaling pathway rather than on JA signaling pathway in response to Pst DC3000. Further study demonstrated that JA could significantly inhibit the accumulation of SA and the generation of the HR induced by Pst DC3000. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. PRMT1-mediated methylation of the EGF receptor regulates signaling and cetuximab response

    Liao, Hsin-Wei

    2015-11-16

    Posttranslational modifications to the intracellular domain of the EGFR are known to regulate EGFR functions; however, modifications to the extracellular domain and their effects remain relatively unexplored. Here, we determined that methylation at R198 and R200 of the EGFR extracellular domain by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) enhances binding to EGF and subsequent receptor dimerization and signaling activation. In a mouse orthotopic colorectal cancer xenograft model, expression of a methylation-defective EGFR reduced tumor growth. Moreover, increased EGFR methylation sustained signaling activation and cell proliferation in the presence of the therapeutic EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab. In colorectal cancer patients, EGFR methylation level also correlated with a higher recurrence rate after cetuximab treatment and reduced overall survival. Together, these data indicate that R198/R200 methylation of the EGFR plays an important role in regulating EGFR functionality and resistance to cetuximab treatment.

  2. Speed of response, pile-up and signal to noise ratio in liquid ionization calorimeters

    Colas, J.

    1989-11-01

    Although liquid ionization calorimeters have been mostly used up to now with slow readout, their signals have a fast rise time. However, it is not easy to get this fast component of the pulse out of the calorimeter. For this purpose a new connection scheme of the electrodes, the electrostatic transformer, is presented and discussed. This technique reduces the detector capacitance while keeping the number of channels at an acceptable level. Also it allows the use of transmission lines to bring signals from the electrodes to the preamplifiers which could be located in an accessible area. With room temperature liquids the length of these cables can be short, keeping the added noise at a reasonable level. Contributions to the error on the energy measurement from pile up and electronics noise are studied in detail. Even on this issue, room temperature liquids (TMP/TMS) are found to be competitive with cold liquid argon at the expense of a moderately higher gap voltage

  3. PRMT1-mediated methylation of the EGF receptor regulates signaling and cetuximab response

    Liao, Hsin-Wei; Hsu, Jung-Mao; Xia, Weiya; Wang, Hung-Ling; Wang, Ying-Nai; Chang, Wei-Chao; Arold, Stefan T.; Chou, Chao-Kai; Tsou, Pei-Hsiang; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Fang, Yueh-Fu; Lee, Hong-Jen; Lee, Heng-Huan; Tai, Shyh-Kuan; Yang, Mhu-Hwa; Morelli, Maria P.; Sen, Malabika; Ladbury, John E.; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Kopetz, Scott; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications to the intracellular domain of the EGFR are known to regulate EGFR functions; however, modifications to the extracellular domain and their effects remain relatively unexplored. Here, we determined that methylation at R198 and R200 of the EGFR extracellular domain by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) enhances binding to EGF and subsequent receptor dimerization and signaling activation. In a mouse orthotopic colorectal cancer xenograft model, expression of a methylation-defective EGFR reduced tumor growth. Moreover, increased EGFR methylation sustained signaling activation and cell proliferation in the presence of the therapeutic EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab. In colorectal cancer patients, EGFR methylation level also correlated with a higher recurrence rate after cetuximab treatment and reduced overall survival. Together, these data indicate that R198/R200 methylation of the EGFR plays an important role in regulating EGFR functionality and resistance to cetuximab treatment. PMID:26571401

  4. PRMT1-mediated methylation of the EGF receptor regulates signaling and cetuximab response

    Liao, Hsin-Wei; Hsu, Jung-Mao; Xia, Weiya; Wang, Hung-Ling; Wang, Ying-Nai; Chang, Wei-Chao; Arold, Stefan T.; Chou, Chao-Kai; Tsou, Pei-Hsiang; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Fang, Yueh-Fu; Lee, Hong-Jen; Lee, Heng-Huan; Tai, Shyh-Kuan; Yang, Mhu-Hwa; Morelli, Maria P.; Sen, Malabika; Ladbury, John E.; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Kopetz, Scott; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications to the intracellular domain of the EGFR are known to regulate EGFR functions; however, modifications to the extracellular domain and their effects remain relatively unexplored. Here, we determined that methylation at R198 and R200 of the EGFR extracellular domain by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) enhances binding to EGF and subsequent receptor dimerization and signaling activation. In a mouse orthotopic colorectal cancer xenograft model, expression of a methylation-defective EGFR reduced tumor growth. Moreover, increased EGFR methylation sustained signaling activation and cell proliferation in the presence of the therapeutic EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab. In colorectal cancer patients, EGFR methylation level also correlated with a higher recurrence rate after cetuximab treatment and reduced overall survival. Together, these data indicate that R198/R200 methylation of the EGFR plays an important role in regulating EGFR functionality and resistance to cetuximab treatment.

  5. Investigation of radiation-induced multilayered signalling response of the inflammatory pathway

    Babini, G.; Ugolini, M.; Morini, J.; Baiocco, G.; Ottolenghi, A.; Mariotti, L.; Tabarelli de Fatis, P.; Liotta, M.

    2015-01-01

    Ionising radiation exposure of cells might induce the perturbation of cell functions and, in particular, the activation or inhibition of several important pathways. This perturbation can cause the deregulation of both intra- and extra-cellular signalling cascades (such as the inflammatory pathway) and alter not only the behaviour of directly exposed cells but also the neighbouring nonirradiated ones, through the so-called bystander effect. The aim of the present work was to investigate the complex nonlinear interactions between the inflammatory pathway and other strictly interlaced signalling pathways, such as Erk1/2 and Akt/PKB, focusing on the radiation-induced perturbation of such pathways in the dose range of 0 -2 Gy. The results show how radiation affects these interconnected pathways and how confounding factors, such as the change of culture medium, can hide radiation-induced perturbations. (authors)

  6. Skeletal muscle signaling and the heart rate and blood pressure response to exercise

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Svendsen, Jesper H; Ersbøll, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Endurance training lowers heart rate and blood pressure responses to exercise, but the mechanisms and consequences remain unclear. To determine the role of skeletal muscle for the cardioventilatory response to exercise, 8 healthy young men were studied before and after 5 weeks of 1-legged knee-ex...... was ≈ 15 bpm lower during exercise with the trained leg (P...

  7. Synaptic and genomic responses to JNK and AP-1 signaling in Drosophila neurons

    Bohmann Dirk

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor AP-1 positively controls synaptic plasticity at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. Although in motor neurons, JNK has been shown to activate AP-1, a positive regulator of growth and strength at the larval NMJ, the consequences of JNK activation are poorly studied. In addition, the downstream transcriptional targets of JNK and AP-1 signaling in the Drosophila nervous system have yet to be identified. Here, we further investigated the role of JNK signaling at this model synapse employing an activated form of JNK-kinase; and using Serial Analysis of Gene Expression and oligonucleotide microarrays, searched for candidate early targets of JNK or AP-1 dependent transcription in neurons. Results Temporally-controlled JNK induction in postembryonic motor neurons triggers synaptic growth at the NMJ indicating a role in developmental plasticity rather than synaptogenesis. An unexpected observation that JNK activation also causes a reduction in transmitter release is inconsistent with JNK functioning solely through AP-1 and suggests an additional, yet-unidentified pathway for JNK signaling in motor neurons. SAGE profiling of mRNA expression helps define the neural transcriptome in Drosophila. Though many putative AP-1 and JNK target genes arose from the genomic screens, few were confirmed in subsequent validation experiments. One potentially important neuronal AP-1 target discovered, CG6044, was previously implicated in olfactory associative memory. In addition, 5 mRNAs regulated by RU486, a steroid used to trigger conditional gene expression were identified. Conclusion This study demonstrates a novel role for JNK signaling at the larval neuromuscular junction and provides a quantitative profile of gene transcription in Drosophila neurons. While identifying potential JNK/AP-1 targets it reveals the limitations of genome-wide analyses using complex tissues like the whole brain.

  8. Protein kinase N2 regulates AMP kinase signaling and insulin responsiveness of glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle.

    Ruby, Maxwell A; Riedl, Isabelle; Massart, Julie; Åhlin, Marcus; Zierath, Juleen R

    2017-10-01

    Insulin resistance is central to the development of type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders. Because skeletal muscle is responsible for the majority of whole body insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, regulation of glucose metabolism in this tissue is of particular importance. Although Rho GTPases and many of their affecters influence skeletal muscle metabolism, there is a paucity of information on the protein kinase N (PKN) family of serine/threonine protein kinases. We investigated the impact of PKN2 on insulin signaling and glucose metabolism in primary human skeletal muscle cells in vitro and mouse tibialis anterior muscle in vivo. PKN2 knockdown in vitro decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, incorporation into glycogen, and oxidation. PKN2 siRNA increased 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling while stimulating fatty acid oxidation and incorporation into triglycerides and decreasing protein synthesis. At the transcriptional level, PKN2 knockdown increased expression of PGC-1α and SREBP-1c and their target genes. In mature skeletal muscle, in vivo PKN2 knockdown decreased glucose uptake and increased AMPK phosphorylation. Thus, PKN2 alters key signaling pathways and transcriptional networks to regulate glucose and lipid metabolism. Identification of PKN2 as a novel regulator of insulin and AMPK signaling may provide an avenue for manipulation of skeletal muscle metabolism. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Proteomic investigations reveal a role for RNA processing factor THRAP3 in the DNA damage response

    Beli, Petra; Lukashchuk, Natalia; Wagner, Sebastian A

    2012-01-01

    /ATR/DNA-PK target consensus motif, suggesting an important role of downstream kinases in amplifying DDR signals. We show that the splicing-regulator phosphatase PPM1G is recruited to sites of DNA damage, while the splicing-associated protein THRAP3 is excluded from these regions. Moreover, THRAP3 depletion causes...

  10. Snake venom VEGF Vammin induces a highly efficient angiogenic response in skeletal muscle via VEGFR-2/NRP specific signaling.

    Toivanen, Pyry I; Nieminen, Tiina; Laakkonen, Johanna P; Heikura, Tommi; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2017-07-17

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors (VEGFs) are promising molecules for the treatment of ischemic diseases by pro-angiogenic therapy. Snake venom VEGFs are a novel subgroup with unique receptor binding profiles and as such are potential new therapeutic agents. We determined the ligand-receptor interactions, gene regulation and angiogenic properties of Vipera ammodytes venom VEGF, Vammin, and compared it to the canonical angiogenic factor VEGF-A to evaluate the use of Vammin for therapeutic angiogenesis. Vammin efficiently induced VEGFR-2 mediated proliferation and expression of genes associated with proliferation, migration and angiogenesis. VEGF-A 165 and especially VEGF-A 109 induced less pronounced effects. Vammin regulates a number of signaling pathways by inducing the expression of NR4A family nuclear receptors and regulators of calcium signaling and MAP kinase pathways. Interestingly, MARC1, which encodes an enzyme discovered to catalyze reduction of nitrate to NO, was identified as a novel VEGFR-2 regulated gene. In rabbit skeletal muscle adenoviral delivery of Vammin induced prominent angiogenic responses. Both the vector dose and the co-receptor binding of the ligand were critical parameters controlling the type of angiogenic response from sprouting angiogenesis to vessel enlargement. Vammin induced VEGFR-2/NRP-1 mediated signaling more effectively than VEGF-A, consequently it is a promising candidate for development of pro-angiogenic therapies.

  11. Response of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway to oxygen deprivation in the red eared slider turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans.

    Bansal, Saumya; Biggar, Kyle K; Krivoruchko, Anastasia; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-11-15

    The red-eared slider turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans, is a model organism commonly used to study the environmental stress of anoxia. It exhibits multiple biochemical adaptations to ensure its survival during the winter months where quantities of oxygen are largely depleted. We proposed that JAK-STAT signaling would display stress responsive regulation to mediate the survival of the red-eared slider turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans, during anoxic stress. Importantly, the JAK-STAT signaling pathway is involved in transmitting extracellular signals to the nucleus resulting in the expression of select genes that aid cell survival and growth. Immunoblotting was used to compare the relative phosphorylation levels of JAK proteins, STAT proteins, and two of its inhibitors, SOCS and PIAS, in response to anoxia. A clear activation of the JAK-STAT pathway was observed in the liver tissue while no significant changes were found in the skeletal muscle. To further support our findings we also found an increase in mRNA transcripts of downstream targets of STATs, namely bcl-xL and bcl-2, using PCR analysis in the liver tissues. These findings suggest an important role for the JAK-STAT pathway in exhibiting natural anoxia tolerance by the red-eared slider turtle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Squalene Inhibits ATM-Dependent Signaling in γIR-Induced DNA Damage Response through Induction of Wip1 Phosphatase.

    Naoto Tatewaki

    Full Text Available Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM kinase plays a crucial role as a master controller in the cellular DNA damage response. Inhibition of ATM leads to inhibition of the checkpoint signaling pathway. Hence, addition of checkpoint inhibitors to anticancer therapies may be an effective targeting strategy. A recent study reported that Wip1, a protein phosphatase, de-phosphorylates serine 1981 of ATM during the DNA damage response. Squalene has been proposed to complement anticancer therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy; however, there is little mechanistic information supporting this idea. Here, we report the inhibitory effect of squalene on ATM-dependent DNA damage signals. Squalene itself did not affect cell viability and the cell cycle of A549 cells, but it enhanced the cytotoxicity of gamma-irradiation (γIR. The in vitro kinase activity of ATM was not altered by squalene. However, squalene increased Wip1 expression in cells and suppressed ATM activation in γIR-treated cells. Consistent with the potential inhibition of ATM by squalene, IR-induced phosphorylation of ATM effectors such as p53 (Ser15 and Chk1 (Ser317 was inhibited by cell treatment with squalene. Thus, squalene inhibits the ATM-dependent signaling pathway following DNA damage through intracellular induction of Wip1 expression.

  13. Transcriptomic profiling of linolenic acid-responsive genes in ROS signalling from RNA-seq data in Arabidopsis

    Capilla eMata-Pérez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Linolenic acid (Ln released from chloroplast membrane galactolipids is a precursor of the phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA. The involvement of this hormone in different plant biological processes, such as responses to biotic stress conditions, has been extensively studied. However, the role of Ln in the regulation of gene expression during abiotic stress situations mediated by cellular redox changes and/or by oxidative stress processes remains poorly understood. An RNA-seq approach has increased our knowledge of the interplay among Ln, oxidative stress and ROS signalling that mediates abiotic stress conditions. Transcriptome analysis with the aid of RNA-seq in the absence of oxidative stress revealed that the incubation of Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures (ACSC with Ln resulted in the modulation of 7525 genes, of which 3034 genes had a 2 fold-change, being 533 up- and 2501 down-regulated genes, respectively. Thus, RNA-seq data analysis showed that an important set of these genes were associated with the jasmonic acid biosynthetic pathway including lypoxygenases (LOXs and Allene oxide cyclases (AOCs. In addition, several transcription factor families involved in the response to biotic stress conditions (pathogen attacks or herbivore feeding, such as WRKY, JAZ, MYC and LRR were also modified in response to Ln. However, this study also shows that Ln has the capacity to modulate the expression of genes involved in the response to abiotic stress conditions, particularly those mediated by ROS signalling. In this regard, we were able to identify new targets such as galactinol synthase 1 (GOLS1, methionine sulfoxide reductase (MSR and alkenal reductase in ACSC. It is therefore possible to suggest that, in the absence of any oxidative stress, Ln is capable of modulating new sets of genes involved in the signalling mechanism mediated by additional abiotic stresses (salinity, UV and high light intensity and especially in stresses mediated by ROS.

  14. Arabidopsis plastid AMOS1/EGY1 integrates abscisic acid signaling to regulate global gene expression response to ammonium stress

    Li, Baohai

    2012-10-12

    Ammonium (NH4 +) is a ubiquitous intermediate of nitrogen metabolism but is notorious for its toxic effects on most organisms. Extensive studies of the underlying mechanisms of NH4 + toxicity have been reported in plants, but it is poorly understood how plants acclimate to high levels of NH4 +. Here, we identified an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, ammonium overly sensitive1 (amos1), that displays severe chlorosis under NH4 + stress. Map-based cloning shows amos1 to carry a mutation in EGY1 (for ethylene-dependent, gravitropism-deficient, and yellow-green-like protein1), which encodes a plastid metalloprotease. Transcriptomic analysis reveals that among the genes activated in response to NH4 +, 90% are regulated dependent on AMOS1/ EGY1. Furthermore, 63% of AMOS1/EGY1-dependent NH4 +-activated genes contain an ACGTG motif in their promoter region, a core motif of abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive elements. Consistent with this, our physiological, pharmacological, transcriptomic, and genetic data show that ABA signaling is a critical, but not the sole, downstream component of the AMOS1/EGY1-dependent pathway that regulates the expression of NH4 +-responsive genes and maintains chloroplast functionality under NH4 + stress. Importantly, abi4 mutants defective in ABA-dependent and retrograde signaling, but not ABA-deficient mutants, mimic leaf NH4 + hypersensitivity of amos1. In summary, our findings suggest that an NH4 +-responsive plastid retrograde pathway, which depends on AMOS1/EGY1 function and integrates with ABA signaling, is required for the regulation of expression of the presence of high NH4 + levels. © 2012 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Arabidopsis plastid AMOS1/EGY1 integrates abscisic acid signaling to regulate global gene expression response to ammonium stress

    Li, Baohai; Li, Qing; Xiong, Liming; Kronzucker, Herbert J.; Krä mer, Ute; Shi, Weiming

    2012-01-01

    Ammonium (NH4 +) is a ubiquitous intermediate of nitrogen metabolism but is notorious for its toxic effects on most organisms. Extensive studies of the underlying mechanisms of NH4 + toxicity have been reported in plants, but it is poorly understood how plants acclimate to high levels of NH4 +. Here, we identified an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, ammonium overly sensitive1 (amos1), that displays severe chlorosis under NH4 + stress. Map-based cloning shows amos1 to carry a mutation in EGY1 (for ethylene-dependent, gravitropism-deficient, and yellow-green-like protein1), which encodes a plastid metalloprotease. Transcriptomic analysis reveals that among the genes activated in response to NH4 +, 90% are regulated dependent on AMOS1/ EGY1. Furthermore, 63% of AMOS1/EGY1-dependent NH4 +-activated genes contain an ACGTG motif in their promoter region, a core motif of abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive elements. Consistent with this, our physiological, pharmacological, transcriptomic, and genetic data show that ABA signaling is a critical, but not the sole, downstream component of the AMOS1/EGY1-dependent pathway that regulates the expression of NH4 +-responsive genes and maintains chloroplast functionality under NH4 + stress. Importantly, abi4 mutants defective in ABA-dependent and retrograde signaling, but not ABA-deficient mutants, mimic leaf NH4 + hypersensitivity of amos1. In summary, our findings suggest that an NH4 +-responsive plastid retrograde pathway, which depends on AMOS1/EGY1 function and integrates with ABA signaling, is required for the regulation of expression of the presence of high NH4 + levels. © 2012 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Identification of some cross flow heat exchanger dynamic responses by measurement with low level binary pseudo-random input signals

    Corran, E.R.; Cummins, J.D.; Hopkinson, A.

    1964-02-01

    An experiment was performed to assess the usefulness of the binary cross-correlation method in the context of the identification problem. An auxiliary burner was excited with a discrete interval binary code and the response to the perturbation of the input heat was observed by recording the variations of the primary inlet, primary outlet and secondary outlet temperatures. The observations were analysed to yield cross-correlation functions and frequency responses were subsequently determined between primary inlet and primary outlet temperatures and also between primary inlet and secondary outlet temperatures. The analysis verified (1) that these dynamic responses of this cross flow heat exchanger may be predicted theoretically, (2) in so far as this heat exchanger is representative of the generality of plant, that the binary cross-correlation method provides adequate identification of plant dynamics for control purposes in environments where small input variations and low signal to noise ratio are obligatory. (author)

  17. Causal signal transmission by quantum fields. III: Coherent response of fermions

    Plimak, L.I.; Stenholm, S.

    2009-01-01

    Structural response properties of fermionic fields are investigated. In the presence of fermions the key technical concept becomes response combination, or R-normal product, of field operators. It generalises the notion of time-normal operator product to response problems. Time-normal products are a special case of R-normal products without inputs; this paper thus also generalises the concept of time-normal ordering to fermions. Explicit causality of R-normal products of arbitrary (bosonic and/or fermionic) field operators is proven, and explicit relations expressing them by conventional Green's functions of quantum field theory are derived

  18. Liver X receptor regulates hepatic nuclear O-GlcNAc signaling and carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein activity

    Bindesbøll, Christian; Fan, Qiong; Nørgaard, Rikke C

    2015-01-01

    in response to feeding, which is believed to be mediated by insulin. We have previously shown that LXRs are targets for glucose-hexosamine-derived O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification enhancing their ability to regulate SREBP-1c promoter activity in vitro. To elucidate insulin...... of glycolytic and lipogenic enzymes, including glucokinase (GK), SREBP-1c, ChREBPα, and the newly identified shorter isoform ChREBPβ. Furthermore, glucose-dependent increases in LXR/retinoid X receptor-regulated luciferase activity driven by the ChREBPα promoter was mediated, at least in part, by O-GlcNAc...... transferase (OGT) signaling in Huh7 cells. Moreover, we show that LXR and OGT interact and colocalize in the nucleus and that loss of LXRs profoundly reduced nuclear O-GlcNAc signaling and ChREBPα promoter binding activity in vivo. In summary, our study provides evidence that LXRs act as nutrient and glucose...

  19. Cellular responses to a prolonged delay in mitosis are determined by a DNA damage response controlled by Bcl-2 family proteins.

    Colin, Didier J; Hain, Karolina O; Allan, Lindsey A; Clarke, Paul R

    2015-03-01

    Anti-cancer drugs that disrupt mitosis inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, although the mechanisms of these responses are poorly understood. Here, we characterize a mitotic stress response that determines cell fate in response to microtubule poisons. We show that mitotic arrest induced by these drugs produces a temporally controlled DNA damage response (DDR) characterized by the caspase-dependent formation of γH2AX foci in non-apoptotic cells. Following exit from a delayed mitosis, this initial response results in activation of DDR protein kinases, phosphorylation of the tumour suppressor p53 and a delay in subsequent cell cycle progression. We show that this response is controlled by Mcl-1, a regulator of caspase activation that becomes degraded during mitotic arrest. Chemical inhibition of Mcl-1 and the related proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL by a BH3 mimetic enhances the mitotic DDR, promotes p53 activation and inhibits subsequent cell cycle progression. We also show that inhibitors of DDR protein kinases as well as BH3 mimetics promote apoptosis synergistically with taxol (paclitaxel) in a variety of cancer cell lines. Our work demonstrates the role of mitotic DNA damage responses in determining cell fate in response to microtubule poisons and BH3 mimetics, providing a rationale for anti-cancer combination chemotherapies.

  20. Timing of CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling blockade is critical to improving responses to CTLA-4 based immunotherapy

    Holmgaard, Rikke B.; Brachfeld, Alexandra; Gasmi, Billel; Jones, David R.; Mattar, Marissa; Doman, Thompson; Murphy, Mary; Schaer, David; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Merghoub, Taha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) is produced by a variety of cancers and recruits myeloid cells that suppress antitumor immunity, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs.) Here, we show that both CSF-1 and its receptor (CSF-1R) are frequently expressed in tumors from cancer patients, and that this expression correlates with tumor-infiltration of MDSCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these tumor-infiltrating MDSCs are highly immunosuppressive but can be reprogrammed toward an antitumor phenotype in vitro upon CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling blockade. Supporting these findings, we show that inhibition of CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling using an anti-CSF-1R antibody can regulate both the number and the function of MDSCs in murine tumors in vivo. We further find that treatment with anti-CSF-1R antibody induces antitumor T-cell responses and tumor regression in multiple tumor models when combined with CTLA-4 blockade therapy. However, this occurs only when administered after or concurrent with CTLA-4 blockade, indicating that timing of each therapeutic intervention is critical for optimal antitumor responses. Importantly, MDSCs present within murine tumors after CTLA-4 blockade showed increased expression of CSF-1R and were capable of suppressing T cell proliferation, and CSF-1/CSF-1R expression in the human tumors was not reduced after treatment with CTLA-4 blockade immunotherapy. Taken together, our findings suggest that CSF-1R-expressing MDSCs can be targeted to modulate the tumor microenvironment and that timing of CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling blockade is critical to improving responses to checkpoint based immunotherapy. Significance: Infiltration by immunosuppressive myeloid cells contributes to tumor immune escape and can render patients resistant or less responsive to therapeutic intervention with checkpoint blocking antibodies. Our data demonstrate that blocking CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling using a monoclonal antibody directed to CSF-1R can regulate both the number

  1. Plasticity of the MAPK signaling network in response to mechanical stress

    Pereira, Andrea M; Tudor, Cicerone; Pouille, Philippe-Alexandre; Shekhar, Shashank; Kanger, Johannes S; Subramaniam, Vinod; Martín-Blanco, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Cells display versatile responses to mechanical inputs and recent studies have identified the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades mediating the biological effects observed upon mechanical stimulation. Although, MAPK pathways can act insulated from each other, several mechanisms

  2. Persistent activation of DNA damage signaling in response to complex mixtures of PAHs in air particulate matter

    Jarvis, Ian W.H., E-mail: Ian.Jarvis@ki.se [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Bergvall, Christoffer, E-mail: Christoffer.Bergvall@anchem.su.se [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, Svante Arrhenius väg 16, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Bottai, Matteo, E-mail: Matteo.Bottai@ki.se [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Westerholm, Roger, E-mail: Roger.Westerholm@anchem.su.se [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, Svante Arrhenius väg 16, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Stenius, Ulla, E-mail: Ulla.Stenius@ki.se [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Dreij, Kristian, E-mail: Kristian.Dreij@ki.se [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-01

    Complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in air particulate matter (PM) and have been associated with many adverse human health effects including cancer and respiratory disease. However, due to their complexity, the risk of exposure to mixtures is difficult to estimate. In the present study the effects of binary mixtures of benzo[a]pyrene (BP) and dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) and complex mixtures of PAHs in urban air PM extracts on DNA damage signaling was investigated. Applying a statistical model to the data we observed a more than additive response for binary mixtures of BP and DBP on activation of DNA damage signaling. Persistent activation of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) was observed at significantly lower BP equivalent concentrations in air PM extracts than BP alone. Activation of DNA damage signaling was also more persistent in air PM fractions containing PAHs with more than four aromatic rings suggesting larger PAHs contribute a greater risk to human health. Altogether our data suggests that human health risk assessment based on additivity such as toxicity equivalency factor scales may significantly underestimate the risk of exposure to complex mixtures of PAHs. The data confirms our previous findings with PAH-contaminated soil (Niziolek-Kierecka et al., 2012) and suggests a possible role for Chk1 Ser317 phosphorylation as a biological marker for future analyses of complex mixtures of PAHs. -- Highlights: ► Benzo[a]pyrene (BP), dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) and air PM PAH extracts were compared. ► Binary mixture of BP and DBP induced a more than additive DNA damage response. ► Air PM PAH extracts were more potent than toxicity equivalency factor estimates. ► Larger PAHs (> 4 rings) contribute more to the genotoxicity of PAHs in air PM. ► Chk1 is a sensitive marker for persistent activation of DNA damage signaling from PAH mixtures.

  3. Persistent activation of DNA damage signaling in response to complex mixtures of PAHs in air particulate matter

    Jarvis, Ian W.H.; Bergvall, Christoffer; Bottai, Matteo; Westerholm, Roger; Stenius, Ulla; Dreij, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in air particulate matter (PM) and have been associated with many adverse human health effects including cancer and respiratory disease. However, due to their complexity, the risk of exposure to mixtures is difficult to estimate. In the present study the effects of binary mixtures of benzo[a]pyrene (BP) and dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) and complex mixtures of PAHs in urban air PM extracts on DNA damage signaling was investigated. Applying a statistical model to the data we observed a more than additive response for binary mixtures of BP and DBP on activation of DNA damage signaling. Persistent activation of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) was observed at significantly lower BP equivalent concentrations in air PM extracts than BP alone. Activation of DNA damage signaling was also more persistent in air PM fractions containing PAHs with more than four aromatic rings suggesting larger PAHs contribute a greater risk to human health. Altogether our data suggests that human health risk assessment based on additivity such as toxicity equivalency factor scales may significantly underestimate the risk of exposure to complex mixtures of PAHs. The data confirms our previous findings with PAH-contaminated soil (Niziolek-Kierecka et al., 2012) and suggests a possible role for Chk1 Ser317 phosphorylation as a biological marker for future analyses of complex mixtures of PAHs. -- Highlights: ► Benzo[a]pyrene (BP), dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) and air PM PAH extracts were compared. ► Binary mixture of BP and DBP induced a more than additive DNA damage response. ► Air PM PAH extracts were more potent than toxicity equivalency factor estimates. ► Larger PAHs (> 4 rings) contribute more to the genotoxicity of PAHs in air PM. ► Chk1 is a sensitive marker for persistent activation of DNA damage signaling from PAH mixtures.

  4. Possible role of glutamine synthetase in the NO signaling response in root nodules by contributing to the antioxidant defenses

    Liliana Santos Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is emerging as an important regulatory player in the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. The occurrence of NO during several steps of the symbiotic interaction suggests an important, but yet unknown, signaling role of this molecule for root nodule formation and functioning. The identification of the molecular targets of NO is key for the assembly of the signal transduction cascade that will ultimately help to unravel NO function. We have recently shown that the key nitrogen assimilatory enzyme Glutamine Synthetase (GS is a molecular target of NO in root nodules of Medicago truncatula, being post-translationally regulated by tyrosine nitration in relation to nitrogen fixation. In functional nodules of M. truncatula NO formation has been located in the bacteroid containing cells of the fixation zone, where the ammonium generated by bacterial nitrogenase is released to the plant cytosol and assimilated into the organic pools by plant GS. We propose that the NO-mediated GS post-translational inactivation is connected to nitrogenase inhibition induced by NO and is related to metabolite channeling to boost the nodule antioxidant defenses. Glutamate, a substrate for GS activity is also the precursor for the synthesis of glutathione (GSH, which is highly abundant in root nodules of several plant species and known to play a major role in the antioxidant defense participating in the ascorbate/GSH cycle. Existing evidence suggests that upon NO-mediated GS inhibition, glutamate could be channeled for the synthesis of GSH. According to this hypothesis, GS would be involved in the NO-signaling responses in root nodules and the NO-signaling events would meet the nodule metabolic pathways to provide an adaptive response to the inhibition of symbiotic nitrogen fixation by reactive nitrogen species (RNS.

  5. Phytohormone signaling pathway analysis method for comparing hormone responses in plant-pest interactions

    Studham Matthew E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytohormones mediate plant defense responses to pests and pathogens. In particular, the hormones jasmonic acid, ethylene, salicylic acid, and abscisic acid have been shown to dictate and fine-tune defense responses, and identification of the phytohormone components of a particular defense response is commonly used to characterize it. Identification of phytohormone regulation is particularly important in transcriptome analyses. Currently there is no computational tool to determine the relative activity of these hormones that can be applied to transcriptome analyses in soybean. Findings We developed a pathway analysis method that provides a broad measure of the activation or suppression of individual phytohormone pathways based on changes in transcript expression of pathway-related genes. The magnitude and significance of these changes are used to determine a pathway score for a phytohormone for a given comparison in a microarray experiment. Scores for individual hormones can then be compared to determine the dominant phytohormone in a given defense response. To validate this method, it was applied to publicly available data from previous microarray experiments that studied the response of soybean plants to Asian soybean rust and soybean cyst nematode. The results of the analyses for these experiments agreed with our current understanding of the role of phytohormones in these defense responses. Conclusions This method is useful in providing a broad measure of the relative induction and suppression of soybean phytohormones during a defense response. This method could be used as part of microarray studies that include individual transcript analysis, gene set analysis, and other methods for a comprehensive defense response characterization.

  6. Immunobiotic Bifidobacteria Strains Modulate Rotavirus Immune Response in Porcine Intestinal Epitheliocytes via Pattern Recognition Receptor Signaling.

    Takamasa Ishizuka

    Full Text Available In this work, we aimed to characterize the antiviral response of an originally established porcine intestinal epithelial cell line (PIE cells by evaluating the molecular innate immune response to rotavirus (RVs. In addition, we aimed to select immunomodulatory bacteria with antiviral capabilities. PIE cells were inoculated with RVs isolated from different host species and the infective titers and the molecular innate immune response were evaluated. In addition, the protection against RVs infection and the modulation of immune response by different lactic acid bacteria (LAB strains was studied. The RVs strains OSU (porcine and UK (bovine effectively infected PIE cells. Our results also showed that RVs infection in PIE cells triggered TLR3-, RIG-I- and MDA-5-mediated immune responses with activation of IRF3 and NF-κB, induction of IFN-β and up-regulation of the interferon stimulated genes MxA and RNase L. Among the LAB strains tested, Bifidobacterium infantis MCC12 and B. breve MCC1274 significantly reduced RVs titers in infected PIE cells. The beneficial effects of both bifidobacteria were associated with reduction of A20 expression, and improvements of IRF-3 activation, IFN-β production, and MxA and RNase L expressions. These results indicate the value of PIE cells for studying RVs molecular innate immune response in pigs and for the selection of beneficial bacteria with antiviral capabilities.

  7. Promiscuous Diffusible Signal Factor Production and Responsiveness of the Xylella fastidiosa Rpf System

    Ionescu, Michael; Yokota, Kenji; Antonova, Elena; Garcia, Angelica; Beaulieu, Ellen; Hayes, Terry; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Lindow, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 Ionescu et al. Cell density-dependent regulation of gene expression in Xylella fastidiosa that is crucial to its switching between plant hosts and insect vectors is dependent on RpfF and its production of 2-enoic acids known as diffusible signal factor (DSF). We show that X. fastidiosa produces a particularly large variety of similar, relatively long-chain-length 2-enoic acids that are active in modulating gene expression. Both X. fastidiosa itself and a Pantoea agglomerans surrogate h...

  8. Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Receptor Signaling in Yeast Mating Pheromone Response.

    Alvaro, Christopher G; Thorner, Jeremy

    2016-04-08

    The DNAs encoding the receptors that respond to the peptide mating pheromones of the budding yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiaewere isolated in 1985, and were the very first genes for agonist-binding heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to be cloned in any organism. Now, over 30 years later, this yeast and its receptors continue to provide a pathfinding experimental paradigm for investigating GPCR-initiated signaling and its regulation, as described in this retrospective overview. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Redox Signaling and Its Impact on Skeletal and Vascular Responses to Spaceflight

    Candice G. T. Tahimic

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Spaceflight entails exposure to numerous environmental challenges with the potential to contribute to both musculoskeletal and vascular dysfunction. The purpose of this review is to describe current understanding of microgravity and radiation impacts on the mammalian skeleton and associated vasculature at the level of the whole organism. Recent experiments from spaceflight and ground-based models have provided fresh insights into how these environmental stresses influence mechanisms that are related to redox signaling, oxidative stress, and tissue dysfunction. Emerging mechanistic knowledge on cellular defenses to radiation and other environmental stressors, including microgravity, are useful for both screening and developing interventions against spaceflight-induced deficits in bone and vascular function.

  10. Redox Signaling and Its Impact on Skeletal and Vascular Responses to Spaceflight

    Tahimic, Candice; Globus, Ruth K.

    2018-01-01

    Spaceflight entails exposure to numerous environmental challenges with the potential to contribute to both musculoskeletal and vascular dysfunction. The purpose of this review is to describe current understanding of microgravity and radiation impacts on the mammalian skeleton and associated vasculature at the level of the whole organism. Recent experiments from spaceflight and groundbased models have provided fresh insights into how these environmental stresses influence mechanisms that are related to redox signaling, oxidative stress, and tissue dysfunction. Emerging mechanistic knowledge on cellular defenses to radiation and other environmental stressors, including microgravity, are useful for both screening and developing interventions against spaceflight-induced deficits in bone and vascular function.

  11. Convergence of PASTA kinase and two-component signaling in response to cell wall stress in Enterococcus faecalis.

    Kellogg, Stephanie L; Kristich, Christopher J

    2018-04-09

    Two common signal transduction mechanisms used by bacteria to sense and respond to changing environments are two-component systems (TCSs) and eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr kinases and phosphatases (eSTK/Ps). Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive bacterium and serious opportunistic pathogen that relies on both a TCS and an eSTK/P pathway for intrinsic resistance to cell wall-targeting antibiotics. The TCS consists of a histidine kinase (CroS) and response regulator (CroR) that become activated upon exposure of cells to cell wall-targeting antibiotics, leading to modulation of gene expression. The eSTK/P pathway consists of a transmembrane kinase (IreK) and its cognate phosphatase (IreP), which act antagonistically to mediate antibiotic resistance through an unknown mechanism. Because both CroS/R and IreK/P contribute to enterococcal resistance towards cell wall-targeting antibiotics, we hypothesized these signaling systems are intertwined. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed CroR phosphorylation and CroS/R-dependent gene expression to probe the influence of IreK and IreP on CroS/R signaling. In addition, we analyzed the phosphorylation state of CroS which revealed IreK-dependent phosphorylation of a Thr residue important for CroS function. Our results are consistent with a model in which IreK positively influences CroR-dependent gene expression through phosphorylation of CroS to promote antimicrobial resistance in E. faecalis Importance Two-component signaling systems (TCSs) and eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr kinases (eSTKs) are used by bacteria to sense and adapt to changing environments. Understanding how these pathways are regulated to promote bacterial survival is critical for a more complete understanding of bacterial stress responses and physiology. The opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis relies on both a TCS (CroS/R) and an eSTK (IreK) for intrinsic resistance to cell wall-targeting antibiotics. We probed the relationship between CroS/R and IreK, revealing

  12. The Hilbert-Huang Transform-Based Denoising Method for the TEM Response of a PRBS Source Signal

    Hai, Li; Guo-qiang, Xue; Pan, Zhao; Hua-sen, Zhong; Khan, Muhammad Younis

    2016-08-01

    The denoising process is critical in processing transient electromagnetic (TEM) sounding data. For the full waveform pseudo-random binary sequences (PRBS) response, an inadequate noise estimation may result in an erroneous interpretation. We consider the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) and its application to suppress the noise in the PRBS response. The focus is on the thresholding scheme to suppress the noise and the analysis of the signal based on its Hilbert time-frequency representation. The method first decomposes the signal into the intrinsic mode function, and then, inspired by the thresholding scheme in wavelet analysis; an adaptive and interval thresholding is conducted to set to zero all the components in intrinsic mode function which are lower than a threshold related to the noise level. The algorithm is based on the characteristic of the PRBS response. The HHT-based denoising scheme is tested on the synthetic and field data with the different noise levels. The result shows that the proposed method has a good capability in denoising and detail preservation.

  13. Integration of reward signalling and appetite regulating peptide systems in the control of food-cue responses.

    Reichelt, A C; Westbrook, R F; Morris, M J

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the neurobiological substrates that encode learning about food-associated cues and how those signals are modulated is of great clinical importance especially in light of the worldwide obesity problem. Inappropriate or maladaptive responses to food-associated cues can promote over-consumption, leading to excessive energy intake and weight gain. Chronic exposure to foods rich in fat and sugar alters the reinforcing value of foods and weakens inhibitory neural control, triggering learned, but maladaptive, associations between environmental cues and food rewards. Thus, responses to food-associated cues can promote cravings and food-seeking by activating mesocorticolimbic dopamine neurocircuitry, and exert physiological effects including salivation. These responses may be analogous to the cravings experienced by abstaining drug addicts that can trigger relapse into drug self-administration. Preventing cue-triggered eating may therefore reduce the over-consumption seen in obesity and binge-eating disorder. In this review we discuss recent research examining how cues associated with palatable foods can promote reward-based feeding behaviours and the potential involvement of appetite-regulating peptides including leptin, ghrelin, orexin and melanin concentrating hormone. These peptide signals interface with mesolimbic dopaminergic regions including the ventral tegmental area to modulate reactivity to cues associated with palatable foods. Thus, a novel target for anti-obesity therapeutics is to reduce non-homeostatic, reward driven eating behaviour, which can be triggered by environmental cues associated with highly palatable, fat and sugar rich foods. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. [TLR2 modulates Staphylococcus aureus-induced inflammatory response and autophagy in macrophages through PI3K signaling pathway].

    Li, Shuai; Fang, Lei; Wang, Jiong; Liu, Rongyu

    2017-09-01

    Objective To investigate the molecular mechanisms of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) taking part in inflammatory response in Staphylococcus aureus (SA)-induced asthma. Methods We established the cell inflammatory response model through stimulating mouse RAW264.7 macrophages with SA. The TLR2, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), nuclear factor κBp65 (NF-κBp65), phospho-NF-κBp65, beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3B) were detected by Western blot analysis after treatment with TLR2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) and 3-methyladenine (3-MA), and the tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were determined by ELISA. In addition, the number of autolysosomes was observed by the laser scanning confocal microscope. Results SA-stimulated macrophages activated various signaling pathways including TLR2. TLR2 siRNA markedly repressed the expressions of PI3K, phospho-NF-κBp65, the autophagy protein beclin-1 and LC3B as well as the number of autolysosomes and the production of TNF- and IL-6. We also demonstrated that 3-MA had the same effect on autophagy and inflammation as TLR2 siRNA did. Conclusion TLR2 modulates SA-induced inflammatory response and autophagy in macrophages through PI3K signaling pathway.

  15. Antihelminth compound niclosamide downregulates Wnt signaling and elicits antitumor responses in tumors with activating APC mutations.

    Osada, Takuya; Chen, Minyong; Yang, Xiao Yi; Spasojevic, Ivan; Vandeusen, Jeffrey B; Hsu, David; Clary, Bryan M; Clay, Timothy M; Chen, Wei; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2011-06-15

    Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation caused by adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations occurs in approximately 80% of sporadic colorectal cancers (CRC). The antihelminth compound niclosamide downregulates components of the Wnt pathway, specifically Dishevelled-2 (Dvl2) expression, resulting in diminished downstream β-catenin signaling. In this study, we determined whether niclosamide could inhibit the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in human CRCs and whether its inhibition might elicit antitumor effects in the presence of APC mutations. We found that niclosamide inhibited Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation, downregulated Dvl2, decreased downstream β-catenin signaling, and exerted antiproliferative effects in human colon cancer cell lines and CRC cells isolated by surgical resection of metastatic disease, regardless of mutations in APC. In contrast, inhibition of NF-κB or mTOR did not exert similar antiproliferative effects in these CRC model systems. In mice implanted with human CRC xenografts, orally administered niclosamide was well tolerated, achieved plasma and tumor levels associated with biologic activity, and led to tumor control. Our findings support clinical explorations to reposition niclosamide for the treatment of CRC.

  16. Speed of response, pile-up, and signal to noise ratio in liquid ionization calorimeters

    Colas, J.

    1989-06-01

    Although liquid ionization calorimeters have been mostly used up to now with slow readout, their signals have a fast rise time. However, it is not easy to get this fast component of the pulse out of the calorimeter. For this purpose a new connection scheme of the electrodes, the ''electrostatic transformer,'' is presented. This technique reduces the detector capacitance while keeping the number of channels at an acceptable level. Also it allows the use of transmission lines to bring signals from the electrodes to the preamplifiers which could be located in an accessible area. With room temperature liquids the length of these cables can be short, keeping the added noise at a reasonable level. Contributions to the error on the energy measurement from pile up and electronics noise are studied in detail. Even on this issue, room temperature liquids (TMP/TMS) are found to be competitive with cold liquid argon at the expense of a moderately higher gap voltage. 5 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  17. PTEN and PI-3 kinase inhibitors control LPS signaling and the lymphoproliferative response in the CD19+ B cell compartment

    Singh, Alok R.; Peirce, Susan K.; Joshi, Shweta; Durden, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), e.g. toll receptors (TLRs) that bind ligands within the microbiome have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer. LPS is a ligand for two TLR family members, TLR4 and RP105 which mediate LPS signaling in B cell proliferation and migration. Although LPS/TLR/RP105 signaling is well-studied; our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms controlling these PRR signaling pathways remains incomplete. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for PTEN/PI-3K signaling in B cell selection and survival, however a role for PTEN/PI-3K in TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the B cell compartment has not been reported. Herein, we crossed a CD19cre and PTEN fl/fl mouse to generate a conditional PTEN knockout mouse in the CD19+ B cell compartment. These mice were further crossed with an IL-14α transgenic mouse to study the combined effect of PTEN deletion, PI-3K inhibition and expression of IL-14α (a cytokine originally identified as a B cell growth factor) in CD19+ B cell lymphoproliferation and response to LPS stimulation. Targeted deletion of PTEN and directed expression of IL-14α in the CD19+ B cell compartment (IL-14+PTEN-/-) lead to marked splenomegaly and altered spleen morphology at baseline due to expansion of marginal zone B cells, a phenotype that was exaggerated by treatment with the B cell mitogen and TLR4/RP105 ligand, LPS. Moreover, LPS stimulation of CD19+ cells isolated from these mice display increased proliferation, augmented AKT and NFκB activation as well as increased expression of c-myc and cyclinD1. Interestingly, treatment of LPS treated IL-14+PTEN-/- mice with a pan PI-3K inhibitor, SF1126, reduced splenomegaly, cell proliferation, c-myc and cyclin D1 expression in the CD19+ B cell compartment and normalized the splenic histopathologic architecture. These findings provide the direct evidence that PTEN and PI-3K inhibitors control TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the CD19+ B cell compartment and that pan PI-3

  18. PTEN and PI-3 kinase inhibitors control LPS signaling and the lymphoproliferative response in the CD19+ B cell compartment

    Singh, Alok R. [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Peirce, Susan K. [Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Joshi, Shweta [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Durden, Donald L., E-mail: ddurden@ucsd.edu [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, UCSD Rady Children' s Hospital, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-09-10

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), e.g. toll receptors (TLRs) that bind ligands within the microbiome have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer. LPS is a ligand for two TLR family members, TLR4 and RP105 which mediate LPS signaling in B cell proliferation and migration. Although LPS/TLR/RP105 signaling is well-studied; our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms controlling these PRR signaling pathways remains incomplete. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for PTEN/PI-3K signaling in B cell selection and survival, however a role for PTEN/PI-3K in TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the B cell compartment has not been reported. Herein, we crossed a CD19cre and PTEN{sup fl/fl} mouse to generate a conditional PTEN knockout mouse in the CD19+ B cell compartment. These mice were further crossed with an IL-14α transgenic mouse to study the combined effect of PTEN deletion, PI-3K inhibition and expression of IL-14α (a cytokine originally identified as a B cell growth factor) in CD19+ B cell lymphoproliferation and response to LPS stimulation. Targeted deletion of PTEN and directed expression of IL-14α in the CD19+ B cell compartment (IL-14+PTEN-/-) lead to marked splenomegaly and altered spleen morphology at baseline due to expansion of marginal zone B cells, a phenotype that was exaggerated by treatment with the B cell mitogen and TLR4/RP105 ligand, LPS. Moreover, LPS stimulation of CD19+ cells isolated from these mice display increased proliferation, augmented AKT and NFκB activation as well as increased expression of c-myc and cyclinD1. Interestingly, treatment of LPS treated IL-14+PTEN-/- mice with a pan PI-3K inhibitor, SF1126, reduced splenomegaly, cell proliferation, c-myc and cyclin D1 expression in the CD19+ B cell compartment and normalized the splenic histopathologic architecture. These findings provide the direct evidence that PTEN and PI-3K inhibitors control TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the CD19+ B cell compartment and that pan PI

  19. Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP Is a Candidate Signaling Molecule in the Mitochondria-to-Nucleus Retrograde Response Pathway

    Zhengchang Liu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular communication from the mitochondria to the nucleus is achieved via the retrograde response. In budding yeast, the retrograde response, also known as the RTG pathway, is regulated positively by Rtg1, Rtg2, Rtg3 and Grr1 and negatively by Mks1, Lst8 and two 14-3-3 proteins, Bmh1/2. Activation of retrograde signaling leads to activation of Rtg1/3, two basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factors. Rtg1/3 activation requires Rtg2, a cytoplasmic protein with an N-terminal adenosine triphosphate (ATP binding domain belonging to the actin/Hsp70/sugar kinase superfamily. The critical regulatory step of the retrograde response is the interaction between Rtg2 and Mks1. Rtg2 binds to and inactivates Mks1, allowing for activation of Rtg1/3 and the RTG pathway. When the pathway is inactive, Mks1 has dissociated from Rtg2 and bound to Bmh1/2, preventing activation of Rtg1/3. What signals association or disassociation of Mks1 and Rtg2 is unknown. Here, we show that ATP at physiological concentrations dissociates Mks1 from Rtg2 in a highly cooperative fashion. We report that ATP-mediated dissociation of Mks1 from Rtg2 is conserved in two other fungal species, K. lactis and K. waltii. Activation of Rtg1/3 upregulates expression of genes encoding enzymes catalyzing the first three reactions of the Krebs cycle, which is coupled to ATP synthesis through oxidative phosphorylation. Therefore, we propose that the retrograde response is an ATP homeostasis pathway coupling ATP production with ATP-mediated repression of the retrograde response by releasing Mks1 from Rtg2.

  20. Constant versus variable response signal delays in speed--accuracy trade-offs: effects of advance preparation for processing time.

    Miller, Jeff; Sproesser, Gudrun; Ulrich, Rolf

    2008-07-01

    In two experiments, we used response signals (RSs) to control processing time and trace out speed--accuracy trade-off(SAT) functions in a difficult perceptual discrimination task. Each experiment compared performance in blocks of trials with constant and, hence, temporally predictable RS lags against performance in blocks with variable, unpredictable RS lags. In both experiments, essentially equivalent SAT functions were observed with constant and variable RS lags. We conclude that there is little effect of advance preparation for a given processing time, suggesting that the discrimination mechanisms underlying SAT functions are driven solely by bottom-up information processing in perceptual discrimination tasks.

  1. Redox signalling and mitochondrial stress responses; lessons from inborn errors of metabolism

    Olsen, Rikke K J; Cornelius, Nanna; Gregersen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in overall cell physiology and health by integrating cellular metabolism with cellular defense and repair mechanisms in response to physiological or environmental changes or stresses. In fact, dysregulation of mitochondrial stress responses and its consequences...... in the form of oxidative stress, has been linked to a wide variety of diseases including inborn errors of metabolism. In this review we will summarize how the functional state of mitochondria -- and especially the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS), produced in connection with the respiratory...... chain -- regulates cellular stress responses by redox regulation of nuclear gene networks involved in repair systems to maintain cellular homeostasis and health. Based on our own and other's studies we re-introduce the ROS triangle model and discuss how inborn errors of mitochondrial metabolism...

  2. Is signal detection theory fundamentally flawed? A response to Balakrishnan (1998a, 1998b, 1999).

    Treisman, Michel

    2002-12-01

    For nearly 50 years, signal detection theory (SDT; Green & Swvets, 1966; Macmillan & Creelman, 1991) has been of central importance in the development of psychophysics and other areas of psychology. The theory has recently been challenged by Balakrishnan (1998b), who argues that, within SDT, an alternative index is "better justified" than d' and who claims to show (1998a, 1999) that SDT is fundamentally flawed and should be rejected. His evidence is based on new nonparametric measures that he has introduced and applied to experimental data. He believes his results show that basic assumptions of SDT are not supported-in particular, that payoff and probability manipulations do not affect the position of the decision criterion. In view of the importance of SDT in psychology, these claims deserve careful examination. They are critically reviewed here. It appears that it is Balakrishnans arguments that fail, and not SDT

  3. Behavioural fever is a synergic signal amplifying the innate immune response.

    Boltaña, Sebastian; Rey, Sonia; Roher, Nerea; Vargas, Reynaldo; Huerta, Mario; Huntingford, Felicity Anne; Goetz, Frederick William; Moore, Janice; Garcia-Valtanen, Pablo; Estepa, Amparo; Mackenzie, S

    2013-09-07

    Behavioural fever, defined as an acute change in thermal preference driven by pathogen recognition, has been reported in a variety of invertebrates and ectothermic vertebrates. It has been suggested, but so far not confirmed, that such changes in thermal regime favour the immune response and thus promote survival. Here, we show that zebrafish display behavioural fever that acts to promote extensive and highly specific temperature-dependent changes in the brain transcriptome. The observed coupling of the immune response to fever acts at the gene-environment level to promote a robust, highly specific time-dependent anti-viral response that, under viral infection, increases survival. Fish that are not offered a choice of temperatures and that therefore cannot express behavioural fever show decreased survival under viral challenge. This phenomenon provides an underlying explanation for the varied functional responses observed during systemic fever. Given the effects of behavioural fever on survival and the fact that it exists across considerable phylogenetic space, such immunity-environment interactions are likely to be under strong positive selection.

  4. Perturbation of Auxin Homeostasis and Signaling by PINOID Overexpression Induces Stress Responses in Arabidopsis

    Kumud Saini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Under normal and stress conditions plant growth require a complex interplay between phytohormones and reactive oxygen species (ROS. However, details of the nature of this crosstalk remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that PINOID (PID, a serine threonine kinase of the AGC kinase family, perturbs auxin homeostasis, which in turn modulates rosette growth and induces stress responses in Arabidopsis plants. Arabidopsis mutants and transgenic plants with altered PID expression were used to study the effect on auxin levels and stress-related responses. In the leaves of plants with ectopic PID expression an accumulation of auxin, oxidative burst and disruption of hormonal balance was apparent. Furthermore, PID overexpression led to the accumulation of antioxidant metabolites, while pid knockout mutants showed only moderate changes in stress-related metabolites. These physiological changes in the plants overexpressing PID modulated their response toward external drought and osmotic stress treatments when compared to the wild type. Based on the morphological, transcriptome, and metabolite results, we propose that perturbations in the auxin hormone levels caused by PID overexpression, along with other hormones and ROS downstream, cause antioxidant accumulation and modify growth and stress responses in Arabidopsis. Our data provide further proof for a strong correlation between auxin and stress biology.

  5. Signaling added response-independent reinforcement to assess Pavlovian processes in resistance to change and relapse.

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Fleet, James D

    2014-09-01

    Behavioral momentum theory asserts Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relations govern the persistence of operant behavior. Specifically, resistance to conditions of disruption (e.g., extinction, satiation) reflects the relation between discriminative stimuli and the prevailing reinforcement conditions. The present study assessed whether Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relations govern resistance to disruption in pigeons by arranging both response-dependent and -independent food reinforcers in two components of a multiple schedule. In one component, discrete-stimulus changes preceded response-independent reinforcers, paralleling methods that reduce Pavlovian conditioned responding to contextual stimuli. Compared to the control component with no added stimuli preceding response-independent reinforcement, response rates increased as discrete-stimulus duration increased (0, 5, 10, and 15 s) across conditions. Although resistance to extinction decreased as stimulus duration increased in the component with the added discrete stimulus, further tests revealed no effect of discrete stimuli, including other disrupters (presession food, intercomponent food, modified extinction) and reinstatement designed to control for generalization decrement. These findings call into question a straightforward conception that the stimulus-reinforcer relations governing resistance to disruption reflect the same processes as Pavlovian conditioning, as asserted by behavioral momentum theory. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  6. The Ewing sarcoma secretome and its response to activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    Hawkins, Allegra G; Basrur, Venkatesha; da Veiga Leprevost, Felipe; Pedersen, Elisabeth; Sperring, Colin; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Lawlor, Elizabeth R

    2018-01-31

    Tumor: tumor microenvironment (TME) interactions are critical for tumor progression and the composition and structure of the local extracellular matrix (ECM) are key determinants of tumor metastasis. We recently reported that activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in Ewing sarcoma cells induces widespread transcriptional changes that are associated with acquisition of a metastatic tumor phenotype. Significantly, ECM protein-encoding genes were found to be enriched among Wnt/beta-catenin induced transcripts, leading us to hypothesize that activation of canonical Wnt signaling might induce changes in the Ewing sarcoma secretome. To address this hypothesis, conditioned media from Ewing sarcoma cell lines cultured in the presence or absence of Wnt3a was collected for proteomic analysis. Label-free mass spectrometry was used to identify and quantify differentially secreted proteins. We then used in silico databases to identify only proteins annotated as secreted. Comparison of the secretomes of two Ewing sarcoma cell lines revealed numerous shared proteins, as well as a degree of heterogeneity, in both basal and Wnt-stimulated conditions. Gene set enrichment analysis of secreted proteins revealed that Wnt stimulation reproducibly resulted in increased secretion of proteins involved in ECM organization, ECM receptor interactions, and collagen formation. In particular, Wnt-stimulated Ewing sarcoma cells upregulated secretion of structural collagens, as well as matricellular proteins, such as the metastasis-associated protein, tenascin C (TNC). Interrogation of published databases confirmed reproducible correlations between Wnt/beta-catenin activation and TNC and COL1A1 expression in patient tumors. In summary, this first study of the Ewing sarcoma secretome reveals that Wnt/beta-catenin activated tumor cells upregulate secretion of ECM proteins. Such Wnt/beta-catenin mediated changes are likely to impact on tumor: TME interactions that contribute to metastatic

  7. Peripheral Signals of Food Intake in Response to Low Leptin Levels Induced by Centrifugation

    Moran, M. M.; Wade, Charles E.; Stein, T. P.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The focus of the study was to examine leptin and other peripheral signals of energy balance, following hypergravity. The study was conducted in two experiments. In experiment 1 rats were centrifuged at either 1.5, 2, or remained at 1 G. During days 8 to 14 of experiment 1, mean body mass of the 1.5 and 2 G groups was significantly (p<0.05) lower than controls. No differences were found in food intake (g/day/100 g body mass). Epididymal fat in the 2 G group was 21% lower than controls and 14% lower than the 1.5 G group. Plasma leptin was reduced from controls in the 1.5 and 2 G groups by 45 and 63%, respectively. A significant correlation was found between G load and urinary catecholamines. In experiment 2, rats were centrifuged at either 1.25, 1.5, or remained at 1 G. During days 8 to 14, body mass and food intake were similar between the 1, 1.25, and 1.5 G groups. Epididymal fat was reduced from controls in the 1.25 (14%) and 1.5 (19%) G groups. Leptin was reduced from controls in the 1.25 (45%) and 1.5 (46%) G groups. No differences were found in urinary epinephrine. Urinary norepinephrine levels were significantly higher than controls in each centrifuge group. During hypergravity exposure, food intake is the result of a complex relationship between multiple pathways, which abates the importance of leptin as a primary signal.

  8. Wound trauma mediated inflammatory signaling attenuates a tissue regenerative response in MRL/MpJ mice

    Elster Eric A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe trauma can induce pathophysiological responses that have marked inflammatory components. The development of systemic inflammation following severe thermal injury has been implicated in immune dysfunction, delayed wound healing, multi-system organ failure and increased mortality. Methods In this study, we examined the impact of thermal injury-induced systemic inflammation on the healing response of a secondary wound in the MRL/MpJ mouse model, which was anatomically remote from the primary site of trauma, a wound that typically undergoes scarless healing in this specific strain. Ear-hole wounds in MRL/MpJ mice have previously displayed accelerated healing and tissue regeneration in the absence of a secondary insult. Results Severe thermal injury in addition to distal ear-hole wounds induced marked local and systemic inflammatory responses in the lungs and significantly augmented the expression of inflammatory mediators in the ear tissue. By day 14, 61% of the ear-hole wounds from thermally injured mice demonstrated extensive inflammation with marked inflammatory cell infiltration, extensive ulceration, and various level of necrosis to the point where a large percentage (38% had to be euthanized early during the study due to extensive necrosis, inflammation and ear deformation. By day 35, ear-hole wounds in mice not subjected to thermal injury were completely closed, while the ear-hole wounds in thermally injured mice exhibited less inflammation and necrosis and only closed partially (62%. Thermal injury resulted in marked increases in serum levels of IL-6, TNFα, KC (CXCL1, and MIP-2α (CXCL2. Interestingly, attenuated early ear wound healing in the thermally injured mouse resulted in incomplete tissue regeneration in addition to a marked inflammatory response, as evidenced by the histological appearance of the wound and increased transcription of potent inflammatory mediators. Conclusion These findings suggest that the

  9. Phospholipidic signaling and vanillin production in response to salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate in Capsicum chinense J. cells.

    Altúzar-Molina, Alma R; Muñoz-Sánchez, J Armando; Vázquez-Flota, Felipe; Monforte-González, Miriam; Racagni-Di Palma, Graciela; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M Teresa

    2011-02-01

    The phospholipidic signal transduction system involves generation of second messengers by hydrolysis or changes in phosphorylation state. Several studies have shown that the signaling pathway forms part of plant response to phytoregulators such as salicylic acid (SA) and methyl jasmonate (MJ), which have been widely used to stimulate secondary metabolite production in cell cultures. An evaluation was made of the effect of SA and MJ on phospholipidic signaling and capsaicinoid production in Capsicum chinense Jacq. suspension cells. Treatment with SA inhibited phospholipase C (PLC) (EC: 3.1.4.3) and phospholipase D (PLD) (EC: 3.1.4.4) activities in vitro, but increased lipid kinase activities in vitro at different SA concentrations. Treatment with MJ produced increases in PLC and PLD activities, while lipid kinase activities were variable and dose-dependent. The production of vanillin, a precursor of capsaicinoids, increased at specific SA or MJ doses. Preincubation with neomycin, a phospholipase inhibitor, before SA or MJ treatment inhibits increase in vanillin production which suggests that phospholipidic second messengers may participate in the observed increase in vanillin production. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. The Brucella abortus virulence regulator, LovhK, is a sensor kinase in the general stress response signalling pathway.

    Kim, Hye-Sook; Willett, Jonathan W; Jain-Gupta, Neeta; Fiebig, Aretha; Crosson, Sean

    2014-11-01

    In the intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus, the general stress response (GSR) signalling system determines survival under acute stress conditions in vitro, and is required for long-term residence in a mammalian host. To date, the identity of the Brucella sensor kinase(s) that function to perceive stress and directly activate GSR signalling have remained undefined. We demonstrate that the flavin-binding sensor histidine kinase, LovhK (bab2_0652), functions as a primary B. abortus GSR sensor. LovhK rapidly and specifically phosphorylates the central GSR regulator, PhyR, and activates transcription of a set of genes that closely overlaps the known B. abortus GSR regulon. Deletion of lovhK severely compromises cell survival under defined oxidative and acid stress conditions. We further show that lovhK is required for cell survival during the early phase of mammalian cell infection and for establishment of long-term residence in a mouse infection model. Finally, we present evidence that particular regions of primary structure within the two N-terminal PAS domains of LovhK have distinct sensory roles under specific environmental conditions. This study elucidates new molecular components of a conserved signalling pathway that regulates B. abortus stress physiology and infection biology. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Specific cellular signal-transduction responses to in vivo combination therapy with ATRA, valproic acid and theophylline in acute myeloid leukemia

    Skavland, J; Jørgensen, K M [Hematology Section, Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Hadziavdic, K [Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Hovland, R [Center for Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Jonassen, I [Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Computational Biology Unit, Bergen Centre for Computational Science, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Bruserud, Ø; Gjertsen, B T, E-mail: bjorn.gjertsen@med.uib.no [Hematology Section, Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Hematology Section, Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)

    2011-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) frequently comprises mutations in genes that cause perturbation in intracellular signaling pathways, thereby altering normal responses to growth factors and cytokines. Such oncogenic cellular signal transduction may be therapeutic if targeted directly or through epigenetic regulation. We treated 24 selected elderly AML patients with all-trans retinoic acid for 2 days before adding theophylline and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00175812; EudraCT no. 2004-001663-22), and sampled 11 patients for peripheral blood at day 0, 2 and 7 for single-cell analysis of basal level and signal-transduction responses to relevant myeloid growth factors (granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-3, Flt3L, stem cell factor, erythropoietin, CXCL-12) on 10 signaling molecules (CREB, STAT1/3/5, p38, Erk1/2, Akt, c-Cbl, ZAP70/Syk and rpS6). Pretreatment analysis by unsupervised clustering and principal component analysis divided the patients into three distinguishable signaling clusters (non-potentiated, potentiated basal and potentiated signaling). Signal-transduction pathways were modulated during therapy and patients moved between the clusters. Patients with multiple leukemic clones demonstrated distinct stimulation responses and therapy-induced modulation. Individual signaling profiles together with clinical and hematological information may be used to early identify AML patients in whom epigenetic and signal-transduction targeted therapy is beneficial.

  12. Transcriptional Upregulation of DNA Damage Response Genes in Bank Voles (Myodes glareolus Inhabiting the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone

    Toni Jernfors

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR from radionuclides released into the environment can damage DNA. An expected response to exposure to environmental radionuclides, therefore, is initiation of DNA damage response (DDR pathways. Increased DNA damage is a characteristic of many organisms exposed to radionuclides but expression of DDR genes of wildlife inhabiting an area contaminated by radionuclides is poorly understood. We quantified expression of five central DDR genes Atm, Mre11, p53, Brca1, and p21 in the livers of the bank vole Myodes glareolus that inhabited areas within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ that differed in levels of ambient radioactivity, and also from control areas outside the CEZ (i.e., sites with no detectable environmental radionuclides in Ukraine. Expression of these DDR genes did not significantly differ between male and female bank voles, nor among sites within the CEZ. We found a near two-fold upregulation in the DDR initiators Mre11 and Atm in animals collected from the CEZ compared with samples from control sites. As Atm is an important regulator of oxidative stress, our data suggest that antioxidant activity may be a key component of the defense against exposure to environmental radioactivity.

  13. Pilot Evaluation of Angiogenesis Signaling Factor Response after Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Ronald, James; Nixon, Andrew B; Marin, Daniele; Gupta, Rajan T; Janas, Gemini; Chen, Willa; Suhocki, Paul V; Pabon-Ramos, Waleska; Sopko, David R; Starr, Mark D; Brady, John C; Hurwitz, Herbert I; Kim, Charles Y

    2017-10-01

    Purpose To identify changes in a broad panel of circulating angiogenesis factors after bland transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE), a purely ischemic treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods This prospective HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board. Informed written consent was obtained from all participants prior to entry into the study. Twenty-five patients (21 men; mean age, 61 years; range, 30-81 years) with Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System category 5 or biopsy-proven HCC and who were undergoing TAE were enrolled from October 15, 2014, through December 2, 2015. Nineteen plasma angiogenesis factors (angiopoietin 2; hepatocyte growth factor; platelet-derived growth factor AA and BB; placental growth factor; vascular endothelial growth factor A and D; vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, 2, and 3; osteopontin; transforming growth factor β1 and β2; thrombospondin 2; intercellular adhesion molecule 1; interleukin 6 [IL-6]; stromal cell-derived factor 1; tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1; and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 [VCAM-1]) were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays at 1 day, 2 weeks, and 5 weeks after TAE and were compared with baseline levels by using paired Wilcoxon tests. Tumor response was assessed according to modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST). Angiogenesis factor levels were compared between responders and nonresponders by mRECIST criteria by using unpaired Wilcoxon tests. Results All procedures were technically successful with no complications. Fourteen angiogenesis factors showed statistically significant changes following TAE, but most changes were transient. IL-6 was upregulated only 1 day after the procedure, but showed the largest increases of any factor. Osteopontin and VCAM-1 demonstrated sustained upregulation at all time points following TAE. At 3-month follow-up imaging, 11 patients had responses to TAE

  14. Tumor Architecture and Notch Signaling Modulate Drug Response in Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    Eberl, Markus; Mangelberger, Doris; Swanson, Jacob B; Verhaegen, Monique E; Harms, Paul W; Frohm, Marcus L; Dlugosz, Andrzej A; Wong, Sunny Y

    2018-02-12

    Hedgehog (Hh) pathway inhibitors such as vismodegib are highly effective for treating basal cell carcinoma (BCC); however, residual tumor cells frequently persist and regenerate the primary tumor upon drug discontinuation. Here, we show that BCCs are organized into two molecularly and functionally distinct compartments. Whereas interior Hh + /Notch + suprabasal cells undergo apoptosis in response to vismodegib, peripheral Hh +++ /Notch - basal cells survive throughout treatment. Inhibiting Notch specifically promotes tumor persistence without causing drug resistance, while activating Notch is sufficient to regress already established lesions. Altogether, these findings suggest that the three-dimensional architecture of BCCs establishes a natural hierarchy of drug response in the tumor and that this hierarchy can be overcome, for better or worse, by modulating Notch. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ASCIZ/ATMIN is dispensable for ATM signaling in response to replication stress.

    Liu, Rui; King, Ashleigh; Hoch, Nicolas C; Chang, Catherine; Kelly, Gemma L; Deans, Andrew J; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2017-09-01

    The ATM kinase plays critical roles in the response to DNA double-strand breaks, and can also be activated by prolonged DNA replication blocks. It has recently been proposed that replication stress-dependent ATM activation is mediated by ASCIZ (also known as ATMIN, ZNF822), an essential developmental transcription factor. In contrast, we show here that ATM activation, and phosphorylation of its substrates KAP1, p53 and H2AX in response to the replication blocking agent aphidicolin was unaffected in both immortalized and primary ASCIZ/ATMIN-deficient murine embryonic fibroblasts compared to control cells. Similar results were also obtained in human ASCIZ/ATMIN-deleted lymphoma cells. The results demonstrate that ASCIZ/ATMIN is dispensable for ATM activation, and contradict the previously reported dependence of ATM on ASCIZ/ATMIN. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Response to the Dorsal Anterior Gradient of EGFR Signaling in Drosophila Oogenesis Is Prepatterned by Earlier Posterior EGFR Activation

    Mariana Fregoso Lomas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Spatially restricted epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR activity plays a central role in patterning the follicular epithelium of the Drosophila ovary. In midoogenesis, localized EGFR activation is achieved by the graded dorsal anterior localization of its ligand, Gurken. Graded EGFR activity determines multiple dorsal anterior fates along the dorsal-ventral axis but cannot explain the sharp posterior limit of this domain. Here, we show that posterior follicle cells express the T-box transcription factors Midline and H15, which render cells unable to adopt a dorsal anterior fate in response to EGFR activation. The posterior expression of Midline and H15 is itself induced in early oogenesis by posteriorly localized EGFR signaling, defining a feedback loop in which early induction of Mid and H15 confers a molecular memory that fundamentally alters the outcome of later EGFR signaling. Spatial regulation of the EGFR pathway thus occurs both through localization of the ligand and through localized regulation of the cellular response.

  17. Differential Signaling and Sugar Exchanges in Response to Avirulent Pathogen- and Symbiont-Derived Molecules in Tobacco Cells

    Carole Pfister

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Plants interact with microbes whose ultimate aim is to exploit plant carbohydrates for their reproduction. Plant–microbe interactions (PMIs are classified according to the nature of their trophic exchanges: while mutualistic microbes trade nutrients with plants, pathogens unilaterally divert carbohydrates. The early responses following microbe recognition and the subsequent control of plant sugar distribution are still poorly understood. To further decipher PMI functionality, we used tobacco cells treated with microbial molecules mimicking pathogenic or mutualistic PMIs, namely cryptogein, a defense elicitor, and chitotetrasaccharide (CO4, which is secreted by mycorrhizal fungi. CO4 was perceived by tobacco cells and triggered widespread transient signaling components such as a sharp cytosolic Ca2+ elevation, NtrbohD-dependent H2O2 production, and MAP kinase activation. These CO4-induced events differed from those induced by cryptogein, i.e., sustained events leading to cell death. Furthermore, cryptogein treatment inhibited glucose and sucrose uptake but not fructose uptake, and promoted the expression of NtSUT and NtSWEET sugar transporters, whereas CO4 had no effect on sugar uptake and only a slight effect on NtSWEET2B expression. Our results suggest that microbial molecules induce different signaling responses that reflect microbial lifestyle and the subsequent outcome of the interaction.

  18. Behavioural fever is a synergic signal amplifying the innate immune response

    Bolta?a, Sebastian; Rey, Sonia; Roher, Nerea; Vargas, Reynaldo; Huerta, Mario; Huntingford, Felicity Anne; Goetz, Frederick William; Moore, Janice; Garcia-Valtanen, Pablo; Estepa, Amparo; MacKenzie, S.

    2013-01-01

    Behavioural fever, defined as an acute change in thermal preference driven by pathogen recognition, has been reported in a variety of invertebrates and ectothermic vertebrates. It has been suggested, but so far not confirmed, that such changes in thermal regime favour the immune response and thus promote survival. Here, we show that zebrafish display behavioural fever that acts to promote extensive and highly specific temperature-dependent changes in the brain transcriptome. The observed coup...

  19. Unfolded Protein Response Signaling and MAP Kinase Pathways Underlie Pathogenesis of Arsenic-induced Cutaneous Inflammation

    Li, Changzhao; Xu, Jianmin; Li, Fugui; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Weng, Zhiping; Wen, Jianming; Elmets, Craig A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Athar, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic exposure through drinking water is a major global public health problem and is associated with an enhanced risk of various cancers including skin cancer. In human skin, arsenic induces precancerous melanosis and keratosis, which may progress to basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma. However, the mechanism by which these pathophysiological alterations occur remains elusive. In this study, we showed that sub-chronic arsenic exposure to SKH-1 mice induced unfolded protein response (UPR)...

  20. BRIC-17 Mapping Spaceflight-Induced Hypoxic Signaling and Response in Plants

    Gilroy, Simon; Choi, Won-Gyu; Swanson, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Goals of this work are: (1) Define global changes in gene expression patterns in Arabidopsis plants grown in microgravity using whole genome microarrays (2) Compare to mutants resistant to low oxygen challenge using whole genome microarrays Also measuring root and shoot size Outcomes from this research are: (1) Provide fundamental information on plant responses to the stresses inherent in spaceflight (2) Potential for informing on genetic strategies to engineer plants for optimal growth in space

  1. Early rehabilitation of occupationally exposed persons in the Staatliches Amt fuer Atomsicherheit und Strahlenschutz der DDR. 2

    Arndt, D.; Lenz, U.; Rothe, E.; Schuettmann, W.

    1977-02-01

    Within the frame of a 3-year pilot study relating to the problem of early rehabilitation of occupationally exposed persons, 178 patients with 189 cases of illness were attended dermatologically and/or internally. Due to the high rate of improvement (67.7 %) the radiation fitness of the patients could be recovered or preserved in several cases, this being of great national economic benefit because of the high level of qualification to be found in this category of persons. The described prophylactic method of early rehabilitation is strongly recommended to the responsible medical officers as a means of optimizing their supervision activity. (author)

  2. Culture shapes a mesolimbic response to signals of dominance and subordination that associates with behavior.

    Freeman, Jonathan B; Rule, Nicholas O; Adams, Reginald B; Ambady, Nalini

    2009-08-01

    It has long been understood that culture shapes individuals' behavior, but how this is accomplished in the human brain has remained largely unknown. To examine this, we made use of a well-established cross-cultural difference in behavior: American culture tends to reinforce dominant behavior whereas, conversely, Japanese culture tends to reinforce subordinate behavior. In 17 Americans and 17 Japanese individuals, we assessed behavioral tendencies towards dominance versus subordination and measured neural responses using fMRI during the passive viewing of stimuli related to dominance and subordination. In Americans, dominant stimuli selectively engaged the caudate nucleus, bilaterally, and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), whereas these were selectively engaged by subordinate stimuli in Japanese. Correspondingly, Americans self-reported a tendency towards more dominant behavior whereas Japanese self-reported a tendency towards more subordinate behavior. Moreover, activity in the right caudate and mPFC correlated with behavioral tendencies towards dominance versus subordination, such that stronger responses in the caudate and mPFC to dominant stimuli were associated with more dominant behavior and stronger responses in the caudate and mPFC to subordinate stimuli were associated with more subordinate behavior. The findings provide a first demonstration that culture can flexibly shape functional activity in the mesolimbic reward system, which in turn may guide behavior.

  3. Xanomeline suppresses excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine responses through neural signal-mediated pathways and improves survival in lethal inflammation

    Rosas-Ballina, Mauricio; Ferrer, Sergio Valdés; Dancho, Meghan; Ochani, Mahendar; Katz, David; Cheng, Kai Fan; Olofsson, Peder S.; Chavan, Sangeeta S.; Al-Abed, Yousef; Tracey, Kevin J.; Pavlov, Valentin A.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions characterized by excessive immune cell activation and cytokine release, are associated with bidirectional immune system-brain communication, underlying sickness behavior and other physiological responses. The vagus nerve has an important role in this communication by conveying sensory information to the brain, and brain-derived immunoregulatory signals that suppress peripheral cytokine levels and inflammation. Brain muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR)-mediated cholinergic signaling has been implicated in this regulation. However, the possibility of controlling inflammation by peripheral administration of centrally-acting mAChR agonists is unexplored. To provide insight we used the centrally-acting M1 mAChR agonist xanomeline, previously developed in the context of Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. Intraperitoneal administration of xanomeline significantly suppressed serum and splenic TNF levels, alleviated sickness behavior, and increased survival during lethal murine endotoxemia. The anti-inflammatory effects of xanomeline were brain mAChR-mediated and required intact vagus nerve and splenic nerve signaling. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of xanomeline was retained for at least 20h, associated with alterations in splenic lymphocyte, and dendritic cell proportions, and decreased splenocyte responsiveness to endotoxin. These results highlight an important role of the M1 mAChR in a neural circuitry to spleen in which brain cholinergic activation lowers peripheral pro-inflammatory cytokines to levels favoring survival. The therapeutic efficacy of xanomeline was also manifested by significantly improved survival in preclinical settings of severe sepsis. These findings are of interest for strategizing novel therapeutic approaches in inflammatory diseases. PMID:25063706

  4. A NOVEL PIPELINE FOR DRUG DISCOVERY IN NEUROPSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS USING HIGH-CONTENT SINGLE-CELL SCREENING OF SIGNALLING NETWORK RESPONSES EX VIVO

    Lago Cooke, Santiago Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The current work entails the development of a novel high content platform for the measurement of kinetic ligand responses across cell signalling networks at the single-cell level in distinct PBMC subtypes ex vivo. Using automated sample preparation, fluorescent cellular barcoding and flow cytometry the platform is capable of detecting 21, 840 parallel cell signalling responses in each PBMC sample. We apply this platform to characterize the effects of neuropsychiatric treatments and CNS ligand...

  5. [Cortical potentials evoked to response to a signal to make a memory-guided saccade].

    Slavutskaia, M V; Moiseeva, V V; Shul'govskiĭ, V V

    2010-01-01

    The difference in parameters of visually guided and memory-guided saccades was shown. Increase in the memory-guided saccade latency as compared to that of the visually guided saccades may indicate the deceleration of saccadic programming on the basis of information extraction from the memory. The comparison of parameters and topography of evoked components N1 and P1 of the evoked potential on the signal to make a memory- or visually guided saccade suggests that the early stage of the saccade programming associated with the space information processing is performed predominantly with top-down attention mechanism before the memory-guided saccade and bottom-up mechanism before the visually guided saccade. The findings show that the increase in the latency of the memory-guided saccades is connected with decision making at the central stage of the saccade programming. We proposed that wave N2, which develops in the middle of the latent period of the memory-guided saccades, is correlated with this process. Topography and spatial dynamics of components N1, P1 and N2 testify that the memory-guided saccade programming is controlled by the frontal mediothalamic system of selective attention and left-hemispheric brain mechanisms of motor attention.

  6. Kin Rejection: Social Signals, Neural Response and Perceived Distress During Social Exclusion

    Sreekrishnan, Anirudh; Herrera, Tania A.; Wu, Jia; Borelli, Jessica L.; White, Lars O.; Rutherford, Helena J. V.; Mayes, Linda C.; Crowley, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Across species, kin bond together to promote survival. We sought to understand the dyadic effect of exclusion by kin (as opposed to non-kin strangers) on brain activity of the mother and her child and their subjective distress. To this end, we probed mother-child relationships with a computerized ball-toss game Cyberball. When excluded by one another, rather than by a stranger, both mothers and children exhibited a significantly pronounced frontal P2. Moreover, upon kin-rejection versus stranger-rejection, both mothers and children showed incremented left frontal positive slow waves for rejection events. Children reported more distress upon exclusion than their own mothers. Similar to past work, relatively augmented negative frontal slow wave activity predicted greater self-reported ostracism distress. This effect, generalized to the P2, was limited to mother or child- rejection by kin, with comparable magnitude of effect across kin identity (mothers vs. children). For both mothers and children, the frontal P2 peak was significantly pronounced for kin-rejection versus stranger rejection. Taken together, our results document the rapid categorization of social signals as kin-relevant and the specificity of early and late neural markers for predicting felt ostracism. PMID:24909389

  7. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling modulates antiviral immune responses: ligand metabolism rather than chemical source is the stronger predictor of outcome.

    Boule, Lisbeth A; Burke, Catherine G; Jin, Guang-Bi; Lawrence, B Paige

    2018-01-29

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) offers a compelling target to modulate the immune system. AHR agonists alter adaptive immune responses, but the consequences differ across studies. We report here the comparison of four agents representing different sources of AHR ligands in mice infected with influenza A virus (IAV): TCDD, prototype exogenous AHR agonist; PCB126, pollutant with documented human exposure; ITE, novel pharmaceutical; and FICZ, degradation product of tryptophan. All four compounds diminished virus-specific IgM levels and increased the proportion of regulatory T cells. TCDD, PCB126 and ITE, but not FICZ, reduced virus-specific IgG levels and CD8 + T cell responses. Similarly, ITE, PCB126, and TCDD reduced Th1 and Tfh cells, whereas FICZ increased their frequency. In Cyp1a1-deficient mice, all compounds, including FICZ, reduced the response to IAV. Conditional Ahr knockout mice revealed that all four compounds require AHR within hematopoietic cells. Thus, differences in the immune response to IAV likely reflect variances in quality, magnitude, and duration of AHR signaling. This indicates that binding affinity and metabolism may be stronger predictors of immune effects than a compound's source of origin, and that harnessing AHR will require finding a balance between dampening immune-mediated pathologies and maintaining sufficient host defenses against infection.

  8. Phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid in plant defence response: from protein-protein and lipid-protein interactions to hormone signalling.

    Zhao, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Phospholipase Ds (PLDs) and PLD-derived phosphatidic acids (PAs) play vital roles in plant hormonal and environmental responses and various cellular dynamics. Recent studies have further expanded the functions of PLDs and PAs into plant-microbe interaction. The molecular diversities and redundant functions make PLD-PA an important signalling complex regulating lipid metabolism, cytoskeleton dynamics, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling in plant defence through protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions or hormone signalling. Different PLD-PA signalling complexes and their targets have emerged as fast-growing research topics for understanding their numerous but not yet established roles in modifying pathogen perception, signal transduction, and downstream defence responses. Meanwhile, advanced lipidomics tools have allowed researchers to reveal further the mechanisms of PLD-PA signalling complexes in regulating lipid metabolism and signalling, and their impacts on jasmonic acid/oxylipins, salicylic acid, and other hormone signalling pathways that essentially mediate plant defence responses. This review attempts to summarize the progress made in spatial and temporal PLD/PA signalling as well as PLD/PA-mediated modification of plant defence. It presents an in-depth discussion on the functions and potential mechanisms of PLD-PA complexes in regulating actin filament/microtubule cytoskeleton, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling, and in influencing lipid metabolism-derived metabolites as critical signalling components in plant defence responses. The discussion puts PLD-PA in a broader context in order to guide future research. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Downregulation of Wip1 phosphatase modulates the cellular threshold of DNA damage signaling in mitosis

    Macurek, Libor; Benada, Jan; Müllers, Erik; Halim, Vincentius A.; Krejčíková, Kateřina; Burdová, Kamila; Pecháčková, Sona; Hodný, Zdeněk; Lindqvist, Arne; Medema, René H.; Bartek, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Cells are constantly challenged by DNA damage and protect their genome integrity by activation of an evolutionary conserved DNA damage response pathway (DDR). A central core of DDR is composed of a spatiotemporally ordered net of post-translational modifications, among which protein phosphorylation plays a major role. Activation of checkpoint kinases ATM/ATR and Chk1/2 leads to a temporal arrest in cell cycle progression (checkpoint) and allows time for DNA repair. Following DNA repair, cells re-enter the cell cycle by checkpoint recovery. Wip1 phosphatase (also called PPM1D) dephosphorylates multiple proteins involved in DDR and is essential for timely termination of the DDR. Here we have investigated how Wip1 is regulated in the context of the cell cycle. We found that Wip1 activity is downregulated by several mechanisms during mitosis. Wip1 protein abundance increases from G1 phase to G2 and declines in mitosis. Decreased abundance of Wip1 during mitosis is caused by proteasomal degradation. In addition, Wip1 is phosphorylated at multiple residues during mitosis, and this leads to inhibition of its enzymatic activity. Importantly, ectopic expression of Wip1 reduced γH2AX staining in mitotic cells and decreased the number of 53BP1 nuclear bodies in G1 cells. We propose that the combined decrease and inhibition of Wip1 in mitosis decreases the threshold necessary for DDR activation and enables cells to react adequately even to modest levels of DNA damage encountered during unperturbed mitotic progression. PMID:23255129

  10. DNA damage signaling and apoptosis in preinvasive tubal lesions of ovarian carcinoma.

    Chene, Gautier; Ouellet, Veronique; Rahimi, Kurosh; Barres, Veronique; Caceres, Katia; Meunier, Liliane; Cyr, Louis; De Ladurantaye, Manon; Provencher, Diane; Mes Masson, Anne Marie

    2015-06-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) is the most life-threatening gynecological malignancy despite surgery and chemotherapy. A better understanding of the molecular basis of the preinvasive stages might be helpful in early detection and diagnosis. Genetic instability is 1 of the characteristics shared by most human cancers, and its level is variable through precancerous lesions to advanced cancer. Because DNA damage response (DDR) has been described as 1 of the first phases in genomic instability, we investigated the level of DDR activation and the apoptosis pathway in serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC), the potential precursor of HGSC. A tissue microarray including 21 benign fallopian tubes, 21 STICs, 17 HGSCs from patients with STICs (associated ovarian cancer [AOC]) from the same individuals, and 30 HGSCs without STICs (non-AOC) was used in this study.Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the level of DDR proteins (pATM, pChk2, γH2AX, 53BP1, and TRF2), apoptosis proteins (Bcl2, BAX, and BIM), and cyclin E. The expression of all DDR proteins increased from benign fallopian tubes to STICs. The level of expression of pATM, pChk2, γH2AX, and TRF2 was also increased in STICs in comparison with AOC. BAX, BIM, and cyclin E expressions were high in STICs, whereas Bcl2 expression was low. Immunohistochemical profiles of AOC and non-AOC were also different. These results suggest an activation of the DDR and apoptosis pathways in STICs, indicating that genomic instability may occur early in the precancerous lesions of HGSC.

  11. Striatal intrinsic reinforcement signals during recognition memory: relationship to response bias and dysregulation in schizophrenia

    Daniel H Wolf

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ventral striatum (VS is a critical brain region for reinforcement learning and motivation, and VS hypofunction is implicated in psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. Providing rewards or performance feedback has been shown to activate VS. Intrinisically motivated subjects performing challenging cognitive tasks are likely to engage reinforcement circuitry even in the absence of external feedback or incentives. However, such intrinsic reinforcement responses have received little attention, have not been examined in relation to behavioral performance, and have not been evaluated for impairment in neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Here we used fMRI to examine a challenging 'old' vs. 'new' visual recognition task in healthy subjects and patients with schizophrenia. Targets were unique fractal stimuli previously presented as salient distractors in a visual oddball task, producing incidental memory encoding. Based on the prediction error theory of reinforcement learning, we hypothesized that correct target recognition would activate VS in controls, and that this activation would be greater in subjects with lower expectation of responding correctly as indexed by a more conservative response bias. We also predicted these effects would be reduced in patients with schizophrenia. Consistent with these predictions, controls activated VS and other reinforcement processing regions during correct recognition, with greater VS activation in those with a more conservative response bias. Patients did not show either effect, with significant group differences suggesting hyporesponsivity in patients to internally-generated feedback. These findings highlight the importance of accounting for intrinsic motivation and reward when studying cognitive tasks, and add to growing evidence of reward circuit dysfunction in schizophrenia that may impact cognition and function.

  12. Non-linear signal response functions and their effects on the statistical and noise cancellation properties of isotope ratio measurements by multi-collector plasma mass spectrometry

    Doherty, W.

    2013-01-01

    A nebulizer-centric response function model of the analytical inductively coupled argon plasma ion source was used to investigate the statistical frequency distributions and noise reduction factors of simultaneously measured flicker noise limited isotope ion signals and their ratios. The response function model was extended by assuming i) a single gaussian distributed random noise source (nebulizer gas pressure fluctuations) and ii) the isotope ion signal response is a parabolic function of the nebulizer gas pressure. Model calculations of ion signal and signal ratio histograms were obtained by applying the statistical method of translation to the non-linear response function model of the plasma. Histograms of Ni, Cu, Pr, Tl and Pb isotope ion signals measured using a multi-collector plasma mass spectrometer were, without exception, negative skew. Histograms of the corresponding isotope ratios of Ni, Cu, Tl and Pb were either positive or negative skew. There was a complete agreement between the measured and model calculated histogram skew properties. The nebulizer-centric response function model was also used to investigate the effect of non-linear response functions on the effectiveness of noise cancellation by signal division. An alternative noise correction procedure suitable for parabolic signal response functions was derived and applied to measurements of isotope ratios of Cu, Ni, Pb and Tl. The largest noise reduction factors were always obtained when the non-linearity of the response functions was taken into account by the isotope ratio calculation. Possible applications of the nebulizer-centric response function model to other types of analytical instrumentation, large amplitude signal noise sources (e.g., lasers, pumped nebulizers) and analytical error in isotope ratio measurements by multi-collector plasma mass spectrometry are discussed. - Highlights: ► Isotope ion signal noise is modelled as a parabolic transform of a gaussian variable. ► Flicker

  13. Participation of intercellular communication and intracellular signal transduction in the radio-adaptive response of human fibroblastic cells

    Ishii, Keiichiro; Hoshi, Yuko; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Watanabe, Masami

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the radio-adaptive response of normal cells to low-dose radiation, we irradiated human embryonic cells with low-dose X-rays and examined the changes in sensitivity to subsequent high-dose X-irradiation. When the cells were irradiated by 200 cGy, the growth ratio of the viable cells five days after the irradiation decreased to 37% of that of the cells which received no X-irradiation. When the cells received a conditioning irradiation of 10 to 20 cGy four hours before the irradiation of 200 cGy, the growth ratio increased significantly to 45-53%, and a peak was reached at a conditioning dose of 13 cGy. Cells blocked off intercellular communication either in Ca 2+ ion-free medium or in TPA added medium during the conditioning irradiation of 13 cGy did not show the improvement of growth ratio. Addition of H-7, as an inhibitor of PKC, to the medium during the conditioning irradiation inhibited the induction of the radio-adaptive response. However, addition of either inhibitor of A kinase, H-89, or inhibitor of G kinase, H-8, failed to inhibit the induction of the radio-adaptive response. These results suggest that: (1) normal cells show an adaptive response to low-dose radiation, (2) intercellular communication may play a role in radio-adaptive responses, (3) the transduction of the signal induced in cells by low-dose X-irradiation via protein kinase C was involved in radio-adaptive responses, not via A kinase nor G kinase. (author)

  14. Experimental study of a SINIS detector response time at 350 GHz signal frequency

    Lemzyakov, S.; Tarasov, M.; Mahashabde, S.; Yusupov, R.; Kuzmin, L.; Edelman, V.

    2018-03-01

    Response time constant of a SINIS bolometer integrated in an annular ring antenna was measured at a bath temperature of 100 mK. Samples comprising superconducting aluminium electrodes and normal-metal Al/Fe strip connected to electrodes via tunnel junctions were fabricated on oxidized Si substrate using shadow evaporation. The bolometer was illuminated by a fast black-body radiation source through a band-pass filter centered at 350 GHz with a passband of 7 GHz. Radiation source is a thin NiCr film on sapphire substrate. For rectangular 10÷100 μs current pulse the radiation front edge was rather sharp due to low thermal capacitance of NiCr film and low thermal conductivity of substrate at temperatures in the range 1-4 K. The rise time of the response was ~1-10 μs. This time presumably is limited by technical reasons: high dynamic resistance of series array of bolometers and capacitance of a long twisted pair wiring from SINIS bolometer to a room-temperature amplifier.

  15. Activated human T cells secrete exosomes that participate in IL-2 mediated immune response signaling.

    Jessica Wahlgren

    Full Text Available It has previously been shown that nano-meter sized vesicles (30-100 nm, exosomes, secreted by antigen presenting cells can induce T cell responses thus showing the potential of exosomes to be used as immunological tools. Additionally, activated CD3⁺ T cells can secrete exosomes that have the ability to modulate different immunological responses. Here, we investigated what effects exosomes originating from activated CD3⁺ T cells have on resting CD3⁺ T cells by studying T cell proliferation, cytokine production and by performing T cell and exosome phenotype characterization. Human exosomes were generated in vitro following CD3⁺ T cell stimulation with anti-CD28, anti-CD3 and IL-2. Our results show that exosomes purified from stimulated CD3⁺ T cells together with IL-2 were able to generate proliferation in autologous resting CD3⁺ T cells. The CD3⁺ T cells stimulated with exosomes together with IL-2 had a higher proportion of CD8⁺ T cells and had a different cytokine profile compared to controls. These results indicate that activated CD3⁺ T cells communicate with resting autologous T cells via exosomes.

  16. Shigella dysenteriae infection activates proinflammatory response through β-catenin/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Ashidha Gopal

    Full Text Available Shigella dysenteriae (S.dysenteriae the causative agent of bacillary dysentery invades the human colonic epithelium resulting in severe intestinal inflammatory response and epithelial destruction. However, the mechanism by which S.dysenteriae infection regulates proinflammatory cytokines during intestinal inflammation is still obscure. In this study, we evaluated whether the interaction of β-catenin and NF-κB regulates proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-8 by modulating GSK-3β activity during S.dysenteriae infection in rat ileal loop model. Here we demonstrated that S.dysenteriae infection stimulate β-catenin degradation which in turn decreased the association between NF-κB and β-catenin. Also, we showed that S.dysenteriae infection increased GSK-3β kinase activity which in turn phosphorylates β-catenin for its degradation by ubiquitination and upregulates IL-8 through NF-κB activation thereby leading to inflammation. Thus these findings revealed the role of β-catenin/ NF-κB and GSK-3β in modulating the inflammatory response during bacterial infection and also showed that β-catenin acts as a critical regulator of inflammation.

  17. MAP kinase-signaling controls nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in response to DNA damage and oxidative stress

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Chakraborti, Shankhamala [Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Glas, Rickard, E-mail: rickard.glas@ki.se [Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of TPPII occurs in response to different DNA damage inducers. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of TPPII is linked to ROS and anti-oxidant enzyme levels. {yields} MAPKs control nuclear accumulation of TPPII. {yields} Inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII decreases DNA damage-induced {gamma}-H2AX expression. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a continuous hazard in eukaroytic cells by their ability to cause damage to biomolecules, in particular to DNA. Previous data indicated that the cytosolic serine peptidase tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) translocates into the nucleus of most tumor cell lines in response to {gamma}-irradiation and ROS production; an event that promoted p53 expression as well as caspase-activation. We here observed that nuclear translocation of TPPII was dependent on signaling by MAP kinases, including p38MAPK. Further, this was caused by several types of DNA-damaging drugs, a DNA cross-linker (cisplatinum), an inhibitor of topoisomerase II (etoposide), and to some extent also by nucleoside-analogues (5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea). In the minority of tumor cell lines where TPPII was not translocated into the nucleus in response to DNA damage we observed reduced intracellular ROS levels, and the expression levels of redox defense systems were increased. Further, treatment with the ROS-inducer {gamma}-hexa-chloro-cyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH, lindane), an inhibitor of GAP junctions, restored nuclear translocation of TPPII in these cell lines upon {gamma}-irradiation. Moreover, blocking nuclear translocation of TPPII in etoposide-treated cells, by using a peptide-derived inhibitor (Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH), attenuated expression of {gamma}-H2AX in {gamma}-irradiated melanoma cells. Our results indicated a role for TPPII in MAPK-dependent DNA damage signaling.

  18. Regulator of G protein signaling-12 modulates the dopamine transporter in ventral striatum and locomotor responses to psychostimulants.

    Gross, Joshua D; Kaski, Shane W; Schroer, Adam B; Wix, Kimberley A; Siderovski, David P; Setola, Vincent

    2018-02-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling are proteins that accelerate the termination of effector stimulation after G protein-coupled receptor activation. Many regulators of G protein signaling proteins are highly expressed in the brain and therefore considered potential drug discovery targets for central nervous system pathologies; for example, here we show that RGS12 is highly expressed in microdissected mouse ventral striatum. Given a role for the ventral striatum in psychostimulant-induced locomotor activity, we tested whether Rgs12 genetic ablation affected behavioral responses to amphetamine and cocaine. RGS12 loss significantly decreased hyperlocomotion to lower doses of both amphetamine and cocaine; however, other outcomes of administration (sensitization and conditioned place preference) were unaffected, suggesting that RGS12 does not function in support of the rewarding properties of these psychostimulants. To test whether observed response changes upon RGS12 loss were caused by changes to dopamine transporter expression and/or function, we prepared crude membranes from the brains of wild-type and RGS12-null mice and measured dopamine transporter-selective [ 3 H]WIN 35428 binding, revealing an increase in dopamine transporter levels in the ventral-but not dorsal-striatum of RGS12-null mice. To address dopamine transporter function, we prepared striatal synaptosomes and measured [ 3 H]dopamine uptake. Consistent with increased [ 3 H]WIN 35428 binding, dopamine transporter-specific [ 3 H]dopamine uptake in RGS12-null ventral striatal synaptosomes was found to be increased. Decreased amphetamine-induced locomotor activity and increased [ 3 H]WIN 35428 binding were recapitulated with an independent RGS12-null mouse strain. Thus, we propose that RGS12 regulates dopamine transporter expression and function in the ventral striatum, affecting amphetamine- and cocaine-induced increases in dopamine levels that specifically elicit acute hyperlocomotor responses.

  19. Monocyte-Derived Signals Activate Human Natural Killer Cells in Response to Leishmania Parasites

    Messlinger, Helena; Sebald, Heidi; Heger, Lukas; Dudziak, Diana; Bogdan, Christian; Schleicher, Ulrike

    2018-01-01

    Activated natural killer (NK) cells release interferon (IFN)-γ, which is crucial for the control of intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania. In contrast to experimental murine leishmaniasis, the human NK cell response to Leishmania is still poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the interaction of human blood NK cells with promastigotes of different Leishmania species (Leishmania major, Leishmania mexicana, Leishmania infantum, and Leishmania donovani). When peripheral blood mononuclear cells or purified NK cells and monocytes (all derived from healthy blood donors from Germany without a history of leishmaniasis) were exposed to promastigotes, NK cells showed increased surface expression of the activation marker CD69. The extent of this effect varied depending on the Leishmania species; differences between dermotropic and viscerotropic L. infantum strains were not observed. Upregulation of CD69 required direct contact between monocytes and Leishmania and was partly inhibitable by anti-interleukin (IL)-18. Unexpectedly, IL-18 was undetectable in most of the supernatants (SNs) of monocyte/parasite cocultures. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of non-permeabilized cells revealed that Leishmania-infected monocytes trans-presented IL-18 to NK cells. Native, but not heat-treated SNs of monocyte/Leishmania cocultures also induced CD69 on NK cells, indicating the involvement of a soluble heat-labile factor other than IL-18. A role for the NK cell-activating cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-12, IL-15, IL-21, and IFN-α/β was excluded. The increase of CD69 was not paralleled by NK cell IFN-γ production or enhanced cytotoxicity. However, prior exposure of NK cells to Leishmania parasites synergistically increased their IFN-γ release in response to IL-12, which was dependent on endogenous IL-18. CD1c+ dendritic cells were identified as possible source of Leishmania-induced IL-12. Finally, we observed that direct contact between Leishmania and NK cells reduced the

  20. Monocyte-Derived Signals Activate Human Natural Killer Cells in Response to Leishmania Parasites

    Helena Messlinger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated natural killer (NK cells release interferon (IFN-γ, which is crucial for the control of intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania. In contrast to experimental murine leishmaniasis, the human NK cell response to Leishmania is still poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the interaction of human blood NK cells with promastigotes of different Leishmania species (Leishmania major, Leishmania mexicana, Leishmania infantum, and Leishmania donovani. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells or purified NK cells and monocytes (all derived from healthy blood donors from Germany without a history of leishmaniasis were exposed to promastigotes, NK cells showed increased surface expression of the activation marker CD69. The extent of this effect varied depending on the Leishmania species; differences between dermotropic and viscerotropic L. infantum strains were not observed. Upregulation of CD69 required direct contact between monocytes and Leishmania and was partly inhibitable by anti-interleukin (IL-18. Unexpectedly, IL-18 was undetectable in most of the supernatants (SNs of monocyte/parasite cocultures. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of non-permeabilized cells revealed that Leishmania-infected monocytes trans-presented IL-18 to NK cells. Native, but not heat-treated SNs of monocyte/Leishmania cocultures also induced CD69 on NK cells, indicating the involvement of a soluble heat-labile factor other than IL-18. A role for the NK cell-activating cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-12, IL-15, IL-21, and IFN-α/β was excluded. The increase of CD69 was not paralleled by NK cell IFN-γ production or enhanced cytotoxicity. However, prior exposure of NK cells to Leishmania parasites synergistically increased their IFN-γ release in response to IL-12, which was dependent on endogenous IL-18. CD1c+ dendritic cells were identified as possible source of Leishmania-induced IL-12. Finally, we observed that direct contact between Leishmania and NK cells

  1. Age-related differences in signaling efficiency of human lens cells underpin differential wound healing response rates following cataract surgery.

    Dawes, Lucy Jean; Duncan, George; Wormstone, Ian Michael

    2013-01-14

    Cataract surgery is blighted by posterior capsule opacification (PCO), which is more severe and frequent in the young than the elderly (>60 years). Our aim was to understand the biological basis for these age-related differences in PCO/wound healing rates. Human capsular bags were prepared by cataract surgery on donor lenses (young [60 years] groups) and maintained in serum-free Eagle's minimum essential medium. Cell growth was determined using the MTS assay. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) levels were determined using ELISA. Protein synthesis rates were elucidated by 35S-methionine incorporation. U0126, SB203580, and SP600125 were used to disrupt ERK-, p38-, and JNK-mediated signaling, respectively. Level of total and phospho-ERK, -c-jun, -P38, and -JNK plus cytokines were detected using a BIOPLEX array system. Following a 2-day culture period, significant decreases in IL-1β and IL-6, and increases in IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, and VEGF in the >60 years group were observed compared with their younger counterparts. Capsular bags (cells and capsule) from aged donors contained greater than or equal levels of HGF and FGF than younger counterparts and had greater rates of protein synthesis. Inhibition of ERK, p38, and JNK signaling significantly suppressed cell coverage on the posterior capsule. pERK, p-c-jun, p-p38, and pJNK were consistently lower in aged cell populations; total signaling protein expression was unaffected by age. Serum stimulation increased pERK, p-c-jun, and pJNK levels in cells of all ages; p-p38 was significantly increased in the >60 years group only. Ligand availability to cells is not a limiting factor as we age, but the ability to convert this resource into signaling activity is. We therefore propose that overall signaling efficiency is reduced as a function of age, which consequently limits wound-healing response rates after injury.

  2. Resveratrol modulates the inflammatory response via an estrogen receptor-signal integration network

    Nwachukwu, Jerome C; Srinivasan, Sathish; Bruno, Nelson E; Parent, Alexander A; Hughes, Travis S; Pollock, Julie A; Gjyshi, Olsi; Cavett, Valerie; Nowak, Jason; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben D; Houtman, René; Griffin, Patrick R; Kojetin, Douglas J; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Conkright, Michael D; Nettles, Kendall W

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol has beneficial effects on aging, inflammation and metabolism, which are thought to result from activation of the lysine deacetylase, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), the cAMP pathway, or AMP-activated protein kinase. In this study, we report that resveratrol acts as a pathway-selective estrogen receptor-α (ERα) ligand to modulate the inflammatory response but not cell proliferation. A crystal structure of the ERα ligand-binding domain (LBD) as a complex with resveratrol revealed a unique perturbation of the coactivator-binding surface, consistent with an altered coregulator recruitment profile. Gene expression analyses revealed significant overlap of TNFα genes modulated by resveratrol and estradiol. Furthermore, the ability of resveratrol to suppress interleukin-6 transcription was shown to require ERα and several ERα coregulators, suggesting that ERα functions as a primary conduit for resveratrol activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02057.001 PMID:24771768

  3. Autoshaping in the rat: conditioned licking response to a stimulus that signals sucrose reinforcement.

    Reilly, Steve; Grutzmacher, Richard P.

    2002-07-31

    The present experiments were designed to determine if repeated presentations of an empty sipper tube (the conditioned stimulus or CS) with the response-independent delivery of a sucrose solution (the unconditioned stimulus or US) from a second spout results in the development of Pavlovian conditioned responding. In Experiment 1, rats in the experimental condition received paired CS-US presentations whereas subjects in the control condition were exposed to random presentations of CS and US. In Experiment 2, an additional control condition (CS alone) was included and, to encourage generalized responding between the US and CS, the CS tube was filled with water for all groups. The results of both experiments indicate that the CS-directed responding in the paired CS-US condition was Pavlovian in nature. Thus, the present procedure serves as an autoshaping task in which conditioned licking is generated.

  4. Decidual Stromal Cell Response to Paracrine Signals from the Trophoblast: Amplification of Immune and Angiogenic Modulators

    Hess, AP; Hamilton, AE; Talbi, S

    2007-01-01

    During the invasive phase of implantation, trophoblasts and maternal decidual stromal cells secrete products that regulate trophoblast differentiation and migration into the maternal endometrium. Paracrine interactions between the extravillous trophoblast and the maternal decidua are important...... a functional genomics approach to investigate these paracrine interactions. Human endometrial stromal cells were decidualized with progesterone and were further treated with conditioned media (CM) from human trophoblasts (TCM) or, as a control, with conditioned media (CCM) from non-decidualized stromal cells...... regulated groups. The data demonstrate a significant induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as angiogenic/static factors in decidualized endometrial stromal cells in response to trophoblast-secreted products. The data suggest that the trophoblast acts to alter the local immune...

  5. Modelling the collective response of heterogeneous cell populations to stationary gradients and chemical signal relay

    Pineda, M.; Eftimie, R.

    2017-12-01

    The directed motion of cell aggregates toward a chemical source occurs in many relevant biological processes. Understanding the mechanisms that control this complex behavior is of great relevance for our understanding of developmental biological processes and many diseases. In this paper, we consider a self-propelled particle model for the movement of heterogeneous subpopulations of chemically interacting cells towards an imposed stable chemical gradient. Our simulations show explicitly how self-organisation of cell populations (which could lead to engulfment or complete cell segregation) can arise from the heterogeneity of chemotactic responses alone. This new result complements current theoretical and experimental studies that emphasise the role of differential cell-cell adhesion on self-organisation and spatial structure of cellular aggregates. We also investigate how the speed of individual cell aggregations increases with the chemotactic sensitivity of the cells, and decreases with the number of cells inside the aggregates

  6. The threshold for conscious report: Signal loss and response bias in visual and frontal cortex.

    van Vugt, Bram; Dagnino, Bruno; Vartak, Devavrat; Safaai, Houman; Panzeri, Stefano; Dehaene, Stanislas; Roelfsema, Pieter R

    2018-05-04

    Why are some visual stimuli consciously detected, whereas others remain subliminal? We investigated the fate of weak visual stimuli in the visual and frontal cortex of awake monkeys trained to report stimulus presence. Reported stimuli were associated with strong sustained activity in the frontal cortex, and frontal activity was weaker and quickly decayed for unreported stimuli. Information about weak stimuli could be lost at successive stages en route from the visual to the frontal cortex, and these propagation failures were confirmed through microstimulation of area V1. Fluctuations in response bias and sensitivity during perception of identical stimuli were traced back to prestimulus brain-state markers. A model in which stimuli become consciously reportable when they elicit a nonlinear ignition process in higher cortical areas explained our results. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  7. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to environmental water samples.

    Gorelick, Daniel A; Iwanowicz, Luke R; Hung, Alice L; Blazer, Vicki S; Halpern, Marnie E

    2014-04-01

    Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ERs) in the larval heart compared with the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit tissue-specific effects similar to those of BPA and genistein, or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of ER genes by RNA in situ hybridization. We observed selective patterns of ER activation in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue specificity in ER activation was due to differences in the expression of ER subtypes. ERα was expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 had the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activated the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero was associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves.

  8. DNA damage response and spindle assembly checkpoint function throughout the cell cycle to ensure genomic integrity.

    Katherine S Lawrence

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Errors in replication or segregation lead to DNA damage, mutations, and aneuploidies. Consequently, cells monitor these events and delay progression through the cell cycle so repair precedes division. The DNA damage response (DDR, which monitors DNA integrity, and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, which responds to defects in spindle attachment/tension during metaphase of mitosis and meiosis, are critical for preventing genome instability. Here we show that the DDR and SAC function together throughout the cell cycle to ensure genome integrity in C. elegans germ cells. Metaphase defects result in enrichment of SAC and DDR components to chromatin, and both SAC and DDR are required for metaphase delays. During persistent metaphase arrest following establishment of bi-oriented chromosomes, stability of the metaphase plate is compromised in the absence of DDR kinases ATR or CHK1 or SAC components, MAD1/MAD2, suggesting SAC functions in metaphase beyond its interactions with APC activator CDC20. In response to DNA damage, MAD2 and the histone variant CENPA become enriched at the nuclear periphery in a DDR-dependent manner. Further, depletion of either MAD1 or CENPA results in loss of peripherally associated damaged DNA. In contrast to a SAC-insensitive CDC20 mutant, germ cells deficient for SAC or CENPA cannot efficiently repair DNA damage, suggesting that SAC mediates DNA repair through CENPA interactions with the nuclear periphery. We also show that replication perturbations result in relocalization of MAD1/MAD2 in human cells, suggesting that the role of SAC in DNA repair is conserved.

  9. Training cows to approach the milking unit in response to acoustic signals in an automatic milking system during the grazing season

    Wredle, E.; Munksgaard, Lene; Sporndly, E.

    2006-01-01

    connected to the automatic milking system. The cows were trained indoors using an operant conditioning technique. All cows had 12 training sessions with 7–12 signals given at variable intervals. An evaluation period followed the training period. During evaluation, the trained cows received an individual...... cows housed in a barn with an automatic milking system. A small box emitting an acoustic signal was attached to the collar of the 10 cows. During the training period, the signal was induced manually from a distance and during the evaluation period, signals were activated automatically from a computer...... (with no signal) in early season was 9.7 ± 0.18 h (P 7 ± 0.56 h and 9.0 ± 0.20 h for the five cows trained in late season and a reference group (with no signal), respectively. During the evaluation in a full herd situation, the response ranged between 15 and 75...

  10. High-dimensional analysis of the aging immune system: verification of age-associated differences in immune signaling responses in healthy donors.

    Longo, Diane M; Louie, Brent; Ptacek, Jason; Friedland, Greg; Evensen, Erik; Putta, Santosh; Atallah, Michelle; Spellmeyer, David; Wang, Ena; Pos, Zoltan; Marincola, Francesco M; Schaeffer, Andrea; Lukac, Suzanne; Railkar, Radha; Beals, Chan R; Cesano, Alessandra; Carayannopoulos, Leonidas N; Hawtin, Rachael E

    2014-06-21

    Single-cell network profiling (SCNP) is a multiparametric flow cytometry-based approach that simultaneously measures evoked signaling in multiple cell subsets. Previously, using the SCNP approach, age-associated immune signaling responses were identified in a cohort of 60 healthy donors. In the current study, a high-dimensional analysis of intracellular signaling was performed by measuring 24 signaling nodes in 7 distinct immune cell subsets within PBMCs in an independent cohort of 174 healthy donors [144 elderly (>65 yrs); 30 young (25-40 yrs)]. Associations between age and 9 immune signaling responses identified in the previously published 60 donor cohort were confirmed in the current study. Furthermore, within the current study cohort, 48 additional immune signaling responses differed significantly between young and elderly donors. These associations spanned all profiled modulators and immune cell subsets. These results demonstrate that SCNP, a systems-based approach, can capture the complexity of the cellular mechanisms underlying immunological aging. Further, the confirmation of age associations in an independent donor cohort supports the use of SCNP as a tool for identifying reproducible predictive biomarkers in areas such as vaccine response and response to cancer immunotherapies.

  11. Chaoborus and gasterosteus anti-predator responses in Daphnia pulex are mediated by independent cholinergic and gabaergic neuronal signals.

    Linda C Weiss

    Full Text Available Many prey species evolved inducible defense strategies that protect effectively against predation threats. Especially the crustacean Daphnia emerged as a model system for studying the ecology and evolution of inducible defenses. Daphnia pulex e.g. shows different phenotypic adaptations against vertebrate and invertebrate predators. In response to the invertebrate phantom midge larvae Chaoborus (Diptera D. pulex develops defensive morphological defenses (neckteeth. Cues originating from predatory fish result in life history changes in which resources are allocated from somatic growth to reproduction. While there are hints that responses against Chaoborus cues are transmitted involving cholinergic neuronal pathways, nothing is known about the neurophysiology underlying the transmission of fish related cues. We investigated the neurophysiological basis underlying the activation of inducible defenses in D. pulex using induction assays with the invertebrate predator Chaoborus and the three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus. Predator-specific cues were combined with neuro-effective substances that stimulated or inhibited the cholinergic and gabaergic nervous system. We show that cholinergic-dependent pathways are involved in the perception and transmission of Chaoborus cues, while GABA was not involved. Thus, the cholinergic nervous system independently mediates the development of morphological defenses in response to Chaoborus cues. In contrast, only the inhibitory effect of GABA significantly influence fish-induced life history changes, while the application of cholinergic stimulants had no effect in combination with fish related cues. Our results show that cholinergic stimulation mediates signal transmission of Chaoborus cues leading to morphological defenses. Fish cues, which are responsible for predator-specific life history adaptations involve gabaergic control. Our study shows that both pathways are independent and thus potentially

  12. Retinoic Acid Signaling in B Cells Is Required for the Generation of an Effective T-Independent Immune Response.

    Marks, Ellen; Ortiz, Carla; Pantazi, Eirini; Bailey, Charlotte S; Lord, Graham M; Waldschmidt, Thomas J; Noelle, Randolph J; Elgueta, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) plays an important role in the balance of inflammation and tolerance in T cells. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that RA facilitates IgA isotype switching in B cells in vivo . However, it is unclear whether RA has a direct effect on T-independent B cell responses in vivo . To address this question, we generated a mouse model where RA signaling is specifically silenced in the B cell lineage. This was achieved through the overexpression of a dominant negative receptor α for RA (dnRARα) in the B cell lineage. In this model, we found a dramatic reduction in marginal zone (MZ) B cells and accumulation of transitional 2 B cells in the spleen. We also observed a reduction in B1 B cells in the peritoneum with a defect in the T-independent B cell response against 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl. This was not a result of inhibited development of B cells in the bone marrow, but likely the result of both defective expression of S1P 1 in MZ B cells and a defect in the development of MZ and B1 B cells. This suggests that RARα expression in B cells is important for B cell frequency in the MZ and peritoneum, which is crucial for the generation of T-independent humoral responses.

  13. Retinoic Acid Signaling in B Cells Is Required for the Generation of an Effective T-Independent Immune Response

    Marks, Ellen; Ortiz, Carla; Pantazi, Eirini; Bailey, Charlotte S.; Lord, Graham M.; Waldschmidt, Thomas J.; Noelle, Randolph J.; Elgueta, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) plays an important role in the balance of inflammation and tolerance in T cells. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that RA facilitates IgA isotype switching in B cells in vivo. However, it is unclear whether RA has a direct effect on T-independent B cell responses in vivo. To address this question, we generated a mouse model where RA signaling is specifically silenced in the B cell lineage. This was achieved through the overexpression of a dominant negative receptor α for RA (dnRARα) in the B cell lineage. In this model, we found a dramatic reduction in marginal zone (MZ) B cells and accumulation of transitional 2 B cells in the spleen. We also observed a reduction in B1 B cells in the peritoneum with a defect in the T-independent B cell response against 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl. This was not a result of inhibited development of B cells in the bone marrow, but likely the result of both defective expression of S1P1 in MZ B cells and a defect in the development of MZ and B1 B cells. This suggests that RARα expression in B cells is important for B cell frequency in the MZ and peritoneum, which is crucial for the generation of T-independent humoral responses. PMID:28066447

  14. SNT-2 interacts with ERK2 and negatively regulates ERK2 signaling in response to EGF stimulation

    Huang Lin; Gotoh, Noriko; Zhang Shengliang; Shibuya, Masabumi; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Tsuchida, Nobuo

    2004-01-01

    The control of cellular responses with fibroblast growth factors and neurotrophins is mediated through membrane-linked docking proteins, SNT (suc1-binding neurotrophic target)-1/FRS2α and SNT-2/FRS2β. ERK1/2 are members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family that regulate diverse cellular activities in response to various stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that SNT-2 does not become tyrosine phosphorylated significantly in response to EGF but forms a complex with ERK2 via the region of 186-252 amino acid residues, and the complex formation is enhanced upon EGF stimulation. SNT-2 downregulates ERK2 phosphorylation, suppresses and delays ERK2 nuclear accumulation which occurs following EGF stimulation. In contrast, the mutant SNT-2 which carries deletion of 186-252 amino acids and lacks ERK2 binding does not have these effects. These observations suggest that SNT-2 negatively regulates ERK2 signaling activated via EGF stimulation through direct binding to ERK2

  15. Protein Profiles Reveal Diverse Responsive Signaling Pathways in Kernels of Two Maize Inbred Lines with Contrasting Drought Sensitivity

    Liming Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress is a major factor that contributes to disease susceptibility and yield loss in agricultural crops. To identify drought responsive proteins and explore metabolic pathways involved in maize tolerance to drought stress, two maize lines (B73 and Lo964 with contrasting drought sensitivity were examined. The treatments of drought and well water were applied at 14 days after pollination (DAP, and protein profiles were investigated in developing kernels (35 DAP using iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation. Proteomic analysis showed that 70 and 36 proteins were significantly altered in their expression under drought treatments in B73 and Lo964, respectively. The numbers and levels of differentially expressed proteins were generally higher in the sensitive genotype, B73, implying an increased sensitivity to drought given the function of the observed differentially expressed proteins, such as redox homeostasis, cell rescue/defense, hormone regulation and protein biosynthesis and degradation. Lo964 possessed a more stable status with fewer differentially expressed proteins. However, B73 seems to rapidly initiate signaling pathways in response to drought through adjusting diverse defense pathways. These changes in protein expression allow for the production of a drought stress-responsive network in maize kernels.

  16. GSK-3α directly regulates β-adrenergic signaling and the response of the heart to hemodynamic stress in mice

    Zhou, Jibin; Lal, Hind; Chen, Xiongwen; Shang, Xiying; Song, Jianliang; Li, Yingxin; Kerkela, Risto; Doble, Bradley W.; MacAulay, Katrina; DeCaul, Morgan; Koch, Walter J.; Farber, John; Woodgett, James; Gao, Erhe; Force, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) family of serine/threonine kinases consists of 2 highly related isoforms, α and β. Although GSK-3β has an important role in cardiac development, much remains unknown about the function of either GSK-3 isoform in the postnatal heart. Herein, we present what we believe to be the first studies defining the role of GSK-3α in the mouse heart using gene targeting. Gsk3a–/– mice over 2 months of age developed progressive cardiomyocyte and cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction. Following thoracic aortic constriction in young mice, we observed enhanced hypertrophy that rapidly transitioned to ventricular dilatation and contractile dysfunction. Surprisingly, markedly impaired β-adrenergic responsiveness was found at both the organ and cellular level. This phenotype was reproduced by acute treatment of WT cardiomyocytes with a small molecule GSK-3 inhibitor, confirming that the response was not due to a chronic adaptation to LV dysfunction. Thus, GSK-3α appears to be the central regulator of a striking range of essential processes, including acute and direct positive regulation of β-adrenergic responsiveness. In the absence of GSK-3α, the heart cannot respond effectively to hemodynamic stress and rapidly fails. Our findings identify what we believe to be a new paradigm of regulation of β-adrenergic signaling and raise concerns given the rapid expansion of drug development targeting GSK-3. PMID:20516643

  17. TOR complex 2-Ypk1 signaling is an essential positive regulator of the general amino acid control response and autophagy.

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Graef, Martin; Nunnari, Jodi; Powers, Ted

    2014-07-22

    The highly conserved Target of Rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a central regulator of cell growth and metabolism in response to nutrient availability. TOR functions in two structurally and functionally distinct complexes, TOR Complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR Complex 2 (TORC2). Through TORC1, TOR negatively regulates autophagy, a conserved process that functions in quality control and cellular homeostasis and, in this capacity, is part of an adaptive nutrient deprivation response. Here we demonstrate that during amino acid starvation TOR also operates independently as a positive regulator of autophagy through the conserved TORC2 and its downstream target protein kinase, Ypk1. Under these conditions, TORC2-Ypk1 signaling negatively regulates the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, to enable the activation of the amino acid-sensing eIF2α kinase, Gcn2, and to promote autophagy. Our work reveals that the TORC2 pathway regulates autophagy in an opposing manner to TORC1 to provide a tunable response to cellular metabolic status.

  18. Peripheral temperature drop in response to anticipation and consumption of a signaled palatable reward in laying hens (Gallus domesticus).

    Moe, Randi Oppermann; Stubsjøen, Solveig Marie; Bohlin, Jon; Flø, Andreas; Bakken, Morten

    2012-06-25

    The present study describes effects of anticipation and consumption of a palatable reward on comb surface temperature. The purpose was to investigate temperature responses as a potential physiological indicator of positive emotional states in laying hens. A rise in body temperature in response to stimuli predictive of or during exposure to unpleasant events has been interpreted as evidence of emotions in mammals and avians. However, this phenomenon has so far only been studied during anticipation of or exposure to negative events; i.e., emotions of a negative valence. Infrared thermography was used to record potential alterations in comb surface temperature to a conditioned cue signaling a reward (mealworms) and during reward delivery. On average, comb temperature dropped 1.5 °C (95% CI: +/-1.2 °C) after exposure to CS and consumption of reward (p~0.0014) when initial comb temperature was above 30 °C. Such temperature drop indicates a peripheral vasoconstriction and has clear resemblances to emotional fever as seen during negative emotional states. Thus, we propose that a drop in peripheral temperature reflects emotional arousal more than emotional valence. Substantial temperature responses due to diet-induced thermogenesis were found, further emphasizing a cautious interpretation of altered comb temperature in studies of animal welfare. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A p53-independent role for the MDM2 antagonist Nutlin-3 in DNA damage response initiation

    Kumar Sonia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian DNA-damage response (DDR has evolved to protect genome stability and maximize cell survival following DNA-damage. One of the key regulators of the DDR is p53, itself tightly regulated by MDM2. Following double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs, mediators including ATM are recruited to the site of DNA-damage. Subsequent phosphorylation of p53 by ATM and ATM-induced CHK2 results in p53 stabilization, ultimately intensifying transcription of p53-responsive genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle checkpoint control and apoptosis. Methods In the current study, we investigated the stabilization and activation of p53 and associated DDR proteins in response to treatment of human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116p53+/+ with the MDM2 antagonist, Nutlin-3. Results Using immunoblotting, Nutlin-3 was observed to stabilize p53, and activate p53 target proteins. Unexpectedly, Nutlin-3 also mediated phosphorylation of p53 at key DNA-damage-specific serine residues (Ser15, 20 and 37. Furthermore, Nutlin-3 induced activation of CHK2 and ATM - proteins required for DNA-damage-dependent phosphorylation and activation of p53, and the phosphorylation of BRCA1 and H2AX - proteins known to be activated specifically in response to DNA damage. Indeed, using immunofluorescent labeling, Nutlin-3 was seen to induce formation of γH2AX foci, an early hallmark of the DDR. Moreover, Nutlin-3 induced phosphorylation of key DDR proteins, initiated cell cycle arrest and led to formation of γH2AX foci in cells lacking p53, whilst γH2AX foci were also noted in MDM2-deficient cells. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first solid evidence showing a secondary role for Nutlin-3 as a DDR triggering agent, independent of p53 status, and unrelated to its role as an MDM2 antagonist.

  20. HTLV-1 Tax upregulates early growth response protein 1 through nuclear factor-κB signaling.

    Huang, Qingsong; Niu, Zhiguo; Han, Jingxian; Liu, Xihong; Lv, Zhuangwei; Li, Huanhuan; Yuan, Lixiang; Li, Xiangping; Sun, Shuming; Wang, Hui; Huang, Xinxiang

    2017-08-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a complex retrovirus that causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in susceptible individuals. The HTLV-1-encoded oncoprotein Tax induces persistent activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. Early growth response protein 1 (EGR1) is overexpressed in HTLV-1-infected T cell lines and ATL cells. Here, we showed that both Tax expression and HTLV-1 infection promoted EGR1 overexpression. Loss of the NF-κB binding site in the EGR1 promotor or inhibition of NF-κB activation reduced Tax-induced EGR1 upregulation. Tax mutants unable to activate NF-κB induced only slight EGR1 upregulation as compared with wild-type Tax, confirming NF-κB pathway involvement in EGR1 regulation. Tax also directly interacted with the EGR1 protein and increased endogenous EGR1 stability. Elevated EGR1 in turn promoted p65 nuclear translocation and increased NF-κB activation. These results demonstrate a positive feedback loop between EGR1 expression and NF-κB activation in HTLV-1-infected and Tax-expressing cells. Both NF-κB activation and Tax-induced EGR1 stability upregulated EGR1, which in turn enhanced constitutive NF-κB activation and facilitated ATL progression in HTLV-1-infected cells. These findings suggest EGR1 may be an effective anti-ATL therapeutic target.

  1. Staphylococcal Bap Proteins Build Amyloid Scaffold Biofilm Matrices in Response to Environmental Signals.

    Agustina Taglialegna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are communities of bacteria that grow encased in an extracellular matrix that often contains proteins. The spatial organization and the molecular interactions between matrix scaffold proteins remain in most cases largely unknown. Here, we report that Bap protein of Staphylococcus aureus self-assembles into functional amyloid aggregates to build the biofilm matrix in response to environmental conditions. Specifically, Bap is processed and fragments containing at least the N-terminus of the protein become aggregation-prone and self-assemble into amyloid-like structures under acidic pHs and low concentrations of calcium. The molten globule-like state of Bap fragments is stabilized upon binding of the cation, hindering its self-assembly into amyloid fibers. These findings define a dual function for Bap, first as a sensor and then as a scaffold protein to promote biofilm development under specific environmental conditions. Since the pH-driven multicellular behavior mediated by Bap occurs in coagulase-negative staphylococci and many other bacteria exploit Bap-like proteins to build a biofilm matrix, the mechanism of amyloid-like aggregation described here may be widespread among pathogenic bacteria.

  2. Single cell analysis of Vibrio harveyi uncovers functional heterogeneity in response to quorum sensing signals

    Anetzberger Claudia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio harveyi and closely related species are important pathogens in aquaculture. A complex quorum sensing cascade involving three autoinducers controls bioluminescence and several genes encoding virulence factors. Single cell analysis of a V. harveyi population has already indicated intercellular heterogeneity in the production of bioluminescence. This study was undertaken to analyze the expression of various autoinducer-dependent genes in individual cells. Results Here we used reporter strains bearing promoter::gfp fusions to monitor the induction/repression of three autoinducer-regulated genes in wild type conjugates at the single cell level. Two genes involved in pathogenesis - vhp and vscP, which code for an exoprotease and a component of the type III secretion system, respectively, and luxC (the first gene in the lux operon were chosen for analysis. The lux operon and the exoprotease gene are induced, while vscP is repressed at high cell density. As controls luxS and recA, whose expression is not dependent on autoinducers, were examined. The responses of the promoter::gfp fusions in individual cells from the same culture ranged from no to high induction. Importantly, simultaneous analysis of two autoinducer induced phenotypes, bioluminescence (light detection and exoproteolytic activity (fluorescence of a promoter::gfp fusion, in single cells provided evidence for functional heterogeneity within a V. harveyi population. Conclusions Autoinducers are not only an indicator for cell density, but play a pivotal role in the coordination of physiological activities within the population.

  3. Skeletal muscle myoblasts possess a stretch-responsive local angiotensin signalling system.

    Johnston, Adam P W; Baker, Jeff; De Lisio, Michael; Parise, Gianni

    2011-06-01

    A paucity of information exists regarding the presence of local renin-angiotensin systems (RASs) in skeletal muscle and associated muscle stem cells. Skeletal muscle and muscle stem cells were isolated from C57BL/6 mice and examined for the presence of a local RAS using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry (IHC), Western blotting and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Furthermore, the effect of mechanical stimulation on RAS member gene expression was analysed. Whole skeletal muscle, primary myoblasts and C2C12 derived myoblasts and myotubes differentially expressed members of the RAS including angiotensinogen, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT(1)) and type 2 (AT(2)). Renin transcripts were never detected, however, mRNA for the 'renin-like' enzyme cathepsin D was observed and Ang I and Ang II were identified in cell culture supernatants from proliferating myoblasts. AT(1) appeared to co-localise with polymerised actin filaments in proliferating myoblasts and was primarily found in the nucleus of terminally differentiated myotubes. Furthermore, mechanical stretch of proliferating and differentiating C2C12 cells differentially induced mRNA expression of angiotensinogen, AT(1) and AT(2). Proliferating and differentiated muscle stem cells possess a local stress-responsive RAS in vitro. The precise function of a local RAS in myoblasts remains unknown. However, evidence presented here suggests that Ang II may be a regulator of skeletal muscle myoblasts.

  4. Single cell analysis of Vibrio harveyi uncovers functional heterogeneity in response to quorum sensing signals.

    Anetzberger, Claudia; Schell, Ursula; Jung, Kirsten

    2012-09-18

    Vibrio harveyi and closely related species are important pathogens in aquaculture. A complex quorum sensing cascade involving three autoinducers controls bioluminescence and several genes encoding virulence factors. Single cell analysis of a V. harveyi population has already indicated intercellular heterogeneity in the production of bioluminescence. This study was undertaken to analyze the expression of various autoinducer-dependent genes in individual cells. Here we used reporter strains bearing promoter::gfp fusions to monitor the induction/repression of three autoinducer-regulated genes in wild type conjugates at the single cell level. Two genes involved in pathogenesis - vhp and vscP, which code for an exoprotease and a component of the type III secretion system, respectively, and luxC (the first gene in the lux operon) were chosen for analysis. The lux operon and the exoprotease gene are induced, while vscP is repressed at high cell density. As controls luxS and recA, whose expression is not dependent on autoinducers, were examined. The responses of the promoter::gfp fusions in individual cells from the same culture ranged from no to high induction. Importantly, simultaneous analysis of two autoinducer induced phenotypes, bioluminescence (light detection) and exoproteolytic activity (fluorescence of a promoter::gfp fusion), in single cells provided evidence for functional heterogeneity within a V. harveyi population. Autoinducers are not only an indicator for cell density, but play a pivotal role in the coordination of physiological activities within the population.

  5. Barcoding T Cell Calcium Response Diversity with Methods for Automated and Accurate Analysis of Cell Signals (MAAACS)

    Sergé, Arnauld; Bernard, Anne-Marie; Phélipot, Marie-Claire; Bertaux, Nicolas; Fallet, Mathieu; Grenot, Pierre; Marguet, Didier; He, Hai-Tao; Hamon, Yannick

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a series of experimental procedures enabling sensitive calcium monitoring in T cell populations by confocal video-microscopy. Tracking and post-acquisition analysis was performed using Methods for Automated and Accurate Analysis of Cell Signals (MAAACS), a fully customized program that associates a high throughput tracking algorithm, an intuitive reconnection routine and a statistical platform to provide, at a glance, the calcium barcode of a population of individual T-cells. Combined with a sensitive calcium probe, this method allowed us to unravel the heterogeneity in shape and intensity of the calcium response in T cell populations and especially in naive T cells, which display intracellular calcium oscillations upon stimulation by antigen presenting cells. PMID:24086124

  6. Critical role of gap junction communication, calcium and nitric oxide signaling in bystander responses to focal photodynamic injury.

    Calì, Bianca; Ceolin, Stefano; Ceriani, Federico; Bortolozzi, Mario; Agnellini, Andrielly H R; Zorzi, Veronica; Predonzani, Andrea; Bronte, Vincenzo; Molon, Barbara; Mammano, Fabio

    2015-04-30

    Ionizing and nonionizing radiation affect not only directly targeted cells but also surrounding "bystander" cells. The underlying mechanisms and therapeutic role of bystander responses remain incompletely defined. Here we show that photosentizer activation in a single cell triggers apoptosis in bystander cancer cells, which are electrically coupled by gap junction channels and support the propagation of a Ca2+ wave initiated in the irradiated cell. The latter also acts as source of nitric oxide (NO) that diffuses to bystander cells, in which NO levels are further increased by a mechanism compatible with Ca(2+)-dependent enzymatic production. We detected similar signals in tumors grown in dorsal skinfold chambers applied to live mice. Pharmacological blockade of connexin channels significantly reduced the extent of apoptosis in bystander cells, consistent with a critical role played by intercellular communication, Ca2+ and NO in the bystander effects triggered by photodynamic therapy.

  7. A translational approach to clinical practice via stress-responsive glucocorticoid receptor signaling.

    Juruena, Mario F; Agustini, Bruno; Cleare, Anthony J; Young, Allan H

    2017-01-01

    A recent article by Kwan and colleagues could elegantly demonstrate the necessary interaction between neuronal serotonin (5-HT) systems and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis through glucocorticoid receptors (GR), producing an adequate stress response, in this case, responding to hypoxia with an increase in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). There is an intricate system connecting brain, body and mind and this exchange is only possible when all these systems-nervous, endocrine, and immune-have receptors on critical cells to receive information (via messenger molecules) from each of the other systems. There is evidence that the expression and function of GR in the hippocampus, mainly MR, is regulated by the stimulation of 5-HT receptors. Stressful stimuli increase 5-HT release and turnover in the hippocampus, and it seems reasonable to suggest that some of the changes in mineralocorticoid and GR expression may be mediated, in part at least, by the increase in 5-HT. Also serotonin and HPA axis dysfunctions have already been implicated in a variety of psychiatric disorders, especially depression. Early life stress (ELS) can have profound impact on these systems and can predispose subjects to a variety of adult metabolic and psychiatric conditions. It is important to analyze the mechanisms of this complex interaction and its subsequent programming effects on the stress systems, so that we can find new ways and targets for treatment of psychiatric disorders. Different areas of research on basic biological sciences are now being integrated and this approach will hopefully provide several new insights, new pharmacological targets and improve our global understanding of these highly debilitating chronic conditions, that we now call mental disorders.

  8. CCR8 signaling influences Toll-like receptor 4 responses in human macrophages in inflammatory diseases.

    Reimer, Martina Kvist; Brange, Charlotte; Rosendahl, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    CCR8 immunity is generally associated with Th2 responses in allergic diseases. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time a pronounced attenuated influx of macrophages in ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged CCR8 knockout mice. To explore whether macrophages in human inflamed lung tissue also were CCR8 positive, human lung tissue from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was evaluated. Indeed, CCR8 expression was pronounced in invading monocytes/macrophages from lungs of patients with Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage IV COPD. Given this expression pattern, the functional role of CCR8 on human macrophages was evaluated in vitro. Human peripheral blood monocytes expressed low levels of CCR8, while macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-derived human macrophages expressed significantly elevated surface levels of CCR8. Importantly, CCL1 directly regulated the expression of CD18 and CD49b and hence influenced the adhesion capacity of human macrophages. CCL1 drives chemotaxis in M-CSF-derived macrophages, and this could be completely inhibited by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Whereas both CCL1 and LPS monotreatment inhibited spontaneous superoxide release in macrophages, CCL1 significantly induced superoxide release in the presence of LPS in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, CCL1 induced production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and could inhibit LPS-induced cytokine production in a dose-dependent manner. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of CCR8 on inflammatory macrophages in human COPD lung tissue. Importantly, the functional data from human macrophages suggest a potential cross talk between the CCR8 and the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathways, both of which are present in COPD patients.

  9. Murine macrophage response from peritoneal cavity requires signals mediated by chemokine receptor CCR-2 during Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Nandi, Ajeya; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2016-02-01

    C-C chemokine receptor-2 (CCR-2) is a cognate receptor for monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and recent studies revealed that MCP-1-CCR-2 signaling is involved in several inflammatory diseases characterized by macrophage infiltration. Currently, there is no study on the involvement of CCR-2 in the killing of S. aureus by macrophages of Swiss albino mice, and its substantial role in host defense against S. aureus infection in murine macrophages is still unclear. Therefore, the present study was aimed to investigate the functional and interactive role of CCR-2 and MCP-1 in regulating peritoneal macrophage responses with respect to acute S. aureus infection. We found that phagocytosis of S. aureus can serve as an important stimulus for MCP-1 production by peritoneal macrophages, which is dependent directly or indirectly on cytokines, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. Neutralization of CCR-2 in macrophages leads to increased production of IL-10 and decreased production of IFN-γ and IL-6. In CCR-2 blocked macrophages, pretreatment with specific blocker of NF-κB or p38-MAPK causes elevation in MCP-1 level and subsequent downregulation of CCR-2 itself. We speculate that CCR-2 is involved in S. aureus-induced MCP-1 production via NF-κB or p38-MAPK signaling. We also hypothesized that unnaturally high level of MCP-1 that build up upon CCR-2 neutralization might allow promiscuous binding to one or more other chemokine receptors, a situation that would not occur in CCR-2 non-neutralized condition. This may be the plausible explanation for such observed Th-2 response in CCR-2 blocked macrophages infected with S. aureus in the present study.

  10. The Role of Unfolded Protein Response and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling in Neurodegenerative Diseases with Special Focus on Prion Diseases

    Lifeng Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are neurodegenerative pathologies characterized by the accumulation of a protease-resistant form of the cellular prion protein named prion protein scrapie (PrPSc in the brain. PrPSc accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER result in a dysregulated calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis and subsequent initiation of unfolded protein response (UPR leading to neuronal dysfunction and apoptosis. The molecular mechanisms for the transition between adaptation to ER stress and ER stress-induced apoptosis are still unclear. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs are serine/threonine protein kinases that rule the signaling of many extracellular stimuli from plasma membrane to the nucleus. However the identification of numerous points of cross talk between the UPR and MAPK signaling pathways may contribute to our understanding of the consequences of ER stress in prion diseases. Indeed the MAPK signaling network is known to regulate cell cycle progression and cell survival or death responses following a variety of stresses including misfolded protein response stress. In this article, we review the UPR signaling in prion diseases and discuss the triad of MAPK signaling pathways. We also describe the role played by MAPK signaling cascades in Alzheimer’s (AD and Parkinson’s disease (PD. We will also overview the mechanisms of cell death and the role of MAPK signaling in prion disease progression and highlight potential avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  11. Age-related changes of healthy bone marrow cell signaling in response to growth factors provide insight into low risk MDS.

    Kornblau, Steven M; Cohen, Aileen C; Soper, David; Huang, Ying-Wen; Cesano, Alessandra

    2014-11-01

    Single Cell Network Profiling (SCNP) is a multiparametric flow cytometry-based assay that quantifiably and simultaneously measures changes in intracellular signaling proteins in response to in vitro extracellular modulators at the single cell level. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous clonal disorder of hematopoietic stem cells that occurs in elderly subjects and is characterized by dysplasia and ineffective hematopoiesis. The functional responsiveness of MDS bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic cells, including functionally distinct myeloid and erythroid precursor subsets, to hematopoietic growth factors (HGF) and the relationship of modulated signaling to disease characteristics is poorly understood. SCNP was used first to examine the effects of age on erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF)-induced signaling in myeloid, nucleated red blood cells (nRBC), and CD34 expressing cell subsets in healthy BM (n = 15). SCNP was then used to map functional signaling profiles in low risk (LR) MDS (n = 7) for comparison to signaling in samples from healthy donors and to probe signaling associations within clinically defined subgroups. In healthy BM samples, signaling responses to HGF were quite homogeneous (i.e., tightly regulated) with age-dependent effects observed in response to EPO but not to GCSF. Despite the relatively small number of samples assayed in the study, LR MDS could be classified into distinct subgroups based on both cell subset frequency and signaling profiles. As a correlate of underlying genetic abnormalities, signal transduction analyses may provide a functional and potentially clinically relevant classification of MDS. Further evaluation in a larger cohort is warranted. © 2013 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  12. Spatio-temporal dependence of the signaling response in immune-receptor trafficking networks regulated by cell density: a theoretical model.

    Pilar García-Peñarrubia

    Full Text Available Cell signaling processes involve receptor trafficking through highly connected networks of interacting components. The binding of surface receptors to their specific ligands is a key factor for the control and triggering of signaling pathways. In most experimental systems, ligand concentration and cell density vary within a wide range of values. Dependence of the signal response on cell density is related with the extracellular volume available per cell. This dependence has previously been studied using non-spatial models which assume that signaling components are well mixed and uniformly distributed in a single compartment. In this paper, a mathematical model that shows the influence exerted by cell density on the spatio-temporal evolution of ligands, cell surface receptors, and intracellular signaling molecules is developed. To this end, partial differential equations were used to model ligand and receptor trafficking dynamics through the different domains of the whole system. This enabled us to analyze several interesting features involved with these systems, namely: a how the perturbation caused by the signaling response propagates through the system; b receptor internalization dynamics and how cell density affects the robustness of dose-response curves upon variation of the binding affinity; and c that enhanced correlations between ligand input and system response are obtained under conditions that result in larger perturbations of the equilibrium ligand + surface receptor [Please see text] ligand - receptor complex. Finally, the results are compared with those obtained by considering that the above components are well mixed in a single compartment.

  13. Systems biology integration of proteomic data in rodent models of depression reveals involvement of the immune response and glutamatergic signaling.

    Carboni, Lucia; Nguyen, Thanh-Phuong; Caberlotto, Laura

    2016-12-01

    The pathophysiological basis of major depression is incompletely understood. Recently, numerous proteomic studies have been performed in rodent models of depression to investigate the molecular underpinnings of depressive-like behaviours with an unbiased approach. The objective of the study is to integrate the results of these proteomic studies in depression models to shed light on the most relevant molecular pathways involved in the disease. Network analysis is performed integrating preexisting proteomic data from rodent models of depression. The IntAct mouse and the HRPD are used as reference protein-protein interaction databases. The functionality analyses of the networks are then performed by testing overrepresented GO biological process terms and pathways. Functional enrichment analyses of the networks revealed an association with molecular processes related to depression in humans, such as those involved in the immune response. Pathways impacted by clinically effective antidepressants are modulated, including glutamatergic signaling and neurotrophic responses. Moreover, dysregulations of proteins regulating energy metabolism and circadian rhythms are implicated. The comparison with protein pathways modulated in depressive patients revealed significant overlapping. This systems biology study supports the notion that animal models can contribute to the research into the biology and therapeutics of depression. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Impaired endocannabinoid signalling in the rostral ventromedial medulla underpins genotype-dependent hyper-responsivity to noxious stimuli.

    Rea, Kieran; Olango, Weredeselam M; Okine, Bright N; Madasu, Manish K; McGuire, Iseult C; Coyle, Kathleen; Harhen, Brendan; Roche, Michelle; Finn, David P

    2014-01-01

    Pain is both a sensory and an emotional experience, and is subject to modulation by a number of factors including genetic background modulating stress/affect. The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat exhibits a stress-hyper-responsive and depressive-like phenotype and increased sensitivity to noxious stimuli, compared with other rat strains. Here, we show that this genotype-dependent hyperalgesia is associated with impaired pain-related mobilisation of endocannabinoids and transcription of their synthesising enzymes in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). Pharmacological blockade of the Cannabinoid1 (CB1) receptor potentiates the hyperalgesia in WKY rats, whereas inhibition of the endocannabinoid catabolising enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase, attenuates the hyperalgesia. The latter effect is mediated by CB1 receptors in the RVM. Together, these behavioural, neurochemical, and molecular data indicate that impaired endocannabinoid signalling in the RVM underpins hyper-responsivity to noxious stimuli in a genetic background prone to heightened stress/affect. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Wearing red for signaling: the heme-bach axis in heme metabolism, oxidative stress response and iron immunology.

    Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Watanabe-Matsui, Miki

    2014-04-01

    The connection between gene regulation and metabolism is an old issue that warrants revisiting in order to understand both normal as well as pathogenic processes in higher eukaryotes. Metabolites affect the gene expression by either binding to transcription factors or serving as donors for post-translational modification, such as that involving acetylation and methylation. The focus of this review is heme, a prosthetic group of proteins that includes hemoglobin and cytochromes. Heme has been shown to bind to several transcription factors, including Bach1 and Bach2, in higher eukaryotes. Heme inhibits the transcriptional repressor activity of Bach1, resulting in the derepression of its target genes, such as globin in erythroid cells and heme oxygenase-1 in diverse cell types. Since Bach2 is important for class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes as well as regulatory and effector T cell differentiation and the macrophage function, the heme-Bach2 axis may regulate the immune response as a signaling cascade. We discuss future issues regarding the topic of the iron/heme-gene regulation network based on current understanding of the heme-Bach axis, including the concept of "iron immunology" as the synthesis of the iron metabolism and the immune response.

  16. Cytolytic T lymphocyte responses to metabolically inactivated stimulator cells. I. Metabolic inactivation impairs both CD and LD antigen signals

    Kelso, A.; Boyle, W.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of metabolic inactivation of spleen cells on antigen presentation to precursors of alloreactive cytolytic T lymphocytes (T/sub c/) were examined. By serological methods, populations inactivated by ultraviolet irradiation, glutaraldehyde fixation or plasma membrane isolation were found to retain normal levels of H-2K/D and Ia antigens. However, comparison of the antigen doses required to stimulate secondary T/sub c/ responses in mixed leukocyte culture showed that the inactivated preparations were approximately 10-fold less immunogenic than X-irradiated spleen cells. Their total inability to stimulate primary cytolytic responses pointed to at least a 100-fold impairment of immunogenicity for unprimed T/sub c/ precursors in the case of uv-irradiated and glutaraldehyde-treated stimulator cells, and at least a 10-fold impairment for membrane fragments. Experiments showing that the capacity of cell monolayers to absorb precursor T/sub c/ from unprimed spleen populations was reduced following uv-irradiation or glutaraldehyde treatment provided direct evidence that this loss of immunogenicity was due in part to suboptimal antigen presentation to precursor T/sub c/. It is concluded that, in addition to the traditional view that these treatments damage the ''LD'' signal to helper T lymphocytes, metabolic inactivation also impairs recognition of ''CD'' determinants by precursor T/sub c/

  17. Regular Exercise Enhances the Immune Response Against Microbial Antigens Through Up-Regulation of Toll-like Receptor Signaling Pathways

    Qishi Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Regular physical exercise can enhance resistance to many microbial infections. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying the changes in the immune system induced by regular exercise. Methods: We recruited members of a university badminton club as the regular exercise (RE group and healthy sedentary students as the sedentary control (SC group. We investigated the distribution of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC subsets and functions in the two groups. Results: There were no significant differences in plasma cytokine levels between the RE and SC groups in the true resting state. However, enhanced levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-α and IL-12 were secreted by PBMCs in the RE group following microbial antigen stimulation, when compared to the SC group. In contrast, the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 secreted by PBMC in the RE group were suppressed compared with those in SC group following non-microbial antigen stimulation (concanavalin A or α-galactosylceramide. Furthermore, PBMC expression of TLR2, TLR7 and MyD88 was significantly increased in the RE group in response to microbial antigen stimulation. Conclusion: Regular exercise enhances immune cell activation in response to pathogenic stimulation leading to enhanced cytokine production mediated via the TLR signaling pathways.

  18. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Regulates Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Activation during the Granulopoietic Response to Systemic Bacterial Infection.

    Shi, Xin; Wei, Shengcai; Simms, Kevin J; Cumpston, Devan N; Ewing, Thomas J; Zhang, Ping

    2018-01-01

    Activation and reprogramming of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells play a critic