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Sample records for respiratory gating methods

  1. Respiratory gating in cardiac PET

    Lassen, Martin Lyngby; Rasmussen, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory motion due to breathing during cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) results in spatial blurring and erroneous tracer quantification. Respiratory gating might represent a solution by dividing the PET coincidence dataset into smaller respiratory phase subsets. The aim...... of our study was to compare the resulting imaging quality by the use of a time-based respiratory gating system in two groups administered either adenosine or dipyridamole as the pharmacological stress agent. METHODS AND RESULTS: Forty-eight patients were randomized to adenosine or dipyridamole cardiac...... stress (82)RB-PET. Respiratory rates and depths were measured by a respiratory gating system in addition to registering actual respiratory rates. Patients undergoing adenosine stress showed a decrease in measured respiratory rate from initial to later scan phase measurements [12.4 (±5.7) vs 5.6 (±4...

  2. An evaluation of gating window size, delivery method, and composite field dosimetry of respiratory-gated IMRT

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2002-01-01

    A respiratory gating system has been developed based on a commercial patient positioning system. The purpose of this study is to investigate the ability of the gating system to reproduce normal, nongated IMRT operation and to quantify the errors produced by delivering a nongated IMRT treatment onto a moving target. A moving phantom capable of simultaneous two-dimensional motion was built, and an analytical liver motion function was used to drive the phantom. Studies were performed to assess the effect of gating window size and choice of delivery method (segmented and dynamic multileaf collimation). Additionally, two multiple field IMRT cases were delivered to quantify the error in gated and nongated IMRT with motion. Dosimetric error between nonmoving and moving deliveries is related to gating window size. By reducing the window size, the error can be reduced. Delivery error can be reduced for both dynamic and segmented delivery with gating. For the implementation of dynamic IMRT delivery in this study, dynamic delivery was found to generate larger delivery errors than segmented delivery in most cases studied. For multiple field IMRT delivery, the largest errors were generated in regions where high field modulation was present parallel to the axis of motion. Gating was found to reduce these large errors to clinically acceptable levels

  3. Extraction of the respiratory signal from small-animal CT projections for a retrospective gating method

    ChavarrIas, C; Vaquero, J J; Sisniega, A; RodrIguez-Ruano, A; Soto-Montenegro, M L; GarcIa-Barreno, P; Desco, M

    2008-01-01

    We propose a retrospective respiratory gating algorithm to generate dynamic CT studies. To this end, we compared three different methods of extracting the respiratory signal from the projections of small-animal cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners. Given a set of frames acquired from a certain axial angle, subtraction of their average image from each individual frame produces a set of difference images. Pixels in these images have positive or negative values (according to the respiratory phase) in those areas where there is lung movement. The respiratory signals were extracted by analysing the shape of the histogram of these difference images: we calculated the first four central and non-central moments. However, only odd-order moments produced the desired breathing signal, as the even-order moments lacked information about the phase. Each of these curves was compared to a reference signal recorded by means of a pneumatic pillow. Given the similar correlation coefficients yielded by all of them, we selected the mean to implement our retrospective protocol. Respiratory phase bins were separated, reconstructed independently and included in a dynamic sequence, suitable for cine playback. We validated our method in five adult rat studies by comparing profiles drawn across the diaphragm dome, with and without retrospective respiratory gating. Results showed a sharper transition in the gated reconstruction, with an average slope improvement of 60.7%

  4. Extraction of the respiratory signal from small-animal CT projections for a retrospective gating method

    ChavarrIas, C; Vaquero, J J; Sisniega, A; RodrIguez-Ruano, A; Soto-Montenegro, M L; GarcIa-Barreno, P; Desco, M [Unidad de Medicina y CirugIa Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Anexo PsiquiatrIa, 1 Planta. C/Ibiza, 43. Madrid 28007 (Spain)

    2008-09-07

    We propose a retrospective respiratory gating algorithm to generate dynamic CT studies. To this end, we compared three different methods of extracting the respiratory signal from the projections of small-animal cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners. Given a set of frames acquired from a certain axial angle, subtraction of their average image from each individual frame produces a set of difference images. Pixels in these images have positive or negative values (according to the respiratory phase) in those areas where there is lung movement. The respiratory signals were extracted by analysing the shape of the histogram of these difference images: we calculated the first four central and non-central moments. However, only odd-order moments produced the desired breathing signal, as the even-order moments lacked information about the phase. Each of these curves was compared to a reference signal recorded by means of a pneumatic pillow. Given the similar correlation coefficients yielded by all of them, we selected the mean to implement our retrospective protocol. Respiratory phase bins were separated, reconstructed independently and included in a dynamic sequence, suitable for cine playback. We validated our method in five adult rat studies by comparing profiles drawn across the diaphragm dome, with and without retrospective respiratory gating. Results showed a sharper transition in the gated reconstruction, with an average slope improvement of 60.7%.

  5. Improved method of in vivo respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging

    Walters, Erin B; Panda, Kunal; Bankson, James A; Brown, Ellana; Cody, Dianna D [Department of Imaging Physics, Unit 56, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2004-09-07

    The presence of motion artifacts is a typical problem in thoracic imaging. However, synchronizing the respiratory cycle with computed tomography (CT) image acquisition can reduce these artifacts. We currently employ a method of in vivo respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging for small laboratory animals (mice). This procedure involves the use of a ventilator that controls the respiratory cycle of the animal and provides a digital output signal that is used to trigger data acquisition. After inspection of the default respiratory trigger timing, we hypothesized that image quality could be improved by moving the data-acquisition window to a portion of the cycle with less respiratory motion. For this reason, we developed a simple delay circuit to adjust the timing of the ventilator signal that initiates micro-CT data acquisition. This delay circuit decreases motion artifacts and substantially improves image quality.

  6. Improved method of in vivo respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging

    Walters, Erin B; Panda, Kunal; Bankson, James A; Brown, Ellana; Cody, Dianna D

    2004-01-01

    The presence of motion artifacts is a typical problem in thoracic imaging. However, synchronizing the respiratory cycle with computed tomography (CT) image acquisition can reduce these artifacts. We currently employ a method of in vivo respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging for small laboratory animals (mice). This procedure involves the use of a ventilator that controls the respiratory cycle of the animal and provides a digital output signal that is used to trigger data acquisition. After inspection of the default respiratory trigger timing, we hypothesized that image quality could be improved by moving the data-acquisition window to a portion of the cycle with less respiratory motion. For this reason, we developed a simple delay circuit to adjust the timing of the ventilator signal that initiates micro-CT data acquisition. This delay circuit decreases motion artifacts and substantially improves image quality

  7. Visual and Quantitative Analysis Methods of Respiratory Patterns for Respiratory Gated PET/CT.

    Son, Hye Joo; Jeong, Young Jin; Yoon, Hyun Jin; Park, Jong-Hwan; Kang, Do-Young

    2016-01-01

    We integrated visual and quantitative methods for analyzing the stability of respiration using four methods: phase space diagrams, Fourier spectra, Poincaré maps, and Lyapunov exponents. Respiratory patterns of 139 patients were grouped based on the combination of the regularity of amplitude, period, and baseline positions. Visual grading was done by inspecting the shape of diagram and classified into two states: regular and irregular. Quantitation was done by measuring standard deviation of x and v coordinates of Poincaré map (SD x , SD v ) or the height of the fundamental peak ( A 1 ) in Fourier spectrum or calculating the difference between maximal upward and downward drift. Each group showed characteristic pattern on visual analysis. There was difference of quantitative parameters (SD x , SD v , A 1 , and MUD-MDD) among four groups (one way ANOVA, p = 0.0001 for MUD-MDD, SD x , and SD v , p = 0.0002 for A 1 ). In ROC analysis, the cutoff values were 0.11 for SD x (AUC: 0.982, p quantitative indices of respiratory stability and determining quantitative cutoff value for differentiating regular and irregular respiration.

  8. Patient training in respiratory-gated radiotherapy

    Kini, Vijay R.; Vedam, Subrahmanya S.; Keall, Paul J.; Patil, Sumukh; Chen, Clayton; Mohan, Radhe

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory gating is used to counter the effects of organ motion during radiotherapy for chest tumors. The effects of variations in patient breathing patterns during a single treatment and from day to day are unknown. We evaluated the feasibility of using patient training tools and their effect on the breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility during respiratory-gated radiotherapy. To monitor respiratory patterns, we used a component of a commercially available respiratory-gated radiotherapy system (Real Time Position Management (RPM) System, Varian Oncology Systems, Palo Alto, CA 94304). This passive marker video tracking system consists of reflective markers placed on the patient's chest or abdomen, which are detected by a wall-mounted video camera. Software installed on a PC interfaced to this camera detects the marker motion digitally and records it. The marker position as a function of time serves as the motion signal that may be used to trigger imaging or treatment. The training tools used were audio prompting and visual feedback, with free breathing as a control. The audio prompting method used instructions to 'breathe in' or 'breathe out' at periodic intervals deduced from patients' own breathing patterns. In the visual feedback method, patients were shown a real-time trace of their abdominal wall motion due to breathing. Using this, they were asked to maintain a constant amplitude of motion. Motion traces of the abdominal wall were recorded for each patient for various maneuvers. Free breathing showed a variable amplitude and frequency. Audio prompting resulted in a reproducible frequency; however, the variability and the magnitude of amplitude increased. Visual feedback gave a better control over the amplitude but showed minor variations in frequency. We concluded that training improves the reproducibility of amplitude and frequency of patient breathing cycles. This may increase the accuracy of respiratory-gated radiation therapy

  9. Respiratory gating in positron emission tomography: A quantitative comparison of different gating schemes

    Dawood, Mohammad; Buether, Florian; Lang, Norbert; Schober, Otmar; Schaefers, Klaus P

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory gating is used for reducing the effects of breathing motion in a wide range of applications from radiotherapy treatment to diagnostical imaging. Different methods are feasible for respiratory gating. In this study seven gating methods were developed and tested on positron emission tomography (PET) listmode data. The results of seven patient studies were compared quantitatively with respect to motion and noise. (1) Equal and (2) variable time-based gating methods use only the time information of the breathing cycle to define respiratory gates. (3) Equal and (4) variable amplitude-based gating approaches utilize the amplitude of the respiratory signal. (5) Cycle-based amplitude gating is a combination of time and amplitude-based techniques. A baseline correction was applied to methods (3) and (4) resulting in two new approaches: Baseline corrected (6) equal and (7) variable amplitude-based gating. Listmode PET data from seven patients were acquired together with a respiratory signal. Images were reconstructed applying the seven gating methods. Two parameters were used to quantify the results: Motion was measured as the displacement of the heart due to respiration and noise was defined as the standard deviation of pixel intensities in a background region. The amplitude-based approaches (3) and (4) were superior to the time-based methods (1) and (2). The improvement in capturing the motion was more than 30% (up to 130%) in all subjects. The variable time (2) and amplitude (4) methods had a more uniform noise distribution among all respiratory gates compared to equal time (1) and amplitude (3) methods. Baseline correction did not improve the results. Out of seven different respiratory gating approaches, the variable amplitude method (4) captures the respiratory motion best while keeping a constant noise level among all respiratory phases

  10. Respiratory gated lung CT using 320-row area detector CT

    Sakamoto, Ryo; Noma, Satoshi; Higashino, Takanori

    2010-01-01

    Three hundred and twenty-row Area Detector CT (ADCT) has made it possible to scan whole lung field with prospective respiratory gated wide volume scan. We evaluated whether the respiratory gated wide volume scan enables to reduce motion induced artifacts in the lung area. Helical scan and respiratory gated wide volume scan were performed in 5 patients and 10 healthy volunteers under spontaneous breathing. Significant reduction of motion artifact and superior image quality were obtained in respiratory gated scan in comparison with helical scan. Respiratory gated wide volume scan is an unique method using ADCT, and is able to reduce motion artifacts in lung CT scans of patients unable to suspend respiration in clinical scenes. (author)

  11. Intrinsic respiratory gating in small-animal CT

    Bartling, Soenke H.; Dinkel, Julien; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Stiller, Wolfram; Semmler, Wolfhard; Grasruck, Michael; Madisch, Ijad; Gupta, Rajiv; Kiessling, Fabian

    2008-01-01

    Gating in small-animal CT imaging can compensate artefacts caused by physiological motion during scanning. However, all published gating approaches for small animals rely on additional hardware to derive the gating signals. In contrast, in this study a novel method of intrinsic respiratory gating of rodents was developed and tested for mice (n=5), rats (n=5) and rabbits (n=2) in a flat-panel cone-beam CT system. In a consensus read image quality was compared with that of non-gated and retrospective extrinsically gated scans performed using a pneumatic cushion. In comparison to non-gated images, image quality improved significantly using intrinsic and extrinsic gating. Delineation of diaphragm and lung structure improved in all animals. Image quality of intrinsically gated CT was judged to be equivalent to extrinsically gated ones. Additionally 4D datasets were calculated using both gating methods. Values for expiratory, inspiratory and tidal lung volumes determined with the two gating methods were comparable and correlated well with values known from the literature. We could show that intrinsic respiratory gating in rodents makes additional gating hardware and preparatory efforts superfluous. This method improves image quality and allows derivation of functional data. Therefore it bears the potential to find wide applications in small-animal CT imaging. (orig.)

  12. Accuracy and Consistency of Respiratory Gating in Abdominal Cancer Patients

    Ge, Jiajia; Santanam, Lakshmi; Yang, Deshan; Parikh, Parag J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate respiratory gating accuracy and intrafractional consistency for abdominal cancer patients treated with respiratory gated treatment on a regular linear accelerator system. Methods and Materials: Twelve abdominal patients implanted with fiducials were treated with amplitude-based respiratory-gated radiation therapy. On the basis of daily orthogonal fluoroscopy, the operator readjusted the couch position and gating window such that the fiducial was within a setup margin (fiducial-planning target volume [f-PTV]) when RPM indicated “beam-ON.” Fifty-five pre- and post-treatment fluoroscopic movie pairs with synchronized respiratory gating signal were recorded. Fiducial motion traces were extracted from the fluoroscopic movies using a template matching algorithm and correlated with f-PTV by registering the digitally reconstructed radiographs with the fluoroscopic movies. Treatment was determined to be “accurate” if 50% of the fiducial area stayed within f-PTV while beam-ON. For movie pairs that lost gating accuracy, a MATLAB program was used to assess whether the gating window was optimized, the external-internal correlation (EIC) changed, or the patient moved between movies. A series of safety margins from 0.5 mm to 3 mm was added to f-PTV for reassessing gating accuracy. Results: A decrease in gating accuracy was observed in 44% of movie pairs from daily fluoroscopic movies of 12 abdominal patients. Three main causes for inaccurate gating were identified as change of global EIC over time (∼43%), suboptimal gating setup (∼37%), and imperfect EIC within movie (∼13%). Conclusions: Inconsistent respiratory gating accuracy may occur within 1 treatment session even with a daily adjusted gating window. To improve or maintain gating accuracy during treatment, we suggest using at least a 2.5-mm safety margin to account for gating and setup uncertainties

  13. An automatic respiratory gating method for the improvement of microcirculation evaluation: application to contrast-enhanced ultrasound studies of focal liver lesions

    Mule, S; Kachenoura, N; Lucidarme, O; De Oliveira, A; Pellot-Barakat, C; Herment, A; Frouin, F, E-mail: Sebastien.Mule@gmail.com [INSERM UMR-S 678, 75634 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2011-08-21

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), with the recent development of both contrast-specific imaging modalities and microbubble-based contrast agents, allows noninvasive quantification of microcirculation in vivo. Nevertheless, functional parameters obtained by modeling contrast uptake kinetics could be impaired by respiratory motion. Accordingly, we developed an automatic respiratory gating method and tested it on 35 CEUS hepatic datasets with focal lesions. Each dataset included fundamental mode and cadence contrast pulse sequencing (CPS) mode sequences acquired simultaneously. The developed method consisted in (1) the estimation of the respiratory kinetics as a linear combination of the first components provided by a principal components analysis constrained by a prior knowledge on the respiratory rate in the frequency domain, (2) the automated generation of two respiratory-gated subsequences from the CPS mode sequence by detecting end-of-inspiration and end-of-expiration phases from the respiratory kinetics. The fundamental mode enabled a more reliable estimation of the respiratory kinetics than the CPS mode. The k-means algorithm was applied on both the original CPS mode sequences and the respiratory-gated subsequences resulting in clustering maps and associated mean kinetics. Our respiratory gating process allowed better superimposition of manually drawn lesion contours on k-means clustering maps as well as substantial improvement of the quality of contrast uptake kinetics. While the quality of maps and kinetics was satisfactory in only 11/35 datasets before gating, it was satisfactory in 34/35 datasets after gating. Moreover, noise amplitude estimated within the delineated lesions was reduced from 62 {+-} 21 to 40 {+-} 10 (p < 0.01) after gating. These findings were supported by the low residual horizontal (0.44 {+-} 0.29 mm) and vertical (0.15 {+-} 0.16 mm) shifts found during manual motion correction of each respiratory-gated subsequence. The developed

  14. Dynamic gating window for compensation of baseline shift in respiratory-gated radiation therapy

    Pepin, Eric W.; Wu Huanmei; Shirato, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze and evaluate the necessity and use of dynamic gating techniques for compensation of baseline shift during respiratory-gated radiation therapy of lung tumors. Methods: Motion tracking data from 30 lung tumors over 592 treatment fractions were analyzed for baseline shift. The finite state model (FSM) was used to identify the end-of-exhale (EOE) breathing phase throughout each treatment fraction. Using duty cycle as an evaluation metric, several methods of end-of-exhale dynamic gating were compared: An a posteriori ideal gating window, a predictive trend-line-based gating window, and a predictive weighted point-based gating window. These methods were evaluated for each of several gating window types: Superior/inferior (SI) gating, anterior/posterior beam, lateral beam, and 3D gating. Results: In the absence of dynamic gating techniques, SI gating gave a 39.6% duty cycle. The ideal SI gating window yielded a 41.5% duty cycle. The weight-based method of dynamic SI gating yielded a duty cycle of 36.2%. The trend-line-based method yielded a duty cycle of 34.0%. Conclusions: Dynamic gating was not broadly beneficial due to a breakdown of the FSM's ability to identify the EOE phase. When the EOE phase was well defined, dynamic gating showed an improvement over static-window gating.

  15. Retrospective data-driven respiratory gating for PET/CT

    Schleyer, Paul J; O'Doherty, Michael J; Barrington, Sally F; Marsden, Paul K

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory motion can adversely affect both PET and CT acquisitions. Respiratory gating allows an acquisition to be divided into a series of motion-reduced bins according to the respiratory signal, which is typically hardware acquired. In order that the effects of motion can potentially be corrected for, we have developed a novel, automatic, data-driven gating method which retrospectively derives the respiratory signal from the acquired PET and CT data. PET data are acquired in listmode and analysed in sinogram space, and CT data are acquired in cine mode and analysed in image space. Spectral analysis is used to identify regions within the CT and PET data which are subject to respiratory motion, and the variation of counts within these regions is used to estimate the respiratory signal. Amplitude binning is then used to create motion-reduced PET and CT frames. The method was demonstrated with four patient datasets acquired on a 4-slice PET/CT system. To assess the accuracy of the data-derived respiratory signal, a hardware-based signal was acquired for comparison. Data-driven gating was successfully performed on PET and CT datasets for all four patients. Gated images demonstrated respiratory motion throughout the bin sequences for all PET and CT series, and image analysis and direct comparison of the traces derived from the data-driven method with the hardware-acquired traces indicated accurate recovery of the respiratory signal.

  16. Evaluation of respiratory pattern during respiratory-gated radiotherapy

    Dobashi, Suguru; Mori, Shinichiro

    2014-01-01

    The respiratory cycle is not strictly regular, and generally varies in amplitude and period from one cycle to the next. We evaluated the characteristics of respiratory patterns acquired during respiratory gating treatment in more than 300 patients. A total 331 patients treated with respiratory-gated carbon-ion beam therapy were selected from a group of patients with thoracic and abdominal conditions. Respiratory data were acquired for a total of 3,171 fractions using an external respiratory sensing monitor and evaluated for respiratory cycle, duty cycle, magnitude of baseline drift, and intrafractional/interfractional peak inhalation/exhalation positional variation. Results for the treated anatomical sites and patient positioning were compared. Mean ± SD respiratory cycle averaged over all patients was 4.1 ± 1.3 s. Mean ± SD duty cycle averaged over all patients was 36.5 ± 7.3 %. Two types of baseline drift were seen, the first decremental and the second incremental. For respiratory peak variation, the mean intrafractional variation in peak-inhalation position relative to the amplitude in the first respiratory cycle (15.5 ± 9.3 %) was significantly larger than that in exhalation (7.5 ± 4.6 %). Interfractional variations in inhalation (17.2 ± 18.5 %) were also significantly greater than those in exhalation (9.4 ± 10.0 %). Statistically significant differences were observed between patients in the supine position and those in the prone position in mean respiratory cycle, duty cycle, and intra-/interfractional variations. We quantified the characteristics of the respiratory curve based on a large number of respiratory data obtained during treatment. These results might be useful in improving the accuracy of respiratory-gated treatment.

  17. Management of the baseline shift using a new and simple method for respiratory-gated radiation therapy: Detectability and effectiveness of a flexible monitoring system

    Tachibana, Hidenobu; Kitamura, Nozomi; Ito, Yasushi; Kawai, Daisuke; Nakajima, Masaru; Tsuda, Akihisa; Shiizuka, Hisao

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In respiratory-gated radiation therapy, a baseline shift decreases the accuracy of target coverage and organs at risk (OAR) sparing. The effectiveness of audio-feedback and audio-visual feedback in correcting the baseline shift in the breathing pattern of the patient has been demonstrated previously. However, the baseline shift derived from the intrafraction motion of the patient's body cannot be corrected by these methods. In the present study, the authors designed and developed a simple and flexible system. Methods: The system consisted of a web camera and a computer running our in-house software. The in-house software was adapted to template matching and also to no preimage processing. The system was capable of monitoring the baseline shift in the intrafraction motion of the patient's body. Another marker box was used to monitor the baseline shift due to the flexible setups required of a marker box for gated signals. The system accuracy was evaluated by employing a respiratory motion phantom and was found to be within AAPM Task Group 142 tolerance (positional accuracy <2 mm and temporal accuracy <100 ms) for respiratory-gated radiation therapy. Additionally, the effectiveness of this flexible and independent system in gated treatment was investigated in healthy volunteers, in terms of the results from the differences in the baseline shift detectable between the marker positions, which the authors evaluated statistically. Results: The movement of the marker on the sternum [1.599 ± 0.622 mm (1 SD)] was substantially decreased as compared with the abdomen [6.547 ± 0.962 mm (1 SD)]. Additionally, in all of the volunteers, the baseline shifts for the sternum [-0.136 ± 0.868 (2 SD)] were in better agreement with the nominal baseline shifts than was the case for the abdomen [-0.722 ± 1.56 mm (2 SD)]. The baseline shifts could be accurately measured and detected using the monitoring system, which could acquire the movement of the marker on the sternum. The

  18. Quality verification for respiratory gated proton therapy

    Kim, Eun Sook; Jang, Yo Jong; Park, Ji Yeon; Kang, Dong Yun; Yeom, Doo Seok

    2013-01-01

    To verify accuracy of respiratory gated proton therapy by measuring and analyzing proton beam delivered when respiratory gated proton therapy is being performed in our institute. The plan data of 3 patients who took respiratory gated proton therapy were used to deliver proton beam from proton therapy system. The manufactured moving phantom was used to apply respiratory gating system to reproduce proton beam which was partially irradiated. The key characteristics of proton beam, range, spreat-out Bragg peak (SOBP) and output factor were measured 5 times and the same categories were measured in the continuous proton beam which was not performed with respiratory gating system. Multi-layer ionization chamber was used to measure range and SOBP, and Scanditronix Wellhofer and farmer chamber was used to measure output factor. The average ranges of 3 patients (A, B, C), who had taken respiratory gated proton therapy or not, were (A) 7.226, 7.230, (B) 12.216, 12.220 and (C) 19.918, 19.920 g/cm 2 and average SOBP were (A) 4.950, 4.940, (B) 6.496, 6.512 and (C) 8.486, 8.490 g/cm 2 . And average output factor were (A) 0.985, 0.984 (B) 1.026, 1.027 and (C) 1.138, 1.136 cGy/MU. The differences of average range were -0.004, -0.004, -0.002 g/cm 2 , that of SOBP were 0.010, -0.016, -0.004 g/cm 2 and that of output factor were 0.001, -0.001, 0.002 cGy/MU. It is observed that the range, SOBP and output factor of proton beam delivered when respiratory gated proton therapy is being performed have the same beam quality with no significant difference compared to the proton beam which was continuously irradiated. Therefore, this study verified the quality of proton beam delivered when respiratory gated proton therapy and confirmed the accuracy of proton therapy using this

  19. Evaluation of the new respiratory gating system

    Shi, Chengyu; Tang, Xiaoli; Chan, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Objective The newly released Respiratory Gating for Scanners (RGSC; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) system has limited existing quality assurance (QA) protocols and pertinent publications. Herein, we report our experiences of the RGSC system acceptance and QA. Methods The RGSC system integration was tested with peripheral equipment, spatial reproducibility, and dynamic localization accuracy for regular and irregular breathing patterns, respectively. A QUASAR Respiratory Motion Phantom and a mathematical fitting method were used for data acquisition and analysis. Results The results showed that the RGSC system could accurately measure regular motion periods of 3–10 s. For irregular breathing patterns, differences from the existing Real-time Position Management (RPM; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) system were observed. For dynamic localization measurements, the RGSC system showed 76% agreement with the programmed test data within ±5% tolerance in terms of fitting period. As s comparison, the RPM system showed 66% agreement within ±5% tolerance, and 65% for the RGSC versus RPM measurements. Conclusions New functions and positioning accuracy improve the RGSC system’s ability to achieve higher dynamic treatment precision. A 4D phantom is helpful for the QA tests. Further investigation is required for the whole RGSC system performance QA. PMID:29722356

  20. Respiratory gated beam delivery cannot facilitate margin reduction, unless combined with respiratory correlated image guidance

    Korreman, Stine S.; Juhler-Nottrup, Trine; Boyer, Arthur L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose/objective: In radiotherapy of targets moving with respiration, beam gating is offered as a means of reducing the target motion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safe magnitude of margin reduction for respiratory gated beam delivery. Materials/methods: The study is based on data for 17 lung cancer patients in separate protocols at Rigshospitalet and Stanford Cancer Center. Respiratory curves for external optical markers and implanted fiducials were collected using equipment based on the RPM system (Varian Medical Systems). A total of 861 respiratory curves represented external measurements over 30 fraction treatment courses for 10 patients, and synchronous external/internal measurements in single sessions for seven patients. Variations in respiratory amplitude (simulated coaching) and external/internal phase shifts were simulated by perturbation with realistic values. Variations were described by medians and standard deviations (SDs) of position distributions of the markers. Gating windows (35% duty cycle) were retrospectively applied to the respiratory data for each session, mimicking the use of commercially available gating systems. Medians and SDs of gated data were compared to those of ungated data, to assess potential margin reductions. Results: External respiratory data collected over entire treatment courses showed SDs from 1.6 to 8.1 mm, the major part arising from baseline variations. The gated data had SDs from 1.5 to 7.7 mm, with a mean reduction of 0.3 mm (6%). Gated distributions were more skewed than ungated, and in a few cases a marginal miss of gated respiration would be found even if no margin reduction was applied. Regularization of breathing amplitude to simulate coaching did not alter these results significantly. Simulation of varying phase shifts between internal and external respiratory signals showed that the SDs of gated distributions were the same as for the ungated or smaller, but the median values were markedly shifted

  1. A statistical method for retrospective cardiac and respiratory motion gating of interventional cardiac x-ray images

    Panayiotou, Maria, E-mail: maria.panayiotou@kcl.ac.uk; King, Andrew P.; Housden, R. James; Ma, YingLiang; Rhode, Kawal S. [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Cooklin, Michael; O' Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C. Aldo [Department of Cardiology, Guy' s and St. Thomas' Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Image-guided cardiac interventions involve the use of fluoroscopic images to guide the insertion and movement of interventional devices. Cardiorespiratory gating can be useful for 3D reconstruction from multiple x-ray views and for reducing misalignments between 3D anatomical models overlaid onto fluoroscopy. Methods: The authors propose a novel and potentially clinically useful retrospective cardiorespiratory gating technique. The principal component analysis (PCA) statistical method is used in combination with other image processing operations to make our proposed masked-PCA technique suitable for cardiorespiratory gating. Unlike many previously proposed techniques, our technique is robust to varying image-content, thus it does not require specific catheters or any other optically opaque structures to be visible. Therefore, it works without any knowledge of catheter geometry. The authors demonstrate the application of our technique for the purposes of retrospective cardiorespiratory gating of normal and very low dose x-ray fluoroscopy images. Results: For normal dose x-ray images, the algorithm was validated using 28 clinical electrophysiology x-ray fluoroscopy sequences (2168 frames), from patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and cardiac resynchronization therapy procedures for heart failure. The authors established end-systole, end-expiration, and end-inspiration success rates of 97.0%, 97.9%, and 97.0%, respectively. For very low dose applications, the technique was tested on ten x-ray sequences from the RFA procedures with added noise at signal to noise ratio (SNR) values of√(5)0, √(1)0, √(8), √(6), √(5), √(2), and √(1) to simulate the image quality of increasingly lower dose x-ray images. Even at the low SNR value of √(2), representing a dose reduction of more than 25 times, gating success rates of 89.1%, 88.8%, and 86.8% were established. Conclusions: The proposed

  2. Role of respiratory-gated PET/CT for pancreatic tumors: A preliminary result

    Kasuya, Takeo; Tateishi, Ukihide; Suzuki, Kazufumi; Daisaki, Hiromitsu; Nishiyama, Yuji; Hata, Masaharu; Inoue, Tomio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to ascertain role of respiratory-gated PET/CT for accurate diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. Materials and methods: Prior to clinical study, the phantom study was performed to evaluate the impact of respiratory motion on lesion quantification. Twenty-two patients (mean age 65 years) with pancreatic tumors were enrolled. Pathological diagnoses by surgical specimens consisted of pancreatic cancer (n = 15) and benign intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN, n = 7). Whole-body scan of non-respiratory-gated PET/CT was performed at first, and subsequent respiratory-gated PET/CT for one bed position was performed. All PET/CT studies were performed prior to surgery. The SUV max obtained by non-respiratory-gated PET/CT and respiratory-gated PET/CT, and percent difference in SUVmax (%SUVmax) were compared. Results: The profile curve of 5 respiratory bin image was most similar to that of static image. The third bin of 5 respiratory bin image showed highest FWHM (24.0 mm) and FWTM (32.7 mm). The mean SUVmax of pancreatic cancer was similar to that of benign IPMN on non-respiratory-gated PET/CT (p = 0.05), whereas significant difference was found between two groups on respiratory-gated PET/CT (p = 0.016). The mean %SUV of pancreatic cancer was greater than that of benign IPMN (p < 0.0001). Identification of the primary tumor in pancreatic head (n = 13, 59%) was improved by using respiratory-gated PET/CT because of minimal affection of physiological accumulation in duodenum. Conclusion: Respiratory-gated PET/CT is a feasible technique for evaluation of pancreatic tumors and allows more accurate identification of pancreatic tumors compared with non-respiratory-gated PET/CT

  3. Evaluation of a direct motion estimation/correction method in respiratory-gated PET/MRI with motion-adjusted attenuation.

    Bousse, Alexandre; Manber, Richard; Holman, Beverley F; Atkinson, David; Arridge, Simon; Ourselin, Sébastien; Hutton, Brian F; Thielemans, Kris

    2017-06-01

    Respiratory motion compensation in PET/CT and PET/MRI is essential as motion is a source of image degradation (motion blur, attenuation artifacts). In previous work, we developed a direct method for joint image reconstruction/motion estimation (JRM) for attenuation-corrected (AC) respiratory-gated PET, which uses a single attenuation-map (μ-map). This approach was successfully implemented for respiratory-gated PET/CT, but since it relied on an accurate μ-map for motion estimation, the question of its applicability in PET/MRI is open. The purpose of this work is to investigate the feasibility of JRM in PET/MRI and to assess the robustness of the motion estimation when a degraded μ-map is used. We performed a series of JRM reconstructions from simulated PET data using a range of simulated Dixon MRI sequence derived μ-maps with wrong attenuation values in the lungs, from -100% (no attenuation) to +100% (double attenuation), as well as truncated arms. We compared the estimated motions with the one obtained from JRM in ideal conditions (no noise, true μ-map as an input). We also applied JRM on 4 patient datasets of the chest, 3 of them containing hot lesions. Patient list-mode data were gated using a principal component analysis method. We compared SUV max values of the JRM reconstructed activity images and non motion-corrected images. We also assessed the estimated motion fields by comparing the deformed JRM-reconstructed activity with individually non-AC reconstructed gates. Experiments on simulated data showed that JRM-motion estimation is robust to μ-map degradation in the sense that it produces motion fields similar to the ones obtained when using the true μ-map, regardless of the attenuation errors in the lungs (PET/MRI clinical datasets. It provides a potential alternative to existing methods where the motion fields are pre-estimated from separate MRI measurements. © 2017 University College London (UCL). Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  4. Audio-visual biofeedback for respiratory-gated radiotherapy: Impact of audio instruction and audio-visual biofeedback on respiratory-gated radiotherapy

    George, Rohini; Chung, Theodore D.; Vedam, Sastry S.; Ramakrishnan, Viswanathan; Mohan, Radhe; Weiss, Elisabeth; Keall, Paul J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory gating is a commercially available technology for reducing the deleterious effects of motion during imaging and treatment. The efficacy of gating is dependent on the reproducibility within and between respiratory cycles during imaging and treatment. The aim of this study was to determine whether audio-visual biofeedback can improve respiratory reproducibility by decreasing residual motion and therefore increasing the accuracy of gated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 331 respiratory traces were collected from 24 lung cancer patients. The protocol consisted of five breathing training sessions spaced about a week apart. Within each session the patients initially breathed without any instruction (free breathing), with audio instructions and with audio-visual biofeedback. Residual motion was quantified by the standard deviation of the respiratory signal within the gating window. Results: Audio-visual biofeedback significantly reduced residual motion compared with free breathing and audio instruction. Displacement-based gating has lower residual motion than phase-based gating. Little reduction in residual motion was found for duty cycles less than 30%; for duty cycles above 50% there was a sharp increase in residual motion. Conclusions: The efficiency and reproducibility of gating can be improved by: incorporating audio-visual biofeedback, using a 30-50% duty cycle, gating during exhalation, and using displacement-based gating

  5. Respiratory gated beam delivery cannot facilitate margin reduction, unless combined with respiratory correlated image guidance

    Korreman, S.S.; Boyer, A.L.; Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: In radiotherapy of targets moving with respiration, beam gating is offered as a means of reducing the target motion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safe magnitude of margin reduction for respiratory gated beam delivery. MATERIALS/METHODS: The study is based on data...... for 17 lung cancer patients in separate protocols at Rigshospitalet and Stanford Cancer Center. Respiratory curves for external optical markers and implanted fiducials were collected using equipment based on the RPM system (Varian Medical Systems). A total of 861 respiratory curves represented external...... measurements over 30 fraction treatment courses for 10 patients, and synchronous external/internal measurements in single sessions for seven patients. Variations in respiratory amplitude (simulated coaching) and external/internal phase shifts were simulated by perturbation with realistic values. Variations...

  6. Respiratory gating and multi field technique radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    Ohta, Atsushi; Kaidu, Motoki; Tanabe, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of a respiratory gating and multi field technique on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Twenty patients who underwent four-dimensional computed tomography for esophageal cancer were included. We retrospectively created the four treatment plans for each patient, with or without the respiratory gating and multi field technique: No gating-2-field, No gating-4-field, Gating-2-field, and Gating-4-field plans. We compared the DVH parameters of the lung and heart in the No gating-2-field plan with the other three plans.Result In the comparison of the parameters in the No gating-2-field plan, there are significant differences in the Lung V 5Gy , V 20Gy , mean dose with all three plans and the Heart V 25Gy -V 40Gy with Gating-2-field plan, V 35Gy , V 40Gy , mean dose with No Gating-4-field plan and V 30Gy -V 40Gy , and mean dose with Gating-4-field plan. The lung parameters were smaller in the Gating-2-field plan and larger in the No gating-4-field and Gating-4-field plans. The heart parameters were all larger in the No gating-2-field plan. The lung parameters were reduced by the respiratory gating technique and increased by the multi field technique. The heart parameters were reduced by both techniques. It is important to select the optimal technique according to the risk of complications. (author)

  7. Respiratory gated PET/CT of the liver: A novel method and its impact on the detection of colorectal liver metastases

    Schulz, Anselm; Godt, Johannes Clemens; Dormagen, Johann Baptist; Holtedahl, Jon Erik; Bogsrud, Trond Velde; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kløw, Nils-Einar; Bach-Gansmo, Tore

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Combined PET/CT and respiratory gated PET/CT improved sensitivity significantly. • Respiratory gated PET/CT had greatest impact on detection of small CRLM <10 mm. • Our results were comparable to earlier reported more complex and expensive methods. • The method used is inexpensive and requires only limited additional imaging time. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of a new method for respiratory gated positron emission tomography (rgPET/CT) for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM), secondly, to assess its additional value to standard PET/CT (PET/CT). Materials and methods: Forty-three patients scheduled for resection of suspected CRLM were prospectively included from September 2011 to January 2013. None of the patients had previously undergone treatment for their CRLM. All patients underwent PET/CT and rgPET/CT in the same session. For rgPET/CT an in-house developed electronic circuit was used which displayed a color-coded countdown for the patient. The patients held their breath according to the countdown and only the data from the inspiration breath-hold period was used for image reconstruction. Two independent and blinded readers evaluated both PET/CT and rgPET/CT separately. The reference standard was histopathological confirmation for 73 out of 131 CRLM and follow-up otherwise. Results: Reference standard identified 131 CRLM in 39/43 patients. Nine patients accounted for 25 mucinous CRLM. The overall per-lesion sensitivity for detection of CRLM was for PET/CT 60.0%, for rgPET/CT 63.1%, and for standard + rgPET/CT 67.7%, respectively. Standard + rgPET/CT was overall significantly more sensitive for CRLM compared to PET/CT (p = 0.002) and rgPET/CT (p = 0.031). The overall positive predictive value (PPV) for detection of CRLM was for PET/CT 97.5%, for rgPET/CT 95.3%, and for standard + rgPET/CT 93.6%, respectively. Conclusion: Combination of PET/CT and rgPET/CT improved the sensitivity significantly for CRLM. However

  8. Respiratory gated PET/CT of the liver: A novel method and its impact on the detection of colorectal liver metastases

    Schulz, Anselm, E-mail: anselm.schulz@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Postboks Pb 4956 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1171 Blindern, 0318 Oslo (Norway); Godt, Johannes Clemens, E-mail: UXGODJ@ous-hf.no [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Postboks Pb 4956 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1171 Blindern, 0318 Oslo (Norway); Dormagen, Johann Baptist, E-mail: UXJORM@ous-hf.no [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Postboks Pb 4956 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Holtedahl, Jon Erik, E-mail: JONHOL@ous-hf.no [The Intervention Centre, Oslo University Hospital, Postboks 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Bogsrud, Trond Velde, E-mail: tvbog@aol.com [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Postboks Pb 4956 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET-Center, Aarhus University Hospital, Norrebrogade 44, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Labori, Knut Jørgen, E-mail: uxknab@ous-hf.no [Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Postboks 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Kløw, Nils-Einar, E-mail: NILKLO@ous-hf.no [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Postboks Pb 4956 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1171 Blindern, 0318 Oslo (Norway); Bach-Gansmo, Tore, E-mail: bat@ous-hf.no [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Postboks Pb 4956 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Combined PET/CT and respiratory gated PET/CT improved sensitivity significantly. • Respiratory gated PET/CT had greatest impact on detection of small CRLM <10 mm. • Our results were comparable to earlier reported more complex and expensive methods. • The method used is inexpensive and requires only limited additional imaging time. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of a new method for respiratory gated positron emission tomography (rgPET/CT) for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM), secondly, to assess its additional value to standard PET/CT (PET/CT). Materials and methods: Forty-three patients scheduled for resection of suspected CRLM were prospectively included from September 2011 to January 2013. None of the patients had previously undergone treatment for their CRLM. All patients underwent PET/CT and rgPET/CT in the same session. For rgPET/CT an in-house developed electronic circuit was used which displayed a color-coded countdown for the patient. The patients held their breath according to the countdown and only the data from the inspiration breath-hold period was used for image reconstruction. Two independent and blinded readers evaluated both PET/CT and rgPET/CT separately. The reference standard was histopathological confirmation for 73 out of 131 CRLM and follow-up otherwise. Results: Reference standard identified 131 CRLM in 39/43 patients. Nine patients accounted for 25 mucinous CRLM. The overall per-lesion sensitivity for detection of CRLM was for PET/CT 60.0%, for rgPET/CT 63.1%, and for standard + rgPET/CT 67.7%, respectively. Standard + rgPET/CT was overall significantly more sensitive for CRLM compared to PET/CT (p = 0.002) and rgPET/CT (p = 0.031). The overall positive predictive value (PPV) for detection of CRLM was for PET/CT 97.5%, for rgPET/CT 95.3%, and for standard + rgPET/CT 93.6%, respectively. Conclusion: Combination of PET/CT and rgPET/CT improved the sensitivity significantly for CRLM. However

  9. An integrated bioimpedance—ECG gating technique for respiratory and cardiac motion compensation in cardiac PET

    Koivumäki, Tuomas; Nekolla, Stephan G; Fürst, Sebastian; Loher, Simone; Schwaiger, Markus; Vauhkonen, Marko; Hakulinen, Mikko A

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory motion may degrade image quality in cardiac PET imaging. Since cardiac PET studies often involve cardiac gating by ECG, a separate respiratory monitoring system is required increasing the logistic complexity of the examination, in case respiratory gating is also needed. Thus, we investigated the simultaneous acquisition of both respiratory and cardiac gating signals using II limb lead mimicking electrode configuration during cardiac PET scans of 11 patients. In addition to conventional static and ECG-gated images, bioimpedance technique was utilized to generate respiratory- and dual-gated images. The ability of the bioimpedance technique to monitor intrathoracic respiratory motion was assessed estimating cardiac displacement between end-inspiration and -expiration. The relevance of dual gating was evaluated in left ventricular volume and myocardial wall thickness measurements. An average 7.6  ±  3.3 mm respiratory motion was observed in the study population. Dual gating showed a small but significant increase (4 ml, p = 0.042) in left ventricular myocardial volume compared to plain cardiac gating. In addition, a thinner myocardial wall was observed in dual-gated images (9.3  ±  1.3 mm) compared to cardiac-gated images (11.3  ±  1.3 mm, p = 0.003). This study shows the feasibility of bioimpedance measurements for dual gating in a clinical setting. The method enables simultaneous acquisition of respiratory and cardiac gating signals using a single device with standard ECG electrodes. (paper)

  10. Respiratory guiding system for respiratory motion management in respiratory gated radiotherapy

    Kang, Seong Hee; Kim, Dong Su; Kim, Tae Ho; Suh, Tae Suk

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory guiding systems have been shown to improve the respiratory regularity. This, in turn, improves the efficiency of synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy, and it reduces the artifacts caused by irregular breathing in imaging techniques such as four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT), which is used for treatment planning in RGRT. We have previously developed a respiratory guiding system that incorporates an individual-specific guiding waveform, which is easy to follow for each volunteer, to improve the respiratory regularity. The present study evaluates the application of this system to improve the respiratory regularity for respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT). In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of an in-house-developed respiratory guiding system incorporating an individual specific guiding waveform to improve the respiratory regularity for RGRT. Most volunteers showed significantly less residual motion at each phase during guided breathing owing to the improvement in respiratory regularity. Therefore, the respiratory guiding system can clearly reduce the residual, or respiratory, motion in each phase. From the result, the CTV and the PTV margins during RGRT can be reduced by using the respiratory guiding system, which reduces the residual motions, thus improving the accuracy of RGRT

  11. Respiratory and cardiac motion correction in dual gated PET/MR imaging

    Fayad, Hadi; Monnier, Florian [LaTIM, INSERM, UMR 1101, Brest (France); Odille, Freedy; Felblinger, Jacques [INSERM U947, University of Nancy, Nancy (France); Lamare, Frederic [INCIA, UMR5287, CNRS, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Visvikis, Dimitris [LaTIM, INSERM, UMR 1101, Brest (France)

    2015-05-18

    Respiratory and cardiac motion in PET/MR imaging leads to reduced quantitative and qualitative image accuracy. Correction methodologies involve the use of double gated acquisitions which lead to low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and to issues concerning the combination of cardiac and respiratory frames. The objective of this work is to use a generalized reconstruction by inversion of coupled systems (GRICS) approach, previously used for PET/MR respiratory motion correction, combined with a cardiac phase signal and a reconstruction incorporated PET motion correction approach in order to reconstruct motion free images from dual gated PET acquisitions. The GRICS method consists of formulating parallel MRI in the presence of patient motion as a coupled inverse problem. Its resolution, using a fixed-point method, allows the reconstructed image to be improved using a motion model constructed from the raw MR data and two respiratory belts. GRICS obtained respiratory displacements are interpolated using the cardiac phase derived from an ECG to model simultaneous cardiac and respiratory motion. Three different volunteer datasets (4DMR acquisitions) were used for evaluation. GATE was used to simulate 4DPET datasets corresponding to the acquired 4DMR images. Simulated data were subsequently binned using 16 cardiac phases (M1) vs diastole only (M2), in combination with 8 respiratory amplitude gates. Respiratory and cardiac motion corrected PET images using either M1 or M2 were compared to respiratory only corrected images and evaluated in terms of SNR and contrast improvement. Significant visual improvements were obtained when correcting simultaneously for respiratory and cardiac motion (using 16 cardiac phase or diastole only) compared to respiratory motion only compensation. Results were confirmed by an associated increased SNR and contrast. Results indicate that using GRICS is an efficient tool for respiratory and cardiac motion correction in dual gated PET/MR imaging.

  12. Automatic tumour volume delineation in respiratory-gated PET images

    Gubbi, Jayavardhana; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Kanakatte, Aparna; Mani, Nallasamy; Kron, Tomas; Binns, David; Srinivasan, Bala

    2011-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a state-of-the-art functional imaging technique used in the accurate detection of cancer. The main problem with the tumours present in the lungs is that they are non-stationary during each respiratory cycle. Tumours in the lungs can get displaced up to 2.5 cm during respiration. Accurate detection of the tumour enables avoiding the addition of extra margin around the tumour that is usually used during radiotherapy treatment planning. This paper presents a novel method to detect and track tumour in respiratory-gated PET images. The approach followed to achieve this task is to automatically delineate the tumour from the first frame using support vector machines. The resulting volume and position information from the first frame is used in tracking its motion in the subsequent frames with the help of level set (LS) deformable model. An excellent accuracy of 97% is obtained using wavelets and support vector machines. The volume calculated as a result of the machine learning (ML) stage is used as a constraint for deformable models and the tumour is tracked in the remaining seven phases of the respiratory cycle. As a result, the complete information about tumour movement during each respiratory cycle is available in relatively short time. The combination of the LS and ML approach accurately delineated the tumour volume from all frames, thereby providing a scope of using PET images towards planning an accurate and effective radiotherapy treatment for lung cancer.

  13. Respiratory trace feature analysis for the prediction of respiratory-gated PET quantification

    Wang, Shouyi; Bowen, Stephen R.; Chaovalitwongse, W. Art; Sandison, George A.; Grabowski, Thomas J.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-02-01

    The benefits of respiratory gating in quantitative PET/CT vary tremendously between individual patients. Respiratory pattern is among many patient-specific characteristics that are thought to play an important role in gating-induced imaging improvements. However, the quantitative relationship between patient-specific characteristics of respiratory pattern and improvements in quantitative accuracy from respiratory-gated PET/CT has not been well established. If such a relationship could be estimated, then patient-specific respiratory patterns could be used to prospectively select appropriate motion compensation during image acquisition on a per-patient basis. This study was undertaken to develop a novel statistical model that predicts quantitative changes in PET/CT imaging due to respiratory gating. Free-breathing static FDG-PET images without gating and respiratory-gated FDG-PET images were collected from 22 lung and liver cancer patients on a PET/CT scanner. PET imaging quality was quantified with peak standardized uptake value (SUVpeak) over lesions of interest. Relative differences in SUVpeak between static and gated PET images were calculated to indicate quantitative imaging changes due to gating. A comprehensive multidimensional extraction of the morphological and statistical characteristics of respiratory patterns was conducted, resulting in 16 features that characterize representative patterns of a single respiratory trace. The six most informative features were subsequently extracted using a stepwise feature selection approach. The multiple-regression model was trained and tested based on a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation. The predicted quantitative improvements in PET imaging achieved an accuracy higher than 90% using a criterion with a dynamic error-tolerance range for SUVpeak values. The results of this study suggest that our prediction framework could be applied to determine which patients would likely benefit from respiratory motion compensation

  14. Respiratory trace feature analysis for the prediction of respiratory-gated PET quantification

    Wang, Shouyi; Chaovalitwongse, W Art; Bowen, Stephen R; Kinahan, Paul E; Sandison, George A; Grabowski, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of respiratory gating in quantitative PET/CT vary tremendously between individual patients. Respiratory pattern is among many patient-specific characteristics that are thought to play an important role in gating-induced imaging improvements. However, the quantitative relationship between patient-specific characteristics of respiratory pattern and improvements in quantitative accuracy from respiratory-gated PET/CT has not been well established. If such a relationship could be estimated, then patient-specific respiratory patterns could be used to prospectively select appropriate motion compensation during image acquisition on a per-patient basis. This study was undertaken to develop a novel statistical model that predicts quantitative changes in PET/CT imaging due to respiratory gating. Free-breathing static FDG-PET images without gating and respiratory-gated FDG-PET images were collected from 22 lung and liver cancer patients on a PET/CT scanner. PET imaging quality was quantified with peak standardized uptake value (SUV peak ) over lesions of interest. Relative differences in SUV peak between static and gated PET images were calculated to indicate quantitative imaging changes due to gating. A comprehensive multidimensional extraction of the morphological and statistical characteristics of respiratory patterns was conducted, resulting in 16 features that characterize representative patterns of a single respiratory trace. The six most informative features were subsequently extracted using a stepwise feature selection approach. The multiple-regression model was trained and tested based on a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation. The predicted quantitative improvements in PET imaging achieved an accuracy higher than 90% using a criterion with a dynamic error-tolerance range for SUV peak values. The results of this study suggest that our prediction framework could be applied to determine which patients would likely benefit from respiratory motion

  15. Respiratory gated radiotherapy-pretreatment patient specific quality assurance

    Rajesh Thiyagarajan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ motions during inter-fraction and intra-fraction radiotherapy introduce errors in dose delivery, irradiating excess of normal tissue, and missing target volume. Lung and heart involuntary motions cause above inaccuracies and gated dose delivery try to overcome above effects. Present work attempts a novel method to verify dynamic dose delivery using a four-dimensional (4D phantom. Three patients with mobile target are coached to maintain regular and reproducible breathing pattern. Appropriate intensity projection image set generated from 4D-computed tomography (4D-CT is used for target delineation. Intensity modulated radiotherapy plans were generated on selected phase using CT simulator (Siemens AG, Germany in conjunction with "Real-time position management" (Varian, USA to acquire 4D-CT images. Verification plans were generated for both ion chamber and Gafchromic (EBT film image sets. Gated verification plans were delivered on the phantom moving with patient respiratory pattern. We developed a MATLAB-based software to generate maximum intensity projection, minimum intensity projections, and average intensity projections, also a program to convert patient breathing pattern to phantom compatible format. Dynamic thorax quality assurance (QA phantom (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems type is used to perform the patient specific QA, which holds an ion chamber and film to measure delivered radiation intensity. Exposed EBT films are analyzed and compared with treatment planning system calculated dose. The ion chamber measured dose shows good agreement with planned dose within ± 0.5% (0.203 ± 0.57%. Gamma value evaluated from EBT film shows passing rates 92–99% (96.63 ± 3.84% for 3% dose and 3 mm distance criteria. Respiratory gated treatment delivery accuracy is found to be within clinically acceptable level.

  16. MR respiratory navigator echo gated coronary angiography at 3 T

    Chang Shixin; Wang Yibin; Zong Genlin; Hao Nanxin; Du Yushan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the techniques and influence factors for the respiratory navigator echo triggered whole-heart coronary MR angiography (WH-CMRA) and evaluate its application in visualizing coronary arteries and the image quality. Methods: Ninety two volunteers were acquired with WH-CMRA at 3 T MR scanner using respiratory navigator-echo gated TFE sequence. Imaging quality was visually graded as 0-IV grade according to the visual inspection, average length, diameter and sharpness of coronary arteries. The correlation between the imaging quality and respiratory pattern, heart rate and navigator efficiency was analyzed. Results: The imaging quality in 92 cases was that 28 were graded as IV, 53 were graded as III, 9 were graded as II and 2 were graded as I. The successful rate of scan was 88% (81/92). The imaging quality is mainly graded as IV when the heart rate was less than 75 beats per minute (bpm) and the sharpness of vessel was (48±11)%. When heart rate was more than 75 bpm, the image quality was mostly graded as 111 and the sharpness was (33±15)%. The correlation between heart rate and imaging quality score was negative (r= -0.726, P O.05). Conclusion: 3 T WH-CMRA technique could facilitated the visualization of whole coronary arteries at free breathing but having indications on heart rate. (authors)

  17. External radioactive markers for PET data-driven respiratory gating in positron emission tomography.

    Büther, Florian; Ernst, Iris; Hamill, James; Eich, Hans T; Schober, Otmar; Schäfers, Michael; Schäfers, Klaus P

    2013-04-01

    Respiratory gating is an established approach to overcoming respiration-induced image artefacts in PET. Of special interest in this respect are raw PET data-driven gating methods which do not require additional hardware to acquire respiratory signals during the scan. However, these methods rely heavily on the quality of the acquired PET data (statistical properties, data contrast, etc.). We therefore combined external radioactive markers with data-driven respiratory gating in PET/CT. The feasibility and accuracy of this approach was studied for [(18)F]FDG PET/CT imaging in patients with malignant liver and lung lesions. PET data from 30 patients with abdominal or thoracic [(18)F]FDG-positive lesions (primary tumours or metastases) were included in this prospective study. The patients underwent a 10-min list-mode PET scan with a single bed position following a standard clinical whole-body [(18)F]FDG PET/CT scan. During this scan, one to three radioactive point sources (either (22)Na or (18)F, 50-100 kBq) in a dedicated holder were attached the patient's abdomen. The list mode data acquired were retrospectively analysed for respiratory signals using established data-driven gating approaches and additionally by tracking the motion of the point sources in sinogram space. Gated reconstructions were examined qualitatively, in terms of the amount of respiratory displacement and in respect of changes in local image intensity in the gated images. The presence of the external markers did not affect whole-body PET/CT image quality. Tracking of the markers led to characteristic respiratory curves in all patients. Applying these curves for gated reconstructions resulted in images in which motion was well resolved. Quantitatively, the performance of the external marker-based approach was similar to that of the best intrinsic data-driven methods. Overall, the gain in measured tumour uptake from the nongated to the gated images indicating successful removal of respiratory motion

  18. Respiratory gated radiotherapy: current techniques and potential benefits

    Giraud, P.; Campana, F.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.; Reboul, F.; Garcia, R.; Clippe, S.; Carrie, C.; Dubray, B.

    2003-01-01

    Respiration-gated radiotherapy offers a significant potential for improvement in the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion such as lung, breast and liver tumors. An increased conformality of irradiation fields leading to decreased complications rates of organs at risk (lung, heart...) is expected. Respiratory gating is in line with the need for improved precision required by radiotherapy techniques such as 3D conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy. Reduction of respiratory motion can be achieved by using either breath hold techniques or respiration synchronized gating techniques. Breath-hold techniques can be achieved with active, in which airflow of the patient is temporarily blocked by a valve, or passive techniques, in which the patient voluntarily breath-hold. Synchronized gating techniques use external devices to predict the phase of the respiration cycle while the patient breaths freely. These techniques presently investigated in several medical centers worldwide. Although promising, the first results obtained in lung and liver cancer patients require confirmation. Physical, technical and physiological questions still remain to be answered. This paper describes the most frequently used gated techniques and the main published clinical reports on the use of respiration-gated radiotherapy in order to evaluate the impact of these techniques. (author)

  19. Dosimetric evaluation of the interplay effect in respiratory-gated RapidArc radiation therapy

    Riley, Craig; Yang, Yong; Li, Tianfang; Zhang, Yongqian; Heron, Dwight E.; Huq, M. Saiful

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with gating capability has had increasing adoption in many clinics in the United States. In this new technique, dose rate, gantry rotation speed, and the leaf motion speed of multileaf collimators (MLCs) are modulated dynamically during gated beam delivery to achieve highly conformal dose coverage of the target and normal tissue sparing. Compared with the traditional gated intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique, this complicated beam delivery technique may result in larger dose errors due to the intrafraction tumor motion. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dosimetric influence of the interplay effect for the respiration-gated VMAT technique (RapidArc, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Our work consisted of two parts: (1) Investigate the interplay effect for different target residual errors during gated RapidArc delivery using a one-dimensional moving phantom capable of producing stable sinusoidal movement; (2) Evaluate the dosimetric influence in ten clinical patients’ treatment plans using a moving phantom driven with a patient-specific respiratory curve. Methods: For the first part of this study, four plans were created with a spherical target for varying residual motion of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 cm. Appropriate gating windows were applied for each. The dosimetric effect was evaluated using EDR2 film by comparing the gated delivery with static delivery. For the second part of the project, ten gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy cases were selected and reoptimized to be delivered by the gated RapidArc technique. These plans were delivered to a phantom, and again the gated treatments were compared to static deliveries by the same methods. Results: For regular sinusoidal motion, the dose delivered to the target was not substantially affected by the gating windows when evaluated with the gamma statistics, suggesting the interplay effect has a small role in respiratory-gated Rapid

  20. Feasibility study of multi-pass respiratory-gated helical tomotherapy of a moving target via binary MLC closure

    Kim, Bryan; Chen, Jeff; Kron, Tomas; Battista, Jerry

    2010-11-01

    Gated radiotherapy of lung lesions is particularly complex for helical tomotherapy, due to the simultaneous motions of its three subsystems (gantry, couch and collimator). We propose a new way to implement gating for helical tomotherapy, namely multi-pass respiratory gating. In this method, gating is achieved by delivering only the beam projections that occur within a respiratory gating window, while blocking the rest of the beam projections by fully closing all collimator leaves. Due to the continuous couch motion, the planned beam projections must be delivered over multiple passes of radiation deliveries. After each pass, the patient couch is reset to its starting position, and the treatment recommences at a different phase of tumour motion to 'fill in' the previously blocked beam projections. The gating process may be repeated until the plan dose is delivered (full gating), or halted after a certain number of passes, with the entire remaining dose delivered in a final pass without gating (partial gating). The feasibility of the full gating approach was first tested for sinusoidal target motion, through experimental measurements with film and computer simulation. The optimal gating parameters for full and partial gating methods were then determined for various fractionation schemes through computer simulation, using a patient respiratory waveform. For sinusoidal motion, the PTV dose deviations of -29 to 5% observed without gating were reduced to range from -1 to 3% for a single fraction, with a 4 pass full gating. For a patient waveform, partial gating required fewer passes than full gating for all fractionation schemes. For a single fraction, the maximum allowed residual motion was only 4 mm, requiring large numbers of passes for both full (12) and partial (7 + 1) gating methods. The number of required passes decreased significantly for 3 and 30 fractions, allowing residual motion up to 7 mm. Overall, the multi-pass gating technique was shown to be a promising

  1. Feasibility study of multi-pass respiratory-gated helical tomotherapy of a moving target via binary MLC closure

    Kim, Bryan; Chen, Jeff; Battista, Jerry [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON (Canada); Kron, Tomas, E-mail: bryan.kim@lhsc.on.c [Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, Melbourne (Australia)

    2010-11-21

    Gated radiotherapy of lung lesions is particularly complex for helical tomotherapy, due to the simultaneous motions of its three subsystems (gantry, couch and collimator). We propose a new way to implement gating for helical tomotherapy, namely multi-pass respiratory gating. In this method, gating is achieved by delivering only the beam projections that occur within a respiratory gating window, while blocking the rest of the beam projections by fully closing all collimator leaves. Due to the continuous couch motion, the planned beam projections must be delivered over multiple passes of radiation deliveries. After each pass, the patient couch is reset to its starting position, and the treatment recommences at a different phase of tumour motion to 'fill in' the previously blocked beam projections. The gating process may be repeated until the plan dose is delivered (full gating), or halted after a certain number of passes, with the entire remaining dose delivered in a final pass without gating (partial gating). The feasibility of the full gating approach was first tested for sinusoidal target motion, through experimental measurements with film and computer simulation. The optimal gating parameters for full and partial gating methods were then determined for various fractionation schemes through computer simulation, using a patient respiratory waveform. For sinusoidal motion, the PTV dose deviations of -29 to 5% observed without gating were reduced to range from -1 to 3% for a single fraction, with a 4 pass full gating. For a patient waveform, partial gating required fewer passes than full gating for all fractionation schemes. For a single fraction, the maximum allowed residual motion was only 4 mm, requiring large numbers of passes for both full (12) and partial (7 + 1) gating methods. The number of required passes decreased significantly for 3 and 30 fractions, allowing residual motion up to 7 mm. Overall, the multi-pass gating technique was shown to be a

  2. Dose verification for respiratory-gated volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Qian Jianguo; Xing Lei; Liu Wu; Luxton, Gary, E-mail: gluxton@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2011-08-07

    A novel commercial medical linac system (TrueBeam(TM), Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) allows respiratory-gated volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), a new modality for treating moving tumors with high precision and improved accuracy by allowing for regular motion associated with a patient's breathing during VMAT delivery. The purpose of this work is to adapt a previously-developed dose reconstruction technique to evaluate the fidelity of VMAT treatment during gated delivery under clinic-relevant periodic motion related to patient breathing. A Varian TrueBeam system was used in this study. VMAT plans were created for three patients with lung or pancreas tumors. Conventional 6 and 15 MV beams with flattening filter and high-dose-rate 10 MV beams with no flattening filter were used in these plans. Each patient plan was delivered to a phantom first without gating and then with gating for three simulated respiratory periods (3, 4.5 and 6 s). Using the adapted log-file-based dose reconstruction procedure supplemented with ion chamber array (Seven29(TM), PTW, Freiburg, Germany) measurements, the delivered dose was used to evaluate the fidelity of gated VMAT delivery. Comparison of Seven29 measurements with and without gating showed good agreement with gamma-index passing rates above 99% for 1%/1 mm dose accuracy/distance-to-agreement criteria. With original plans as reference, gamma-index passing rates were 100% for the reconstituted plans (1%/1 mm criteria) and 93.5-100% for gated Seven29 measurements (3%/3 mm criteria). In the presence of leaf error deliberately introduced into the gated delivery of a pancreas patient plan, both dose reconstruction and Seven29 measurement consistently indicated substantial dosimetric differences from the original plan. In summary, a dose reconstruction procedure was demonstrated for evaluating the accuracy of respiratory-gated VMAT delivery. This technique showed that under clinical operation, the TrueBeam system

  3. Dosimetric Analysis of Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Xi Mian; Zhang Li; Liu Mengzhong; Deng Xiaowu; Huang Xiaoyan; Liu Hui

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define individualized internal target volume (ITV) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using 4D computed tomography (4DCT), and to determine the geometric and dosimetric benefits of respiratory gating. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on 10 respiratory phases of 4DCT images for 12 patients with HCC. Three treatment plans were prepared using different planning target volumes (PTVs): (1) PTV 3D , derived from a single helical clinical target volume (CTV) plus conventional margins; (2) PTV 10phases , derived from ITV 10phases , which encompassed all 10 CTVs plus an isotropic margin of 0.8 cm; (3) PTV gating , derived from ITV gating , which encompassed three CTVs within gating-window at end-expiration plus an isotropic margin of 0.8 cm. The PTV 3D was the largest volume for all patients. The ITV-based plans and gating plans spared more normal tissues than 3D plans, especially the liver. Without increasing normal tissue complication probability of the 3D plans, the ITV-based plans allowed for increasing the calculated dose from 50.8 Gy to 54.7 Gy on average, and the gating plans could further escalate the dose to 58.5 Gy. Compared with ITV-based plans, the dosimetric gains with gating plan strongly correlated with GTV mobility in the craniocaudal direction. The ITV-based plans can ensure target coverage with less irradiation of normal tissues compared with 3D plans. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy can further reduce the target volumes to spare more surrounding tissues and allow dose escalation, especially for patients with tumor mobility >1 cm.

  4. Correlation between the respiratory waveform measured using a respiratory sensor and 3D tumor motion in gated radiotherapy

    Tsunashima, Yoshikazu; Sakae, Takeji; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Kagei, Kenji; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Nohtomi, Akihiro; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlation between the respiratory waveform measured using a respiratory sensor and three-dimensional (3D) tumor motion. Methods and materials: A laser displacement sensor (LDS: KEYENCE LB-300) that measures distance using infrared light was used as the respiratory sensor. This was placed such that the focus was in an area around the patient's navel. When the distance from the LDS to the body surface changes as the patient breathes, the displacement is detected as a respiratory waveform. To obtain the 3D tumor motion, a biplane digital radiography unit was used. For the tumor in the lung, liver, and esophagus of 26 patients, the waveform was compared with the 3D tumor motion. The relationship between the respiratory waveform and the 3D tumor motion was analyzed by means of the Fourier transform and a cross-correlation function. Results: The respiratory waveform cycle agreed with that of the cranial-caudal and dorsal-ventral tumor motion. A phase shift observed between the respiratory waveform and the 3D tumor motion was principally in the range 0.0 to 0.3 s, regardless of the organ being measured, which means that the respiratory waveform does not always express the 3D tumor motion with fidelity. For this reason, the standard deviation of the tumor position in the expiration phase, as indicated by the respiratory waveform, was derived, which should be helpful in suggesting the internal margin required in the case of respiratory gated radiotherapy. Conclusion: Although obtained from only a few breathing cycles for each patient, the correlation between the respiratory waveform and the 3D tumor motion was evident in this study. If this relationship is analyzed carefully and an internal margin is applied, the accuracy and convenience of respiratory gated radiotherapy could be improved by use of the respiratory sensor.Thus, it is expected that this procedure will come into wider use

  5. Dosimetric evaluation of the interplay effect in respiratory-gated RapidArc radiation therapy.

    Riley, Craig; Yang, Yong; Li, Tianfang; Zhang, Yongqian; Heron, Dwight E; Huq, M Saiful

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with gating capability has had increasing adoption in many clinics in the United States. In this new technique, dose rate, gantry rotation speed, and the leaf motion speed of multileaf collimators (MLCs) are modulated dynamically during gated beam delivery to achieve highly conformal dose coverage of the target and normal tissue sparing. Compared with the traditional gated intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique, this complicated beam delivery technique may result in larger dose errors due to the intrafraction tumor motion. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dosimetric influence of the interplay effect for the respiration-gated VMAT technique (RapidArc, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Our work consisted of two parts: (1) Investigate the interplay effect for different target residual errors during gated RapidArc delivery using a one-dimensional moving phantom capable of producing stable sinusoidal movement; (2) Evaluate the dosimetric influence in ten clinical patients' treatment plans using a moving phantom driven with a patient-specific respiratory curve. For the first part of this study, four plans were created with a spherical target for varying residual motion of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 cm. Appropriate gating windows were applied for each. The dosimetric effect was evaluated using EDR2 film by comparing the gated delivery with static delivery. For the second part of the project, ten gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy cases were selected and reoptimized to be delivered by the gated RapidArc technique. These plans were delivered to a phantom, and again the gated treatments were compared to static deliveries by the same methods. For regular sinusoidal motion, the dose delivered to the target was not substantially affected by the gating windows when evaluated with the gamma statistics, suggesting the interplay effect has a small role in respiratory-gated RapidArc therapy. Varied results were

  6. Technical and dosimetric aspects of respiratory gating using a pressure-sensor motion monitoring system

    Li, X. Allen; Stepaniak, Christopher; Gore, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    This work introduces a gating technique that uses 4DCT to determine gating parameters and to plan gated treatment, and employs a Siemens linear accelerator to deliver the gated treatment. Because of technology incompatibility, the 4DCT scanner (LightSpeed, GE) and the Siemens accelerator require two different motion-monitoring systems. The motion monitoring system (AZ-773V, Anzai Med.) used for the gated delivery utilizes a pressure sensor to detect the external respiratory motion (pressure change) in real time. Another system (RPM, Varian) used for the 4DCT scanner (LightSpeed, GE) is based on an infrared camera to detect motion of external markers. These two motion monitoring systems (RPM and Anzai systems) were found to correlate well with each other. The depth doses and profile measured for gated delivery (with a duty cycle of 25% or 50%) were found to agree within 1.0% with those measured for ungated delivery, indicating that gating did not significantly alter beam characteristics. The measurement verified also that the MU linearity and beam output remained unchanged (within 0.3%). A practical method of using 4DCT to plan a gated treatment was developed. The duty cycle for either phase or amplitude gating can be determined based on 4DCT with consideration of set-up error and delivery efficiency. The close-loop measurement involving the entire gating process (imaging, planning, and delivery) showed that the measured isodose distributions agreed with those intended, validating the accuracy and reliability of the gating technique. Based these observations, we conclude that the gating technique introduced in this work, integrating Siemens linear accelerator and Anzai pressure sensor device with GE/Varian RPM 4DCT, is reliable and effective, and it can be used clinically to account for respiratory motion during radiation therapy

  7. Respiratory lung motion analysis using a nonlinear motion correction technique for respiratory-gated lung perfusion SPECT images

    Ue, Hidenori; Haneishi, Hideaki; Iwanaga, Hideyuki; Suga, Kazuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the respiratory motion of lungs using a nonlinear motion correction technique for respiratory-gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. The motion correction technique corrects the respiratory motion of the lungs nonlinearly between two-phase images obtained by respiratory-gated SPECT. The displacement vectors resulting from respiration can be computed at every location of the lungs. Respiratory lung motion analysis is carried out by calculating the mean value of the body axis component of the displacement vector in each of the 12 small regions into which the lungs were divided. In order to enable inter-patient comparison, the 12 mean values were normalized by the length of the lung region along the direction of the body axis. This method was applied to 25 Technetium (Tc)-99m-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) perfusion SPECT images, and motion analysis results were compared with the diagnostic results. It was confirmed that the respiratory lung motion reflects the ventilation function. A statistically significant difference in the amount of the respiratory lung motion was observed between the obstructive pulmonary diseases and other conditions, based on an unpaired Student's t test (P<0.0001). A difference in the motion between normal lungs and lungs with a ventilation obstruction was detected by the proposed method. This method is effective for evaluating obstructive pulmonary diseases such as pulmonary emphysema and diffuse panbronchiolitis. (author)

  8. Respiratory signal analysis of liver cancer patients with respiratory-gated radiation therapy

    Kang, Dong Im; Jung, Sang Hoon; Kim, Chul Jong; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Byung Ki

    2015-01-01

    External markers respiratory movement measuring device (RPM; Real-time Position Management, Varian Medical System, USA) Liver Cancer Radiation Therapy Respiratory gated with respiratory signal with irradiation time and the actual research by analyzing the respiratory phase with the breathing motion measurement device respiratory tuning evaluate the accuracy of radiation therapy May-September 2014 Novalis Tx. (Varian Medical System, USA) and liver cancer radiotherapy using respiratory gated RPM (Duty Cycle 20%, Gating window 40%-60%) of 16 patients who underwent total when recording the analyzed respiratory movement. After the breathing motion of the external markers recorded on the RPM was reconstructed by breathing through the acts phase analysis, for Beam-on Time and Duty Cycle recorded by using the reconstructed phase breathing breathing with RPM gated the prediction accuracy of the radiation treatment analysis and analyzed the correlation between prediction accuracy and Duty Cycle in accordance with the reproducibility of the respiratory movement. Treatment of 16 patients with respiratory cycle during the actual treatment plan was analyzed with an average difference -0.03 seconds (range -0.50 seconds to 0.09 seconds) could not be confirmed statistically significant difference between the two breathing (p = 0.472). The average respiratory period when treatment is 4.02 sec (0.71 sec), the average value of the respiratory cycle of the treatment was characterized by a standard deviation 7.43% (range 2.57 to 19.20%). Duty Cycle is that the actual average 16.05% (range 13.78 to 17.41%), average 56.05 got through the acts of the show and then analyzed% (range 39.23 to 75.10%) is planned in respiratory research phase (40% to 60%) in was confirmed. The investigation on the correlation between the ratio Duty Cycle and planned respiratory phase and the standard deviation of the respiratory cycle was analyzed in each -0.156 (p = 0.282) and -0.385 (p = 0.070). This study is

  9. SU-E-J-159: Analysis of Total Imaging Uncertainty in Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy

    Suzuki, J; Okuda, T; Sakaino, S; Yokota, N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In respiratory-gated radiotherapy, the gating phase during treatment delivery needs to coincide with the corresponding phase determined during the treatment plan. However, because radiotherapy is performed based on the image obtained for the treatment plan, the time delay, motion artifact, volume effect, and resolution in the images are uncertain. Thus, imaging uncertainty is the most basic factor that affects the localization accuracy. Therefore, these uncertainties should be analyzed. This study aims to analyze the total imaging uncertainty in respiratory-gated radiotherapy. Methods: Two factors of imaging uncertainties related to respiratory-gated radiotherapy were analyzed. First, CT image was used to determine the target volume and 4D treatment planning for the Varian Realtime Position Management (RPM) system. Second, an X-ray image was acquired for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for the BrainLAB ExacTrac system. These factors were measured using a respiratory gating phantom. The conditions applied during phantom operation were as follows: respiratory wave form, sine curve; respiratory cycle, 4 s; phantom target motion amplitude, 10, 20, and 29 mm (which is maximum phantom longitudinal motion). The target and cylindrical marker implanted in the phantom coverage of the CT images was measured and compared with the theoretically calculated coverage from the phantom motion. The theoretical position of the cylindrical marker implanted in the phantom was compared with that acquired from the X-ray image. The total imaging uncertainty was analyzed from these two factors. Results: In the CT image, the uncertainty between the target and cylindrical marker’s actual coverage and the coverage of CT images was 1.19 mm and 2.50mm, respectively. In the Xray image, the uncertainty was 0.39 mm. The total imaging uncertainty from the two factors was 1.62mm. Conclusion: The total imaging uncertainty in respiratory-gated radiotherapy was clinically acceptable. However

  10. SU-E-J-159: Analysis of Total Imaging Uncertainty in Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy

    Suzuki, J; Okuda, T [Toyota memorial hospital, Toyota, Aichi (Japan); Sakaino, S; Yokota, N [Suzukake central hospital, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In respiratory-gated radiotherapy, the gating phase during treatment delivery needs to coincide with the corresponding phase determined during the treatment plan. However, because radiotherapy is performed based on the image obtained for the treatment plan, the time delay, motion artifact, volume effect, and resolution in the images are uncertain. Thus, imaging uncertainty is the most basic factor that affects the localization accuracy. Therefore, these uncertainties should be analyzed. This study aims to analyze the total imaging uncertainty in respiratory-gated radiotherapy. Methods: Two factors of imaging uncertainties related to respiratory-gated radiotherapy were analyzed. First, CT image was used to determine the target volume and 4D treatment planning for the Varian Realtime Position Management (RPM) system. Second, an X-ray image was acquired for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for the BrainLAB ExacTrac system. These factors were measured using a respiratory gating phantom. The conditions applied during phantom operation were as follows: respiratory wave form, sine curve; respiratory cycle, 4 s; phantom target motion amplitude, 10, 20, and 29 mm (which is maximum phantom longitudinal motion). The target and cylindrical marker implanted in the phantom coverage of the CT images was measured and compared with the theoretically calculated coverage from the phantom motion. The theoretical position of the cylindrical marker implanted in the phantom was compared with that acquired from the X-ray image. The total imaging uncertainty was analyzed from these two factors. Results: In the CT image, the uncertainty between the target and cylindrical marker’s actual coverage and the coverage of CT images was 1.19 mm and 2.50mm, respectively. In the Xray image, the uncertainty was 0.39 mm. The total imaging uncertainty from the two factors was 1.62mm. Conclusion: The total imaging uncertainty in respiratory-gated radiotherapy was clinically acceptable. However

  11. In Vivo Respiratory-Gated Micro-CT Imaging in Small-Animal Oncology Models

    Dawn Cavanaugh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT is becoming an accepted research tool for the noninvasive examination of laboratory animals such as mice and rats, but to date, in vivo scanning has largely been limited to the evaluation of skeletal tissues. We use a commercially available micro-CT device to perform respiratory gated in vivo acquisitions suitable for thoracic imaging. The instrument is described, along with the scan protocol and animal preparation techniques. Preliminary results confirm that lung tumors as small as 1 mm in diameter are visible in vivo with these methods. Radiation dose was evaluated using several approaches, and was found to be approximately 0.15 Gy for this respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging protocol. The combination of high-resolution CT imaging and respiratory-gated acquisitions appears well-suited to serial in vivo scanning.

  12. Dose profile measurements during respiratory-gated lung stereotactic radiotherapy: A phantom study

    Jong, W L; Ung, N M; Wong, J H D; Ng, K H

    2016-01-01

    During stereotactic body radiotherapy, high radiation dose (∼60 Gy) is delivered to the tumour in small fractionation regime. In this study, the dosimetric characteristics were studied using radiochromic film during respiratory-gated and non-gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Specifically, the effect of respiratory cycle and amplitude, as well as gating window on the dosimetry were studied. In this study, the dose profiles along the irradiated area were measured. The dose profiles for respiratory-gated radiation delivery with different respiratory or tumour motion amplitudes, gating windows and respiratory time per cycle were in agreement with static radiation delivery. The respiratory gating system was able to deliver the radiation dose accurately (±1.05 mm) in the longitudinal direction. Although the treatment time for respiratory-gated SBRT was prolonged, this approach can potentially reduce the margin for internal tumour volume without compromising the tumour coverage. In addition, the normal tissue sparing effect can be improved. (paper)

  13. SU-E-J-45: Design and Study of An In-House Respiratory Gating Phantom Platform for Gated Radiotherapy

    Senthilkumar, S [Madurai Medical College ' Govt. Rajaji Hospital, Madurai (India)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this work was to develop an in-house low cost respiratory motion phantom platform for testing the accuracy of the gated radiotherapy system and analyze the dosimetric difference during gated radiotherapy. Methods: An in-house respiratory motion platform(RMP) was designed and constructed for testing the targeting accuracy of respiratory tracking system. The RMP consist of acrylic Chest Wall Platform, 2 DC motors, 4 IR sensors, speed controller circuit, 2 LED and 2 moving rods inside the RMP. The velocity of the movement can be varied from 0 to 30 cycles per minute. The platform mounted to a base using precision linear bearings. The base and platform are made of clear, 15mm thick polycarbonate plastic and the linear ball bearings are oriented to restrict the platform to a movement of approximately 50mm up and down with very little friction. Results: The targeting accuracy of the respiratory tracking system was evaluated using phantom with and without respiratory movement with varied amplitude. We have found the 5% dose difference to the PTV during the movement in comparison with stable PTV. The RMP can perform sinusoidal motion in 1D with fixed peak to peak motion of 5 to 50mm and cycle interval from 2 to 6 seconds. The RMP was designed to be able to simulate the gross anatomical anterior posterior motion attributable to respiration-induced motion of the thoracic region. Conclusion: The unique RMP simulates breathing providing the means to create a comprehensive program for commissioning, training, quality assurance and dose verification of gated radiotherapy treatments. Create the anterior/posterior movement of a target over a 5 to 50 mm distance to replicate tumor movement. The targeting error of the respiratory tracking system is less than 1.0 mm which shows suitable for clinical treatment with highly performance.

  14. SU-E-J-45: Design and Study of An In-House Respiratory Gating Phantom Platform for Gated Radiotherapy

    Senthilkumar, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this work was to develop an in-house low cost respiratory motion phantom platform for testing the accuracy of the gated radiotherapy system and analyze the dosimetric difference during gated radiotherapy. Methods: An in-house respiratory motion platform(RMP) was designed and constructed for testing the targeting accuracy of respiratory tracking system. The RMP consist of acrylic Chest Wall Platform, 2 DC motors, 4 IR sensors, speed controller circuit, 2 LED and 2 moving rods inside the RMP. The velocity of the movement can be varied from 0 to 30 cycles per minute. The platform mounted to a base using precision linear bearings. The base and platform are made of clear, 15mm thick polycarbonate plastic and the linear ball bearings are oriented to restrict the platform to a movement of approximately 50mm up and down with very little friction. Results: The targeting accuracy of the respiratory tracking system was evaluated using phantom with and without respiratory movement with varied amplitude. We have found the 5% dose difference to the PTV during the movement in comparison with stable PTV. The RMP can perform sinusoidal motion in 1D with fixed peak to peak motion of 5 to 50mm and cycle interval from 2 to 6 seconds. The RMP was designed to be able to simulate the gross anatomical anterior posterior motion attributable to respiration-induced motion of the thoracic region. Conclusion: The unique RMP simulates breathing providing the means to create a comprehensive program for commissioning, training, quality assurance and dose verification of gated radiotherapy treatments. Create the anterior/posterior movement of a target over a 5 to 50 mm distance to replicate tumor movement. The targeting error of the respiratory tracking system is less than 1.0 mm which shows suitable for clinical treatment with highly performance

  15. Determination of prospective displacement-based gate threshold for respiratory-gated radiation delivery from retrospective phase-based gate threshold selected at 4D CT simulation

    Vedam, S.; Archambault, L.; Starkschall, G.; Mohan, R.; Beddar, S.

    2007-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) imaging has found increasing importance in the localization of tumor and surrounding normal structures throughout the respiratory cycle. Based on such tumor motion information, it is possible to identify the appropriate phase interval for respiratory gated treatment planning and delivery. Such a gating phase interval is determined retrospectively based on tumor motion from internal tumor displacement. However, respiratory-gated treatment is delivered prospectively based on motion determined predominantly from an external monitor. Therefore, the simulation gate threshold determined from the retrospective phase interval selected for gating at 4D CT simulation may not correspond to the delivery gate threshold that is determined from the prospective external monitor displacement at treatment delivery. The purpose of the present work is to establish a relationship between the thresholds for respiratory gating determined at CT simulation and treatment delivery, respectively. One hundred fifty external respiratory motion traces, from 90 patients, with and without audio-visual biofeedback, are analyzed. Two respiratory phase intervals, 40%-60% and 30%-70%, are chosen for respiratory gating from the 4D CT-derived tumor motion trajectory. From residual tumor displacements within each such gating phase interval, a simulation gate threshold is defined based on (a) the average and (b) the maximum respiratory displacement within the phase interval. The duty cycle for prospective gated delivery is estimated from the proportion of external monitor displacement data points within both the selected phase interval and the simulation gate threshold. The delivery gate threshold is then determined iteratively to match the above determined duty cycle. The magnitude of the difference between such gate thresholds determined at simulation and treatment delivery is quantified in each case. Phantom motion tests yielded coincidence of simulation

  16. A novel optical gating method for laser gated imaging

    Ginat, Ran; Schneider, Ron; Zohar, Eyal; Nesher, Ofer

    2013-06-01

    For the past 15 years, Elbit Systems is developing time-resolved active laser-gated imaging (LGI) systems for various applications. Traditional LGI systems are based on high sensitive gated sensors, synchronized to pulsed laser sources. Elbit propriety multi-pulse per frame method, which is being implemented in LGI systems, improves significantly the imaging quality. A significant characteristic of the LGI is its ability to penetrate a disturbing media, such as rain, haze and some fog types. Current LGI systems are based on image intensifier (II) sensors, limiting the system in spectral response, image quality, reliability and cost. A novel propriety optical gating module was developed in Elbit, untying the dependency of LGI system on II. The optical gating module is not bounded to the radiance wavelength and positioned between the system optics and the sensor. This optical gating method supports the use of conventional solid state sensors. By selecting the appropriate solid state sensor, the new LGI systems can operate at any desired wavelength. In this paper we present the new gating method characteristics, performance and its advantages over the II gating method. The use of the gated imaging systems is described in a variety of applications, including results from latest field experiments.

  17. Detection of respiratory tumour motion using intrinsic list mode-driven gating in positron emission tomography.

    Büther, Florian; Ernst, Iris; Dawood, Mohammad; Kraxner, Peter; Schäfers, Michael; Schober, Otmar; Schäfers, Klaus P

    2010-12-01

    Respiratory motion of organs during PET scans is known to degrade PET image quality, potentially resulting in blurred images, attenuation artefacts and erroneous tracer quantification. List mode-based gating has been shown to reduce these pitfalls in cardiac PET. This study evaluates these intrinsic gating methods for tumour PET scans. A total of 34 patients with liver or lung tumours (14 liver tumours and 27 lung tumours in all) underwent a 15-min single-bed list mode PET scan of the tumour region. Of these, 15 patients (8 liver and 11 lung tumours in total) were monitored by a video camera registering a marker on the patient's abdomen, thus capturing the respiratory motion for PET gating (video method). Further gating information was deduced by dividing the list mode stream into 200-ms frames, determining the number of coincidences (sensitivity method) and computing the axial centre of mass of the measured count rates in the same frames (centre of mass method). Additionally, these list mode-based methods were evaluated using only coincidences originating from the tumour region by segmenting the tumour in sinogram space (segmented sensitivity/centre of mass method). Measured displacement of the tumours between end-expiration and end-inspiration and the increase in apparent uptake in the gated images served as a measure for the exactness of gating. To estimate the accuracy, a thorax phantom study with moved activity sources simulating small tumours was also performed. All methods resolved the respiratory motion with varying success. The best results were seen in the segmented centre of mass method, on average leading to larger displacements and uptake values than the other methods. The simple centre of mass method performed worse in terms of displacements due to activities moving into the field of view during the respiratory cycle. Both sensitivity- and video-based methods lead to similar results. List mode-driven PET gating, especially the segmented centre of mass

  18. Issues in quantification of registered respiratory gated PET/CT in the lung

    Cuplov, Vesna; Holman, Beverley F.; McClelland, Jamie; Modat, Marc; Hutton, Brian F.; Thielemans, Kris

    2018-01-01

    PET/CT quantification of lung tissue is limited by several difficulties: the lung density and local volume changes during respiration, the anatomical mismatch between PET and CT and the relative contributions of tissue, air and blood to the PET signal (the tissue fraction effect). Air fraction correction (AFC) has been shown to improve PET image quantification in the lungs. Methods to correct for the movement and anatomical mismatch involve respiratory gating and image registration techniques. While conventional registration methods only account for spatial mismatch, the Jacobian determinant of the deformable registration transformation field can be used to estimate local volume changes and could therefore potentially be used to correct (i.e. Jacobian Correction, JC) the PET signal for changes in concentration due to local volume changes. This work aims to investigate the relationship between variations in the lung due to respiration, specifically density, tracer concentration and local volume changes. In particular, we study the effect of AFC and JC on PET quantitation after registration of respiratory gated PET/CT patient data. Six patients suffering from lung cancer with solitary pulmonary nodules underwent 18 F-FDG PET/cine-CT. The PET data were gated into six respiratory gates using displacement gating based on a real-time position management (RPM) signal and reconstructed with matched gated CT. The PET tracer concentration and tissue density were extracted from registered gated PET and CT images before and after corrections (AFC or JC) and compared to the values from the reference images. Before correction, we observed a linear correlation between the PET tracer concentration values and density. Across all gates and patients, the maximum relative change in PET tracer concentration before (after) AFC was found to be 16.2% (4.1%) and the maximum relative change in tissue density and PET tracer concentration before (after) JC was found to be 17.1% (5.5%) and 16

  19. Evaluation of irradiation position in respiratory-gated radiotherapy using a phantom system simulating patient respiration

    Oyama, Masaya; Ueda, Takashi; Kitoh, Satoshi; Tanaka, Takashi; Goka, Tomonori; Ogino, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory-gated (RG) radiotherapy is useful for minimizing the irradiated volume of normal tissues resulting from the shifting of internal structures caused by respiratory movement. The present study was conducted to evaluate the treatment field in RG radiotherapy using a phantom system simulating patient respiration. A phantom system consisting of a 3-cm ball-shaped dummy tumor and film placed in a cork lung phantom was used (THK Co., Ltd.). RG radiotherapy was employed in the expiratory phase. The phantom movement distance was set to 2 cm, and the gating signals from a respiratory-gating system (AZ-733V, Anzai Medical) were varied. The settings used for irradiation were an X-ray energy of 6 MV (PRIMUS, Toshiba Medical Systems), treatment field of 5 cm x 7 cm, and X-ray dose of 100 MU. Images were acquired using an electric portal-imaging device (EPID, OPTIVUE 500), and the X-ray dose distribution was measured by the film method. In images acquired using the EPID, the tumor margins became less clear when the gating signals were increased, and the ITVs were determined to be 3.6 cm, 3.7 cm, 4.2 cm, and 5.1 cm at gating rates of 10%, 25%, 50%, and no gate, respectively. With regard to the X-ray dose distribution measured by the film method, the dose profile in the cephalocaudal direction was shifted toward the expiratory phase, and the degree of shift became greater when the gating signals were increased. In addition, the optimal treatment fields in the cephalocaudal direction were determined to be 5.2 cm, 5.2 cm, 5.6 cm, and 7.0 cm at gating rates of 10%, 25%, 50%, and no gating, respectively. Although RG radiotherapy is useful for improving the accuracy of radiotherapy, the characteristics of the RG radiotherapy technique and the radiotherapy system must be clearly understood when this method is to be employed in clinical practice. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is now assuming a central role in radiotherapy, and properly identifying internal margins is an

  20. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system

    Chan, Chung; Sinusas, Albert J; Liu, Chi; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high-resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory–cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or eight cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p < 0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory–cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p < 0.05) compared to EXG-SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased

  1. The clinical implementation of respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Keall, Paul; Vedam, Sastry; George, Rohini; Bartee, Chris; Siebers, Jeffrey; Lerma, Fritz; Weiss, Elisabeth; Chung, Theodore

    2006-01-01

    The clinical use of respiratory-gated radiotherapy and the application of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are 2 relatively new innovations to the treatment of lung cancer. Respiratory gating can reduce the deleterious effects of intrafraction motion, and IMRT can concurrently increase tumor dose homogeneity and reduce dose to critical structures including the lungs, spinal cord, esophagus, and heart. The aim of this work is to describe the clinical implementation of respiratory-gated IMRT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Documented clinical procedures were developed to include a tumor motion study, gated CT imaging, IMRT treatment planning, and gated IMRT delivery. Treatment planning procedures for respiratory-gated IMRT including beam arrangements and dose-volume constraints were developed. Quality assurance procedures were designed to quantify both the dosimetric and positional accuracy of respiratory-gated IMRT, including film dosimetry dose measurements and Monte Carlo dose calculations for verification and validation of individual patient treatments. Respiratory-gated IMRT is accepted by both treatment staff and patients. The dosimetric and positional quality assurance test results indicate that respiratory-gated IMRT can be delivered accurately. If carefully implemented, respiratory-gated IMRT is a practical alternative to conventional thoracic radiotherapy. For mobile tumors, respiratory-gated radiotherapy is used as the standard of care at our institution. Due to the increased workload, the choice of IMRT is taken on a case-by-case basis, with approximately half of the non-small cell lung cancer patients receiving respiratory-gated IMRT. We are currently evaluating whether superior tumor coverage and limited normal tissue dosing will lead to improvements in local control and survival in non-small cell lung cancer

  2. Acquisition and automated 3-D segmentation of respiratory/cardiac-gated PET transmission images

    Reutter, B.W.; Klein, G.J.; Brennan, K.M.; Huesman, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of respiratory motion on attenuation correction of cardiac PET data, we acquired and automatically segmented gated transmission data for a dog breathing on its own under gas anesthesia. Data were acquired for 20 min on a CTI/Siemens ECAT EXACT HR (47-slice) scanner configured for 12 gates in a static study, Two respiratory gates were obtained using data from a pneumatic bellows placed around the dog's chest, in conjunction with 6 cardiac gates from standard EKG gating. Both signals were directed to a LabVIEW-controlled Macintosh, which translated them into one of 12 gate addresses. The respiratory gating threshold was placed near end-expiration to acquire 6 cardiac-gated datasets at end-expiration and 6 cardiac-gated datasets during breaths. Breaths occurred about once every 10 sec and lasted about 1-1.5 sec. For each respiratory gate, data were summed over cardiac gates and torso and lung surfaces were segmented automatically using a differential 3-D edge detection algorithm. Three-dimensional visualizations showed that lung surfaces adjacent to the heart translated 9 mm inferiorly during breaths. Our results suggest that respiration-compensated attenuation correction is feasible with a modest amount of gated transmission data and is necessary for accurate quantitation of high-resolution gated cardiac PET data

  3. Evaluation of the Usefulness of the Respiratory Guidance System in the Respiratory Gating Radiation Therapy

    Lee, Yeong Cheol; Kim, Sun Myung; Do, Gyeong Min; Park, Geun Yong; Kim, Gun Oh; Kim, Young Bum [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Guro Hospital, Korea Univeristy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The respiration is one of the most important factors in respiratory gating radiation therapy (RGRT). We have developed an unique respiratory guidance system using an audio-visual system in order to support and stabilize individual patient's respiration and evaluated the usefulness of this system. Seven patients received the RGRT at our clinic from June 2011 to April 2012. After breathing exercise standard deviations by the superficial contents of respiratory cycles and functions, and analyzed them to examine changes in their breathing before and with the audio-visual system, we measured their spontaneous respiration and their respiration with the audio-visual system respectively. With the measured data, we yielded after the therapy. The PTP (peak to peak) of the standard deviations of the free breathing, the audio guidance system, and the respiratory guidance system were 0.343, 0.148, and 0.078 respectively. The respiratory cycles were 0.645, 0.345, and 0.171 respectively and the superficial contents of the respiratory functions were 2.591, 1.008, and 0.877 respectively. The average values of the differences in the standard deviations among the whole patients at the CT room and therapy room were 0.425 for the PTP, 1.566 for the respiratory cycles, and 3.671 for the respiratory superficial contents. As for the standard deviations before and after the application of the PTP respiratory guidance system, that of the PTP was 0.265, that of the respiratory cycles was 0.474, and that of the respiratory superficial contents. The results of t-test of the values before and after free breathing and the audio-visual guidance system showed that the P-value of the PTP was 0.035, that of the cycles 0.009, and that of the respiratory superficial contents 0.010. The respiratory control could be one of the most important factors in the RGRT which determines the success or failure of a treatment. We were able to get more stable breathing with the audio-visual respiratory

  4. Evaluation of the Usefulness of the Respiratory Guidance System in the Respiratory Gating Radiation Therapy

    Lee, Yeong Cheol; Kim, Sun Myung; Do, Gyeong Min; Park, Geun Yong; Kim, Gun Oh; Kim, Young Bum

    2012-01-01

    The respiration is one of the most important factors in respiratory gating radiation therapy (RGRT). We have developed an unique respiratory guidance system using an audio-visual system in order to support and stabilize individual patient's respiration and evaluated the usefulness of this system. Seven patients received the RGRT at our clinic from June 2011 to April 2012. After breathing exercise standard deviations by the superficial contents of respiratory cycles and functions, and analyzed them to examine changes in their breathing before and with the audio-visual system, we measured their spontaneous respiration and their respiration with the audio-visual system respectively. With the measured data, we yielded after the therapy. The PTP (peak to peak) of the standard deviations of the free breathing, the audio guidance system, and the respiratory guidance system were 0.343, 0.148, and 0.078 respectively. The respiratory cycles were 0.645, 0.345, and 0.171 respectively and the superficial contents of the respiratory functions were 2.591, 1.008, and 0.877 respectively. The average values of the differences in the standard deviations among the whole patients at the CT room and therapy room were 0.425 for the PTP, 1.566 for the respiratory cycles, and 3.671 for the respiratory superficial contents. As for the standard deviations before and after the application of the PTP respiratory guidance system, that of the PTP was 0.265, that of the respiratory cycles was 0.474, and that of the respiratory superficial contents. The results of t-test of the values before and after free breathing and the audio-visual guidance system showed that the P-value of the PTP was 0.035, that of the cycles 0.009, and that of the respiratory superficial contents 0.010. The respiratory control could be one of the most important factors in the RGRT which determines the success or failure of a treatment. We were able to get more stable breathing with the audio-visual respiratory guidance

  5. Evaluation of respiratory movement during gated radiotherapy using film and electronic portal imaging

    Ford, E.C.; Mageras, G.S.; Yorke, E.; Rosenzweig, K.E.; Wagman, R.; Ling, C.C.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of a commercial system in reducing respiration-induced treatment uncertainty by gating the radiation delivery. Methods and Materials: The gating system considered here measures respiration from the position of a reflective marker on the patient's chest. Respiration-triggered planning CT scans were obtained for 8 patients (4 lung, 4 liver) at the intended phase of respiration (6 at end expiration and 2 at end inspiration). In addition, fluoroscopic movies were recorded simultaneously with the respiratory waveform. During the treatment sessions, gated localization films were used to measure the position of the diaphragm relative to the vertebral bodies, which was compared to the reference digitally reconstructed radiograph derived from the respiration-triggered planning CT. Variability was quantified by the standard deviation about the mean position. We also assessed the interfraction variability of soft tissue structures during gated treatment in 2 patients using an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device. Results: The gated localization films revealed an interfraction patient-averaged diaphragm variability of 2.8±1.0 mm (error bars indicate standard deviation in the patient population). The fluoroscopic data yielded a patient-averaged intrafraction diaphragm variability of 2.6±1.7 mm. With no gating, this intrafraction excursion became 6.9±2.1 mm. In gated localization films, the patient-averaged mean displacement of the diaphragm from the planning position was 0.0±3.9 mm. However, in 4 of the 8 patients, the mean (over localization films) displacement was >4 mm, indicating a systematic displacement in treatment position from the planned one. The position of soft tissue features observed in portal images during gated treatments over several fractions showed a mean variability between 2.6 and 5.7 mm. The intrafraction variability, however, was between 0.6 and 1.4 mm, indicating that most of the variability was

  6. Respiratory-Gated Positron Emission Tomography and Breath-Hold Computed Tomography Coupling to Reduce the Influence of Respiratory Motion: Methodology and Feasibility

    Daouk, J.; Fin, L.; Bailly, P.; Meyer, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Respiratory motion causes uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) images of chest and abdominal structures to be blurred and reduced in intensity. Purpose: To compare two respiratory-gated PET binning methods (based on frequency and amplitude analyses of the respiratory signal) and to propose a 'BH-based' method based on an additional breath-hold computed tomography (CT) acquisition. Material and Methods: Respiratory-gated PET consists in list-mode (LM) acquisition with simultaneous respiratory signal recording. A phantom study featured rectilinear movement of a 0.5-ml sphere filled with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) solution, placed in a radioactive background (sphere-to-background contrast 6:1). Two patients were also examined. Three figures of merit were calculated: the target-to-background ratio profile (TBRP) in the axial direction through the uptake (i.e., the sphere or lesion), full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) values, and maximized standard uptake values (SUVmax). Results: In the phantom study, the peak TBRP was 0.9 for non-gated volume, 1.83 for BH-based volume, and varied between 1.13 and 1.73 for Freq-based volumes and between 1.34 and 1.66 for Amp-based volumes. A reference volume (REF-static) was also acquired for the phantom (in a static, 'expiratory' state), with a peak TBRP at 1.88. TBRPs were computed for patient data, with higher peak values for all gated volumes than for non-gated volumes. Conclusion: Respiratory-gated PET acquisition reduces the blurring effect and increases image contrast. However, Freq-based and Amp-based volumes are still influenced by inappropriate attenuation correction and misregistration of mobile lesions on CT images. The proposed BH-based method both reduces motion artifacts and improves PET-CT registration

  7. Data-driven gating in PET: Influence of respiratory signal noise on motion resolution.

    Büther, Florian; Ernst, Iris; Frohwein, Lynn Johann; Pouw, Joost; Schäfers, Klaus Peter; Stegger, Lars

    2018-05-21

    Data-driven gating (DDG) approaches for positron emission tomography (PET) are interesting alternatives to conventional hardware-based gating methods. In DDG, the measured PET data themselves are utilized to calculate a respiratory signal, that is, subsequently used for gating purposes. The success of gating is then highly dependent on the statistical quality of the PET data. In this study, we investigate how this quality determines signal noise and thus motion resolution in clinical PET scans using a center-of-mass-based (COM) DDG approach, specifically with regard to motion management of target structures in future radiotherapy planning applications. PET list mode datasets acquired in one bed position of 19 different radiotherapy patients undergoing pretreatment [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT or [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI were included into this retrospective study. All scans were performed over a region with organs (myocardium, kidneys) or tumor lesions of high tracer uptake and under free breathing. Aside from the original list mode data, datasets with progressively decreasing PET statistics were generated. From these, COM DDG signals were derived for subsequent amplitude-based gating of the original list mode file. The apparent respiratory shift d from end-expiration to end-inspiration was determined from the gated images and expressed as a function of signal-to-noise ratio SNR of the determined gating signals. This relation was tested against additional 25 [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI list mode datasets where high-precision MR navigator-like respiratory signals were available as reference signal for respiratory gating of PET data, and data from a dedicated thorax phantom scan. All original 19 high-quality list mode datasets demonstrated the same behavior in terms of motion resolution when reducing the amount of list mode events for DDG signal generation. Ratios and directions of respiratory shifts between end-respiratory gates and the respective nongated image were constant over all

  8. Automatic intrinsic cardiac and respiratory gating from cone-beam CT scans of the thorax region

    Hahn, Andreas; Sauppe, Sebastian; Lell, Michael; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We present a new algorithm that allows for raw data-based automated cardiac and respiratory intrinsic gating in cone-beam CT scans. It can be summarized in three steps: First, a median filter is applied to an initially reconstructed volume. The forward projection of this volume contains less motion information and is subtracted from the original projections. This results in new raw data that contain only moving and not static anatomy like bones, that would otherwise impede the cardiac or respiratory signal acquisition. All further steps are applied to these modified raw data. Second, the raw data are cropped to a region of interest (ROI). The ROI in the raw data is determined by the forward projection of a binary volume of interest (VOI) that includes the diaphragm for respiratory gating and most of the edge of the heart for cardiac gating. Third, the mean gray value in this ROI is calculated for every projection and the respiratory/cardiac signal is acquired using a bandpass filter. Steps two and three are carried out simultaneously for 64 or 1440 overlapping VOI inside the body for the respiratory or cardiac signal respectively. The signals acquired from each ROI are compared and the most consistent one is chosen as the desired cardiac or respiratory motion signal. Consistency is assessed by the standard deviation of the time between two maxima. The robustness and efficiency of the method is evaluated using simulated and measured patient data by computing the standard deviation of the mean signal difference between the ground truth and the intrinsic signal.

  9. Residual Motion and Duty Time in Respiratory Gating Radiotherapy Using Individualized or Population-Based Windows

    Fuji, Hiroshi; Asada, Yoshihiro; Numano, Masumi; Yamashita, Haruo; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Harada, Hideyuki; Asakura, Hirofumi; Murayama, Shigeyuki

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The efficiency and precision of respiratory gated radiation therapy for tumors is affected by variations in respiration-induced tumor motion. We evaluated the use of individualized and population-based parameters for such treatment. Methods and Materials: External respiratory signal records and images of respiration-induced tumor motion were obtained from 42 patients undergoing respiratory gated radiation therapy for liver tumors. Gating window widths were calculated for each patient, with 2, 4, and 10 mm of residual motion, and the mean was defined as the population-based window width. Residual motions based on population-based and predefined window widths were compared. Duty times based on whole treatment sessions, at various window levels, were calculated. The window level giving the longest duty time was defined as the individualized most efficient level (MEL). MELs were also calculated based on the first 10 breathing cycles. The duty times for population-based MELs (defined as mean MELs) and individualized MELs were compared. Results: Tracks of respiration-induced tumor motion ranged from 3 to 50 mm. Half of the patients had larger actual residual motions than the assigned residual motions. Duty times were greater when based on individualized, rather than population-based, window widths. The MELs established during whole treatment sessions for 2 mm and 4 mm of residual motion gave significantly increased duty times, whereas those calculated using the first 10 breathing cycles showed only marginal increases. Conclusions: Using individualized window widths and levels provided more precise and efficient respiratory gated radiation therapy. However, methods for predicting individualized window levels before treatment remain to be explored.

  10. Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac motion correction schemes in dual gated PET/CT cardiac imaging

    Lamare, F., E-mail: frederic.lamare@chu-bordeaux.fr; Fernandez, P. [Univ. Bordeaux, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); CNRS, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); Service de Médecine Nucléaire, Hôpital Pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D. [INSERM, UMR1101, LaTIM, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, 29609 Brest (France); Dawood, M.; Schäfers, K. P. [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Mendelstr. 11, 48149 Münster (Germany); Rimoldi, O. E. [Vita-Salute University and Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy and CNR Istituto di Bioimmagini e Fisiologia Molecolare, Milan (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Cardiac imaging suffers from both respiratory and cardiac motion. One of the proposed solutions involves double gated acquisitions. Although such an approach may lead to both respiratory and cardiac motion compensation there are issues associated with (a) the combination of data from cardiac and respiratory motion bins, and (b) poor statistical quality images as a result of using only part of the acquired data. The main objective of this work was to evaluate different schemes of combining binned data in order to identify the best strategy to reconstruct motion free cardiac images from dual gated positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions. Methods: A digital phantom study as well as seven human studies were used in this evaluation. PET data were acquired in list mode (LM). A real-time position management system and an electrocardiogram device were used to provide the respiratory and cardiac motion triggers registered within the LM file. Acquired data were subsequently binned considering four and six cardiac gates, or the diastole only in combination with eight respiratory amplitude gates. PET images were corrected for attenuation, but no randoms nor scatter corrections were included. Reconstructed images from each of the bins considered above were subsequently used in combination with an affine or an elastic registration algorithm to derive transformation parameters allowing the combination of all acquired data in a particular position in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. Images were assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, image profile, coefficient-of-variation (COV), and relative difference of the recovered activity concentration. Results: Regardless of the considered motion compensation strategy, the nonrigid motion model performed better than the affine model, leading to higher SNR and contrast combined with a lower COV. Nevertheless, when compensating for respiration only, no statistically significant differences were

  11. Efficiency of respiratory-gated delivery of synchrotron-based pulsed proton irradiation

    Tsunashima, Yoshikazu; Vedam, Sastry; Dong, Lei; Bues, Martin; Balter, Peter; Smith, Alfred; Mohan, Radhe; Umezawa, Masumi; Sakae, Takeji

    2008-01-01

    Significant differences exist in respiratory-gated proton beam delivery with a synchrotron-based accelerator system when compared to photon therapy with a conventional linear accelerator. Delivery of protons with a synchrotron accelerator is governed by a magnet excitation cycle pattern. Optimal synchronization of the magnet excitation cycle pattern with the respiratory motion pattern is critical to the efficiency of respiratory-gated proton delivery. There has been little systematic analysis to optimize the accelerator's operational parameters to improve gated treatment efficiency. The goal of this study was to estimate the overall efficiency of respiratory-gated synchrotron-based proton irradiation through realistic simulation. Using 62 respiratory motion traces from 38 patients, we simulated respiratory gating for duty cycles of 30%, 20% and 10% around peak exhalation for various fixed and variable magnet excitation patterns. In each case, the time required to deliver 100 monitor units in both non-gated and gated irradiation scenarios was determined. Based on results from this study, the minimum time required to deliver 100 MU was 1.1 min for non-gated irradiation. For respiratory-gated delivery at a 30% duty cycle around peak exhalation, corresponding average delivery times were typically three times longer with a fixed magnet excitation cycle pattern. However, when a variable excitation cycle was allowed in synchrony with the patient's respiratory cycle, the treatment time only doubled. Thus, respiratory-gated delivery of synchrotron-based pulsed proton irradiation is feasible and more efficient when a variable magnet excitation cycle pattern is used

  12. Poster — Thur Eve — 37: Respiratory gating with an Elekta flattening filter free photon beam

    Péloquin, S; Furstoss, C; Munger, P; Wierzbicki, W; Carrier, J-F

    2014-01-01

    In cases where surgery is not possible for lung cancer treatment, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) may be an option. One problem when treating this type of cancer is the motion of the lungs caused by the patient's respiration. It is possible to reduce the impact of this movement with the use of respiratory gating. By combining respiratory gating with a flattening filter free (FFF) photon beam linac, the increased treatment time caused by a reduced beam-on time of respiratory gating methods can be compensated by the inherent increased dose rate of FFF beams. This project's aim is to create hardware and software interfaces allowing free respiration gating on an Elekta Synergy-S linac specially modified to deliver 6 MV FFF photon beams. First, a printed circuit board was created for reading the signal from a Bellows Belt from Philips (a respiration monitor belt) and transmitting an On/Off signal to the accelerator. A software was also developed to visualize patient respiration. Secondly, a FFF model was created with the Pinnacle treatment planning system from Philips. Gamma (Γ) analysis (2%, 2 mm) was used to evaluate model. For fields going from 5.6 × 5.6 to 12 × 12 cm 2 , central axis depth dose model fitting shows an average gamma value of 0.2 and 100% of gamma values remain under the Γ = 1 limit. For smaller fields (0.8 × 0.8 and 1.6 × 1.6 cm 2 ), Pinnacle has more trouble trying to fit the measurements, overestimating dose in penumbra and buildup regions

  13. Effectiveness of the Respiratory Gating System for Stereotectic Radiosurgery of Lung Cancer

    Song, Heung Kwon; Kwon, Kyung Tae; Park, Cheol Su; Yang, Oh Nam; Kim, Min Su; Kim, Jeong Man [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    For stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of a tumor in the region whose movement due to respiration is significant, like Lung lower lobe, the gated therapy, which delivers radiation dose to the selected respiratory phases when tumor motion is small, was performed using the Respiratory gating system and its clinical effectiveness was evaluated. For two SRS patients with a tumor in Lung lower lobe, a marker block (infrared reflector) was attached on the abdomen. While patient' respiratory cycle was monitored with Real-time Position Management (RPM, Varian, USA), 4D CT was performed (10 phases per a cycle). Phases in which tumor motion did not change rapidly were decided as treatment phases. The treatment volume was contoured on the CT images for selected treatment phases using maximum intensity projection (MIP) method. In order to verify setup reproducibility and positional variation, 4D CT was repeated. Gross tumor volume (GTV) showed maximum movement in superior-inferior direction. For patient no 1, motion of GTV was reduced to 2.6 mm in treatment phases (30-60%), while that was 9.4 mm in full phases (0-90%) and for patient no 2, it was reduced to 2.3 mm in treatment phases (30-70%), while it was 11.7 mm in full phases (0-90%). When comparing two sets of CT images, setup errors in all the directions were within 3 mm. Since tumor motion was reduced less than 5 mm, the Respiratory gating system for SRS of Lung lower lobe is useful.

  14. Respiratory motion management using audio-visual biofeedback for respiratory-gated radiotherapy of synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion beam delivery

    He, Pengbo; Ma, Yuanyuan; Huang, Qiyan; Yan, Yuanlin; Li, Qiang; Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Zhao, Ting; Fu, Tingyan; Shen, Guosheng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently deliver respiratory-gated radiation during synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion radiotherapy, a novel respiratory guidance method combining a personalized audio-visual biofeedback (BFB) system, breath hold (BH), and synchrotron-based gating was designed to help patients synchronize their respiratory patterns with synchrotron pulses and to overcome typical limitations such as low efficiency, residual motion, and discomfort. Methods: In-house software was developed to acquire body surface marker positions and display BFB, gating signals, and real-time beam profiles on a LED screen. Patients were prompted to perform short BHs or short deep breath holds (SDBH) with the aid of BFB following a personalized standard BH/SDBH (stBH/stSDBH) guiding curve or their own representative BH/SDBH (reBH/reSDBH) guiding curve. A practical simulation was performed for a group of 15 volunteers to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of this method. Effective dose rates (EDRs), mean absolute errors between the guiding curves and the measured curves, and mean absolute deviations of the measured curves were obtained within 10%–50% duty cycles (DCs) that were synchronized with the synchrotron’s flat-top phase. Results: All maneuvers for an individual volunteer took approximately half an hour, and no one experienced discomfort during the maneuvers. Using the respiratory guidance methods, the magnitude of residual motion was almost ten times less than during nongated irradiation, and increases in the average effective dose rate by factors of 2.39–4.65, 2.39–4.59, 1.73–3.50, and 1.73–3.55 for the stBH, reBH, stSDBH, and reSDBH guiding maneuvers, respectively, were observed in contrast with conventional free breathing-based gated irradiation, depending on the respiratory-gated duty cycle settings. Conclusions: The proposed respiratory guidance method with personalized BFB was confirmed to be feasible in a group of volunteers. Increased effective dose

  15. Respiratory motion management using audio-visual biofeedback for respiratory-gated radiotherapy of synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion beam delivery

    He, Pengbo; Ma, Yuanyuan; Huang, Qiyan; Yan, Yuanlin [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Life Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Qiang, E-mail: liqiang@impcas.ac.cn; Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Zhao, Ting; Fu, Tingyan; Shen, Guosheng [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To efficiently deliver respiratory-gated radiation during synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion radiotherapy, a novel respiratory guidance method combining a personalized audio-visual biofeedback (BFB) system, breath hold (BH), and synchrotron-based gating was designed to help patients synchronize their respiratory patterns with synchrotron pulses and to overcome typical limitations such as low efficiency, residual motion, and discomfort. Methods: In-house software was developed to acquire body surface marker positions and display BFB, gating signals, and real-time beam profiles on a LED screen. Patients were prompted to perform short BHs or short deep breath holds (SDBH) with the aid of BFB following a personalized standard BH/SDBH (stBH/stSDBH) guiding curve or their own representative BH/SDBH (reBH/reSDBH) guiding curve. A practical simulation was performed for a group of 15 volunteers to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of this method. Effective dose rates (EDRs), mean absolute errors between the guiding curves and the measured curves, and mean absolute deviations of the measured curves were obtained within 10%–50% duty cycles (DCs) that were synchronized with the synchrotron’s flat-top phase. Results: All maneuvers for an individual volunteer took approximately half an hour, and no one experienced discomfort during the maneuvers. Using the respiratory guidance methods, the magnitude of residual motion was almost ten times less than during nongated irradiation, and increases in the average effective dose rate by factors of 2.39–4.65, 2.39–4.59, 1.73–3.50, and 1.73–3.55 for the stBH, reBH, stSDBH, and reSDBH guiding maneuvers, respectively, were observed in contrast with conventional free breathing-based gated irradiation, depending on the respiratory-gated duty cycle settings. Conclusions: The proposed respiratory guidance method with personalized BFB was confirmed to be feasible in a group of volunteers. Increased effective dose

  16. Respiratory gating of cardiac PET data in list-mode acquisition.

    Livieratos, Lefteris; Rajappan, Kim; Stegger, Lars; Schafers, Klaus; Bailey, Dale L; Camici, Paolo G

    2006-05-01

    Respiratory motion has been identified as a source of artefacts in most medical imaging modalities. This paper reports on respiratory gating as a means to eliminate motion-related inaccuracies in PET imaging. Respiratory gating was implemented in list mode with physiological signal recorded every millisecond together with the PET data. Respiration was monitored with an inductive respiration monitor using an elasticised belt around the patient's chest. Simultaneous ECG gating can be maintained independently by encoding ECG trigger signal into the list-mode data. Respiratory gating is performed in an off-line workstation with gating parameters defined retrospectively. The technique was applied on a preliminary set of patient data with C(15)O. Motion was visually observed in the cine displays of the sagittal and coronal views of the reconstructed respiratory gated images. Significant changes in the cranial-caudal position of the heart could be observed. The centroid of the cardiac blood pool showed an excursion of 4.5-16.5 mm (mean 8.5+/-4.8 mm) in the cranial-caudal direction, with more limited excursion of 1.1-7.0 mm (mean 2.5+/-2.2 mm) in the horizontal direction and 1.3-3.7 mm (mean 2.4+/-0.9 mm) in the vertical direction. These preliminary data show that the extent of motion involved in respiration is comparable to myocardial wall thickness, and respiratory gating may be considered in order to reduce this effect in the reconstructed images.

  17. SU-E-T-217: Intrinsic Respiratory Gating in Small Animal CT

    Liu, Y; Smith, M; Mistry, N [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Preclinical animal models of lung cancer can provide a controlled test-bed for testing dose escalation or function-based-treatment-planning studies. However, to extract lung function, i.e. ventilation, one needs to be able to image the lung at different phases of ventilation (in-hale / ex-hale). Most respiratory-gated imaging using micro-CT involves using an external ventilator and surgical intervention limiting the utility in longitudinal studies. A new intrinsic respiratory retrospective gating method was developed and tested in mice. Methods: A fixed region of interest (ROI) that covers the diaphragm was selected on all projection images to estimate the mean intensity (M). The mean intensity depends on the projection angle and diaphragm position. A 3-point moving average (A) of consecutive M values: Mpre, Mcurrent and Mpost, was calculated to be subtracted from Mcurrent. A fixed threshold was used to enable amplitude based sorting into 4 different phases of respiration. Images at full-inhale and end-exhale phases of respiration were reconstructed using the open source OSCaR. Lung volumes estimated at the 2 phases of respiration were validated against literature values. Results: Intrinsic retrospective gating was accomplished without the use of any external breathing waveform. While projection images were acquired at 360 different angles. Only 138 and 104 projections were used to reconstruct images at full-inhale and end-exhale. This often results in non-uniform under-sampled angular projections leading to some minor streaking artifacts. The calculated expiratory, inspiratory and tidal lung volumes correlated well with the values known from the literature. Conclusion: Our initial result demonstrates an intrinsic gating method that is suitable for flat panel cone beam small animal CT systems. Reduction in streaking artifacts can be accomplished by oversampling the data or using iterative reconstruction methods. This initial experience will enable

  18. Quantifying the impact of respiratory-gated 4D CT acquisition on thoracic image quality: A digital phantom study

    Bernatowicz, K.; Knopf, A.; Lomax, A.; Keall, P.; Kipritidis, J.; Mishra, P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Prospective respiratory-gated 4D CT has been shown to reduce tumor image artifacts by up to 50% compared to conventional 4D CT. However, to date no studies have quantified the impact of gated 4D CT on normal lung tissue imaging, which is important in performing dose calculations based on accurate estimates of lung volume and structure. To determine the impact of gated 4D CT on thoracic image quality, the authors developed a novel simulation framework incorporating a realistic deformable digital phantom driven by patient tumor motion patterns. Based on this framework, the authors test the hypothesis that respiratory-gated 4D CT can significantly reduce lung imaging artifacts. Methods: Our simulation framework synchronizes the 4D extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom with tumor motion data in a quasi real-time fashion, allowing simulation of three 4D CT acquisition modes featuring different levels of respiratory feedback: (i) “conventional” 4D CT that uses a constant imaging and couch-shift frequency, (ii) “beam paused” 4D CT that interrupts imaging to avoid oversampling at a given couch position and respiratory phase, and (iii) “respiratory-gated” 4D CT that triggers acquisition only when the respiratory motion fulfills phase-specific displacement gating windows based on prescan breathing data. Our framework generates a set of ground truth comparators, representing the average XCAT anatomy during beam-on for each of ten respiratory phase bins. Based on this framework, the authors simulated conventional, beam-paused, and respiratory-gated 4D CT images using tumor motion patterns from seven lung cancer patients across 13 treatment fractions, with a simulated 5.5 cm 3 spherical lesion. Normal lung tissue image quality was quantified by comparing simulated and ground truth images in terms of overall mean square error (MSE) intensity difference, threshold-based lung volume error, and fractional false positive/false negative rates. Results: Averaged

  19. Quantifying the impact of respiratory-gated 4D CT acquisition on thoracic image quality: A digital phantom study

    Bernatowicz, K., E-mail: kingab@student.ethz.ch; Knopf, A.; Lomax, A. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI 5232, Switzerland and Department of Physics, ETH Zürich, Zürich 8092 (Switzerland); Keall, P.; Kipritidis, J., E-mail: john.kipritidis@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Mishra, P. [Brigham and Womens Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Prospective respiratory-gated 4D CT has been shown to reduce tumor image artifacts by up to 50% compared to conventional 4D CT. However, to date no studies have quantified the impact of gated 4D CT on normal lung tissue imaging, which is important in performing dose calculations based on accurate estimates of lung volume and structure. To determine the impact of gated 4D CT on thoracic image quality, the authors developed a novel simulation framework incorporating a realistic deformable digital phantom driven by patient tumor motion patterns. Based on this framework, the authors test the hypothesis that respiratory-gated 4D CT can significantly reduce lung imaging artifacts. Methods: Our simulation framework synchronizes the 4D extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom with tumor motion data in a quasi real-time fashion, allowing simulation of three 4D CT acquisition modes featuring different levels of respiratory feedback: (i) “conventional” 4D CT that uses a constant imaging and couch-shift frequency, (ii) “beam paused” 4D CT that interrupts imaging to avoid oversampling at a given couch position and respiratory phase, and (iii) “respiratory-gated” 4D CT that triggers acquisition only when the respiratory motion fulfills phase-specific displacement gating windows based on prescan breathing data. Our framework generates a set of ground truth comparators, representing the average XCAT anatomy during beam-on for each of ten respiratory phase bins. Based on this framework, the authors simulated conventional, beam-paused, and respiratory-gated 4D CT images using tumor motion patterns from seven lung cancer patients across 13 treatment fractions, with a simulated 5.5 cm{sup 3} spherical lesion. Normal lung tissue image quality was quantified by comparing simulated and ground truth images in terms of overall mean square error (MSE) intensity difference, threshold-based lung volume error, and fractional false positive/false negative rates. Results

  20. Technical Report: TG-142 compliant and comprehensive quality assurance tests for respiratory gating

    Woods, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Rong, Yi, E-mail: yrong@ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To develop and establish a comprehensive gating commissioning and quality assurance procedure in compliance with TG-142. Methods: Eight Varian TrueBeam Linacs were used for this study. Gating commissioning included an end-to-end test and baseline establishment. The end-to-end test was performed using a CIRS dynamic thoracic phantom with a moving cylinder inside the lung, which was used for carrying both optically simulated luminescence detectors (OSLDs) and Gafchromic EBT2 films while the target is moving, for a point dose check and 2D profile check. In addition, baselines were established for beam-on temporal delay and calibration of the surrogate, for both megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) beams. A motion simulation device (MotionSim) was used to provide periodic motion on a platform, in synchronizing with a surrogate motion. The overall accuracy and uncertainties were analyzed and compared. Results: The OSLD readings were within 5% compared to the planned dose (within measurement uncertainty) for both phase and amplitude gated deliveries. Film results showed less than 3% agreement to the predicted dose with a standard sinusoid motion. The gate-on temporal accuracy was averaged at 139 ± 10 ms for MV beams and 92 ± 11 ms for kV beams. The temporal delay of the surrogate motion depends on the motion speed and was averaged at 54.6 ± 3.1 ms for slow, 24.9 ± 2.9 ms for intermediate, and 23.0 ± 20.1 ms for fast speed. Conclusions: A comprehensive gating commissioning procedure was introduced for verifying the output accuracy and establishing the temporal accuracy baselines with respiratory gating. The baselines are needed for routine quality assurance tests, as suggested by TG-142.

  1. Technical Report: TG-142 compliant and comprehensive quality assurance tests for respiratory gating

    Woods, Kyle; Rong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and establish a comprehensive gating commissioning and quality assurance procedure in compliance with TG-142. Methods: Eight Varian TrueBeam Linacs were used for this study. Gating commissioning included an end-to-end test and baseline establishment. The end-to-end test was performed using a CIRS dynamic thoracic phantom with a moving cylinder inside the lung, which was used for carrying both optically simulated luminescence detectors (OSLDs) and Gafchromic EBT2 films while the target is moving, for a point dose check and 2D profile check. In addition, baselines were established for beam-on temporal delay and calibration of the surrogate, for both megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) beams. A motion simulation device (MotionSim) was used to provide periodic motion on a platform, in synchronizing with a surrogate motion. The overall accuracy and uncertainties were analyzed and compared. Results: The OSLD readings were within 5% compared to the planned dose (within measurement uncertainty) for both phase and amplitude gated deliveries. Film results showed less than 3% agreement to the predicted dose with a standard sinusoid motion. The gate-on temporal accuracy was averaged at 139 ± 10 ms for MV beams and 92 ± 11 ms for kV beams. The temporal delay of the surrogate motion depends on the motion speed and was averaged at 54.6 ± 3.1 ms for slow, 24.9 ± 2.9 ms for intermediate, and 23.0 ± 20.1 ms for fast speed. Conclusions: A comprehensive gating commissioning procedure was introduced for verifying the output accuracy and establishing the temporal accuracy baselines with respiratory gating. The baselines are needed for routine quality assurance tests, as suggested by TG-142

  2. A contactless approach for respiratory gating in PET using continuous-wave radar

    Ersepke, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.Ersepke@rub.de; Büther, Florian; Heß, Mirco [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Münster 48149 (Germany); Schäfers, Klaus P. [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Münster 48149, Germany and DFG EXC 1003, Cluster of Excellence ‘Cells in Motion,’ Münster 48149 (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Respiratory gating is commonly used to reduce motion artifacts in positron emission tomography (PET). Clinically established methods for respiratory gating in PET require contact to the patient or a direct optical line between the sensor and the patient’s torso and time consuming preparation. In this work, a contactless method for capturing a respiratory signal during PET is presented based on continuous-wave radar. Methods: The proposed method relies on the principle of emitting an electromagnetic wave and detecting the phase shift of the reflected wave, modulated due to the respiratory movement of the patient’s torso. A 24 GHz carrier frequency was chosen allowing wave propagation through plastic and clothing with high reflections at the skin surface. A detector module and signal processing algorithms were developed to extract a quantitative respiratory signal. The sensor was validated using a high precision linear table. During volunteer measurements and [{sup 18}F] FDG PET scans, the radar sensor was positioned inside the scanner bore of a PET/computed tomography scanner. As reference, pressure belt (one volunteer), depth camera-based (two volunteers, two patients), and PET data-driven (six patients) signals were acquired simultaneously and the signal correlation was quantified. Results: The developed system demonstrated a high measurement accuracy for movement detection within the submillimeter range. With the proposed method, small displacements of 25 μm could be detected, not considerably influenced by clothing or blankets. From the patient studies, the extracted respiratory radar signals revealed high correlation (Pearson correlation coefficient) to those derived from the external pressure belt and depth camera signals (r = 0.69–0.99) and moderate correlation to those of the internal data-driven signals (r = 0.53–0.70). In some cases, a cardiac signal could be visualized, due to the representation of the mechanical heart motion on the skin

  3. SU-E-J-169: The Dosimetric and Temporal Effects of Respiratory-Gated Radiation Therapy in Lung Cancer Patients

    Rouabhi, O; Gross, B; Xia, J; Bayouth, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric and temporal effects of high dose rate treatment mode for respiratory-gated radiation therapy in lung cancer patients. Methods: Treatment plans from five lung cancer patients (3 nongated (Group 1), 2 gated at 80EX-80IN (Group 2)) were retrospectively evaluated. The maximum tumor motions range from 6–12 mm. Using the same planning criteria, four new treatment plans, corresponding to four gating windows (20EX–20IN, 40EX–40IN, 60EX–60IN, and 80EX–80IN), were generated for each patient. Mean tumor dose (MTD), mean lung dose (MLD), and lung V20 were used to assess the dosimetric effects. A MATLAB algorithm was developed to compute treatment time by considering gantry rotation time, time to position collimator leaves, dose delivery time (scaled relative to the gating window), and communication overhead. Treatment delivery time for each plan was estimated using a 500 MU/min dose rate for the original plans and a 1500 MU/min dose rate for the gated plans. Results: Differences in MTD were less than 1Gy across plans for all five patients. MLD and lung V20 were on average reduced between −16.1% to −6.0% and −20.0% to −7.2%, respectively for non-gated plans when compared with the corresponding gated plans, and between − 5.8% to −4.2% and −7.0% to −5.4%, respectively for plans originally gated at 80EX–80IN when compared with the corresponding 20EX-20IN to 60EX– 60IN gated plans. Treatment delivery times of gated plans using high dose rate were reduced on average between −19.7% (−1.9min) to −27.2% (−2.7min) for originally non-gated plans and −15.6% (−0.9min) to −20.3% (−1.2min) for originally 80EX-80IN gated plans. Conclusion: Respiratory-gated radiation therapy in lung cancer patients can reduce lung toxicity, while maintaining tumor dose. Using a gated high-dose-rate treatment, delivery time comparable to non-gated normal-dose-rate treatment can be achieved. This research is supported by Siemens

  4. A contactless approach for respiratory gating in PET using continuous-wave radar.

    Ersepke, Thomas; Büther, Florian; Heß, Mirco; Schäfers, Klaus P

    2015-08-01

    Respiratory gating is commonly used to reduce motion artifacts in positron emission tomography (PET). Clinically established methods for respiratory gating in PET require contact to the patient or a direct optical line between the sensor and the patient's torso and time consuming preparation. In this work, a contactless method for capturing a respiratory signal during PET is presented based on continuous-wave radar. The proposed method relies on the principle of emitting an electromagnetic wave and detecting the phase shift of the reflected wave, modulated due to the respiratory movement of the patient's torso. A 24 GHz carrier frequency was chosen allowing wave propagation through plastic and clothing with high reflections at the skin surface. A detector module and signal processing algorithms were developed to extract a quantitative respiratory signal. The sensor was validated using a high precision linear table. During volunteer measurements and [(18)F] FDG PET scans, the radar sensor was positioned inside the scanner bore of a PET/computed tomography scanner. As reference, pressure belt (one volunteer), depth camera-based (two volunteers, two patients), and PET data-driven (six patients) signals were acquired simultaneously and the signal correlation was quantified. The developed system demonstrated a high measurement accuracy for movement detection within the submillimeter range. With the proposed method, small displacements of 25 μm could be detected, not considerably influenced by clothing or blankets. From the patient studies, the extracted respiratory radar signals revealed high correlation (Pearson correlation coefficient) to those derived from the external pressure belt and depth camera signals (r = 0.69-0.99) and moderate correlation to those of the internal data-driven signals (r = 0.53-0.70). In some cases, a cardiac signal could be visualized, due to the representation of the mechanical heart motion on the skin. Accurate respiratory signals were

  5. SU-E-J-89: Motion Effects On Organ Dose in Respiratory Gated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Wang, T; Zhu, L [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia); Khan, M; Landry, J; Rajpara, R; Hawk, N [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Existing reports on gated radiation therapy focus mainly on optimizing dose delivery to the target structure. This work investigates the motion effects on radiation dose delivered to organs at risk (OAR) in respiratory gated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). A new algorithmic tool of dose analysis is developed to evaluate the optimality of gating phase for dose sparing on OARs while ensuring adequate target coverage. Methods: Eight patients with pancreatic cancer were treated on a phase I prospective study employing 4DCT-based SBRT. For each patient, 4DCT scans are acquired and sorted into 10 respiratory phases (inhale-exhale- inhale). Treatment planning is performed on the average CT image. The average CT is spatially registered to other phases. The resultant displacement field is then applied on the plan dose map to estimate the actual dose map for each phase. Dose values of each voxel are fitted to a sinusoidal function. Fitting parameters of dose variation, mean delivered dose and optimal gating phase for each voxel over respiration cycle are mapped on the dose volume. Results: The sinusoidal function accurately models the dose change during respiratory motion (mean fitting error 4.6%). In the eight patients, mean dose variation is 3.3 Gy on OARs with maximum of 13.7 Gy. Two patients have about 100cm{sup 3} volumes covered by more than 5 Gy deviation. The mean delivered dose maps are similar to plan dose with slight deformation. The optimal gating phase highly varies across the patient, with phase 5 or 6 on about 60% of the volume, and phase 0 on most of the rest. Conclusion: A new algorithmic tool is developed to conveniently quantify dose deviation on OARs from plan dose during the respiratory cycle. The proposed software facilitates the treatment planning process by providing the optimal respiratory gating phase for dose sparing on each OAR.

  6. Comparison of respiratory surrogates for gated lung radiotherapy without internal fiducials

    Korreman, S.; Mostafavi, H.; Le, Q.T.; Boyer, A.

    2006-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to compare the ability of two respiratory surrogates to mimic actual lung tumor motion during audio coaching. The investigation employed video clips acquired after patients had had fiducial markers implanted in lung tumors to be used for image-guided stereoscopic radiotherapy. The positions of the markers in the clips were measured within the video frames and used as the standard for tumor volume motion. An external marker was tracked optically during the fluoroscopic acquisitions. An image correlation technique was developed to compute a gating signal from the fluoroscopic images. The correlation gating trace was similar to the optical gating trace in the phase regions of the respiratory cycle used for gating. A cross correlation analysis and comparison of the external optical marker gating with internal fluoroscopic gating was performed. The fluoroscopic image correlation surrogate was found to be superior to the external optical surrogate in the AP-views in four out of six cases. In one of the remaining two cases, the two surrogates performed comparably, while in the last case, the external fiducial trace performed best. It was concluded that fluoroscopic gating based on correlation of native image features in the fluoroscopic images will be adequate for respiratory gating

  7. Comparison of respiratory surrogates for gated lung radiotherapy without internal fiducials

    Korreman, S. [Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Mostafavi, H. [Varian Medical Systems, Mountain View, CA (United States). Gintzon Technology Center; Le, Q.T.; Boyer, A. [Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2006-09-15

    An investigation was carried out to compare the ability of two respiratory surrogates to mimic actual lung tumor motion during audio coaching. The investigation employed video clips acquired after patients had had fiducial markers implanted in lung tumors to be used for image-guided stereoscopic radiotherapy. The positions of the markers in the clips were measured within the video frames and used as the standard for tumor volume motion. An external marker was tracked optically during the fluoroscopic acquisitions. An image correlation technique was developed to compute a gating signal from the fluoroscopic images. The correlation gating trace was similar to the optical gating trace in the phase regions of the respiratory cycle used for gating. A cross correlation analysis and comparison of the external optical marker gating with internal fluoroscopic gating was performed. The fluoroscopic image correlation surrogate was found to be superior to the external optical surrogate in the AP-views in four out of six cases. In one of the remaining two cases, the two surrogates performed comparably, while in the last case, the external fiducial trace performed best. It was concluded that fluoroscopic gating based on correlation of native image features in the fluoroscopic images will be adequate for respiratory gating.

  8. Organ motion study and dosimetric impact of respiratory gating radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    Lorchel, F.

    2007-04-01

    Chemoradiotherapy is now the standard treatment for locally advanced or inoperable esophageal carcinoma. In this indication, conformal radiotherapy is generally used. However, prognosis remains poor for these patients. Respiratory gating radiotherapy can decrease healthy tissues irradiation and allows escalation dose in lung, liver and breast cancer. In order to improve radiotherapy technique, we propose to study the feasibility of respiratory gating for esophageal cancer. We will study the respiratory motions of esophageal cancer to optimize target volume delineation, especially the internal margin (I.M.). We will test the correlation between tumour and chest wall displacements to prove that esophageal cancer motions are induced by respiration. This is essential before using free breathing respiratory gating systems. We will work out the dosimetric impact of respiratory gating using various dosimetric analysis parameters. We will compare dosimetric plans at end expiration, end inspiration and deep inspiration with dosimetric plan in free-breathing condition. This will allow us to establish the best respiratory phase to irradiate for each gating system. This dosimetric study will be completed with linear quadratic equivalent uniform dose (E.U.D.) calculation for each volume of interest. Previously, we will do a theoretical study of histogram dose volume gradation to point up its use. (author)

  9. Respiratory gating based on internal electromagnetic motion monitoring during stereotactic liver radiation therapy: First results.

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Worm, Esben Schjødt; Hansen, Rune; Larsen, Lars Peter; Grau, Cai; Høyer, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Intrafraction motion may compromise the target dose in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of tumors in the liver. Respiratory gating can improve the treatment delivery, but gating based on an external surrogate signal may be inaccurate. This is the first paper reporting on respiratory gating based on internal electromagnetic monitoring during liver SBRT. Two patients with solitary liver metastases were treated with respiratory-gated SBRT guided by three implanted electromagnetic transponders. The treatment was delivered in end-exhale with beam-on when the centroid of the three transponders deviated less than 3 mm [left-right (LR) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions] and 4mm [cranio-caudal (CC)] from the planned position. For each treatment fraction, log files were used to determine the transponder motion during beam-on in the actual gated treatments and in simulated treatments without gating. The motion was used to reconstruct the dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) with and without gating. The reduction in D95 (minimum dose to 95% of the CTV) relative to the plan was calculated for both treatment courses. With gating the maximum course mean (standard deviation) geometrical error in any direction was 1.2 mm (1.8 mm). Without gating the course mean error would mainly increase for Patient 1 [to -2.8 mm (1.6 mm) (LR), 7.1 mm (5.8 mm) (CC), -2.6 mm (2.8mm) (AP)] due to a large systematic cranial baseline drift at each fraction. The errors without gating increased only slightly for Patient 2. The reduction in CTV D95 was 0.5% (gating) and 12.1% (non-gating) for Patient 1 and 0.3% (gating) and 1.7% (non-gating) for Patient 2. The mean duty cycle was 55%. Respiratory gating based on internal electromagnetic motion monitoring was performed for two liver SBRT patients. The gating added robustness to the dose delivery and ensured a high CTV dose even in the presence of large intrafraction motion.

  10. Dual cardiac-respiratory gated PET: implementation and results from a feasibility study

    Martinez-Moeller, Axel; Zikic, Darko; Navab, Nassir; Botnar, Rene M.; Bundschuh, Ralph A.; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Schwaiger, Markus; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Howe, William

    2007-01-01

    Spatial resolution in myocardial imaging is impaired by both cardiac and respiratory motion owing to motional blurring. We investigated the feasibility of a dual cardiac-respiratory gated positron emission tomography (PET) acquisition using a clinical PET/computer tomography (CT) scanner. We describe its implementation and present results on the respiratory motion observed. The correlation between diaphragmatic excursion measured by real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the expansion of the chest measured with an elastic belt was studied in six subjects. PET list mode acquisitions were then performed in 12 patients, six of them injected with 13 N-ammonia and six with 18 F-FDG. In parallel, the ECG and respiratory signals of the patients were recorded and the list mode file correspondingly sorted using a dual gated approach. Respiratory motion of the heart was quantified by measuring the displacement between the inspiratory and expiratory images in the diastolic phase by means of intensity-based non-rigid image registration. The correlation between diaphragmatic excursion and expansion of the chest was excellent (R 2 = 0.91), validating the ability of the elastic belt to provide an adequate respiratory trigger. Respiratory signals corresponding to the chest expansion showed a large inter-patient variability, requiring adapted algorithms in order to define suitable respiratory gates. Dual gated PET series were successfully acquired for both groups of patients, showing better resolved myocardial walls. The average respiratory motion of the heart measured by PET was 4.8 mm, with its largest component in the craniocaudal direction. Moreover, a deformation of the heart with respiration was observed, with the inferior wall moving significantly more than the anterior. Dual gated cardiac PET studies were performed successfully and showed better resolved myocardial walls as compared with ungated acquisitions. The respiratory motion of the heart presented a

  11. MO-FG-BRA-03: A Novel Method for Characterizing Gating Response Time in Radiation Therapy

    Wiersma, R; McCabe, B; Belcher, A; Jenson, P [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Smith, B [University Illinois at Chicago, Orland Park, IL (United States); Aydogan, B [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); University Illinois at Chicago, Orland Park, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Low temporal latency between a gating ON/OFF signal and the LINAC beam ON/OFF during respiratory gating is critical for patient safety. Current film based methods to assess gating response have poor temporal resolution and are highly qualitative. We describe a novel method to precisely measure gating lag times at high temporal resolutions and use it to characterize the temporal response of several gating systems. Methods: A respiratory gating simulator with an oscillating platform was modified to include a linear potentiometer for position measurement. A photon diode was placed at linear accelerator isocenter for beam output measurement. The output signals of the potentiometer and diode were recorded simultaneously at 2500 Hz (0.4 millisecond (ms) sampling interval) with an analogue-to-digital converter (ADC). The techniques was used on three commercial respiratory gating systems. The ON and OFF of the beam signal were located and compared to the expected gating window for both phase and position based gating and the temporal lag times extracted using a polynomial fit method. Results: A Varian RPM system with a monoscopic IR camera was measured to have mean beam ON and OFF lag times of 98.2 ms and 89.6 ms, respectively. A Varian RPM system with a stereoscopic IR camera was measured to have mean beam ON and OFF lag times of 86.0 ms and 44.0 ms, respectively. A Calypso magnetic fiducial tracking system was measured to have mean beam ON and OFF lag times of 209.0 ms and 60.0 ms, respectively. Conclusions: A novel method allowed for quantitative determination of gating timing accuracy for several clinically used gating systems. All gating systems met the 100 ms TG-142 criteria for mean beam OFF times. For beam ON response, the Calypso system exceeded the recommended response time.

  12. Quantification of liver fat with respiratory-gated quantitative chemical shift encoded MRI.

    Motosugi, Utaroh; Hernando, Diego; Bannas, Peter; Holmes, James H; Wang, Kang; Shimakawa, Ann; Iwadate, Yuji; Taviani, Valentina; Rehm, Jennifer L; Reeder, Scott B

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate free-breathing chemical shift-encoded (CSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantification of hepatic proton density fat-fraction (PDFF). A secondary purpose was to evaluate hepatic R2* values measured using free-breathing quantitative CSE-MRI. Fifty patients (mean age, 56 years) were prospectively recruited and underwent the following four acquisitions to measure PDFF and R2*; 1) conventional breath-hold CSE-MRI (BH-CSE); 2) respiratory-gated CSE-MRI using respiratory bellows (BL-CSE); 3) respiratory-gated CSE-MRI using navigator echoes (NV-CSE); and 4) single voxel MR spectroscopy (MRS) as the reference standard for PDFF. Image quality was evaluated by two radiologists. MRI-PDFF measured from the three CSE-MRI methods were compared with MRS-PDFF using linear regression. The PDFF and R2* values were compared using two one-sided t-test to evaluate statistical equivalence. There was no significant difference in the image quality scores among the three CSE-MRI methods for either PDFF (P = 1.000) or R2* maps (P = 0.359-1.000). Correlation coefficients (95% confidence interval [CI]) for the PDFF comparisons were 0.98 (0.96-0.99) for BH-, 0.99 (0.97-0.99) for BL-, and 0.99 (0.98-0.99) for NV-CSE. The statistical equivalence test revealed that the mean difference in PDFF and R2* between any two of the three CSE-MRI methods was less than ±1 percentage point (pp) and ±5 s(-1) , respectively (P liver PDFF and R2* and are as valid as the standard breath-hold technique. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Impact of a new respiratory amplitude-based gating technique in evaluation of upper abdominal PET lesions

    Van Der Gucht, Axel, E-mail: axel.vandergucht@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Princesse Grace, Monaco (Monaco); Serrano, Benjamin [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Princesse Grace, Monaco (Monaco); Hugonnet, Florent; Paulmier, Benoît [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Princesse Grace, Monaco (Monaco); Garnier, Nicolas [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Princesse Grace, Monaco (Monaco); Faraggi, Marc [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Princesse Grace, Monaco (Monaco)

    2014-03-15

    PET acquisition requires several minutes which can lead to respiratory motion blurring, to increase partial volume effect and SUV under-estimation. To avoid these artifacts, conventional 10-min phase-based respiratory gating (PBRG) can be performed but is time-consuming and difficult with a non-compliant patient. We evaluated an automatic amplitude-based gating method (AABG) which keeps 35% of the counts at the end of expiration to minimize respiratory motion. We estimated the impact of AABG on upper abdominal lesion detectability, quantification and patient management. Methods: We consecutively included 31 patients (82 hepatic and 25 perihepatic known lesions). Each patient underwent 3 acquisitions on a Siemens Biograph mCT (4 rings and time-of-flight): a standard free-breathing whole-body (SWB, 5–7 steps/2.5 min per step, 3.3 ± 0.4 MBq/kg of 18F-FDG), a 10-min PBRG with six bins and a 5-min AABG method. All gated acquisitions were performed with an ANZAI respiratory gating system. SUV{sub max} and target to background ratio (TBR, defined as the maximum SUV of the lesion divided by the mean SUV of a region of interest drawn in healthy liver) were compared. Results: All 94 lesions in SWB images were detected in the gated images. 10-min PBRG and 5-min AABG acquisitions respectively revealed 9 and 13 new lesions and relocated 7 and 8 lesions. Four lesions revealed by 5-min AABG were missed by 10-min PBRG in 3 non-compliant patients. Both gated methods failed to relocate 2 lesions seen on SWB acquisition. Compared to SWB, TBR increased significantly with 10-min PBRG and with 5-min AABG (respectively 41 ± 59%, p = 4.10–3 and 66 ± 75%, p = 6.10–5) whereas SUV{sub max} did not (respectively 14 ± 43%, p = 0.29 with 10-min PBRG, and 24 ± 46%, p = 0.11 with 5-min AABG). Conclusion: The AABG is a fast and a user-friendly respiratory gating method to increase detectability and quantification of upper abdominal lesions compared to the conventional PBRG procedure and

  14. SU-D-12A-05: Iterative Reconstruction Techniques to Enable Intrinsic Respiratory Gated CT in Mice

    Sun, T; Sun, N; Tan, S [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Liu, Y; Mistry, N [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Longitudinal studies of lung function in mice need the ability to image different phases of ventilation in free-breathing mice using retrospective gating. However, retrospective gating often produces under-sampled and uneven angular samples, resulting in severe reconstruction artifacts when using traditional FDK based reconstruction algorithms. We wanted to demonstrate the utility of iterative reconstruction method to enable intrinsic respiratory gating in small-animal CT. Methods: Free-breathing mice were imaged using a Siemens Inveon PET/micro-CT system. Evenly distributed projection images were acquired at 360 angles. Retrospective respiratory gating was performed using an intrinsic marker based on the average intensity in a region covering the diaphragm. Projections were classified into 4 and 6 phases (finer temporal resolution) resulting in 138 and 67 projections respectively. Reconstruction was carried out using 3 Methods: conventional FDK, iterative penalized least-square (PWLS) with total variation (TV), and PWLS with edge-preserving penalty. The performance of the methods was compared using contrast-to-noise (CNR) in a region of interest (ROI). Line profile through a specific region was plotted to evaluate the preserving of edges. Results: In both the cases with 4 and 6 phases, inadequate and non-uniform angular sampling results in artifacts using conventional FDK. However, such artifacts are minimized using both the iterative methods. Using both 4 and 6 phases, the iterative techniques outperformed FDK in terms of CNR and maintaining sharp edges. This is further evidenced especially with increased artifacts using FDK for 6 phases. Conclusion: This work indicates fewer artifacts and better image details can be achieved with iterative reconstruction methods in non-uniform under-sampled reconstruction. Using iterative methods can enable free-breathing intrinsic respiratory gating in small-animal CT. Further studies are needed to compare the

  15. Respiratory gating of cardiac PET data in list-mode acquisition

    Livieratos, Lefteris; Rajappan, Kim; Camici, Paolo G.; Stegger, Lars; Schafers, Klaus; Bailey, Dale L.

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory motion has been identified as a source of artefacts in most medical imaging modalities. This paper reports on respiratory gating as a means to eliminate motion-related inaccuracies in PET imaging. Respiratory gating was implemented in list mode with physiological signal recorded every millisecond together with the PET data. Respiration was monitored with an inductive respiration monitor using an elasticised belt around the patient's chest. Simultaneous ECG gating can be maintained independently by encoding ECG trigger signal into the list-mode data. Respiratory gating is performed in an off-line workstation with gating parameters defined retrospectively. The technique was applied on a preliminary set of patient data with C 15 O. Motion was visually observed in the cine displays of the sagittal and coronal views of the reconstructed respiratory gated images. Significant changes in the cranial-caudal position of the heart could be observed. The centroid of the cardiac blood pool showed an excursion of 4.5-16.5 mm (mean 8.5±4.8 mm) in the cranial-caudal direction, with more limited excursion of 1.1-7.0 mm (mean 2.5±2.2 mm) in the horizontal direction and 1.3-3.7 mm (mean 2.4±0.9 mm) in the vertical direction. These preliminary data show that the extent of motion involved in respiration is comparable to myocardial wall thickness, and respiratory gating may be considered in order to reduce this effect in the reconstructed images. (orig.)

  16. 3-D cardiac MRI in free-breathing newborns and infants: when is respiratory gating necessary?

    Seeger, Achim [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Krumm, Patrick; Schaefer, Juergen F.; Kramer, Ulrich [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Hornung, Andreas; Sieverding, Ludger [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Newborns and small infants have shallow breathing. To suggest criteria for when respiratory gating is necessary during cardiac MRI in newborns and infants. One-hundred ten data sets of newborns and infants with (n = 92, mean age: 1.9 ± 1.7 [SD] years) and without (n = 18, mean age: 1.6 ± 1.8 [SD] years) navigator gating were analysed retrospectively. The respiratory motion of the right hemidiaphragm was recorded and correlated to age, weight, body surface area and qualitative image quality on a 4-point score. Quantitative image quality assessment was performed (sharpness of the delineation of the ventricular septal wall) as well as a matched-pair comparison between navigator-gated and non-gated data sets. No significant differences were found in overall image quality or in the sharpness of the ventricular septal wall between gated and non-gated scans. A navigator acceptance of >80% was frequently found in patients ages <12 months, body surface area <0.40 m{sup 2}, body weight <10 kg and a size of <80 cm. Sequences without respiratory gating may be used in newborns and small infants, in particular if age <12 months, body surface area <0.40 m{sup 2}, body weight <10 kg and height <80 cm. (orig.)

  17. Respiratory gating during stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer reduces tumor position variability.

    Saito, Tetsuo; Matsuyama, Tomohiko; Toya, Ryo; Fukugawa, Yoshiyuki; Toyofuku, Takamasa; Semba, Akiko; Oya, Natsuo

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of respiratory gating on treatment accuracy in lung cancer patients undergoing lung stereotactic body radiotherapy by using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. Our study population consisted of 30 lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (48 Gy/4 fractions/4 to 9 days). Of these, 14 were treated with- (group A) and 16 without gating (group B); typically the patients whose tumors showed three-dimensional respiratory motion ≧5 mm were selected for gating. Tumor respiratory motion was estimated using four-dimensional computed tomography images acquired during treatment simulation. Tumor position variability during all treatment sessions was assessed by measuring the standard deviation (SD) and range of tumor displacement on EPID images. The two groups were compared for tumor respiratory motion and position variability using the Mann-Whitney U test. The median three-dimensional tumor motion during simulation was greater in group A than group B (9 mm, range 3-30 mm vs. 2 mm, range 0-4 mm; psimulation, tumor position variability in the EPID images was low and comparable to patients treated without gating. This demonstrates the benefit of respiratory gating.

  18. Investigation of patient, tumour and treatment variables affecting residual motion for respiratory-gated radiotherapy

    George, R; Ramakrishnan, V; Siebers, J V; Chung, T D; Keall, P J

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory gating can reduce the apparent respiratory motion during imaging and treatment; however, residual motion within the gating window remains. Respiratory training can improve respiratory reproducibility and, therefore, the efficacy of respiratory-gated radiotherapy. This study was conducted to determine whether residual motion during respiratory gating is affected by patient, tumour or treatment characteristics. The specific aims of this study were to: (1) identify significant characteristics affecting residual motion, (2) investigate time trends of residual motion over a period of days (inter-session) and (3) investigate time trends of residual motion within the same day (intra-session). Twenty-four lung cancer patients were enrolled in an Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved protocol. For approximately five sessions, 331 four-minute, respiratory motion traces were acquired with free breathing, audio instructions and audio-visual biofeedback for each patient. The residual motion was quantified by the standard deviation of the displacement within the gating window. The generalized linear model was used to obtain coefficients for each variable within the model and to evaluate the clinical and statistical significance. The statistical significance was determined by a p-value <0.05, while effect sizes of ≥0.1 cm (one standard deviation) were considered clinically significant. This data analysis was applied to patient, tumour and treatment variables. Inter- and intra-session variations were also investigated. The only variable that was significant for both inhale- and exhale-based gating was disease type. In addition, visual-training displacement, breathing type and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) values were significant for inhale-based gating, and dose-per-fraction was significant for exhale-based gating. Temporal respiratory variations within and between sessions were observed for individual patients. However inter- and intra-session analyses did

  19. Investigation of patient, tumour and treatment variables affecting residual motion for respiratory-gated radiotherapy

    George, R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Ramakrishnan, V [Department of Biostatistics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Siebers, J V [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Chung, T D [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Keall, P J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2006-10-21

    Respiratory gating can reduce the apparent respiratory motion during imaging and treatment; however, residual motion within the gating window remains. Respiratory training can improve respiratory reproducibility and, therefore, the efficacy of respiratory-gated radiotherapy. This study was conducted to determine whether residual motion during respiratory gating is affected by patient, tumour or treatment characteristics. The specific aims of this study were to: (1) identify significant characteristics affecting residual motion, (2) investigate time trends of residual motion over a period of days (inter-session) and (3) investigate time trends of residual motion within the same day (intra-session). Twenty-four lung cancer patients were enrolled in an Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved protocol. For approximately five sessions, 331 four-minute, respiratory motion traces were acquired with free breathing, audio instructions and audio-visual biofeedback for each patient. The residual motion was quantified by the standard deviation of the displacement within the gating window. The generalized linear model was used to obtain coefficients for each variable within the model and to evaluate the clinical and statistical significance. The statistical significance was determined by a p-value <0.05, while effect sizes of {>=}0.1 cm (one standard deviation) were considered clinically significant. This data analysis was applied to patient, tumour and treatment variables. Inter- and intra-session variations were also investigated. The only variable that was significant for both inhale- and exhale-based gating was disease type. In addition, visual-training displacement, breathing type and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) values were significant for inhale-based gating, and dose-per-fraction was significant for exhale-based gating. Temporal respiratory variations within and between sessions were observed for individual patients. However inter- and intra-session analyses did

  20. Prospective respiratory-gated micro-CT of free breathing rodents

    Ford, Nancy L.; Nikolov, Hristo N.; Norley, Chris J.D.; Thornton, Michael M.; Foster, Paula J.; Drangova, Maria; Holdsworth, David W.

    2005-01-01

    Microcomputed tomography (Micro-CT) has the potential to noninvasively image the structure of organs in rodent models with high spatial resolution and relatively short image acquisition times. However, motion artifacts associated with the normal respiratory motion of the animal may arise when imaging the abdomen or thorax. To reduce these artifacts and the accompanying loss of spatial resolution, we propose a prospective respiratory gating technique for use with anaesthetized, free-breathing rodents. A custom-made bed with an embedded pressure chamber was connected to a pressure transducer. Anaesthetized animals were placed in the prone position on the bed with their abdomens located over the chamber. During inspiration, the motion of the diaphragm caused an increase in the chamber pressure, which was converted into a voltage signal by the transducer. An output voltage was used to trigger image acquisition at any desired time point in the respiratory cycle. Digital radiographic images were acquired of anaesthetized, free-breathing rats with a digital radiographic system to correlate the respiratory wave form with respiration-induced organ motion. The respiratory wave form was monitored and recorded simultaneously with the x-ray radiation pulses, and an imaging window was defined, beginning at end expiration. Phantom experiments were performed to verify that the respiratory gating apparatus was triggering the micro-CT system. Attached to the distensible phantom were 100 μm diameter copper wires and the measured full width at half maximum was used to assess differences in image quality between respiratory-gated and ungated imaging protocols. This experiment allowed us to quantify the improvement in the spatial resolution, and the reduction of motion artifacts caused by moving structures, in the images resulting from respiratory-gated image acquisitions. The measured wire diameters were 0.135 mm for the stationary phantom image, 0.137 mm for the image gated at end

  1. Consideration of the accuracy by variation of respiration in real-time position management respiratory gating system

    Na, Jun Young; Kang, Tae Young; Beak, Geum Mun; Kwon, Gyeong Tae

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory Gated Radiation Therapy (RGRT) has been carried out using RPM (Real-time Position Management) Respiratory Gating System (version 1.7.5, varian, USA) in Asan Medical Center. This study was to analyze and evaluate the accuracy of Respiratory Gated Radiation Therapy (RGRT) according to variation of respiration. Making variation of respiration using Motion Phantom:QUASAR Programmable Respiratory Motion Phantom (Moudus Medical Device Inc. CANADA) able to adjust respiration pattern randomly was varying period, amplitude and baseline by analyze 50 patient's respiration of lung and liver cancer. One of the variations of respiration is baseline shift gradually downward per 0.01 cm, 0.03 cm, 0.05 cm. The other variation of respiration is baseline shift accidently downward per 0.2 cm, 0.4 cm, 0.6 cm, 0.8 cm. Experiments were performed in the same way that is used RPM Respiratory Gating System (phase gating, usually 30-70% gating) in Asan Medical Center. It was all exposed radiation under one of the conditions of baseline shift gradually downward per 0.01 cm, 0.03 cm, 0.05 cm. Under the other condition of baseline shift accidently downward per 0.2 cm, 0.4 cm, 0.6 cm, 0.8 cm equally radiation was exposed. The variations of baseline shifts didn't accurately reflect on phase gating in RPM Respiratory Gating System. This inexactitude makes serious uncertainty in Respiratory Gated Radiation Therapy. So, Must be stabilized breathing of patient before conducting Respiratory Gated Radiation Therapy. also must be monitored breathing of patient in the middle of treatment. If you observe considerable changes of breathing when conducting Respiratory Gated Radiation Therapy. Stopping treatment immediately and then must be need to recheck treatment site using fluoroscopy. If patient's respiration rechecked using fluoroscopy restabilize, it is possible to restart Respiratory Gated Radiation Therapy

  2. MO-FG-BRA-08: Swarm Intelligence-Based Personalized Respiratory Gating in Lung SAbR

    Modiri, A; Sabouri, P; Sawant, A [University of Maryland in Baltimore, Baltimore, MD (United States); Gu, X; Timmerman, R [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Respiratory gating is widely deployed as a clinical motion-management strategy in lung radiotherapy. In conventional gating, the beam is turned on during a pre-determined phase window; typically, around end-exhalation. In this work, we challenge the notion that end-exhalation is always the optimal gating phase. Specifically, we use a swarm-intelligence-based, inverse planning approach to determine the optimal respiratory phase and MU for each beam with respect to (i) the state of the anatomy at each phase and (ii) the time spent in that state, estimated from long-term monitoring of the patient’s breathing motion. Methods: In a retrospective study of five lung cancer patients, we compared the dosimetric performance of our proposed personalized gating (PG) with that of conventional end-of-exhale gating (CEG) and a previously-developed, fully 4D-optimized plan (combined with MLC tracking delivery). For each patient, respiratory phase probabilities (indicative of the time duration of the phase) were estimated over 2 minutes from lung tumor motion traces recorded previously using the Synchrony system (Accuray Inc.). Based on this information, inverse planning optimization was performed to calculate the optimal respiratory gating phase and MU for each beam. To ensure practical deliverability, each PG beam was constrained to deliver the assigned MU over a time duration comparable to that of CEG delivery. Results: Maximum OAR sparing for the five patients achieved by the PG and the 4D plans compared to CEG plans was: Esophagus Dmax [PG:57%, 4D:37%], Heart Dmax [PG:71%, 4D:87%], Spinal cord Dmax [PG:18%, 4D:68%] and Lung V13 [PG:16%, 4D:31%]. While patients spent the most time in exhalation, the PG-optimization chose end-exhale only for 28% of beams. Conclusion: Our novel gating strategy achieved significant dosimetric improvements over conventional gating, and approached the upper limit represented by fully 4D optimized planning while being significantly simpler

  3. MO-FG-BRA-08: Swarm Intelligence-Based Personalized Respiratory Gating in Lung SAbR

    Modiri, A; Sabouri, P; Sawant, A; Gu, X; Timmerman, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory gating is widely deployed as a clinical motion-management strategy in lung radiotherapy. In conventional gating, the beam is turned on during a pre-determined phase window; typically, around end-exhalation. In this work, we challenge the notion that end-exhalation is always the optimal gating phase. Specifically, we use a swarm-intelligence-based, inverse planning approach to determine the optimal respiratory phase and MU for each beam with respect to (i) the state of the anatomy at each phase and (ii) the time spent in that state, estimated from long-term monitoring of the patient’s breathing motion. Methods: In a retrospective study of five lung cancer patients, we compared the dosimetric performance of our proposed personalized gating (PG) with that of conventional end-of-exhale gating (CEG) and a previously-developed, fully 4D-optimized plan (combined with MLC tracking delivery). For each patient, respiratory phase probabilities (indicative of the time duration of the phase) were estimated over 2 minutes from lung tumor motion traces recorded previously using the Synchrony system (Accuray Inc.). Based on this information, inverse planning optimization was performed to calculate the optimal respiratory gating phase and MU for each beam. To ensure practical deliverability, each PG beam was constrained to deliver the assigned MU over a time duration comparable to that of CEG delivery. Results: Maximum OAR sparing for the five patients achieved by the PG and the 4D plans compared to CEG plans was: Esophagus Dmax [PG:57%, 4D:37%], Heart Dmax [PG:71%, 4D:87%], Spinal cord Dmax [PG:18%, 4D:68%] and Lung V13 [PG:16%, 4D:31%]. While patients spent the most time in exhalation, the PG-optimization chose end-exhale only for 28% of beams. Conclusion: Our novel gating strategy achieved significant dosimetric improvements over conventional gating, and approached the upper limit represented by fully 4D optimized planning while being significantly simpler

  4. A novel respiratory motion compensation strategy combining gated beam delivery and mean target position concept - A compromise between small safety margins and long duty cycles

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Kavanagh, Anthony; Webb, Steve; Brada, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a novel respiratory motion compensation strategy combining gated beam delivery with the mean target position (MTP) concept for pulmonary stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Materials and methods: Four motion compensation strategies were compared for 10 targets with motion amplitudes between 6 mm and 31 mm: the internal target volume concept (plan ITV ); the MTP concept where safety margins were adapted based on 4D dose accumulation (plan MTP ); gated beam delivery without margins for motion compensation (plan gated ); a novel approach combining gating and the MTP concept (plan gated and MTP ). Results: For 5/10 targets with an average motion amplitude of 9 mm, the differences in the mean lung dose (MLD) between plan gated and plan MTP were gated and MTP . Despite significantly shorter duty cycles, plan gated reduced the MLD by gated and MTP . The MLD was increased by 18% in plan MTP compared to that of plan gated and MTP . Conclusions: For pulmonary targets with motion amplitudes >10-15 mm, the combination of gating and the MTP concept allowed small safety margins with simultaneous long duty cycles.

  5. Audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI

    Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Arm, J.; Keall, P.; Kim, T.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback can improve image quality and reduce scan time for respiratory-gated 3D thoracic MRI. For five healthy human subjects respiratory motion guidance in MR scans was provided using an AV biofeedback system, utilizing real-time respiratory motion signals. To investigate the improvement of respiratory-gated 3D MR images between free breathing (FB) and AV biofeedback (AV), each subject underwent two imaging sessions. Respiratory-related motion artifacts and imaging time were qualitatively evaluated in addition to the reproducibility of external (abdominal) motion. In the results, 3D MR images in AV biofeedback showed more anatomic information such as a clear distinction of diaphragm, lung lobes and sharper organ boundaries. The scan time was reduced from 401±215 s in FB to 334±94 s in AV (p-value 0.36). The root mean square variation of the displacement and period of the abdominal motion was reduced from 0.4±0.22 cm and 2.8±2.5 s in FB to 0.1±0.15 cm and 0.9±1.3 s in AV (p-value of displacement audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential to be a useful motion management tool in medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  6. Feasibility of Systematic Respiratory-Gated Acquisition in Unselected Patients Referred for 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    Philippe Robin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveRespiratory motion in 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT induces blurred images, leading to errors in location and quantification for lung and abdominal lesions. Various methods have been developed to correct for these artifacts, and most of current PET/CT scanners are equipped with a respiratory gating system. However, they are not routinely performed because their use is time-consuming. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility and quantitative impact of a systematic respiratory-gated acquisition in unselected patients referred for FDG PET/CT, without increasing acquisition time.MethodsPatients referred for a FDG PET/CT examination to the nuclear medicine department of Brest University Hospital were consecutively enrolled, during a 3-month period. Cases presenting lung or liver uptakes were analyzed. Two sets of images were reconstructed from data recorded during a unique acquisition with a continuous table speed of 1 mm/s of the used Biograph mCT Flow PET/CT scanner: standard free-breathing images, and respiratory-gated images. Lesion location and quantitative parameters were recorded and compared.ResultsFrom October 1 2015 to December 31 2015, 847 patients were referred for FDG PET/CT, 741 underwent a respiratory-gated acquisition. Out of them, 213 (29% had one or more lung or liver uptake but 82 (38% had no usable respiratory-gated signal. Accordingly, 131 (62% patients with 183 lung or liver uptakes were analyzed. Considering the 183 lesions, 140 and 43 were located in the lungs and the liver, respectively. The median (IQR difference between respiratory-gated images and non-gated images was 18% (4−32 for SUVmax, increasing to 30% (14−57 in lower lobes for lung lesions, and −18% (−40 to −4 for MTV (p < 0.05. Technologists’ active personal dosimetry and mean total examinations duration were not statistically different between periods with and without

  7. Evaluation and reduction of respiratory motion artifacts in small animal SPECT with GATE

    Lee, C.-L.; Park, S.-J.; Kim, H.-J.

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of image quality caused by respiration is a major impediment to accurate lesion detection in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of lung motion on image quantification. A small animal SPECT system with NaI(Tl) was modeled in the Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) simulation for a lung lesion using a 4D mouse whole-body phantom. SPECT images were obtained using 120 projection views acquired from 0 o to 360 o with a 3 o step. Slices were reconstructed using ordered subsets expectation maximization (OS-EM) without attenuation correction with five iterations and four subsets. Image quality was compared between the static mode without respiratory motion, and dynamic mode with respiratory motion in terms of spatial resolution was measured by the full width at half maximum (FWHM), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The FWHM of the non-gated image and the respiratory gated image were also compared. Spatial resolution improved as activity increased and lesion diameter decreased in the static and dynamic modes. The SNR and CNR increased significantly as lesion activity increased and lesion diameter decreased. Our results show that respiratory motion leads to reduced contrast and quantitative accuracy and that image quantification depends on both the amplitude and the pattern of the respiratory motion. We verified that respiratory motion can have a major effect on the accuracy of measurement of lung lesions and that respiratory gating can reduce activity smearing on SPECT images

  8. Determining the most stable breathing phase for respiratory gating using velocity deformable registration in patients with lung cancer

    Aarons, Y.; Wightman, F.; Roxby, P.; Kron, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Respiratory gated radiotherapy is a high-precision technique where the treatment beam is turned on during a predetermined phase of the breathing cycle in order to minimise dose to surrounding healthy dose sensitive structures. We aim to compare inspiration and expiration phases to determine which is more stable in the breathing cycle to perform respiratory gating. Methods Nine patients underwent a planning time resolved 4DCT (Philips Brilliance 16-multislice widebore) and repeat 4DCT during weeks I, 3 and 5 of a radical course of radiotherapy for lung cancer. Inspiration scans were co-registered to the same phase image of the original planning CT using rigid and then deformable registration with Velocity software. The process was repeated for scans at exhalation phase. The deformation matrix for the diaphragm was used to compare the reproducibility of breathing phases. In the majority of patients (seven of nine) the expiration phase was found to be the more stable compared with inspiration. The maximum diaphragm displacement exceeded 3 cm in one case for the registered inhalation images while the deformation was typically half of that in the exhalation images. Interestingly, several patients showed significant differences in deformation for the left and right diaphragm. Conclusions In a group of lung cancer patients we found the expiration phase to be more reproducible for delivering respiratory gated RT, when compared with inspiration.

  9. Respiratory-Gated MRgHIFU in Upper Abdomen Using an MR-Compatible In-Bore Digital Camera

    Vincent Auboiroux

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To demonstrate the technical feasibility and the potential interest of using a digital optical camera inside the MR magnet bore for monitoring the breathing cycle and subsequently gating the PRFS MR thermometry, MR-ARFI measurement, and MRgHIFU sonication in the upper abdomen. Materials and Methods. A digital camera was reengineered to remove its magnetic parts and was further equipped with a 7 m long USB cable. The system was electromagnetically shielded and operated inside the bore of a closed 3T clinical scanner. Suitable triggers were generated based on real-time motion analysis of the images produced by the camera (resolution 640×480 pixels, 30 fps. Respiratory-gated MR-ARFI prepared MRgHIFU ablation was performed in the kidney and liver of two sheep in vivo, under general anaesthesia and ventilator-driven forced breathing. Results. The optical device demonstrated very good MR compatibility. The current setup permitted the acquisition of motion artefact-free and high resolution MR 2D ARFI and multiplanar interleaved PRFS thermometry (average SNR 30 in liver and 56 in kidney. Microscopic histology indicated precise focal lesions with sharply delineated margins following the respiratory-gated HIFU sonications. Conclusion. The proof-of-concept for respiratory motion management in MRgHIFU using an in-bore digital camera has been validated in vivo.

  10. Dynamic respiratory gated 18FDG-PET of lung tumors - a feasibility study

    Skjei Knudtsen, Ingerid; Skretting, Arne; Roedal, Jan; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Aaslaug; Malinen, Eirik

    2011-01-01

    Background. 18 FDG-PET/CT imaging is well established for diagnosis and staging of lung tumors. However, more detailed information regarding the distribution of FDG within the tumor, also as a function of time after injection may be relevant. In this study we explore the feasibility of a combined dynamic and respiratory gated (DR) PET protocol. Material and methods. A DR FDG-PET protocol for a Siemens Biograph 16 PET/CT scanner was set up, allowing data acquisition from the time of FDG injection. Breath-hold (BH) respiratory gating was performed at four intervals over a total acquisition time of 50 minutes. Thus, the PET protocol provides both motion-free images and a spatiotemporal characterization of the glucose distribution in lung tumors. Software tools were developed in-house for tentative tumor segmentation and for extracting standard uptake values (SUVs) voxel by voxel, tumor volumes and SUV gradients in all directions. Results. Four pilot patients have been investigated with the DR PET protocol. The procedure was well tolerated by the patients. The BH images appeared sharper, and SUV max /SUV mean was higher, compared to free breathing (FB) images. Also, SUV gradients in the periphery of the tumor in the BH images were in general greater than or equal to the gradients in the FB PET images. Conclusion. The DR FDG-PET protocol is feasible and the BH images have a superior quality compared to the FB images. The protocol may also provide information of relevance for radiotherapy planning and follow-up. A patient trial is needed for assessing the clinical value of the imaging protocol

  11. SU-G-JeP3-09: Tumor Location Prediction Using Natural Respiratory Volume for Respiratory Gated Radiation Therapy (RGRT): System Verification Study

    Kim, M; Jung, J; Yoon, D; Shin, H; Kim, S; Suh, T [The catholic university of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Respiratory gated radiation therapy (RGRT) gives accurate results when a patient’s breathing is stable and regular. Thus, the patient should be fully aware during respiratory pattern training before undergoing the RGRT treatment. In order to bypass the process of respiratory pattern training, we propose a target location prediction system for RGRT that uses only natural respiratory volume, and confirm its application. Methods: In order to verify the proposed target location prediction system, an in-house phantom set was used. This set involves a chest phantom including target, external markers, and motion generator. Natural respiratory volume signals were generated using the random function in MATLAB code. In the chest phantom, the target takes a linear motion based on the respiratory signal. After a four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scan of the in-house phantom, the motion trajectory was derived as a linear equation. The accuracy of the linear equation was compared with that of the motion algorithm used by the operating motion generator. In addition, we attempted target location prediction using random respiratory volume values. Results: The correspondence rate of the linear equation derived from the 4DCT images with the motion algorithm of the motion generator was 99.41%. In addition, the average error rate of target location prediction was 1.23% for 26 cases. Conclusion: We confirmed the applicability of our proposed target location prediction system for RGRT using natural respiratory volume. If additional clinical studies can be conducted, a more accurate prediction system can be realized without requiring respiratory pattern training.

  12. Systematic errors in respiratory gating due to intrafraction deformations of the liver

    Siebenthal, Martin von; Szekely, Gabor; Lomax, Antony J.; Cattin, Philippe C.

    2007-01-01

    This article shows the limitations of respiratory gating due to intrafraction deformations of the right liver lobe. The variability of organ shape and motion over tens of minutes was taken into account for this evaluation, which closes the gap between short-term analysis of a few regular cycles, as it is possible with 4DCT, and long-term analysis of interfraction motion. Time resolved MR volumes (4D MR sequences) were reconstructed for 12 volunteers and subsequent non-rigid registration provided estimates of the 3D trajectories of points within the liver over time. The full motion during free breathing and its distribution over the liver were quantified and respiratory gating was simulated to determine the gating accuracy for different gating signals, duty cycles, and different intervals between patient setup and treatment. Gating effectively compensated for the respiratory motion within short sequences (3 min), but deformations, mainly in the anterior inferior part (Couinaud segments IVb and V), led to systematic deviations from the setup position of more than 5 mm in 7 of 12 subjects after 20 min. We conclude that measurements over a few breathing cycles should not be used as a proof of accurate reproducibility of motion, not even within the same fraction, if it is longer than a few minutes. Although the diaphragm shows the largest magnitude of motion, it should not be used to assess the gating accuracy over the entire liver because the reproducibility is typically much more limited in inferior parts. Simple gating signals, such as the trajectory of skin motion, can detect the exhalation phase, but do not allow for an absolute localization of the complete liver over longer periods because the drift of these signals does not necessarily correlate with the internal drift

  13. Fully automated intrinsic respiratory and cardiac gating for small animal CT

    Kuntz, J; Baeuerle, T; Semmler, W; Bartling, S H [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Dinkel, J [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Zwick, S [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical Physics, Freiburg University (Germany); Grasruck, M [Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim (Germany); Kiessling, F [Chair of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH-Aachen University, Medical Faculty, Aachen (Germany); Gupta, R [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: j.kuntz@dkfz.de

    2010-04-07

    A fully automated, intrinsic gating algorithm for small animal cone-beam CT is described and evaluated. A parameter representing the organ motion, derived from the raw projection images, is used for both cardiac and respiratory gating. The proposed algorithm makes it possible to reconstruct motion-corrected still images as well as to generate four-dimensional (4D) datasets representing the cardiac and pulmonary anatomy of free-breathing animals without the use of electrocardiogram (ECG) or respiratory sensors. Variation analysis of projections from several rotations is used to place a region of interest (ROI) on the diaphragm. The ROI is cranially extended to include the heart. The centre of mass (COM) variation within this ROI, the filtered frequency response and the local maxima are used to derive a binary motion-gating parameter for phase-sensitive gated reconstruction. This algorithm was implemented on a flat-panel-based cone-beam CT scanner and evaluated using a moving phantom and animal scans (seven rats and eight mice). Volumes were determined using a semiautomatic segmentation. In all cases robust gating signals could be obtained. The maximum volume error in phantom studies was less than 6%. By utilizing extrinsic gating via externally placed cardiac and respiratory sensors, the functional parameters (e.g. cardiac ejection fraction) and image quality were equivalent to this current gold standard. This algorithm obviates the necessity of both gating hardware and user interaction. The simplicity of the proposed algorithm enables adoption in a wide range of small animal cone-beam CT scanners.

  14. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP2-02: Audiovisual Biofeedback Guided Respiratory-Gated MRI: An Investigation of Tumor Definition and Scan Time for Lung Cancer

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Greer, P; Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Kim, T [Virginia Commonwealth University, Glen Allen, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Breathing consistency variations can cause respiratory-related motion blurring and artifacts and increase in MRI scan time due to inadequate respiratory-gating and discarding of breathing cycles. In a previous study the concept of audiovisual biofeedback (AV) guided respiratory-gated MRI was tested with healthy volunteers and it demonstrated image quality improvement on anatomical structures and scan time reduction. This study tests the applicability of AV-guided respiratorygated MRI for lung cancer in a prospective patient study. Methods: Image quality and scan time were investigated in thirteen lung cancer patients who underwent two 3T MRI sessions. In the first MRI session (pre-treatment), respiratory-gated MR images with free breathing (FB) and AV were acquired at inhalation and exhalation. An RF navigator placed on the liver dome was employed for the respiratory-gated MRI. This was repeated in the second MRI session (mid-treatment). Lung tumors were delineated on each dataset. FB and AV were compared in terms of (1) tumor definition assessed by lung tumor contours and (2) intra-patient scan time variation using the total image acquisition time of inhalation and exhalation datasets from the first and second MRI sessions across 13 lung cancer patients. Results: Compared to FB AV-guided respiratory-gated MRI improved image quality for contouring tumors with sharper boundaries and less blurring resulted in the improvement of tumor definition. Compared to FB the variation of intra-patient scan time with AV was reduced by 48% (p<0.001) from 54 s to 28 s. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that AV-guided respiratorygated MRI improved the quality of tumor images and fixed tumor definition for lung cancer. These results suggest that audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance has the potential to control breathing for adequate respiratory-gating for lung cancer imaging and radiotherapy.

  15. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP2-02: Audiovisual Biofeedback Guided Respiratory-Gated MRI: An Investigation of Tumor Definition and Scan Time for Lung Cancer

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P; Greer, P; Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J; Kim, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Breathing consistency variations can cause respiratory-related motion blurring and artifacts and increase in MRI scan time due to inadequate respiratory-gating and discarding of breathing cycles. In a previous study the concept of audiovisual biofeedback (AV) guided respiratory-gated MRI was tested with healthy volunteers and it demonstrated image quality improvement on anatomical structures and scan time reduction. This study tests the applicability of AV-guided respiratorygated MRI for lung cancer in a prospective patient study. Methods: Image quality and scan time were investigated in thirteen lung cancer patients who underwent two 3T MRI sessions. In the first MRI session (pre-treatment), respiratory-gated MR images with free breathing (FB) and AV were acquired at inhalation and exhalation. An RF navigator placed on the liver dome was employed for the respiratory-gated MRI. This was repeated in the second MRI session (mid-treatment). Lung tumors were delineated on each dataset. FB and AV were compared in terms of (1) tumor definition assessed by lung tumor contours and (2) intra-patient scan time variation using the total image acquisition time of inhalation and exhalation datasets from the first and second MRI sessions across 13 lung cancer patients. Results: Compared to FB AV-guided respiratory-gated MRI improved image quality for contouring tumors with sharper boundaries and less blurring resulted in the improvement of tumor definition. Compared to FB the variation of intra-patient scan time with AV was reduced by 48% (p<0.001) from 54 s to 28 s. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that AV-guided respiratorygated MRI improved the quality of tumor images and fixed tumor definition for lung cancer. These results suggest that audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance has the potential to control breathing for adequate respiratory-gating for lung cancer imaging and radiotherapy.

  16. Evaluation of the MEMS based portable respiratory training system with a tactile sensor for respiratory-gated radiotherapy

    Moon, Sun Young; Yoon, Myonggeun; Chung, Mijoo; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Dong Wook

    2017-10-01

    In respiratory-gated radiotherapy, it is important to maintain the regular respiratory cycles of patients. If patients undergo respiration training, their regular breathing pattern is affected. Therefore, we developed a respiratory training system based on a micro electromechanical system (MEMS) and evaluated the feasibility of the MEMS in radiotherapy. By comparing the measured signal before and after radiation exposure, we confirmed the effects of radiation. By evaluating the period of the electric signal emitted by a tactile sensor and its constancy, the performance of the tactile sensor was confirmed. Moreover, by comparing the delay between the motion of the MEMS and the electric signal from the tactile sensor, we confirmed the reaction time of the tactile sensor. The results showed that a baseline shift occurred for an accumulated dose of 400 Gy in the sensor, and both the amplitude and period changed. The period of the signal released by the tactile sensor was 5.39 and its standard deviation was 0.06. Considering the errors from the motion phantom, a standard deviation of 0.06 was desirable. The delay time was within 0.5 s and not distinguishable by a patient. We confirmed the performance of the MEMS and concluded that MEMS could be applied to patients for respiratory-gated radiotherapy.

  17. The correlation between internal and external markers for abdominal tumors: Implications for respiratory gating

    Gierga, David P.; Brewer, Johanna; Sharp, Gregory C.; Betke, Margrit; Willett, Christopher G.; Chen, George T.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The correlation of the respiratory motion of external patient markers and abdominal tumors was examined. Data of this type are important for image-guided therapy techniques, such as respiratory gating, that monitor the movement of external fiducials. Methods and Materials: Fluoroscopy sessions for 4 patients with internal, radiopaque tumor fiducial clips were analyzed by computer vision techniques. The motion of the internal clips and the external markers placed on the patient's abdominal skin surface were quantified and correlated. Results: In general, the motion of the tumor and external markers were well correlated. The maximum amount of peak-to-peak craniocaudal tumor motion was 2.5 cm. The ratio of tumor motion to external-marker motion ranged from 0.85 to 7.1. The variation in tumor position for a given external-marker position ranged from 2 to 9 mm. The period of the breathing cycle ranged from 2.7 to 4.5 seconds, and the frequency patterns for both the tumor and the external markers were similar. Conclusions: Although tumor motion generally correlated well with external fiducial marker motion, relatively large underlying tumor motion can occur compared with external-marker motion and variations in the tumor position for a given marker position. Treatment margins should be determined on the basis of a detailed understanding of tumor motion, as opposed to relying only on external-marker information

  18. Amplitude-based optimal respiratory gating in positron emission tomography in patients with primary lung cancer

    Grootjans, Willem; Meeuwis, Antoi P.W.; Vos, Charlotte S. van der; Gotthardt, Martin; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Visser, Eric P. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee de [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); University of Twente, MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Respiratory motion during PET imaging introduces quantitative and diagnostic inaccuracies, which may result in non-optimal patient management. This study investigated the effects of respiratory gating on image quantification using an amplitude-based optimal respiratory gating (ORG) algorithm. Whole body FDG-PET/CT was performed in 66 lung cancer patients. The respiratory signal was obtained using a pressure sensor integrated in an elastic belt placed around the patient's thorax. ORG images were reconstructed with 50 %, 35 %, and 20 % of acquired PET data (duty cycle). Lesions were grouped into anatomical locations. Differences in lesion volume between ORG and non-gated images, and mean FDG-uptake (SUV{sub mean}) were calculated. Lesions in the middle and lower lobes demonstrated a significant SUV{sub mean} increase for all duty cycles and volume decrease for duty cycles of 35 % and 20 %. Significant increase in SUV{sub mean} and decrease in volume for lesions in the upper lobes were observed for a 20 % duty cycle. The SUV{sub mean} increase for central lesions was significant for all duty cycles, whereas a significant volume decrease was observed for a duty cycle of 20 %. This study implies that ORG could influence clinical PET imaging with respect to response monitoring and radiotherapy planning. (orig.)

  19. Audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI

    Lee, D; Keall, P; Kim, T; Greer, P B; Arm, J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback can improve image quality and reduce scan time for respiratory-gated 3D thoracic MRI. For five healthy human subjects respiratory motion guidance in MR scans was provided using an AV biofeedback system, utilizing real-time respiratory motion signals. To investigate the improvement of respiratory-gated 3D MR images between free breathing (FB) and AV biofeedback (AV), each subject underwent two imaging sessions. Respiratory-related motion artifacts and imaging time were qualitatively evaluated in addition to the reproducibility of external (abdominal) motion. In the results, 3D MR images in AV biofeedback showed more anatomic information such as a clear distinction of diaphragm, lung lobes and sharper organ boundaries. The scan time was reduced from 401±215 s in FB to 334±94 s in AV (p-value 0.36). The root mean square variation of the displacement and period of the abdominal motion was reduced from 0.4±0.22 cm and 2.8±2.5 s in FB to 0.1±0.15 cm and 0.9±1.3 s in AV (p-value of displacement <0.01 and p-value of period 0.12). This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential to be a useful motion management tool in medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  20. SPECT acquisition using dynamic projections: a novel approach for data-driven respiratory gating

    Hutton, B.F.; Hatton, R.L.; Yip, N.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Movement of the heart due to respiration has been previously demonstrated to produce potentially serious artefacts. On-line respiratory gating is difficult, as it requires a high level of patient cooperation. We demonstrate that use of dynamic acquisition of projections permits identification of the respiratory dynamics, allowing retrospective selection of data corresponding to a fixed point in the respiratory cycle. To demonstrate the feasibility of the technique a dynamic study was acquired just prior to myocardial per-fusion SPECT acquisition, using 5 frames/sec for 20 seconds (64*64 matrix) in anterior and lateral projections (using a dual-head right-angled configuration). The dynamic was processed a) by compressing frames in the transverse direction so as to illustrate time dependence, b) by plotting the centre of mass in the axial direction as a function of time. Respiratory motion was enhanced by use of temporal smoothing and intensity thresholding. In ten patients studied the cyclic pattern of motion due to respiratory dynamics was clearly visible in nine. Respiration typically resulted in around 1cm axial translation but in some individuals, movements as large as 3 cm were identified. The respiration rate ranged from 12-18 /min in agreement with independent observation of the patient's breathing pattern. These results suggest that retrospective respiratory gating is feasible without the need for any external respiratory monitoring device, provide that dynamic acquisition of SPECT projections is implemented. Correction for respiratory motion may also be feasible using this technique. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  1. Quantifying lung morphology with respiratory-gated micro-CT in a murine model of emphysema

    Ford, N. L.; Martin, E. L.; Lewis, J. F.; Veldhuizen, R. A. W.; Holdsworth, D. W.; Drangova, M.

    2009-04-01

    Non-invasive micro-CT imaging techniques have been developed to investigate lung structure in free-breathing rodents. In this study, we investigate the utility of retrospectively respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging in an emphysema model to determine if anatomical changes could be observed in the image-derived quantitative analysis at two respiratory phases. The emphysema model chosen was a well-characterized, genetically altered model (TIMP-3 knockout mice) that exhibits a homogeneous phenotype. Micro-CT scans of the free-breathing, anaesthetized mice were obtained in 50 s and retrospectively respiratory sorted and reconstructed, providing 3D images representing peak inspiration and end expiration with 0.15 mm isotropic voxel spacing. Anatomical measurements included the volume and CT density of the lungs and the volume of the major airways, along with the diameters of the trachea, left bronchus and right bronchus. From these measurements, functional parameters such as functional residual capacity and tidal volume were calculated. Significant differences between the wild-type and TIMP-3 knockout groups were observed for measurements of CT density over the entire lung, indicating increased air content in the lungs of TIMP-3 knockout mice. These results demonstrate retrospective respiratory-gated micro-CT, providing images at multiple respiratory phases that can be analyzed quantitatively to investigate anatomical changes in murine models of emphysema.

  2. Quantifying lung morphology with respiratory-gated micro-CT in a murine model of emphysema

    Ford, N L; Martin, E L; Lewis, J F; Veldhuizen, R A W; Holdsworth, D W; Drangova, M

    2009-01-01

    Non-invasive micro-CT imaging techniques have been developed to investigate lung structure in free-breathing rodents. In this study, we investigate the utility of retrospectively respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging in an emphysema model to determine if anatomical changes could be observed in the image-derived quantitative analysis at two respiratory phases. The emphysema model chosen was a well-characterized, genetically altered model (TIMP-3 knockout mice) that exhibits a homogeneous phenotype. Micro-CT scans of the free-breathing, anaesthetized mice were obtained in 50 s and retrospectively respiratory sorted and reconstructed, providing 3D images representing peak inspiration and end expiration with 0.15 mm isotropic voxel spacing. Anatomical measurements included the volume and CT density of the lungs and the volume of the major airways, along with the diameters of the trachea, left bronchus and right bronchus. From these measurements, functional parameters such as functional residual capacity and tidal volume were calculated. Significant differences between the wild-type and TIMP-3 knockout groups were observed for measurements of CT density over the entire lung, indicating increased air content in the lungs of TIMP-3 knockout mice. These results demonstrate retrospective respiratory-gated micro-CT, providing images at multiple respiratory phases that can be analyzed quantitatively to investigate anatomical changes in murine models of emphysema.

  3. Quantifying lung morphology with respiratory-gated micro-CT in a murine model of emphysema

    Ford, N L [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Martin, E L; Lewis, J F; Veldhuizen, R A W [Lawson Health Research Institute, 268 Grosvenor Street, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Holdsworth, D W; Drangova, M [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, PO Box 5015, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)], E-mail: nlford@ryerson.ca

    2009-04-07

    Non-invasive micro-CT imaging techniques have been developed to investigate lung structure in free-breathing rodents. In this study, we investigate the utility of retrospectively respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging in an emphysema model to determine if anatomical changes could be observed in the image-derived quantitative analysis at two respiratory phases. The emphysema model chosen was a well-characterized, genetically altered model (TIMP-3 knockout mice) that exhibits a homogeneous phenotype. Micro-CT scans of the free-breathing, anaesthetized mice were obtained in 50 s and retrospectively respiratory sorted and reconstructed, providing 3D images representing peak inspiration and end expiration with 0.15 mm isotropic voxel spacing. Anatomical measurements included the volume and CT density of the lungs and the volume of the major airways, along with the diameters of the trachea, left bronchus and right bronchus. From these measurements, functional parameters such as functional residual capacity and tidal volume were calculated. Significant differences between the wild-type and TIMP-3 knockout groups were observed for measurements of CT density over the entire lung, indicating increased air content in the lungs of TIMP-3 knockout mice. These results demonstrate retrospective respiratory-gated micro-CT, providing images at multiple respiratory phases that can be analyzed quantitatively to investigate anatomical changes in murine models of emphysema.

  4. Establishing tumour tracking accuracy in free-breathing respiratory gated SBRT of lung cancer

    Wen, Chuan-Dong; Wong, C; Ackerly, T; Ruben, J; Millar, J

    2014-01-01

    Free-breathing respiratory gated SBRT of surgically inoperable lung cancer has been clinically commissioned. This study was to establish the tumour tracking accuracy under clinical conditions based on an implanted fiducial marker. A Visicoil TM marker embedded in tissue-equivalent material mounted in a phantom (ET Gating Phantom TM Brainlab) driven by a patient's breathing data was treated with the ExacTrac TM system. This one-dimensional moving marker represented a tumour motion in superior-inferior (S-I) direction measured through 4DCT study of the same patient. Both Gafchromic TM films and the stereoscopic kV images were used for tracking the position of the marker. For tumour motion at magnitudes of 10, 20 and 29 mm and treated with corresponding gate widths of 50%, 33% and 20% of free breathing amplitude, the implanted marker was able to be tracked with a deviation ≤1.53 mm to its planned position.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the coronary arteries : clinical results from three dimensional evaluation of a respiratory gated technique

    van Geuns, R J; de Bruin, H G; Rensing, B J; Wielopolski, P A; Hulshoff, M D; van Ooijen, P M; Oudkerk, M; de Feyter, P J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance coronary angiography is challenging because of the motion of the vessels during cardiac contraction and respiration. Additional challenges are the small calibre of the arteries and their complex three dimensional course. Respiratory gating, turboflash acquisition, and

  6. SU-E-J-211: Design and Study of In-House Software Based Respiratory Motion Monitoring, Controlling and Breath-Hold Device for Gated Radiotherapy

    Shanmugam, Senthilkumar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this present work was to fabricate an in-house software based respiratory monitoring, controlling and breath-hold device using computer software programme which guides the patient to have uniform breath hold in response to request during the gated radiotherapy. Methods: The respiratory controlling device consists of a computer, inhouse software, video goggles, a highly sensitive sensor for measurement of distance, mounting systems, a camera, a respiratory signal device, a speaker and a visual indicator. The computer is used to display the respiratory movements of the patient with digital as well as analogue respiration indicators during the respiration cycle, to control, breath-hold and analyze the respiratory movement using indigenously developed software. Results: Studies were conducted with anthropomophic phantoms by simulating the respiratory motion on phantoms and recording the respective movements using the respiratory monitoring device. The results show good agreement between the simulated and measured movements. Further studies were conducted for 60 cancer patients with several types of cancers in the thoracic region. The respiratory movement cycles for each fraction of radiotherapy treatment were recorded and compared. Alarm indications are provided in the system to indicate when the patient breathing movement exceeds the threshold level. This will help the patient to maintain uniform breath hold during the radiotherapy treatment. Our preliminary clinical test results indicate that our device is highly reliable and able to maintain the uniform respiratory motion and breathe hold during the entire course of gated radiotherapy treatment. Conclusion: An indigenous respiratory monitoring device to guide the patient to have uniform breath hold device was fabricated. The alarm feature and the visual waveform indicator in the system guide the patient to have normal respiration. The signal from the device can be connected to the radiation

  7. SU-E-J-211: Design and Study of In-House Software Based Respiratory Motion Monitoring, Controlling and Breath-Hold Device for Gated Radiotherapy

    Shanmugam, Senthilkumar [Madurai Medical College ' Govt. Rajaji Hospital, Madurai (India)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this present work was to fabricate an in-house software based respiratory monitoring, controlling and breath-hold device using computer software programme which guides the patient to have uniform breath hold in response to request during the gated radiotherapy. Methods: The respiratory controlling device consists of a computer, inhouse software, video goggles, a highly sensitive sensor for measurement of distance, mounting systems, a camera, a respiratory signal device, a speaker and a visual indicator. The computer is used to display the respiratory movements of the patient with digital as well as analogue respiration indicators during the respiration cycle, to control, breath-hold and analyze the respiratory movement using indigenously developed software. Results: Studies were conducted with anthropomophic phantoms by simulating the respiratory motion on phantoms and recording the respective movements using the respiratory monitoring device. The results show good agreement between the simulated and measured movements. Further studies were conducted for 60 cancer patients with several types of cancers in the thoracic region. The respiratory movement cycles for each fraction of radiotherapy treatment were recorded and compared. Alarm indications are provided in the system to indicate when the patient breathing movement exceeds the threshold level. This will help the patient to maintain uniform breath hold during the radiotherapy treatment. Our preliminary clinical test results indicate that our device is highly reliable and able to maintain the uniform respiratory motion and breathe hold during the entire course of gated radiotherapy treatment. Conclusion: An indigenous respiratory monitoring device to guide the patient to have uniform breath hold device was fabricated. The alarm feature and the visual waveform indicator in the system guide the patient to have normal respiration. The signal from the device can be connected to the radiation

  8. Quantifying the impact of respiratory-gated 4D CT acquisition on thoracic image quality : a digital phantom study

    Bernatowicz, K; Keall, P; Mishra, P; Knopf, A; Lomax, A; Kipritidis, J

    PURPOSE: Prospective respiratory-gated 4D CT has been shown to reduce tumor image artifacts by up to 50% compared to conventional 4D CT. However, to date no studies have quantified the impact of gated 4D CT on normal lung tissue imaging, which is important in performing dose calculations based on

  9. Free-breathing steady-state free precession cine cardiac magnetic resonance with respiratory navigator gating.

    Moghari, Mehdi H; Komarlu, Rukmini; Annese, David; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    To develop and validate a respiratory motion compensation method for free-breathing cardiac cine imaging. A free-breathing navigator-gated cine steady-state free precession acquisition (Cine-Nav) was developed which preserves the equilibrium state of the net magnetization vector, maintains the high spatial and temporal resolutions of standard breath-hold (BH) acquisition, and images entire cardiac cycle. Cine image data is accepted only from cardiac cycles occurring entirely during end-expiration. Prospective validation was performed in 10 patients by obtaining in each three complete ventricular image stacks with different respiratory motion compensation approaches: (1) BH, (2) free-breathing with 3 signal averages (3AVG), and (3) free-breathing with Cine-Nav. The subjective image quality score (1 = worst, 4 = best) for Cine-Nav (3.8 ± 0.4) was significantly better than for 3AVG (2.2 ± 0.5, P = 0.002), and similar to BH (4.0 ± 0.0, P = 0.13). The blood-to-myocardium contrast ratio for Cine-Nav (6.3 ± 1.5) was similar to BH (5.9 ± 1.6, P = 0.52) and to 3AVG (5.6 ± 2.5, P = 0.43). There were no significant differences between Cine-Nav and BH for the ventricular volumes and mass. In contrast, there were significant differences between 3AVG and BH in all of these measurements but right ventricular mass. Free-breathing cine imaging with Cine-Nav yielded comparable image quality and ventricular measurements to BH, and was superior to 3AVG. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Reproducibility of image quality for moving objects using respiratory-gated computed tomography. A study using a phantom model

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Ishida, Masaya; Terunuma, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the reproducibility of computed tomography (CT) imaging quality in respiratory-gated radiation treatment planning is essential in radiotherapy of movable tumors. Seven series of regular and six series of irregular respiratory motions were performed using a thorax dynamic phantom. For the regular respiratory motions, the respiratory cycle was changed from 2.5 to 4 s and the amplitude was changed from 4 to 10 mm. For the irregular respiratory motions, a cycle of 2.5 to 4 or an amplitude of 4 to 10 mm was added to the base data (id est (i.e.) 3.5-s cycle, 6-mm amplitude) every three cycles. Images of the object were acquired six times using respiratory-gated data acquisition. The volume of the object was calculated and the reproducibility of the volume was decided based on the variety. The registered image of the object was added and the reproducibility of the shape was decided based on the degree of overlap of objects. The variety in the volumes and shapes differed significantly as the respiratory cycle changed according to regular respiratory motions. In irregular respiratory motion, shape reproducibility was further inferior, and the percentage of overlap among the six images was 35.26% in the 2.5- and 3.5-s cycle mixed group. Amplitude changes did not produce significant differences in the variety of the volumes and shapes. Respiratory cycle changes reduced the reproducibility of the image quality in respiratory-gated CT. (author)

  11. Effectiveness of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with audio-visual biofeedback for synchrotron-based scanned heavy-ion beam delivery

    He, Pengbo; Li, Qiang; Zhao, Ting; Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Ma, Yuanyuan

    2016-12-01

    A synchrotron-based heavy-ion accelerator operates in pulse mode at a low repetition rate that is comparable to a patient’s breathing rate. To overcome inefficiencies and interplay effects between the residual motion of the target and the scanned heavy-ion beam delivery process for conventional free breathing (FB)-based gating therapy, a novel respiratory guidance method was developed to help patients synchronize their breathing patterns with the synchrotron excitation patterns by performing short breath holds with the aid of personalized audio-visual biofeedback (BFB) system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the treatment precision, efficiency and reproducibility of the respiratory guidance method in scanned heavy-ion beam delivery mode. Using 96 breathing traces from eight healthy volunteers who were asked to breathe freely and guided to perform short breath holds with the aid of BFB, a series of dedicated four-dimensional dose calculations (4DDC) were performed on a geometric model which was developed assuming a linear relationship between external surrogate and internal tumor motions. The outcome of the 4DDCs was quantified in terms of the treatment time, dose-volume histograms (DVH) and dose homogeneity index. Our results show that with the respiratory guidance method the treatment efficiency increased by a factor of 2.23-3.94 compared with FB gating, depending on the duty cycle settings. The magnitude of dose inhomogeneity for the respiratory guidance methods was 7.5 times less than that of the non-gated irradiation, and good reproducibility of breathing guidance among different fractions was achieved. Thus, our study indicates that the respiratory guidance method not only improved the overall treatment efficiency of respiratory-gated scanned heavy-ion beam delivery, but also had the advantages of lower dose uncertainty and better reproducibility among fractions.

  12. Low-dose respiratory-gated PET/CT: based on 30 mA tube current

    Wu Ping; Li Sijin; Zhang Yanlan; Hao Xinzhong; Qin Zhixing; Yan Min; Cheng Pengliang; Wu Zhifang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish a low-dose but image-comparable respiratory-gated PET/CT (RG PET/CT) protocol based on 30 mA tube current plus other improved scanning parameters, such as the tube current, the number of respiratory phase and length of breathing cycle. Methods: Twenty-six patients with 18 F-FDG-intaking lung nodules underwent one-bed standard-dose PET/CT (120 mA, 2 min/bed) and low dose RG PET/CT (30 mA, 6 respiratory phases, 1 min/phase). The radiation dose and image quality were analyzed subsequently with signal to noise ratio (SNR) for PET and the homogeneity, noise level for CT in the water phantom respectively. Otherwise the CT images were both visual evaluated by two experienced doctors. In addition, different respiratory cycle was simulated to observe its relation with radiation dose. Results: The effective dose of low-dose RG PET/CT was 4.88∼7.69 mSv [mean (5.68±0.83) mSv]. The PET SNR showed no significance between groups. The homogeneity of 30 mA is good (< 5 HU), although noise level was high, the visual character like lobulation, speculation of lung nodule was superior in some respiratory phases. The radiation dose was positively correlated with respiratory cycle. Conclusions: The performance of low-dose RG PET/CT was comparable to those of standard-dose PET/CT based on a protocol with 30 mA tube current, 6 respiratory phases and breathing state of eupnoea. It produced a much lower radiation exposure and the image quality was enough for clinical use such as delineation of tumor active target, characterization and staging of lung nodules, etc. (authors)

  13. Implementation of respiratory-gated VMAT on a Versa HD linear accelerator.

    Snyder, Jeffrey E; Flynn, Ryan T; Hyer, Daniel E

    2017-09-01

    The accurate delivery of respiratory-gated volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans presents a challenge since the gantry rotation and collimator leaves must be repeatedly stopped and set into motion during each breathing cycle. In this study, we present the commissioning process for an Anzai gating system (AZ-733VI) on an Elekta Versa HD linear accelerator and make recommendations for successful clinical implementation. The commissioning tests include central axis dose consistency, profile consistency, gating beam-on/off delay, and comparison of gated versus nongated gamma pass rates for patient-specific quality assurance using four clinically commissioned photon energies: 6 MV, 6 FFF, 10 MV, and 10 FFF. The central axis dose constancy between gated and nongated deliveries was within 0.6% for all energies and the analysis of open field profiles for gated and nongated deliveries showed an agreement of 97.8% or greater when evaluated with a percent difference criteria of 1%. The measurement of the beam-on/off delay was done by evaluating images of a moving ball-bearing phantom triggered by the gating system and average beam-on delays of 0.22-0.29 s were observed. No measurable beam-off delay was present. Measurements of gated VMAT dose distributions resulted in decrements as high as 9% in the gamma passing rate as compared to nongated deliveries when evaluated against the planned dose distribution at 3%/3 mm. By decreasing the dose rate, which decreases the gantry speed during gated delivery, the gamma passing rates of gated and nongated treatments can be made equivalent. We present an empirically derived formula to limit the maximum dose rate during VMAT deliveries and show that by implementing a reduced dose rate, a gamma passing rate of greater than 95% (3%/3 mm) was obtained for all plan measurements. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of

  14. Contrast-enhanced specific absorption rate-efficient 3D cardiac cine with respiratory-triggered radiofrequency gating.

    Henningsson, Markus; Chan, Raymond H; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois A; Razavi, Reza; Botnar, Rene M; Schaeffter, Tobias; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the use of radiofrequency (RF) gating in conjunction with a paramagnetic contrast agent to reduce the specific absorption rate (SAR) and increase the blood-myocardium contrast in balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) 3D cardiac cine. RF gating was implemented by synchronizing the RF-excitation with an external respiratory sensor (bellows), which could additionally be used for respiratory gating. For reference, respiratory-gated 3D cine images were acquired without RF gating. Free-breathing 3D cine images were acquired in eight healthy subjects before and after contrast injection (Gd-BOPTA) and compared to breath-hold 2D cine. RF-gated 3D cine reduced the SAR by nearly 40% without introducing significant artifacts while providing left ventricle (LV) measurements similar to those obtained with 2D cine. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was significantly higher for 3D cine compared to 2D cine, both before and after contrast injection; however, no statistically significant CNR increase was observed for the postcontrast 3D cine compared to the precontrast acquisitions. Respiratory-triggered RF gating significantly reduces SAR in 3D cine acquisitions, which may enable a more widespread clinical use of 3D cine. Furthermore, CNR of 3D bSSFP cine is higher than of 2D and administration of Gd-BOPTA does not improve the CNR of 3D cine. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The feasibility evaluation of Respiratory Gated radiation therapy simulation according to the Respiratory Training with lung cancer

    Hong, Mi Ran; Kim, Cheol Jong; Park, Soo Yeon; Choi, Jae Won; Pyo, Hong Ryeol

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of the breathing exercise,we analyzed the change in the RPM signal and the diaphragm image before 4D respiratory gated radiation therapy planning of lung cancer patients. The breathing training was enforced on 11 patients getting the 4D respiratory gated radiation therapy from April, 2016 until August. At the same time, RPM signal and diaphragm image was obtained respiration training total three steps in step 1 signal acquisition of free-breathing state, 2 steps respiratory signal acquisition through the guide of the respiratory signal, 3 steps, won the regular respiration signal to the description and repeat training. And then, acquired the minimum value, maximum value, average value, and a standard deviation of the inspiration and expiration in RPM signal and diaphragm image in each steps. Were normalized by the value of the step 1, to convert the 2,3 steps to the other distribution ratio (%), by evaluating the change in the interior of the respiratory motion of the patient, it was evaluated breathing exercise usefulness of each patient. The mean value and the standard deviation of each step were obtained with the procedure 1 of the RPM signal and the diaphragm amplitude as a 100% reference. In the RPM signal, the amplitudes and standard deviations of four patients (36.4%, eleven) decreased by 18.1%, 27.6% on average in 3 steps, and 2 patients (18.2%, 11 people) had standard deviation, It decreased by an average of 36.5%. Meanwhile, the other four patients (36.4%, eleven) decreased by an average of only amplitude 13.1%. In Step 3, the amplitude of the diaphragm image decreased by 30% on average of 9 patients (81.8%, 11 people), and the average of 2 patients (18.2%, 11 people) increased by 7.3%. However, the amplitudes of RPM signals and diaphragm image in 3 steps were reduced by 52.6% and 42.1% on average from all patients, respectively, compared to the 2 steps. Relationship between RPM signal and diaphragm image amplitude difference

  16. The feasibility evaluation of Respiratory Gated radiation therapy simulation according to the Respiratory Training with lung cancer

    Hong, Mi Ran; Kim, Cheol Jong; Park, Soo Yeon; Choi, Jae Won; Pyo, Hong Ryeol [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of the breathing exercise,we analyzed the change in the RPM signal and the diaphragm image before 4D respiratory gated radiation therapy planning of lung cancer patients. The breathing training was enforced on 11 patients getting the 4D respiratory gated radiation therapy from April, 2016 until August. At the same time, RPM signal and diaphragm image was obtained respiration training total three steps in step 1 signal acquisition of free-breathing state, 2 steps respiratory signal acquisition through the guide of the respiratory signal, 3 steps, won the regular respiration signal to the description and repeat training. And then, acquired the minimum value, maximum value, average value, and a standard deviation of the inspiration and expiration in RPM signal and diaphragm image in each steps. Were normalized by the value of the step 1, to convert the 2,3 steps to the other distribution ratio (%), by evaluating the change in the interior of the respiratory motion of the patient, it was evaluated breathing exercise usefulness of each patient. The mean value and the standard deviation of each step were obtained with the procedure 1 of the RPM signal and the diaphragm amplitude as a 100% reference. In the RPM signal, the amplitudes and standard deviations of four patients (36.4%, eleven) decreased by 18.1%, 27.6% on average in 3 steps, and 2 patients (18.2%, 11 people) had standard deviation, It decreased by an average of 36.5%. Meanwhile, the other four patients (36.4%, eleven) decreased by an average of only amplitude 13.1%. In Step 3, the amplitude of the diaphragm image decreased by 30% on average of 9 patients (81.8%, 11 people), and the average of 2 patients (18.2%, 11 people) increased by 7.3%. However, the amplitudes of RPM signals and diaphragm image in 3 steps were reduced by 52.6% and 42.1% on average from all patients, respectively, compared to the 2 steps. Relationship between RPM signal and diaphragm image amplitude difference

  17. Real-time system for respiratory-cardiac gating in positron tomography

    Klein, G.J.; Reutter, B.W.; Ho, M.H.; Huesman, R.H.; Reed, J.H.

    1998-01-01

    A Macintosh-based signal processing system has been developed to support simultaneous respiratory and cardiac gating on the ECAT EXACT HR PET scanner. Using the Lab-View real-time software environment, the system reads analog inputs from a pneumatic respiratory bellows and an EGG monitor to compute an appropriate histogram memory location for the PET data. Respiratory state is determined by the bellows signal amplitude; cardiac state is based on the time since the last R-wave. These two states are used in a 2D lookup table to determine a combined respiratory-cardiac state. A 4-bit address encoding the selected histogram is directed from the system to the ECAT scanner, which dynamically switches the destination of tomograph events as respiratory-cardiac state changes. to Test the switching efficiency of the combined Macintosh/ECAT system, a rotating emission phantom was built. Acquisitions with 25 msec states while the phantom was rotating at 240 rpm demonstrate the system could effectively stop motion at this rate, with approximately 5 msec switching time between states

  18. Verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system using cine EPID images and a log file

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Hanazawa, Hideki; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Shibuya, Keiko

    2017-02-01

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed at our institution. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images and a log file and to verify this treatment in clinical cases. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy was performed using TrueBeam and the SyncTraX system. Cine EPID images and a log file were acquired for a phantom and three patients during the course of the treatment. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were created for each treatment beam using a planning CT set. The cine EPID images, log file, and DRRs were analysed using a developed software. For the phantom case, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated to verify the respiratory-gated radiotherapy. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were calculated to evaluate the gating accuracy and set-up uncertainty in the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and left-right (LR) directions. The proposed method achieved high accuracy for the phantom verification. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker were  ⩽3 mm and  ±3 mm in the SI, AP, and LR directions. We proposed a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine EPID images and a log file and showed that this treatment is performed with high accuracy in clinical cases. This work was partly presented at the 58th Annual meeting of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  19. Verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system using cine EPID images and a log file.

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Hanazawa, Hideki; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Shibuya, Keiko

    2017-02-21

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed at our institution. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images and a log file and to verify this treatment in clinical cases. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy was performed using TrueBeam and the SyncTraX system. Cine EPID images and a log file were acquired for a phantom and three patients during the course of the treatment. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were created for each treatment beam using a planning CT set. The cine EPID images, log file, and DRRs were analysed using a developed software. For the phantom case, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated to verify the respiratory-gated radiotherapy. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were calculated to evaluate the gating accuracy and set-up uncertainty in the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and left-right (LR) directions. The proposed method achieved high accuracy for the phantom verification. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker were  ⩽3 mm and  ±3 mm in the SI, AP, and LR directions. We proposed a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine EPID images and a log file and showed that this treatment is performed with high accuracy in clinical cases.

  20. Influence of Respiratory Gating, Image Filtering, and Animal Positioning on High-Resolution Electrocardiography-Gated Murine Cardiac Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    Chao Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac parameters obtained from single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT images can be affected by respiratory motion, image filtering, and animal positioning. We investigated the influence of these factors on ultra-high-resolution murine myocardial perfusion SPECT. Five mice were injected with 99m technetium (99mTc-tetrofosmin, and each was scanned in supine and prone positions in a U-SPECT-II scanner with respiratory and electrocardiographic (ECG gating. ECG-gated SPECT images were created without applying respiratory motion correction or with two different respiratory motion correction strategies. The images were filtered with a range of three-dimensional gaussian kernels, after which end-diastolic volumes (EDVs, end-systolic volumes (ESVs, and left ventricular ejection fractions were calculated. No significant differences in the measured cardiac parameters were detected when any strategy to reduce or correct for respiratory motion was applied, whereas big differences (> 5% in EDV and ESV were found with regard to different positioning of animals. A linear relationship (p < .001 was found between the EDV or ESV and the kernel size of the gaussian filter. In short, respiratory gating did not significantly affect the cardiac parameters of mice obtained with ultra-high-resolution SPECT, whereas the position of the animals and the image filters should be the same in a comparative study with multiple scans to avoid systematic differences in measured cardiac parameters.

  1. Deep-inspiration breath-hold PET/CT versus free breathing PET/CT and respiratory gating PET for reference. Evaluation in 95 patients with lung cancer

    Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Ohtake, Eiji; Inoue, Tomio

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to define the factors that correlate with differences in maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) in deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and free breathing (FB) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT admixed with respiratory gating (RG) PET for reference. Patients (n=95) with pulmonary lesions were evaluated at one facility over 33 months. After undergoing whole-body PET/CT, a RG PET and FB PET/CT scans were obtained, followed by a DIBH PET/CT scan. All scans were recorded using a list-mode dynamic collection method with respiratory gating. The RG PET was reconstructed using phase gating without attenuation correction; the FB PET was reconstructed from the RG PET sinogram datasets with attenuation correction. Respiratory motion distance, breathing cycle speed, and waveform of RG PET were recorded. The SUV max of FB PET/CT and DIBH PET/CT were recorded: the percent difference in SUV max between the FB and DIBH scans was defined as the %BH-index. The %BH-index was significantly higher for lesions in the lower lung area than in the upper lung area. Respiratory motion distance was significantly higher in the lower lung area than in the upper lung area. A significant relationship was observed between the %BH-index and respiratory motion distance. Waveforms without steady end-expiration tended to show a high %BH-index. Significant inverse relationships were observed between %BH-index and cycle speed, and between respiratory motion distance and cycle speed. Decrease in SUV max of FB PET/CT was due to tumor size, distribution of lower lung, long respiratory movement at slow breathing cycle speeds, and respiratory waveforms without steady end-expiration. (author)

  2. SU-G-JeP1-08: Dual Modality Verification for Respiratory Gating Using New Real- Time Tumor Tracking Radiotherapy System

    Shiinoki, T; Hanazawa, H; Shibuya, K [Yamaguchi University, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan); Kawamura, S; Koike, M; Yuasa, Y; Uehara, T; Fujimoto, K [Yamaguchi University Hospital, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The respirato ry gating system combined the TrueBeam and a new real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system (RTRT) was installed. The RTRT system consists of two x-ray tubes and color image intensifiers. Using fluoroscopic images, the fiducial marker which was implanted near the tumor was tracked and was used as the internal surrogate for respiratory gating. The purposes of this study was to develop the verification technique of the respiratory gating with the new RTRT using cine electronic portal image device images (EPIDs) of TrueBeam and log files of the RTRT. Methods: A patient who underwent respiratory gated SBRT of the lung using the RTRT were enrolled in this study. For a patient, the log files of three-dimensional coordinate of fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were acquired using the RTRT. Simultaneously, the cine EPIDs were acquired during respiratory gated radiotherapy. The data acquisition was performed for one field at five sessions during the course of SBRT. The residual motion errors were calculated using the log files (E{sub log}). The fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate into the cine EPIDs was automatically extracted by in-house software based on the template-matching algorithm. The differences between the the marker positions of cine EPIDs and digitally reconstructed radiograph were calculated (E{sub EPID}). Results: Marker detection on EPID using in-house software was influenced by low image contrast. For one field during the course of SBRT, the respiratory gating using the RTRT showed the mean ± S.D. of 95{sup th} percentile E{sub EPID} were 1.3 ± 0.3 mm,1.1 ± 0.5 mm,and those of E{sub log} were 1.5 ± 0.2 mm, 1.1 ± 0.2 mm in LR and SI directions, respectively. Conclusion: We have developed the verification method of respiratory gating combined TrueBeam and new real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system using EPIDs and log files.

  3. Respiratory analysis system and method

    Liu, F. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A system is described for monitoring the respiratory process in which the gas flow rate and the frequency of respiration and expiration cycles can be determined on a real time basis. A face mask is provided with one-way inlet and outlet valves where the gas flow is through independent flowmeters and through a mass spectrometer. The opening and closing of a valve operates an electrical switch, and the combination of the two switches produces a low frequency electrical signal of the respiratory inhalation and exhalation cycles. During the time a switch is operated, the corresponsing flowmeter produces electric pulses representative of the flow rate; the electrical pulses being at a higher frequency than that of the breathing cycle and combined with the low frequency signal. The high frequency pulses are supplied to conventional analyzer computer which also receives temperature and pressure inputs and computes mass flow rate and totalized mass flow of gas. From the mass spectrometer, components of the gas are separately computed as to flow rate. The electrical switches cause operation of up-down inputs of a reversible counter. The respective up and down cycles can be individually monitored and combined for various respiratory measurements.

  4. Main technical aspects and clinical benefits of respiratory Gating for radiotherapy of lung neoplasm

    Benites, Rafaela Freitas Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    The concern with the irradiation of lung tumors is that many of them can move along the breathing, which can cause problems in defining accurately the target and increases the irradiation of normal tissues. The objectives are to present the 4D CT principles, image acquisition, reconstruction and application in planning of the radiotherapy. It justifies the quick implantation, improvements in acquisition and images, the possibility in quantify the tumor movement, verifying strategies and delivery treatment. It's concluded that the toxicity risk is reduced with the respiratory gating, and the results suggests that the closed RT will be of clinical relevance. (author)

  5. Utility estimation of the application of auditory-visual-tactile sense feedback in respiratory gated radiation therapy

    Jo, Jung Hun; KIm, Byeong Jin; Roh, Shi Won; Lee, Hyeon Chan; Jang, Hyeong Jun; Kim, Hoi Nam [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Biomedical Engineering, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jae Hoon [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Jae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwang Yang Health Collage, Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility to optimize the gated treatment delivery time and maintenance of stable respiratory by the introduction of breath with the assistance of auditory-visual-tactile sense. The experimenter's respiration were measured by ANZAI 4D system. We obtained natural breathing signal, monitor-induced breathing signal, monitor and ventilator-induced breathing signal, and breath-hold signal using real time monitor during 10 minutes beam-on-time. In order to check the stability of respiratory signals distributed in each group were compared with means, standard deviation, variation value, beam{sub t}ime of the respiratory signal. The stability of each respiratory was measured in consideration of deviation change studied in each respiratory time lapse. As a result of an analysis of respiratory signal, all experimenters has showed that breathing signal used both Real time monitor and Ventilator was the most stable and shortest time. In this study, it was evaluated that respiratory gated radiation therapy with auditory-visual-tactual sense and without auditory-visual-tactual sense feedback. The study showed that respiratory gated radiation therapy delivery time could significantly be improved by the application of video feedback when this is combined with audio-tactual sense assistance. This delivery technique did prove its feasibility to limit the tumor motion during treatment delivery for all patients to a defined value while maintaining the accuracy and proved the applicability of the technique in a conventional clinical schedule.

  6. Utility estimation of the application of auditory-visual-tactile sense feedback in respiratory gated radiation therapy

    Jo, Jung Hun; KIm, Byeong Jin; Roh, Shi Won; Lee, Hyeon Chan; Jang, Hyeong Jun; Kim, Hoi Nam; Song, Jae Hoon; Kim, Young Jae

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility to optimize the gated treatment delivery time and maintenance of stable respiratory by the introduction of breath with the assistance of auditory-visual-tactile sense. The experimenter's respiration were measured by ANZAI 4D system. We obtained natural breathing signal, monitor-induced breathing signal, monitor and ventilator-induced breathing signal, and breath-hold signal using real time monitor during 10 minutes beam-on-time. In order to check the stability of respiratory signals distributed in each group were compared with means, standard deviation, variation value, beam t ime of the respiratory signal. The stability of each respiratory was measured in consideration of deviation change studied in each respiratory time lapse. As a result of an analysis of respiratory signal, all experimenters has showed that breathing signal used both Real time monitor and Ventilator was the most stable and shortest time. In this study, it was evaluated that respiratory gated radiation therapy with auditory-visual-tactual sense and without auditory-visual-tactual sense feedback. The study showed that respiratory gated radiation therapy delivery time could significantly be improved by the application of video feedback when this is combined with audio-tactual sense assistance. This delivery technique did prove its feasibility to limit the tumor motion during treatment delivery for all patients to a defined value while maintaining the accuracy and proved the applicability of the technique in a conventional clinical schedule

  7. Validation of a gating technique for radiotherapy treatment of injuries affected by respiratory motion; Validacion de una atecnica de gating para el tratamiento con radioterapia externa de lesiones afectadas por el movimiento respiratorio

    Martinez Ortega, J.; Castro Tejero, P.

    2011-07-01

    The use of gating techniques for the treatment of lesions that are involved respiratory motion may bring an increase in the dose administered. tumors and decreased the dose to adjacent healthy organs. In the study presented shows the steps taken to validate the respiratory gating technique using the RPM system (Real-time Position Management) from Varian. (Author)

  8. Detection and compensation of organ/lesion motion using 4D-PET/CT respiratory gated acquisition techniques

    Bettinardi, Valentino; Picchio, Maria; Di Muzio, Nadia; Gianolli, Luigi; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Messa, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the degradation effects produced by respiratory organ and lesion motion on PET/CT images and to define the role of respiratory gated (RG) 4D-PET/CT techniques to compensate for such effects. Methods: Based on the literature and on our own experience, technical recommendations and clinical indications for the use of RG 4D PET/CT have been outlined. Results: RG 4D-PET/CT techniques require a state of the art PET/CT scanner, a respiratory monitoring system and dedicated acquisition and processing protocols. Patient training is particularly important to obtain a regular breathing pattern. An adequate number of phases has to be selected to balance motion compensation and statistical noise. RG 4D PET/CT motion free images may be clinically useful for tumour tissue characterization, monitoring patient treatment and target definition in radiation therapy planning. Conclusions: RG 4D PET/CT is a valuable tool to improve image quality and quantitative accuracy and to assess and measure organ and lesion motion for radiotherapy planning.

  9. Quality assurance for respiratory-gated stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung using real-time position management system

    Nakaguchi, Yuji; Maruyama, Masato; Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated comprehensive quality assurance (QA) for respiratory-gated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the lungs using a real-time position management system (RPM). By using the phantom study, we evaluated dose liberality and reproducibility, and dose distributions for low monitor unite (MU), and also checked the absorbed dose at isocenter and dose profiles for the respiratory-gated exposure using RPM. Furthermore, we evaluated isocenter dose and dose distributions for respiratory-gated SBRT plans in the lungs using RPM. The maximum errors for the dose liberality were 4% for 2 MU, 1% for 4-10 MU, and 0.5% for 15 MU and 20 MU. The dose reproducibility was 2% for 1 MU and within 0.1% for 5 MU or greater. The accuracy for dose distributions was within 2% for 2 MU or greater. The dose error along a central axis for respiratory cycles of 2, 4, and 6 sec was within 1%. As for geometric accuracy, 90% and 50% isodose areas for the respiratory-gated exposure became almost 1 mm and 2 mm larger than without gating, respectively. For clinical lung-SBRT plans, the point dose at isocenter agreed within 2.1% with treatment planning system (TPS). And the pass rates of all plans for TPS were more than 96% in the gamma analysis (3 mm/3%). The geometrical accuracy and the dose accuracy of TPS calculation algorithm are more important for the dose evaluation at penumbra region for respiratory-gated SBRT in lung using RPM. (author)

  10. Motion management within two respiratory-gating windows: feasibility study of dual quasi-breath-hold technique in gated medical procedures

    Kim, Taeho; Kim, Siyong; Youn, Kaylin K; Park, Yang-Kyun; Keall, Paul; Lee, Rena

    2014-01-01

    A dual quasi-breath-hold (DQBH) technique is proposed for respiratory motion management (a hybrid technique combining breathing-guidance with breath-hold task in the middle). The aim of this study is to test a hypothesis that the DQBH biofeedback system improves both the capability of motion management and delivery efficiency. Fifteen healthy human subjects were recruited for two respiratory motion measurements (free breathing and DQBH biofeedback breathing for 15 min). In this study, the DQBH biofeedback system utilized the abdominal position obtained using an real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA) to audio-visually guide a human subject for 4 s breath-hold at EOI and 90% EOE (EOE 90% ) to improve delivery efficiency. We investigated the residual respiratory motion and the delivery efficiency (duty-cycle) of abdominal displacement within the gating window. The improvement of the abdominal motion reproducibility was evaluated in terms of cycle-to-cycle displacement variability, respiratory period and baseline drift. The DQBH biofeedback system improved the abdominal motion management capability compared to that with free breathing. With a phase based gating (mean ± std: 55  ±  5%), the averaged root mean square error (RMSE) of the abdominal displacement in the dual-gating windows decreased from 2.26 mm of free breathing to 1.16 mm of DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.007). The averaged RMSE of abdominal displacement over the entire respiratory cycles reduced from 2.23 mm of free breathing to 1.39 mm of DQBH biofeedback breathing in the dual-gating windows (p-value = 0.028). The averaged baseline drift dropped from 0.9 mm min −1 with free breathing to 0.09 mm min −1 with DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.048). The averaged duty-cycle with an 1 mm width of displacement bound increased from 15% of free breathing to 26% of DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.003). The study demonstrated that the DQBH

  11. Methods of respiratory system investigation

    Rozenshtraukh, L.C.; Rybakova, N.I.; Vinner, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Different methods of chest organs investigation are discussed in detail: roentgenoscopy, roentgenography, tomography and others. A detailed roentgenologic semiotics of every method is presented, as well as their comparative evaluation

  12. Evaluating FDG uptake changes between pre and post therapy respiratory gated PET scans

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Yong, Yue; Yap, Jeffrey T.; Killoran, Joseph H.; Allen, Aaron M.; Berbeco, Ross I.; Chen, Aileen B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Whole body (3D) and respiratory gated (4D) FDG-PET/CT scans performed pre-radiotherapy (pre-RT) and post-radiotherapy (post-RT) were analyzed to investigate the impact of 4D PET in evaluating 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake changes due to therapy, relative to traditional 3D PET. Methods and materials: 3D and 4D sequential FDG-PET/CT scans were acquired pre-RT and approximately one month post-RT for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The lesions of high uptake targeted with radiotherapy were identified on the pre-RT scan of each patient. Each lesion on the 3D and each of the five phases of the 4D scan were analyzed using a region of interest (ROI). For each patient the ROIs of the pre-RT scans were used to locate the areas of initial FDG uptake on the post-RT scans following rigid registration. Post-RT ROIs were drawn and the FDG uptake was compared with that of the pre-RT scans. Results: Sixteen distinct lesions from 12 patients were identified and analyzed. Standardized uptake value (SUV) maxima were significantly higher (p-value <0.005) for the lesions as measured on the 4D compared to 3D PET. Comparison of serial pre and post-RT scans showed a mean 62% decrease in SUV with the 3D PET scan (range 36–89%), and a 67% decrease with the 4D PET scan (range 30–89%). The mean absolute difference in SUV change on 3D versus 4D scans was 4.9%, with a range 0–15% (p-value = 0.07). Conclusions: Signal recovery with 4D PET results in higher SUVs when compared to standard 3D PET. Consequently, differences in the evaluation of SUV changes between pre and post-RT plans were observed. Such difference can have a significant impact in PET-based response assessment.

  13. Optimization of a retrospective technique for respiratory-gated high speed micro-CT of free-breathing rodents

    Ford, Nancy L; Wheatley, Andrew R; Holdsworth, David W; Drangova, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a technique for dynamic respiratory imaging using retrospectively gated high-speed micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice. Free-breathing C57Bl6 mice were scanned using a dynamic micro-CT scanner, comprising a flat-panel detector mounted on a slip-ring gantry. Projection images were acquired over ten complete gantry rotations in 50 s, while monitoring the respiratory motion in synchrony with projection-image acquisition. Projection images belonging to a selected respiratory phase were retrospectively identified and used for 3D reconstruction. The effect of using fewer gantry rotations-which influences both image quality and the ability to quantify respiratory function-was evaluated. Images reconstructed using unique projections from six or more gantry rotations produced acceptable images for quantitative analysis of lung volume, CT density, functional residual capacity and tidal volume. The functional residual capacity (0.15 ± 0.03 mL) and tidal volumes (0.08 ± 0.03 mL) measured in this study agree with previously reported measurements made using prospectively gated micro-CT and at higher resolution (150 μm versus 90 μm voxel spacing). Retrospectively gated micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice enables quantitative dynamic measurement of morphological and functional parameters in the mouse models of respiratory disease, with scan times as short as 30 s, based on the acquisition of projection images over six gantry rotations

  14. Optimization of a retrospective technique for respiratory-gated high speed micro-CT of free-breathing rodents

    Ford, Nancy L [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Wheatley, Andrew R [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, PO Box 5015, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Holdsworth, David W [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, PO Box 5015, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Drangova, Maria [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, PO Box 5015, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2007-09-21

    The objective of this study was to develop a technique for dynamic respiratory imaging using retrospectively gated high-speed micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice. Free-breathing C57Bl6 mice were scanned using a dynamic micro-CT scanner, comprising a flat-panel detector mounted on a slip-ring gantry. Projection images were acquired over ten complete gantry rotations in 50 s, while monitoring the respiratory motion in synchrony with projection-image acquisition. Projection images belonging to a selected respiratory phase were retrospectively identified and used for 3D reconstruction. The effect of using fewer gantry rotations-which influences both image quality and the ability to quantify respiratory function-was evaluated. Images reconstructed using unique projections from six or more gantry rotations produced acceptable images for quantitative analysis of lung volume, CT density, functional residual capacity and tidal volume. The functional residual capacity (0.15 {+-} 0.03 mL) and tidal volumes (0.08 {+-} 0.03 mL) measured in this study agree with previously reported measurements made using prospectively gated micro-CT and at higher resolution (150 {mu}m versus 90 {mu}m voxel spacing). Retrospectively gated micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice enables quantitative dynamic measurement of morphological and functional parameters in the mouse models of respiratory disease, with scan times as short as 30 s, based on the acquisition of projection images over six gantry rotations.

  15. SU-E-T-247: Determinations of the Optimal Phase for Respiratory Gated Radiotherapy From Statistical Analysis Using a Visible Guidance System

    Oh, S; Yea, J; Kang, M; Lee, H; Kim, S [Yeungnam University Medical Center, Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Respiratory gated radiation therapy (RGRT) is used to minimize the radiation dose to normal tissue in lung cancer patients. Determination of the optimal point in the respiratory phase of a patient is important in RGRT but it is not easy. The goal of the present study was to see if a visible guidance system is helpful in determining the optimal phase in respiratory gated therapy. Methods: The breathing signals of 23 lung cancer patients were recorded with a Real-time Position Management (RPM) respiratory gating system (Varian, USA). The patients underwent breathing training with our visible guidance system, after which their breathing signals were recorded during 5 min of free breathing and 5 min of guided breathing. The breathing signals recorded between 3 and 5 min before and after training were compared. We performed statistical analysis of the breathing signals to find the optimal duty cycle in guided breathing for RGRT. Results: The breathing signals aided by the visible guidance system had more regular cycles over time and smaller variations in the positions of the marker block than the free breathing signals. Of the 23 lung cancer patients, 19 showed statistically significant differences by time when the values obtained before and after breathing were compared (p < 0.05); 30% and 40% of the duty cycle, respectively, was determined to be the most effective, and the corresponding phases were 30 60% (duty cycle, 30%; p < 0.05) and 30 70% (duty cycle, 40%; p < 0.05). Conclusion: Respiratory regularity was significantly improved with the use of the RPM with our visible guiding system; therefore, it would help improve the accuracy and efficiency of RGRT.

  16. Universal programmable logic gate and routing method

    Fijany, Amir (Inventor); Vatan, Farrokh (Inventor); Akarvardar, Kerem (Inventor); Blalock, Benjamin (Inventor); Chen, Suheng (Inventor); Cristoloveanu, Sorin (Inventor); Kolawa, Elzbieta (Inventor); Mojarradi, Mohammad M. (Inventor); Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An universal and programmable logic gate based on G.sup.4-FET technology is disclosed, leading to the design of more efficient logic circuits. A new full adder design based on the G.sup.4-FET is also presented. The G.sup.4-FET can also function as a unique router device offering coplanar crossing of signal paths that are isolated and perpendicular to one another. This has the potential of overcoming major limitations in VLSI design where complex interconnection schemes have become increasingly problematic.

  17. Initial clinical results for breath-hold CT-based processing of respiratory-gated PET acquisitions

    Fin, Loic; Daouk, Joel; Morvan, Julie; Esper, Isabelle El; Saidi, Lazhar; Meyer, Marc-Etienne; Bailly, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory motion causes uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) images of chest structures to spread out and misregister with the CT images. This misregistration can alter the attenuation correction and thus the quantisation of PET images. In this paper, we present the first clinical results for a respiratory-gated PET (RG-PET) processing method based on a single breath-hold CT (BH-CT) acquisition, which seeks to improve diagnostic accuracy via better PET-to-CT co-registration. We refer to this method as ''CT-based'' RG-PET processing. Thirteen lesions were studied. Patients underwent a standard clinical PET protocol and then the CT-based protocol, which consists of a 10-min List Mode RG-PET acquisition, followed by a shallow end-expiration BH-CT. The respective performances of the CT-based and clinical PET methods were evaluated by comparing the distances between the lesions' centroids on PET and CT images. SUV MAX and volume variations were also investigated. The CT-based method showed significantly lower (p=0.027) centroid distances (mean change relative to the clinical method =-49%; range =-100% to 0%). This led to higher SUV MAX (mean change =+33%; range =-4% to 69%). Lesion volumes were significantly lower (p=0.022) in CT-based PET volumes (mean change =-39%: range =-74% to -1%) compared with clinical ones. A CT-based RG-PET processing method can be implemented in clinical practice with a small increase in radiation exposure. It improves PET-CT co-registration of lung lesions and should lead to more accurate attenuation correction and thus SUV measurement. (orig.)

  18. SU-E-T-66: Characterization of Radiation Dose Associated with Dark Currents During Beam Hold for Respiratory-Gated Electron Therapy

    Hessler, J; Gupta, N; Rong, Y; Weldon, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this study was to estimate the radiation dose contributed by dark currents associated with the respiratory-gated electron therapy during beam hold. The secondary aim was to determine clinical benefits of using respiratory-gated electron therapy for left-sided breast cancer patients with positive internal mammary nodes (IMN). Methods: Measurements of the dark current-induced dose in all electron modes were performed on multiple Siemens and Varian linear accelerators by manually simulating beam-hold during respiratory gating. Dose was quantified at the machine isocenter by comparing the collected charge to the known output for all energies ranging from 6 to 18 MeV for a 10cm × 10cm field at 100 SSD with appropriate solid-water buildup. Using the Eclipse treatment planning system, we compared the additional dose associated with dark current using gated electron fields to the dose uncertainties associated with matching gated photon fields and ungated electron fields. Dose uncertainties were seen as hot and cold spots along the match line of the fields. Results: The magnitude of the dose associated with dark current is highly correlated to the energy of the beam and the amount of time the beam is on hold. For lower energies (6–12 MeV), there was minimal dark current dose (0.1–1.3 cGy/min). Higher energies (15–18 MeV) showed measurable amount of doses. The dark current associated with the electron beam-hold varied between linear accelerator vendors and depended on dark current suppression and the age of the linear accelerator. Conclusion: For energies up to 12 MeV, the dose associated with the dark current for respiratorygated electron therapy was shown to be negligible, and therefore should be considered an option for treating IMN positive left-sided breast cancer patients. However, at higher energies the benefit of respiratory gating may be outweighed by dose due to the dark current

  19. Improved attenuation correction for respiratory gated PET/CT with extended-duration cine CT: a simulation study

    Zhang, Ruoqiao; Alessio, Adam M.; Pierce, Larry A.; Byrd, Darrin W.; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; De Man, Bruno; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2017-03-01

    Due to the wide variability of intra-patient respiratory motion patterns, traditional short-duration cine CT used in respiratory gated PET/CT may be insufficient to match the PET scan data, resulting in suboptimal attenuation correction that eventually compromises the PET quantitative accuracy. Thus, extending the duration of cine CT can be beneficial to address this data mismatch issue. In this work, we propose to use a long-duration cine CT for respiratory gated PET/CT, whose cine acquisition time is ten times longer than a traditional short-duration cine CT. We compare the proposed long-duration cine CT with the traditional short-duration cine CT through numerous phantom simulations with 11 respiratory traces measured during patient PET/CT scans. Experimental results show that, the long-duration cine CT reduces the motion mismatch between PET and CT by 41% and improves the overall reconstruction accuracy by 42% on average, as compared to the traditional short-duration cine CT. The long-duration cine CT also reduces artifacts in PET images caused by misalignment and mismatch between adjacent slices in phase-gated CT images. The improvement in motion matching between PET and CT by extending the cine duration depends on the patient, with potentially greater benefits for patients with irregular breathing patterns or larger diaphragm movements.

  20. Clinical application of MRI-respiratory gating technology in the evaluation of children with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome.

    Zeng, Guohui; Teng, Yaoshu; Zhu, Jin; Zhu, Darong; Yang, Bin; Hu, Linping; Chen, Manman; Fu, Xiao

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the clinical application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-respiratory gating technology for assessing illness severity in children with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS).MRI-respiratory gating technology was used to scan the nasopharyngeal cavities of 51 children diagnosed with OSAHS during 6 respiratory phases. Correlations between the ratio of the area of the adenoid to the area of the nasopalatine pharyngeal cavity (Sa/Snp), with the main indexes of polysomnography (PSG), were analyzed. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve and Kappa analysis were used to determine the diagnostic accuracy of Sa/Snp in pediatric OSAHS.The Sa/Snp was positively correlated with the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) (P children. Consistency analysis with the AHI showed a diagnosis accordance rate of 96.0% in severe pediatric OSAHS and 96.2% in slight-moderate pediatric OSAHS (Kappa = 0.922, P children with adenoidal hypertrophy was greatest at the end-expiration phase during sleep. The end-expiratory Sa/Snp obtained by a combination of MRI and respiratory gating technology has potential as an important imaging index for diagnosing and evaluating severity in pediatric OSAHS.

  1. A Comparison of Amplitude-Based and Phase-Based Positron Emission Tomography Gating Algorithms for Segmentation of Internal Target Volumes of Tumors Subject to Respiratory Motion

    Jani, Shyam S.; Robinson, Clifford G.; Dahlbom, Magnus; White, Benjamin M.; Thomas, David H.; Gaudio, Sergio; Low, Daniel A.; Lamb, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare the accuracy of tumor volume segmentation in amplitude-based and phase-based respiratory gating algorithms in respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET). Methods and Materials: List-mode fluorodeoxyglucose-PET data was acquired for 10 patients with a total of 12 fluorodeoxyglucose-avid tumors and 9 lymph nodes. Additionally, a phantom experiment was performed in which 4 plastic butyrate spheres with inner diameters ranging from 1 to 4 cm were imaged as they underwent 1-dimensional motion based on 2 measured patient breathing trajectories. PET list-mode data were gated into 8 bins using 2 amplitude-based (equal amplitude bins [A1] and equal counts per bin [A2]) and 2 temporal phase-based gating algorithms. Gated images were segmented using a commercially available gradient-based technique and a fixed 40% threshold of maximum uptake. Internal target volumes (ITVs) were generated by taking the union of all 8 contours per gated image. Segmented phantom ITVs were compared with their respective ground-truth ITVs, defined as the volume subtended by the tumor model positions covering 99% of breathing amplitude. Superior-inferior distances between sphere centroids in the end-inhale and end-exhale phases were also calculated. Results: Tumor ITVs from amplitude-based methods were significantly larger than those from temporal-based techniques (P=.002). For lymph nodes, A2 resulted in ITVs that were significantly larger than either of the temporal-based techniques (P<.0323). A1 produced the largest and most accurate ITVs for spheres with diameters of ≥2 cm (P=.002). No significant difference was shown between algorithms in the 1-cm sphere data set. For phantom spheres, amplitude-based methods recovered an average of 9.5% more motion displacement than temporal-based methods under regular breathing conditions and an average of 45.7% more in the presence of baseline drift (P<.001). Conclusions: Target volumes in images generated

  2. Measurement of time delays in gated radiotherapy for realistic respiratory motions

    Chugh, Brige P.; Quirk, Sarah; Conroy, Leigh; Smith, Wendy L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Gated radiotherapy is used to reduce internal motion margins, escalate target dose, and limit normal tissue dose; however, its temporal accuracy is limited. Beam-on and beam-off time delays can lead to treatment inefficiencies and/or geographic misses; therefore, AAPM Task Group 142 recommends verifying the temporal accuracy of gating systems. Many groups use sinusoidal phantom motion for this, under the tacit assumption that use of sinusoidal motion for determining time delays produces negligible error. The authors test this assumption by measuring gating time delays for several realistic motion shapes with increasing degrees of irregularity. Methods: Time delays were measured on a linear accelerator with a real-time position management system (Varian TrueBeam with RPM system version 1.7.5) for seven motion shapes: regular sinusoidal; regular realistic-shape; large (40%) and small (10%) variations in amplitude; large (40%) variations in period; small (10%) variations in both amplitude and period; and baseline drift (30%). Film streaks of radiation exposure were generated for each motion shape using a programmable motion phantom. Beam-on and beam-off time delays were determined from the difference between the expected and observed streak length. Results: For the system investigated, all sine, regular realistic-shape, and slightly irregular amplitude variation motions had beam-off and beam-on time delays within the AAPM recommended limit of less than 100 ms. In phase-based gating, even small variations in period resulted in some time delays greater than 100 ms. Considerable time delays over 1 s were observed with highly irregular motion. Conclusions: Sinusoidal motion shapes can be considered a reasonable approximation to the more complex and slightly irregular shapes of realistic motion. When using phase-based gating with predictive filters even small variations in period can result in time delays over 100 ms. Clinical use of these systems for patients

  3. Measurement of time delays in gated radiotherapy for realistic respiratory motions

    Chugh, Brige P.; Quirk, Sarah; Conroy, Leigh; Smith, Wendy L., E-mail: Wendy.Smith@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Gated radiotherapy is used to reduce internal motion margins, escalate target dose, and limit normal tissue dose; however, its temporal accuracy is limited. Beam-on and beam-off time delays can lead to treatment inefficiencies and/or geographic misses; therefore, AAPM Task Group 142 recommends verifying the temporal accuracy of gating systems. Many groups use sinusoidal phantom motion for this, under the tacit assumption that use of sinusoidal motion for determining time delays produces negligible error. The authors test this assumption by measuring gating time delays for several realistic motion shapes with increasing degrees of irregularity. Methods: Time delays were measured on a linear accelerator with a real-time position management system (Varian TrueBeam with RPM system version 1.7.5) for seven motion shapes: regular sinusoidal; regular realistic-shape; large (40%) and small (10%) variations in amplitude; large (40%) variations in period; small (10%) variations in both amplitude and period; and baseline drift (30%). Film streaks of radiation exposure were generated for each motion shape using a programmable motion phantom. Beam-on and beam-off time delays were determined from the difference between the expected and observed streak length. Results: For the system investigated, all sine, regular realistic-shape, and slightly irregular amplitude variation motions had beam-off and beam-on time delays within the AAPM recommended limit of less than 100 ms. In phase-based gating, even small variations in period resulted in some time delays greater than 100 ms. Considerable time delays over 1 s were observed with highly irregular motion. Conclusions: Sinusoidal motion shapes can be considered a reasonable approximation to the more complex and slightly irregular shapes of realistic motion. When using phase-based gating with predictive filters even small variations in period can result in time delays over 100 ms. Clinical use of these systems for patients

  4. Development of anti-biofouling methods for gate facilities

    Fukuoka, Mari; Akamine, Kenichi; Iai, Yuuichi; Takatoo, Norihiro; Fukushima, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    In the maintenance and management of gate facilities, a large sum of money and labor are required to remove and clean organisms that attach themselves to the facilities. That is why we developed two anti-biofouling systems, one that uses a weak electric current and another that uses ultrasonic waves. We carried out basic examinations and actual environment examinations to verify the effects of these methods. As a result, it has been confirmed that these methods effectively anti-foul the parts they are applied to, and that they can be used on gate facilities. In the future, we will evaluate their adaptability to aqueducts, such as those used in thermal and nuclear power plants, and marine structures, such as floating breakwaters, in addition to gate facilities. (author)

  5. Three-Dimensional Respiratory-Gated Coronary Mr Angiography with Reference to X-Ray Coronary Angiography

    Ikonen, A. E. J.; Manninen, H. I.; Vainio, P.; Vanninen, R. L.; Matsi, P. J.; Soimakallio, S.; Hirvonen, T.P.J.; Hartikainen, J.E.K.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical value of three-dimensional coronary MR angiography (CMRA) in the detection of significant coronary artery stenosis using conventional X-ray angiography as the standard reference. Material and Methods: Sixty-nine patients underwent X-ray coronary angiography and CMRA because of suspected or previously diagnosed coronary artery disease. MRI was performed with a 1.5-T whole body imaging system using ECG-triggered 3D gradient echo sequence with retrospective navigator echo respiratory gating and fat suppression. Results: A total of 276 coronary artery segments were analyzed. The X-ray coronary angiography was normal in 22 patients. Significant proximal stenoses (exceeding 50%) or occlusions were present in 102 coronary artery segments. In all, 120 stenoses or occlusions were identified in CMRA. Sixteen percent of the coronary artery segments had to be excluded because of poor image quality. The overall sensitivity and specificity for MRA for identification of significant stenosis were 75% and 62%, respectively. CMRA correctly detected 89% of patients with at least one vessel disease, but 6 patients with coronary artery disease would have been missed. Conclusions: Because of the high data exclusion and false-negative case rate, CMRA with retrospective navigator echo triggering is at present not suitable as a clinical screening method in coronary artery disease

  6. SU-F-J-158: Respiratory Motion Resolved, Self-Gated 4D-MRI Using Rotating Cartesian K-Space Sampling

    Han, F; Zhou, Z; Yang, Y; Sheng, K; Hu, P [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Dynamic MRI has been used to quantify respiratory motion of abdominal organs in radiation treatment planning. Many existing 4D-MRI methods based on 2D acquisitions suffer from limited slice resolution and additional stitching artifacts when evaluated in 3D{sup 1}. To address these issues, we developed a 4D-MRI (3D dynamic) technique with true 3D k-space encoding and respiratory motion self-gating. Methods: The 3D k-space was acquired using a Rotating Cartesian K-space (ROCK) pattern, where the Cartesian grid was reordered in a quasi-spiral fashion with each spiral arm rotated using golden angle{sup 2}. Each quasi-spiral arm started with the k-space center-line, which were used as self-gating{sup 3} signal for respiratory motion estimation. The acquired k-space data was then binned into 8 respiratory phases and the golden angle ensures a near-uniform k-space sampling in each phase. Finally, dynamic 3D images were reconstructed using the ESPIRiT technique{sup 4}. 4D-MRI was performed on 6 healthy volunteers, using the following parameters (bSSFP, Fat-Sat, TE/TR=2ms/4ms, matrix size=500×350×120, resolution=1×1×1.2mm, TA=5min, 8 respiratory phases). Supplemental 2D real-time images were acquired in 9 different planes. Dynamic locations of the diaphragm dome and left kidney were measured from both 4D and 2D images. The same protocol was also performed on a MRI-compatible motion phantom where the motion was programmed with different amplitude (10–30mm) and frequency (3–10/min). Results: High resolution 4D-MRI were obtained successfully in 5 minutes. Quantitative motion measurements from 4D-MRI agree with the ones from 2D CINE (<5% error). The 4D images are free of the stitching artifacts and their near-isotropic resolution facilitates 3D visualization and segmentation of abdominal organs such as the liver, kidney and pancreas. Conclusion: Our preliminary studies demonstrated a novel ROCK 4D-MRI technique with true 3D k-space encoding and respiratory

  7. Interfractional changes in tumour volume and position during entire radiotherapy courses for lung cancer with respiratory gating and image guidance

    Juhler-Noettrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine S.; Pedersen, Anders N.; Persson, Gitte F.; Aarup, Lasse R.; Nystroem, Haakan; Olsen, Mikael; Tarnavski, Nikolai; Specht, Lena (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The Finsen Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2008-08-15

    Introduction. With the purpose of implementing gated radiotherapy for lung cancer patients, this study investigated the interfraction variations in tumour size and internal displacement over entire treatment courses. To explore the potential of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) the variations were measured using a set-up strategy based on imaging of bony landmarks and compared to a strategy using in room lasers, skin tattoos and cupper landmarks. Materials and methods. During their six week treatment course of 60Gy in 2Gy fractions, ten patients underwent 3 respiratory gated CT scans. The tumours were contoured on each CT scan to evaluate the variations in volumes and position. The lung tumours and the mediastinal tumours were contoured separately. The positional variations were measured as 3D mobility vectors and correlated to matching of the scans using the two different strategies. Results. The tumour size was significantly reduced from the first to the last CT scan. For the lung tumours the reduction was 19%, p=0.03, and for the mediastinal tumours the reduction was 34%, p=0.0007. The mean 3D mobility vector and the SD for the lung tumours was 0.51cm (+-0.21) for matching using bony landmarks and 0.85cm (+-0.54) for matching using skin tattoos. For the mediastinal tumours the corresponding vectors and SD's were 0.55cm (+-0.19) and 0.72cm (+-0.43). The differences between the vectors were significant for the lung tumours p=0.004. The interfractional overlap of lung tumours was 80-87% when matched using bony landmarks and 70-76% when matched using skin tattoos. The overlap of the mediastinal tumours were 60-65% and 41-47%, respectively. Conclusions. Despite the use of gating the tumours varied considerably, regarding both position and volume. The variations in position were dependent on the set-up strategy. Set-up using IGRT was superior to set-up using skin tattoos.

  8. Interfractional changes in tumour volume and position during entire radiotherapy courses for lung cancer with respiratory gating and image guidance

    Juhler-Noettrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine S.; Pedersen, Anders N.; Persson, Gi tte F.; Aarup, Lasse R.; Nystroem, Haakan; Olsen, Mikael; Tarnavski, Nikolai; Sp echt, Lena

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. With the purpose of implementing gated radiotherapy for lung cancer patients, this study investigated the interfraction variations in tumour size and internal displacement over entire treatment courses. To explore the potential of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) the variations were measured using a set-up strategy based on imaging of bony landmarks and compared to a strategy using in room lasers, skin tattoos and cupper landmarks. Materials and methods. During their six week treatment course of 60Gy in 2Gy fractions, ten patients underwent 3 respiratory gated CT scans. The tumours were contoured on each CT scan to evaluate the variations in volumes and position. The lung tumours and the mediastinal tumours were contoured separately. The positional variations were measured as 3D mobility vectors and correlated to matching of the scans using the two different strategies. Results. The tumour size was significantly reduced from the first to the last CT scan. For the lung tumours the reduction was 19%, p=0.03, and for the mediastinal tumours the reduction was 34%, p=0.0007. The mean 3D mobility vector and the SD for the lung tumours was 0.51cm (±0.21) for matching using bony landmarks and 0.85cm (±0.54) for matching using skin tattoos. For the mediastinal tumours the corresponding vectors and SD's were 0.55cm (±0.19) and 0.72cm (±0.43). The differences between the vectors were significant for the lung tumours p=0.004. The interfractional overlap of lung tumours was 80-87% when matched using bony landmarks and 70-76% when matched using skin tattoos. The overlap of the mediastinal tumours were 60-65% and 41-47%, respectively. Conclusions. Despite the use of gating the tumours varied considerably, regarding both position and volume. The variations in position were dependent on the set-up strategy. Set-up using IGRT was superior to set-up using skin tattoos

  9. Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA Respiratory Monitoring System Using a Flow Microsensor and an Accelerometer

    Mellal Idir

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a non-invasive system for respiratory monitoring using a Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS flow sensor and an IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit accelerometer. The designed system is intended to be wearable and used in a hospital or at home to assist people with respiratory disorders. To ensure the accuracy of our system, we proposed a calibration method based on ANN (Artificial Neural Network to compensate the temperature drift of the silicon flow sensor. The sigmoid activation functions used in the ANN model were computed with the CORDIC (COordinate Rotation DIgital Computer algorithm. This algorithm was also used to estimate the tilt angle in body position. The design was implemented on reconfigurable platform FPGA.

  10. Real-time prediction and gating of respiratory motion using an extended Kalman filter and Gaussian process regression

    Bukhari, W; Hong, S-M

    2015-01-01

    Motion-adaptive radiotherapy aims to deliver a conformal dose to the target tumour with minimal normal tissue exposure by compensating for tumour motion in real time. The prediction as well as the gating of respiratory motion have received much attention over the last two decades for reducing the targeting error of the treatment beam due to respiratory motion. In this article, we present a real-time algorithm for predicting and gating respiratory motion that utilizes a model-based and a model-free Bayesian framework by combining them in a cascade structure. The algorithm, named EKF-GPR + , implements a gating function without pre-specifying a particular region of the patient’s breathing cycle. The algorithm first employs an extended Kalman filter (LCM-EKF) to predict the respiratory motion and then uses a model-free Gaussian process regression (GPR) to correct the error of the LCM-EKF prediction. The GPR is a non-parametric Bayesian algorithm that yields predictive variance under Gaussian assumptions. The EKF-GPR + algorithm utilizes the predictive variance from the GPR component to capture the uncertainty in the LCM-EKF prediction error and systematically identify breathing points with a higher probability of large prediction error in advance. This identification allows us to pause the treatment beam over such instances. EKF-GPR + implements the gating function by using simple calculations based on the predictive variance with no additional detection mechanism. A sparse approximation of the GPR algorithm is employed to realize EKF-GPR + in real time. Extensive numerical experiments are performed based on a large database of 304 respiratory motion traces to evaluate EKF-GPR + . The experimental results show that the EKF-GPR + algorithm effectively reduces the prediction error in a root-mean-square (RMS) sense by employing the gating function, albeit at the cost of a reduced duty cycle. As an example, EKF-GPR + reduces the patient-wise RMS error to 37%, 39% and 42

  11. Real-time prediction and gating of respiratory motion using an extended Kalman filter and Gaussian process regression

    Bukhari, W.; Hong, S.-M.

    2015-01-01

    Motion-adaptive radiotherapy aims to deliver a conformal dose to the target tumour with minimal normal tissue exposure by compensating for tumour motion in real time. The prediction as well as the gating of respiratory motion have received much attention over the last two decades for reducing the targeting error of the treatment beam due to respiratory motion. In this article, we present a real-time algorithm for predicting and gating respiratory motion that utilizes a model-based and a model-free Bayesian framework by combining them in a cascade structure. The algorithm, named EKF-GPR+, implements a gating function without pre-specifying a particular region of the patient’s breathing cycle. The algorithm first employs an extended Kalman filter (LCM-EKF) to predict the respiratory motion and then uses a model-free Gaussian process regression (GPR) to correct the error of the LCM-EKF prediction. The GPR is a non-parametric Bayesian algorithm that yields predictive variance under Gaussian assumptions. The EKF-GPR+ algorithm utilizes the predictive variance from the GPR component to capture the uncertainty in the LCM-EKF prediction error and systematically identify breathing points with a higher probability of large prediction error in advance. This identification allows us to pause the treatment beam over such instances. EKF-GPR+ implements the gating function by using simple calculations based on the predictive variance with no additional detection mechanism. A sparse approximation of the GPR algorithm is employed to realize EKF-GPR+ in real time. Extensive numerical experiments are performed based on a large database of 304 respiratory motion traces to evaluate EKF-GPR+. The experimental results show that the EKF-GPR+ algorithm effectively reduces the prediction error in a root-mean-square (RMS) sense by employing the gating function, albeit at the cost of a reduced duty cycle. As an example, EKF-GPR+ reduces the patient-wise RMS error to 37%, 39% and 42% in

  12. Real-time prediction and gating of respiratory motion using an extended Kalman filter and Gaussian process regression.

    Bukhari, W; Hong, S-M

    2015-01-07

    Motion-adaptive radiotherapy aims to deliver a conformal dose to the target tumour with minimal normal tissue exposure by compensating for tumour motion in real time. The prediction as well as the gating of respiratory motion have received much attention over the last two decades for reducing the targeting error of the treatment beam due to respiratory motion. In this article, we present a real-time algorithm for predicting and gating respiratory motion that utilizes a model-based and a model-free Bayesian framework by combining them in a cascade structure. The algorithm, named EKF-GPR(+), implements a gating function without pre-specifying a particular region of the patient's breathing cycle. The algorithm first employs an extended Kalman filter (LCM-EKF) to predict the respiratory motion and then uses a model-free Gaussian process regression (GPR) to correct the error of the LCM-EKF prediction. The GPR is a non-parametric Bayesian algorithm that yields predictive variance under Gaussian assumptions. The EKF-GPR(+) algorithm utilizes the predictive variance from the GPR component to capture the uncertainty in the LCM-EKF prediction error and systematically identify breathing points with a higher probability of large prediction error in advance. This identification allows us to pause the treatment beam over such instances. EKF-GPR(+) implements the gating function by using simple calculations based on the predictive variance with no additional detection mechanism. A sparse approximation of the GPR algorithm is employed to realize EKF-GPR(+) in real time. Extensive numerical experiments are performed based on a large database of 304 respiratory motion traces to evaluate EKF-GPR(+). The experimental results show that the EKF-GPR(+) algorithm effectively reduces the prediction error in a root-mean-square (RMS) sense by employing the gating function, albeit at the cost of a reduced duty cycle. As an example, EKF-GPR(+) reduces the patient-wise RMS error to 37%, 39% and

  13. In vivo measurements of relaxation process in the human liver by MRI. The role of respiratory gating/triggering

    Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O; Ring, P

    1988-01-01

    In vivo estimation of relaxation processes in the liver by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be helpful for characterization of various pathological conditions in the liver. However, such measurements may be significantly hampered by movement of the liver with the respiration. The effect...... of synchronization of data acquisition to the respiratory cycle on measured T1- and T2-relaxation curves was studied in normal subjects, patients with diffuse liver disease, and patients with focal liver pathology. Multi spin echo sequences with five different repetition times were used. The measurements were...... carried out with and without respiratory gating/triggering. In the healthy subjects as well as in the patients with diffuse liver diseases respiratory synchronization did not alter the obtained relaxation curves. However, in the patients with focal pathology the relaxation curves were significantly...

  14. Dual respiratory and cardiac motion estimation in PET imaging: Methods design and quantitative evaluation.

    Feng, Tao; Wang, Jizhe; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2018-04-01

    The goal of this study was to develop and evaluate four post-reconstruction respiratory and cardiac (R&C) motion vector field (MVF) estimation methods for cardiac 4D PET data. In Method 1, the dual R&C motions were estimated directly from the dual R&C gated images. In Method 2, respiratory motion (RM) and cardiac motion (CM) were separately estimated from the respiratory gated only and cardiac gated only images. The effects of RM on CM estimation were modeled in Method 3 by applying an image-based RM correction on the cardiac gated images before CM estimation, the effects of CM on RM estimation were neglected. Method 4 iteratively models the mutual effects of RM and CM during dual R&C motion estimations. Realistic simulation data were generated for quantitative evaluation of four methods. Almost noise-free PET projection data were generated from the 4D XCAT phantom with realistic R&C MVF using Monte Carlo simulation. Poisson noise was added to the scaled projection data to generate additional datasets of two more different noise levels. All the projection data were reconstructed using a 4D image reconstruction method to obtain dual R&C gated images. The four dual R&C MVF estimation methods were applied to the dual R&C gated images and the accuracy of motion estimation was quantitatively evaluated using the root mean square error (RMSE) of the estimated MVFs. Results show that among the four estimation methods, Methods 2 performed the worst for noise-free case while Method 1 performed the worst for noisy cases in terms of quantitative accuracy of the estimated MVF. Methods 4 and 3 showed comparable results and achieved RMSE lower by up to 35% than that in Method 1 for noisy cases. In conclusion, we have developed and evaluated 4 different post-reconstruction R&C MVF estimation methods for use in 4D PET imaging. Comparison of the performance of four methods on simulated data indicates separate R&C estimation with modeling of RM before CM estimation (Method 3) to be

  15. Integrating respiratory-gated PET-based target volume delineation in liver SBRT planning, a pilot study

    Riou, Olivier; Thariat, Juliette; Serrano, Benjamin; Azria, David; Paulmier, Benoit; Villeneuve, Remy; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Artenie, Antonella; Ortholan, Cécile; Faraggi, Marc

    2014-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and benefit of integrating four-dimensional (4D) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) – computed tomography (CT) for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning. 8 patients with 14 metastases were accrued in the study. They all underwent a non-gated PET and a 4D PET centered on the liver. The same CT scan was used for attenuation correction, registration, and considered the planning CT for SBRT planning. Six PET phases were reconstructed for each 4D PET. By applying an individualized threshold to the 4D PET, a Biological Internal Target Volume (BITV) was generated for each lesion. A gated Planning Target Volume (PTVg) was created by adding 3 mm to account for set-up margins. This volume was compared to a manual Planning Target Volume (PTV) delineated with the help of a semi-automatic Biological Target Volume (BTV) obtained from the non-gated exam. A 5 mm radial and a 10 mm craniocaudal margins were applied to account for tumor motion and set-up margins to create the PTV. One undiagnosed liver metastasis was discovered thanks to the 4D PET. The semi-automatic BTV were significantly smaller than the BITV (p = 0.0031). However, after applying adapted margins, 4D PET allowed a statistically significant decrease in the PTVg as compared to the PTV (p = 0.0052). In comparison to non-gated PET, 4D PET may better define the respiratory movements of liver targets and improve SBRT planning for liver metastases. Furthermore, non respiratory-gated PET exams can both misdiagnose liver metastases and underestimate the real internal target volumes

  16. Dual gated PET/CT imaging of small targets of the heart: method description and testing with a dynamic heart phantom.

    Kokki, Tommi; Sipilä, Hannu T; Teräs, Mika; Noponen, Tommi; Durand-Schaefer, Nicolas; Klén, Riku; Knuuti, Juhani

    2010-01-01

    In PET imaging respiratory and cardiac contraction motions interfere the imaging of heart. The aim was to develop and evaluate dual gating method for improving the detection of small targets of the heart. The method utilizes two independent triggers which are sent periodically into list mode data based on respiratory and ECG cycles. An algorithm for generating dual gated segments from list mode data was developed. The test measurements showed that rotational and axial movements of point source can be separated spatially to different segments with well-defined borders. The effect of dual gating on detection of small moving targets was tested with a moving heart phantom. Dual gated images showed 51% elimination (3.6 mm out of 7.0 mm) of contraction motion of hot spot (diameter 3 mm) and 70% elimination (14 mm out of 20 mm) of respiratory motion. Averaged activity value of hot spot increases by 89% when comparing to non-gated images. Patient study of suspected cardiac sarcoidosis shows sharper spatial myocardial uptake profile and improved detection of small myocardial structures such as papillary muscles. The dual gating method improves detection of small moving targets in a phantom and it is feasible in clinical situations.

  17. A radial sampling strategy for uniform k-space coverage with retrospective respiratory gating in 3D ultrashort-echo-time lung imaging.

    Park, Jinil; Shin, Taehoon; Yoon, Soon Ho; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Jang-Yeon

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a 3D radial-sampling strategy which maintains uniform k-space sample density after retrospective respiratory gating, and demonstrate its feasibility in free-breathing ultrashort-echo-time lung MRI. A multi-shot, interleaved 3D radial sampling function was designed by segmenting a single-shot trajectory of projection views such that each interleaf samples k-space in an incoherent fashion. An optimal segmentation factor for the interleaved acquisition was derived based on an approximate model of respiratory patterns such that radial interleaves are evenly accepted during the retrospective gating. The optimality of the proposed sampling scheme was tested by numerical simulations and phantom experiments using human respiratory waveforms. Retrospectively, respiratory-gated, free-breathing lung MRI with the proposed sampling strategy was performed in healthy subjects. The simulation yielded the most uniform k-space sample density with the optimal segmentation factor, as evidenced by the smallest standard deviation of the number of neighboring samples as well as minimal side-lobe energy in the point spread function. The optimality of the proposed scheme was also confirmed by minimal image artifacts in phantom images. Human lung images showed that the proposed sampling scheme significantly reduced streak and ring artifacts compared with the conventional retrospective respiratory gating while suppressing motion-related blurring compared with full sampling without respiratory gating. In conclusion, the proposed 3D radial-sampling scheme can effectively suppress the image artifacts due to non-uniform k-space sample density in retrospectively respiratory-gated lung MRI by uniformly distributing gated radial views across the k-space. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. SU-E-J-67: Evaluation of Breathing Patterns for Respiratory-Gated Radiation Therapy Using Respiration Regularity Index

    Cheong, K; Lee, M; Kang, S; Yoon, J; Park, S; Hwang, T; Kim, H; Kim, K; Han, T; Bae, H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the importance of accurately estimating the respiration regularity of a patient in motion compensation treatment, an effective and simply applicable method has rarely been reported. The authors propose a simple respiration regularity index based on parameters derived from a correspondingly simplified respiration model. Methods: In order to simplify a patient's breathing pattern while preserving the data's intrinsic properties, we defined a respiration model as a power of cosine form with a baseline drift. According to this respiration formula, breathing-pattern fluctuation could be explained using four factors: sample standard deviation of respiration period, sample standard deviation of amplitude and the results of simple regression of the baseline drift (slope and standard deviation of residuals of a respiration signal. Overall irregularity (δ) was defined as a Euclidean norm of newly derived variable using principal component analysis (PCA) for the four fluctuation parameters. Finally, the proposed respiration regularity index was defined as ρ=ln(1+(1/ δ))/2, a higher ρ indicating a more regular breathing pattern. Subsequently, we applied it to simulated and clinical respiration signals from real-time position management (RPM; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and investigated respiration regularity. Moreover, correlations between the regularity of the first session and the remaining fractions were investigated using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: The respiration regularity was determined based on ρ; patients with ρ 0.7 was suitable for respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT). Fluctuations in breathing cycle and amplitude were especially determinative of ρ. If the respiration regularity of a patient's first session was known, it could be estimated through subsequent sessions. Conclusions: Respiration regularity could be objectively determined using a respiration regularity index, ρ. Such single-index testing of

  19. Respiratory-Gated Helical Computed Tomography of Lung: Reproducibility of Small Volumes in an Ex Vivo Model

    Biederer, Juergen; Dinkel, Julien; Bolte, Hendrik; Welzel, Thomas; Hoffmann, Beata M.Sc.; Thierfelder, Carsten; Mende, Ulrich; Debus, Juergen; Heller, Martin; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Motion-adapted radiotherapy with gated irradiation or tracking of tumor positions requires dedicated imaging techniques such as four-dimensional (4D) helical computed tomography (CT) for patient selection and treatment planning. The objective was to evaluate the reproducibility of spatial information for small objects on respiratory-gated 4D helical CT using computer-assisted volumetry of lung nodules in a ventilated ex vivo system. Methods and Materials: Five porcine lungs were inflated inside a chest phantom and prepared with 55 artificial nodules (mean diameter, 8.4 mm ± 1.8). The lungs were respirated by a flexible diaphragm and scanned with 40-row detector CT (collimation, 24 x 1.2 mm; pitch, 0.1; rotation time, 1 s; slice thickness, 1.5 mm; increment, 0.8 mm). The 4D-CT scans acquired during respiration (eight per minute) and reconstructed at 0-100% inspiration and equivalent static scans were scored for motion-related artifacts (0 or absent to 3 or relevant). The reproducibility of nodule volumetry (three readers) was assessed using the variation coefficient (VC). Results: The mean volumes from the static and dynamic inspiratory scans were equal (364.9 and 360.8 mm 3 , respectively, p = 0.24). The static and dynamic end-expiratory volumes were slightly greater (371.9 and 369.7 mm 3 , respectively, p = 0.019). The VC for volumetry (static) was 3.1%, with no significant difference between 20 apical and 20 caudal nodules (2.6% and 3.5%, p = 0.25). In dynamic scans, the VC was greater (3.9%, p = 0.004; apical and caudal, 2.6% and 4.9%; p = 0.004), with a significant difference between static and dynamic in the 20 caudal nodules (3.5% and 4.9%, p = 0.015). This was consistent with greater motion-related artifacts and image noise at the diaphragm (p <0.05). The VC for interobserver variability was 0.6%. Conclusion: Residual motion-related artifacts had only minimal influence on volumetry of small solid lesions. This indicates a high reproducibility of

  20. Assessment of regional lung functional impairment with co-registered respiratory-gated ventilation/perfusion SPET-CT images: initial experiences

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Yasuhiko, Kawakami; Zaki, Mohammed; Yamashita, Tomio; Seto, Aska; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2004-01-01

    In this study, respiratory-gated ventilation and perfusion single-photon emission tomography (SPET) were used to define regional functional impairment and to obtain reliable co-registration with computed tomography (CT) images in various lung diseases. Using a triple-headed SPET unit and a physiological synchroniser, gated perfusion SPET was performed in a total of 78 patients with different pulmonary diseases, including metastatic nodules (n=15); in 34 of these patients, it was performed in combination with gated technetium-99m Technegas SPET. Projection data were acquired using 60 stops over 120 for each detector. Gated end-inspiration and ungated images were reconstructed from 1/8 data centered at peak inspiration for each regular respiratory cycle and full respiratory cycle data, respectively. Gated images were registered with tidal inspiration CT images using automated three-dimensional (3D) registration software. Registration mismatch was assessed by measuring 3D distance of the centroid of the nine selected round perfusion-defective nodules. Gated SPET images were completed within 29 min, and increased the number of visible ventilation and perfusion defects by 9.7% and 17.2%, respectively, as compared with ungated images; furthermore, lesion-to-normal lung contrast was significantly higher on gated SPET images. In the nine round perfusion-defective nodules, gated images yielded a significantly better SPET-CT match compared with ungated images (4.9±3.1 mm vs 19.0±9.1 mm, P<0.001). The co-registered SPET-CT images allowed accurate perception of the location and extent of each ventilation/perfusion defect on the underlying CT anatomy, and characterised the pathophysiology of the various diseases. By reducing respiratory motion effects and enhancing perfusion/ventilation defect clarity, gated SPET can provide reliable co-registered images with CT images to accurately characterise regional functional impairment in various lung diseases. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of MotionSim XY/4D for patient specific QA of respiratory gated treatment for lung cancer

    Wen, C.; Ackerly, T.; Lancaster, C.; Bailey, N.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: A commercial system-MotionSim XY/4D(TM) capable of simulating two-dimensional tumour motion and measuring planar dose with diode-matrix was evaluated at the Alfred Hospital, for establishing patient-specific QA programme of respiratory gated treatment of lung cancer. This study presents the investigation of accuracies, limitations and the practical aspects of that system. Planar doses generated on iPlan-TM by mapping clinical beams to a scanned-in water phantom were measured by MotionSim XY/4D-TM with 5 cm water equivalent build-up at normal incidence. The gated delivery using ExacTrac-TM through tracking infrared markers simulating external respiration surrogate was measured simultaneously with Gaf-ChromicR RTQA2 film and MapCHECK 2TM . Dose maps of both non-gated and gated beams with 30% duty cycle were compared with both film and diodes measurements. Differences in dose distribution were analysed with built-in tools in MapCHECK2 TM and the effect of residual motion within the beamenabled window was then assessed. Preliminary results indicate that difference between Gafchromic film and MapCHECK2 measurements of same beam was ignorable. Gated dose delivery to a target at 9 mm maximum motion was in good agreement with planned dose. Complement to measurements suggested in AAPM Report No.9 I I, this QA device can detect any random error and assess the magnitude of residual target motion through analysing differences between planned and delivered doses as gamma function. Although some user-friendliness aspects could be improved, it meets its specification and can be used for routine clinical QA purposes provided calibrations were performed and procedures were followed.

  2. Respiratory-gated segment reconstruction for radiation treatment planning using 256-slice CT-scanner during free breathing

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Kohno, Ryosuke; Minohara, Shinichi; Kohno, Kazutoshi; Asakura, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Murase, Kenya

    2005-04-01

    The conventional respiratory-gated CT scan technique includes anatomic motion induced artifacts due to the low temporal resolution. They are a significant source of error in radiotherapy treatment planning for the thorax and upper abdomen. Temporal resolution and image quality are important factors to minimize planning target volume margin due to the respiratory motion. To achieve high temporal resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio, we developed a respiratory gated segment reconstruction algorithm and adapted it to Feldkamp-Davis-Kress algorithm (FDK) with a 256-detector row CT. The 256-detector row CT could scan approximately 100 mm in the cranio-caudal direction with 0.5 mm slice thickness in one rotation. Data acquisition for the RS-FDK relies on the assistance of the respiratory sensing system by a cine scan mode (table remains stationary). We evaluated RS-FDK in phantom study with the 256-detector row CT and compared it with full scan (FS-FDK) and HS-FDK results with regard to volume accuracy and image noise, and finally adapted the RS-FDK to an animal study. The RS-FDK gave a more accurate volume than the others and it had the same signal-to-noise ratio as the FS-FDK. In the animal study, the RS-FDK visualized the clearest edges of the liver and pulmonary vessels of all the algorithms. In conclusion, the RS-FDK algorithm has a capability of high temporal resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore it will be useful when combined with new radiotherapy techniques including image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and 4D radiation therapy.

  3. Estimation of patient-specific imaging dose for real-time tumour monitoring in lung patients during respiratory-gated radiotherapy

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Onizuka, Ryota; Kawahara, Daisuke; Suzuki, Tatsuhiko; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Hanazawa, Hideki; Shibuya, Keiko

    2018-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify the patient-specific imaging dose for real-time tumour monitoring in the lung during respiratory-gated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in clinical cases using SyncTraX. Methods and Materials: Ten patients who underwent respiratory-gated SBRT with SyncTraX were enrolled in this study. The imaging procedure for real-time tumour monitoring using SyncTraX was simulated using Monte Carlo. We evaluated the dosimetric effect of a real-time tumour monitoring in a critical organ at risk (OAR) and the planning target volume (PTV) over the course of treatment. The relationship between skin dose and gating efficiency was also investigated. Results: For all patients, the mean D50 to the PTV, ipsilateral lung, liver, heart, spinal cord and skin was 118.3 (21.5–175.9), 31.9 (9.5–75.4), 15.4 (1.1–31.6), 10.1 (1.3–18.1), 25.0 (1.6–101.8), and 3.6 (0.9–7.1) mGy, respectively. The mean D2 was 352.0 (26.5–935.8), 146.4 (27.3–226.7), 90.7 (3.6–255.0), 42.2 (4.8–82.7), 88.0 (15.4–248.5), and 273.5 (98.3–611.6) mGy, respectively. The D2 of the skin dose was found to increase as the gating efficiency decreased. Conclusions: The additional dose to the PTV was at most 1.9% of the prescribed dose over the course of treatment for real-time tumour monitoring. For OARs, we could confirm the high dose region, which may not be susceptible to radiation toxicity. However, to reduce the skin dose from SyncTraX, it is necessary to increase the gating efficiency.

  4. Observation of Interfractional Variations in Lung Tumor Position Using Respiratory Gated and Ungated Megavoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Chang, Jenghwa; Mageras, Gig S.; Yorke, Ellen; De Arruda, Fernando; Sillanpaa, Jussi; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Hertanto, Agung; Pham, Hai; Seppi, Edward; Pevsner, Alex; Ling, C. Clifton; Amols, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) to measure interfractional variation in lung tumor position. Methods and Materials: Eight non-small-cell lung cancer patients participated in the study, 4 with respiratory gating and 4 without. All patients underwent MV CBCT scanning at weekly intervals. Contoured planning CT and MV CBCT images were spatially registered based on vertebral anatomy, and displacements of the tumor centroid determined. Setup error was assessed by comparing weekly portal orthogonal radiographs with digitally reconstructed radiographs generated from planning CT images. Hypothesis testing was performed to test the statistical significance of the volume difference, centroid displacement, and setup uncertainty. Results: The vertebral bodies and soft tissue portions of tumor within lung were visible on the MV CBCT scans. Statistically significant systematic volume decrease over the course of treatment was observed for 1 patient. The average centroid displacement between simulation CT and MV CBCT scans were 2.5 mm, -2.0 mm, and -1.5 mm with standard deviations of 2.7 mm, 2.7 mm, and 2.6 mm in the right-left, anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions. The mean setup errors were smaller than the centroid shifts, while the standard deviations were comparable. In most cases, the gross tumor volume (GTV) defined on the MV CBCT was located on average at least 5 mm inside a 10 mm expansion of the GTV defined on the planning CT scan. Conclusions: The MV CBCT technique can be used to image lung tumors and may prove valuable for image-guided radiotherapy. Our conclusions must be verified in view of the small patient number

  5. Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan); Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

  6. The effects of tumor motion on planning and delivery of respiratory-gated IMRT

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of object motion on the planning and delivery of IMRT. Two phantoms containing objects were imaged using CT under a variety of motion conditions. The effects of object motion on axial CT acquisition with and without gating were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. Measurements of effective slice width and position for the CT scans were made. Mutual information image fusion was adapted for use as a quantitative measure of object deformation in CT images. IMRT plans were generated on the CT scans of the moving and gated object images. These plans were delivered with motion, with and without gating, and the delivery error between the moving deliveries and a nonmoving delivery was assessed using a scalable vector-based index. Motion during CT acquisition produces motion artifact, object deformation, and object mispositioning, which can be substantially reduced with gating. Objects that vary in cross section in the direction of motion exhibit the most deformation in CT images. Mutual information provides a useful quantitative estimate of object deformation. The delivery of IMRT in the presence of target motion significantly alters the delivered dose distribution in relation to the planned distribution. The utilization of gating for IMRT treatment, including imaging, planning, and delivery, significantly reduces the errors introduced by object motion

  7. Quality assurance device for four-dimensional IMRT or SBRT and respiratory gating using patient-specific intrafraction motion kernels.

    Nelms, Benjamin E; Ehler, Eric; Bragg, Henry; Tomé, Wolfgang A

    2007-09-17

    Emerging technologies such as four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) and implanted beacons are expected to allow clinicians to accurately model intrafraction motion and to quantitatively estimate internal target volumes (ITVs) for radiation therapy involving moving targets. In the case of intensity-modulated (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivery, clinicians must consider the interplay between the temporal nature of the modulation and the target motion within the ITV. A need exists for a 4D IMRT/SBRT quality assurance (QA) device that can incorporate and analyze customized intrafraction motion as it relates to dose delivery and respiratory gating. We built a 4D IMRT/SBRT prototype device and entered (X, Y, Z)(T) coordinates representing a motion kernel into a software application that 1. transformed the kernel into beam-specific two-dimensional (2D) motion "projections," 2. previewed the motion in real time, and 3. drove a recision X-Y motorized device that had, atop it, a mounted planar IMRT QA measurement device. The detectors that intersected the target in the beam's-eye-view of any single phase of the breathing cycle (a small subset of all the detectors) were defined as "target detectors" to be analyzed for dose uniformity between multiple fractions. Data regarding the use of this device to quantify dose variation fraction-to-fraction resulting from target motion (for several delivery modalities and with and without gating) have been recently published. A combined software and hardware solution for patient-customized 4D IMRT/SBRT QA is an effective tool for assessing IMRT delivery under conditions of intrafraction motion. The 4D IMRT QA device accurately reproduced the projected motion kernels for all beam's-eye-view motion kernels. This device has been proved to, effectively quantify the degradation in dose uniformity resulting from a moving target within a static planning target volume, and, integrate with a commercial

  8. Quality assurance device for four‐dimensional IMRT or SBRT and respiratory gating using patient‐specific intrafraction motion kernels

    Ehler, Eric; Bragg, Henry; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2007-01-01

    Emerging technologies such as four‐dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) and implanted beacons are expected to allow clinicians to accurately model intrafraction motion and to quantitatively estimate internal target volumes (ITVs) for radiation therapy involving moving targets. In the case of intensity‐modulated (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivery, clinicians must consider the interplay between the temporal nature of the modulation and the target motion within the ITV. A need exists for a 4D IMRT/SBRT quality assurance (QA) device that can incorporate and analyze customized intrafraction motion as it relates to dose delivery and respiratory gating. We built a 4D IMRT/SBRT prototype device and entered (X, Y, Z)(T) coordinates representing a motion kernel into a software application that transformed the kernel into beam‐specific two‐dimensional (2D) motion “projections,”previewed the motion in real time, anddrove a precision X–Y motorized device that had, atop it, a mounted planar IMRT QA measurement device. The detectors that intersected the target in the beam's‐eye‐view of any single phase of the breathing cycle (a small subset of all the detectors) were defined as “target detectors” to be analyzed for dose uniformity between multiple fractions. Data regarding the use of this device to quantify dose variation fraction‐to‐fraction resulting from target motion (for several delivery modalities and with and without gating) have been recently published. A combined software and hardware solution for patient‐customized 4D IMRT/ SBRT QA is an effective tool for assessing IMRT delivery under conditions of intrafraction motion. The 4D IMRT QA device accurately reproduced the projected motion kernels for all beam's‐eye‐view motion kernels. This device has been proved to • effectively quantify the degradation in dose uniformity resulting from a moving target within a static planning target volume, and • integrate

  9. SU-E-J-67: Evaluation of Breathing Patterns for Respiratory-Gated Radiation Therapy Using Respiration Regularity Index

    Cheong, K; Lee, M; Kang, S; Yoon, J; Park, S; Hwang, T; Kim, H; Kim, K; Han, T; Bae, H [Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Despite the importance of accurately estimating the respiration regularity of a patient in motion compensation treatment, an effective and simply applicable method has rarely been reported. The authors propose a simple respiration regularity index based on parameters derived from a correspondingly simplified respiration model. Methods: In order to simplify a patient's breathing pattern while preserving the data's intrinsic properties, we defined a respiration model as a power of cosine form with a baseline drift. According to this respiration formula, breathing-pattern fluctuation could be explained using four factors: sample standard deviation of respiration period, sample standard deviation of amplitude and the results of simple regression of the baseline drift (slope and standard deviation of residuals of a respiration signal. Overall irregularity (δ) was defined as a Euclidean norm of newly derived variable using principal component analysis (PCA) for the four fluctuation parameters. Finally, the proposed respiration regularity index was defined as ρ=ln(1+(1/ δ))/2, a higher ρ indicating a more regular breathing pattern. Subsequently, we applied it to simulated and clinical respiration signals from real-time position management (RPM; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and investigated respiration regularity. Moreover, correlations between the regularity of the first session and the remaining fractions were investigated using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: The respiration regularity was determined based on ρ; patients with ρ<0.3 showed worse regularity than the others, whereas ρ>0.7 was suitable for respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT). Fluctuations in breathing cycle and amplitude were especially determinative of ρ. If the respiration regularity of a patient's first session was known, it could be estimated through subsequent sessions. Conclusions: Respiration regularity could be objectively determined

  10. Reductions in the variations of respiration signals for respiratory-gated radiotherapy when using the video-coaching respiration guiding system

    Lee, Hyun Jeong; Yea, Ji Woon; Oh, Se An

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT) has been used to minimize the dose to normal tissue in lung-cancer radiotherapy. The present research aims to improve the regularity of respiration in RGRT by using a video-coached respiration guiding system. In the study, 16 patients with lung cancer were evaluated. The respiration signals of the patients were measured by using a realtime position management (RPM) respiratory gating system (Varian, USA), and the patients were trained using the video-coaching respiration guiding system. The patients performed free breathing and guided breathing, and the respiratory cycles were acquired for ~5 min. Then, Microsoft Excel 2010 software was used to calculate the mean and the standard deviation for each phase. The standard deviation was computed in order to analyze the improvement in the respiratory regularity with respect to the period and the displacement. The standard deviation of the guided breathing decreased to 48.8% in the inhale peak and 24.2% in the exhale peak compared with the values for the free breathing of patient 6. The standard deviation of the respiratory cycle was found to be decreased when using the respiratory guiding system. The respiratory regularity was significantly improved when using the video-coaching respiration guiding system. Therefore, the system is useful for improving the accuracy and the efficiency of RGRT.

  11. Four-dimensional (4D) flow of the whole heart and great vessels using real-time respiratory self-gating

    Uribe, Sergio; Beerbaum, Philipp; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2009-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) flow imaging has been used to study flow patterns and pathophysiology, usually focused on specific thoracic vessels and cardiac chambers. Whole-heart 4D flow at high measurement accuracy covering the entire thoracic cardiovascular system would be desirable to simplify...... and improve hemodynamic assessment. This has been a challenge because compensation of respiratory motion is difficult to achieve, but it is paramount to limit artifacts and improve accuracy. In this work we propose a self-gating technique for respiratory motion-compensation integrated into a whole-heart 4D...... flow acquisition that overcomes these challenges. Flow components are measured in all three directions for each pixel over the complete cardiac cycle, and 1D volume projections are obtained at certain time intervals for respiratory gating in real time during the acquisition. The technique was tested...

  12. Extension of a data-driven gating technique to 3D, whole body PET studies

    Schleyer, Paul J; O'Doherty, Michael J; Marsden, Paul K

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory gating can be used to separate a PET acquisition into a series of near motion-free bins. This is typically done using additional gating hardware; however, software-based methods can derive the respiratory signal from the acquired data itself. The aim of this work was to extend a data-driven respiratory gating method to acquire gated, 3D, whole body PET images of clinical patients. The existing method, previously demonstrated with 2D, single bed-position data, uses a spectral analysis to find regions in raw PET data which are subject to respiratory motion. The change in counts over time within these regions is then used to estimate the respiratory signal of the patient. In this work, the gating method was adapted to only accept lines of response from a reduced set of axial angles, and the respiratory frequency derived from the lung bed position was used to help identify the respiratory frequency in all other bed positions. As the respiratory signal does not identify the direction of motion, a registration-based technique was developed to align the direction for all bed positions. Data from 11 clinical FDG PET patients were acquired, and an optical respiratory monitor was used to provide a hardware-based signal for comparison. All data were gated using both the data-driven and hardware methods, and reconstructed. The centre of mass of manually defined regions on gated images was calculated, and the overall displacement was defined as the change in the centre of mass between the first and last gates. The mean displacement was 10.3 mm for the data-driven gated images and 9.1 mm for the hardware gated images. No significant difference was found between the two gating methods when comparing the displacement values. The adapted data-driven gating method was demonstrated to successfully produce respiratory gated, 3D, whole body, clinical PET acquisitions.

  13. Feasibility of deep-inspiration breath-hold PET/CT with short-time acquisition. Detectability for pulmonary lesions compared with respiratory-gated PET/CT

    Yamashita, Shozo; Yamamoto, Haruki; Hiko, Shigeaki; Horita, Akihiro; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Nakajima, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT with short-time acquisition and respiratory-gated (RG) PET/CT are performed for pulmonary lesions to reduce the respiratory motion artifacts, and to obtain more accurate standardized uptake value (SUV). DIBH PET/CT demonstrates significant advantages in terms of rapid examination, good quality of CT images and low radiation exposure. On the other hand, the image quality of DIBH PET is generally inferior to that of RG PET because of short-time acquisition resulting in poor signal-to-noise ratio. In this study, RG PET has been regarded as a gold standard, and its detectability between DIBH and RG PET studies was compared using each of the most optimal reconstruction parameters. In the phantom study, the most optimal reconstruction parameters for DIBH and RG PET were determined. In the clinical study, 19 cases were examined using each of the most optimal reconstruction parameters. In the phantom study, the most optimal reconstruction parameters for DIBH and RG PET were different. Reconstruction parameters of DIBH PET could be obtained by reducing the number of subsets for those of RG PET in the state of fixing the number of iterations. In the clinical study, high correlation in the maximum SUV was observed between DIBH and RG PET studies. The clinical result was consistent with that of the phantom study surrounded by air since most of the lesions were located in the low pulmonary radioactivity. DIBH PET/CT may be the most practical method which can be the first choice to reduce respiratory motion artifacts if the detectability of DIBH PET is equivalent with that of RG PET. Although DIBH PET may have limitations in suboptimal signal-to-noise ratio, most of the lesions surrounded by low background radioactivity could provide nearly equivalent image quality between DIBH and RG PET studies when each of the most optimal reconstruction parameters was used. (author)

  14. Respiratory

    The words "respiratory" and "respiration" refer to the lungs and breathing. ... Boron WF. Organization of the respiratory system. In: Boron WF, Boulpaep EL, eds. Medical Physiology . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 26.

  15. Development of patient-controlled respiratory gating system based on visual guidance for magnetic-resonance image-guided radiation therapy.

    Kim, Jung-In; Lee, Hanyoung; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kang, Hyun-Cheol; Park, Jong Min

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a visual guidance patient-controlled (VG-PC) respiratory gating system for respiratory-gated magnetic-resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) and to evaluate the performance of the developed system. The near-real-time cine planar MR image of a patient acquired during treatment was transmitted to a beam projector in the treatment room through an optical fiber cable. The beam projector projected the cine MR images inside the bore of the ViewRay system in order to be visible to a patient during treatment. With this visual information, patients voluntarily controlled their respiration to put the target volume into the gating boundary (gating window). The effect of the presence of the beam projector in the treatment room on the image quality of the MRI was investigated by evaluating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity, low-contrast detectability, high-contrast spatial resolution, and spatial integrity with the VG-PC gating system. To evaluate the performance of the developed system, we applied the VG-PC gating system to a total of seven patients; six patients received stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and one patient received conventional fractionated radiation therapy. The projected cine MR images were visible even when the room light was on. No image data loss or additional time delay during delivery of image data were observed. Every indicator representing MRI quality, including SNR, uniformity, low-contrast detectability, high-contrast spatial resolution, and spatial integrity exhibited values higher than the tolerance levels of the manufacturer with the VG-PC gating system; therefore, the presence of the VG-PC gating system in the treatment room did not degrade the MR image quality. The average beam-off times due to respiratory gating with and without the VG-PC gating system were 830.3 ± 278.2 s and 1264.2 ± 302.1 s respectively (P = 0.005). Consequently, the total treatment times excluding

  16. Registration and Summation of Respiratory-Gated or Breath-Hold PET Images Based on Deformation Estimation of Lung from CT Image

    Hideaki Haneishi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung motion due to respiration causes image degradation in medical imaging, especially in nuclear medicine which requires long acquisition times. We have developed a method for image correction between the respiratory-gated (RG PET images in different respiration phases or breath-hold (BH PET images in an inconsistent respiration phase. In the method, the RG or BH-PET images in different respiration phases are deformed under two criteria: similarity of the image intensity distribution and smoothness of the estimated motion vector field (MVF. However, only these criteria may cause unnatural motion estimation of lung. In this paper, assuming the use of a PET-CT scanner, we add another criterion that is the similarity for the motion direction estimated from inhalation and exhalation CT images. The proposed method was first applied to a numerical phantom XCAT with tumors and then applied to BH-PET image data for seven patients. The resultant tumor contrasts and the estimated motion vector fields were compared with those obtained by our previous method. Through those experiments we confirmed that the proposed method can provide an improved and more stable image quality for both RG and BH-PET images.

  17. Methods of gated-blood-pool-spect data processing

    Kosa, I.; Mester, J.; Tanaka, M.; Csernay, L.; Mate, E.; Szasz, K.

    1991-01-01

    Three techniques of gated SPECT were evaluated. The methods of Integral SPECT (ISPECT), enddyastole-endsystole SPECT (ED-ES SPECT) and Fourier SPECT were adapted and developed on the Hungarian nuclear medicine data processing system microSEGAMS. The methods are based on data reduction before back projection which results in processing times acceptable for the clinical routine. The clinical performance of the introduced techniques was tested in 10 patients with old posterior myocardial infarction and in 5 patients without cardiac disease. The left ventricular ejection faction determined by ISPECT correlated well with the planar values. The correlation coefficient was 0.89. The correlation coefficient of EF values determined by ED-ES SPECT and planar radionuclide ventriculography was lower (0.70). For the identification of left ventricular wall motion abnormalities ED-ES SPECT and Fourier SPECT exhibited a favourable performance, but ISPECT only moderate suitability. In the detection of regional phase delay Fourier-SPECT demonstrated higher sensitivity than the planar radionuclide ventriculography. (author) 4 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  18. A novel method of developing all optical frequency encoded Fredkin gates

    Garai, Sisir Kumar

    2014-02-01

    All optical reversible logic gates have significant applications in the field of optics and optoelectronics for developing different sequential and combinational circuits of optical computing, optical signal processing and in multi-valued logic operations and quantum computing. Here the author proposes a method for developing all optical three-input-output Fredkin gate and modified Fredkin gate using frequency encoded data. For this purpose the author has exploited the properties of efficient frequency conversion and faster switching speed of semiconductor optical amplifiers. Simulation results of the three input-output Fredkin gate testifies to the feasibility of the proposed scheme. These Fredkin gates are universal logic gates, and can be used to develop different all-optical logic and data processors in communication network.

  19. Does mean heart dose sufficiently reflect coronary artery exposure in left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy. Influence of respiratory gating

    Becker-Schiebe, Martina [Klinikum Braunschweig, Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Braunschweig (Germany); Hannover Medical School, Radiation Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Stockhammer, Maxi; Franz, Heiko [Klinikum Braunschweig, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Braunschweig (Germany); Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Wetzel, Fabian [Klinikum Braunschweig, Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    With extensive use of systemic treatment, the issue of cardiac mortality after breast cancer radiation (RT) is still important. The aim of our analysis was to clarify whether the dose to one surrogate parameter (e. g., mean heart dose, as used in most studies) reflects the dose to the other cardiovascular structures especially the left anterior descending artery depending on breathing-adapted RT. A total of 130 patients who underwent adjuvant RT (50.4 Gy plus boost 9-16 Gy) were evaluated. In all, 71 patients were treated with free-breathing and 59 patients using respiratory monitoring (gated RT). Dosimetric associations were calculated. The mean dose to the heart (Dmean heart) was reduced from 2.7 (0.8-5.2) Gy to 2.4 (1.1-4.6) Gy, the Dmean LAD (left anterior descending artery) decreased from 11.1 (1.3-28.6) Gy to 9.3 (2.2-19.9) Gy with gated RT (p = 0.04). A significant relationship was shown for Dmean{sub heart}-Dmean LAD, V25heart-Dmean LAD and Dmax heart-Dmax LAD for gated patients only (p < 0.01). For every 1 Gy increase in Dmean heart, mean LAD doses rose by 3.6 Gy, without gating V25 ≤5 % did not assure a benefit and resulted in Dmean LAD between 1.3 and 28.6 Gy. A significant reduction and association of heart and coronary artery (LAD) doses using inspiratory gating was shown. However, in free-breathing plans commonly measured dose constraints do not allow precise estimation of the dose to the coronary arteries. (orig.) [German] Das Risiko kardialer Spaetfolgen nach Bestrahlung (RT) eines Mammakarzinoms spielt insbesondere auch aufgrund der zunehmenden systemischen Begleittherapien eine wichtige Rolle. Unklar ist, welche koronaren und/oder myokardialen Mechanismen hier entscheidend sind. Der Einfluss der Atemtriggerung und der daraus resultierenden geometrischen Lagevariabilitaet der Risikoorgane auf die Dosisverteilung am Herzen/Koronarien sollte geprueft werden, um zu klaeren, inwieweit die mittlere Herzdosis ein ausreichender Surrogatparameter fuer

  20. The relation between respiratory motion artifact correction and lung standardized uptake value

    Yin Lijie; Liu Xiaojian; Liu Jie; Xu Rui; Yan Jue

    2014-01-01

    PET/CT is playing an important role in disease diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation. But the respiratory motion artifact may bring trouble in diagnosis and therapy. There are many methods to correct the respiratory motion artifact. Respiratory gated PET/CT is applied most extensively of them. Using respiratory gated PET/CT to correct respiratory motion artifact can increase the maximum standardized uptake value of lung lesion obviously, thereby improving the quality of image and accuracy of diagnosis. (authors)

  1. Respiratory-Gated Proton Beam Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Adjacent to the Gastrointestinal Tract without Fiducial Markers

    Miu Mizuhata

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of proton beam therapy (PBT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has been reported, but insertion of fiducial markers in the liver is usually required. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of respiratory-gated PBT without fiducial markers for HCC located within 2 cm of the gastrointestinal tract. From March 2011 to December 2015 at our institution, 40 patients were evaluated (median age, 72 years; range, 38–87 years. All patients underwent PBT at a dose of 60 to 80 cobalt gray equivalents (CGE in 20 to 38 fractions. The median follow-up period was 19.9 months (range, 1.2–72.3 months. The median tumor size was 36.5 mm (range, 11–124 mm. Kaplan–Meier estimates of the 2-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and local tumor control rates were 76%, 60%, and 94%, respectively. One patient (2.5% developed a grade 3 gastric ulcer and one (2.5% developed grade 3 ascites retention; none of the remaining patients developed grade >3 toxicities (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events ver. 4.0.. This study indicates that PBT without fiducial markers achieves good local control without severe treatment-related toxicity of the gastrointestinal tract for HCC located within 2 cm of the gastrointestinal tract.

  2. Carbon-ion scanning lung treatment planning with respiratory-gated phase-controlled rescanning: simulation study using 4-dimensional CT data.

    Takahashi, Wataru; Mori, Shinichiro; Nakajima, Mio; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Inaniwa, Taku; Furukawa, Takuji; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Kamada, Tadashi

    2014-11-11

    To moving lung tumors, we applied a respiratory-gated strategy to carbon-ion pencil beam scanning with multiple phase-controlled rescanning (PCR). In this simulation study, we quantitatively evaluated dose distributions based on 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) treatment planning. Volumetric 4DCTs were acquired for 14 patients with lung tumors. Gross tumor volume, clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated. Field-specific target volumes (FTVs) were calculated, and 48Gy(RBE) in a single fraction was prescribed to the FTVs delivered from four beam angles. The dose assessment metrics were quantified by changing the number of PCR and the results for the ungated and gated scenarios were then compared. For the ungated strategy, the mean dose delivered to 95% of the volume of the CTV (CTV-D95) was in average 45.3 ± 0.9 Gy(RBE) even with a single rescanning (1 × PCR). Using 4 × PCR or more achieved adequate target coverage (CTV-D95 = 46.6 ± 0.3 Gy(RBE) for ungated 4 × PCR) and excellent dose homogeneity (homogeneity index =1.0 ± 0.2% for ungated 4 × PCR). Applying respiratory gating, percentage of lung receiving at least 20 Gy(RBE) (lung-V20) and heart maximal dose, averaged over all patients, significantly decreased by 12% (p lung tumors without gating. The use of a respiratory-gated strategy in combination with PCR reduced excessive doses to OARs.

  3. Clinical validation of free breathing respiratory triggered retrospectively cardiac gated cine balanced steady-state free precession cardiovascular magnetic resonance in sedated children

    Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Pednekar, Amol; Atweh, Lamya A; Vogelius, Esben; Chu, Zili David; Zhang, Wei; Maskatia, Shiraz; Masand, Prakash; Morris, Shaine A; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Muthupillai, Raja

    2015-01-01

    Background Cine balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP), the preferred sequence for ventricular function, demands uninterrupted radio frequency (RF) excitation to maintain the steady-state during suspended respiration. This is difficult to accomplish in sedated children. In this work, we validate a respiratory triggered (RT) SSFP sequence that drives the magnetization to steady-state before commencing retrospectively cardiac gated cine acquisition in a sedated pediatric population. Metho...

  4. Respiratory motion-resolved, self-gated 4D-MRI using Rotating Cartesian K-space (ROCK): Initial clinical experience on an MRI-guided radiotherapy system.

    Han, Fei; Zhou, Ziwu; Du, Dongsu; Gao, Yu; Rashid, Shams; Cao, Minsong; Shaverdian, Narek; Hegde, John V; Steinberg, Michael; Lee, Percy; Raldow, Ann; Low, Daniel A; Sheng, Ke; Yang, Yingli; Hu, Peng

    2018-06-01

    To optimize and evaluate the respiratory motion-resolved, self-gated 4D-MRI using Rotating Cartesian K-space (ROCK-4D-MRI) method in a 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRgRT) system. The study included seven patients with abdominal tumors treated on the MRgRT system. ROCK-4D-MRI and 2D-CINE, was performed immediately after one of the treatment fractions. Motion quantification based on 4D-MRI was compared with those based on 2D-CINE. The image quality of 4D-MRI was evaluated against 4D-CT. The gross tumor volumes (GTV) were defined based on individual respiratory phases of both 4D-MRI and 4D-CT and compared for their variability over the respiratory cycle. The motion measurements based on 4D-MRI matched well with 2D-CINE, with differences of 1.04 ± 0.52 mm in the superior-inferior and 0.54 ± 0.21 mm in the anterior-posterior directions. The image quality scores of 4D-MRI were significantly higher than 4D-CT, with better tumor contrast (3.29 ± 0.76 vs. 1.86 ± 0.90) and less motion artifacts (3.57 ± 0.53 vs. 2.29 ± 0.95). The GTVs were more consistent in 4D-MRI than in 4D-CT, with significantly smaller GTV variability (9.31 ± 4.58% vs. 34.27 ± 23.33%). Our study demonstrated the clinical feasibility of using the ROCK-4D-MRI to acquire high quality, respiratory motion-resolved 4D-MRI in a low-field MRgRT system. The 4D-MRI image could provide accurate dynamic information for radiotherapy treatment planning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. MR-guided percutaneous biopsy of solitary pulmonary lesions using a 1.0-T open high-field MRI scanner with respiratory gating

    Liu, Ming; Huang, Jie; Xu, Yujun; He, Xiangmeng; Lue, Yubo; Liu, Qiang; Li, Chengli [Department of Interventional MRI, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong Key Laboratory of Advanced Medical Imaging Technologies and Applications, Jinan, Shandong (China); Li, Lei [Qingdao Central Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto [Turku University Hospital, The South Western Finland Imaging Centre, Turku (Finland)

    2017-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility, safety and accuracy of MR-guided percutaneous biopsy of solitary pulmonary lesions using a 1.0-T open MR scanner with respiratory gating. Sixty-five patients with 65 solitary pulmonary lesions underwent MR-guided percutaneous coaxial cutting needle biopsy using a 1.0-T open MR scanner with respiratory gating. Lesions were divided into two groups according to maximum lesion diameters: ≤2.0 cm (n = 31) and >2.0 cm (n = 34). The final diagnosis was established in surgery and subsequent histology. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were compared between the groups using Fisher's exact test. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of MRI-guided percutaneous pulmonary biopsy in diagnosing malignancy were 96.9 %, 96.4 % and 100 %, respectively. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were 96.8 %, 96.3 % and 100 % for lesions 2.0 cm or smaller and 97.1 %, 96.4 % and 100 %, respectively, for lesions larger than 2.0 cm. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). Biopsy-induced complications encountered were pneumothorax in 12.3 % (8/65) and haemoptysis in 4.6 % (3/65). There were no serious complications. MRI-guided percutaneous biopsy using a 1.0-T open MR scanner with respiratory gating is an accurate and safe diagnostic technique in evaluation of pulmonary lesions. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of accuracy about 2D vs 3D real-time position management system based on couch rotation when non-coplanar respiratory gated radiation therapy

    Kwon, Kyung Tae; Kim, Jung Soo; Sim, Hyun Sun; Min, Jung Whan; Son, Soon Yong; Han, Dong Kyoon

    2016-01-01

    Because of non-coplanar therapy with couch rotation in respiratory gated radiation therapy, the recognition of marker movement due to the change in the distance between the infrared camera and the marker due to the rotation of the couch is called RPM (Real-time The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the accuracy of motion reflections (baseline changes) of 2D gating configuration (two dot marker block) and 3D gating configuration (six dot marker block). The motion was measured by varying the couch angle in the clockwise and counterclockwise directions by 10° in the 2D gating configuration. In the 3D gating configuration, the couch angle was changed by 10° in the clockwise direction and compared with the baseline at the reference 0°. The reference amplitude was 1.173 to 1.165, the couch angle at 20° was 1.132, and the couch angle at 1.0° was 1.083. At 350° counterclockwise, the reference amplitude was 1.168 to 1.157, the couch angle at 340° was 1.124, and the couch angle at 330° was 1.079. In this study, the phantom is used to quantitatively evaluate the value of the amplitude according to couch change

  7. Evaluation of accuracy about 2D vs 3D real-time position management system based on couch rotation when non-coplanar respiratory gated radiation therapy

    Kwon, Kyung Tae; Kim, Jung Soo [Dongnam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Sim, Hyun Sun [College of Health Sciences, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung Whan [Shingu University College, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Son, Soon Yong [Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Dong Kyoon [College of Health Sciences, EulJi University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Because of non-coplanar therapy with couch rotation in respiratory gated radiation therapy, the recognition of marker movement due to the change in the distance between the infrared camera and the marker due to the rotation of the couch is called RPM (Real-time The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the accuracy of motion reflections (baseline changes) of 2D gating configuration (two dot marker block) and 3D gating configuration (six dot marker block). The motion was measured by varying the couch angle in the clockwise and counterclockwise directions by 10° in the 2D gating configuration. In the 3D gating configuration, the couch angle was changed by 10° in the clockwise direction and compared with the baseline at the reference 0°. The reference amplitude was 1.173 to 1.165, the couch angle at 20° was 1.132, and the couch angle at 1.0° was 1.083. At 350° counterclockwise, the reference amplitude was 1.168 to 1.157, the couch angle at 340° was 1.124, and the couch angle at 330° was 1.079. In this study, the phantom is used to quantitatively evaluate the value of the amplitude according to couch change.

  8. Dual-gated cardiac PET-clinical feasibility study

    Teraes, Mika; Kokki, Tommi; Noponen, Tommi; Hoppela, Erika; Sipilae, Hannu T.; Knuuti, Juhani [Turku PET Centre, PO BOX 52, Turku (Finland); Durand-Schaefer, Nicolas [General Electric Medical Systems, Buc (France); Pietilae, Mikko [Turku University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Turku (Finland); Kiss, Jan [Turku University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Turku (Finland)

    2010-03-15

    Both respiratory and cardiac motions reduce image quality in myocardial imaging. For accurate imaging of small structures such as vulnerable coronary plaques, simultaneous cardiac and respiratory gating is warranted. This study tests the feasibility of a recently developed robust method for cardiac-respiratory gating. List-mode data with triggers from respiratory and cardiac cycles are rearranged into dual-gated segments and reconstructed with standard algorithms of a commercial PET/CT scanner. Cardiac gates were defined as three fixed phases and one variable diastolic phase. Chest motion was measured with a respiratory gating device and post-processed to determine gates. Preservation of quantification in dual-gated images was tested with an IEC whole-body phantom. Minipig and human studies were performed to evaluate the feasibility of the method. In minipig studies, a coronary catheter with radioactive tip was guided in coronary artery for in vivo and ex vivo acquisitions. Dual gating in humans with suspected cardiac disorders was performed using 18-F-FDG as a tracer. The method was found feasible for in vivo imaging and the radioactive catheter tip was better resolved in gated images. In human studies, the dual gating was found feasible and easy for clinical routine. Maximal movement of myocardial surface in cranio-caudal direction was over 20 mm. The shape of myocardium was clearly different between the gates and papillary muscles become more visible in diastolic images. The first clinical experiences using robust cardiac-respiratory dual gating are encouraging. Further testing in larger clinical populations using tracers designed especially for plaque imaging is warranted. (orig.)

  9. Dual-gated cardiac PET-clinical feasibility study

    Teraes, Mika; Kokki, Tommi; Noponen, Tommi; Hoppela, Erika; Sipilae, Hannu T.; Knuuti, Juhani; Durand-Schaefer, Nicolas; Pietilae, Mikko; Kiss, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Both respiratory and cardiac motions reduce image quality in myocardial imaging. For accurate imaging of small structures such as vulnerable coronary plaques, simultaneous cardiac and respiratory gating is warranted. This study tests the feasibility of a recently developed robust method for cardiac-respiratory gating. List-mode data with triggers from respiratory and cardiac cycles are rearranged into dual-gated segments and reconstructed with standard algorithms of a commercial PET/CT scanner. Cardiac gates were defined as three fixed phases and one variable diastolic phase. Chest motion was measured with a respiratory gating device and post-processed to determine gates. Preservation of quantification in dual-gated images was tested with an IEC whole-body phantom. Minipig and human studies were performed to evaluate the feasibility of the method. In minipig studies, a coronary catheter with radioactive tip was guided in coronary artery for in vivo and ex vivo acquisitions. Dual gating in humans with suspected cardiac disorders was performed using 18-F-FDG as a tracer. The method was found feasible for in vivo imaging and the radioactive catheter tip was better resolved in gated images. In human studies, the dual gating was found feasible and easy for clinical routine. Maximal movement of myocardial surface in cranio-caudal direction was over 20 mm. The shape of myocardium was clearly different between the gates and papillary muscles become more visible in diastolic images. The first clinical experiences using robust cardiac-respiratory dual gating are encouraging. Further testing in larger clinical populations using tracers designed especially for plaque imaging is warranted. (orig.)

  10. 18F-FDG PET-CT respiratory gating in characterization of pulmonary lesions. Approximation towards clinical indications

    Garcia Vicente, A.M.; Soriano Castrejon, A.M.; Talavera Rubio, M.P.; Leon Martin, A.A.; Palomar Munoz, A.M.; Pilkington Woll, J.P.; Poblete Garcia, V.M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)-CT respiratory gating (4D) study in the correct documentation of pulmonary lesions with faint uptake in standard PET-CT. Forty-two pulmonary lesions with a low or no detectable uptake of FDG (standardized uptake value (SUV) max max was determined for each lesion in both studies. For the 4D studies, we selected the SUV max in respiratory period with the highest uptake ('best bin'). We calculated the SUV max percentage difference between 3D and 4D PET-CT (% difference=SUV max 4D-SUV max 3D/SUV max 3D x 100) and the relation of this value with the size and locations of the lesions. In 4D study, any lesion with SUV max ≥2.5 was classified as malignant. We assessed the changes of lesion classification (from benign to malignant) applying the 4D technique. The final diagnosis was obtained by histological assessment or clinical and radiological follow-up longer than 12 months. Forty out of 42 lesions showed an increase of SUV max in the 4D study with respect to 3D. The mean SUV max in the 3D and 4D PET-CT studies were 1.33 (±0.59) and 2.26 (±0.87), respectively. The SUV max percentage difference mean between both techniques was 83.3% (±80.81). The smaller the lesion the greater was the SUV max percentage difference (P<0.05). No differences were observed depending on the location of the lesion. In 40% of cases, there was a change in the final classification of lesions from benign to malignant. In the final diagnosis, 24 lesions were malignant. 4D PET-CT diagnosed correctly the 52% of them. The 4D PET-CT study permitted a better characterization of malignant lung lesions compared with the standard PET-CT, because of its higher sensitivity. 4D PET-CT is a recommendable technique in the early diagnosis of malignant lesions. (author)

  11. The Analysis of Predictive Factors for the Identification of Patients Who Could Benefit from Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Jang, Seong Soon; Park, Ji Chan

    2009-01-01

    4DCT scans performed for radiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed to assess the possible benefits of respiratory gating in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and established the predictive factors for identifying patients who could benefit from this approach. Three treatment planning was performed for 15 patients with stage I∼III NSCLC using different planning target volumes (PTVs) as follows: 1) PTVroutine, derived from the addition of conventional uniform margins to gross tumor volume (GTV) of a single bin, 2) PTVall phases (patient-specific PTV), derived from the composite GTV of all 6 bins of the 4DCT, and 3) PTVgating, derived from the composite GTV of 3 consecutive bins at end-exhalation. The reductions in PTV were 43.2% and 9.5%, respectively, for the PTVall phases vs. PTVroutine and PTVgating vs. PTVall phases. Compared to PTVroutine, the use of PTVall phases and PTVgating reduced the mean lung dose (MLD) by 18.1% and 21.6%, and V20 by 18.2% and 22.0%, respectively. Significant correlations were seen between certain predictive factors selected from the tumor mobility and volume analysis, such as the 3D mobility vector, the reduction in 3D mobility and PTV with gating, and the ratio of GTV overlap between 2 extreme bins and additional reductions in both MLD and V20 with gating. The additional benefits with gating compared to the use of patient-specific PTV were modest; however, there were distinct correlations and differences according to the predictive factors. Therefore, these predictive factors might be useful for identifying patients who could benefit from respiratory-gated radiotherapy

  12. Digital Tomosynthesis for Respiratory Gated Liver Treatment: Clinical Feasibility for Daily Image Guidance

    Wu, Q. Jackie; Meyer, Jeffrey; Fuller, Jessica; Godfrey, Devon; Wang Zhiheng; Zhang Junan; Yin Fangfang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Breath-hold (BH) treatment minimizes internal target volumes (ITV) when treating sites prone to motion. Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) imaging has advantages over cone-beam CT (CBCT) for BH imaging: BH-DTS scan can be completed during a single breath-hold, whereas BH-CBCT is usually acquired by parsing the gantry rotation into multiple BH segments. This study evaluates the localization accuracy of DTS for BH treatment of liver tumors. Methods: Both planning CT and on-board DTS/CBCT images were acquired under BH, using the planning CT BH window as reference. Onboard imaging data sets included two independent DTS orientations (coronal and sagittal), and CBCT images. Soft tissue target positioning was measured by each imaging modality and translated into couch shifts. Performance of the two DTS orientations was evaluated by comparing target positioning with the CBCT benchmark, determined by two observers. Results: Image data sets were collected from thirty-eight treatment fractions (14 patients). Mean differences between the two DTS methods and the CBCT method were <1 mm in all directions (except the lateral direction with sagittal-DTS: 1.2 mm); the standard deviation was in the range of 2.1-3.5 mm for all techniques. The Pearson correlation showed good interobserver agreement for the coronal-DTS (0.72-0.78). The interobserver agreement for the sagittal-DTS was good for the in-plane directions (0.70-0.82), but poor in the out-of-plane direction (lateral, 0.26). Conclusions: BH-DTS may be a simpler alternative to BH-CBCT for onboard soft tissue localization of the liver, although the precision of DTS localization appears to be somewhat lower because of the presence of subtle out-of-plane blur.

  13. Main technical aspects and clinical benefits of respiratory Gating for radiotherapy of lung neoplasm; Principais aspectos tecnicos e beneficios clinicos do Gating respitatorio para radioterapia do cancer de pulmao

    Benites, Rafaela Freitas Oliveira, E-mail: rafaelafreitasfisica@gmail.com [Fundacao do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The concern with the irradiation of lung tumors is that many of them can move along the breathing, which can cause problems in defining accurately the target and increases the irradiation of normal tissues. The objectives are to present the 4D CT principles, image acquisition, reconstruction and application in planning of the radiotherapy. It justifies the quick implantation, improvements in acquisition and images, the possibility in quantify the tumor movement, verifying strategies and delivery treatment. It's concluded that the toxicity risk is reduced with the respiratory gating, and the results suggests that the closed RT will be of clinical relevance. (author)

  14. Real-time prediction and gating of respiratory motion in 3D space using extended Kalman filters and Gaussian process regression network

    Bukhari, W.; Hong, S.-M.

    2016-03-01

    The prediction as well as the gating of respiratory motion have received much attention over the last two decades for reducing the targeting error of the radiation treatment beam due to respiratory motion. In this article, we present a real-time algorithm for predicting respiratory motion in 3D space and realizing a gating function without pre-specifying a particular phase of the patient’s breathing cycle. The algorithm, named EKF-GPRN+ , first employs an extended Kalman filter (EKF) independently along each coordinate to predict the respiratory motion and then uses a Gaussian process regression network (GPRN) to correct the prediction error of the EKF in 3D space. The GPRN is a nonparametric Bayesian algorithm for modeling input-dependent correlations between the output variables in multi-output regression. Inference in GPRN is intractable and we employ variational inference with mean field approximation to compute an approximate predictive mean and predictive covariance matrix. The approximate predictive mean is used to correct the prediction error of the EKF. The trace of the approximate predictive covariance matrix is utilized to capture the uncertainty in EKF-GPRN+ prediction error and systematically identify breathing points with a higher probability of large prediction error in advance. This identification enables us to pause the treatment beam over such instances. EKF-GPRN+ implements a gating function by using simple calculations based on the trace of the predictive covariance matrix. Extensive numerical experiments are performed based on a large database of 304 respiratory motion traces to evaluate EKF-GPRN+ . The experimental results show that the EKF-GPRN+ algorithm reduces the patient-wise prediction error to 38%, 40% and 40% in root-mean-square, compared to no prediction, at lookahead lengths of 192 ms, 384 ms and 576 ms, respectively. The EKF-GPRN+ algorithm can further reduce the prediction error by employing the gating function, albeit

  15. Real-time prediction and gating of respiratory motion in 3D space using extended Kalman filters and Gaussian process regression network

    Bukhari, W; Hong, S-M

    2016-01-01

    The prediction as well as the gating of respiratory motion have received much attention over the last two decades for reducing the targeting error of the radiation treatment beam due to respiratory motion. In this article, we present a real-time algorithm for predicting respiratory motion in 3D space and realizing a gating function without pre-specifying a particular phase of the patient’s breathing cycle. The algorithm, named EKF-GPRN +  , first employs an extended Kalman filter (EKF) independently along each coordinate to predict the respiratory motion and then uses a Gaussian process regression network (GPRN) to correct the prediction error of the EKF in 3D space. The GPRN is a nonparametric Bayesian algorithm for modeling input-dependent correlations between the output variables in multi-output regression. Inference in GPRN is intractable and we employ variational inference with mean field approximation to compute an approximate predictive mean and predictive covariance matrix. The approximate predictive mean is used to correct the prediction error of the EKF. The trace of the approximate predictive covariance matrix is utilized to capture the uncertainty in EKF-GPRN + prediction error and systematically identify breathing points with a higher probability of large prediction error in advance. This identification enables us to pause the treatment beam over such instances. EKF-GPRN + implements a gating function by using simple calculations based on the trace of the predictive covariance matrix. Extensive numerical experiments are performed based on a large database of 304 respiratory motion traces to evaluate EKF-GPRN +  . The experimental results show that the EKF-GPRN + algorithm reduces the patient-wise prediction error to 38%, 40% and 40% in root-mean-square, compared to no prediction, at lookahead lengths of 192 ms, 384 ms and 576 ms, respectively. The EKF-GPRN + algorithm can further reduce the prediction error by employing the gating function

  16. Organ motion study and dosimetric impact of respiratory gating radiotherapy for esophageal cancer; Etude de mobilite organique et impact dosimetrique de l'asservissement respiratoire dans la radiotherapie des cancers de l'oesophage

    Lorchel, F

    2007-04-15

    Chemoradiotherapy is now the standard treatment for locally advanced or inoperable esophageal carcinoma. In this indication, conformal radiotherapy is generally used. However, prognosis remains poor for these patients. Respiratory gating radiotherapy can decrease healthy tissues irradiation and allows escalation dose in lung, liver and breast cancer. In order to improve radiotherapy technique, we propose to study the feasibility of respiratory gating for esophageal cancer. We will study the respiratory motions of esophageal cancer to optimize target volume delineation, especially the internal margin (I.M.). We will test the correlation between tumour and chest wall displacements to prove that esophageal cancer motions are induced by respiration. This is essential before using free breathing respiratory gating systems. We will work out the dosimetric impact of respiratory gating using various dosimetric analysis parameters. We will compare dosimetric plans at end expiration, end inspiration and deep inspiration with dosimetric plan in free-breathing condition. This will allow us to establish the best respiratory phase to irradiate for each gating system. This dosimetric study will be completed with linear quadratic equivalent uniform dose (E.U.D.) calculation for each volume of interest. Previously, we will do a theoretical study of histogram dose volume gradation to point up its use. (author)

  17. Left ventricular volume measurements with free breathing respiratory self-gated 3-dimensional golden angle radial whole-heart cine imaging - Feasibility and reproducibility.

    Holst, Karen; Ugander, Martin; Sigfridsson, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    To develop and evaluate a free breathing respiratory self-gated isotropic resolution technique for left ventricular (LV) volume measurements. A 3D radial trajectory with double golden-angle ordering was used for free-running data acquisition during free breathing in 9 healthy volunteers. A respiratory self-gating signal was extracted from the center of k-space and used with the electrocardiogram to bin all data into 3 respiratory and 25 cardiac phases. 3D image volumes were reconstructed and the LV endocardial border was segmented. LV volume measurements and reproducibility from 3D free breathing cine were compared to conventional 2D breath-held cine. No difference was found between 3D free breathing cine and 2D breath-held cine with regards to LV ejection fraction, stroke volume, end-systolic volume and end-diastolic volume (Pcine and 2D breath-held cine (Pcine and conventional 2D breath-held cine showed similar values and test-retest repeatability for LV volumes in healthy volunteers. 3D free breathing cine enabled retrospective sorting and arbitrary angulation of isotropic data, and could correctly measure LV volumes during free breathing acquisition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Residual motion of lung tumors in end-of-inhale respiratory gated radiotherapy based on external surrogates

    Berbeco, Ross I.; Nishioka, Seiko; Shirato, Hiroki; Jiang, Steve B.

    2006-01-01

    It has been noted that some lung tumors exhibit large periodic motion due to respiration. To limit the amount of dose to healthy lung tissues, many clinics have begun gating radiotherapy treatment using externally placed surrogates. It has been observed by several institutions that the end-of-exhale (EOE) tumor position is more reproducible than other phases of the breathing cycle, so the gating window is often set there. From a treatment planning perspective, end-of-inhale (EOI) phase might be preferred for gating because the expanded lungs will further decrease the healthy tissue within the treatment field. We simulate gated treatment at the EOI phase, using a set of recently measured internal/external anatomy patient data. This paper attempts to answer three questions: (1) How much is the tumor residual motion when we use an external surrogate gating window at EOI? (2) How could we reduce the residual motion in the EOI gating window? (3) Is there a preference for amplitude- versus phase-based gating at EOI? We found that under free breathing conditions the residual motion of the tumors is much larger for EOI phase than for EOE phase. The mean values of residual motion at EOI were found to be 2.2 and 2.7 mm for amplitude- and phase-based gating, respectively, and, at EOE, 1.0 and 1.2 mm for amplitude- and phase-based gating, respectively. However, we note that the residual motion in the EOI gating window is correlated well with the reproducibility of the external surface position in the EOI phase. Using the results of a published breath-coaching study, we deduce that the residual motion of a lung tumor at EOI would approach that at EOE, with the same duty cycle (30%), under breath-coaching conditions. Additionally, we found that under these same conditions, phase-based gating approaches the same residual motion as amplitude-based gating, going from a 28% difference to 11%, for the patient with the largest difference between the two gating modalities. We conclude

  19. Comparison of gating methods for the real-time analysis of left ventricular function in nonimaging blood pool studies.

    Beard, B B; Stewart, J R; Shiavi, R G; Lorenz, C H

    1995-01-01

    Gating methods developed for electrocardiographic-triggered radionuclide ventriculography are being used with nonimaging detectors. These methods have not been compared on the basis of their real-time performance or suitability for determination of load-independent indexes of left ventricular function. This work evaluated the relative merits of different gating methods for nonimaging radionuclude ventriculographic studies, with particular emphasis on their suitability for real-time measurements and the determination of pressure-volume loops. A computer model was used to investigate the relative accuracy of forward gating, backward gating, and phase-mode gating. The durations of simulated left ventricular time-activity curves were randomly varied. Three acquisition parameters were considered: frame rate, acceptance window, and sample size. Twenty-five studies were performed for each combination of acquisition parameters. Hemodynamic and shape parameters from each study were compared with reference parameters derived directly from the random time-activity curves. Backward gating produced the largest errors under all conditions. For both forward gating and phase-mode gating, ejection fraction was underestimated and time to end systole and normalized peak ejection rate were overestimated. For the hemodynamic parameters, forward gating was marginally superior to phase-mode gating. The mean difference in errors between forward and phase-mode gating was 1.47% (SD 2.78%). However, for root mean square shape error, forward gating was several times worse in every case and seven times worse than phase-mode gating on average. Both forward and phase-mode gating are suitable for real-time hemodynamic measurements by nonimaging techniques. The small statistical difference between the methods is not clinically significant. The true shape of the time-activity curve is maintained most accurately by phase-mode gating.

  20.  Methods of detection of selected respiratory viruses

    Ilona Stefańska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  Respiratory viruses contribute to significant morbidity and mortality in healthy and immunocompromised individuals and are considered as a significant economic burden in the healthcare system. The similar clinical symptoms in the course of different viral and bacterial respiratory infections make the proper diagnosis difficult. An accurate and prompt diagnostics is crucial for infection control and patient management decisions, especially regarding the use of antibacterial or antiviral therapy and hospitalization. Moreover, the identification of the causative agent eliminates inappropriate use of antibiotics and may reduce the cost of healthcare.A wide variety of diagnostic procedures is applied for the detection of viral agents responsible for respiratory tract infections. For many years, the viral antigen detection and standard isolation technique in cell culture was the main method used in routine diagnostics. However, in recent years the nucleic acid amplification techniques have become widely used and have significantly improved the sensitivity of viral detection in clinical specimens. Molecular diagnostic assays have contributed to revealing high rates of co-infection (multiplex reactions and allow identification of agents that are difficult to culture.This paper discusses a number of technical aspects of the current most commonly used techniques, their general principles, main benefits and diagnostic value, but also some of their limitations.

  1. MO-FG-BRA-05: Dosimetric and Radiobiological Validation of Respiratory Gating in Conventional and Hypofractionated Radiotherapy of the Lung: Effect of Dose, Dose Rate, Gating Window and Breathing Pattern

    Cervino, L; Soultan, D; Pettersson, N; Yock, A; Cornell, M; Aguilera, J; Murphy, J; Advani, S; Moiseenko, V [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Gill, B [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the dosimetric and radiobiological consequences from having different gating windows, dose rates, and breathing patterns in gated VMAT lung radiotherapy. Methods: A novel 3D-printed moving phantom with central high and peripheral low tracer uptake regions was 4D FDG-PET/CT-scanned using ideal, patient-specific regular, and irregular breathing patterns. A scan of the stationary phantom was obtained as a reference. Target volumes corresponding to different uptake regions were delineated. Simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) 6 MV VMAT plans were produced for conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapy, using 30–70 and 100% cycle gating scenarios. Prescribed doses were 200 cGy with SIB to 240 cGy to high uptake volume for conventional, and 800 with SIB to 900 cGy for hypofractionated plans. Dose rates of 600 MU/min (conventional and hypofractionated) and flattening filter free 1400 MU/min (hypofractionated) were used. Ion chamber measurements were performed to verify delivered doses. Vials with A549 cells placed in locations matching ion chamber measurements were irradiated using the same plans to measure clonogenic survival. Differences in survival for the different doses, dose rates, gating windows, and breathing patterns were analyzed. Results: Ion chamber measurements agreed within 3% of the planned dose, for all locations, breathing patterns and gating windows. Cell survival depended on dose alone, and not on gating window, breathing pattern, MU rate, or delivery time. The surviving fraction varied from approximately 40% at 2Gy to 1% for 9 Gy and was within statistical uncertainty relative to that observed for the stationary phantom. Conclusions: Use of gated VMAT in PET-driven SIB radiotherapy was validated using ion chamber measurements and cell survival assays for conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapy.

  2. Ultra-low power thin film transistors with gate oxide formed by nitric acid oxidation method

    Kobayashi, H.; Kim, W. B.; Matsumoto, T.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a low temperature fabrication method of SiO 2 /Si structure by use of nitric acid, i.e., nitric acid oxidation of Si (NAOS) method, and applied it to thin film transistors (TFT). A silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ) layer formed by the NAOS method at room temperature possesses 1.8 nm thickness, and its leakage current density is as low as that of thermally grown SiO 2 layer with the same thickness formed at ∼900 deg C. The fabricated TFTs possess an ultra-thin NAOS SiO 2 /CVD SiO 2 stack gate dielectric structure. The ultrathin NAOS SiO 2 layer effectively blocks a gate leakage current, and thus, the thickness of the gate oxide layer can be decreased from 80 to 20 nm. The thin gate oxide layer enables to decrease the operation voltage to 2 V (cf. the conventional operation voltage of TFTs with 80 nm gate oxide: 12 V) because of the low threshold voltages, i.e., -0.5 V for P-ch TFTs and 0.5 V for N-ch TFTs, and thus the consumed power decreases to 1/36 of that of the conventional TFTs. The drain current increases rapidly with the gate voltage, and the sub-threshold voltage is ∼80 mV/dec. The low sub-threshold swing is attributable to the thin gate oxide thickness and low interface state density of the NAOS SiO 2 layer. (authors)

  3. Simplified Analytical Methods to Analyze Lock Gates Submitted to Ship Collisions and Earthquakes

    Buldgen Loic

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two simplified analytical methods to analyze lock gates submitted to two different accidental loads. The case of an impact involving a vessel is first investigated. In this situation, the resistance of the struck gate is evaluated by assuming a local and a global deforming mode. The super-element method is used in the first case, while an equivalent beam model is simultaneously introduced to capture the overall bending motion of the structure. The second accidental load considered in this paper is the seismic action, for which an analytical method is presented to evaluate the total hydrodynamic pressure applied on a lock gate during an earthquake, due account being taken of the fluid-structure interaction. For each of these two actions, numerical validations are presented and the analytical results are compared to finite-element solutions.

  4. Re-estimation of renal function with 99mTc-DTPA by the Gates' method

    Itoh, Kazuo; Arakawa, Masanori

    1987-01-01

    We analyzed a regression equation between percent total renal uptake (%TRU) of 99m Tc-DTPA and creatinine clearance (Ccr) by the Gates' method in 82 patients. 1) The following regression equations between measured renal depth on CT scan and (weight in kg)/(height in cm) in Japanese were obtained; Right in both kidneys = 13.6361 · (W/H) 0.6996 (n = 217, r = 0.86691, p 0.7554 (n = 224, r = 0.8822, p 0.8099 (n = 27, r = 0.9515, p 0.6997 (n = 21, r = 0.9213, p 2 ) = 13.15 · %TRU 0.787 (n = 86, r = 0.820, p 0.753 (n = 40, r = 0.754). The Gates' method is very convenient for an immediate estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) after renal scintigraphy using 99m Tc-DTPA. However, the correlation coefficient was not high as compared to the Gates' results. The equation which was reported by Gates' is not necessarily adaptable in routine study. Each facility which uses the Gates' method for estimating GFR should obtain the corrected regression equation between %TRU and Ccr. (author)

  5. The Impact of Optimal Respiratory Gating and Image Noise on Evaluation of Intratumor Heterogeneity on 18F-FDG PET Imaging of Lung Cancer.

    Grootjans, Willem; Tixier, Florent; van der Vos, Charlotte S; Vriens, Dennis; Le Rest, Catherine C; Bussink, Johan; Oyen, Wim J G; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Visvikis, Dimitris; Visser, Eric P

    2016-11-01

    Accurate measurement of intratumor heterogeneity using parameters of texture on PET images is essential for precise characterization of cancer lesions. In this study, we investigated the influence of respiratory motion and varying noise levels on quantification of textural parameters in patients with lung cancer. We used an optimal-respiratory-gating algorithm on the list-mode data of 60 lung cancer patients who underwent 18 F-FDG PET. The images were reconstructed using a duty cycle of 35% (percentage of the total acquired PET data). In addition, nongated images of varying statistical quality (using 35% and 100% of the PET data) were reconstructed to investigate the effects of image noise. Several global image-derived indices and textural parameters (entropy, high-intensity emphasis, zone percentage, and dissimilarity) that have been associated with patient outcome were calculated. The clinical impact of optimal respiratory gating and image noise on assessment of intratumor heterogeneity was evaluated using Cox regression models, with overall survival as the outcome measure. The threshold for statistical significance was adjusted for multiple comparisons using Bonferroni correction. In the lower lung lobes, respiratory motion significantly affected quantification of intratumor heterogeneity for all textural parameters (P 0.007). The mean increase in entropy, dissimilarity, zone percentage, and high-intensity emphasis was 1.3% ± 1.5% (P = 0.02), 11.6% ± 11.8% (P = 0.006), 2.3% ± 2.2% (P = 0.002), and 16.8% ± 17.2% (P = 0.006), respectively. No significant differences were observed for lesions in the upper lung lobes (P > 0.007). Differences in the statistical quality of the PET images affected the textural parameters less than respiratory motion, with no significant difference observed. The median follow-up time was 35 mo (range, 7-39 mo). In multivariate analysis for overall survival, total lesion glycolysis and high-intensity emphasis were the two most

  6. Method of X-ray examination of upper respiratory tracts

    Portnoj, L.M.; Surenchik, V.I.; Shuster, M.A.; Sal'nikova, Eh.A.

    1982-01-01

    Method of X-ray examination of upper respiratory tracts by radiography both in direct and lateral projection with an introduction of radiocontrast media through tracheostoma is described. The main objective of the invention is to improve accuracy of diagnostics of larynx and trachea cicatrix structures in children. The objective is attained by the examination under general anesthesia; barium sulfate is simultaneously introduced through laryngoscope and tracheostoma, and polypositional radiography is accomplished just in the moment of air introduction under 130-170 mm Hg pressure in the amounts of 60-200 ml

  7. Comparative evaluation of respiratory-gated and ungated FDG-PET for target volume definition in radiotherapy treatment planning for pancreatic cancer.

    Kishi, Takahiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Akira; Nakamoto, Yuji; Itasaka, Satoshi; Mizowaki, Takashi; Togashi, Kaori; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of respiratory-gated positron emission tomography (4D-PET) in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy treatment planning (RTTP). Fourteen patients with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-avid pancreatic tumours were evaluated between December 2013 and March 2015. Two sets of volumes were contoured for the pancreatic tumour of each patient. The biological target volume in three-dimensional RTTP (BTV3D) was contoured using conventional respiratory un-gated PET. The BTV3D was then expanded using population-based margins to generate a series of internal target volume 3D (ITV3D) values. The ITV 4D (ITV4D) was contoured using 4D-PET. Each of the five phases of 4D-PET was used for 4D contouring, and the ITV4D was constructed by summing the volumes defined on the five individual 4D-PET images. The relative volumes and normalized volumetric overlap were computed between ITV3D and ITV4D. On average, the FDG-avid tumour volumes were 1.6 (range: 0.8-2.3) fold greater in the ITV4D than in the BTV3D. On average, the ITV3D values were 2.0 (range: 1.1-3.4) fold larger than the corresponding ITV4D values. The ITV generated from 4D-PET can be used to improve the accuracy or reduce normal tissue irradiation compared with conventional un-gated PET-based ITV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Initial evaluation of a practical PET respiratory motion correction method in clinical simultaneous PET/MRI

    Manber, Richard; Thielemans, Kris; Hutton, Brian; Barnes, Anna; Ourselin, Sebastien; Arridge, Simon; O’Meara, Celia; Atkinson, David

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory motion during PET acquisitions can cause image artefacts, with sharpness and tracer quantification adversely affected due to count ‘smearing’. Motion correction by registration of PET gates becomes increasingly difficult with shorter scan times and less counts. The advent of simultaneous PET/MRI scanners allows the use of high spatial resolution MRI to capture motion states during respiration [1, 2]. In this work, we use a respiratory signal derived from the PET list-mode data [3, ], with no requirement for an external device or MR sequence modifications.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the coronary arteries: clinical results from three dimensional evaluation of a respiratory gated technique

    R.J.M. van Geuns (Robert Jan); H.G. de Bruin (Hein); B.J.W.M. Rensing (Benno); P.A. Wielopolski (Piotr); M.D. Hulshoff; P.M.A. van Ooijen (Peter); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs); P.J. de Feyter (Pim)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance coronary angiography is challenging because of the motion of the vessels during cardiac contraction and respiration. Additional challenges are the small calibre of the arteries and their complex three dimensional course. Respiratory

  10. Active gate driving method for reliability improvement of IGBTs via junction temperature swing reduction

    Luo, Haoze; Iannuzzo, Francesco; Ma, Ke

    2016-01-01

    be changed according to the amplitude of AC current. Accordingly, a closed-loop thermal control method including the functions of root-mean-square calculation and phase analysis is proposed. Hence ΔTj can be reduced by means of changing losses-related gate resistors on the basis of output fundamental...

  11. A Method for Estimating the Probability of Floating Gate Prompt Charge Loss in a Radiation Environment

    Edmonds, L. D.

    2016-01-01

    Since advancing technology has been producing smaller structures in electronic circuits, the floating gates in modern flash memories are becoming susceptible to prompt charge loss from ionizing radiation environments found in space. A method for estimating the risk of a charge-loss event is given.

  12. Quality assurance program of a respiratory gating irradiation system based on external and internal fiducial markers; Programa de garantia de calidad de un sistema de irradiacion con control respiratorio basado en marcadores fiduciales externos e internos

    Zucca Aparicio, D.; Perez Moreno, J. M.; Fernandez Leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrilla, J.; Minambres Moro, A.

    2011-07-01

    Respiratory Gating involves the administration of radiation during treatment delivery within a particular portion of the patients breathing cycle, so the absorbed dose administration with respiratory control techniques requires specific quality control to ensure the correctness of the delivered dose. The establishment of a Quality Control Program (QC) is proposed for the Respiratory Gating based techniques in order to have a better understanding of how this system works and to know its associated dosimetric impact. The influence of the CT acquisition under respiratory motion conditions has been analyzed for the treatment isocenter localization, using internal and external fiducial markers with IGRT techniques that allow the correlation of the isocenter positioning with the phase of the respiratory cycle. Radiation delivery in the presence of intra fraction organ motion causes an averaging or blurring of the static dose distribution over the path of motion increasing the beam penumbra of the radiation field and reducing the therapeutic region when the irradiation is not breath controlled. The feasibility of intensity modulated treatments (IMRT) for both static and dynamic techniques, managed by respiratory control has been tested, demonstrating the possibility of synchronizing the movement of the leaves in the microfluorimeter collimator (mMLC) with the gated beam irradiation. (Author) 45 refs.

  13. A Prospective Cohort Study of Gated Stereotactic Liver Radiation Therapy Using Continuous Internal Electromagnetic Motion Monitoring

    Worm, Esben S; Høyer, Morten; Hansen, Rune

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Intrafraction motion can compromise the treatment accuracy in liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Respiratory gating can improve treatment delivery; however, gating based on external motion surrogates is inaccurate. The present study reports the use of Calypso-based internal...... electromagnetic motion monitoring for gated liver SBRT. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Fifteen patients were included in a study of 3-fraction respiratory gated liver SBRT guided by 3 implanted electromagnetic transponders. The planning target volume was created by a 5-mm axial and 7-mm (n = 12) or 10-mm (n = 3...

  14. Gated listmode acquisition with the QuadHIDAC animal PET to image mouse hearts

    Schaefers, K.P.; Lang, N.; Stegger, L.; Schober, O.; Schaefers, M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: the aim of this study was to develop ECG and respiratory gating in combination with listmode acquisition for the quadHIDAC small-animal PET scanner. Methods: ECG and respiratory gating was realized with the help of an external trigger device (BioVET) synchronized with the listmode acquisition. Listmode data of a mouse acquisition (injected with 6.5 MBq of 18 F-FDG) were sorted according to three different gating definitions: 12 cardiac gates, 8 respiratory gates and a combination of 8 cardiac and 8 respiratory gates. Images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (ramp filter), and parameters like left ventricular wall thickness (WT), wall-to-wall separation (WS) and blood to myocardium activity ratios (BMR) were calculated. Results: cardiac gated images show improvement of all parameters (WT 2.6 mm, WS 4.1 mm, BRM 2.3) in diastole compared to ungated images (WT 3.0 mm, WS 3.4 mm, BMR 1.3). Respiratory gating had little effect on calculated parameters. Conclusion: ECG gating with the quadHIDAC can improve myocardial image quality in mice. This could have a major impact on the calculation of an image-derived input function for kinetic modelling. (orig.)

  15. Procedural sedation and analgesia for respiratory-gated MR-HIFU in the liver : a feasibility study

    van Breugel, Marjolein; Wijlemans, JW; Vaessen, Hermanus H B; de Greef, Martijn; Moonen, Chrit T W; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Ries, Mario G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies demonstrated both pre-clinically and clinically the feasibility of magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablations in the liver. To overcome the associated problem of respiratory motion of the ablation area, general anesthesia (GA) and

  16. Charge carrier mobility in thin films of organic semiconductors by the gated van der Pauw method

    Rolin, Cedric; Kang, Enpu; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Borghs, Gustaaf; Heremans, Paul; Genoe, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Thin film transistors based on high-mobility organic semiconductors are prone to contact problems that complicate the interpretation of their electrical characteristics and the extraction of important material parameters such as the charge carrier mobility. Here we report on the gated van der Pauw method for the simple and accurate determination of the electrical characteristics of thin semiconducting films, independently from contact effects. We test our method on thin films of seven high-mobility organic semiconductors of both polarities: device fabrication is fully compatible with common transistor process flows and device measurements deliver consistent and precise values for the charge carrier mobility and threshold voltage in the high-charge carrier density regime that is representative of transistor operation. The gated van der Pauw method is broadly applicable to thin films of semiconductors and enables a simple and clean parameter extraction independent from contact effects. PMID:28397852

  17. Respiration-correlated spiral CT: A method of measuring respiratory-induced anatomic motion for radiation treatment planning

    Ford, E.C.; Mageras, G.S.; Yorke, E.; Ling, C.C.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a method for generating CT images at multiple respiratory phases with a single spiral CT scan, referred to as respiratory-correlated spiral CT (RCCT). RCCT relies on a respiration wave form supplied by an external patient monitor. During acquisition this wave form is recorded along with the initiation time of the CT scan, so as to 'time stamp' each reconstructed slice with the phase of the respiratory cycle. By selecting the appropriate slices, a full CT image set is generated at several phases, typically 7-11 per cycle. The CT parameters are chosen to optimize the temporal resolution while minimizing the spatial gap between slices at successive respiratory cycles. Using a pitch of 0.5, a gantry rotation period of 1.5 s, and a 180 degree sign reconstruction algorithm results in ∼5 mm slice spacing at a given phase for typical respiration periods, and a respiratory motion within each slice that is acceptably small, particularly near end expiration or end inspiration where gated radiotherapy is to occur. We have performed validation measurements on a phantom with a moving sphere designed to simulate respiration-induced tumor motion. RCCT scans of the phantom at respiratory periods of 4, 5, and 6 s show good agreement of the sphere's motion with that observed under fluoroscopic imaging. The positional deviations in the sphere's centroid between RCCT and fluoroscopy are 1.1±0.9 mm in the transaxial direction (average over all scans at all phases ±1 s.d.) and 1.2±1.0 mm in the longitudinal direction. Reconstructed volumes match those expected on the basis of stationary-phantom scans to within 5% in all cases. The surface distortions of the reconstructed sphere, as quantified by deviations from a mathematical reference sphere, are similar to those from a stationary phantom scan and are correlated with the speed of the phantom. A RCCT scan of the phantom undergoing irregular motion, demonstrates that successful reconstruction can be achieved even with

  18. Interfractional changes in tumour volume and position during entire radiotherapy courses for lung cancer with respiratory gating and image guidance

    Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders N

    2008-01-01

    were contoured on each CT scan to evaluate the variations in volumes and position. The lung tumours and the mediastinal tumours were contoured separately. The positional variations were measured as 3D mobility vectors and correlated to matching of the scans using the two different strategies. RESULTS......-87% when matched using bony landmarks and 70-76% when matched using skin tattoos. The overlap of the mediastinal tumours were 60-65% and 41-47%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the use of gating the tumours varied considerably, regarding both position and volume. The variations in position were...

  19. A method for evaluating pressure locking and thermal binding of gate valves

    Dogan, T.

    1996-12-01

    A method is described to evaluate the susceptibility of gate valves to pressure locking and thermal binding. Binding of the valve disc in the closed position due to high pressure water trapped in the bonnet cavity (pressure locking) or differential thermal expansion of the disk in the seat (thermal binding) represents a potential mechanism that can prevent safety-related systems from functioning when called upon. The method described here provides a general equation that can be applied to a given gate valve design and set of operating conditions to determine the susceptibility of the valve to fail due to disc binding. The paper is organized into three parts. The first part discusses the physical mechanisms that cause disc binding. The second part describes the mathematical equations. The third part discusses the conclusions.

  20. Improvement of high-fold gamma-ray data processing: the spherical gate method

    Theisen, C; Stezowski, O; Vivien, J P

    1999-01-01

    A new method for optimizing the processing of events from a highly efficient large array gamma-ray detector is described in this article. The spherical gates technique, developed to project high-fold events, consists of optimizing n-dimensional gate shape as a function of peak width and shape of each detector. Formulas in closed form are proposed for determining the projected statistics from coincidence fold and peak shape and for estimating the increased quality of projected spectra. This procedure has been tested on high-fold, high statistics data sets including superdeformed cascades. Compared to the classical 'square-gate' technique, better peak-to-background ratios as well as a reduction in fluctuations are observed. A quality parameter is defined to characterize the optimal parameter set. This method leads roughly to a gain in spectral quality equivalent of one fold. It is also shown that the efficiency of the method increases with coincidence fold. This should be particularly suited for future higher-f...

  1. Evaluation of diastolic phase by left ventricular volume curve using s2-gated equilibrium method among radioisotope angiography

    Watanabe, Yoshirou; Sakai, Akira; Inada, Mitsuo; Shiraishi, Tomokuni; Kobayashi, Akitoshi

    1982-01-01

    S2-gated (the second heart sound) method was designed by authors. In 6 normal subjects and 16 patients (old myocardial infarction 12 cases, hypertension 2 cases and aortic regurgitation 2 cases), radioisotope (RI) angiography using S2-gated equilibrium method was performed. In RI angiography, sup(99m)Tc-human serum albumin (HSA) 555MBq (15mCi) as tracer, PDP11/34 as minicomputer and PCG/ECG symchromizer (Metro Inst.) were used. Then left ventricular (LV) volume curve by S2-gated and electrocardiogram (ECG) R wave-gated method were obtained. Using LV volume curve, left ventricular ejection fraction (EF), mean ejection rate (mER, s -1 ), mean filling rate (mFR, -1 ) and rapid filling fraction (RFF) were calculated. mFR indicated mean filling rate during rapid filling phase. RFF was defined as the filling fraction during rapid filling phase among stroke volume. S2-gated method was reliable in evaluation of early diastolic phase, compared with ECG-gated method. There was the difference between RFF in normal group and myocardial infarction (MI) group (p < 0.005). RFF in 2 groups were correlated with EF (r = 0.82, p < 0.01). RFF was useful in evaluating MI cases who had normal EF values. The comparison with mER by ECG-gated and mFR by S2-gated was useful in evaluating MI cases who had normal mER values. mFR was remarkably lower than mER in MI group, but was equal to mER in normal group approximately. In conclusion, the evaluation using RFF and mFR by S2-gated method was useful in MI cases who had normal systolic phase indices. (author)

  2. Respiratory gated PET/CT in a European multicentre retrospective study: added diagnostic value in detection and characterization of lung lesions

    Guerra, Luca; Elisei, Federica [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); De Ponti, Elena [San Gerardo Hospital, Medical Physics, Monza (Italy); Bettinardi, Valentino; Picchio, Maria [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); National Research Council, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy); Landoni, Claudio [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Gilardi, Maria Carla [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); National Research Council, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Tecnomed Foundation, Milan (Italy); Versari, Annibale [Scientific Institute Santa Maria Nuova Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Fioroni, Federica [Scientific Institute Santa Maria Nuova Hospital, Medical Physics, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Dziuk, Miroslaw [Masovian PET-CT Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Military Institute of Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Koza, Magdalena [Masovian PET-CT Centre, Euromedic Diagnostic, Warsaw (Poland); Ahond-Vionnet, Renee; Collin, Bertrand [Hopital Pierre Beregovoy, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Nevers (France); Messa, Cristina [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); National Research Council, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Tecnomed Foundation, Milan (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    The aim of our work is to evaluate the added diagnostic value of respiratory gated (4-D) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in lung lesion detection/characterization in a large patient population of a multicentre retrospective study. The data of 155 patients (89 men, 66 women, mean age 63.9 {+-} 11.1 years) from 5 European centres and submitted to standard (3-D) and 4-D PET/CT were retrospectively analysed. Overall, 206 lung lesions were considered for the analysis (mean {+-} SD lesions dimension 14.7 {+-} 11.8 mm). Maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) and lesion detectability were assessed for both 3-D and 4-D PET/CT studies; 3-D and 4-D PET/CT findings were compared to clinical follow-up as standard reference. Mean {+-} SD 3-D and 4-D SUV{sub max} values were 5.2 {+-} 5.1 and 6.8 {+-} 6.1 (p < 0.0001), respectively, with an average percentage increase of 30.8 %. In 3-D PET/CT, 86 of 206 (41.7 %) lesions were considered positive, 70 of 206 (34 %) negative and 50 of 206 (24.3 %) equivocal, while in 4-D PET/CT 117 of 206 (56.8 %) lesions were defined as positive, 80 of 206 (38.8 %) negative and 9 of 206 (4.4 %) equivocal. In 34 of 50 (68 %) 3-D equivocal lesions follow-up data were available and the presence of malignancy was confirmed in 21 of 34 (61.8 %) lesions, while in 13 of 34 (38.2 %) was excluded. In 31 of these 34 controlled lesions, 20 of 34 (58.8 %) and 11 of 34 (32.4 %) were correctly classified by 4-D PET/CT as positive and negative, respectively; 3 of 34 (8.8 %) remained equivocal. With equivocal lesions classified as positive, the overall accuracy of 3-D and 4-D was 85.7 and 92.8 %, respectively, while the same figures were 80.5 and 94.2 % when equivocal lesions were classified as negative. The respiratory gated PET/CT technique is a valuable clinical tool in diagnosing lung lesions, improving quantification and confidence in reporting, reducing 3-D undetermined findings and increasing the overall accuracy in lung

  3. Added diagnostic value of respiratory-gated 4D 18F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of liver lesions. A multicenter study

    Crivellaro, Cinzia; Landoni, Claudio; Guerra, Luca [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); De Ponti, Elena; Morzenti, Sabrina [San Gerardo Hospital, Medical Physics, Monza (Italy); Elisei, Federica [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); Picchio, Maria; Bettinardi, Valentino [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Versari, Annibale [Santa Maria Nuova Hospital IRCCS, Nuclear Medicine, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Fioroni, Federica [Santa Maria Nuova Hospital IRCCS, Medical Physics, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Dziuk, Miroslaw; Tkaczewski, Konrad [Military Institute of Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Ahond-Vionnet, Renee; Nodari, Guillaume [Hopital Pierre Beregovoy, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Nevers (France); Todde, Sergio [University of Milan-Bicocca, Tecnomed Foundation, Monza (Italy)

    2018-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the added diagnostic value of respiratory-gated 4D18F-FDG PET/CT in liver lesion detection and characterization in a European multicenter retrospective study. Fifty-six oncological patients (29 males and 27 females, mean age, 61.2 ± 11.2 years) from five European centers, submitted to standard 3D-PET/CT and liver 4D-PET/CT were retrospectively evaluated. Based on visual analysis, liver PET/CT findings were scored as positive, negative, or equivocal both in 3D and 4D PET/CT. The impact of 4D-PET/CT on the confidence in classifying liver lesions was assessed. PET/CT findings were compared to histology and clinical follow-up as standard reference and diagnostic accuracy was calculated for both techniques. At semi-quantitative analysis, SUVmax was calculated for each detected lesion in 3D and 4D-PET/CT. Overall, 72 liver lesions were considered for the analysis. Based on visual analysis in 3D-PET/CT, 32/72 (44.4%) lesions were considered positive, 21/72 (29.2%) negative, and 19/72 (26.4%) equivocal, while in 4D-PET/CT 48/72 (66.7%) lesions were defined positive, 23/72 (31.9%) negative, and 1/72 (1.4%) equivocal. 4D-PET/CT findings increased the confidence in lesion definition in 37/72 lesions (51.4%). Considering 3D equivocal lesions as positive, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 88.9, 70.0, and 83.1%, respectively, while the same figures were 67.7, 90.0, and 73.8% if 3D equivocal findings were included as negative. 4D-PET/CT sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 97.8, 90.0, and 95.4%, respectively, considering equivocal lesions as positive and 95.6, 90.0, and 93.8% considering equivocal lesions as negative. The SUVmax of the liver lesions in 4D-PET (mean ± SD, 6.9 ± 3.2) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than SUVmax in 3D-PET (mean ± SD, 5.2 ± 2.3). Respiratory-gated PET/CT technique is a valuable clinical tool in diagnosing liver lesions, reducing 3D undetermined findings, improving diagnostic

  4. Ion transport by gating voltage to nanopores produced via metal-assisted chemical etching method

    Van Toan, Nguyen; Inomata, Naoki; Toda, Masaya; Ono, Takahito

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we report a simple and low-cost way to create nanopores that can be employed for various applications in nanofluidics. Nano sized Ag particles in the range from 1 to 20 nm are formed on a silicon substrate with a de-wetting method. Then the silicon nanopores with an approximate 15 nm average diameter and 200 μm height are successfully produced by the metal-assisted chemical etching method. In addition, electrically driven ion transport in the nanopores is demonstrated for nanofluidic applications. Ion transport through the nanopores is observed and could be controlled by an application of a gating voltage to the nanopores.

  5. SU-E-T-350: Verification of Gating Performance of a New Elekta Gating Solution: Response Kit and Catalyst System

    Xie, X; Cao, D; Housley, D; Mehta, V; Shepard, D [Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this work, we have tested the performance of new respiratory gating solutions for Elekta linacs. These solutions include the Response gating and the C-RAD Catalyst surface mapping system.Verification measurements have been performed for a series of clinical cases. We also examined the beam on latency of the system and its impact on delivery efficiency. Methods: To verify the benefits of tighter gating windows, a Quasar Respiratory Motion Platform was used. Its vertical-motion plate acted as a respiration surrogate and was tracked by the Catalyst system to generate gating signals. A MatriXX ion-chamber array was mounted on its longitudinal-moving platform. Clinical plans are delivered to a stationary and moving Matrix array at 100%, 50% and 30% gating windows and gamma scores were calculated comparing moving delivery results to the stationary result. It is important to note that as one moves to tighter gating windows, the delivery efficiency will be impacted by the linac's beam-on latency. Using a specialized software package, we generated beam-on signals of lengths of 1000ms, 600ms, 450ms, 400ms, 350ms and 300ms. As the gating windows get tighter, one can expect to reach a point where the dose rate will fall to nearly zero, indicating that the gating window is close to beam-on latency. A clinically useful gating window needs to be significantly longer than the latency for the linac. Results: As expected, the use of tighter gating windows improved delivery accuracy. However, a lower limit of the gating window, largely defined by linac beam-on latency, exists at around 300ms. Conclusion: The Response gating kit, combined with the C-RAD Catalyst, provides an effective solution for respiratorygated treatment delivery. Careful patient selection, gating window design, even visual/audio coaching may be necessary to ensure both delivery quality and efficiency. This research project is funded by Elekta.

  6. A progressively reduced pretension method to fabricate Bradbury-Nielsen gates with uniform tension

    Ni, Kai; Guo, Jingran; Yu, Zhou; Cao, Like; Yu, Quan; Qian, Xiang; Wang, Xiaohao

    2015-01-01

    A Bradbury-Nielsen gate (BNG) is often used to modulate ion beams. It consists of two interleaved and electrically isolated sets of wires with uniform tension, which ideally keep parallel, equidistant, and coplanar over a wide temperature range, making the BNG reliable and robust. We have previously analyzed the non-uniformity problem of wire tensions with sequentially winding method and developed a template-based transfer method to solve this problem. In this paper, we introduced a progressively reduced pretension method, which allows directly and sequentially fixing wires onto the substrate without using a template. Theoretical analysis shows that by applying proper pretension to each wire when fixing it, the final wire tensions of all wires can be uniform. The algorithm and flowchart to calculate the pretension sequence are given, and the fabrication process is introduced in detail. Pretensions are generated by weight combination with a weaving device. A BNG with stainless steel wire and a printed circuit board substrate is constructed with this method. The non-uniformity of the final wire tensions is less than 2.5% in theory. The BNG is successfully employed in our ion mobility spectrometer, and the measured resolution is 33.5 at a gate opening time of 350 μs. Compared to the template-based method, this method is simpler, faster, and more flexible with comparable production quality when manufacturing BNGs with different configurations

  7. Breath pacing system and method for pacing the respiratory activity of a subject

    2016-01-01

    To provide a breath pacing system and a corresponding method for pacing the respiratory activity of a subject that provide the possibility to adapt the output signal to the respiration characteristics of the subject automatically and effectively a breath pacing system (10) for pacing the respiratory

  8. Enzyme-Based Logic Gates and Networks with Output Signals Analyzed by Various Methods.

    Katz, Evgeny

    2017-07-05

    The paper overviews various methods that are used for the analysis of output signals generated by enzyme-based logic systems. The considered methods include optical techniques (optical absorbance, fluorescence spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance), electrochemical techniques (cyclic voltammetry, potentiometry, impedance spectroscopy, conductivity measurements, use of field effect transistor devices, pH measurements), and various mechanoelectronic methods (using atomic force microscope, quartz crystal microbalance). Although each of the methods is well known for various bioanalytical applications, their use in combination with the biomolecular logic systems is rather new and sometimes not trivial. Many of the discussed methods have been combined with the use of signal-responsive materials to transduce and amplify biomolecular signals generated by the logic operations. Interfacing of biocomputing logic systems with electronics and "smart" signal-responsive materials allows logic operations be extended to actuation functions; for example, stimulating molecular release and switchable features of bioelectronic devices, such as biofuel cells. The purpose of this review article is to emphasize the broad variability of the bioanalytical systems applied for signal transduction in biocomputing processes. All bioanalytical systems discussed in the article are exemplified with specific logic gates and multi-gate networks realized with enzyme-based biocatalytic cascades. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Delineation of the anatomical relationship of innominate artery and trachea by respiratory-gated MR imaging with true FISP sequence in patients with severe motor and intellectual disabilities

    Fujikawa, Yoshinao; Sato, Noriko; Sugai, Kenji; Endo, Yusaku; Matsufuji, Hiroki; Oomi, Tsuyoshi; Honzawa, Shiho; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2008-01-01

    Tracheoinnominate artery fistula is a well-known complication that arises on using a cannula. Therefore, routine examination of the anatomical relationship of the innominate artery and trachea should be carried out. We evaluated the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging in 5 patients with severe motor and intellectual disabilities (SMID) using a combination of true-fast imaging of steady-state precession (true-FISP) sequences and two-dimensional prospective acquisition correction (2D-PACE). For all patients, the trachea and the innominate artery were identified without sedation and contrast media. In one patient, the innominate artery was observed to be pressing on the trachea. In three patients, the trachea and innominate artery were brought very close each other, and in the other patient the anatomical relationship of the trachea and surrounding structure was delineated before tracheotomy. The validity of true-FISP sequences combined with the respiratory-gated technique was confirmed useful for the patients who are difficult to lie quietly and to hold their breath voluntarily. (author)

  10. High-resolution imaging of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion with 68Ga-VQ respiratory gated (4-D) PET/CT

    Callahan, Jason; Hofman, Michael S.; Siva, Shankar; Kron, Tomas; Schneider, Michal E.; Binns, David; Eu, Peter; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2014-01-01

    Our group has previously reported on the use of 68 Ga-ventilation/perfusion (VQ) PET/CT scanning for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. We describe here the acquisition methodology for 68 Ga-VQ respiratory gated (4-D) PET/CT and the effects of respiratory motion on image coregistration in VQ scanning. A prospective study was performed in 15 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. 4-D PET and 4-D CT images were acquired using an infrared marker on the patient's abdomen as a surrogate for breathing motion following inhalation of Galligas and intravenous administration of 68 Ga-macroaggregated albumin. Images were reconstructed with phase-matched attenuation correction. The lungs were contoured on CT and PET VQ images during free-breathing (FB) and at maximum inspiration (Insp) and expiration (Exp). The similarity between PET and CT volumes was measured using the Dice coefficient (DC) comparing the following groups; (1) FB-PET/CT, (2) InspPET/InspCT, (3) ExpPET/Exp CT, and (4) FB-PET/AveCT. A repeated measures one-way ANOVA with multiple comparison Tukey tests were performed to evaluate any difference between the groups. Diaphragmatic motion in the superior-inferior direction on the 4-D CT scan was also measured. 4-D VQ scanning was successful in all patients without additional acquisition time compared to the nongated technique. The highest volume overlap was between ExpPET and ExpCT and between FB-PET and AveCT with a DC of 0.82 and 0.80 for ventilation and perfusion, respectively. This was significantly better than the DC comparing the other groups (0.78-0.79, p 68 Ga-VQ 4-D PET/CT is feasible and the blurring caused by respiratory motion is well corrected with 4-D acquisition, which principally reduces artefact at the lung bases. The images with the highest spatial overlap were the combined expiration phase or FB PET and average CT. With higher resolution than SPECT/CT, the PET/CT technique has a broad range of potential clinical applications including

  11. Impact of window size of extracranial stereotactic treatments Gating with respiratory synchronization; Analisis de las correcciones interfraccion en el posicionamiento de los pacientes mediante IGRT

    Sanchez Rubio, P.; Castro Tejero, P.; Medrano Prado, J. C.

    2011-07-01

    The choice of the gating window is to find a compromise between the duration of the treatment session and the accuracy and precision in the administration. This paper analyzes the dosimetric impact depending on the selected gating window.

  12. Adaptive SLICE method: an enhanced method to determine nonlinear dynamic respiratory system mechanics

    Zhao, Zhanqi; Möller, Knut; Guttmann, Josef

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce and evaluate the adaptive SLICE method (ASM) for continuous determination of intratidal nonlinear dynamic compliance and resistance. The tidal volume is subdivided into a series of volume intervals called slices. For each slice, one compliance and one resistance are calculated by applying a least-squares-fit method. The volume window (width) covered by each slice is determined based on the confidence interval of the parameter estimation. The method was compared to the original SLICE method and evaluated using simulation and animal data. The ASM was also challenged with separate analysis of dynamic compliance during inspiration. If the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the respiratory data decreased from +∞ to 10 dB, the relative errors of compliance increased from 0.1% to 22% for the ASM and from 0.2% to 227% for the SLICE method. Fewer differences were found in resistance. When the SNR was larger than 40 dB, the ASM delivered over 40 parameter estimates (42.2 ± 1.3). When analyzing the compliance during inspiration separately, the estimates calculated with the ASM were more stable. The adaptive determination of slice bounds results in consistent and reliable parameter values. Online analysis of nonlinear respiratory mechanics will profit from such an adaptive selection of interval size. (paper)

  13. Dual-gated volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Fahimian, Benjamin; Wu, Junqing; Wu, Huanmei; Geneser, Sarah; Xing, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Gated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is an emerging radiation therapy modality for treatment of tumors affected by respiratory motion. However, gating significantly prolongs the treatment time, as delivery is only activated during a single respiratory phase. To enhance the efficiency of gated VMAT delivery, a novel dual-gated VMAT (DG-VMAT) technique, in which delivery is executed at both exhale and inhale phases in a given arc rotation, is developed and experimentally evaluated. Arc delivery at two phases is realized by sequentially interleaving control points consisting of MUs, MLC sequences, and angles of VMAT plans generated at the exhale and inhale phases. Dual-gated delivery is initiated when a respiration gating signal enters the exhale window; when the exhale delivery concludes, the beam turns off and the gantry rolls back to the starting position for the inhale window. The process is then repeated until both inhale and exhale arcs are fully delivered. DG-VMAT plan delivery accuracy was assessed using a pinpoint chamber and diode array phantom undergoing programmed motion. DG-VMAT delivery was experimentally implemented through custom XML scripting in Varian’s TrueBeam™ STx Developer Mode. Relative to single gated delivery at exhale, the treatment time was improved by 95.5% for a sinusoidal breathing pattern. The pinpoint chamber dose measurement agreed with the calculated dose within 0.7%. For the DG-VMAT delivery, 97.5% of the diode array measurements passed the 3%/3 mm gamma criterion. The feasibility of DG-VMAT delivery scheme has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. By leveraging the stability and natural pauses that occur at end-inspiration and end-exhalation, DG-VMAT provides a practical method for enhancing gated delivery efficiency by up to a factor of two

  14. Kawasaki disease-associated coronary artery lesions with navigator echo-based. Respiratory-gated three dimensional coronary magnetic resonance angiography compared with echocardiography in young children

    Amino, Masayuki; Teraoka, Kunihiko; Hirano, Masaharu; Kawashima, Naoshi; Kakizaki, Dai; Ookubo, Yasuo; Sasaki, Kazuyoshi; Katuyama, Hiroaki

    2004-01-01

    Navigator echo-based respiratory-gated three dimensional coronary magnetic resonance angiography (3D-CMRA) was compared with echocardiography, to determine whether 3D-CMRA was useful for the evaluation of Kawasaki disease-associated coronary artery lesions. Sixteen consecutive patients (imaging was performed 17 times in total) who were given a diagnosis of Kawasaki's disease at the pediatric department of our hospital and examined for the precise examination of complicating coronary artery lesions on MRI using a navigator-echo technique because of their incapability of holding their breath during imaging were entered into the present study. A 1.5T MRI system was used. Gd-DOTA was given at a total volume of 0.1 mmol/kg. During imaging, CMRA visualized the left coronary arteries in all 17 cases and the right coronary arteries in 16 cases, but not in one case. The left main coronary trunk segment no.5 was demonstrated in all cases with CMRA, but not in 4 cases with echocardiography. The left anterior descending branch no.6 was visualized in 11 of the 17 cases with CMRA, but only in 5 cases with echocardiography. The left circumflex branch no.11 was observed in 6 cases with CMRA, but only in 2 cases with echocardiography. As for the right coronary arteries, branches no.1 and no.2 were observed in 16 and 9 cases with CMRA, respectively, and in 13 and 3 cases with echocardiography, respectively. Vascular diameters measured on CMRA were almost identical to those on echocardiography, within the range of arteries visualized. 3D-CMRA combined with a navigator echo technique appears to be a useful tool for the observation of coronary artery lesions associated with Kawasaki's disease because it is superior in lesion visualization to echocardiography. (author)

  15. Evaluation of a New Motion-correction Algorithm Using On-rigid Registration in Respiratory-gated PET/CT Images of Liver Tumors.

    Wagatsuma, Kei; Osawa, Tatsufumi; Yokokawa, Naoki; Miwa, Kenta; Oda, Keiichi; Kudo, Yoshiro; Unno, Yasushi; Ito, Kimiteru; Ishii, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the qualitative and quantitative accuracy of the Q.Freeze algorithm in PET/CT images of liver tumors. A body phantom and hot spheres representing liver tumors contained 5.3 and 21.2 kBq/mL of a solution containing 18 F radioactivity, respectively. The phantoms were moved in the superior-inferior direction at a motion displacement of 20 mm. Conventional respiratory-gated (RG) and Q.Freeze images were sorted into 6, 10, and 13 phase-groups. The SUV ave was calculated from the background of the body phantom, and the SUV max was determined from the hot spheres of the liver tumors. Three patients with four liver tumors were also clinically assessed by whole-body and RG PET. The RG and Q.Freeze images derived from the clinical study were also sorted into 6, 10 and 13 phase-groups. Liver signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and SUV max were determined from the RG and Q.Freeze clinical images. The SUV ave of Q.Freeze images was the same as those derived from the body phantom using RG. The liver SNR improved with Q.Freeze, and the SUVs max was not overestimated when Q.Freeze was applied in both the phantom and clinical studies. Q.Freeze did not degrade the liver SNR and SUV max even though the phase number was larger. Q.Freeze delivered qualitative and quantitative motion correction than conventional RG imaging even in 10-phase groups.

  16. Investigation of gating parameter, temperature and density effects on mold filling in the lost foam casting (LFC process by direct observation method

    A. Sharifi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mold filling sequence of A356 aluminum alloy was investigated with the aid of direct observation method (photography method. The results show that increase of the foam density causes decrease of the filling rate and increase of the filling time. Foam density has more pronounced effect on mold filling rate rather than pouring temperature. Gating design also affects the profile of molten metal advancement in the mold. The results show that the higher filling rate was obtained with G2 gating than with other gating system. Regarding the mold filling pattern, G3 gating system has more effective contact interface than G2 gating system and has lower filling time. Filling time in G4 gating and G1 gating system are nearly the same.

  17. Respiratory synchronization for lung tumors exploration by positon emission tomography

    Grotus, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a medical imaging technique that requires several minutes of acquisition to get an image. PET images are thus severely affected by the respiratory motion of the patient, which introduces a blur in the images. Techniques consisting in gating the PET acquisition as a function of the patient respiration exist and reduce the respiratory blur in the PET images. However, these techniques increase the noise in the reconstructed images. The aim of this work was to propose a method for respiratory motion compensation that would not enhance the noise in the PET images, without increasing the acquisition duration nor estimating the deformation field associated with the respiratory motion. We proposed 2 original spatio-temporal (4D) reconstruction algorithms of gated PET images. These 2 methods take advantage of the temporal correlation between the images corresponding to the different breathing phases. The performances of these techniques were evaluated and compared to classic approaches using phantom data and simulated data. The results showed that the 4D reconstructions increase the signal-to-noise ratio compared to the classic reconstructions while maintaining the reduction of the respiratory blur. For a fixed acquisition duration, the 4D reconstructions can thus yield gated images that are almost free of respiratory blur and of the same quality in terms of noise level as the ones obtained without respiratory gating. The clinical feasibility of the proposed techniques was also demonstrated. (author) [fr

  18. High-resolution imaging of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion with {sup 68}Ga-VQ respiratory gated (4-D) PET/CT

    Callahan, Jason [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Hofman, Michael S. [The University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Siva, Shankar [The University of Melbourne, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The University of Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Kron, Tomas [The University of Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The University of Melbourne, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Physical Sciences, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Schneider, Michal E. [Monash University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Science, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Binns, David; Eu, Peter [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Cancer Imaging, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [The University of Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2014-02-15

    Our group has previously reported on the use of {sup 68}Ga-ventilation/perfusion (VQ) PET/CT scanning for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. We describe here the acquisition methodology for {sup 68}Ga-VQ respiratory gated (4-D) PET/CT and the effects of respiratory motion on image coregistration in VQ scanning. A prospective study was performed in 15 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. 4-D PET and 4-D CT images were acquired using an infrared marker on the patient's abdomen as a surrogate for breathing motion following inhalation of Galligas and intravenous administration of {sup 68}Ga-macroaggregated albumin. Images were reconstructed with phase-matched attenuation correction. The lungs were contoured on CT and PET VQ images during free-breathing (FB) and at maximum inspiration (Insp) and expiration (Exp). The similarity between PET and CT volumes was measured using the Dice coefficient (DC) comparing the following groups; (1) FB-PET/CT, (2) InspPET/InspCT, (3) ExpPET/Exp CT, and (4) FB-PET/AveCT. A repeated measures one-way ANOVA with multiple comparison Tukey tests were performed to evaluate any difference between the groups. Diaphragmatic motion in the superior-inferior direction on the 4-D CT scan was also measured. 4-D VQ scanning was successful in all patients without additional acquisition time compared to the nongated technique. The highest volume overlap was between ExpPET and ExpCT and between FB-PET and AveCT with a DC of 0.82 and 0.80 for ventilation and perfusion, respectively. This was significantly better than the DC comparing the other groups (0.78-0.79, p < 0.05). These values agreed with a visual inspection of the images with improved image coregistration around the lung bases. The diaphragmatic motion during the 4-D CT scan was highly variable with a range of 0.4-3.4 cm (SD 0.81 cm) in the right lung and 0-2.8 cm (SD 0.83 cm) in the left lung. Right-sided diaphragmatic nerve palsy was observed in 3 of 15 patients. {sup 68}Ga-VQ 4-D

  19. General method for realizing the conditional phase-shift gate and a simulation of Grover's algorithm in an ion-trap system

    Fujiwara, Shingo; Hasegawa, Shuichi

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that, in order to build the universal quantum circuit, one only needs one-qubit rotation gate and two-qubit controlled-NOT gate and until now quantum networks have been built from these gates. However, the minimum components of quantum networks in real experiments are not these quantum gates, so we develop a general method for realizing the conditional phase-shift gate in multiqubit ion-trap quantum computation which has the scalability to N qubits (N≥3). The duration of the laser manipulations for the proposed conditional phase-shift gate is almost the same as that for the controlled-NOT gate in ion-trap quantum computation. Moreover, we simulate Grover's algorithm taking into consideration the real laser fluctuations and analyze the effect of decoherence on the practical search

  20. Real-world comparison of two molecular methods for detection of respiratory viruses

    Miller E Kathryn

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular polymerase chain reaction (PCR based assays are increasingly used to diagnose viral respiratory infections and conduct epidemiology studies. Molecular assays have generally been evaluated by comparing them to conventional direct fluorescent antibody (DFA or viral culture techniques, with few published direct comparisons between molecular methods or between institutions. We sought to perform a real-world comparison of two molecular respiratory viral diagnostic methods between two experienced respiratory virus research laboratories. Methods We tested nasal and throat swab specimens obtained from 225 infants with respiratory illness for 11 common respiratory viruses using both a multiplex assay (Respiratory MultiCode-PLx Assay [RMA] and individual real-time RT-PCR (RT-rtPCR. Results Both assays detected viruses in more than 70% of specimens, but there was discordance. The RMA assay detected significantly more human metapneumovirus (HMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, while RT-rtPCR detected significantly more influenza A. We speculated that primer differences accounted for these discrepancies and redesigned the primers and probes for influenza A in the RMA assay, and for HMPV and RSV in the RT-rtPCR assay. The tests were then repeated and again compared. The new primers led to improved detection of HMPV and RSV by RT-rtPCR assay, but the RMA assay remained similar in terms of influenza detection. Conclusions Given the absence of a gold standard, clinical and research laboratories should regularly correlate the results of molecular assays with other PCR based assays, other laboratories, and with standard virologic methods to ensure consistency and accuracy.

  1. Study To Build Method For Analyzing Some Component Of Airborne Which Cause Respiratory Disease

    Vo Thi Anh; Nguyen Thuy Binh; Vuong Thu Bac; Ha Lan Anh; Nguyen Hong Thinh; Duong Van Thang; Nguyen Mai Anh; Vo Tuong Hanh

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol sampler is located at the top of the three floors building of INST. The amount of PM particle and components such as black carbon; chemical elements; violated organic compounds and microorganisms are analyzed by appropriate methods. Using the method of regression and analysis of variance ANOVA to find out correlation between there pollution components and patients treated at the Department of Respiratory in Hanoi E-Hospital. It shown that microorganisms, benzene, toluene, element sulfur and element silica have effects on monthly number of patients treated respiratory diseases at the E-Hospital. (author)

  2. SU-G-JeP3-13: Use of Volumetric Indices to Study the Viability of Respiratory Gating in Conjunction with Abdominal Compression in the Management of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Tumors Using Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Under the Conditions of Controlled Breathing

    Malhotra, H; Gomez, J [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM TG-76 report advises lung patients experiencing tumor motion >5mm to use some form of motion management with even smaller limit for complex/special procedures like SBRT. Generally, either respiratory gating or abdominal compression is used for motion management. In this retrospective study, we are using an innovative index, Volumetric Indices (VI) = (GTVnn AND GTV{sub 50+}Xmm)/(GTVnn) to quantify how much of the tumor remains within 1, 2, and 3mm margins throughout the breathing cycle using GTV{sub 50+}Xmm margin on GTV{sub 50}[nn=0,10,20,…90]. Using appropriate limits, VI can provide tumor motion information and to check if RPM gates could have been used in conjunction with abdominal compression to better manage tumor motion. Methods: 64 SBRT patients with a total of 67 lung tumors were studied. 4DCT scans were taken, fully capturing tumor motion throughout the 10 phases of the breathing cycle. For each phase, Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) was segmented and appropriates structures were defined to determine VI values. For the 2mm margin, VI values less than 0.95 for peripheral lesions and 0.97 for central lesions indicate tumor movement greater than 4mm. VI values for 1mm and 3mm margins were also analyzed signifying tumor motion of 2mm & 6mm, respectively. Results: Of the 64 patients, 35 (55%) had motion greater than 4mm & could have benefited from respiratory gating. For 5/8 (63%) middle lobe lesions, 21/27 (78%) lower lobe lesions, and 10/32 (31%) upper lobe lesions, gating could have resulted in smaller ITV. 32/55 (58%) peripheral lesions and 4/12 (33%) central lesions could have had gating. Average ITV decreased by 1.25cc (11.43%) and average VI increased by 0.11. Conclusion: Out of 64 patients, 55% exhibited motion greater than 4mm even with abdominal compression. Even with abdominalcompression, lung tumors can move >4mm as the degree of pressure which a patient can tolerate, is patient specific.

  3. FEVER IN CHILDREN WITH RESPIRATORY VIRAL INFECTIONS: EFFECTIVE AND SAFE METHODS OF TREATMENT

    T. E. Taranushenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important — the problem of treatment of fever in children with respiratory viral infections — is discussed in this article. It is fever as one of the first symptoms of disease which often frightens parents and leads to inappropriate and excess usage of antipyretic agents, which in its turn can cause unfavorable consequences. The authors represent their own data on frequency of antipyretic drugs usage in children with respiratory viral infections, as well as the answers of pediatricians to the questionnaires on methods of choice in temperature normalization. According to the modern Russian as well as European and American clinical guidelines on treatment of fever in children the management of selection of patients demanding antipyretic treatment is detailed, indications and contraindications to such therapy are described, the most effective methods of temperature normalization in children with acute respiratory infection are discussed. The authors suggested the data on recommended dosages of paracetamol, which were revised in 2011 by the UK Medicines Control Agency, to be very useful. The current information on advantages of ibuprofen in comparison to paracetamol in treatment of fever in children with respiratory viral infections is shown. The main target of this article is understanding and acceptance by pediatricians of the modern recommendation on differential and reasonable approach to administration of antipyretic drugs in children with respiratory viral infections.

  4. Explaining transgression in respiratory rate observation methods in the emergency department: A classic grounded theory analysis.

    Flenady, Tracy; Dwyer, Trudy; Applegarth, Judith

    2017-09-01

    Abnormal respiratory rates are one of the first indicators of clinical deterioration in emergency department(ED) patients. Despite the importance of respiratory rate observations, this vital sign is often inaccurately recorded on ED observation charts, compromising patient safety. Concurrently, there is a paucity of research reporting why this phenomenon occurs. To develop a substantive theory explaining ED registered nurses' reasoning when they miss or misreport respiratory rate observations. This research project employed a classic grounded theory analysis of qualitative data. Seventy-nine registered nurses currently working in EDs within Australia. Data collected included detailed responses from individual interviews and open-ended responses from an online questionnaire. Classic grounded theory (CGT) research methods were utilised, therefore coding was central to the abstraction of data and its reintegration as theory. Constant comparison synonymous with CGT methods were employed to code data. This approach facilitated the identification of the main concern of the participants and aided in the generation of theory explaining how the participants processed this issue. The main concern identified is that ED registered nurses do not believe that collecting an accurate respiratory rate for ALL patients at EVERY round of observations is a requirement, and yet organizational requirements often dictate that a value for the respiratory rate be included each time vital signs are collected. The theory 'Rationalising Transgression', explains how participants continually resolve this problem. The study found that despite feeling professionally conflicted, nurses often erroneously record respiratory rate observations, and then rationalise this behaviour by employing strategies that adjust the significance of the organisational requirement. These strategies include; Compensating, when nurses believe they are compensating for errant behaviour by enhancing the patient's outcome

  5. Evaluation of two different respiratory physiotherapy methods after ...

    Introduction: Although the methods used in thoracic surgery have been developing rapidly over the last five decades, postoperative pulmonary complications are seen in this field more than in other surgical branches. We aimed at comparing the acute effects of incentive spirometry (IS) and breathing retraining exercises by ...

  6. Evaluation of two different respiratory physiotherapy methods after ...

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... Methods: Patients were randomized into two groups as spirometry and physiotherapist. Combined .... thoracic surgery, and efficiency of pain control, shoulder ... coughing, posture exercises and combined respiration exercises ..... non‑small cell lung cancer in the elderly: A nested case‑control study. Ann.

  7. Intervention methods to control the transmission of noroviruses and other enteric and respiratory viruses

    Tuladhar, E.

    2014-01-01

    Intervention methods to control the transmission of noroviruses and other enteric and respiratory viruses

    Era Tuladhar

    Abstract

    Human noroviruses are the leading cause of acute and outbreak associated gastroenteritis worldwide. The outbreaks

  8. Measurements of the velocity fields by PIV method round about titling gate

    Mistrová Ivana

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with problems of using of measurement method Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV to measure velocity fields in the flowing water in front, above and behind drowned titling weir gate. The aim was to obtain information about the distribution of speed in the area of interest for the verification or calibration of the numerical model. Experiments were carried out in inclinable channel connected to the hydraulic circuit with a pump and storage tank at the Water Management Research Laboratory (LVV of Institute of Water Structures at the Faculty of Civil Engineering in Brno University of Technology. Hydraulic inclinable channel has cross-section with dimensions of 0.4×0.4m and length of 12.5m. The measured area has cross-section approximately 0.2m wide and 0.4m high and its length is 1m. The results of physical modelling allowed a comparison of experimental data with numerical simulation results of this type of flow in the commercial software ANSYS CFX-12.0.

  9. A new method for measuring temporal resolution in electrocardiogram-gated reconstruction image with area-detector computed tomography

    Kaneko, Takeshi; Takagi, Masachika; Kato, Ryohei; Anno, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Masanao; Yoshimi, Satoshi; Sanda, Yoshihiro; Katada, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design and construct a phantom for using motion artifact in the electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated reconstruction image. In addition, the temporal resolution under various conditions was estimated. A stepping motor was used to move the phantom over an arc in a reciprocating manner. The program for controlling the stepping motor permitted the stationary period and the heart rate to be adjusted as desired. Images of the phantom were obtained using a 320-row area-detector computed tomography (ADCT) system under various conditions using the ECG-gated reconstruction method. For estimation, the reconstruction phase was continuously changed and the motion artifacts were quantitatively assessed. The temporal resolution was calculated from the number of motion-free images. Changes in the temporal resolution according to heart rate, rotation time, the number of reconstruction segments and acquisition position in z-axis were also investigated. The measured temporal resolution of ECG-gated half reconstruction is 180 ms, which is in good agreement with the nominal temporal resolution of 175 ms. The measured temporal resolution of ECG-gated segmental reconstruction is in good agreement with the nominal temporal resolution in most cases. The estimated temporal resolution improved to approach the nominal temporal resolution as the number of reconstruction segments was increased. Temporal resolution in changing acquisition position is equal. This study shows that we could design a new phantom for estimating temporal resolution. (author)

  10. Production of Superoxide in Bacteria Is Stress- and Cell State-Dependent: A Gating-Optimized Flow Cytometry Method that Minimizes ROS Measurement Artifacts with Fluorescent Dyes.

    McBee, Megan E; Chionh, Yok H; Sharaf, Mariam L; Ho, Peiying; Cai, Maggie W L; Dedon, Peter C

    2017-01-01

    The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in microbial metabolism and stress response has emerged as a major theme in microbiology and infectious disease. Reactive fluorescent dyes have the potential to advance the study of ROS in the complex intracellular environment, especially for high-content and high-throughput analyses. However, current dye-based approaches to measuring intracellular ROS have the potential for significant artifacts. Here, we describe a robust platform for flow cytometric quantification of ROS in bacteria using fluorescent dyes, with ROS measurements in 10s-of-1000s of individual cells under a variety of conditions. False positives and variability among sample types (e.g., bacterial species, stress conditions) are reduced with a flexible four-step gating scheme that accounts for side- and forward-scattered light (morphological changes), background fluorescence, DNA content, and dye uptake to identify cells producing ROS. Using CellROX Green dye with Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium smegmatis , and Mycobacterium bovis BCG as diverse model bacteria, we show that (1) the generation of a quantifiable CellROX Green signal for superoxide, but not hydrogen peroxide-induced hydroxyl radicals, validates this dye as a superoxide detector; (2) the level of dye-detectable superoxide does not correlate with cytotoxicity or antibiotic sensitivity; (3) the non-replicating, antibiotic tolerant state of nutrient-deprived mycobacteria is associated with high levels of superoxide; and (4) antibiotic-induced production of superoxide is idiosyncratic with regard to both the species and the physiological state of the bacteria. We also show that the gating method is applicable to other fluorescent indicator dyes, such as the 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate acetoxymethyl ester and 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride for cellular esterase and reductive respiratory activities, respectively. These results demonstrate that properly controlled flow cytometry coupled

  11. Accuracy and effectiveness of self-gating signals in free-breathing three-dimensional cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging

    Li Shuo; Gao Song; Wang Lei; Zhu Yan-Chun; Yang Jie; Xie Yao-Qin; Fu Nan; Wang Yi

    2016-01-01

    Conventional multiple breath-hold two-dimensional (2D) balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) presents many difficulties in cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently, a self-gated free-breathing three-dimensional (3D) SSFP technique has been proposed as an alternative in many studies. However, the accuracy and effectiveness of self-gating signals have been barely studied before. Since self-gating signals are crucially important in image reconstruction, a systematic study of self-gating signals and comparison with external monitored signals are needed.Previously developed self-gated free-breathing 3D SSFP techniques are used on twenty-eight healthy volunteers. Both electrocardiographic (ECG) and respiratory bellow signals are also acquired during the scan as external signals. Self-gating signal and external signal are compared by trigger and gating window. Gating window is proposed to evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of respiratory self-gating signal. Relative deviation of the trigger and root-mean-square-deviation of the cycle duration are calculated. A two-tailed paired t-test is used to identify the difference between self-gating and external signals. A Wilcoxon signed rank test is used to identify the difference between peak and valley self-gating triggers.The results demonstrate an excellent correlation ( P = 0, R > 0.99) between self-gating and external triggers. Wilcoxon signed rank test shows that there is no significant difference between peak and valley self-gating triggers for both cardiac ( H = 0, P > 0.10) and respiratory ( H = 0, P > 0.44) motions. The difference between self-gating and externally monitored signals is not significant (two-tailed paired-sample t-test: H = 0, P > 0.90).The self-gating signals could demonstrate cardiac and respiratory motion accurately and effectively as ECG and respiratory bellow. The difference between the two methods is not significant and can be explained. Furthermore, few ECG trigger errors

  12. Quantum gate decomposition algorithms.

    Slepoy, Alexander

    2006-07-01

    Quantum computing algorithms can be conveniently expressed in a format of a quantum logical circuits. Such circuits consist of sequential coupled operations, termed ''quantum gates'', or quantum analogs of bits called qubits. We review a recently proposed method [1] for constructing general ''quantum gates'' operating on an qubits, as composed of a sequence of generic elementary ''gates''.

  13. Respiratory monitoring with an acceleration sensor

    Ono, Tomohiro; Takegawa, Hideki; Ageishi, Tatsuya; Takashina, Masaaki; Numasaki, Hodaka; Matsumoto, Masao; Teshima, Teruki

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory gating radiotherapy is used to irradiate a local area and to reduce normal tissue toxicity. There are certain methods for the detection of tumor motions, for example, using internal markers or an external respiration signal. However, because some of these respiratory monitoring systems require special or expensive equipment, respiratory monitoring can usually be performed only in limited facilities. In this study, the feasibility of using an acceleration sensor for respiratory monitoring was evaluated. The respiratory motion was represented by means of a platform and measured five times with the iPod touch (registered) at 3, 4 and 5 s periods of five breathing cycles. For these three periods of the reference waveform, the absolute means ± standard deviation (SD) of displacement were 0.45 ± 0.34 mm, 0.33 ± 0.24 mm and 0.31 ± 0.23 mm, respectively. On the other hand, the corresponding absolute means ± SD for the periods were 0.04 ± 0.09 s, 0.04 ± 0.02 s and 0.06 ± 0.04 s. The accuracy of respiratory monitoring using the acceleration sensor was satisfactory in terms of the absolute means ± SD. Using the iPod touch (registered) for respiratory monitoring does not need special equipment and makes respiratory monitoring easier. For these reasons, this system is a viable alternative to other respiratory monitoring systems.

  14. MR flow measurements for assessment of the pulmonary, systemic and bronchosystemic circulation: Impact of different ECG gating methods and breathing schema

    Ley, Sebastian; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Iliyushenko, Svitlana; Puderbach, Michael; Hosch, Waldemar; Wenz, Heiner; Schenk, Jens-Peter; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Different ECG gating techniques are available for MR phase-contrast (PC) flow measurements. Until now no study has reported the impact of different ECG gating techniques on quantitative flow parameters. The goal was to evaluate the impact of the gating method and the breathing schema on the pulmonary, systemic and bronchosystemic circulation. Material and methods: Twenty volunteers were examined (1.5 T) with free breathing phase-contrast flow (PC-flow) measurements with prospective (free-prospective) and retrospective (free-retrospective) ECG gating. Additionally, expiratory breath-hold retrospective ECG gated measurements (bh-retrospective) were performed. Blood flow per minute; peak velocity and time to peak velocity were compared. The clinically important difference between the systemic and pulmonary circulation (bronchosystemic shunt) was calculated. Results: Blood flow per minute was lowest for free-prospective (6 l/min, pulmonary trunc) and highest for bh-retrospective measurements (6.9 l/min, pulmonary trunc). No clinically significant difference in peak velocity was assessed (82-83 cm/s pulmonary trunc, 109-113 cm/s aorta). Time to peak velocity was shorter for retro-gated free-retrospective and bh-retrospective than for pro-gated free-prospective. The difference between systemic and pulmonary measurements was least for the free-retrospective technique. Conclusion: The type of gating has a significant impact on flow measurements. Therefore, it is important to use the same ECG gating method, especially for follow-up examinations. Retrospective ECG gated free breathing measurements allow for the most precise assessment of the bronchosystemic blood flow and should be used in clinical routine

  15. A semi-automatic method for peak and valley detection in free-breathing respiratory waveforms

    Lu Wei; Nystrom, Michelle M.; Parikh, Parag J.; Fooshee, David R.; Hubenschmidt, James P.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Low, Daniel A.

    2006-01-01

    The existing commercial software often inadequately determines respiratory peaks for patients in respiration correlated computed tomography. A semi-automatic method was developed for peak and valley detection in free-breathing respiratory waveforms. First the waveform is separated into breath cycles by identifying intercepts of a moving average curve with the inspiration and expiration branches of the waveform. Peaks and valleys were then defined, respectively, as the maximum and minimum between pairs of alternating inspiration and expiration intercepts. Finally, automatic corrections and manual user interventions were employed. On average for each of the 20 patients, 99% of 307 peaks and valleys were automatically detected in 2.8 s. This method was robust for bellows waveforms with large variations

  16. Real-time prediction of respiratory motion based on local regression methods

    Ruan, D; Fessler, J A; Balter, J M

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in modulation techniques enable conformal delivery of radiation doses to small, localized target volumes. One of the challenges in using these techniques is real-time tracking and predicting target motion, which is necessary to accommodate system latencies. For image-guided-radiotherapy systems, it is also desirable to minimize sampling rates to reduce imaging dose. This study focuses on predicting respiratory motion, which can significantly affect lung tumours. Predicting respiratory motion in real-time is challenging, due to the complexity of breathing patterns and the many sources of variability. We propose a prediction method based on local regression. There are three major ingredients of this approach: (1) forming an augmented state space to capture system dynamics, (2) local regression in the augmented space to train the predictor from previous observation data using semi-periodicity of respiratory motion, (3) local weighting adjustment to incorporate fading temporal correlations. To evaluate prediction accuracy, we computed the root mean square error between predicted tumor motion and its observed location for ten patients. For comparison, we also investigated commonly used predictive methods, namely linear prediction, neural networks and Kalman filtering to the same data. The proposed method reduced the prediction error for all imaging rates and latency lengths, particularly for long prediction lengths

  17. Comparative evaluation of CT-based and respiratory-gated PET/CT-based planning target volume (PTV) in the definition of radiation treatment planning in lung cancer: preliminary results

    Guerra, Luca; Elisei, Federica [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); Meregalli, Sofia; Niespolo, Rita [San Gerardo Hospital, Radiotherapy, Monza (Italy); Zorz, Alessandra; De Ponti, Elena; Morzenti, Sabrina; Crespi, Andrea [San Gerardo Hospital, Medical Physics, Monza (Italy); Brenna, Sarah [University of Milan-Bicocca, School of Radiation Oncology, Monza (Italy); Gardani, Gianstefano [San Gerardo Hospital, Radiotherapy, Monza (Italy); University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Messa, Cristina [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); University of Milan-Bicocca, Tecnomed Foundation, Milan (Italy); National Research Council, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to compare planning target volume (PTV) defined on respiratory-gated positron emission tomography (PET)/CT (RG-PET/CT) to PTV based on ungated free-breathing CT and to evaluate if RG-PET/CT can be useful to personalize PTV by tailoring the target volume to the lesion motion in lung cancer patients. Thirteen lung cancer patients (six men, mean age 70.0 years, 1 small cell lung cancer, 12 non-small cell lung cancer) who were candidates for radiation therapy were prospectively enrolled and submitted to RG-PET/CT. Ungated free-breathing CT images obtained during a PET/CT study were visually contoured by the radiation oncologist to define standard clinical target volumes (CTV1). Standard PTV (PTV1) resulted from CTV1 with the addition of 1-cm expansion of margins in all directions. RG-PET/CT images were contoured by the nuclear medicine physician and radiation oncologist according to a standardized institutional protocol for contouring gated images. Each CT and PET image of the patient's respiratory cycle phases was contoured to obtain the RG-CT-based CTV (CTV2) and the RG-PET/CT-based CTV (CTV3), respectively. RG-CT-based and RG-PET/CT-based PTV (PTV2 and PTV3, respectively) were then derived from gated CTVs with a margin expansion of 7-8 mm in head to feet direction and 5 mm in anterior to posterior and left to right direction. The portions of gated PTV2 and PTV3 geometrically not encompassed in PTV1 (PTV2 out PTV1 and PTV3 out PTV1) were also calculated. Mean ± SD CTV1, CTV2 and CTV3 were 30.5 ± 33.2, 43.1 ± 43.2 and 44.8 ± 45.2 ml, respectively. CTV1 was significantly smaller than CTV2 and CTV3 (p = 0.017 and 0.009 with Student's t test, respectively). No significant difference was found between CTV2 and CTV3. Mean ± SD of PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 were 118.7 ± 94.1, 93.8 ± 80.2 and 97.0 ± 83.9 ml, respectively. PTV1 was significantly larger than PTV2 and PTV3 (p = 0.038 and 0.043 with Student's t test, respectively). No

  18. Management of respiratory motion in radiation oncology

    Vedam, Subrahmanya Sastry

    2003-01-01

    images obtained during simulation by reducing the motion artifacts typically seen during CT imaging. An analysis of several patient breathing patterns with (audio instructions and visual feedback) and without training, indicated that breathing training improved the reproducibility of amplitude and/or frequency of patient breathing cycles. A phantom based study by superposition of sinusoidal motion of a 'simulated' tumor onto the initial beam aperture as formed by the multileaf collimator revealed that target dose measurements obtained with such a motion synchronized setup were equivalent to those delivered to a static target by a static beam. An attempt to acquire respiration synchronized (4D) CT images of a motion phantom and a patient also yielded a 4D CT data set with reduced motion artifacts. Respiratory gated and respiration synchronized radiotherapy are both viable approaches to account for respiratory motion during radiotherapy. While respiratory gated radiotherapy has been successfully implemented in some centers, several technical advances are required for clinical implementation of respiration synchronized radiotherapy. Future applicability of either of the above approaches as routine treatment procedures will be determined by their potential clinical gains over currently available methods

  19. SU-F-T-526: A Comparative Study On Gating Efficiency of Varian RPM Device and Calypso System

    Ravindran, P [Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore (India); Wui Ann, W; Lim, Y [The Brunei Cancer Center (Brunei Darussalam)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In general, the linear accelerator is gated using respiratory signal obtained by way of external sensors to account for the breathing motion during radiotherapy. One of the commonly used gating devices is the Varian RPM device. Calypso system that uses electromagnetic tracking of implanted or surface transponders could also be used for gating. The aim of this study is to compare the gating efficiency of RPM device and the calypso system by phantom studies. Methods: An ArcCheck insert was used as the phantom with a Gafchromic film placed in its holder. The ArcCheck insert was placed on a Motion Sim platform and moved in the longitudinal direction simulating a respiratory motion with a period of 5 seconds and amplitude of ±6mm. The Gafchromic film was exposed to a 2 × 2cm{sup 2} field, i) with the phantom static, ii) phantom moving but ungated iii) gated with gating window of 2mm and 3mm. This was repeated with Calypso system using surface transponders with the same gating window. The Gafchromic films were read with an EPSON 11000 flatbed scanner and analysed with ‘Medphysto’ software. Results: The full width at half maximum (FWHM) as measured with film at the level of the film holder was 1.65cm when the phantom was static. FWHM measured with phantom moving and without gating was 1.16 cm and penumbra was 7 mm (80–20%) on both sides. When the beam was gated with 2 mm gating window the FWHM was 1.8 cm with RPM device and 1.9 cm with Calypso. Similarly, when the beam was gated with 3 mm window, the FWHM was 1.9cm with RPM device and 2cm with Calypso. Conclusion: This work suggests that the gating efficiency of RPM device is better than that of the Calypso with surface transponder, with reference to the latency in gating.

  20. The impact of optimal respiratory gating and image noise on evaluation of intra-tumor heterogeneity in 18F-FDG positron emission tomography imaging of lung cancer

    Grootjans, W.; Tixier, F.; Vos, C.S. van der; Vriens, D.; Rest, C.C. Le; Bussink, J.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Visvikis, D.; Visser, E.P.

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of measurement accuracy of intra-tumor heterogeneity using texture features in positron emission tomography (PET) images is essential to characterize cancer lesions with high precision. In this study, we investigated the influence of respiratory motion and varying noise levels on

  1. The Impact of Optimal Respiratory Gating and Image Noise on Evaluation of Intratumor Heterogeneity on 18F-FDG PET Imaging of Lung Cancer

    Grootjans, W.; Tixier, F.; van der Vos, Charlotte Sophie; Vriens, D.; Le Rest, C.C.; Bussink, J.; Oyen, W.J.; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Visvikis, D.; Visser, E.P.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurement of intratumor heterogeneity using parameters of texture on PET images is essential for precise characterization of cancer lesions. In this study, we investigated the influence of respiratory motion and varying noise levels on quantification of textural parameters in patients

  2. Motion management during IMAT treatment of mobile lung tumors-A comparison of MLC tracking and gated delivery

    Falk, Marianne; Pommer, Tobias; Keall, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:To compare real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking, respiratory amplitude and phase gating, and no compensation for intrafraction motion management during intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods: Motion management with MLC tracking and gating was evaluated for four...... tracking reduced the effects of the target movements, although the gated delivery showed a better dosimetric accuracy and enabled a larger reduction of the margins in some cases. MLC tracking did not prolong the treatment time compared to delivery with no motion compensation while gating had a considerably...... of the dosimetric error contributions showed that the gated delivery mainly had errors in target localization, while MLC tracking also had contributions from MLC leaf fitting and leaf adjustment. The average treatment time was about three times longer with gating compared to delivery with MLC tracking (that did...

  3. Off-line wafer level reliability control: unique measurement method to monitor the lifetime indicator of gate oxide validated within bipolar/CMOS/DMOS technology

    Gagnard, Xavier; Bonnaud, Olivier

    2000-08-01

    We have recently published a paper on a new rapid method for the determination of the lifetime of the gate oxide involved in a Bipolar/CMOS/DMOS technology (BCD). Because this previous method was based on a current measurement with gate voltage as a parameter needing several stress voltages, it was applied only by lot sampling. Thus, we tried to find an indicator in order to monitor the gate oxide lifetime during the wafer level parametric test and involving only one measurement of the device on each wafer test cell. Using the Weibull law and Crook model, combined with our recent model, we have developed a new test method needing only one electrical measurement of MOS capacitor to monitor the quality of the gate oxide. Based also on a current measurement, the parameter is the lifetime indicator of the gate oxide. From the analysis of several wafers, we gave evidence of the possibility to detect a low performance wafer, which corresponds to the infantile failure on the Weibull plot. In order to insert this new method in the BCD parametric program, a parametric flowchart was established. This type of measurement is an important challenges, because the actual measurements, breakdown charge, Qbd, and breakdown electric field, Ebd, at parametric level and Ebd and interface states density, Dit during the process cannot guarantee the gate oxide lifetime all along fabrication process. This indicator measurement is the only one, which predicts the lifetime decrease.

  4. High-resolution 3D coronary vessel wall imaging with near 100% respiratory efficiency using epicardial fat tracking: reproducibility and comparison with standard methods.

    Scott, Andrew D; Keegan, Jennifer; Firmin, David N

    2011-01-01

    To quantitatively assess the performance and reproducibility of 3D spiral coronary artery wall imaging with beat-to-beat respiratory-motion-correction (B2B-RMC) compared to navigator gated 2D spiral and turbo-spin-echo (TSE) acquisitions. High-resolution (0.7 × 0.7 mm) cross-sectional right coronary wall acquisitions were performed in 10 subjects using four techniques (B2B-RMC 3D spiral with alternate (2RR) and single (1RR) R-wave gating, navigator-gated 2D spiral (2RR) and navigator-gated 2D TSE (2RR)) on two occasions. Wall thickness measurements were compared with repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Reproducibility was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). In all, 91% (73/80) of acquisitions were successful (failures: four TSE, two 3D spiral (1RR) and one 3D spiral (2RR)). Respiratory efficiency of the B2B-RMC was less variable and substantially higher than for navigator gating (99.6 ± 1.2% vs. 39.0 ± 7.5%, P B2B-RMC permits coronary vessel wall assessment over multiple thin contiguous slices in a clinically feasible duration. Excellent reproducibility of the technique potentially enables studies of disease progression/regression. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Signatures of Mechanosensitive Gating.

    Morris, Richard G

    2017-01-10

    The question of how mechanically gated membrane channels open and close is notoriously difficult to address, especially if the protein structure is not available. This perspective highlights the relevance of micropipette-aspirated single-particle tracking-used to obtain a channel's diffusion coefficient, D, as a function of applied membrane tension, σ-as an indirect assay for determining functional behavior in mechanosensitive channels. While ensuring that the protein remains integral to the membrane, such methods can be used to identify not only the gating mechanism of a protein, but also associated physical moduli, such as torsional and dilational rigidity, which correspond to the protein's effective shape change. As an example, three distinct D-versus-σ "signatures" are calculated, corresponding to gating by dilation, gating by tilt, and gating by a combination of both dilation and tilt. Both advantages and disadvantages of the approach are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Predicting respiratory motion signals for image-guided radiotherapy using multi-step linear methods (MULIN)

    Ernst, Floris; Schweikard, Achim

    2008-01-01

    Forecasting of respiration motion in image-guided radiotherapy requires algorithms that can accurately and efficiently predict target location. Improved methods for respiratory motion forecasting were developed and tested. MULIN, a new family of prediction algorithms based on linear expansions of the prediction error, was developed and tested. Computer-generated data with a prediction horizon of 150 ms was used for testing in simulation experiments. MULIN was compared to Least Mean Squares-based predictors (LMS; normalized LMS, nLMS; wavelet-based multiscale autoregression, wLMS) and a multi-frequency Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) approach. The in vivo performance of the algorithms was tested on data sets of patients who underwent radiotherapy. The new MULIN methods are highly competitive, outperforming the LMS and the EKF prediction algorithms in real-world settings and performing similarly to optimized nLMS and wLMS prediction algorithms. On simulated, periodic data the MULIN algorithms are outperformed only by the EKF approach due to its inherent advantage in predicting periodic signals. In the presence of noise, the MULIN methods significantly outperform all other algorithms. The MULIN family of algorithms is a feasible tool for the prediction of respiratory motion, performing as well as or better than conventional algorithms while requiring significantly lower computational complexity. The MULIN algorithms are of special importance wherever high-speed prediction is required. (orig.)

  7. Predicting respiratory motion signals for image-guided radiotherapy using multi-step linear methods (MULIN)

    Ernst, Floris; Schweikard, Achim [University of Luebeck, Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, Luebeck (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    Forecasting of respiration motion in image-guided radiotherapy requires algorithms that can accurately and efficiently predict target location. Improved methods for respiratory motion forecasting were developed and tested. MULIN, a new family of prediction algorithms based on linear expansions of the prediction error, was developed and tested. Computer-generated data with a prediction horizon of 150 ms was used for testing in simulation experiments. MULIN was compared to Least Mean Squares-based predictors (LMS; normalized LMS, nLMS; wavelet-based multiscale autoregression, wLMS) and a multi-frequency Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) approach. The in vivo performance of the algorithms was tested on data sets of patients who underwent radiotherapy. The new MULIN methods are highly competitive, outperforming the LMS and the EKF prediction algorithms in real-world settings and performing similarly to optimized nLMS and wLMS prediction algorithms. On simulated, periodic data the MULIN algorithms are outperformed only by the EKF approach due to its inherent advantage in predicting periodic signals. In the presence of noise, the MULIN methods significantly outperform all other algorithms. The MULIN family of algorithms is a feasible tool for the prediction of respiratory motion, performing as well as or better than conventional algorithms while requiring significantly lower computational complexity. The MULIN algorithms are of special importance wherever high-speed prediction is required. (orig.)

  8. Linear gate

    Suwono.

    1978-01-01

    A linear gate providing a variable gate duration from 0,40μsec to 4μsec was developed. The electronic circuity consists of a linear circuit and an enable circuit. The input signal can be either unipolar or bipolar. If the input signal is bipolar, the negative portion will be filtered. The operation of the linear gate is controlled by the application of a positive enable pulse. (author)

  9. Gated Treatment Delivery Verification With On-Line Megavoltage Fluoroscopy

    Tai An; Christensen, James D.; Gore, Elizabeth; Khamene, Ali; Boettger, Thomas; Li, X. Allen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and clinically demonstrate the use of on-line real-time megavoltage (MV) fluoroscopy for gated treatment delivery verification. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage fluoroscopy (MVF) image sequences were acquired using a flat panel equipped for MV cone-beam CT in synchrony with the respiratory signal obtained from the Anzai gating device. The MVF images can be obtained immediately before or during gated treatment delivery. A prototype software tool (named RTReg4D) was developed to register MVF images with phase-sequenced digitally reconstructed radiograph images generated from the treatment planning system based on four-dimensional CT. The image registration can be used to reposition the patient before or during treatment delivery. To demonstrate the reliability and clinical usefulness, the system was first tested using a thoracic phantom and then prospectively in actual patient treatments under an institutional review board-approved protocol. Results: The quality of the MVF images for lung tumors is adequate for image registration with phase-sequenced digitally reconstructed radiographs. The MVF was found to be useful for monitoring inter- and intrafractional variations of tumor positions. With the planning target volume contour displayed on the MVF images, the system can verify whether the moving target stays within the planning target volume margin during gated delivery. Conclusions: The use of MVF images was found to be clinically effective in detecting discrepancies in tumor location before and during respiration-gated treatment delivery. The tools and process developed can be useful for gated treatment delivery verification.

  10. Inhalation method for delivery of nanoparticles to the Drosophila respiratory system for toxicity testing

    Posgai, Ryan; Ahamed, Maqusood [Department of Biology, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH, 45469-2320 (United States); Hussain, Saber M. [Applied Biotechnology Branch, Human Effectiveness Directorate Air Force Research Laboratory/RHBP, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH, 45433 (United States); Rowe, John J. [Department of Biology, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH, 45469-2320 (United States); Nielsen, Mark G., E-mail: Mark.Nielsen@notes.udayton.edu [Department of Biology, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH, 45469-2320 (United States)

    2009-12-20

    The growth of the nanotechnology industry and subsequent proliferation of nanoparticle types present the need to rapidly assess nanoparticle toxicity. We present a novel, simple and cost-effective nebulizer-based method to deliver nanoparticles to the Drosophila melanogaster respiratory system, for the purpose of toxicity testing. FluoSpheres (registered) , silver, and CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles of different sizes were effectively aerosolized, showing the system is capable of functioning with a wide range of nanoparticle types and sizes. Red fluorescent CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles were successfully delivered to the fly respiratory system, as visualized by fluorescent microscopy. Silver coated and uncoated nanoparticles were delivered in a toxicity test, and induced Hsp70 expression in flies, confirming the utility of this model in toxicity testing. This is the first method developed capable of such delivery, provides the advantage of the Drosophila health model, and can serve as a link between tissue culture and more expensive mammalian models in a tiered toxicity testing strategy.

  11. Inhalation method for delivery of nanoparticles to the Drosophila respiratory system for toxicity testing

    Posgai, Ryan; Ahamed, Maqusood; Hussain, Saber M.; Rowe, John J.; Nielsen, Mark G.

    2009-01-01

    The growth of the nanotechnology industry and subsequent proliferation of nanoparticle types present the need to rapidly assess nanoparticle toxicity. We present a novel, simple and cost-effective nebulizer-based method to deliver nanoparticles to the Drosophila melanogaster respiratory system, for the purpose of toxicity testing. FluoSpheres (registered) , silver, and CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles of different sizes were effectively aerosolized, showing the system is capable of functioning with a wide range of nanoparticle types and sizes. Red fluorescent CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles were successfully delivered to the fly respiratory system, as visualized by fluorescent microscopy. Silver coated and uncoated nanoparticles were delivered in a toxicity test, and induced Hsp70 expression in flies, confirming the utility of this model in toxicity testing. This is the first method developed capable of such delivery, provides the advantage of the Drosophila health model, and can serve as a link between tissue culture and more expensive mammalian models in a tiered toxicity testing strategy.

  12. [Molecular diagnostic methods of respiratory infections. Has the scheme diagnosis changed?].

    Vila Estapé, Jordi; Zboromyrska, Yuliya; Vergara Gómez, Andrea; Alejo Cancho, Izaskun; Rubio García, Elisa; Álvarez-Martínez, Miriam José; la Bellacasa Brugada, Jorge Puig de; Marcos Maeso, M Ángeles

    2016-07-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections remain one of the most common causes of mortality worldwide, which is why early diagnosis is crucial. Traditionally the microbiological diagnosis of these infections has been based on conventional methods including culture on artificial media for isolation of bacteria and fungi and cell cultures for virus and antibody or antigen detection using antigen-antibody reactions. The main drawback of the above mentioned methods is the time needed for an etiological diagnosis of the infection. The techniques based on molecular biology have drawn much attention in recent decades as tools for rapid diagnosis of infections. Some techniques are very expensive, especially those that can detect various microorganisms in the same reaction, therefore the question that arises is whether the cost of such testing is justified by the information obtained and by the clinical impact that its implementation will determine. In this article we make a review of the various techniques of molecular biology applied to the diagnosis of pneumonia and focus primarily on analysing the impact they may have on the management of patients with acute respiratory tract infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer: comparison of free breathing gating with the breath-hold technique

    Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders N; Nøttrup, Trine Jakobi

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer implies a risk of late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. This is the first study to evaluate cardiopulmonary dose sparing of breathing adapted radiotherapy (BART) using free breathing gating......, and to compare this respiratory technique with voluntary breath-hold. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 17 patients were CT-scanned during non-coached breathing manoeuvre including free breathing (FB), end-inspiration gating (IG), end-expiration gating (EG), deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and end-expiration breath......-hold (EBH). The Varian Real-time Position Management system (RPM) was used to monitor respiratory movement and to gate the scanner. For each breathing phase, a population based internal margin (IM) was estimated based on average chest wall excursion, and incorporated into an individually optimised three...

  14. A new automated method for analysis of gated-SPECT images based on a three-dimensional heart shaped model

    Lomsky, Milan; Richter, Jens; Johansson, Lena

    2005-01-01

    A new automated method for quantification of left ventricular function from gated-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images has been developed. The method for quantification of cardiac function (CAFU) is based on a heart shaped model and the active shape algorithm. The model....... The maximal differences between the CAFU estimations and the true left ventricular volumes of the digital phantoms were 11 ml for the end-diastolic volume (EDV), 3 ml for the end-systolic volume (ESV) and 3% for the ejection fraction (EF). The largest differences were seen in the smallest heart....... In the patient group the EDV calculated using QGS and CAFU showed good agreement for large hearts and higher CAFU values compared with QGS for the smaller hearts. In the larger hearts, ESV was much larger for QGS than for CAFU both in the phantom and patient studies. In the smallest hearts there was good...

  15. Comparison of five methods for extraction of Legionella pneumophila from respiratory specimens.

    Wilson, Deborah; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Reischl, Udo; Warshawsky, Ilka; Procop, Gary W

    2004-12-01

    The efficiencies of five commercially available nucleic acid extraction methods were evaluated for the recovery of a standardized inoculum of Legionella pneumophila in respiratory specimens (sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL] specimens). The concentrations of Legionella DNA recovered from sputa with the automated MagNA Pure (526,200 CFU/ml) and NucliSens (171,800 CFU/ml) extractors were greater than those recovered with the manual methods (i.e., Roche High Pure kit [133,900 CFU/ml], QIAamp DNA Mini kit [46,380 CFU/ml], and ViralXpress kit [13,635 CFU/ml]). The rank order was the same for extracts from BAL specimens, except that for this specimen type the QIAamp DNA Mini kit recovered more than the Roche High Pure kit.

  16. A low-voltage flash memory cell utilizing the gate-injection program/erase method with a recessed channel structure

    Wu Dake; Huang Ru; Wang Pengfei; Tang Poren; Wang Yangyuan

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a low-voltage recessed channel SONOS flash memory using the gate-injection program/erase method is proposed and investigated for NAND application. It is shown that the proposed flash memory can achieve 8 V lower programming voltage compared with planar flash memory, due to the effective capacitance coupling and the electric-field enhancement by combining the recessed channel structure and the gate-injection program/erase method. In addition, more than 30% larger threshold voltage window and improved short channel effects can be obtained in the proposed flash memory

  17. Short-term effects of air pollution on lower respiratory diseases and forecasting by the group method of data handling

    Zhu, Wenjin; Wang, Jianzhou; Zhang, Wenyu; Sun, Donghuai

    2012-05-01

    Risk of lower respiratory diseases was significantly correlated with levels of monthly average concentration of SO2; NO2 and association rules have high lifts. In view of Lanzhou's special geographical location, taking into account the impact of different seasons, especially for the winter, the relations between air pollutants and the respiratory disease deserve further study. In this study the monthly average concentration of SO2, NO2, PM10 and the monthly number of people who in hospital because of lower respiratory disease from January 2001 to December 2005 are grouped equidistant and considered as the terms of transactions. Then based on the relational algebraic theory we employed the optimization relation association rule to mine the association rules of the transactions. Based on the association rules revealing the effects of air pollutants on the lower respiratory disease, we forecast the number of person who suffered from lower respiratory disease by the group method of data handling (GMDH) to reveal the risk and give a consultation to the hospital in Xigu District, the most seriously polluted district in Lanzhou. The data and analysis indicate that individuals may be susceptible to the short-term effects of pollution and thus suffer from lower respiratory diseases and this effect presents seasonal.

  18. A mixed methods study to understand patient expectations for antibiotics for an upper respiratory tract infection

    Christina Gaarslev

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antimicrobial resistance is a public health challenge supplemented by inappropriate prescribing, especially for an upper respiratory tract infection in primary care. Patient/carer expectations have been identified as one of the main drivers for inappropriate antibiotics prescribing by primary care physicians. The aim of this study was to understand who is more likely to expect an antibiotic for an upper respiratory tract infection from their doctor and the reasons underlying it. Methods This study used a sequential mixed methods approach: a nationally representative cross sectional survey (n = 1509 and four focus groups. The outcome of interest was expectation and demand for an antibiotic from a doctor when presenting with a cold or flu. Results The study found 19.5 % of survey respondents reported that they would expect the doctor to prescribe antibiotics for a cold or flu. People younger than 65 years of age, those who never attended university and those speaking a language other than English at home were more likely to expect or demand antibiotics for a cold or flu. People who knew that ‘antibiotics don’t kill viruses’ and agreed that ‘taking an antibiotic when one is not needed means they won’t work in the future’ were less likely to expect or demand antibiotics. The main reasons for expecting antibiotics were believing that antibiotics are an effective treatment for a cold or flu and that they shortened the duration and potential deterioration of their illness. The secondary reason centered around the value or return on investment for visiting a doctor when feeling unwell. Conclusion Our study found that patients do not appear to feel they have a sufficiently strong incentive to consider the impact of their immediate use of antibiotics on antimicrobial resistance. The issue of antibiotic resistance needs to be explained and reframed as a more immediate health issue with dire consequences to ensure the

  19. Acute Pain Perception During Different Sampling Methods for Respiratory Culture in Cystic Fibrosis Patients.

    Eyns, Hanneke; De Wachter, Elke; Malfroot, Anne; Vaes, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Reliable identification of lower respiratory tract pathogens is crucial in the management of cystic fibrosis (CF). The multitude of treatments and clinical procedures are a considerable burden and are potentially provoking pain. As part of another study (NCT02363764), investigating the bacterial yield of three sampling methods, nasal swabs (NSs), cough swabs (CSs), and (induced) sputum samples ([I]SSs), in both expectorating patients (EPs) and non-expectorating patients (NEPs) with CF, the present study aimed to explore the prevalence of respiratory culture sampling-related pain as assessed by self-report within a cohort of children and adults. Literate patients with CF (aged six years or older) completed a questionnaire on pain perception related to the three aforementioned sampling methods (No/Yes; visual analogue scale for pain [VAS-Pain] [0-10 cm]). In addition, patients were asked to rank these methods by their own preference without taking into account the presumed bacterial yield. In total, 119 questionnaires were returned. In the EPs-group, CS was most frequently (n%; mean VAS-Pain if pain [range]) reported as painful method: overall (n = 101; 12.9%; 1.8 [0.2-4.8]), children (n = 41; 22.0%; 1.4 [0.2-2.7]), and adults (n = 60; 6.7%; 2.5 [0.5-4.8]). Highest pain intensity scores were observed with NS overall (3.0%; 2.4 [0.3-6.2]) and in children (4.9%; 3.3 [0.3-6.2]), but not in adults (1.7%; 0.6 [-]).NEPs-children (n = 17) reported ISS most frequently and as most painful sampling method (17.6%; 2.0 [1.0-4.0]). The only NEP-adult did not perceive pain. NEPs preferred NS > CS > ISS (61.1%, 33.3%, 5.6%, respectively [P = 0.001]) as primary sampling method, whereas EPs preferred SS > NS > CS (65.7%, 26.3%, 8.1%, respectively [P method inversely correlated to pain perception and intensity in EPs (φ = -0.155 [P = 0.007] and ρ = -0.926 [P = 0.008], respectively), but not in NEPs (φ = -0.226 [P = 0.097] and ρ = -0.135 [P = 0

  20. Electrical Impedance Tomography: a new study method for neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    Chatziioannidis, I; Samaras, T; Nikolaidis, N

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of cardiorespiratory system diseases is a procedure that usually demands data collection on terms of the anatomy and the operation of the organs that are under study. Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is an alternative approach, in comparison to existing techniques. With EIT electrodes are placed in the perimeter of the human body and images of the estimated organ are reconstructed, using the measurement of its impendence (or resistance) distribution and determining its alteration through time, while at the same time the patient is not exposed to ionizing radiation. Its clinical use presupposes the correct placement of the electrodes over the perimeter of the human body, the rapid data collection and electrical safety. It is a low cost technique and it is implemented near the patient. It is able to determine the distribution of ventilation, blood supply, diffused or localized lung defects, but it can also estimate therapeutic interventions or alteration to assisted ventilation of the neonate. EIT was developed at the beginning of the 1980s, but it has only recently begun to be implemented on neonates, and especially in the study of their respiratory system function. The low rate of image analysis is considered to be a drawback, but it is offset by the potential offered for the estimation of lungs' function (both under normal and pathological conditions), since ventilation and resistance are two quite similar concepts. In this review the most important studies about EIT are mentioned as a method of estimating respiratory distress syndrome in neonates. In terms of the above mentioned development, it is supposed that this technique will offer a great amount of help to the doctor in his / her estimations of the cardiorespiratory system and to his / her selection of the best intervening strategies. PMID:22435017

  1. A mixed methods study to understand patient expectations for antibiotics for an upper respiratory tract infection.

    Gaarslev, Christina; Yee, Melissa; Chan, Georgi; Fletcher-Lartey, Stephanie; Khan, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a public health challenge supplemented by inappropriate prescribing, especially for an upper respiratory tract infection in primary care. Patient/carer expectations have been identified as one of the main drivers for inappropriate antibiotics prescribing by primary care physicians. The aim of this study was to understand who is more likely to expect an antibiotic for an upper respiratory tract infection from their doctor and the reasons underlying it. This study used a sequential mixed methods approach: a nationally representative cross sectional survey ( n  = 1509) and four focus groups. The outcome of interest was expectation and demand for an antibiotic from a doctor when presenting with a cold or flu. The study found 19.5 % of survey respondents reported that they would expect the doctor to prescribe antibiotics for a cold or flu. People younger than 65 years of age, those who never attended university and those speaking a language other than English at home were more likely to expect or demand antibiotics for a cold or flu. People who knew that 'antibiotics don't kill viruses' and agreed that 'taking an antibiotic when one is not needed means they won't work in the future' were less likely to expect or demand antibiotics. The main reasons for expecting antibiotics were believing that antibiotics are an effective treatment for a cold or flu and that they shortened the duration and potential deterioration of their illness. The secondary reason centered around the value or return on investment for visiting a doctor when feeling unwell. Our study found that patients do not appear to feel they have a sufficiently strong incentive to consider the impact of their immediate use of antibiotics on antimicrobial resistance. The issue of antibiotic resistance needs to be explained and reframed as a more immediate health issue with dire consequences to ensure the success of future health campaigns.

  2. Wicket gate trailing-edge blowing: A method for improving off-design hydroturbine performance by adjusting the runner inlet swirl angle

    Lewis, B J; Cimbala, J M; Wouden, A M

    2014-01-01

    At their best efficiency point (BEP), hydroturbines operate at very high efficiency. However, with the ever-increasing penetration of alternative electricity generation, it has become common to operate hydroturbines at off-design conditions in order to maintain stability in the electric power grid. This paper demonstrates a method for improving hydroturbine performance during off-design operation by injecting water through slots at the trailing edges of the wicket gates. The injected water causes a change in bulk flow direction at the inlet of the runner. This change in flow angle from the wicket gate trailing-edge jets provides the capability of independently varying the flow rate and swirl angle through the runner, which in current designs are both determined by the wicket gate opening angle. When properly tuned, altering the flow angle results in a significant improvement in turbine efficiency during off-design operation

  3. Wicket gate trailing-edge blowing: A method for improving off-design hydroturbine performance by adjusting the runner inlet swirl angle

    Lewis, B. J.; Cimbala, J. M.; Wouden, A. M.

    2014-03-01

    At their best efficiency point (BEP), hydroturbines operate at very high efficiency. However, with the ever-increasing penetration of alternative electricity generation, it has become common to operate hydroturbines at off-design conditions in order to maintain stability in the electric power grid. This paper demonstrates a method for improving hydroturbine performance during off-design operation by injecting water through slots at the trailing edges of the wicket gates. The injected water causes a change in bulk flow direction at the inlet of the runner. This change in flow angle from the wicket gate trailing-edge jets provides the capability of independently varying the flow rate and swirl angle through the runner, which in current designs are both determined by the wicket gate opening angle. When properly tuned, altering the flow angle results in a significant improvement in turbine efficiency during off-design operation.

  4. Simultaneous ECG-gated PET imaging of multiple mice

    Seidel, Jurgen; Bernardo, Marcelino L.; Wong, Karen J.; Xu, Biying; Williams, Mark R.; Kuo, Frank; Jagoda, Elaine M.; Basuli, Falguni; Li, Changhui; Griffiths, Gary L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We describe and illustrate a method for creating ECG-gated PET images of the heart for each of several mice imaged at the same time. The method is intended to increase “throughput” in PET research studies of cardiac dynamics or to obtain information derived from such studies, e.g. tracer concentration in end-diastolic left ventricular blood. Methods: An imaging bed with provisions for warming, anesthetic delivery, etc., was fabricated by 3D printing to allow simultaneous PET imaging of two side-by-side mice. After electrode attachment, tracer injection and placement of the animals in the scanner field of view, ECG signals from each animal were continuously analyzed and independent trigger markers generated whenever an R-wave was detected in each signal. PET image data were acquired in “list” mode and these trigger markers were inserted into this list along with the image data. Since each mouse is in a different spatial location in the FOV, sorting of these data using trigger markers first from one animal and then the other yields two independent and correctly formed ECG-gated image sequences that reflect the dynamical properties of the heart during an “average” cardiac cycle. Results: The described method yields two independent ECG-gated image sequences that exhibit the expected properties in each animal, e.g. variation of the ventricular cavity volumes from maximum to minimum and back during the cardiac cycle in the processed animal with little or no variation in these volumes during the cardiac cycle in the unprocessed animal. Conclusion: ECG-gated image sequences for each of several animals can be created from a single list mode data collection using the described method. In principle, this method can be extended to more than two mice (or other animals) and to other forms of physiological gating, e.g. respiratory gating, when several subjects are imaged at the same time

  5. Analyzing non-respiratory movements of the chest: methods and devices

    Pariaszewska, Katarzyna; Młyńczak, Marcel; Cybulski, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    Respiration is the main reason of the chest movements. However, there are also non-respiratory ones, resulting from e.g. snoring, wheezing, stridor, throat clearing or coughing. They may exist sporadically, however should be examined in case when their incidences increase. Detecting non-respiratory movements is very important, because many of them are symptoms of respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or lung cancer. Assessment of the presence of non-respiratory movements could be important element of effective diagnosis. It is also necessary to provide quantitative and objective results for intra-subject studies. Most of these events generate vibroacoustic signals that contain components of sound and vibrations. This work provides the review of the solutions and devices for monitoring of the non-respiratory movements, primarily considering the accuracy of the chest movements' detection and distinguishing.

  6. The management of respiratory motion in radiation oncology report of AAPM Task Group 76

    Keall, Paul J.; Mageras, Gig S.; Balter, James M.

    2006-01-01

    This document is the report of a task group of the AAPM and has been prepared primarily to advise medical physicists involved in the external-beam radiation therapy of patients with thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic tumors affected by respiratory motion. This report describes the magnitude of respiratory motion, discusses radiotherapy specific problems caused by respiratory motion, explains techniques that explicitly manage respiratory motion during radiotherapy and gives recommendations in the application of these techniques for patient care, including quality assurance (QA) guidelines for these devices and their use with conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy. The technologies covered by this report are motion-encompassing methods, respiratory gated techniques, breath-hold techniques, forced shallow-breathing methods, and respiration-synchronized techniques. The main outcome of this report is a clinical process guide for managing respiratory motion. Included in this guide is the recommendation that tumor motion should be measured (when possible) for each patient for whom respiratory motion is a concern. If target motion is greater than 5 mm, a method of respiratory motion management is available, and if the patient can tolerate the procedure, respiratory motion management technology is appropriate. Respiratory motion management is also appropriate when the procedure will increase normal tissue sparing. Respiratory motion management involves further resources, education and the development of and adherence to QA procedures

  7. Classification methods to detect sleep apnea in adults based on respiratory and oximetry signals: a systematic review.

    Uddin, M B; Chow, C M; Su, S W

    2018-03-26

    Sleep apnea (SA), a common sleep disorder, can significantly decrease the quality of life, and is closely associated with major health risks such as cardiovascular disease, sudden death, depression, and hypertension. The normal diagnostic process of SA using polysomnography is costly and time consuming. In addition, the accuracy of different classification methods to detect SA varies with the use of different physiological signals. If an effective, reliable, and accurate classification method is developed, then the diagnosis of SA and its associated treatment will be time-efficient and economical. This study aims to systematically review the literature and present an overview of classification methods to detect SA using respiratory and oximetry signals and address the automated detection approach. Sixty-two included studies revealed the application of single and multiple signals (respiratory and oximetry) for the diagnosis of SA. Both airflow and oxygen saturation signals alone were effective in detecting SA in the case of binary decision-making, whereas multiple signals were good for multi-class detection. In addition, some machine learning methods were superior to the other classification methods for SA detection using respiratory and oximetry signals. To deal with the respiratory and oximetry signals, a good choice of classification method as well as the consideration of associated factors would result in high accuracy in the detection of SA. An accurate classification method should provide a high detection rate with an automated (independent of human action) analysis of respiratory and oximetry signals. Future high-quality automated studies using large samples of data from multiple patient groups or record batches are recommended.

  8. Respiratory acidosis

    Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory ... Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and COPD ) Diseases of the lung tissue (such as ...

  9. Comparison of objective methods to classify the pattern of respiratory sinus arrhythmia during mechanical ventilation and paced spontaneous breathing

    Carvalho, N C; Beda, A; Granja-Filho, P; Jandre, F C; Giannella-Neto, A; De Abreu, M G; Spieth, P M

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is a fluctuation of heart period that occurs during a respiratory cycle. It has been suggested that inspiratory heart period acceleration and expiratory deceleration during spontaneous ventilation (henceforth named positive RSA) improve the efficiency of gas exchange compared to the absence or the inversion of such a pattern (negative RSA). During mechanical ventilation (MV), for which maximizing the efficiency of gas exchange is of critical importance, the pattern of RSA is still the object of debate. In order to gain a better insight into this matter, we compared five different methods of RSA classification using the data of five mechanically ventilated piglets. The comparison was repeated using the data of 15 volunteers undergoing a protocol of paced spontaneous breathing, which is expected to result in a positive RSA pattern. The results showed that the agreement between the employed methods is limited, suggesting that the lack of a consensus about the RSA pattern during MV is, at least in part, of methodological origin. However, independently of the method used, the pattern of RSA within the respiratory cycle was not consistent among the subjects and conditions of MV considered. Also, the outcomes showed that even during paced spontaneous breathing a negative RSA pattern might be present, when a low respiratory frequency is imposed

  10. Membrane humidification--a new method for humidification of respiratory gases in ventilator treatment of neonates.

    Hanssler, L; Tennhoff, W; Roll, C

    1992-01-01

    A humidifier system for neonatology that functions according to the 'membrane humidification' principle was subjected to a performance test in our laboratory. Humidification and heating of the respiratory gases took place in a module consisting of a net of hollow fibres placed inside the incubator. In 18 measurement combinations flow, respiratory gas temperature, and incubator temperature were varied. At respiratory gas temperatures within the range of 33-37 degrees C the minimum international standard for the absolute air humidity in the respiratory gas was achieved or exceeded in all measurements. No controlled clinical tests regarding the importance and long term effects of different temperatures and different humidity levels in the inspiratory air are yet available for the ventilation treatment of neonates. PMID:1444554

  11. Difference in target definition using three different methods to include respiratory motion in radiotherapy of lung cancer.

    Sloth Møller, Ditte; Knap, Marianne Marquard; Nyeng, Tine Bisballe; Khalil, Azza Ahmed; Holt, Marianne Ingerslev; Kandi, Maria; Hoffmann, Lone

    2017-11-01

    Minimizing the planning target volume (PTV) while ensuring sufficient target coverage during the entire respiratory cycle is essential for free-breathing radiotherapy of lung cancer. Different methods are used to incorporate the respiratory motion into the PTV. Fifteen patients were analyzed. Respiration can be included in the target delineation process creating a respiratory GTV, denoted iGTV. Alternatively, the respiratory amplitude (A) can be measured based on the 4D-CT and A can be incorporated in the margin expansion. The GTV expanded by A yielded GTV + resp, which was compared to iGTV in terms of overlap. Three methods for PTV generation were compared. PTV del (delineated iGTV expanded to CTV plus PTV margin), PTV σ (GTV expanded to CTV and A was included as a random uncertainty in the CTV to PTV margin) and PTV ∑ (GTV expanded to CTV, succeeded by CTV linear expansion by A to CTV + resp, which was finally expanded to PTV ∑ ). Deformation of tumor and lymph nodes during respiration resulted in volume changes between the respiratory phases. The overlap between iGTV and GTV + resp showed that on average 7% of iGTV was outside the GTV + resp implying that GTV + resp did not capture the tumor during the full deformable respiration cycle. A comparison of the PTV volumes showed that PTV σ was smallest and PTV Σ largest for all patients. PTV σ was in mean 14% (31 cm 3 ) smaller than PTV del , while PTV del was 7% (20 cm 3 ) smaller than PTV Σ . PTV σ yields the smallest volumes but does not ensure coverage of tumor during the full respiratory motion due to tumor deformation. Incorporating the respiratory motion in the delineation (PTV del ) takes into account the entire respiratory cycle including deformation, but at the cost, however, of larger treatment volumes. PTV Σ should not be used, since it incorporates the disadvantages of both PTV del and PTV σ .

  12. Calculation of left ventricular volume and ejection fraction from ECG-gated myocardial SPECT. Automatic detection of endocardial borders by threshold method

    Fukushi, Shoji; Teraoka, Satomi.

    1997-01-01

    A new method which calculate end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (LVEF) of the left ventricle from myocardial short axis images of ECG-gated SPECT using 99m Tc myocardial perfusion tracer has been designed. Eight frames per cardiac cycle ECG-gated 180 degrees SPECT was performed. Threshold method was used to detect myocardial borders automatically. The optimal threshold was 45% by myocardial SPECT phantom. To determine if EDV, ESV and LVEF can also be calculated by this method, 12 patients were correlated ventriculography (LVG) for 10 days each. The correlation coefficient with LVG was 0.918 (EDV), 0.935 (ESV) and 0.900 (LVEF). This method is excellent at objectivity and reproductivity because of the automatic detection of myocardial borders. It also provides useful information on heart function in addition to myocardial perfusion. (author)

  13. Gate valve performance prediction

    Harrison, D.H.; Damerell, P.S.; Wang, J.K.; Kalsi, M.S.; Wolfe, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute is carrying out a program to improve the performance prediction methods for motor-operated valves. As part of this program, an analytical method to predict the stem thrust required to stroke a gate valve has been developed and has been assessed against data from gate valve tests. The method accounts for the loads applied to the disc by fluid flow and for the detailed mechanical interaction of the stem, disc, guides, and seats. To support development of the method, two separate-effects test programs were carried out. One test program determined friction coefficients for contacts between gate valve parts by using material specimens in controlled environments. The other test program investigated the interaction of the stem, disc, guides, and seat using a special fixture with full-sized gate valve parts. The method has been assessed against flow-loop and in-plant test data. These tests include valve sizes from 3 to 18 in. and cover a considerable range of flow, temperature, and differential pressure. Stem thrust predictions for the method bound measured results. In some cases, the bounding predictions are substantially higher than the stem loads required for valve operation, as a result of the bounding nature of the friction coefficients in the method

  14. A counting-weighted calibration method for a field-programmable-gate-array-based time-to-digital converter

    Chen, Yuan-Ho

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we propose a counting-weighted calibration method for field-programmable-gate-array (FPGA)-based time-to-digital converter (TDC) to provide non-linearity calibration for use in positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. To deal with the non-linearity in FPGA, we developed a counting-weighted delay line (CWD) to count the delay time of the delay cells in the TDC in order to reduce the differential non-linearity (DNL) values based on code density counts. The performance of the proposed CWD-TDC with regard to linearity far exceeds that of TDC with a traditional tapped delay line (TDL) architecture, without the need for nonlinearity calibration. When implemented in a Xilinx Vertix-5 FPGA device, the proposed CWD-TDC achieved time resolution of 60 ps with integral non-linearity (INL) and DNL of [−0.54, 0.24] and [−0.66, 0.65] least-significant-bit (LSB), respectively. This is a clear indication of the suitability of the proposed FPGA-based CWD-TDC for use in PET scanners.

  15. A counting-weighted calibration method for a field-programmable-gate-array-based time-to-digital converter

    Chen, Yuan-Ho, E-mail: chenyh@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Center for Reliability Sciences and Technologies, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2017-05-11

    In this work, we propose a counting-weighted calibration method for field-programmable-gate-array (FPGA)-based time-to-digital converter (TDC) to provide non-linearity calibration for use in positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. To deal with the non-linearity in FPGA, we developed a counting-weighted delay line (CWD) to count the delay time of the delay cells in the TDC in order to reduce the differential non-linearity (DNL) values based on code density counts. The performance of the proposed CWD-TDC with regard to linearity far exceeds that of TDC with a traditional tapped delay line (TDL) architecture, without the need for nonlinearity calibration. When implemented in a Xilinx Vertix-5 FPGA device, the proposed CWD-TDC achieved time resolution of 60 ps with integral non-linearity (INL) and DNL of [−0.54, 0.24] and [−0.66, 0.65] least-significant-bit (LSB), respectively. This is a clear indication of the suitability of the proposed FPGA-based CWD-TDC for use in PET scanners.

  16. A novel sampling method to detect airborne influenza and other respiratory viruses in mechanically ventilated patients: a feasibility study.

    Mitchell, Alicia B; Tang, Benjamin; Shojaei, Maryam; Barnes, Lachlan S; Nalos, Marek; Oliver, Brian G; McLean, Anthony S

    2018-04-17

    Respiratory viruses circulate constantly in the ambient air. The risk of opportunistic infection from these viruses can be increased in mechanically ventilated patients. The present study evaluates the feasibility of detecting airborne respiratory viruses in mechanically ventilated patients using a novel sample collection method involving ventilator filters. We collected inspiratory and expiratory filters from the ventilator circuits of mechanically ventilated patients in an intensive care unit over a 14-month period. To evaluate whether we could detect respiratory viruses collected in these filters, we performed a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction on the extracted filter membrane with primers specific for rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus A and B, parainfluenza virus (type 1, 2 and 3) and human metapneumovirus. For each patient, we also performed a full virology screen (virus particles, antibody titres and virus-induced biomarkers) on respiratory samples (nasopharyngeal swab, tracheal aspirate or bronchoalveolar fluid) and blood samples. Respiratory viruses were detected in the ventilator filters of nearly half the patients in the study cohort (n = 33/70). The most common virus detected was influenza A virus (n = 29). There were more viruses detected in the inspiratory filters (n = 18) than in the expiratory filters (n = 15). A third of the patients with a positive virus detection in the ventilator filters had a hospital laboratory confirmed viral infection. In the remaining cases, the detected viruses were different from viruses already identified in the same patient, suggesting that these additional viruses come from the ambient air or from cross-contamination (staff or visitors). In patients in whom new viruses were detected in the ventilator filters, there was no evidence of clinical signs of an active viral infection. Additionally, the levels of virus-induced biomarker in these patients were not

  17. Comparison of different methods for assessment of left ventricular regional motility using the gated blood pool method

    Neumann, P.; Schicha, H.; Karsch, K.R.; Kreuzer, H.; Emrich, D.

    1983-01-01

    The following methods of evaluation were compared: qualitative analysis of cine mode; qualitative analysis of parametric scans obtained by Fourier analysis including the phase histogram; quantitative analysis of regional ejection fraction (EF). Regional wall motion abnormalities of high degree (akinesia, dyskinesia) were recognized by all three methods with a high sensitivity of 89.7-96.6% without statistically significant differences. The sensitivity for detecting hypokinetic segments was significantly lower (50.0-68.2%) without statistically significant differences between the three methods. Sensitivity for all kinds of wall motion abnormalities could be increased by combining the quantitative method of regional EF with the qualitative evaluation after Fourier analysis

  18. Bayesian model averaging method for evaluating associations between air pollution and respiratory mortality: a time-series study.

    Fang, Xin; Li, Runkui; Kan, Haidong; Bottai, Matteo; Fang, Fang; Cao, Yang

    2016-08-16

    To demonstrate an application of Bayesian model averaging (BMA) with generalised additive mixed models (GAMM) and provide a novel modelling technique to assess the association between inhalable coarse particles (PM10) and respiratory mortality in time-series studies. A time-series study using regional death registry between 2009 and 2010. 8 districts in a large metropolitan area in Northern China. 9559 permanent residents of the 8 districts who died of respiratory diseases between 2009 and 2010. Per cent increase in daily respiratory mortality rate (MR) per interquartile range (IQR) increase of PM10 concentration and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) in single-pollutant and multipollutant (including NOx, CO) models. The Bayesian model averaged GAMM (GAMM+BMA) and the optimal GAMM of PM10, multipollutants and principal components (PCs) of multipollutants showed comparable results for the effect of PM10 on daily respiratory MR, that is, one IQR increase in PM10 concentration corresponded to 1.38% vs 1.39%, 1.81% vs 1.83% and 0.87% vs 0.88% increase, respectively, in daily respiratory MR. However, GAMM+BMA gave slightly but noticeable wider CIs for the single-pollutant model (-1.09 to 4.28 vs -1.08 to 3.93) and the PCs-based model (-2.23 to 4.07 vs -2.03 vs 3.88). The CIs of the multiple-pollutant model from two methods are similar, that is, -1.12 to 4.85 versus -1.11 versus 4.83. The BMA method may represent a useful tool for modelling uncertainty in time-series studies when evaluating the effect of air pollution on fatal health outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Statistical analysis of target motion in gated lung stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Zhao Bo; Yang Yong; Li Tianfang; Li Xiang; Heron, Dwight E; Huq, M Saiful

    2011-01-01

    An external surrogate-based respiratory gating technique is a useful method to reduce target margins for the treatment of a moving lung tumor. The success of this technique relies on a good correlation between the motion of the external markers and the internal tumor as well as the repeatability of the respiratory motion. In gated lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), the treatment time for each fraction could exceed 30 min due to large fractional dose. Tumor motion may experience pattern changes such as baseline shift during such extended treatment time. The purpose of this study is to analyze tumor motion traces in actual treatment situations and to evaluate the effect of the target baseline shift in gated lung SBRT treatment. Real-time motion data for both the external markers and tumors from 51 lung SBRT treatments with Cyberknife Synchrony technology were analyzed in this study. The treatment time is typically greater than 30 min. The baseline shift was calculated with a rolling average window equivalent to ∼20 s and subtracted from that at the beginning. The magnitude of the baseline shift and its relationship with treatment time were investigated. Phase gating simulation was retrospectively performed on 12 carefully selected treatments with respiratory amplitude larger than 5 mm and regular phases. A customized gating window was defined for each individual treatment. It was found that the baseline shifts are specific to each patient and each fraction. Statistical analysis revealed that more than 69% treatments exhibited increased baseline shifts with the lapse of treatment time. The magnitude of the baseline shift could reach 5.3 mm during a 30 min treatment. Gating simulation showed that tumor excursion was caused mainly by the uncertainties in phase gating simulation and baseline shift, the latter being the primary factor. With a 5 mm gating window, 2 out of 12 treatments in the study group showed significant tumor excursion. Baseline shifts

  20. Double optical gating

    Gilbertson, Steve

    The observation and control of dynamics in atomic and molecular targets requires the use of laser pulses with duration less than the characteristic timescale of the process which is to be manipulated. For electron dynamics, this time scale is on the order of attoseconds where 1 attosecond = 10 -18 seconds. In order to generate pulses on this time scale, different gating methods have been proposed. The idea is to extract or "gate" a single pulse from an attosecond pulse train and switch off all the other pulses. While previous methods have had some success, they are very difficult to implement and so far very few labs have access to these unique light sources. The purpose of this work is to introduce a new method, called double optical gating (DOG), and to demonstrate its effectiveness at generating high contrast single isolated attosecond pulses from multi-cycle lasers. First, the method is described in detail and is investigated in the spectral domain. The resulting attosecond pulses produced are then temporally characterized through attosecond streaking. A second method of gating, called generalized double optical gating (GDOG), is also introduced. This method allows attosecond pulse generation directly from a carrier-envelope phase un-stabilized laser system for the first time. Next the methods of DOG and GDOG are implemented in attosecond applications like high flux pulses and extreme broadband spectrum generation. Finally, the attosecond pulses themselves are used in experiments. First, an attosecond/femtosecond cross correlation is used for characterization of spatial and temporal properties of femtosecond pulses. Then, an attosecond pump, femtosecond probe experiment is conducted to observe and control electron dynamics in helium for the first time.

  1. DETERMINATION AND EVALUATION OF FREE SILICA IN THE RESPIRATORY ZONE OF GLASSWORKERS WITH X-RAY DIFFRACTION METHOD

    H.Dehghan Shahreza; N. Razavizadeh

    1999-01-01

    This research was conducted from July 1993 to June 1994 on the total population (711 workers) of a glass factory. The purpose of this study was to determine the quantitative free silica (quartz) in respiratory zone of workers in glass industry. Field samples including 50 samples total dust and 37 samples respirable dust and standard simplex were collected on membrane filters using SKC dust sampler (NIOSH method). To include effects of uneven dust thickness on the filters, standard filters wer...

  2. The European Respiratory Society study on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (EUROSCOP) : recruitment methods and strategies

    Lofdahl, CG; Postma, DS; Laitinen, LA; Ohlsson, SV; Pauwels, RA; Pride, NB

    The European Respiratory Society's study on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (EUROSCOP) is a multicentre study performed initially in 12 countries to assess the effect of 3 years' treatment with inhaled corticosteroids on lung function decline in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary

  3. Measurement of time delay for a prospectively gated CT simulator.

    Goharian, M; Khan, R F H

    2010-04-01

    For the management of mobile tumors, respiratory gating is the ideal option, both during imaging and during therapy. The major advantage of respiratory gating during imaging is that it is possible to create a single artifact-free CT data-set during a selected phase of the patient's breathing cycle. The purpose of the present work is to present a simple technique to measure the time delay during acquisition of a prospectively gated CT. The time delay of a Philips Brilliance BigBore (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) scanner attached to a Varian Real-Time Position Management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was measured. Two methods were used to measure the CT time delay: using a motion phantom and using a recorded data file from the RPM system. In the first technique, a rotating wheel phantom was altered by placing two plastic balls on its axis and rim, respectively. For a desired gate, the relative positions of the balls were measured from the acquired CT data and converted into corresponding phases. Phase difference was calculated between the measured phases and the desired phases. Using period of motion, the phase difference was converted into time delay. The Varian RPM system provides an external breathing signal; it also records transistor-transistor logic (TTL) 'X-Ray ON' status signal from the CT scanner in a text file. The TTL 'X-Ray ON' indicates the start of CT image acquisition. Thus, knowledge of the start time of CT acquisition, combined with the real-time phase and amplitude data from the external respiratory signal, provides time-stamping of all images in an axial CT scan. The TTL signal with time-stamp was used to calculate when (during the breathing cycle) a slice was recorded. Using the two approaches, the time delay between the prospective gating signal and CT simulator has been determined to be 367 +/- 40 ms. The delay requires corrections both at image acquisition and while setting gates for the treatment delivery

  4. Measurement of time delay for a prospectively gated CT simulator

    Goharian M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For the management of mobile tumors, respiratory gating is the ideal option, both during imaging and during therapy. The major advantage of respiratory gating during imaging is that it is possible to create a single artifact-free CT data-set during a selected phase of the patient′s breathing cycle. The purpose of the present work is to present a simple technique to measure the time delay during acquisition of a prospectively gated CT. The time delay of a Philips Brilliance BigBore™ (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI scanner attached to a Varian Real-Time Position Management™ (RPM system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA was measured. Two methods were used to measure the CT time delay: using a motion phantom and using a recorded data file from the RPM system. In the first technique, a rotating wheel phantom was altered by placing two plastic balls on its axis and rim, respectively. For a desired gate, the relative positions of the balls were measured from the acquired CT data and converted into corresponding phases. Phase difference was calculated between the measured phases and the desired phases. Using period of motion, the phase difference was converted into time delay. The Varian RPM system provides an external breathing signal; it also records transistor-transistor logic (TTL ′X-Ray ON′ status signal from the CT scanner in a text file. The TTL ′X-Ray ON′ indicates the start of CT image acquisition. Thus, knowledge of the start time of CT acquisition, combined with the real-time phase and amplitude data from the external respiratory signal, provides time-stamping of all images in an axial CT scan. The TTL signal with time-stamp was used to calculate when (during the breathing cycle a slice was recorded. Using the two approaches, the time delay between the prospective gating signal and CT simulator has been determined to be 367 ± 40 ms. The delay requires corrections both at image acquisition and while setting gates for

  5. Measurement of time delay for a prospectively gated CT simulator

    Goharian, M.; Khan, R.F.H.

    2010-01-01

    For the management of mobile tumors, respiratory gating is the ideal option, both during imaging and during therapy. The major advantage of respiratory gating during imaging is that it is possible to create a single artifact-free CT data-set during a selected phase of the patient's breathing cycle. The purpose of the present work is to present a simple technique to measure the time delay during acquisition of a prospectively gated CT. The time delay of a Philips Brilliance BigBore (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) scanner attached to a Varian Real-Time Position Management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was measured. Two methods were used to measure the CT time delay: using a motion phantom and using a recorded data file from the RPM system. In the first technique, a rotating wheel phantom was altered by placing two plastic balls on its axis and rim, respectively. For a desired gate, the relative positions of the balls were measured from the acquired CT data and converted into corresponding phases. Phase difference was calculated between the measured phases and the desired phases. Using period of motion, the phase difference was converted into time delay. The Varian RPM system provides an external breathing signal; it also records transistor-transistor logic (TTL) 'X-Ray ON' status signal from the CT scanner in a text file. The TTL 'X-Ray ON' indicates the start of CT image acquisition. Thus, knowledge of the start time of CT acquisition, combined with the real-time phase and amplitude data from the external respiratory signal, provides time-stamping of all images in an axial CT scan. The TTL signal with time-stamp was used to calculate when (during the breathing cycle) a slice was recorded. Using the two approaches, the time delay between the prospective gating signal and CT simulator has been determined to be 367 ± 40 ms. The delay requires corrections both at image acquisition and while setting gates for the treatment delivery

  6. Accuracy and effectiveness of self-gating signals in free-breathing three-dimensional cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging

    Li, Shuo; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Yan-Chun; Yang, Jie; Xie, Yao-Qin; Fu, Nan; Wang, Yi; Gao, Song

    2016-12-01

    Conventional multiple breath-hold two-dimensional (2D) balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) presents many difficulties in cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently, a self-gated free-breathing three-dimensional (3D) SSFP technique has been proposed as an alternative in many studies. However, the accuracy and effectiveness of self-gating signals have been barely studied before. Since self-gating signals are crucially important in image reconstruction, a systematic study of self-gating signals and comparison with external monitored signals are needed. Previously developed self-gated free-breathing 3D SSFP techniques are used on twenty-eight healthy volunteers. Both electrocardiographic (ECG) and respiratory bellow signals are also acquired during the scan as external signals. Self-gating signal and external signal are compared by trigger and gating window. Gating window is proposed to evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of respiratory self-gating signal. Relative deviation of the trigger and root-mean-square-deviation of the cycle duration are calculated. A two-tailed paired t-test is used to identify the difference between self-gating and external signals. A Wilcoxon signed rank test is used to identify the difference between peak and valley self-gating triggers. The results demonstrate an excellent correlation (P = 0, R > 0.99) between self-gating and external triggers. Wilcoxon signed rank test shows that there is no significant difference between peak and valley self-gating triggers for both cardiac (H = 0, P > 0.10) and respiratory (H = 0, P > 0.44) motions. The difference between self-gating and externally monitored signals is not significant (two-tailed paired-sample t-test: H = 0, P > 0.90). The self-gating signals could demonstrate cardiac and respiratory motion accurately and effectively as ECG and respiratory bellow. The difference between the two methods is not significant and can be explained. Furthermore, few ECG trigger errors

  7. On photonic controlled phase gates

    Kieling, K; Eisert, J; O'Brien, J L

    2010-01-01

    As primitives for entanglement generation, controlled phase gates have a central role in quantum computing. Especially in ideas realizing instances of quantum computation in linear optical gate arrays, a closer look can be rewarding. In such architectures, all effective nonlinearities are induced by measurements. Hence the probability of success is a crucial parameter of such quantum gates. In this paper, we discuss this question for controlled phase gates that implement an arbitrary phase with one and two control qubits. Within the class of post-selected gates in dual-rail encoding with vacuum ancillas, we identify the optimal success probabilities. We construct networks that allow for implementation using current experimental capabilities in detail. The methods employed here appear specifically useful with the advent of integrated linear optical circuits, providing stable interferometers on monolithic structures.

  8. GATE: Improving the computational efficiency

    Staelens, S.; De Beenhouwer, J.; Kruecker, D.; Maigne, L.; Rannou, F.; Ferrer, L.; D'Asseler, Y.; Buvat, I.; Lemahieu, I.

    2006-01-01

    GATE is a software dedicated to Monte Carlo simulations in Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). An important disadvantage of those simulations is the fundamental burden of computation time. This manuscript describes three different techniques in order to improve the efficiency of those simulations. Firstly, the implementation of variance reduction techniques (VRTs), more specifically the incorporation of geometrical importance sampling, is discussed. After this, the newly designed cluster version of the GATE software is described. The experiments have shown that GATE simulations scale very well on a cluster of homogeneous computers. Finally, an elaboration on the deployment of GATE on the Enabling Grids for E-Science in Europe (EGEE) grid will conclude the description of efficiency enhancement efforts. The three aforementioned methods improve the efficiency of GATE to a large extent and make realistic patient-specific overnight Monte Carlo simulations achievable

  9. Evaluation of 99Tcm-DTPA glomerular filtration rate by the Gates method in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Yuan Jie; Zhang Guangming; Liu Congjin; Wang Yuankai; Zhu Huiqing; Kuai Dayu; Wu Xia; Hu Renming; Liu Xingdang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of GFR measured in different time intervals after the injection of 99 Tc m -DTPA and to evaluate the clinical value of GFR in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Eleven healthy volunteers (6 males, 5 females; mean age (61.45±7.90) years, age range: 47-79 years) and 56 patients with type 2 diabetes (31 males, 25 females; mean age (60.98±6.96) years, age range: 45-75 years) were recruited. 99 Tc m -DTPA was used to measure GFR for all subjects. ROI was drawn at 2 and 3 min post-injection and GFR was calculated by Gates method. Two-sample t test and Pearson correlation analysis were performed with SPSS 15.0. Results: SCr ((84.90±14.38) μmol/L) was significantly correlated with GFR in patients with type 2 diabetes. There was negative correlation between SCr and GFR for both, left and right kidneys at 3 min post-injection (r=-0.652, -0.636, -0.470, all P≤0.001) and at 2 min post-injection (r=-0.599, -0.553, -0.529, all P<0.001). Total GFR, GFR for left kidney and GFR for right kidney at 3 min post-injection in diabetes group ((69.77 ± 11.00),(33.12 ± 5.74), (37.34 ± 9.81) ml/min) were lower than those in control group ((97.89±5.98), (46.60±4.91), (51.28±4.20) ml/min; t=-8.212, -7.233, -4.069, all P<0.001). Conclusions: To calculate the GFR of the patients with type 2 diabetes, 3 min post-injection is the optimal time. Measurement of GFR by 99 Tc m -DTPA is useful in early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy. (authors)

  10. Extracting a respiratory signal from raw dynamic PET data that contain tracer kinetics.

    Schleyer, P J; Thielemans, K; Marsden, P K

    2014-08-07

    Data driven gating (DDG) methods provide an alternative to hardware based respiratory gating for PET imaging. Several existing DDG approaches obtain a respiratory signal by observing the change in PET-counts within specific regions of acquired PET data. Currently, these methods do not allow for tracer kinetics which can interfere with the respiratory signal and introduce error. In this work, we produced a DDG method for dynamic PET studies that exhibit tracer kinetics. Our method is based on an existing approach that uses frequency-domain analysis to locate regions within raw PET data that are subject to respiratory motion. In the new approach, an optimised non-stationary short-time Fourier transform was used to create a time-varying 4D map of motion affected regions. Additional processing was required to ensure that the relationship between the sign of the respiratory signal and the physical direction of movement remained consistent for each temporal segment of the 4D map. The change in PET-counts within the 4D map during the PET acquisition was then used to generate a respiratory curve. Using 26 min dynamic cardiac NH3 PET acquisitions which included a hardware derived respiratory measurement, we show that tracer kinetics can severely degrade the respiratory signal generated by the original DDG method. In some cases, the transition of tracer from the liver to the lungs caused the respiratory signal to invert. The new approach successfully compensated for tracer kinetics and improved the correlation between the data-driven and hardware based signals. On average, good correlation was maintained throughout the PET acquisitions.

  11. Extracting a respiratory signal from raw dynamic PET data that contain tracer kinetics

    Schleyer, P J; Thielemans, K; Marsden, P K

    2014-01-01

    Data driven gating (DDG) methods provide an alternative to hardware based respiratory gating for PET imaging. Several existing DDG approaches obtain a respiratory signal by observing the change in PET-counts within specific regions of acquired PET data. Currently, these methods do not allow for tracer kinetics which can interfere with the respiratory signal and introduce error. In this work, we produced a DDG method for dynamic PET studies that exhibit tracer kinetics. Our method is based on an existing approach that uses frequency-domain analysis to locate regions within raw PET data that are subject to respiratory motion. In the new approach, an optimised non-stationary short-time Fourier transform was used to create a time-varying 4D map of motion affected regions. Additional processing was required to ensure that the relationship between the sign of the respiratory signal and the physical direction of movement remained consistent for each temporal segment of the 4D map. The change in PET-counts within the 4D map during the PET acquisition was then used to generate a respiratory curve. Using 26 min dynamic cardiac NH 3 PET acquisitions which included a hardware derived respiratory measurement, we show that tracer kinetics can severely degrade the respiratory signal generated by the original DDG method. In some cases, the transition of tracer from the liver to the lungs caused the respiratory signal to invert. The new approach successfully compensated for tracer kinetics and improved the correlation between the data-driven and hardware based signals. On average, good correlation was maintained throughout the PET acquisitions. (paper)

  12. Impact of CT attenuation correction method on quantitative respiratory-correlated (4D) PET/CT imaging

    Nyflot, Matthew J., E-mail: nyflot@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States); Lee, Tzu-Cheng [Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States); Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E. [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States); Wollenweber, Scott D.; Stearns, Charles W. [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Bowen, Stephen R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 and Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET/CT) 4D PET/CT is used to mitigate errors from respiratory motion; however, the optimal CT attenuation correction (CTAC) method for 4D PET/CT is unknown. The authors performed a phantom study to evaluate the quantitative performance of CTAC methods for 4D PET/CT in the ground truth setting. Methods: A programmable respiratory motion phantom with a custom movable insert designed to emulate a lung lesion and lung tissue was used for this study. The insert was driven by one of five waveforms: two sinusoidal waveforms or three patient-specific respiratory waveforms. 3DPET and 4DPET images of the phantom under motion were acquired and reconstructed with six CTAC methods: helical breath-hold (3DHEL), helical free-breathing (3DMOT), 4D phase-averaged (4DAVG), 4D maximum intensity projection (4DMIP), 4D phase-matched (4DMATCH), and 4D end-exhale (4DEXH) CTAC. Recovery of SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, SUV{sub peak}, and segmented tumor volume was evaluated as RC{sub max}, RC{sub mean}, RC{sub peak}, and RC{sub vol}, representing percent difference relative to the static ground truth case. Paired Wilcoxon tests and Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA were used to test for significant differences. Results: For 4DPET imaging, the maximum intensity projection CTAC produced significantly more accurate recovery coefficients than all other CTAC methods (p < 0.0001 over all metrics). Over all motion waveforms, ratios of 4DMIP CTAC recovery were 0.2 ± 5.4, −1.8 ± 6.5, −3.2 ± 5.0, and 3.0 ± 5.9 for RC{sub max}, RC{sub peak}, RC{sub mean}, and RC{sub vol}. In comparison, recovery coefficients for phase-matched CTAC were −8.4 ± 5.3, −10.5 ± 6.2, −7.6 ± 5.0, and −13.0 ± 7.7 for RC{sub max}, RC{sub peak}, RC{sub mean}, and RC{sub vol}. When testing differences between phases over all CTAC methods and waveforms, end-exhale phases were significantly more accurate (p = 0.005). However, these differences were driven by

  13. Examination of geometric and dosimetric accuracies of gated step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy

    Wiersma, R. D.; Xing, L.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the complicated technical nature of gated radiation therapy, electronic and mechanical limitations may affect the precision of delivery. The purpose of this study is to investigate the geometric and dosimetric accuracies of gated step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation treatments (SS-IMRT). Unique segmental MLC plans are designed, which allow quantitative testing of the gating process. Both ungated and gated deliveries are investigated for different dose sizes, dose rates, and gating window times using a commercial treatment system (Varian Trilogy) together with a respiratory gating system [Varian Real-Time Position Management system]. Radiographic film measurements are used to study the geometric accuracy, where it is found that with both ungated and gated SS-IMRT deliveries the MLC leaf divergence away from planned is less than or equal to the MLC specified leaf tolerance value for all leafs (leaf tolerance being settable from 0.5-5 mm). Nevertheless, due to the MLC controller design, failure to define a specific leaf tolerance value suitable to the SS-IMRT plan can lead to undesired geometric effects, such as leaf motion of up to the maximum 5 mm leaf tolerance value occurring after the beam is turned on. In this case, gating may be advantageous over the ungated case, as it allows more time for the MLC to reach the intended leaf configuration. The dosimetric precision of gated SS-IMRT is investigated using ionization chamber methods. Compared with the ungated case, it is found that gating generally leads to increased dosimetric errors due to the interruption of the ''overshoot phenomena.'' With gating the average timing deviation for intermediate segments is found to be 27 ms, compared to 18 ms for the ungated case. For a plan delivered at 600 MU/min this would correspond to an average segment dose error of ∼0.27 MU and ∼0.18 MU for gated and ungated deliveries, respectively. The maximum dosimetric errors for individual intermediate segments are

  14. Respiratory alkalosis

    Alkalosis - respiratory ... leads to shortness of breath can also cause respiratory alkalosis (such as pulmonary embolism and asthma). ... Treatment is aimed at the condition that causes respiratory alkalosis. Breathing into a paper bag -- or using ...

  15. Estimating intratidal nonlinearity of respiratory system mechanics: a model study using the enhanced gliding-SLICE method

    Schumann, Stefan; Burcza, Boris; Guttmann, Josef; Haberthür, Christoph; Lichtwarck-Aschoff, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In the clinical situation and in most research work, the analysis of respiratory system mechanics is limited to the estimation of single-value compliances during static or quasi-static conditions. In contrast, our SLICE method analyses intratidal nonlinearity under the dynamic conditions of mechanical ventilation by calculating compliance and resistance for six conjoined volume portions (slices) of the pressure–volume loop by multiple linear regression analysis. With the gliding-SLICE method we present a new approach to determine continuous intratidal nonlinear compliance. The performance of the gliding-SLICE method was tested both in computer simulations and in a physical model of the lung, both simulating different intratidal compliance profiles. Compared to the original SLICE method, the gliding-SLICE method resulted in smaller errors when calculating the compliance or pressure course (all p 2 O s L −1 to 0.8 ± 0.3 cmH 2 O s L −1 (mathematical model) and from 7.2 ± 3.9 cmH 2 O s L −1 to 0.4 ± 0.2 cmH 2 O s L −1 (physical model) (all p < 0.001). We conclude that the new gliding-SLICE method allows detailed assessment of intratidal nonlinear respiratory system mechanics without discontinuity error

  16. Gfr estimation using 99mTc DTPA gates method for assessment of early diabetic nephropathy - a comparison with 24-hour creatinine clearance

    Ghafoor, S.; Ali, M.K.; Khan, G.

    2014-01-01

    To correlate Gates glomerular filtration rate (GGFR) using technetium-99m diethylene triaminepentacetic acid (99mTc DTPA) with 24-hour creatinine clearance (CRCL) and to establish relationship with duration of diabetes in patients with early diabetic nephropathy. Study Design: A cross-sectional comparative study carried out in Nuclear Medical Centre from Aug 2009 to Jan 2010 at Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Patients and Methods: A total of eighty three subjects were enrolled, who were divided into three groups; group 1 comprised 31 normotensive diabetics, group 2 had 37 hypertensive diabetics while group 3 had 15 normal subjects. The DTPA GFR and creatinine clearance in healthy subjects as well as diabetic patients were compared using the unpaired student's t-test. The linear association between GFR, creatinine clearance and disease duration was expressed by Pearson's correlation coefficient 'r' along with their significance levels. Results: Gates GFR showed hyperfiltration in normotensive diabetics (96.6 +- 3.3 ml/min/1.73 m/sub 2/), significantly (p<0.05) higher than controls (85.5 +- 5 ml/min/1.73 m/sub 2/), whereas hypertensive diabetics had a significantly lower (p<0.05) Gates GFR (76.8 +- 3.7) than that of controls. Significant degree of correlation existed between GGFR and CRCL in hypertensive diabetics (p<0.05, r=0.716) and controls (r=0.546). Gates GFR also showed good correlation with duration of diabetes in both diabetic groups as compared to that of CRCL. GGFR also correlated well with duration of hypertension 0.37 (0.31-0.43) as compared to CRCL 0.155 (0.15-0.16) in all groups. Conclusions: The 99mTc-DTPA clearance correlates significantly with 24-hour creatinine clearance as well as with disease duration and can provide a simple and convenient index of kidney function in patients of early diabetic nephropathy. (author)

  17. Fluoroscopic gating without implanted fiducial markers for lung cancer radiotherapy based on support vector machines

    Cui Ying; Dy, Jennifer G; Alexander, Brian; Jiang, Steve B

    2008-01-01

    Various problems with the current state-of-the-art techniques for gated radiotherapy have prevented this new treatment modality from being widely implemented in clinical routine. These problems are caused mainly by applying various external respiratory surrogates. There might be large uncertainties in deriving the tumor position from external respiratory surrogates. While tracking implanted fiducial markers has sufficient accuracy, this procedure may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previously, we have developed a technique to generate gating signals from fluoroscopic images without implanted fiducial markers using template matching methods (Berbeco et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4481-90, Cui et al 2007b Phys. Med. Biol. 52 741-55). In this note, our main contribution is to provide a totally different new view of the gating problem by recasting it as a classification problem. Then, we solve this classification problem by a well-studied powerful classification method called a support vector machine (SVM). Note that the goal of an automated gating tool is to decide when to turn the beam ON or OFF. We treat ON and OFF as the two classes in our classification problem. We create our labeled training data during the patient setup session by utilizing the reference gating signal, manually determined by a radiation oncologist. We then pre-process these labeled training images and build our SVM prediction model. During treatment delivery, fluoroscopic images are continuously acquired, pre-processed and sent as an input to the SVM. Finally, our SVM model will output the predicted labels as gating signals. We test the proposed technique on five sequences of fluoroscopic images from five lung cancer patients against the reference gating signal as ground truth. We compare the performance of the SVM to our previous template matching method (Cui et al 2007b Phys. Med. Biol. 52 741-55). We find that the SVM is slightly more accurate on average (1-3%) than

  18. Community-based exercise training for people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease: a mixed-methods evaluation

    McNamara RJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Renae J McNamara,1,2 Zoe J McKeough,3 Laura R Mo,3 Jamie T Dallimore,4 Sarah M Dennis3 1Physiotherapy Department, 2Respiratory and Sleep Medicine Department, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, 3Discipline of Physiotherapy, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, 4Eastern Sydney Medicare Local, Rosebery, NSW, Australia Background: Poor uptake and adherence are problematic for hospital-based pulmonary and heart failure rehabilitation programs, often because of access difficulties. The aims of this mixed-methods study were to determine the feasibility of a supervised exercise training program in a community gymnasium in people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease, to explore the experiences of participants and physiotherapists and to determine if a community venue improved access and adherence to rehabilitation. Methods: Adults with chronic respiratory and/or chronic cardiac disease referred to a hospital-based pulmonary and heart failure rehabilitation program were screened to determine their suitability to exercise in a community venue. Eligible patients were offered the opportunity to attend supervised exercise training for 8 weeks in a community gymnasium. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants and physiotherapists at the completion of the program. Results: Thirty-one people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease (34% males, mean [standard deviation] age 72 [10] years commenced the community-based exercise training program. Twenty-two (71% completed the program. All participants who completed the program, and the physiotherapists delivering the program, were highly satisfied, with reports of the community venue being well-equipped, convenient, and easily accessible. Using a community gymnasium promoted a sense of normality and instilled confidence in some to continue exercising at a similar venue post rehabilitation. However, factors such as cost and lack of motivation continue to be barriers

  19. Can Machines Learn Respiratory Virus Epidemiology?: A Comparative Study of Likelihood-Free Methods for the Estimation of Epidemiological Dynamics

    Heidi L. Tessmer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To estimate and predict the transmission dynamics of respiratory viruses, the estimation of the basic reproduction number, R0, is essential. Recently, approximate Bayesian computation methods have been used as likelihood free methods to estimate epidemiological model parameters, particularly R0. In this paper, we explore various machine learning approaches, the multi-layer perceptron, convolutional neural network, and long-short term memory, to learn and estimate the parameters. Further, we compare the accuracy of the estimates and time requirements for machine learning and the approximate Bayesian computation methods on both simulated and real-world epidemiological data from outbreaks of influenza A(H1N1pdm09, mumps, and measles. We find that the machine learning approaches can be verified and tested faster than the approximate Bayesian computation method, but that the approximate Bayesian computation method is more robust across different datasets.

  20. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-02: Commissioning of Radiofrequency Tracking for Gated SBRT of the Liver Using Novel Motion System

    James, J; Cetnar, A; Nguyen, V; Wang, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Tracking soft tissue targets has recently been approved as a new application of the Calypso radiofrequency tracking system allowing for gated treatment of the liver based on the motion of the target volume itself. As part of the commissioning process, an end-to-end test was performed using a 3D diode array and 6D motion platform to verify the dosimetric accuracy and establish the workflow of gated SBRT treatment of the liver using Calypso. Methods: A 4DCT scan of the ScandiDos Delta4 phantom was acquired using the HexaMotion motion platform to simulate realistic breathing motion. A VMAT plan was optimized on the end of inspiration phase of the 4DCT scan and delivered to the Delta4 phantom using the Varian TrueBeam. The treatment beam was gated by Calypso to deliver dose at the end of inspiration. The expected dose was compared to the delivered dose using gamma analysis. In addition, gating limits were investigated to determine how large the gating range can be while still maintaining dosimetric accuracy. Results: The 3%/3mm and 2%/2mm gamma pass rate for the gated treatment delivery was 100% and 98.4%, respectively. When increasing the gating limits beyond the known extent of planned motion from the 4DCT, the gamma pass rates decreased as expected. The 3%/3mm gamma pass rate for a 1, 2, and 3mm increase in gating limits were measured to be 96.0%, 92.7%, and 78.8%, respectively. Conclusion: Radiofrequency tracking was shown to be an effective way to provide gated SBRT treatment of the liver. Baseline gating limits should be determined by measuring the extent of target motion during the respiratory phases used for planning. We recommend adding 1mm to the baseline limits to provide the proper balance between treatment efficiency and dosimetric accuracy

  1. TU-D-202-03: Gating Is the Best ITV Killer

    Low, D.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory motion has long been recognized as an important factor affecting the precision of radiotherapy. After the introduction of the 4D CT to visualize the respiratory motion in 3D, the internal target volume (ITV) has been widely adopted as simple method to take the motion into account in treatment planning and delivery. The ITV is generated as the union of the CTVs as the patient goes through the respiratory cycle. Many issues have been identified with the ITV. In this session three alternatives for the ITV will be discussed: 1) An alternative motion-inclusive approach with better imaging and smaller margins, called mid-position CT. 2) The tracking approach and 3) The gating approach. The following topics will be addressed by Marcel van Herk (“Is ITV the correct motion encompassing strategy”): Magnitude of respiratory motion, effect of motion on radiotherapy, motion encompassing strategies, and software solutions to assist in motion encompassing strategies. Then Paul Keall (“Make margins simple: Use real-time target tracking”) will discuss tracking with: clinical drivers for tracking, current clinical status of tumor tracking, future tumor tracking technology, and margin margin challenges with and without tracking. Finally Daniel Low will discuss gating (“Gating is the best ITV killer”): why ITV in the first place, requirements for planning, requirements at the machine, benefits and costs. The session will end with a discussion and live demo of motion simulation software to illustrate the issues and explain the relative benefit and appropriate uses for the three methods. Learning Objectives: Explain the 4D imaging and treatment planning process. Summarize the various approaches to deal with respiratory motion during radiotherapy Discuss the tradeoffs involved when choosing one of the three discussed approaches. Explain in which situation each method is the best choice Research is partly funded by Elekta Oncology Systems and the Dutch Cancer

  2. TU-D-202-03: Gating Is the Best ITV Killer

    Low, D.

    2016-06-15

    Respiratory motion has long been recognized as an important factor affecting the precision of radiotherapy. After the introduction of the 4D CT to visualize the respiratory motion in 3D, the internal target volume (ITV) has been widely adopted as simple method to take the motion into account in treatment planning and delivery. The ITV is generated as the union of the CTVs as the patient goes through the respiratory cycle. Many issues have been identified with the ITV. In this session three alternatives for the ITV will be discussed: 1) An alternative motion-inclusive approach with better imaging and smaller margins, called mid-position CT. 2) The tracking approach and 3) The gating approach. The following topics will be addressed by Marcel van Herk (“Is ITV the correct motion encompassing strategy”): Magnitude of respiratory motion, effect of motion on radiotherapy, motion encompassing strategies, and software solutions to assist in motion encompassing strategies. Then Paul Keall (“Make margins simple: Use real-time target tracking”) will discuss tracking with: clinical drivers for tracking, current clinical status of tumor tracking, future tumor tracking technology, and margin margin challenges with and without tracking. Finally Daniel Low will discuss gating (“Gating is the best ITV killer”): why ITV in the first place, requirements for planning, requirements at the machine, benefits and costs. The session will end with a discussion and live demo of motion simulation software to illustrate the issues and explain the relative benefit and appropriate uses for the three methods. Learning Objectives: Explain the 4D imaging and treatment planning process. Summarize the various approaches to deal with respiratory motion during radiotherapy Discuss the tradeoffs involved when choosing one of the three discussed approaches. Explain in which situation each method is the best choice Research is partly funded by Elekta Oncology Systems and the Dutch Cancer

  3. Approaches to systems biology. Four methods to study single-cell gene expression, cell motility, antibody reactivity, and respiratory metabolism

    Hagedorn, Peter

    To understand how complex systems, such as cells, function, comprehensive Measurements of their constituent parts must be made. This can be achieved by combining methods that are each optimized to measure specific parts of the system. Four such methods,each covering a different area, are presented...... from such measurements allows models of the system to be developed and tested. For each of the methods, such analysis and modelling approaches have beenapplied and are presented: Differentially regulated genes are identified and classified according to function; cell-specfic motility models...... are developed that can distinguish between different surfaces; a method for selecting repertoires of antigens thatseparate mice based on their response to treatment is developed; and the observed concentrations of free and bound NADH is used to build and test a basic model of respiratory metabolism...

  4. Respiratory motion correction for PET oncology applications using affine transformation of list mode data

    Lamare, F; Cresson, T; Savean, J; Rest, C Cheze Le; Reader, A J; Visvikis, D

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory motion is a source of artefacts and reduced image quality in PET. Proposed methodology for correction of respiratory effects involves the use of gated frames, which are however of low signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore a method accounting for respiratory motion effects without affecting the statistical quality of the reconstructed images is necessary. We have implemented an affine transformation of list mode data for the correction of respiratory motion over the thorax. The study was performed using datasets of the NCAT phantom at different points throughout the respiratory cycle. List mode data based PET simulated frames were produced by combining the NCAT datasets with a Monte Carlo simulation. Transformation parameters accounting for respiratory motion were estimated according to an affine registration and were subsequently applied on the original list mode data. The corrected and uncorrected list mode datasets were subsequently reconstructed using the one-pass list mode EM (OPL-EM) algorithm. Comparison of corrected and uncorrected respiratory motion average frames suggests that an affine transformation in the list mode data prior to reconstruction can produce significant improvements in accounting for respiratory motion artefacts in the lungs and heart. However, the application of a common set of transformation parameters across the imaging field of view does not significantly correct the respiratory effects on organs such as the stomach, liver or spleen

  5. Determination of single-kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) with CT urography versus renal dynamic imaging Gates method

    You, Shan [Hebei North University, Department of Graduate, Zhangjiakou City, Hebei Province (China); Ma, XianWu; Zhang, ChangZhu; Li, Qiang [Qiqihar Chinese Medicine Hospital, Department of Radiology, Qigihar City, Heilongjiang Province (China); Shi, WenWei; Zhang, Jing; Yuan, XiaoDong [The 309th Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China)

    2018-03-15

    To present a single-kidney CT-GFR measurement and compare it with the renal dynamic imaging Gates-GFR. Thirty-six patients with hydronephrosis referred for CT urography and 99mTc-DTPA renal dynamic imaging were prospectively included. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. The CT urography protocol included non-contrast, nephrographic, and excretory phase imaging. The total CT-GFR was calculated by dividing the CT number increments of the total urinary system between the nephrographic and excretory phase by the products of iodine concentration in the aorta and the elapsed time, then multiplied by (1- Haematocrit). The total CT-GFR was then split into single-kidney CT-GFR by a left and right kidney proportionality factor. The results were compared with single-kidney Gates-GFR by using paired t-test, correlation analysis, and Bland-Altman plots. Paired difference between single-kidney CT-GFR (45.02 ± 13.91) and single-kidney Gates-GFR (51.21 ± 14.76) was 6.19 ± 5.63 ml/min, p<0.001, demonstrating 12.1% systematic underestimation with ±11.03 ml/min (±21.5%) measurement deviation. A good correlation was revealed between both measurements (r=0.87, p<0.001). The proposed single-kidney CT-GFR correlates and agrees well with the reference standard despite a systematic underestimation, therefore it could be a one-stop-shop for evaluating urinary tract morphology and split renal function. (orig.)

  6. Determination of single-kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) with CT urography versus renal dynamic imaging Gates method

    You, Shan; Ma, XianWu; Zhang, ChangZhu; Li, Qiang; Shi, WenWei; Zhang, Jing; Yuan, XiaoDong

    2018-01-01

    To present a single-kidney CT-GFR measurement and compare it with the renal dynamic imaging Gates-GFR. Thirty-six patients with hydronephrosis referred for CT urography and 99mTc-DTPA renal dynamic imaging were prospectively included. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. The CT urography protocol included non-contrast, nephrographic, and excretory phase imaging. The total CT-GFR was calculated by dividing the CT number increments of the total urinary system between the nephrographic and excretory phase by the products of iodine concentration in the aorta and the elapsed time, then multiplied by (1- Haematocrit). The total CT-GFR was then split into single-kidney CT-GFR by a left and right kidney proportionality factor. The results were compared with single-kidney Gates-GFR by using paired t-test, correlation analysis, and Bland-Altman plots. Paired difference between single-kidney CT-GFR (45.02 ± 13.91) and single-kidney Gates-GFR (51.21 ± 14.76) was 6.19 ± 5.63 ml/min, p<0.001, demonstrating 12.1% systematic underestimation with ±11.03 ml/min (±21.5%) measurement deviation. A good correlation was revealed between both measurements (r=0.87, p<0.001). The proposed single-kidney CT-GFR correlates and agrees well with the reference standard despite a systematic underestimation, therefore it could be a one-stop-shop for evaluating urinary tract morphology and split renal function. (orig.)

  7. Gating-ML: XML-based gating descriptions in flow cytometry.

    Spidlen, Josef; Leif, Robert C; Moore, Wayne; Roederer, Mario; Brinkman, Ryan R

    2008-12-01

    The lack of software interoperability with respect to gating due to lack of a standardized mechanism for data exchange has traditionally been a bottleneck, preventing reproducibility of flow cytometry (FCM) data analysis and the usage of multiple analytical tools. To facilitate interoperability among FCM data analysis tools, members of the International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) Data Standards Task Force (DSTF) have developed an XML-based mechanism to formally describe gates (Gating-ML). Gating-ML, an open specification for encoding gating, data transformations and compensation, has been adopted by the ISAC DSTF as a Candidate Recommendation. Gating-ML can facilitate exchange of gating descriptions the same way that FCS facilitated for exchange of raw FCM data. Its adoption will open new collaborative opportunities as well as possibilities for advanced analyses and methods development. The ISAC DSTF is satisfied that the standard addresses the requirements for a gating exchange standard.

  8. An improved method of early diagnosis of smoking-induced respiratory changes using machine learning algorithms.

    Amaral, Jorge L M; Lopes, Agnaldo J; Jansen, José M; Faria, Alvaro C D; Melo, Pedro L

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an automatic classifier to increase the accuracy of the forced oscillation technique (FOT) for diagnosing early respiratory abnormalities in smoking patients. The data consisted of FOT parameters obtained from 56 volunteers, 28 healthy and 28 smokers with low tobacco consumption. Many supervised learning techniques were investigated, including logistic linear classifiers, k nearest neighbor (KNN), neural networks and support vector machines (SVM). To evaluate performance, the ROC curve of the most accurate parameter was established as baseline. To determine the best input features and classifier parameters, we used genetic algorithms and a 10-fold cross-validation using the average area under the ROC curve (AUC). In the first experiment, the original FOT parameters were used as input. We observed a significant improvement in accuracy (KNN=0.89 and SVM=0.87) compared with the baseline (0.77). The second experiment performed a feature selection on the original FOT parameters. This selection did not cause any significant improvement in accuracy, but it was useful in identifying more adequate FOT parameters. In the third experiment, we performed a feature selection on the cross products of the FOT parameters. This selection resulted in a further increase in AUC (KNN=SVM=0.91), which allows for high diagnostic accuracy. In conclusion, machine learning classifiers can help identify early smoking-induced respiratory alterations. The use of FOT cross products and the search for the best features and classifier parameters can markedly improve the performance of machine learning classifiers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimization design of a gating system for sand casting aluminium A356 using a Taguchi method and multi-objective culture-based QPSO algorithm

    Wen-Jong Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article combined Taguchi method and analysis of variance with the culture-based quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization to determine the optimal models of gating system for aluminium (Al A356 sand casting part. First, the Taguchi method and analysis of variance were, respectively, applied to establish an L27(38 orthogonal array and determine significant process parameters, including riser diameter, pouring temperature, pouring speed, riser position and gating diameter. Subsequently, a response surface methodology was used to construct a second-order regression model, including filling time, solidification time and oxide ratio. Finally, the culture-based quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization was used to determine the multi-objective Pareto optimal solutions and identify corresponding process conditions. The results showed that the proposed method, compared with initial casting model, enabled reducing the filling time, solidification time and oxide ratio by 68.14%, 50.56% and 20.20%, respectively. A confirmation experiment was verified to be able to effectively reduce the defect of casting and improve the casting quality.

  10. Difference in target definition using three different methods to include respiratory motion in radiotherapy of lung cancer

    Sloth Møller, Ditte; Knap, Marianne Marquard; Nyeng, Tine Bisballe

    2017-01-01

    : PTVσ yields the smallest volumes but does not ensure coverage of tumor during the full respiratory motion due to tumor deformation. Incorporating the respiratory motion in the delineation (PTVdel) takes into account the entire respiratory cycle including deformation, but at the cost, however, of larger...

  11. SU-E-J-48: Development of An Abdominal Compression Device for Respiratory Correlated Radiation Therapy

    Kim, T; Kang, S; Kim, D; Suh, T; Kim, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop the abdominal compression device which could control pressure level according to the abdominal respiratory motion and evaluate its feasibility. Methods: In this study, we focused on developing the abdominal compression device which could control pressure level at any point of time so the developed device is possible to use a variety of purpose (gating technique or respiratory training system) while maintaining the merit of the existing commercial device. The compression device (air pad form) was designed to be able to compress the front and side of abdomen and the pressure level of the abdomen is controlled by air flow. Pressure level of abdomen (air flow) was determined using correlation data between external abdominal motion and respiratory volume signal measured by spirometer. In order to verify the feasibility of the device, it was necessary to confirm the correlation between the abdominal respiratory motion and respiratory volume signal and cooperation with respiratory training system also checked. Results: In the previous study, we could find that the correlation coefficient ratio between diaphragm and respiratory volume signal measured by spirometer was 0.95. In this study, we confirmed the correlation between the respiratory volume signal and the external abdominal motion measured by belt-transducer (correlation coefficient ratio was 0.92) and used the correlated respiratory volume data as an abdominal pressure level. It was possible to control the pressure level with negligible time delay and respiratory volume data based guiding waveforms could be properly inserted into the respiratory training system. Conclusion: Through this feasibility study, we confirmed the correlation between the respiratory volume signal and the external abdominal motion. Also initial assessment of the device and its compatibility with the respiratory training system were verified. Further study on application in respiratory gated

  12. From individual innovation to global impact: the Global Cooperation on Assistive Technology (GATE) innovation snapshot as a method for sharing and scaling.

    Layton, Natasha; Murphy, Caitlin; Bell, Diane

    2018-05-09

    Assistive technology (AT) is an essential facilitator of independence and participation, both for people living with the effects of disability and/or non-communicable disease, as well as people aging with resultant functional decline. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes the substantial gap between the need for and provision of AT and is leading change through the Global Cooperation on Assistive Technology (GATE) initiative. Showcasing innovations gathered from 92 global researchers, innovators, users and educators of AT through the WHO GREAT Summit, this article provides an analysis of ideas and actions on a range of dimensions in order to provide a global overview of AT innovation. The accessible method used to capture and showcase this data is presented and critiqued, concluding that "innovation snapshots" are a rapid and concise strategy to capture and showcase AT innovation and to foster global collaboration. Implications for Rehabilitation Focal tools such as ePosters with uniform data requirements enable the rapid sharing of information. A diversity of innovative practices are occurring globally in the areas of AT Products, Policy, Provision, People and Personnel. The method offered for Innovation Snapshots had substantial uptake and is a feasible means to capture data across a range of stakeholders. Meeting accessibility criteria is an emerging competency in the AT community. Substantial areas of common interest exist across regions and globally in the AT community, demonstrating the effectiveness of information sharing platforms such as GATE and supporting the idea of regional forums and networks.

  13. Contact effects analyzed by a parameter extraction method based on a single bottom-gate/top-contact organic thin-film transistor

    Takagaki, Shunsuke; Yamada, Hirofumi; Noda, Kei

    2018-03-01

    Contact effects in organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) were examined by using our previously proposed parameter extraction method from the electrical characteristics of a single staggered-type device. Gate-voltage-dependent contact resistance and channel mobility in the linear regime were evaluated for bottom-gate/top-contact (BGTC) pentacene TFTs with active layers of different thicknesses, and for pentacene TFTs with contact-doped layers prepared by coevaporation of pentacene and tetrafluorotetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ). The extracted parameters suggested that the influence of the contact resistance becomes more prominent with the larger active-layer thickness, and that contact-doping experiments give rise to a drastic decrease in the contact resistance and a concurrent considerable improvement in the channel mobility. Additionally, the estimated energy distributions of trap density in the transistor channel probably reflect the trap filling with charge carriers injected into the channel regions. The analysis results in this study confirm the effectiveness of our proposed method, with which we can investigate contact effects and circumvent the influences of characteristic variations in OTFT fabrication.

  14. SU-F-T-514: Evaluation of the Accuracy of Free-Breathing and Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold Gated Beam Delivery Using An Elekta Linac

    Jermoumi, M; Cao, D; Housley, D; Shepard, D [Department of Radiation Oncology, Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Xie, R [Ironwood Cancer and Research Centers, Chandler, AZ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, we evaluated the performance of an Elekta linac in the delivery of gated radiotherapy. We examined whether the use of either a short gating window or a long beam hold impacts the accuracy of the delivery Methods: The performance of an Elekta linac in the delivery of gated radiotherapy was assessed using a 20cmX 20cm open field with the radiation delivered using a range of beam-on and beam-off time periods. Two SBRT plans were used to examine the accuracy of gated beam delivery for clinical treatment plans. For the SBRT cases, tests were performed for both free-breathing based gating and for gated delivery with a simulated breath-hold. A MatriXX 2D ion chamber array was used for data collection, and the gating accuracy was evaluated using gamma score. Results: For the 20cmX20cm open field, the gated beam delivery agreed closely with the non-gated delivery results. Discrepancies in the agreement, however, began to appear with a 5-to-1 ratio of the beam-off to beam-on. For these tight gating windows, each beam-on segment delivered a small number of monitor units. This finding was confirmed with dose distribution analysis from the delivery of the two VMAT plans where the gamma score(±1%,2%/1mm) showed passing rates in the range of 95% to 100% for gating windows of 25%, 38%, 50%, 63%, 75%, and 83%. Using a simulated sinusoidal breathing signal with a 4 second period, the gamma score of freebreathing gating and breath-hold gating deliveries were measured in the range of 95.7% to 100%. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that Elekta linacs can be used to accurately deliver respiratory gated treatments for both free-breathing and breath-hold patients. The accuracy of beams delivered in a gated delivery mode at low small MU proved higher than similar deliveries performed in a non-gated (manually interrupted) fashion.

  15. SU-F-T-514: Evaluation of the Accuracy of Free-Breathing and Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold Gated Beam Delivery Using An Elekta Linac

    Jermoumi, M; Cao, D; Housley, D; Shepard, D; Xie, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we evaluated the performance of an Elekta linac in the delivery of gated radiotherapy. We examined whether the use of either a short gating window or a long beam hold impacts the accuracy of the delivery Methods: The performance of an Elekta linac in the delivery of gated radiotherapy was assessed using a 20cmX 20cm open field with the radiation delivered using a range of beam-on and beam-off time periods. Two SBRT plans were used to examine the accuracy of gated beam delivery for clinical treatment plans. For the SBRT cases, tests were performed for both free-breathing based gating and for gated delivery with a simulated breath-hold. A MatriXX 2D ion chamber array was used for data collection, and the gating accuracy was evaluated using gamma score. Results: For the 20cmX20cm open field, the gated beam delivery agreed closely with the non-gated delivery results. Discrepancies in the agreement, however, began to appear with a 5-to-1 ratio of the beam-off to beam-on. For these tight gating windows, each beam-on segment delivered a small number of monitor units. This finding was confirmed with dose distribution analysis from the delivery of the two VMAT plans where the gamma score(±1%,2%/1mm) showed passing rates in the range of 95% to 100% for gating windows of 25%, 38%, 50%, 63%, 75%, and 83%. Using a simulated sinusoidal breathing signal with a 4 second period, the gamma score of freebreathing gating and breath-hold gating deliveries were measured in the range of 95.7% to 100%. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that Elekta linacs can be used to accurately deliver respiratory gated treatments for both free-breathing and breath-hold patients. The accuracy of beams delivered in a gated delivery mode at low small MU proved higher than similar deliveries performed in a non-gated (manually interrupted) fashion.

  16. Markerless gating for lung cancer radiotherapy based on machine learning techniques

    Lin Tong; Li Ruijiang; Tang Xiaoli; Jiang, Steve B; Dy, Jennifer G

    2009-01-01

    In lung cancer radiotherapy, radiation to a mobile target can be delivered by respiratory gating, for which we need to know whether the target is inside or outside a predefined gating window at any time point during the treatment. This can be achieved by tracking one or more fiducial markers implanted inside or near the target, either fluoroscopically or electromagnetically. However, the clinical implementation of marker tracking is limited for lung cancer radiotherapy mainly due to the risk of pneumothorax. Therefore, gating without implanted fiducial markers is a promising clinical direction. We have developed several template-matching methods for fluoroscopic marker-less gating. Recently, we have modeled the gating problem as a binary pattern classification problem, in which principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector machine (SVM) are combined to perform the classification task. Following the same framework, we investigated different combinations of dimensionality reduction techniques (PCA and four nonlinear manifold learning methods) and two machine learning classification methods (artificial neural networks-ANN and SVM). Performance was evaluated on ten fluoroscopic image sequences of nine lung cancer patients. We found that among all combinations of dimensionality reduction techniques and classification methods, PCA combined with either ANN or SVM achieved a better performance than the other nonlinear manifold learning methods. ANN when combined with PCA achieves a better performance than SVM in terms of classification accuracy and recall rate, although the target coverage is similar for the two classification methods. Furthermore, the running time for both ANN and SVM with PCA is within tolerance for real-time applications. Overall, ANN combined with PCA is a better candidate than other combinations we investigated in this work for real-time gated radiotherapy.

  17. Noise Gating Solar Images

    DeForest, Craig; Seaton, Daniel B.; Darnell, John A.

    2017-08-01

    I present and demonstrate a new, general purpose post-processing technique, "3D noise gating", that can reduce image noise by an order of magnitude or more without effective loss of spatial or temporal resolution in typical solar applications.Nearly all scientific images are, ultimately, limited by noise. Noise can be direct Poisson "shot noise" from photon counting effects, or introduced by other means such as detector read noise. Noise is typically represented as a random variable (perhaps with location- or image-dependent characteristics) that is sampled once per pixel or once per resolution element of an image sequence. Noise limits many aspects of image analysis, including photometry, spatiotemporal resolution, feature identification, morphology extraction, and background modeling and separation.Identifying and separating noise from image signal is difficult. The common practice of blurring in space and/or time works because most image "signal" is concentrated in the low Fourier components of an image, while noise is evenly distributed. Blurring in space and/or time attenuates the high spatial and temporal frequencies, reducing noise at the expense of also attenuating image detail. Noise-gating exploits the same property -- "coherence" -- that we use to identify features in images, to separate image features from noise.Processing image sequences through 3-D noise gating results in spectacular (more than 10x) improvements in signal-to-noise ratio, while not blurring bright, resolved features in either space or time. This improves most types of image analysis, including feature identification, time sequence extraction, absolute and relative photometry (including differential emission measure analysis), feature tracking, computer vision, correlation tracking, background modeling, cross-scale analysis, visual display/presentation, and image compression.I will introduce noise gating, describe the method, and show examples from several instruments (including SDO

  18. Respiratory Failure

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  19. Respiratory system

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The general anatomy and function of the human respiratory system is summarized. Breathing movements, control of breathing, lung volumes and capacities, mechanical relations, and factors relevant to respiratory support and equipment design are discussed.

  20. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia responses to induced emotional states: effects of RSA indices, emotion induction method, age, and sex.

    Overbeek, Thérèse J M; van Boxtel, Anton; Westerink, Joyce H D M

    2012-09-01

    The literature shows large inconsistencies in respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) responses to induced emotional states. This may be caused by differences in emotion induction methods, RSA quantification, and non-emotional demands of the situation. In 83 healthy subjects, we studied RSA responses to pictures and film fragments eliciting six different discrete emotions relative to neutral baseline stimuli. RSA responses were quantified in the time and frequency domain and were additionally corrected for differences in mean heart rate and respiration rate, resulting in eight different RSA response measures. Subjective ratings of emotional stimuli and facial electromyographic responses indicated that pictures and film fragments elicited the intended emotions. Although RSA measures showed various emotional effects, responses were quite heterogeneous and frequently nonsignificant. They were substantially influenced by methodological factors, in particular time vs. frequency domain response measures, correction for changes in respiration rate, use of pictures vs. film fragments, and sex of participants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Universal quantum gates for Single Cooper Pair Box based quantum computing

    Echternach, P.; Williams, C. P.; Dultz, S. C.; Braunstein, S.; Dowling, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a method for achieving arbitrary 1-qubit gates and controlled-NOT gates within the context of the Single Cooper Pair Box (SCB) approach to quantum computing. Such gates are sufficient to support universal quantum computation.

  2. New gate opening hours

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    Please note the new opening hours of the gates as well as the intersites tunnel from the 19 May 2009: GATE A 7h - 19h GATE B 24h/24 GATE C 7h - 9h\t17h - 19h GATE D 8h - 12h\t13h - 16h GATE E 7h - 9h\t17h - 19h Prévessin 24h/24 The intersites tunnel will be opened from 7h30 to 18h non stop. GS-SEM Group Infrastructure and General Services Department

  3. Online junction temperature measurement using peak gate current

    Baker, Nick; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Iannuzzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A new method for junction temperature measurement of MOS-gated power semiconductor switches is presented. The measurement method involves detecting the peak voltage over the external gate resistor of an IGBT or MOSFET during turn-on. This voltage is directly proportional to the peak gate current...

  4. SU-F-J-121: Dosimetric Evaluation of Active Breathing Coordinator-Response Gating System Linked to Linear Accelerator in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    Lee, S; Zheng, Y; Albani, D; Colussi, V; Dorth, J; Sohn, J [Case Western University, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To reduce internal target volume (ITV), respiratory management is a must in imaging and treatment for lung, liver, and breast cancers. We investigated the dosimetric accuracy of VMAT treatment delivery with a Response™ gating system linked to linear accelerator. Methods: The Response™ gating module designed to directly control radiation beam by breath-holding with a ABC system (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) was tested for VMAT treatments. Seven VMAT plans including three conventional and four stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) cases were evaluated. Each plan was composed of two or four arcs of 6MV radiation beam with prescribed dose ranged from 1.8 to 9 Gy per fraction. Each plan was delivered continuously without gating and delivered with multiple interruptions by the ResponseTM gating module with a 20 or 30 second breath-holding period. MapCheck2 and Gafchromic EBT3 films sandwiched in MapPHAN were used to measure the delivered dose with and without gating. Films were scanned on a flatbed color scanner, and red channel was extracted for film dosimetry. Gamma analysis was performed to analyze the dosimetrical accuracy of the radiation delivery with gating. Results: The measured doses with gating remarkably agree with the planned dose distributions in the results of gamma index passing rate (within 20% isodose; >98% for 3%/3mm and >92% for 2%/2mm in MapCheck2, and >91% for 3%/3mm criteria in EBT3 film except one case which was for large target and highly modulated). No significant difference (student t-test: p-value < 0.0005) was shown between the doses delivered with and without gating. There was no indication of radiation gap or overlapping during deliver interruption in film dosimetry. Conclusion: The Response™ gating system can be safely used during VMAT treatment. The accurate performance of the gating system linked to ABC can contribute to ITV reduction for SBRT using VMAT.

  5. Respiration Induced Heart Motion and Indications of Gated Delivery for Left-Sided Breast Irradiation

    Qi, X. Sharon; Hu, Angela; Wang Kai; Newman, Francis; Crosby, Marcus; Hu Bin; White, Julia; Li, X. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate respiration-induced heart motion for left-sided breast irradiation using a four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) technique and to determine novel indications to assess heart motion and identify breast patients who may benefit from a gated treatment. Methods and Materials: Images of 4DCT acquired during free breathing for 20 left-sided breast cancer patients, who underwent whole breast irradiation with or without regional nodal irradiation, were analyzed retrospectively. Dose distributions were reconstructed in the phases of 0%, 20%, and 50%. The intrafractional heart displacement was measured in three selected transverse CT slices using D LAD (the distance from left ascending aorta to a fixed line [connecting middle point of sternum and the body] drawn on each slice) and maximum heart depth (MHD, the distance of the forefront of the heart to the line). Linear regression analysis was used to correlate these indices with mean heart dose and heart dose volume at different breathing phases. Results: Respiration-induced heart displacement resulted in observable variations in dose delivered to the heart. During a normal free-breathing cycle, heart-induced motion D LAD and MHD changed up to 9 and 11 mm respectively, resulting in up to 38% and 39% increases of mean doses and V 25.2 for the heart. MHD and D LAD were positively correlated with mean heart dose and heart dose volume. Respiratory-adapted gated treatment may better spare heart and ipsilateral-lung compared with the conventional non-gated plan in a subset of patients with large D LAD or MHD variations. Conclusion: Proposed indices offer novel assessment of heart displacement based on 4DCT images. MHD and D LAD can be used independently or jointly as selection criteria for respiratory gating procedure before treatment planning. Patients with great intrafractional MHD variations or tumor(s) close to the diaphragm may particularly benefit from the gated treatment.

  6. Exogenous surfactant kinetics in infant respiratory distress syndrome : A novel method with stable isotopes

    Torresin, M; Zimmermann, LJI; Cogo, PE; Cavicchioli, P; Badon, T; Giordano, G; Zacchello, F; Sauer, PJJ; Carnielli, VP

    Little is known about surfactant metabolism in newborn infants, since radioactive isotopes cannot be used in humans. We describe here a new method for studying exogenous surfactant pharmacokinetics in vivo. We measured surfactant half-life, pool size, and turnover time in eight preterm infants

  7. SU-F-J-151: Evaluation of a Magnetic Resonance Image Gated Radiotherapy System Using a Motion Phantom and Radiochromic Film

    Lamb, J; Ginn, J; O’Connell, D; Thomas, D; Agazaryan, N; Cao, M; Yang, Y; Low, D [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance image (MRI) guided radiotherapy enables gating directly on target position for soft-tissue targets in the lung and abdomen. We present a dosimetric evaluation of a commercially-available FDA-approved MRI-guided radiotherapy system’s gating performance using a MRI-compatible respiratory motion phantom and radiochromic film. Methods: The MRI-compatible phantom was capable of one-dimensional motion. The phantom consisted of a target rod containing high-contrast target inserts which moved inside a body structure containing background contrast material. The target rod was equipped with a radiochromic film insert. Treatment plans were generated for a 3 cm diameter spherical target, and delivered to the phantom at rest and in motion with and without gating. Both sinusoidal and actual tumor trajectories (two free-breathing trajectories and one repeated-breath hold) were used. Gamma comparison at 5%/3mm was used to measure fidelity to the static target dose distribution. Results: Without gating, gamma pass rates were 24–47% depending on motion trajectory. Using our clinical standard of repeated breath holds and a gating window of 3 mm with 10% of the target allowed outside the gating boundary, the gamma pass rate was 99.6%. Relaxing the gating window to 5 mm resulted in gamma pass rate of 98.6% with repeated breath holds. For all motion trajectories gated with 3 mm margin and 10% allowed out, gamma pass rates were between 64–100% (mean:87.5%). For a 5 mm margin and 10% allowed out, gamma pass rates were between 57–98% (mean: 82.49%), significantly lower than for 3 mm by paired t-test (p=0.01). Conclusion: We validated the performance of respiratory gating based on real-time cine MRI images with the only FDA-approved MRI-guided radiotherapy system. Our results suggest that repeated breath hold gating should be used when possible for best accuracy. A 3 mm gating margin is statistically significantly more accurate than a 5 mm gating margin.

  8. Access to a polymerase chain reaction assay method targeting 13 respiratory viruses can reduce antibiotics: a randomised, controlled trial

    Lindh Magnus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral respiratory infections are common worldwide and range from completely benign disease to life-threatening illness. Symptoms can be unspecific, and an etiologic diagnosis is rarely established because of a lack of suitable diagnostic tools. Improper use of antibiotics is common in this setting, which is detrimental in light of the development of bacterial resistance. It has been suggested that the use of diagnostic tests could reduce antibiotic prescription rates. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether access to a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay panel for etiologic diagnosis of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs would have an impact on antibiotic prescription rate in primary care clinical settings. Methods Adult patients with symptoms of ARTI were prospectively included. Nasopharyngeal and throat swabs were analysed by using a multiplex real-time PCR method targeting thirteen viruses and two bacteria. Patients were recruited at 12 outpatient units from October 2006 through April 2009, and samples were collected on the day of inclusion (initial visit and after 10 days (follow-up visit. Patients were randomised in an open-label treatment protocol to receive a rapid or delayed result (on the following day or after eight to twelve days. The primary outcome measure was the antibiotic prescription rate at the initial visit, and the secondary outcome was the total antibiotic prescription rate during the study period. Results A total sample of 447 patients was randomised. Forty-one were excluded, leaving 406 patients for analysis. In the group of patients randomised for a rapid result, 4.5% (9 of 202 of patients received antibiotics at the initial visit, compared to 12.3% (25 of 204 (P = 0.005 of patients in the delayed result group. At follow-up, there was no significant difference between the groups: 13.9% (28 of 202 in the rapid result group and 17.2% (35 of 204 in the delayed result group (P

  9. Computer-based automated left atrium segmentation and volumetry from ECG-gated coronary CT angiography data. Comparison with manual slice segmentation and ultrasound planimetric methods

    Bauer, R.W.; Kraus, B.; Kerl, J.M.; Lehnert, T.; Vogl, T.J. [Universitaetsklinikum Frankfurt (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Bernhardt, D.; Vega-Higuera, F. [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim (Germany). Computed Tomography; Ackermann, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Frankfurt (Germany). Inst. fuer Biostatistik und Mathematische Modellierung

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Enlargement of the left atrium is a risk factor for cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events. We evaluated the performance of prototype software for fully automated segmentation and volumetry of the left atrium. Materials and Methods: In 34 retrospectively ECG-gated coronary CT angiography scans, the end-systolic (LAVsys) and end-diastolic (LAVdia) volume of the left atrium was calculated fully automatically by prototype software. Manual slice segmentation by two independent experienced radiologists served as the reference standard. Furthermore, two independent observers calculated the LAV utilizing two ultrasound planimetric methods ('area length' and 'prolate ellipse') on CTA images. Measurement periods were compared for all methods. Results: The left atrial volumes calculated with the prototype software were in excellent agreement with the results from manual slice segmentation (r = 0.97 - 0.99; p < 0.001; Bland-Altman) with excellent interobserver agreement between both radiologists (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). Ultrasound planimetric methods clearly showed a higher variation (r = 0.72 - 0.86) with moderate interobserver agreement (r = 0.51 - 0.79). The measurement period was significantly lower with the software (267 {+-} 28 sec; p < 0.001) than with ultrasound methods (431 {+-} 68 sec) or manual slice segmentation (567 {+-} 91 sec). Conclusion: The prototype software showed excellent agreement with manual slice segmentation with the least time consumption. This will facilitate the routine assessment of the LA volume from coronary CTA data and therefore risk stratification. (orig.)

  10. An attenuation correction method for PET/CT images

    Ue, Hidenori; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2006-01-01

    In PET/CT systems, accurate attenuation correction can be achieved by creating an attenuation map from an X-ray CT image. On the other hand, respiratory-gated PET acquisition is an effective method for avoiding motion blurring of the thoracic and abdominal organs caused by respiratory motion. In PET/CT systems employing respiratory-gated PET, using an X-ray CT image acquired during breath-holding for attenuation correction may have a large effect on the voxel values, especially in regions with substantial respiratory motion. In this report, we propose an attenuation correction method in which, as the first step, a set of respiratory-gated PET images is reconstructed without attenuation correction, as the second step, the motion of each phase PET image from the PET image in the same phase as the CT acquisition timing is estimated by the previously proposed method, as the third step, the CT image corresponding to each respiratory phase is generated from the original CT image by deformation according to the motion vector maps, and as the final step, attenuation correction using these CT images and reconstruction are performed. The effectiveness of the proposed method was evaluated using 4D-NCAT phantoms, and good stability of the voxel values near the diaphragm was observed. (author)

  11. Development and clinical application of respiration gated irradiation system (ReGIS) in heavy ion radiotherapy

    Osaka, Yasuhiro; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Mizoe, Jun-etsu

    1999-01-01

    In order to achieve maximal radiation dose concentration for thoraco-abdominal tumors and spare normal surrounding tissue in heavy ion therapy, compensation for respiration-related movement is desirable. Hence, a respiration-gated irradiation system (ReGIS) was introduced to the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) in June 1996. In this report, the development and clinical application of ReGIS, as well as the analysis of respiration-related movement and reduction of target volumes are described. When using ReGIS, a sensor emitting infrared rays is attached to the thoracic or abdominal wall to measure respiratory movement. A position-sensitive device (camera) senses these rays to detect sensor locations and data are forwarded to a computer system. A curve representing respiratory cycles is displayed, upon which a trigger level that is part of a respiratory cycle (about a fourth or fifth of the expiratory phase). Beams can be delivered while the respiratory curve is under the trigger level. Thirty-five patients involving 37 irradiated sites (19 lung cancers, 13 hepatomas, 2 mediastinal tumors, and 3 metastatic lung tumors) were retrospectively analyzed. Target volumes were reduced an average of 29.5% (11.0 to 57.9%) using ReGIS. Average tumor respiration-related movement in gated phase was 3.7 mm (0 mm to 14.6 mm). Although irradiation using ReGIS took more time to perform (average 1.62 times non-gated irradiation), it was considered to be acceptable for routine heavy ion therapy. ReGIS has proved to be useful for compensation of respiration-related movement and reduction of target volume in radiotherapy, and this method is sufficiently simple for practical clinical application. (author)

  12. Non-enhanced ECG-gated respiratory-triggered 3-D steady-state free-precession MR angiography with slab-selective inversion: initial experience in visualisation of renal arteries in free-breathing children without renal artery abnormality

    Klee, Dirk; Lanzman, Rotem Shlomo; Blondin, Dirk; Antoch, Gerald; Schaper, Joerg; Schmitt, Peter; Oh, Jun; Salgin, Burak; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2012-01-01

    ECG-gated non-enhanced balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) MR angiography requires neither breath-holding nor administration of contrast material. To investigate the image quality of free-breathing ECG-gated non-enhanced bSSFP MR angiography of renal arteries in children. Fourteen boys and seven girls (mean age, 9.7 years; range, 7 weeks-17 years) with no history of renovascular disease were included. MRI was performed at 1.5 T. Subjective image quality of axial and coronal maximum-intensity-projection reconstructions of four segments (I, aorta and renal artery ostium; II, main renal artery; III, segmental branches; IV, intrarenal vessels) was evaluated using a 4-point scale (4 = excellent, 3 = good, 2 = acceptable, 1 = non-diagnostic). Image quality was excellent for segments I (mean ± SD, 3.9 ± 0.3) and II (4.0 ± 0.1), good for segment III (3.4 ± 0.9) and acceptable for segment IV (2.3 ± 1.1). Mean image quality did not differ between sedated and non-sedated children. bSSFP MR angiography enables visualisation of renal arteries in children. (orig.)

  13. Multi-scaled normal mode analysis method for dynamics simulation of protein-membrane complexes: A case study of potassium channel gating motion correlations

    Wu, Xiaokun; Han, Min; Ming, Dengming, E-mail: dming@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-10-07

    Membrane proteins play critically important roles in many cellular activities such as ions and small molecule transportation, signal recognition, and transduction. In order to fulfill their functions, these proteins must be placed in different membrane environments and a variety of protein-lipid interactions may affect the behavior of these proteins. One of the key effects of protein-lipid interactions is their ability to change the dynamics status of membrane proteins, thus adjusting their functions. Here, we present a multi-scaled normal mode analysis (mNMA) method to study the dynamics perturbation to the membrane proteins imposed by lipid bi-layer membrane fluctuations. In mNMA, channel proteins are simulated at all-atom level while the membrane is described with a coarse-grained model. mNMA calculations clearly show that channel gating motion can tightly couple with a variety of membrane deformations, including bending and twisting. We then examined bi-channel systems where two channels were separated with different distances. From mNMA calculations, we observed both positive and negative gating correlations between two neighboring channels, and the correlation has a maximum as the channel center-to-center distance is close to 2.5 times of their diameter. This distance is larger than recently found maximum attraction distance between two proteins embedded in membrane which is 1.5 times of the protein size, indicating that membrane fluctuation might impose collective motions among proteins within a larger area. The hybrid resolution feature in mNMA provides atomic dynamics information for key components in the system without costing much computer resource. We expect it to be a conventional simulation tool for ordinary laboratories to study the dynamics of very complicated biological assemblies. The source code is available upon request to the authors.

  14. Improving the Spatial Alignment in PET/CT Using Amplitude-Based Respiration-Gated PET and Respiration-Triggered CT

    Vos, C.S. van der; Grootjans, W.; Osborne, D.R.; Meeuwis, A.P.; Hamill, J.J.; Acuff, S.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Visser, E.P.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory motion during PET can cause inaccuracies in the quantification of radiotracer uptake, which negatively affects PET-guided radiotherapy planning. Quantitative accuracy can be improved by respiratory gating. However, additional miscalculation of standardized uptake value (SUV) in PET

  15. Evaluation of left ventricular function in patients with atrial fibrillation by ECG gated blood pool scintigraphy. Using frame count normalization method

    Akanabe, Hiroshi; Oshima, Motoo; Sakuma, Sadayuki

    1988-07-01

    The assumption necessary to perform ECG gated blood pool scintigraphy (EGBPS) are seemingly not valid for patients with atrial fibrillation (af), since they have wide variability in cardiac cycle length. The data were acquired in frame mode within the limits of mean heart rate of fix the first diastolic volume, and were calculated by frame count normalization (FCN) method to correct total counts in each frame. EGBPS were performed twelve patients with af, who were operated against valvular disease. The data acquired within mean heart rate +-10 % in frame mode were divided to 32 frames, and calculated total frame counts. With FCN method total frame counts from at 22nd to 32nd frame were multiplied to be equal to the average of total frame counts. FCN method could correct total frame counts at the latter frames. And there was good correlation between left ventricular ejection fraction calculated from scintigraphy and that from contrast cineangiography. Thus EGBPS with FCN method may be allow estimation of cardiac function even in subjects with af.

  16. Method and apparatus for the diagnosis of respiratory diseases and allergies

    Kremer, C.P.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for uniformly coating the airways of the lung of a patient with a mist formed by aspirating a liquid. The maximum size of the particles of the mist is restricted to about 1.2 microns with the major portion of the particles being in the range of 0.056 microns to 1 micron causing the mist to behave as a gas. Conduits are used for feeding the mist together with a gas containing oxygen to a patient to be inhaled during the normal breathing process, and valves are connected to the conduits for diverting the exhaled mist and gas through a discharge path. By radioactively tagging the liquid prior to production of the mist, the uniform deposition of the mist throughout the entire lung without encountering heavy accumulations in the large airways and at branch points, enables the production of high definition image scans of the lung. (author)

  17. Comparison of INSURE method with conventional mechanical ventilation after surfactant administration in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome: therapeutic challenge.

    Fatemeh Sadat Nayeri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Administration of endotracheal surfactant is potentially the main treatment for neonates suffering from RDS (Respiratory Distress Syndrome, which is followed by mechanical ventilation. Late and severe complications may develop as a consequence of using mechanical ventilation. In this study, conventional methods for treatment of RDS are compared with surfactant administration, use of mechanical ventilation for a brief period and NCPAP (Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, (INSURE method ((Intubation, Surfactant administration and extubation. A randomized clinical trial study was performed, including all newborn infants with diagnosed RDS and a gestational age of 35 weeks or less, who were admitted in NICU of Valiasr hospital. The patients were then divided randomly into two CMV (Conventional Mechanical Ventilation and INSURE groups. Surfactant administration and consequent long-term mechanical ventilation were done in the first group (CMV group. In the second group (INSURE group, surfactant was administered followed by a short-term period of mechanical ventilation. The infants were then extubated, and NCPAP was embedded. The comparison included crucial duration of mechanical ventilation and oxygen therapy, IVH (Intraventricular Hemorrhage, PDA (Patent Ductus Arteriosus, air-leak syndromes, BPD (Broncho-Pulmonary Dysplasia and mortality rate. The need for mechanical ventilation in 5th day of admission was 43% decreased (P=0.005 in INSURE group in comparison to CMV group. A decline (P=0.01 in the incidence of IVH and PDA was also achieved. Pneumothorax, chronic pulmonary disease and mortality rates, were not significantly different among two groups. (P=0.25, P=0.14, P=0.25, respectively. This study indicated that INSURE method in the treatment of RDS decreases the need for mechanical ventilation and oxygen-therapy in preterm neonates. Moreover, relevant complications as IVH and PDA were observed to be reduced. Thus, it seems rationale to

  18. Four-dimensional measurement of intrafractional respiratory motion of pancreatic tumors using a 256 multi-slice CT scanner

    Mori, Shinichiro; Hara, Ryusuke; Yanagi, Takeshi; Sharp, Gregory C.; Kumagai, Motoki; Asakura, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Riwa; Yamada, Shigeru; Kandatsu, Susumu; Kamada, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify pancreas and pancreatic tumor movement due to respiratory motion using volumetric cine CT images. Materials and methods: Six patients with pancreatic tumors were scanned in cine mode with a 256 multi-slice CT scanner under free breathing conditions. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and pancreas were manually contoured on the CT data set by a radiation oncologist. Intrafractional respiratory movement of the GTV and pancreas was calculated, and the results were compared between the respiratory ungated and gated phases, which is a 30% duty cycle around exhalation. Results: Respiratory-induced organ motion was observed mainly in the anterior abdominal side than the posterior side. Average GTV displacement (ungated/gated phases) was 0.7 mm/0.2 mm in both the left and right directions, and 2.5 mm/0.9 mm in the anterior, 0.1 mm/0 mm in the posterior, and 8.9 mm/2.6 mm in the inferior directions. Average pancreas center of mass displacement relative to that at peak exhalation was mainly in the inferior direction, at 9.6 mm in the ungated phase and 2.3 mm in the gated phase. Conclusions: By allowing accurate determination of the margin, quantitative analysis of tumor and pancreas displacement provides useful information in treatment planning in all radiation approaches for pancreatic tumors.

  19. Respiratory mechanics

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  20. Applications of Bayesian Phylodynamic Methods in a Recent U.S. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Outbreak

    Mohammad A. Alkhamis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Classical phylogenetic methods such as neighbor-joining or maximum likelihood trees, provide limited inferences about the evolution of important pathogens and ignore important evolutionary parameters and uncertainties, which in turn limits decision making related to surveillance, control and prevention resources. Bayesian phylodynamic models have recently been used to test research hypothesis related to evolution of infectious agents. However, few studies have attempted to model the evolutionary dynamics of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV and, to the authors’ knowledge, no attempt has been made to use large volumes of routinely collected data, sometimes referred to as big data, in the context of animal disease surveillance. The objective of this study was to explore and discuss the applications of Bayesian phylodynamic methods for modeling the evolution and spread of a notable 1-7-4 RFLP-type PRRSV between 2014 and 2015. A convenience sample of 288 ORF5 sequences was collected from 5 swine production systems in the United States between September 2003 and March 2015. Using coalescence and discrete trait phylodynamic models, we were able to infer population growth and demographic history of the virus, identified the most likely ancestral system (root state posterior probability = 0.95 and revealed significant dispersal routes (Bayes factor > 6 of viral exchange among systems. Results indicate that currently circulating viruses are evolving rapidly, and show a higher level of relative genetic diversity over time, when compared to earlier relatives. Biological soundness of model results is supported by the finding that sow farms were responsible for PRRSV spread within the systems. Such results can’t be obtained by traditional phylogenetic methods, and therefore, our results provide a methodological framework for molecular epidemiological modeling of new PRRSV outbreaks and demonstrate the prospects of phylodynamic

  1. SU-E-T-163: Evaluation of Dose Distributions Recalculated with Per-Field Measurement Data Under the Condition of Respiratory Motion During IMRT for Liver Cancer

    Song, J; Yoon, M; Nam, T; Ahn, S; Chung, W [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun-kun, Chonnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The dose distributions within the real volumes of tumor targets and critical organs during internal target volume-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (ITV-IMRT) for liver cancer were recalculated by applying the effects of actual respiratory organ motion, and the dosimetric features were analyzed through comparison with gating IMRT (Gate-IMRT) plan results. Methods: The 4DCT data for 10 patients who had been treated with Gate-IMRT for liver cancer were selected to create ITV-IMRT plans. The ITV was created using MIM software, and a moving phantom was used to simulate respiratory motion. The period and range of respiratory motion were recorded in all patients from 4DCT-generated movie data, and the same period and range were applied when operating the dynamic phantom to realize coincident respiratory conditions in each patient. The doses were recalculated with a 3 dose-volume histogram (3DVH) program based on the per-field data measured with a MapCHECK2 2-dimensional diode detector array and compared with the DVHs calculated for the Gate-IMRT plan. Results: Although a sufficient prescription dose covered the PTV during ITV-IMRT delivery, the dose homogeneity in the PTV was inferior to that with the Gate-IMRT plan. We confirmed that there were higher doses to the organs-at-risk (OARs) with ITV-IMRT, as expected when using an enlarged field, but the increased dose to the spinal cord was not significant and the increased doses to the liver and kidney could be considered as minor when the reinforced constraints were applied during IMRT plan optimization. Conclusion: Because Gate-IMRT cannot always be considered an ideal method with which to correct the respiratory motional effect, given the dosimetric variations in the gating system application and the increased treatment time, a prior analysis for optimal IMRT method selection should be performed while considering the patient's respiratory condition and IMRT plan results.

  2. A prospective gating method to acquire a diverse set of free-breathing CT images for model-based 4DCT

    O'Connell, D.; Ruan, D.; Thomas, D. H.; Dou, T. H.; Lewis, J. H.; Santhanam, A.; Lee, P.; Low, D. A.

    2018-02-01

    Breathing motion modeling requires observation of tissues at sufficiently distinct respiratory states for proper 4D characterization. This work proposes a method to improve sampling of the breathing cycle with limited imaging dose. We designed and tested a prospective free-breathing acquisition protocol with a simulation using datasets from five patients imaged with a model-based 4DCT technique. Each dataset contained 25 free-breathing fast helical CT scans with simultaneous breathing surrogate measurements. Tissue displacements were measured using deformable image registration. A correspondence model related tissue displacement to the surrogate. Model residual was computed by comparing predicted displacements to image registration results. To determine a stopping criteria for the prospective protocol, i.e. when the breathing cycle had been sufficiently sampled, subsets of N scans where 5  ⩽  N  ⩽  9 were used to fit reduced models for each patient. A previously published metric was employed to describe the phase coverage, or ‘spread’, of the respiratory trajectories of each subset. Minimum phase coverage necessary to achieve mean model residual within 0.5 mm of the full 25-scan model was determined and used as the stopping criteria. Using the patient breathing traces, a prospective acquisition protocol was simulated. In all patients, phase coverage greater than the threshold necessary for model accuracy within 0.5 mm of the 25 scan model was achieved in six or fewer scans. The prospectively selected respiratory trajectories ranked in the (97.5  ±  4.2)th percentile among subsets of the originally sampled scans on average. Simulation results suggest that the proposed prospective method provides an effective means to sample the breathing cycle with limited free-breathing scans. One application of the method is to reduce the imaging dose of a previously published model-based 4DCT protocol to 25% of its original value while

  3. Detection of Airway Anomalies in?Pediatric?Patients with Cardiovascular Anomalies with Low Dose Prospective ECG-Gated Dual-Source CT

    Jiao, Hui; Xu, Zhuodong; Wu, Lebin; Cheng, Zhaoping; Ji, Xiaopeng; Zhong, Hai; Meng, Chen

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the feasibility of low-dose prospective ECG-gated dual-source CT (DSCT) in detecting airway anomalies in pediatric patients with cardiovascular anomalies compared with flexible tracheobronchoscopy (FTB). METHODS: 33 pediatrics with respiratory symptoms who had been revealed cardiovascular anomalies by transthoracic echocardiography underwent FTB and contrast material-enhanced prospective ECG-triggering CT were enrolled. The study was approved by our institution review bo...

  4. Short-term effects of combination of several physiotherapy methods on the respiratory function - a case report of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Wnuk, Bartosz; Frackiewicz, Joanna; Durmala, Jacek; Czernicki, Krzysztof; Wadolowski, Karol

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the positive effects of combination of several physiotherapy methods on the respiratory function on example of a case report. 14 years old girl with an adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), right thoracic (primary curve, Cobb angle = 40°, AVR = 12°) and left lumbar (secondary curve, Cobb angle = 33°, AVR = 24°) participated in the study. She was 2 years after menarche. She underwent stationary (in-patient) treatment for 3 weeks with use of standard medical care (DoboMed). Treatment also included manual therapy (OMT Kaltenborn-Evjenth) and Dynamic Brace System (DBC) device, produced by Meditrack. Then she continued exercises at home. Respiratory system function was analyzed with use of SpiroPro electronic spirometer (Jaeger) and the strength of respiratory muscles with use of portable digital pressure meter equipped with the Omega PX 25 ± 35 kPa pressure transducer. Range of movement of the spine was examined with Rippstein V plurimeter, angle of apical trunk rotation (ATR) with the Bunnell scoliometer. Measurement was performed 4 times: before treatment, after one week and 3 weeks after the beginning of the treatment and 3 months after finalization of the treatment period. Examination showed that DoboMed medical care treatment, manual therapy and use of DBC device in period of 3 weeks caused improvement of respiratory parameters (MIP - maximal inspiration pressure by 6.7%; MEP - maximal expiratory pressure by 12.6%, PEF - peak expiratory flow by 16.1%). Spinal range of lateral movement and angle of apical trunk rotation has also improved. In short term treatment, the manual therapy aided with DBC system has improved the respiratory parameters and trunk morphology values. Such a composition of various physiotherapy methods can help to conduct further specialized exercises of DoboMed method.

  5. SU-E-J-235: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves the Correlation Between Internal and External Respiratory Motion

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P; Greer, P; Ludbrook, J; Paganelli, C; Kim, T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: External respiratory surrogates are often used to predict internal lung tumor motion for beam gating but the assumption of correlation between external and internal surrogates is not always verified resulting in amplitude mismatch and time shift. To test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback improves the correlation between internal and external respiratory motion, in order to improve the accuracy of respiratory-gated treatments for lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: In nine lung cancer patients, 2D coronal and sagittal cine-MR images were acquired across two MRI sessions (pre- and mid-treatment) with (1) free breathing (FB) and (2) AV biofeedback. External anterior-posterior (AP) respiratory motions of (a) chest and (b) abdomen were simultaneously acquired with physiological measurement unit (PMU, 3T Skyra, Siemens Healthcare Erlangen, Germany) and real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian, Palo Alto, USA), respectively. Internal superior-inferior (SI) respiratory motions of (c) lung tumor (i.e. centroid of auto-segmented lung tumor) and (d) diaphragm (i.e. upper liver dome) were measured from individual cine-MR images across 32 dataset. The four respiratory motions were then synchronized with the cine-MR image acquisition time. Correlation coefficients were calculated in the time variation of two nominated respiratory motions: (1) chest-abdomen, (2) abdomen-diaphragm and (3) diaphragm-lung tumor. The three combinations were compared between FB and AV biofeedback. Results: Compared to FB, AV biofeedback improved chest-abdomen correlation by 17% (p=0.005) from 0.75±0.23 to 0.90±0.05 and abdomen-diaphragm correlation by 4% (p=0.058) from 0.91±0.11 to 0.95±0.05. Compared to FB, AV biofeedback improved diaphragm-lung tumor correlation by 12% (p=0.023) from 0.65±0.21 to 0.74±0.16. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that AV biofeedback significantly improved the correlation of internal and external respiratory motion, thus

  6. SU-E-J-235: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves the Correlation Between Internal and External Respiratory Motion

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Ludbrook, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Paganelli, C [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Kim, T [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: External respiratory surrogates are often used to predict internal lung tumor motion for beam gating but the assumption of correlation between external and internal surrogates is not always verified resulting in amplitude mismatch and time shift. To test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback improves the correlation between internal and external respiratory motion, in order to improve the accuracy of respiratory-gated treatments for lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: In nine lung cancer patients, 2D coronal and sagittal cine-MR images were acquired across two MRI sessions (pre- and mid-treatment) with (1) free breathing (FB) and (2) AV biofeedback. External anterior-posterior (AP) respiratory motions of (a) chest and (b) abdomen were simultaneously acquired with physiological measurement unit (PMU, 3T Skyra, Siemens Healthcare Erlangen, Germany) and real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian, Palo Alto, USA), respectively. Internal superior-inferior (SI) respiratory motions of (c) lung tumor (i.e. centroid of auto-segmented lung tumor) and (d) diaphragm (i.e. upper liver dome) were measured from individual cine-MR images across 32 dataset. The four respiratory motions were then synchronized with the cine-MR image acquisition time. Correlation coefficients were calculated in the time variation of two nominated respiratory motions: (1) chest-abdomen, (2) abdomen-diaphragm and (3) diaphragm-lung tumor. The three combinations were compared between FB and AV biofeedback. Results: Compared to FB, AV biofeedback improved chest-abdomen correlation by 17% (p=0.005) from 0.75±0.23 to 0.90±0.05 and abdomen-diaphragm correlation by 4% (p=0.058) from 0.91±0.11 to 0.95±0.05. Compared to FB, AV biofeedback improved diaphragm-lung tumor correlation by 12% (p=0.023) from 0.65±0.21 to 0.74±0.16. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that AV biofeedback significantly improved the correlation of internal and external respiratory motion, thus

  7. Evaluation of the combined effects of target size, respiratory motion and background activity on 3D and 4D PET/CT images

    Park, Sang-June; Ionascu, Dan; Killoran, Joseph; Chin, Lee; Berbeco, Ross; Mamede, Marcelo; Gerbaudo, Victor H

    2008-01-01

    Gated (4D) PET/CT has the potential to greatly improve the accuracy of radiotherapy at treatment sites where internal organ motion is significant. However, the best methodology for applying 4D-PET/CT to target definition is not currently well established. With the goal of better understanding how to best apply 4D information to radiotherapy, initial studies were performed to investigate the effect of target size, respiratory motion and target-to-background activity concentration ratio (TBR) on 3D (ungated) and 4D PET images. Using a PET/CT scanner with 4D or gating capability, a full 3D-PET scan corrected with a 3D attenuation map from 3D-CT scan and a respiratory gated (4D) PET scan corrected with corresponding attenuation maps from 4D-CT were performed by imaging spherical targets (0.5-26.5 mL) filled with 18 F-FDG in a dynamic thorax phantom and NEMA IEC body phantom at different TBRs (infinite, 8 and 4). To simulate respiratory motion, the phantoms were driven sinusoidally in the superior-inferior direction with amplitudes of 0, 1 and 2 cm and a period of 4.5 s. Recovery coefficients were determined on PET images. In addition, gating methods using different numbers of gating bins (1-20 bins) were evaluated with image noise and temporal resolution. For evaluation, volume recovery coefficient, signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were calculated as a function of the number of gating bins. Moreover, the optimum thresholds which give accurate moving target volumes were obtained for 3D and 4D images. The partial volume effect and signal loss in the 3D-PET images due to the limited PET resolution and the respiratory motion, respectively were measured. The results show that signal loss depends on both the amplitude and pattern of respiratory motion. However, the 4D-PET successfully recovers most of the loss induced by the respiratory motion. The 5-bin gating method gives the best temporal resolution with acceptable image noise. The results based on the 4D

  8. Double-gated spectral snapshots for biomolecular fluorescence

    Nakamura, Ryosuke; Hamada, Norio; Ichida, Hideki; Tokunaga, Fumio; Kanematsu, Yasuo

    2007-01-01

    A versatile method to take femtosecond spectral snapshots of fluorescence has been developed based on a double gating technique in the combination of an optical Kerr gate and an image intensifier as an electrically driven gate set in front of a charge-coupled device detector. The application of a conventional optical-Kerr-gate method is limited to molecules with the short fluorescence lifetime up to a few hundred picoseconds, because long-lifetime fluorescence itself behaves as a source of the background signal due to insufficiency of the extinction ratio of polarizers employed for the Kerr gate. By using the image intensifier with the gate time of 200 ps, we have successfully suppressed the background signal and overcome the application limit of optical-Kerr-gate method. The system performance has been demonstrated by measuring time-resolved fluorescence spectra for laser dye solution and the riboflavin solution as a typical sample of biomolecule

  9. Comparative studies of AlGaN/GaN MOS-HEMTs with stacked gate dielectrics by the mixed thin film growth method

    Chou, Bo-Yi; Hsu, Wei-Chou; Liu, Han-Yin; Ho, Chiu-Sheng; Lee, Ching-Sung

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports Al 0.27 Ga 0.73 N/GaN metal–oxide–semiconductor high electron mobility transistors (MOS-HEMTs) with stacked Al 2 O 3 /HfO 2 gate dielectrics by using hydrogen peroxideoxidation/sputtering techniques. The Al 2 O 3 employed as a gate dielectric and surface passivation layer effectively suppresses the gate leakage current, improves RF drain current collapse and exhibits good thermal stability. Moreover, by stacking the good insulating high-k HfO 2 dielectric further suppresses the gate leakage, enhances the dielectric breakdown field and power-added efficiency, and decreases the equivalent oxide thickness. The present MOS-HEMT design has demonstrated superior improvements of 10.1% (16.4%) in the maximum drain–source current (I DS,max ), 11.4% (22.5%) in the gate voltage swing and 12.5%/14.4% (21.9%/22.3%) in the two-terminal gate–drain breakdown/turn-on voltages (BV GD /V ON ), and the present design also demonstrates the lowest gate leakage current and best thermal stability characteristics as compared to two reference MOS-HEMTs with a single Al 2 O 3 /(HfO 2 ) dielectric layer of the same physical thickness. (invited paper)

  10. Respiratory quotient: innovative method for monitoring ‘Royal Gala’ apple storage in a dynamic controlled atmosphere

    Anderson Weber

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Apples (Malus domestica, Borkh. which are not stored at low temperature or in a properly controlled atmosphere (CA may have a high metabolic rate during the postharvest stage resulting in losses in quality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of ‘Royal Gala’ apple fruit stored in accordance with a new method of dynamic controlled atmosphere (DCA.The respiratory quotient (RQ was monitored at two temperatures which were then compared using a commercially available technology based on chlorophyll fluorescence DCA (DCA-CF and static CA. Ethylene production and respiration rates were lower in apples stored in DCA than in CA, as a result of lower 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase activity, especially in apples stored in DCA-RQ2. Flesh firmness of apples stored in DCA did not differ from those stored in CA. Apples stored at 1 °C had less flesh breakdown occurrence and a high percentage of healthy fruit. ‘Royal Gala’ stored at DCA-RQ2 had less flesh breakdown than apples stored in CA; however, the apples stored in DCA-CF did not differ from those stored in DCA-RQ2 and CA. Apples stored at the highest RQ value (6 and 4, especially at 0.5 °C, had low O2 injury occurrence after storage. However the increase in temperature to 1.0 °C, reduced the occurrence of this disorder. Therefore, storage in DCA-RQ2 at 1 °C or DCA-CF at 0.5 °C are the recommendations of preference for ensuring maintenance of quality in ‘Royal Gala’ apples after eight months of storage.

  11. Application of real space Kerker method in simulating gate-all-around nanowire transistors with realistic discrete dopants*

    Li Chang-Sheng; Ma Lei; Guo Jie-Rong

    2017-01-01

    We adopt a self-consistent real space Kerker method to prevent the divergence from charge sloshing in the simulating transistors with realistic discrete dopants in the source and drain regions. The method achieves efficient convergence by avoiding unrealistic long range charge sloshing but keeping effects from short range charge sloshing. Numerical results show that discrete dopants in the source and drain regions could have a bigger influence on the electrical variability than the usual continuous doping without considering charge sloshing. Few discrete dopants and the narrow geometry create a situation with short range Coulomb screening and oscillations of charge density in real space. The dopants induced quasi-localized defect modes in the source region experience short range oscillations in order to reach the drain end of the device. The charging of the defect modes and the oscillations of the charge density are identified by the simulation of the electron density. (paper)

  12. A computer-aided audit system for respiratory therapy consult evaluations: description of a method and early results.

    Kester, Lucy; Stoller, James K

    2013-05-01

    Use of respiratory therapist (RT)-guided protocols enhances allocation of respiratory care. In the context that optimal protocol use requires a system for auditing respiratory care plans to assure adherence to protocols and expertise of the RTs generating the care plan, a live audit system has been in longstanding use in our Respiratory Therapy Consult Service. Growth in the number of RT positions and the need to audit more frequently has prompted development of a new, computer-aided audit system. The number and results of audits using the old and new systems were compared (for the periods May 30, 2009 through May 30, 2011 and January 1, 2012 through May 30, 2012, respectively). In contrast to the original, live system requiring a patient visit by the auditor, the new system involves completion of a respiratory therapy care plan using patient information in the electronic medical record, both by the RT generating the care plan and the auditor. Completing audits in the new system also uses an electronic respiratory therapy management system. The degrees of concordance between the audited RT's care plans and the "gold standard" care plans using the old and new audit systems were similar. Use of the new system was associated with an almost doubling of the rate of audits (ie, 11 per month vs 6.1 per month). The new, computer-aided audit system increased capacity to audit more RTs performing RT-guided consults while preserving accuracy as an audit tool. Ensuring that RTs adhere to the audit process remains the challenge for the new system, and is the rate-limiting step.

  13. Low-dose cardio-respiratory phase-correlated cone-beam micro-CT of small animals.

    Sawall, Stefan; Bergner, Frank; Lapp, Robert; Mronz, Markus; Karolczak, Marek; Hess, Andreas; Kachelriess, Marc

    2011-03-01

    Micro-CT imaging of animal hearts typically requires a double gating procedure because scans during a breath-hold are not possible due to the long scan times and the high respiratory rates, Simultaneous respiratory and cardiac gating can either be done prospectively or retrospectively. True five-dimensional information can be either retrieved with retrospective gating or with prospective gating if several prospective gates are acquired. In any case, the amount of information available to reconstruct one volume for a given respiratory and cardiac phase is orders of magnitud lower than the total amount of information acquired. For example, the reconstruction of a volume from a 10% wide respiratory and a 20% wide cardiac window uses only 2% of the data acquired. Achieving a similar image quality as a nongated scan would therefore require to increase the amount of data and thereby the dose to the animal by up to a factor of 50. To achieve the goal of low-dose phase-correlated (LDPC) imaging, the authors propose to use a highly efficient combination of slightly modified existing algorithms. In particular, the authors developed a variant of the McKinnon-Bates image reconstruction algorithm and combined it with bilateral filtering in up to five dimensions to significantly reduce image noise without impairing spatial or temporal resolution. The preliminary results indicate that the proposed LDPC reconstruction method typically reduces image noise by a factor of up to 6 (e.g., from 170 to 30 HU), while the dose values lie in a range from 60 to 500 mGy. Compared to other publications that apply 250-1800 mGy for the same task [C. T. Badea et al., "4D micro-CT of the mouse heart," Mol. Imaging 4(2), 110-116 (2005); M. Drangova et al., "Fast retrospectively gated quantitative four-dimensional (4D) cardiac micro computed tomography imaging of free-breathing mice," Invest. Radiol. 42(2), 85-94 (2007); S. H. Bartling et al., "Retrospective motion gating in small animal CT of mice

  14. Study of the distribution patterns of the constituent herbs in classical Chinese medicine prescriptions treating respiratory disease by data mining methods.

    Fu, Xian-Jun; Song, Xu-Xia; Wei, Lin-Bo; Wang, Zhen-Guo

    2013-08-01

    To provide the distribution pattern and compatibility laws of the constituent herbs in prescriptions, for doctor's convenience to make decision in choosing correct herbs and prescriptions for treating respiratory disease. Classical prescriptions treating respiratory disease were selected from authoritative prescription books. Data mining methods (frequent itemsets and association rules) were used to analyze the regular patterns and compatibility laws of the constituent herbs in the selected prescriptions. A total of 562 prescriptions were selected to be studied. The result exhibited that, Radix glycyrrhizae was the most frequently used in 47.2% prescriptions, other frequently used were Semen armeniacae amarum, Fructus schisandrae Chinese, Herba ephedrae, and Radix ginseng. Herbal ephedrae was always coupled with Semen armeniacae amarum with the confidence of 73.3%, and many herbs were always accompanied by Radix glycyrrhizae with high confidence. More over, Fructus schisandrae Chinese, Herba ephedrae and Rhizoma pinelliae was most commonly used to treat cough, dyspnoea and associated sputum respectively besides Radix glycyrrhizae and Semen armeniacae amarum. The prescriptions treating dyspnoea often used double herb group of Herba ephedrae & Radix glycyrrhizae, while prescriptions treating sputum often used double herb group of Rhizoma pinelliae & Radix glycyrrhizae and Rhizoma pinelliae & Semen armeniacae amarum, triple herb groups of Rhizoma pinelliae & Semen armeniacae amarum & Radix glycyrrhizae and Pericarpium citri reticulatae & Rhizoma pinelliae & Radix glycyrrhizae. The prescriptions treating respiratory disease showed common compatibility laws in using herbs and special compatibility laws for treating different respiratory symptoms. These principle patterns and special compatibility laws reported here could be useful for doctors to choose correct herbs and prescriptions in treating respiratory disease.

  15. Exchange gate on the qudit space and Fock space

    Fujii, Kazuyuki

    2003-01-01

    We construct an exchange gate with small elementary gates on the space of qudits, which consist of three controlled shift gates and three 'reverse' gates. This is a natural extension of the qubit case. We also consider a similar situation in Fock space, but in this case we find some differences. However, we can construct the exchange gate by making use of a generalized coherent operator based on the Lie algebra su(2), which is a well-known method in quantum optics. We also make a brief comment on 'imperfect clones'

  16. Image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT: A sensitivity analysis of respiratory signal, binning method, reconstruction algorithm, and projection angular spacing

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory signal, binning method, and reconstruction algorithm are three major controllable factors affecting image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT), which is widely used in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Previous studies have investigated each of these factors individually, but no integrated sensitivity analysis has been performed. In addition, projection angular spacing is also a key factor in reconstruction, but how it affects image quality is not obvious. An inv...

  17. Seasonal variation of total particulate matter and children respiratory diseases at Lisbon primary schools using passive methods

    Canha, N.; Almeida, M.; Do Carmo Freitas, M.; Almeida, S.M.; Wolterbeek, H.T.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, 14 primary schools of Lisbon city, Portugal, followed a questionnaire of the ISAAC - International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Program, in 2009/2010. The questionnaire contained questions to identify children with respiratory diseases (wheeze, asthma and rhinitis). Total

  18. Effects of the pneumoperitoneum and Trendelenburg position on respiratory mechanics in the rats by the end-inflation occlusion method

    Alessandro Rubini

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The cranial displacement of the diaphgram occurring as a consequence of Pnp and/or Tnd, for example during laparoscopic surgical procedures, causes an increment of respiratory system elastance and viscoelastic resistance. The analysis of addictive effects show that these are more likely to occur when Pnp + Tnd are compared to isolated Tnd rather than to isolated Pnp.

  19. Motion-compensated PET image reconstruction with respiratory-matched attenuation correction using two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images

    Nam, Woo Hyun; Ahn, Il Jun; Ra, Jong Beom; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Byung Il

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used for diagnosis and follow up assessment of radiotherapy. However, thoracic and abdominal PET suffers from false staging and incorrect quantification of the radioactive uptake of lesion(s) due to respiratory motion. Furthermore, respiratory motion-induced mismatch between a computed tomography (CT) attenuation map and PET data often leads to significant artifacts in the reconstructed PET image. To solve these problems, we propose a unified framework for respiratory-matched attenuation correction and motion compensation of respiratory-gated PET. For the attenuation correction, the proposed algorithm manipulates a 4D CT image virtually generated from two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images, rather than a real 4D CT image which significantly increases the radiation burden on a patient. It also utilizes CT-driven motion fields for motion compensation. To realize the proposed algorithm, we propose an improved region-based approach for non-rigid registration between body CT images, and we suggest a selection scheme of 3D CT images that are respiratory-matched to each respiratory-gated sinogram. In this work, the proposed algorithm was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively by using patient datasets including lung and/or liver lesion(s). Experimental results show that the method can provide much clearer organ boundaries and more accurate lesion information than existing algorithms by utilizing two low-dose CT images. (paper)

  20. Textbook of respiratory medicine

    Murray, J.F.; Nadel, J.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents a clinical reference of respiratory medicine. It also details basic science aspects of pulmonary physiology and describes recently developed, sophisticated diagnostic tools and therapeutic methods. It also covers anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, and pathology; microbiologic, radiologic, nuclear medicine, and biopsy methods for diagnosis

  1. [The application of aerodynamic method for the evaluation of the efficiency of the vocal, articulation and respiratory organs during singing and playing wind instruments].

    Pawłowski, Z; Zółtowski, M; Kazanecka, E

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of the aerodynamic method for the estimation of the efficiency of the vocal articulation and respiratory organ during singing and playing wind instruments. An evaluation of the vocal and respiratory organ was carried out on the basis of an analysis and correlation between the following parameters: PV--phonation volume, MPT--maximum phonation/playing time, SP--subglottal/blowing pressure, MFR--mean flow rate, GR--glottal resistance, EP--expiratory power, W--work. Volume and airflow was measured by a pneumotachometr with an electronic spirometer. The application of a plethysmographic booth made it possible to carry out non-invasive, indirect measurements of the subglottal and blowing pressure. Changes of pressure during singing and playing were recorded in the form of an aerodynamogram curve. This curve was used to determine the maximum duration of sound. Other quantities were derived from a mathematical analysis.

  2. Synthesis of multivalued quantum logic circuits by elementary gates

    Di, Yao-Min; Wei, Hai-Rui

    2013-01-01

    We propose the generalized controlled X (gcx) gate as the two-qudit elementary gate, and based on Cartan decomposition, we also give the one-qudit elementary gates. Then we discuss the physical implementation of these elementary gates and show that it is feasible with current technology. With these elementary gates many important qudit quantum gates can be synthesized conveniently. We provide efficient methods for the synthesis of various kinds of controlled qudit gates and greatly simplify the synthesis of existing generic multi-valued quantum circuits. Moreover, we generalize the quantum Shannon decomposition (QSD), the most powerful technique for the synthesis of generic qubit circuits, to the qudit case. A comparison of ququart (d=4) circuits and qubit circuits reveals that using ququart circuits may have an advantage over the qubit circuits in the synthesis of quantum circuits.

  3. FEVER AS KEY SYMPTOM OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS AND MODERN METHODS OF THERAPY FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE IN CHILDREN

    O.A. Solntseva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia is the key symptom of acute respiratory infections (ARI. An increase in the body temperature is accompanied with phagocytosis activation, increased interferon synthesis, antibody genesis stimulation, lymphocytes activation and differentiation. Nevertheless, significant hyperthermia may result in my unfavourable consequences. It may particularly cause an exacerbation of chronic diseases. Modern therapy for hyperthermia is, therefore, an important aspect of treating children with ARI. The article outlines the modern approach to treating fever in children, identifies key criteria for selecting a medication. It also contains a case study of applying ibuprofen and data from various trials which verify the rationale for applying ibuprofen in children with hyperthermia that developed in conjunction with ARI.Key words: children, acute respiratory infections, hyperthermia, ibuprofen.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(5:80-84

  4. Comparison of direct-plating and broth-enrichment culture methods for detection of potential bacterial pathogens in respiratory secretions.

    Kaur, Ravinder; Wischmeyer, Jareth; Morris, Matthew; Pichichero, Michael E

    2017-11-01

    We compared the recovery of potential respiratory bacterial pathogens and normal flora from nasopharyngeal specimens collected from children during health and at the onset of acute otitis media (AOM) by selective direct-plating and overnight broth-enrichment. Overall, 3442 nasal wash (NW) samples collected from young children were analysed from a 10-year prospective study. NWs were cultured by (1) direct-plating to TSAII/5 % sheep blood agar and chocolate agar plates and (2) overnight broth-enrichment in BacT/ALERT SA-broth followed by plating. Standard microbiology techniques were applied to identify three dominant respiratory bacterial pathogens: Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn), Haemophilus influenzae (Hflu) and Moraxella catarrhalis (Mcat) as well as two common nasal flora, Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and alpha-haemolytic Streptococci (AHS).Results/Key findings. Direct-plating of NW resulted in isolation of Spn from 37.8 %, Hflu from 13.6 % and Mcat from 33.2 % of samples. In comparison, overnight broth-enrichment isolated fewer Spn (30.1 %), Hflu (6.2 %) and Mcat (16.2 %) (Penrichment resulted in significant increased isolation of SA (6.0 %) and AHS (30.1 %) (Penrichment when samples were collected from healthy children but not during AOM. In middle ear fluids (MEF) at the onset of AOM, broth-enrichment resulted in higher recovery of Spn (+10.4 %, Penrichment significantly reduces the accurate detection of bacterial respiratory pathogens and increases identification of SA and AHS in NW. Broth-enrichment improves detection of bacterial respiratory pathogens in MEF samples.

  5. Optical XOR gate

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2013-11-12

    An optical XOR gate is formed as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) from two sets of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each set of the optical waveguide devices including an electroabsorption modulator electrically connected in series with a waveguide photodetector. The optical XOR gate utilizes two digital optical inputs to generate an XOR function digital optical output. The optical XOR gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  6. Spirometrically gated /sup 133/Xe ventilation imaging and phase analysis for assessment of regional lung function

    Inoue, Tomio (Kanto Teishin Hospital, Tokyo (Japan))

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the technique of performing spirometrically gated /sup 133/Xe ventilation imaging and to evaluate its clinical usefulness for the assessment of regional ventilatory function in various lung diseases. Patients rebreathed /sup 133/Xe gas through the system with constant rates signaled by a metronome. The trigger signals from the patients were recorded in a minicomputer for 60 respiratory cycles simultaneously with posterior lung images. Functional images (phase analysis images) indicating phase and amplitude of regional ventilation were constructed by the first harmonic Fourier analysis. Materials included 13 normal volunteers and patients with COPD (24), lung cancer (5), pulmonary embolism (4) and others (20). In normal controls, phase analysis images before respiratory motion correction revealed gradual decrease in amplitude from base to apex with uniform phase distribution. The amplitude and phase distribution after respiratory motion correction became even more uniform. In patients with COPD, phase analysis images showed asymmetrical and irregular amplitude distribution with non-uniform phase distribution. The standard deviation (S.D.) of phase histogram correlated well with FEVsub(1.0)% (r=0.71, p < 0.001) and down slope of flow-volume curve (r=0.55, p < 0.001), and less prominently with %VC (r=0.42, p < 0.01). Mean S.D. in patients with COPD (12.3 +- 6.5 degree, mean+-1 s.d.) was significantly larger than in normal controls (6.3 +- 1.5). Amplitude profile curve analysis revealed 83% sensitivity for the detection of abnormal spirometric respiratory function test. Data aquisition and processing of present method are rapid and easy to perform. The phase analysis of the gated ventilation images should prove useful in the clinical evaluation of patients with uneven ventilation such as COPD.

  7. Spirometrically gated 133Xe ventilation imaging and phase analysis for assessment of regional lung function

    Inoue, Tomio

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the technique of performing spirometrically gated 133 Xe ventilation imaging and to evaluate its clinical usefulness for the assessmentof regional ventilatory function in various lung diseases. Patients rebreathe d 133 Xe gas through the system with constant rates signaled by a metronom. The trigger signals from the patients were recorded in a minicomputer for 60 respiratory cycles simultaneously with posterior lung images. Functional images (phase analysis images) indicating phase and amplitude of regional ventilation were constructed by the first harmonic Fourier analysis. Materials included 13 normal volunteers and patients with COPD (24), lung cancer (5), pulmonary embolism (4) and others (20). In normal controls, phase analysis images before respiratory motion correction revealed gradual decrease in amplitude from base to apex with uniform phase distribution. The amplitude and phase distribution after respiratory motion correction became even more uniform. In patients with COPD, phase analysis images showed asymmetrical and irregular amplitude distribution with non-uniform phase distribution. The standard deviation (S.D.) of phase histogram correlated well with FEVsub(1.0)% (r=0.71, p<0.001) and down slope of flowvolume curve (r=0.55, p<0.001), and less prominently with %VC (r=0.42, p<0.01). Mean S.D. in patients with COPD (12.3+-6.5 degree, mean+-1 s.d.) was significantly larger than in normal controls (6.3+-1.5). Amplitude profile curve analysis revealed 83% sensitivity for the detection of abnormal spirometric respiratory function test. Data aquisition and processing of present method are rapid and easy to perform. The phase analysis of the gated ventilation images should prove useful in the clinical evaluation of patients with uneven ventilation such as COPD. (J.P.N.)

  8. Elucidative analysis and sequencing of two respiratory health monitoring methods to study the impact of varying atmospheric composition on human health

    Awasthi, Amit; Hothi, Navjot; Kaur, Prabhjot; Singh, Nirankar; Chakraborty, Monojit; Bansal, Sangeeta

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric composition of ambient air consists of different gases in definite proportion that affect the earth's climate and its ecological system. Due to varied anthropogenic reasons, this composition is changed, which ultimately have an impact on the health of living beings. For survival, the human respiratory system is one of the sensitive systems, which is easily and closely affected by the change in atmospheric composition of an external environment. Many studies have been conducted to quantify the effects of atmospheric pollution on human health by using different approaches. This article presents different scenario of studies conducted to evaluate the effects on different human groups. Differences between the studies conducted using spirometry and survey methods are presented in this article to extract a better sequence between these two methodologies. Many studies have been conducted to measure the respiratory status by evaluating the respiratory symptoms and hospital admissions. Limited numbers of studies are found with repeated spirometry on the same subjects for long duration to nullify the error arising due to decrease in efforts by the same subjects during manoeuvre of pulmonary function tests. Present study reveals the importance of methodological sequencing in order to obtain more authentic and reliable results. This study suggests that impacts of deteriorating atmospheric composition on human health can be more significantly studied if spirometry is done after survey analysis. The article also proposes that efficiency and authenticity of surveys involving health impacts will increase, if medical data information of patients is saved in hospitals in a proper format.

  9. Physiologically gated microbeam radiation using a field emission x-ray source array

    Chtcheprov, Pavel, E-mail: PavelC@unc.edu, E-mail: zhou@email.unc.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, 152 MacNider Hall, Campus Box 7575, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Burk, Laurel; Inscoe, Christina; Ger, Rachel; Hadsell, Michael; Lu, Jianping [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Phillips Hall, CB #3255, 120 East Cameron Avenue, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Yuan, Hong [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, 2006 Old Clinic, CB #7510, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Zhang, Lei [Department of Applied Physical Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapman Hall, CB#3216, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Chang, Sha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, 101 Manning Drive, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 and UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, 101 Manning Drive, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 (United States); Zhou, Otto, E-mail: PavelC@unc.edu, E-mail: zhou@email.unc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Phillips Hall, CB #3255, 120 East Cameron Avenue, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, 101 Manning Drive, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) uses narrow planes of high dose radiation beams to treat cancerous tumors. This experimental therapy method based on synchrotron radiation has been shown to spare normal tissue at up to 1000 Gy of peak entrance dose while still being effective in tumor eradication and extending the lifetime of tumor-bearing small animal models. Motion during treatment can lead to significant movement of microbeam positions resulting in broader beam width and lower peak to valley dose ratio (PVDR), which reduces the effectiveness of MRT. Recently, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of generating microbeam radiation for small animal treatment using a carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array. The purpose of this study is to incorporate physiological gating to the CNT microbeam irradiator to minimize motion-induced microbeam blurring. Methods: The CNT field emission x-ray source array with a narrow line focal track was operated at 160 kVp. The x-ray radiation was collimated to a single 280 μm wide microbeam at entrance. The microbeam beam pattern was recorded using EBT2 Gafchromic{sup ©} films. For the feasibility study, a strip of EBT2 film was attached to an oscillating mechanical phantom mimicking mouse chest respiratory motion. The servo arm was put against a pressure sensor to monitor the motion. The film was irradiated with three microbeams under gated and nongated conditions and the full width at half maximums and PVDRs were compared. An in vivo study was also performed with adult male athymic mice. The liver was chosen as the target organ for proof of concept due to its large motion during respiration compared to other organs. The mouse was immobilized in a specialized mouse bed and anesthetized using isoflurane. A pressure sensor was attached to a mouse's chest to monitor its respiration. The output signal triggered the electron extraction voltage of the field emission source such that x-ray was generated only

  10. Constant flow ventilation as a novel approach to elimination of respiratory artifact in MR imaging

    Shtern, F.; Kersh, R.; Lee, A.; Venegas, J.; Brady, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    This pilot study was performed to evaluate constant flow ventilation (CFV) as a method of respiratory artifact suppression in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In contrast to currently used methods of respiratory artifact suppression, CFV is able to provide adequate ventilation in the absence of any chest wall motion and thus obviates the need for respiratory gating. High-velocity jets of fresh gas delivered through two narrow (2-mm) intrabronchial cannulas promote gas exchange through airway turbulence and enhanced molecular diffusion. One mongrel dog (8.5 kg) was anesthetized with pentobarbital (35 mg/kg). For CFV, endobronchial cannulas were inserted with the aid of bronchoscopy and connected to a flow meter (flow rate, 500 mL/sec). Intrathoracic pressure was monitored via a pressure transducer connected to an air-filled intraesophageal balloon. Conventional ventilation (CV), with a tidal volume of 85 mL and ten breaths per minute, was provided through a cuffed endotracheal tube. After establishment of adequate ventilation (carbon dioxide pressure, 39), muscle paralysis was induced by succinylcholine at 0.1 mg/kg. T2-weighted [1,500/50 (repetition time msec/echo time msec), two excitations] gradient-echo and spin-echo images were obtained at 0.6T with both CV and CFV. MR images with CFV were free of respiratory motion artifact, which was present on all MR images with CV. This pilot study indicates that implementation of CFV results in elimination of respiratory motion artifact

  11. Five-dimensional motion compensation for respiratory and cardiac motion with cone-beam CT of the thorax region

    Sauppe, Sebastian; Hahn, Andreas; Brehm, Marcus; Paysan, Pascal; Seghers, Dieter; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We propose an adapted method of our previously published five-dimensional (5D) motion compensation (MoCo) algorithm1, developed for micro-CT imaging of small animals, to provide for the first time motion artifact-free 5D cone-beam CT (CBCT) images from a conventional flat detector-based CBCT scan of clinical patients. Image quality of retrospectively respiratory- and cardiac-gated volumes from flat detector CBCT scans is deteriorated by severe sparse projection artifacts. These artifacts further complicate motion estimation, as it is required for MoCo image reconstruction. For high quality 5D CBCT images at the same x-ray dose and the same number of projections as todays 3D CBCT we developed a double MoCo approach based on motion vector fields (MVFs) for respiratory and cardiac motion. In a first step our already published four-dimensional (4D) artifact-specific cyclic motion-compensation (acMoCo) approach is applied to compensate for the respiratory patient motion. With this information a cyclic phase-gated deformable heart registration algorithm is applied to the respiratory motion-compensated 4D CBCT data, thus resulting in cardiac MVFs. We apply these MVFs on double-gated images and thereby respiratory and cardiac motion-compensated 5D CBCT images are obtained. Our 5D MoCo approach processing patient data acquired with the TrueBeam 4D CBCT system (Varian Medical Systems). Our double MoCo approach turned out to be very efficient and removed nearly all streak artifacts due to making use of 100% of the projection data for each reconstructed frame. The 5D MoCo patient data show fine details and no motion blurring, even in regions close to the heart where motion is fastest.

  12. Rapid gated Thallium-201 perfusion SPECT - clinically feasible?

    Wadhwa, S.S.; Mansberg, R.; Fernandes, V.B.; Wilkinson, D.; Abatti, D.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Standard dose energy window optimised Thallium-201 (Tl-201) SPECT has about half the counts of a standard dose from Technetium-99m Sestamibi (Tc99m-Mibi) gated perfusion SPECT. This study investigates the clinical feasibility of rapid energy window optimised Tl-201 gated perfusion SPECT (gated-TI) and compares quantitative left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and visually assessed image quality for wall motion and thickening to analogous values obtained from Tc99m-Mibi gated perfusion SPECT (gated - mibi). Methods: We studied 60 patients with a rest gated Tl-201 SPECT (100 MBq, 77KeV peak, 34% window, 20 sec/projection) followed by a post stress gated Sestamibi SPECT (1GBq, 140KeV, 20% window, 20 sec/projection) separate dual isotope protocol. LVEF quantitation was performed using commercially available software (SPECTEF, General Electric). Visual grading of image quality for wall thickening and motion was performed using a three-point scale (excellent, good and poor). Results: LVEF for gated Tl-201 SPECT was 59.6 ± 12.0% (Mean ± SD). LVEF for gated Sestamibi SPECT was 60.4 ±11.4% (Mean ± SD). These were not significantly different (P=0.27, T-Test). There was good correlation (r=0.9) between gated-TI and gated-mibi LVEF values. The quality of gated-Tl images was ranked as excellent, good and poor in 12, 50 and 38% of the patients respectively. Image quality was better in gated-mibi SPECT, with ratings of 12, 62 and 26% respectively. Conclusion: Rapid gated Thallium-201 acquisition with energy window optimisation can be effectively performed on majority of patients and offers the opportunity to assess not only myocardial perfusion and function, as with Technetium based agents, but also viability using a single day one isotope protocol

  13. Respiratory Home Health Care

    ... Us Home > Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources ... Teenagers Living With Lung Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at ...

  14. Highly-accelerated self-gated free-breathing 3D cardiac cine MRI: validation in assessment of left ventricular function.

    Liu, Jing; Feng, Li; Shen, Hsin-Wei; Zhu, Chengcheng; Wang, Yan; Mukai, Kanae; Brooks, Gabriel C; Ordovas, Karen; Saloner, David

    2017-08-01

    This work presents a highly-accelerated, self-gated, free-breathing 3D cardiac cine MRI method for cardiac function assessment. A golden-ratio profile based variable-density, pseudo-random, Cartesian undersampling scheme was implemented for continuous 3D data acquisition. Respiratory self-gating was achieved by deriving motion signal from the acquired MRI data. A multi-coil compressed sensing technique was employed to reconstruct 4D images (3D+time). 3D cardiac cine imaging with self-gating was compared to bellows gating and the clinical standard breath-held 2D cine imaging for evaluation of self-gating accuracy, image quality, and cardiac function in eight volunteers. Reproducibility of 3D imaging was assessed. Self-gated 3D imaging provided an image quality score of 3.4 ± 0.7 vs 4.0 ± 0 with the 2D method (p = 0.06). It determined left ventricular end-systolic volume as 42.4 ± 11.5 mL, end-diastolic volume as 111.1 ± 24.7 mL, and ejection fraction as 62.0 ± 3.1%, which were comparable to the 2D method, with bias ± 1.96 × SD of -0.8 ± 7.5 mL (p = 0.90), 2.6 ± 3.3 mL (p = 0.84) and 1.4 ± 6.4% (p = 0.45), respectively. The proposed 3D cardiac cine imaging method enables reliable respiratory self-gating performance with good reproducibility, and provides comparable image quality and functional measurements to 2D imaging, suggesting that self-gated, free-breathing 3D cardiac cine MRI framework is promising for improved patient comfort and cardiac MRI scan efficiency.

  15. Respiratory Symptoms in Firefighters

    Greven, Frans E.; Rooyackers, Jos M.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Heederik, Dick J.

    Background The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with respiratory symptoms in common firefighters in the Netherlands. Methods A total of 1,330 firefighters from the municipal fire brigades of three provinces of the Netherlands were included in the

  16. Sci-Fri PM: Radiation Therapy, Planning, Imaging, and Special Techniques - 06: Patient-specific QA Procedure for Gated VMAT SABR Treatments using 10x Beam in Flattening-Filter Free Mode

    Mestrovic, Ante; Chitsazzadeh, Shadi; Wells, Derek M.; Gray, Stephen [University of Calgary, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Tom Baker Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a highly sensitive patient specific QA procedure for gated VMAT stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) treatments. Methods: A platform was constructed to attach the translational stage of a Quasar respiratory motion phantom to a pinpoint ion chamber insert and move the ion chamber inside the ArcCheck. The Quasar phantom controller uses a patient-specific breathing pattern to translate the ion chamber in a superior-inferior direction inside the ArcCheck. With this system the ion chamber is used to QA the correct phase of the gated delivery and the ArcCheck diodes are used to QA the overall dose distribution. This novel approach requires a single plan delivery for a complete QA of a gated plan. The sensitivity of the gating QA procedure was investigated with respect to the following parameters: PTV size, exhale duration, baseline drift, gating window size. Results: The difference between the measured dose to a point in the penumbra and the Eclipse calculated dose was under 2% for small residual motions. The QA procedure was independent of PTV size and duration of exhale. Baseline drift and gating window size, however, significantly affected the penumbral dose measurement, with differences of up to 30% compared to Eclipse. Conclusion: This study described a highly sensitive QA procedure for gated VMAT SABR treatments. The QA outcome was dependent on the gating window size and baseline drift. Analysis of additional patient breathing patterns is currently undergoing to determine a clinically relevant gating window size and an appropriate tolerance level for this procedure.

  17. Respiratory manifestations of hypothyroidism

    Sorensen, Jesper Roed; Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypothyroidism has been associated with increased pulmonary morbidity and overall mortality. We conducted a systematic review to identify the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of respiratory problems among patients with thyroid insufficiency. METHODS: PubMed and EMBASE databases were...... searched for relevant literature from January 1950 through January 2015 with study eligibility criteria: English-language publications; Adult subclinical or overt hypothyroid patients; Intervention, observational or retrospective studies; and respiratory manifestations. We followed the PRISMA statement...... and used the Cochrane's risk of bias tool. RESULTS: A total of 1699 papers were screened by two independent authors for relevant titles. Of 109 relevant abstracts, 28 papers underwent full text analyses, of which 22 were included in the review. We identified possible mechanisms explaining respiratory...

  18. Reconfigurable chaotic logic gates based on novel chaotic circuit

    Behnia, S.; Pazhotan, Z.; Ezzati, N.; Akhshani, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel method for implementing logic gates based on chaotic maps is introduced. • The logic gates can be implemented without any changes in the threshold voltage. • The chaos-based logic gates may serve as basic components of future computing devices. - Abstract: The logical operations are one of the key issues in today’s computer architecture. Nowadays, there is a great interest in developing alternative ways to get the logic operations by chaos computing. In this paper, a novel implementation method of reconfigurable logic gates based on one-parameter families of chaotic maps is introduced. The special behavior of these chaotic maps can be utilized to provide same threshold voltage for all logic gates. However, there is a wide interval for choosing a control parameter for all reconfigurable logic gates. Furthermore, an experimental implementation of this nonlinear system is presented to demonstrate the robustness of computing capability of chaotic circuits

  19. Image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT: A sensitivity analysis of respiratory signal, binning method, reconstruction algorithm, and projection angular spacing

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Keall, Paul J.; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory signal, binning method, and reconstruction algorithm are three major controllable factors affecting image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT), which is widely used in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Previous studies have investigated each of these factors individually, but no integrated sensitivity analysis has been performed. In addition, projection angular spacing is also a key factor in reconstruction, but how it affects image quality is not obvious. An investigation of the impacts of these four factors on image quality can help determine the most effective strategy in improving 4D-CBCT for IGRT. Methods: Fourteen 4D-CBCT patient projection datasets with various respiratory motion features were reconstructed with the following controllable factors: (i) respiratory signal (real-time position management, projection image intensity analysis, or fiducial marker tracking), (ii) binning method (phase, displacement, or equal-projection-density displacement binning), and (iii) reconstruction algorithm [Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK), McKinnon–Bates (MKB), or adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS)]. The image quality was quantified using signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio, and edge-response width in order to assess noise/streaking and blur. The SNR values were also analyzed with respect to the maximum, mean, and root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) projection angular spacing to investigate how projection angular spacing affects image quality. Results: The choice of respiratory signals was found to have no significant impact on image quality. Displacement-based binning was found to be less prone to motion artifacts compared to phase binning in more than half of the cases, but was shown to suffer from large interbin image quality variation and large projection angular gaps. Both MKB and ASD-POCS resulted in noticeably improved image quality almost 100% of the time relative to FDK. In addition, SNR

  20. Image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT: A sensitivity analysis of respiratory signal, binning method, reconstruction algorithm, and projection angular spacing

    Shieh, Chun-Chien [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kipritidis, John; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Keall, Paul J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kuncic, Zdenka [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 200