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Sample records for respiratory epithelium patterns

  1. Kinetics Analysis of Respiratory Epithelium by Virtual Instrumentation

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    Libor HARGAŠ

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with measurement and analysis of kinetic parameters of human respiratory epithelium. The article shows possibilities of data acquisition (videosequences and postprocessing using virtual instrumentation – LabVIEW. The designed methods enable analysis and measurement of two parameters: cilia beat frequency (CBF and trajectory of cilia of respiratory epithelium. The problem task is divided into videosequence acquisition of cilia from the microscope, region of interest (ROI selection for analyzed data reduction, preprocessing of reduced sequences. Frequency analysis is done by intensity method, which records and evaluates intensity variations in ROI. Trajectory analysis uses sophisticated algorithms of object detection in the image called pattern matching. Results of this work are used for diagnostics of some pathology of respiratory apparatus and epithelium. All solution steps are realized in LabVIEW development system.

  2. Respiratory Epithelium Lined Cyst of the Maxilla: Differential Diagnosis

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    C. P. Martinelli-Kläy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Maxillary cysts, including the cysts lined by respiratory epithelium, can present a diagnostic challenge. We report an unusual case of a maxillary cyst on an endodontically treated tooth #16, in which the cavity was totally lined by a respiratory epithelium. The patient, a 35-year-old male, presented with a generalized chronic periodontitis and complained of a pain in the tooth #16 region. A periodontal pocket extending to the root apices with pus coming out from the gingival was found. A combined endodontic periodontal was observed on a panoramic radiography. CBCT-scan revealed a well-circumscribed radiolucent lesion at the apices of the distobuccal root of the 16. A communication with the right maxillary sinus cavity and a maxillary and ethmoidal sinusitis were also observed. The lesion was removed and histological examination revealed a cyst lined exclusively by respiratory epithelium. Ciliated and rare mucous cells were also observed. The diagnosis could evoke a surgical ciliated cyst mimicking the radicular cyst but the patient has no previous history of trauma or surgery in the maxillofacial region. It could also be an unusual radicular cyst in which the stratified squamous epithelium was destroyed by inflammation and replaced by a respiratory epithelium of the maxillary sinus.

  3. Respiratory Epithelium Lined Cyst of the Maxilla: Differential Diagnosis

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    Chatelain, S.; Salvado, F.

    2017-01-01

    Maxillary cysts, including the cysts lined by respiratory epithelium, can present a diagnostic challenge. We report an unusual case of a maxillary cyst on an endodontically treated tooth #16, in which the cavity was totally lined by a respiratory epithelium. The patient, a 35-year-old male, presented with a generalized chronic periodontitis and complained of a pain in the tooth #16 region. A periodontal pocket extending to the root apices with pus coming out from the gingival was found. A combined endodontic periodontal was observed on a panoramic radiography. CBCT-scan revealed a well-circumscribed radiolucent lesion at the apices of the distobuccal root of the 16. A communication with the right maxillary sinus cavity and a maxillary and ethmoidal sinusitis were also observed. The lesion was removed and histological examination revealed a cyst lined exclusively by respiratory epithelium. Ciliated and rare mucous cells were also observed. The diagnosis could evoke a surgical ciliated cyst mimicking the radicular cyst but the patient has no previous history of trauma or surgery in the maxillofacial region. It could also be an unusual radicular cyst in which the stratified squamous epithelium was destroyed by inflammation and replaced by a respiratory epithelium of the maxillary sinus. PMID:29093979

  4. Cigarette smoke facilitates allergen penetration across respiratory epithelium.

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    Gangl, K; Reininger, R; Bernhard, D; Campana, R; Pree, I; Reisinger, J; Kneidinger, M; Kundi, M; Dolznig, H; Thurnher, D; Valent, P; Chen, K-W; Vrtala, S; Spitzauer, S; Valenta, R; Niederberger, V

    2009-03-01

    The association between cigarette smoke exposure and allergic airway disease is a matter for debate. We sought to investigate in an in vitro system whether active smoking reduces the integrity and barrier function of the respiratory epithelium and thus facilitates allergen penetration. We cultured the human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE14o- in a transwell culture system as a surrogate for the intact respiratory epithelium. The cell monolayer was exposed to standardized cigarette smoke extract (CSE). The extent and effects of trans-epithelial allergen penetration were measured using 125I-labelled purified major respiratory allergens (rBet v 1, rPhl p 5 and rDer p 2) and histamine release experiments. Exposure of cells to concentrations of CSE similar to those found in smokers induced the development of para-cellular gaps and a decrease in trans-epithelial resistance. CSE exposure induced a more than threefold increase in allergen penetration. Increased subepithelial allergen concentrations provoked a substantial augmentation of histamine release from sensitized basophils. Our results indicate that cigarette smoke is a potent factor capable of reducing the barrier function of the respiratory epithelium for allergens and may contribute to increased allergic inflammation, exacerbation of allergic disease and boosting of IgE memory.

  5. New Aspects in Respiratory Epithelium Diagnostics Using Virtual Instrumentation

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    Dušan KONIAR

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject of interest is trajectory analysis of moving object. Object is represented by respiratory epithelium cilium. Cilium trajectory and another parameter – beating frequency – are very important parameters in respiratory apparatus diagnostics. Main method of motion detection is Geometric Matching and gray level variance capturing. Primary experiments were taken on video phantoms simulating cilia movement using two camera systems: Marlin and PONTOS. All the phantoms were processed in LabVIEW development environment. Article focuses on acquisition conditions, preprocessing of videosequences and basic measurement on acquired phantoms.

  6. Macrophages are required for dendritic cell uptake of respiratory syncytial virus from an infected epithelium.

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    Ugonna, Kelechi; Bingle, Colin D; Plant, Karen; Wilson, Kirsty; Everard, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that the respiratory syncytial virus [RSV] can productively infect monocyte derived dendritic cells [MoDC] and remain dormant within the same cells for prolonged periods. It is therefore possible that infected dendritic cells act as a reservoir within the airways of individuals between annual epidemics. In the present study we explored the possibility that sub-epithelial DCs can be infected with RSV from differentiated bronchial epithelium and that in turn RSV from DCs can infect the epithelium. A dual co-culture model was established in which a differentiated primary airway epithelium on an Air Liquid Interface (ALI) was cultured on a transwell insert and MoDCs were subsequently added to the basolateral membrane of the insert. Further experiments were undertaken using a triple co-culture model in which in which macrophages were added to the apical surface of the differentiated epithelium. A modified RSV [rr-RSV] expressing a red fluorescent protein marker of replication was used to infect either the MoDCs or the differentiated epithelium and infection of the reciprocal cell type was assessed using confocal microscopy. Our data shows that primary epithelium became infected when rr-RSV infected MoDCs were introduced onto the basal surface of the transwell insert. MoDCs located beneath the epithelium did not become infected with virus from infected epithelial cells in the dual co-culture model. However when macrophages were present on the apical surface of the primary epithelium infection of the basal MoDCs occurred. Our data suggests that RSV infected dendritic cells readily transmit infection to epithelial cells even when they are located beneath the basal layer. However macrophages appear to be necessary for the transmission of infection from epithelial cells to basal dendritic cells.

  7. Macrophages are required for dendritic cell uptake of respiratory syncytial virus from an infected epithelium.

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    Kelechi Ugonna

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that the respiratory syncytial virus [RSV] can productively infect monocyte derived dendritic cells [MoDC] and remain dormant within the same cells for prolonged periods. It is therefore possible that infected dendritic cells act as a reservoir within the airways of individuals between annual epidemics. In the present study we explored the possibility that sub-epithelial DCs can be infected with RSV from differentiated bronchial epithelium and that in turn RSV from DCs can infect the epithelium. A dual co-culture model was established in which a differentiated primary airway epithelium on an Air Liquid Interface (ALI was cultured on a transwell insert and MoDCs were subsequently added to the basolateral membrane of the insert. Further experiments were undertaken using a triple co-culture model in which in which macrophages were added to the apical surface of the differentiated epithelium. A modified RSV [rr-RSV] expressing a red fluorescent protein marker of replication was used to infect either the MoDCs or the differentiated epithelium and infection of the reciprocal cell type was assessed using confocal microscopy. Our data shows that primary epithelium became infected when rr-RSV infected MoDCs were introduced onto the basal surface of the transwell insert. MoDCs located beneath the epithelium did not become infected with virus from infected epithelial cells in the dual co-culture model. However when macrophages were present on the apical surface of the primary epithelium infection of the basal MoDCs occurred. Our data suggests that RSV infected dendritic cells readily transmit infection to epithelial cells even when they are located beneath the basal layer. However macrophages appear to be necessary for the transmission of infection from epithelial cells to basal dendritic cells.

  8. Sox2 Activates Cell Proliferation and Differentiation in the Respiratory Epithelium

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    Tompkins, David H.; Besnard, Valérie; Lange, Alexander W.; Keiser, Angela R.; Wert, Susan E.; Bruno, Michael D.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Sox2, a transcription factor critical for the maintenance of embryonic stem cells and induction of pluripotent stem cells, is expressed exclusively in the conducting airway epithelium of the lung, where it is required for differentiation of nonciliated, goblet, and ciliated cells. To determine the role of Sox2 in respiratory epithelial cells, Sox2 was selectively and conditionally expressed in nonciliated airway epithelial cells and in alveolar type II cells in the adult mouse. Sox2 induced e...

  9. Inhibition of Pasteurella multocida Adhesion to Rabbit Respiratory Epithelium Using Lectins

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    Magda Patricia Carrillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the ability of a panel of lectins to inhibit the ability of Pasteurella multocida to adhere to and affect the rabbit respiratory epithelium. Nasal septa from rabbit fetuses were cultured with various lectins before the addition of P. multocida. The percentage of bacteria adhering to the epithelium was evaluated semiquantitatively by indirect immunoperoxidase (IIP staining. The goblet cells (GCs were counted in semithin sections stained with toluidine blue and served as the main morphological criterion to evaluate the inhibitory effect of the lectins. The lectins PNA, WGA, RCA120, and DBA significantly inhibited the adhesion of P. multocida to the ciliated epithelium P<0.05 and prevented the pathogen-induced increase in the number of GCs P<0.05 compared with those of positive control tissues. In addition, VVA, SJA, UEA I, DSL, SBA, and ECL significantly inhibited the increase in GCs compared with that of the control tissues. The results suggest that less aggressive therapeutic strategies, such as treatment with lectins, may represent alternative approaches to control bacterial respiratory infections.

  10. Inhibition of Pasteurella multocida Adhesion to Rabbit Respiratory Epithelium Using Lectins

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    Carrillo, Magda Patricia; Martinez, Nhora María; Patiño, María del Pilar; Iregui, Carlos Arturo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ability of a panel of lectins to inhibit the ability of Pasteurella multocida to adhere to and affect the rabbit respiratory epithelium. Nasal septa from rabbit fetuses were cultured with various lectins before the addition of P. multocida. The percentage of bacteria adhering to the epithelium was evaluated semiquantitatively by indirect immunoperoxidase (IIP) staining. The goblet cells (GCs) were counted in semithin sections stained with toluidine blue and served as the main morphological criterion to evaluate the inhibitory effect of the lectins. The lectins PNA, WGA, RCA120, and DBA significantly inhibited the adhesion of P. multocida to the ciliated epithelium (P < 0.05) and prevented the pathogen-induced increase in the number of GCs (P < 0.05) compared with those of positive control tissues. In addition, VVA, SJA, UEA I, DSL, SBA, and ECL significantly inhibited the increase in GCs compared with that of the control tissues. The results suggest that less aggressive therapeutic strategies, such as treatment with lectins, may represent alternative approaches to control bacterial respiratory infections. PMID:25810949

  11. DNA strand breaks in human nasal respiratory epithelium are induced upon exposure to urban pollution

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    Calderon-Garciduenas, L.; Osnaya-Brizuela, N.; Ramirez-Martinez, L. [Instituto Nacional de Pediatria, Mexico City (Mexico)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    All organisms have the ability to respond and adapt to a myriad of environmental insults. The human respiratory epithelium, when exposed to oxidant gases in photochemical smog, is at risk of DNA damage and requires efficient cellular adaptative responses to resist the environmentally induced cell damage. Ozone and its reaction products induce in vitro and in vivo DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) in respiratory epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. To determine if exposure to a polluted atmosphere with ozone as the main criteria pollutant of 19 children and 13 adult males who lived in a low-polluted Pacific port, 69 males and 16 children who were permanent residents of Southwest Metropolitan Mexico City (SWMMC), and 22 young males newly arrived to SWMMC and followed for 12 weeks. Respiratory symptoms, nasal cytology and histopathology, cell viabilities, and single-cell gel electrophoresis were investigated. Atmospheric pollutant data were obtained from a fixed-site monitoring station. SWMMC volunteers spent >7 hr/day outdoors and all had upper respiratory symptoms. A significant difference in the numbers of DNA-damaged nasal cells was observed between control and chronically exposed subjects, both in children (p<0.00001) and in adults (p>0.01). SSBs in newly arrived subjects quickly increased upon arrival to the city, from 39.8 {+-}8.34% in the first week to 67.29 {+-}2.35 by week 2. Thereafter, the number of cells with SSBs remained stable in spite of the continuous increase in cumulative ozone, suggesting a threshold for cumulative DNA nasal damage. Exposure to a polluted urban atmosphere induces SSBs in human nasal respiratory epithelium, and nasal SSBs could serve as a biomarker of ozone exposure. Further, because DNA strand breaks are a threat to cell viability and genome integrity and appear to be a critical lesion responsible for p53 induction, nasal SSBs should be evaluated in ozone-exposed individuals. 43 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Lugol staining pattern in background epithelium of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Katagiri, Atsushi; Kaneko, Kazuhiro; Konishi, Kazuo; Ito, Hiroaki; Kushima, Miki; Mitamura, Keiji

    2004-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus often arises in the setting of chronic esophagitis. We investigated whether chronic esophagitis was associated with carcinogenesis in the esophageal squamous epithelium. Videoendoscopy with Lugol staining was performed in 70 patients with invasive carcinoma of the esophagus. We especially focused the study on background epithelium of the esophagus, then background epithelium was classified into two groups according to differences in Lugol staining patterns. Following Lugol solution spraying, background epithelium showing uniform greenish-brown staining was defined as having a uniform pattern. In contrast, when multiple Lugol-unstained speckles were present throughout the esophagus, the pattern was defined as speckled. Furthermore, we also investigated whether glycogenic acanthosis is present or not in background epithelium. Chronic esophagitis was present in 11 of 70 patients (16%) with invasive carcinoma, indicating a speckled pattern in background epithelium following Lugol solution spraying. The remaining 84% of patients with invasive carcinoma showed normally uniform Lugol staining background epithelium. Glycogenic acanthosis was found in 65 (93%) of 70 patients. Approximately 80% of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma showed normal Lugol staining of background epithelium. Field carcinogenesis is postulated to be not predominant in the development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in our Japanese subjects. In contrast, glycogenic acanthosis of the esophagus was associated with the background epithelium accompanied with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  13. Isolated omental duplication cyst with respiratory epithelium & pancreatic glands: Case report & review of literature

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    Phuoc T. Nguyen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Duplication cysts are uncommon congenital anomalies. They are usually in communication with or are attached to an adjacent segment of bowel. Rarely are they completely isolated from the gastrointestinal tract. To date, there have been 29 reported cases of non-communicating or isolated duplication cysts. Few contain respiratory epithelium and pancreatic glands. Patients may present with pain, an acute abdomen, bleeding or malignant degeneration. Differential diagnoses for an isolated cystic mass should include duplication cyst in the pediatric population. Recognition and awareness of these anomalies and their various presentations can aid in management. The unusual case of an isolated duplication cyst containing respiratory and pancreatic tissue, found within omentum, is presented with a review of the literature.

  14. Pyocyanin effects on respiratory epithelium: relevance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infections.

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    Rada, Balázs; Leto, Thomas L

    2013-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) uses several virulence factors to establish chronic respiratory infections in bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. One of its toxins, pyocyanin (PYO), is a redox-active pigment that is required for full virulence in animal models and has been detected in patients' airway secretions. PYO promotes virulence by interfering with several cellular functions in host cells including electron transport, cellular respiration, energy metabolism, gene expression, and innate immune mechanisms. This review summarizes recent advances in PYO biology with special attention to current views on its role in human airway infections and on its interactions with the first line of our airway defense, the respiratory epithelium. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. A model of the deciliation process caused by Mycoplasma fermentans strain incognitus on respiratory epithelium.

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    Stadtländer, Christian T K H

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate by light microscopy as well as by scanning and transmission electron microscopy the deciliation process which takes place on the respiratory epithelium of tracheal explants after experimental infection with Mycoplasma fermentans strain incognitus. Time-point photography allowed distinguishing five phases which occurred during the infection on the epithelial cell surface: (1) Attachment of M. fermentans to the cilia causing clumping of the cilia tips; (2) matting of cilia into bundles; (3) formation of abnormally shaped and shorter cilia; (4) collapse of cilia onto the epithelial cell surface; and (5) widespread loss of cilia. Based on the photographic images, a schematic model of the deciliation process was developed. Various potential factors contributing to the cilia destruction are discussed, including the release of mycoplasmal toxins, the physical presence of a high number of M. fermentans cells attached to the cilia, and the depletion of culture medium components by the mycoplasmas. This model of M. fermentans strain incognitus infection of respiratory epithelium is important for understanding mycoplasmal pathogenicity on a comparative level.

  16. Sox2 activates cell proliferation and differentiation in the respiratory epithelium.

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    Tompkins, David H; Besnard, Valérie; Lange, Alexander W; Keiser, Angela R; Wert, Susan E; Bruno, Michael D; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2011-07-01

    Sox2, a transcription factor critical for the maintenance of embryonic stem cells and induction of pluripotent stem cells, is expressed exclusively in the conducting airway epithelium of the lung, where it is required for differentiation of nonciliated, goblet, and ciliated cells. To determine the role of Sox2 in respiratory epithelial cells, Sox2 was selectively and conditionally expressed in nonciliated airway epithelial cells and in alveolar type II cells in the adult mouse. Sox2 induced epithelial cell proliferation within 3 days of expression. Epithelial cell proliferation was associated with increased Ki-67 and cyclin D1 staining. Expression of cell cycle genes, including FoxM1, Ccna2 (Cyclin A2), Ccnb2 (Cyclin B2), and Ccnd1 (Cyclin D1), was increased. Consistent with a role in cell proliferation, Sox2 activated the transcription of FoxM1 in vitro. In alveoli, Sox2 caused hyperplasia and ectopic differentiation of epithelial cells to those with morphologic and molecular characteristics of conducting airway epithelium. Sox2 induced the expression of conducting airway epithelial specific genes, including Scgb1a1, Foxj1, Tubb3, and Cyp2f2. Although prolonged expression of Sox2 caused cell proliferation and epithelial hyperplasia, Sox2 did not induce pulmonary tumors. Sox2 induces proliferation of respiratory epithelial cells and, subsequently, partially reprograms alveolar epithelial cells into cells with characteristics of the conducting airways.

  17. Clinical evaluation and changes of the respiratory epithelium function after administration of Pidotimod in Greek children with recurrent respiratory tract infections.

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    Aivazis, V; Hatzimichail, A; Papachristou, A; Valeri, R; Iuga-Donca, G

    2002-08-01

    Several studies have been conducted on young children with recurrent respiratory infections using several compounds (synthetic derivates or lyophilized bacterial extracts) causing improvement in the clinical process. We conducted a prospective, randomized study comparing the clinical results and the changes of the respiratory epithelium function after the administration of immunostimulating drug (Pidotimod) to children with respiratory infections over a 9 month period. A total of 32 children (group A) were randomly assigned to receive Pidotimod therapy while a second group of 18 children (group B) weren't. All the children in group A received Pidotimod (400 mg x 2 daily) for fifteen days and 400 mg daily for the next twenty days. The proper function of the ciliary respiratory epithelium in all children was checked, using the Edicol Orange and CaH PO4 2H2O, coloring method before the therapeutic intervention and after the first and the sixth month. 87.5% of group A, responded exceptionally well to treatment presenting two or less infections in the nine month period, whereas only 33.3% of group B showed improvement (pPidotimod therapy is a reliable, simple and safe approach to treat children with recurrent respiratory infections and it can reduce the frequency of such infections as a result of improvement of the ciliary respiratory epithelium.

  18. Epithelial maturation pattern of dysplastic epithelium and normal oral epithelium exposed to tobacco and alcohol: a scanning electron microscopic study.

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    Jagannathan, Nithya; Ramani, Pratibha; Premkumar, Priya; Natesan, Anuja; Sherlin, Herald J

    2013-05-01

    The detection of oral cancer at an early stage is an optimal strategy and is the most effective approach for preventing further progression. The rationale of the study was to evaluate the epithelial maturation pattern in oral mucosa exposed to tobacco/alcohol and on dysplastic oral mucosa using the scanning electron microscope. Fifteen subjects were selected based on clinical examination and divided into three groups: group 1-patients with apparently normal oral mucosa; group 2-patients with oral mucosa exposed to tobacco/alcohol; group 3-patients with clinical diagnosis of leukoplakia. An incisional biopsy was performed from the buccal mucosa. One part of the specimen was prepared for light microscopy and the other part was prepared for scanning electron microscopy. Light microscopy revealed nonkeratinized stratified squamous epithelium in group 1, while group 2 demonstrated hyperparakeratinized stratified squamous epithelium with mild cytological atypia, and group 3 showed architectural and cytological changes. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated flat-surfaced cells with equidistant parallel microridges in group 1, while group 2 showed irregular and widened microridges with numerous pits and absence of honeycomb pattern. Group 3 showed irregularly arranged broad and swollen cells with numerous pits and irregular microvilli projecting over the surface. The present study establishes the relationship of the surface abnormalities to the tendency of the cells to become malignant and thus serves as a tool in early detection of squamous cell carcinoma. It also emphasizes the need of routine follow-up in these high-risk patients for progression of carcinoma.

  19. The ureteric bud epithelium: Morphogenesis and roles in metanephric kidney patterning

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    Nagalakshmi, Vidya K.; Yu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian metanephric kidney is composed of two epithelial components –the collecting duct system and the nephron epithelium– that differentiate from two different tissues –the ureteric bud epithelium and the nephron progenitors, respectively– of intermediate mesoderm origin. The collecting duct system is generated through reiterative ureteric bud branching morphogenesis whereas the nephron epithelium is formed in a process termed nephrogenesis, which is initiated with the mesenchymal-epithelial transition of the nephron progenitors. Ureteric bud branching morphogenesis is regulated by nephron progenitors, and in return the ureteric bud epithelium regulates nephrogenesis. The metanephric kidney is also physiologically divided along the cortico-medullary axis into subcompartments that are enriched with specific segments of these two epithelial structures. Here we provide an overview of the major molecular and cellular processes underlying the morphogenesis and patterning of the ureteric bud epithelium and its roles in the cortical-medullary patterning of the metanephric kidney. PMID:25783232

  20. Introduction of respiratory pattern generators into models of respiratory control.

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    Longobardo, Guy; Evangelisti, Carlo J; Cherniack, Neil S

    2005-10-12

    We have adapted two models previously proposed as respiratory pattern generators (RPGs) into a neurochemical feed back control model of ventilation. The RPG models, non-dimensional as originally presented, consisted of oscillating circuits of either two or five interconnected neurons [Matsugu, M., Duffin, J., Poon, C.-S., 1998. Entrainment, instability, quasi-periodicity, and chaos in a compound neural oscillator. J. Comput. Neurosci. 5, 35-51; Botros, S.M., Bruce, E.N., 1990. Neural network implementation of a three-phase model of respiratory rhythm generation. Biol. Cybern. 63, 143-153]. The neurochemical model into which they were integrated [Longobardo, G., Evangelisti, C.J., Cherniack, N.S., 2002. Effects of neural drives on breathing in the awake state in humans. Respir. Physiol. 129, 317-333] included the effects of cerebral blood flow variation with CO2, vagal stretch receptors input and a multicompartment model of carbon dioxide stores. The methodology is described whereby these neuronal oscillator networks were quantified, a necessary step for their inclusion as RPGs in broader models of the overall control of respiration. Subsequent simulations of the ventilation response to carbon dioxide with either respiratory pattern generator model exhibited only a limited range in which tidal volume and frequency increased with increasing respiratory drive. With both models, frequency peaked and then declined, as did ventilation when P CO2 was greater than normal. The range of the models was extended if the respiratory pattern generators were considered to be composed of multiple neuronal oscillators or a single oscillator in which there was increasing phasic input that was gated or pacemaker driven.

  1. Spatial pattern of cell geometry and cell-division orientation in zebrafish lens epithelium

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    Toshiaki Mochizuki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell proliferation is a key regulator of tissue morphogenesis. We examined cell proliferation and cell division in zebrafish lens epithelium by visualizing cell-cycle phases and nuclear positions, using fluorescent-labeled geminin and histone proteins. Proliferation was low in the anterior region of lens epithelium and higher in the marginal zone anterior to the equator, suggesting that the proliferation zone, called the germinative zone, is formed in zebrafish lens. Interestingly, cell-division orientation was biased longitudinally in the anterior region, shifted from longitudinal to circumferential along the anterior–posterior axis of lens sphere, and was biased circumferentially in the peripheral region. These data suggest that cell-division orientation is spatially regulated in zebrafish lens epithelium. The Hertwig rule indicates that cells tend to divide along their long axes. Orientation of long axes and cell division were biased similarly in zebrafish lens epithelium, suggesting that cell geometry correlates with cell-division orientation. A cell adhesion molecule, E-cadherin, is expressed in lens epithelium. In a zebrafish e-cadherin mutant, the long axes and cell-division orientation were shifted more longitudinally. These data suggest that E-cadherin is required for the spatial pattern of cell geometry and cell-division orientation in zebrafish lens epithelium.

  2. [Inhibitory effect of nasal mucus on the absorption of drugs through respiratory epithelium].

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    Hayashi, H

    1990-01-01

    The absorption of Dibekacin (DKB) through rabbit's tracheal mucosa with and without nasal mucus were examined in vitro. The modified double chamber method was used for the purpose of this study. DKB solution (20 mg/ml) and Hanks' balanced salt solution were put into the donor compartment (DC) and the receiver compartment (RC), respectively. A plate with a hole and the tracheal mucosa were inserted between the compartments in the order of DC, dialytic membrane, the plate, the rabbit tracheal mucosa and RC. The hole of the plate was filled with nasal mucus or Hanks' solution. The latter was used as the control. The chamber was incubated in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 in air for 3 hours at 37 degrees C. The absorption rate (AR) was obtained by dividing the concentration of DKB in RC by that in DC. The nasal mucus from patients with chronic sinusitis significantly decreased the AR of DKB compared with that in the control (P less than 0.05). The AR significantly decreased with increments in the thickness of nasal mucus by chronic sinusitis. This decreased AR was improved by the addition of N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) to DKB solution in DC. NAC can cleave disulfied bonds of mucus glycoprotein and this results in the decrease of viscoelasticity of nasal mucus. The results indicate that nasal mucus by chronic sinusitis intercept the absorption of drugs through respiratory epithelium in vitro. One of the mechanisms of the intercepter may be due to the high molecular-reticular structure of nasal mucus.

  3. cAMP response element binding protein is required for differentiation of respiratory epithelium during murine development.

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    A Daniel Bird

    Full Text Available The cAMP response element binding protein 1 (Creb1 transcription factor regulates cellular gene expression in response to elevated levels of intracellular cAMP. Creb1(-/- fetal mice are phenotypically smaller than wildtype littermates, predominantly die in utero and do not survive after birth due to respiratory failure. We have further investigated the respiratory defect of Creb1(-/- fetal mice during development. Lungs of Creb1(-/- fetal mice were pale in colour and smaller than wildtype controls in proportion to their reduced body size. Creb1(-/- lungs also did not mature morphologically beyond E16.5 with little or no expansion of airway luminal spaces, a phenotype also observed with the Creb1(-/- lung on a Crem(-/- genetic background. Creb1 was highly expressed throughout the lung at all stages examined, however activation of Creb1 was detected primarily in distal lung epithelium. Cell differentiation of E17.5 Creb1(-/- lung distal epithelium was analysed by electron microscopy and showed markedly reduced numbers of type-I and type-II alveolar epithelial cells. Furthermore, immunomarkers for specific lineages of proximal epithelium including ciliated, non-ciliated (Clara, and neuroendocrine cells showed delayed onset of expression in the Creb1(-/- lung. Finally, gene expression analyses of the E17.5 Creb1(-/- lung using whole genome microarray and qPCR collectively identified respiratory marker gene profiles and provide potential novel Creb1-regulated genes. Together, these results demonstrate a crucial role for Creb1 activity for the development and differentiation of the conducting and distal lung epithelium.

  4. An electron microscope study of the respiratory epithelium in the lungs of the fire salamander (Salamandra salamandra).

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    Meban, C

    1979-01-01

    The respiratory epithelium in the lungs of the common fire salamander (Salamandra salamandra) has been studied by electron microscopy. The entire pulmonary gas-exchange area is covered by a continuous epithelium, the cells of which are all of the same type and are termed 'pneumonocytes'. Typically, each pneumonocyte is squamous and has attenuated sheets of cytoplasm which extend over the pulmonary capillaries. Its free surface bears squat microvilli, and osmiophilic inclusion bodies and other organelles are prominent in the cytoplasm. The lateral cell walls have numerous desmosomes and interdigitating cytoplasmic processes. Many cells send cytoplasmic processes deep into the substance of the lung septa. The morphological evidence suggests that the pneumonocytes are responsible for the secretion of pulmonary surface-active agents and for maintaining the integrity of the gaseous diffusion membrane. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 PMID:422482

  5. Expression pattern of odontogenic ameloblast-associated and amelotin during formation and regeneration of the junctional epithelium

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    Kuroda, S.; Moffatt, P; Nanci, A.; R Wazen; C Nishio

    2010-01-01

    The junctional epithelium (JE) adheres to the tooth surface, and seals off periodontal tissues from the oral environment. This incompletely differentiated epithelium is formed initially by the fusion of the reduced enamel organ with the oral epithelium (OE). Two proteins, odontogenic ameloblast-associated (ODAM) and amelotin (AMTN), have been identified in the JE. The objective of this study was to evaluate their expression pattern during formation and regeneration of the JE. Cytokeratin 14 w...

  6. Assessment of Pasteurella multocida A Lipopolysaccharide, as an Adhesin in an In Vitro Model of Rabbit Respiratory Epithelium

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    Romero, Stefany; Esquinas, Paula; Patiño, Pilar; Martínez, Nhora

    2017-01-01

    The role of the P. multocida lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a putative adhesin during the early stages of infection with this bacterium in the respiratory epithelium of rabbits was investigated. By light microscopy and double enzyme labeling of nasal septa tissues, the amount of bacteria attached to the respiratory epithelium and the amount of LPS present in goblet cells at different experimental times were estimated. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and LPS labeling with colloidal gold particles were also used to determine the exact location of LPS in the cells. Septa that were challenged with LPS of P. multocida and 30 minutes later with P. multocida showed more adherent bacteria and more severe lesions than the other treatments. Free LPS was observed in the lumen of the nasal septum, forming bilamellar structures and adhering to the cilia, microvilli, cytoplasmic membrane, and cytoplasm of epithelial ciliated and goblet cells. The above findings suggest that P. multocida LPS plays an important role in the process of bacterial adhesion and that it has the ability of being internalized into host cells. PMID:28251016

  7. Assessment of Pasteurella multocida A Lipopolysaccharide, as an Adhesin in an In Vitro Model of Rabbit Respiratory Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Gallego

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the P. multocida lipopolysaccharide (LPS as a putative adhesin during the early stages of infection with this bacterium in the respiratory epithelium of rabbits was investigated. By light microscopy and double enzyme labeling of nasal septa tissues, the amount of bacteria attached to the respiratory epithelium and the amount of LPS present in goblet cells at different experimental times were estimated. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and LPS labeling with colloidal gold particles were also used to determine the exact location of LPS in the cells. Septa that were challenged with LPS of P. multocida and 30 minutes later with P. multocida showed more adherent bacteria and more severe lesions than the other treatments. Free LPS was observed in the lumen of the nasal septum, forming bilamellar structures and adhering to the cilia, microvilli, cytoplasmic membrane, and cytoplasm of epithelial ciliated and goblet cells. The above findings suggest that P. multocida LPS plays an important role in the process of bacterial adhesion and that it has the ability of being internalized into host cells.

  8. Assessment of Pasteurella multocida A Lipopolysaccharide, as an Adhesin in an In Vitro Model of Rabbit Respiratory Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Carolina; Romero, Stefany; Esquinas, Paula; Patiño, Pilar; Martínez, Nhora; Iregui, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The role of the P. multocida lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a putative adhesin during the early stages of infection with this bacterium in the respiratory epithelium of rabbits was investigated. By light microscopy and double enzyme labeling of nasal septa tissues, the amount of bacteria attached to the respiratory epithelium and the amount of LPS present in goblet cells at different experimental times were estimated. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and LPS labeling with colloidal gold particles were also used to determine the exact location of LPS in the cells. Septa that were challenged with LPS of P. multocida and 30 minutes later with P. multocida showed more adherent bacteria and more severe lesions than the other treatments. Free LPS was observed in the lumen of the nasal septum, forming bilamellar structures and adhering to the cilia, microvilli, cytoplasmic membrane, and cytoplasm of epithelial ciliated and goblet cells. The above findings suggest that P. multocida LPS plays an important role in the process of bacterial adhesion and that it has the ability of being internalized into host cells.

  9. Effect of oxidative stress on respiratory epithelium from children with Down syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, Martijn; Lutter, René; Eldering, Eric; Bos, Albert P.; van Woensel, Job B. M.

    2013-01-01

    Children with Down syndrome are at high risk for acute respiratory distress syndrome. In Down syndrome, both regulation of inflammation and apoptosis, important in acute respiratory distress syndrome pathophysiology, are abnormal. This has been linked to an imbalance in free radical scavengers. We

  10. The pattern of paediatric respiratory illnesses admitted in Ebonyi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Reports from the developed nations reveal respiratory tract infections as the leading cause of childhood hospital admissions. Children may be admitted for a variety of respiratory illnesses. Data on the spectrum of pediatric respiratory illnesses admitted in the hospital is scarce. Aim: To determine the pattern of ...

  11. The Pattern of Pediatric Respiratory Illnesses Admitted in Ebonyi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Reports from the developed nations reveal respiratory tract infections as the leading cause of ... Ezeonu, et al.: The pattern of Paediatric Respiratory illnesses admitted in Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital, South-East Nigeria. 66 .... particularly, the acute respiratory tract infections during these seasons.

  12. Use of sensitive, broad-spectrum molecular assays and human airway epithelium cultures for detection of respiratory pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Pyrc

    Full Text Available Rapid and accurate detection and identification of viruses causing respiratory tract infections is important for patient care and disease control. Despite the fact that several assays are available, identification of an etiological agent is not possible in ~30% of patients suffering from respiratory tract diseases. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to develop a diagnostic set for the detection of respiratory viruses with sensitivity as low as 1-10 copies per reaction. Evaluation of the assay using a training clinical sample set showed that viral nucleic acids were identified in ~76% of cases. To improve assay performance and facilitate the identification of novel species or emerging strains, cultures of fully differentiated human airway epithelium were used to pre-amplify infectious viruses. This additional step resulted in the detection of pathogens in all samples tested. Based on these results it can be hypothesized that the lack of an etiological agent in some clinical samples, both reported previously and observed in the present study, may result not only from the presence of unknown viral species, but also from imperfections in the detection methods used.

  13. Interactive effects of ozone and formaldehyde on the nasal respiratory lining epithelium in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuzel, P.G.; Wilmer, J.W.; Woutersen, R.A.; Zwart, A.; Rombout, P.J.; Feron, V.J. (TNO-CIVO Toxicology and Nutrition Institute, Zeist (Netherlands))

    1990-01-01

    The combined effects on the nasal epithelium of mixtures of ozone and formaldehyde at cytotoxic and noncytotoxic concentrations were examined. Male Wistar rats were exposed by inhalation during 22 h/d for 3 consecutive days to 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 ppm formaldehyde, or to 0.2, 0.4, or 0.8 ppm ozone, or to mixtures of 0.4 ppm ozone and 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 ppm formaldehyde, or to 1.0 ppm formaldehyde and 0.2, 0.4, or 0.8 ppm ozone, or they were sham-exposed to clean air. The noses were examined for pathological changes at six standard cross levels by light microscopy and for epithelial cell proliferation by counting (3H-methyl)thymidine-labeled cells at cross levels II and III. Ozone at 0.4 ppm or 0.8 ppm or formaldehyde at 3 ppm enhanced cell proliferation at cross level II at all locations, except for the epithelium of the septum, which was not affected by ozone. At cross level III ozone alone did not induce cell proliferation, but formaldehyde at 0.3 and 1 ppm tended to reduce cell proliferation while at 3 ppm proliferation was slightly stimulated. The combined exposure to 0.4 ppm ozone and 0.3 ppm formaldehyde induced less cell proliferation at cross levels II and III when compared with that of 0.4 ppm ozone alone. Less cell proliferation was also seen at cross level II when animals were exposed to 0.4 or 0.8 ppm ozone in combination with 1 ppm formaldehyde than when exposed to these ozone concentrations alone. A more than additive increase in cell proliferation was found at cross level II after exposure to 0.4 ppm ozone in combination with 3 ppm formaldehyde, and at cross level III in animals exposed to 0.4 ppm ozone and 1 or 3 ppm formaldehyde. Treatment-related histopathological nasal changes, such as disarrangement, loss of cilia, and hyper/metaplasia of the epithelium were seen at 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 ppm ozone and at 3 ppm formaldehyde.

  14. Demonstration of carboxylesterase in cytology samples of human nasal respiratory epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, D.A.; Nikula, K.J.; Avila, K. [and others

    1995-12-01

    The epithelial lining of the nasal airways is a target for responses induced by a variety of toxicant exposures. The high metabolic capacity of this tissue has been suggested to play a role in both protection of the airways through detoxication of certain toxicants, as well as in activation of other compounds to more toxic metabolites. Specifically, nasal carboxylesterase (CE) has been shown to mediate the toxicity of inhaled esters and acrylates by converting them to more toxic acid and alcohol metabolites which can be cytotoxic and/or carcinogenic to the nasal mucosa. Due to difficulties in extrapolating rodent models to human, new paradigms using human cells and tissues are essential to understanding and evaluating the metabolic processes in human nasal epithelium.

  15. Cytokeratin patterns in corneal, limbal, and conjunctival epithelium. An immunofluorescence study with PKK-1, 8.12, 8.60, and 4.62 anticytokeratin antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, M I; Weinreb, R N

    1990-11-01

    The authors examined immunofluorescently the specific cytokeratin staining patterns of corneal, limbal, and conjunctival epithelium with PKK-1, 8.12, 4.62, and 8.60 monoclonal anticytokeratin antibodies. Observations were made on unfixed frozen postmortem human tissue. The PKK-1 antibody stain was observed in all layers of corneal epithelium but only in suprabasal layers of limbal and conjunctival epithelium. By contrast, the 8.12 antibody stain was observed only in the superficial layer of corneal epithelium but through all layers of limbal and conjunctival epithelium. The 4.60 antibody stain was seen in focal areas of corneal and limbal epithelium and through all layers of conjunctival epithelium. The 8.60 antibody stain was not present in the three epithelia. These immunofluorescence studies showed unique cytokeratin patterns among layers in corneal, limbal, and conjunctival epithelium.

  16. Interaction of Bordetella bronchiseptica and Its Lipopolysaccharide with In Vitro Culture of Respiratory Nasal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Gallego

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nasal septa of fetal rabbits at 26 days of gestation were harvested by cesarean section of the does while under anesthesia and then exposed to Bordetella bronchiseptica or its lipopolysaccharide (LPS for periods of 2 and 4 hours. A total of 240 explants were used. The tissues were examined using the Hematoxylin & Eosin technique. Then, semithin sections (0.5 m were stained with toluidine blue and examined with indirect immunoperoxidase (IPI and lectin histochemistry. The most frequent and statistically significant findings were as follows: (1 cell death and increased goblet cell activity when exposed to bacteria and (2 cell death, cytoplasmic vacuolation and infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes when exposed to LPS. The lesions induced by the bacterium were more severe than with LPS alone, except for the cytoplasmic vacuolation in epithelial cells. IPI stained the ciliated border of the epithelium with the bacterium more intensely, while LPS lectin histochemistry preferentially labeled the cytoplasm of goblet cell. These data indicate that B. bronchiseptica and its LPS may have an affinity for specific glycoproteins that would act as adhesion receptors in both locations.

  17. Pattern of acute respiratory infections in hospitalized children under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of acute respiratory infections in hospitalized children under five years of age in Jos Nigeria. ... Abstract. Background: Acute respiratory infections are the commonest cause of acute morbidity in children especially those under five in the developing countries. ... prevalence of 43.5/1000 person per year (39/897).

  18. Patterns of Global DNA and Histone Methylation Appear to be Similar in Normal, Dysplastic and Neoplastic Oral Epithelium of Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika J. Piyathilake

    2005-01-01

    H3-Lys4 and H3-Lys9 were statistically significant in all tissue types and strongest in normal oral epithelium from non-cancer subjects (r = 0.77, p < 0.001. Patterns of DNA and histone methylation are similar in tissues across the spectrum of oral carcinogenesis, and there is a significant positive association between these two epigenetic mechanisms.

  19. Interactions of Francisella tularensis with Alveolar Type II Epithelial Cells and the Murine Respiratory Epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Faron

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is classified as a Tier 1 select agent by the CDC due to its low infectious dose and the possibility that the organism can be used as a bioweapon. The low dose of infection suggests that Francisella is unusually efficient at evading host defenses. Although ~50 cfu are necessary to cause human respiratory infection, the early interactions of virulent Francisella with the lung environment are not well understood. To provide additional insights into these interactions during early Francisella infection of mice, we performed TEM analysis on mouse lungs infected with F. tularensis strains Schu S4, LVS and the O-antigen mutant Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn. For all three strains, the majority of the bacteria that we could detect were observed within alveolar type II epithelial cells at 16 hours post infection. Although there were no detectable differences in the amount of bacteria within an infected cell between the three strains, there was a significant increase in the amount of cellular debris observed in the air spaces of the lungs in the Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn mutant compared to either the Schu S4 or LVS strain. We also studied the interactions of Francisella strains with human AT-II cells in vitro by characterizing the ability of these three strains to invade and replicate within these cells. Gentamicin assay and confocal microscopy both confirmed that F. tularensis Schu S4 replicated robustly within these cells while F. tularensis LVS displayed significantly lower levels of growth over 24 hours, although the strain was able to enter these cells at about the same level as Schu S4 (1 organism per cell, as determined by confocal imaging. The Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn mutant that we have previously described as attenuated for growth in macrophages and mouse virulence displayed interesting properties as well. This mutant induced significant airway inflammation (cell debris and had an attenuated growth phenotype in the human AT-II cells. These

  20. Early respiratory microbiota composition determines bacterial succession patterns and respiratory health in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesbroek, Giske; Tsivtsivadze, Evgeni; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Montijn, Roy; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Keijser, Bart J F; Bogaert, Debby

    2014-12-01

    Many bacterial pathogens causing respiratory infections in children are common residents of the respiratory tract. Insight into bacterial colonization patterns and microbiota stability at a young age might elucidate healthy or susceptible conditions for development of respiratory disease. To study bacterial succession of the respiratory microbiota in the first 2 years of life and its relation to respiratory health characteristics. Upper respiratory microbiota profiles of 60 healthy children at the ages of 1.5, 6, 12, and 24 months were characterized by 16S-based pyrosequencing. We determined consecutive microbiota profiles by machine-learning algorithms and validated the findings cross-sectionally in an additional cohort of 140 children per age group. Overall, we identified eight distinct microbiota profiles in the upper respiratory tract of healthy infants. Profiles could already be identified at 1.5 months of age and were associated with microbiota stability and change over the first 2 years of life. More stable patterns were marked by early presence and high abundance of Moraxella and Corynebacterium/Dolosigranulum and were positively associated with breastfeeding in the first period of life and with lower rates of parental-reported respiratory infections in the consecutive periods. Less stable profiles were marked by high abundance of Haemophilus or Streptococcus. These findings provide novel insights into microbial succession in the respiratory tract in infancy and link early-life profiles to microbiota stability and respiratory health characteristics. New prospective studies should elucidate potential implications of our findings for early diagnosis and prevention of respiratory infections. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00189020).

  1. Cardiac and Respiratory Patterns Synchronize between Persons during Choir Singing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Viktor; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2011-01-01

    Dyadic and collective activities requiring temporally coordinated action are likely to be associated with cardiac and respiratory patterns that synchronize within and between people. However, the extent and functional significance of cardiac and respiratory between-person couplings have not been investigated thus far. Here, we report interpersonal oscillatory couplings among eleven singers and one conductor engaged in choir singing. We find that: (a) phase synchronization both in respiration and heart rate variability increase significantly during singing relative to a rest condition; (b) phase synchronization is higher when singing in unison than when singing pieces with multiple voice parts; (c) directed coupling measures are consistent with the presence of causal effects of the conductor on the singers at high modulation frequencies; (d) the different voices of the choir are reflected in network analyses of cardiac and respiratory activity based on graph theory. Our results suggest that oscillatory coupling of cardiac and respiratory patterns provide a physiological basis for interpersonal action coordination. PMID:21957466

  2. Investigating the complexity of respiratory patterns during the laryngeal chemoreflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curran Aidan K

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The laryngeal chemoreflex exists in infants as a primary sensory mechanism for defending the airway from the aspiration of liquids. Previous studies have hypothesized that prolonged apnea associated with this reflex may be life threatening and might be a cause of sudden infant death syndrome. Methods In this study we quantified the output of the respiratory neural network, the diaphragm EMG signal, during the laryngeal chemoreflex and eupnea in early postnatal (3–10 days piglets. We tested the hypothesis that diaphragm EMG activity corresponding to reflex-related events involved in clearance (restorative mechanisms such as cough and swallow exhibit lower complexity, suggesting that a synchronized homogeneous group of neurons in the central respiratory network are active during these events. Nonlinear dynamic analysis was performed using the approximate entropy to asses the complexity of respiratory patterns. Results Diaphragm EMG, genioglossal activity EMG, as well as other physiological signals (tracheal pressure, blood pressure and respiratory volume were recorded from 5 unanesthetized chronically instrumented intact piglets. Approximate entropy values of the EMG during cough and swallow were found significantly (p p Conclusion Reduced complexity values of the respiratory neural network output corresponding to coughs and swallows suggest synchronous neural activity of a homogeneous group of neurons. The higher complexity values exhibited by eupneic respiratory activity are the result of a more random behaviour, which is the outcome of the integrated action of several groups of neurons involved in the respiratory neural network.

  3. Role of Scrib and Dlg in anterior-posterior patterning of the follicular epithelium during Drosophila oogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lingzhu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper patterning of the follicle cell epithelium over the egg chamber is essential for the Drosophila egg development. Differentiation of the epithelium into several distinct cell types along the anterior-posterior axis requires coordinated activities of multiple signaling pathways. Previously, we reported that lethal(2giant larvae (lgl, a Drosophila tumor suppressor gene, is required in the follicle cells for the posterior follicle cell (PFC fate induction at mid-oogenesis. Here we explore the role of another two tumor suppressor genes, scribble (scrib and discs large (dlg, in the epithelial patterning. Results We found that removal of scrib or dlg function from the follicle cells at posterior terminal of the egg chamber causes a complete loss of the PFC fate. Aberrant specification and differentiation of the PFCs in the mosaic clones can be ascribed to defects in coordinated activation of the EGFR, JAK and Notch signaling pathways in the multilayered cells. Meanwhile, the clonal analysis revealed that loss-of-function mutations in scrib/dlg at the anterior domains result in a partially penetrant phenotype of defective induction of the stretched and centripetal cell fate, whereas specification of the border cell fate can still occur in the most anterior region of the mutant clones. Further, we showed that scrib genetically interacts with dlg in regulating posterior patterning of the epithelium. Conclusion In this study we provide evidence that scrib and dlg function differentially in anterior and posterior patterning of the follicular epithelium at oogenesis. Further genetic analysis indicates that scrib and dlg act in a common pathway to regulate PFC fate induction. This study may open another window for elucidating role of scrib/dlg in controlling epithelial polarity and cell proliferation during development.

  4. Pattern of respiratory diseases seen among adults in an emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is a paucity of information on utilisation of emergency medical services in Nigeria. This study was conducted to determine the pattern of respiratory diseases seen among adults in an emergency room(ER) and their mortality within twenty- four hours in a health facility in Nigeria. Methods: We carried out a ...

  5. Enteric Duplication Cyst Containing Squamous and Respiratory Epithelium: An Interesting Case of a Typically Pediatric Entity Presenting in an Adult Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Leigh Baumann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enteric duplication cysts are rare congenital malformations that can occur at any point along the digestive tract, most commonly the small bowel. They are characterized by the presence of an outer layer of smooth muscle and an inner lining of mucosa that may resemble any portion of the digestive tract. Less commonly, cases have been reported that also contain mucosal components of nonintestinal origin. This entity is typically diagnosed in young children, but occasionally presents in adolescence and young adulthood. We present a rare case of a 21-year-old male who presented with nonspecific symptoms of abdominal discomfort and weight loss and was later found to have a 9 cm nonenhancing mass in the distal ileum on CT imaging. Laparoscopic dissection of the mass revealed a cystic lesion lined mainly by pseudostratified ciliated columnar respiratory-type epithelium, with patchy areas of squamous epithelium as well as villous columnar epithelium resembling small bowel. The unique histology and advanced patient age make this case a unique presentation of what is already a rare pathological entity.

  6. The histogenic origin of melanoma arising in respiratory epithelium of a teratomatous germ cell tumor of the mediastinum: an enigma unraveled from an unlikely source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, Patricia; Quigley, Brian; Mendoza, Tania; Hakam, Ardeshir; Khalil, Farah; Fishman, Mayer; Altiok, Soner

    2012-01-01

    Mixed germ cell tumors are rare neoplasms that are known to occur in the anterior mediastinum. Characterized by two or more types of germ cell components, these tumors comprise upwards of 25% of mediastinal germ cell tumors. Even rarer are those harboring somatic-type malignancies such as carcinoma, sarcoma, and hematopoietic malignancies. To date, however, there are no known cases of melanoma arising in a malignant mixed germ cell tumor of the anterior mediastinum. We describe the first case of malignant melanoma with spindle and epithelioid components arising from respiratory epithelium in a mediastinal malignant mixed germ cell tumor of a 32-year-old male. In addition, we also provide evidence supporting the theory of neuroendocrine cells as the origin of melanoma arising in the respiratory epithelium. This case emphasizes the need to carefully evaluate all germ cell tumors, not only for a myriad of benign embryological components, but also for malignancies arising in these components, as they might change the prognosis and patient's course of treatment. This microscopic approach should bring to light the diversity of mixed germ cell tumors in addition to somatic malignancies with corresponding biologic potentials.

  7. Cardiac and respiratory patterns synchronize between persons during choir singing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Müller

    Full Text Available Dyadic and collective activities requiring temporally coordinated action are likely to be associated with cardiac and respiratory patterns that synchronize within and between people. However, the extent and functional significance of cardiac and respiratory between-person couplings have not been investigated thus far. Here, we report interpersonal oscillatory couplings among eleven singers and one conductor engaged in choir singing. We find that: (a phase synchronization both in respiration and heart rate variability increase significantly during singing relative to a rest condition; (b phase synchronization is higher when singing in unison than when singing pieces with multiple voice parts; (c directed coupling measures are consistent with the presence of causal effects of the conductor on the singers at high modulation frequencies; (d the different voices of the choir are reflected in network analyses of cardiac and respiratory activity based on graph theory. Our results suggest that oscillatory coupling of cardiac and respiratory patterns provide a physiological basis for interpersonal action coordination.

  8. Respiratory Pattern Variability Analysis Based on Nonlinear Prediction Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    weaning trials from mechanical ventilation have been studied at two different PSV levels. High statistically significant differences have been obtained...ACQUISITION A group of 12 patients on weaning trials from mechanical ventilation has been studied in the Department of Intensive Care Medicine at Santa Creu i...study the respiratory pattern variability at different levels of pressure support ventilation (PSV) has been analyzed using nonlinear prediction

  9. [Respiratory work and pattern with different proportional assist ventilation levels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Ferrón, Francisco; Machado, Juan; Morante, Antonia; Galindo, Silvia; Castillo, Ana; Rucabado, Luis

    2009-01-01

    To study the minimum assistance level during proportional assist ventilation (PAV) to decrease the work of breathing to physiological limits (0.6 j/l) and the relationship between breathing pattern changes and respiratory effort at different PAV levels. Prospective cohort study. Polyvalent intensive care unit of a teaching hospital of Jaen, Spain. Twelve long-term mechanical ventilated patients who met criteria to initiate weaning from the ventilator. We used the Puritan-Bennett 840 ventilator in proportional assist ventilation. The percentage of support was randomly modified between 5% and 80%, in intervals of 10%. Prior to the change in the PAV level, the patients were ventilated in assist-volume control followed by pressure support ventilation. Before PAV, we measured the respiratory mechanics and the breathing pattern and work of breathing during this mode. The decrease in respiratory assist in PAV was related to significantly higher work of breathing, this going from 0.2+/-0,07 (0.1-0.3) j/l with PAV80 to 0.9+/-0.2 (0.4-1.5) j/l with PAV5 (p=0.002). The coefficient correlation between PAV level and work of breathing (measured as j/l and j/min) was r=-0.8 and -0.6, respectively. Minimum PAV level related with physiological work of breathing was 30% (0.63+/-0.13 j/l). Except for the tidal volume that increased significantly (PAV80 vs PAV5=0.4+/-0.1 vs 0.3+/-0.1; p=0.02), the remaining variables defining the breathing pattern did not changed with the increase in PAV. In the group of patients studied, the increase in the PAV levels decreases work of breathing, without significantly changing the breathing pattern. Levels lower than 30% of PAV are associated to excessive work of breathing.

  10. Expression pattern of odontogenic ameloblast-associated and amelotin during formation and regeneration of the junctional epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Clarice; Wazen, Rima; Kuroda, Shingo; Moffatt, Pierre; Nanci, Antonio

    2010-12-10

    The junctional epithelium (JE) adheres to the tooth surface, and seals off periodontal tissues from the oral environment. This incompletely differentiated epithelium is formed initially by the fusion of the reduced enamel organ with the oral epithelium (OE). Two proteins, odontogenic ameloblast-associated (ODAM) and amelotin (AMTN), have been identified in the JE. The objective of this study was to evaluate their expression pattern during formation and regeneration of the JE. Cytokeratin 14 was used as a differentiation marker for oral epithelial cells, and Ki67 for cell proliferation. Immunohistochemistry was carried out on erupting rat molars, and in regenerating JE following gingivectomy. In the reducing enamel organ and in established JE, ODAM and AMTN were present at the cell-tooth interface while only ODAM and CK14 were found throughout the JE. Both were also conspicuously present in cell clusters situated between the erupting tooth and OE. During JE regeneration, ODAM was detected first at the leading wound edge and then in the regenerating JE. Some cell clusters in the subjacent connective tissue were also positive for ODAM. AMTN appeared later and both AMTN and ODAM accumulated at the interface with the tooth. Cytokeratin 14 gradually appeared in the regenerating JE but the cell clusters showed variable labeling. Cells associated with JE formation and regeneration exhibited higher division activity than adjacent epithelial cells. These findings suggest that ODAM and AMTN have a role at the cell-tooth interface, and that ODAM is likely also implicated in cellular events during formation and regeneration of the JE.

  11. The impact of topically applied preservation solutions on the respiratory epithelium of tracheal grafts submitted to cold ischemia: functional and morphological analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Eugênio de Azevedo-Pereira

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Advances in graft reepithelialization and revascularization have renewed interest in airway transplantation. This study aims to determine whether topically applied preservation solutions can ameliorate ischemic injury to tracheal grafts. We analyzed 1 the effects of cold ischemia on the mucociliary clearance of tracheal grafts and 2 the impact of topically applied preservation solutions on the effects of cold ischemia on mucociliary clearance. METHOD: Tracheal segments (n=217 from 109 male Wistar rats were harvested, submerged in low-potassium-dextran-glucose, histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate, or saline solution (saline group, and stored at 4°C for 6, 10, 16, or 24 hours. A control group (not submerged was analyzed immediately after harvesting. In situ mucociliary transport and ciliary beating frequency were measured using a stroboscope. Epithelial integrity, cellular infiltration, and mucus storage were quantified by light microscopy and image analysis software, along with transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: 1 The effects of cold ischemia: in situ mucociliary transport and ciliary beating frequency were greater in the control group than after cold ischemia. Microscopic analysis results were similar between groups. 2 The effects of preservation solutions: there was no difference between the low-potassium-dextran-glucose, histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate, and saline groups in functional or light microscopy analysis. The saline group presented stronger signs of ischemic injury with transmission electron microscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Cold ischemia diminished the mucociliary clearance of the tracheal respiratory epithelium. Topically applied preservation solutions did not ameliorate the injury caused by cold ischemia to the tracheal respiratory epithelium.

  12. Architectural organization of filiform papillae in normal and black hairy tongue epithelium: dissection of differentiation pathways in a complex human epithelium according to their patterns of keratin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, M; Lim, H W; Winzer, M; Loomis, C A

    1999-02-01

    An inadequate understanding of the complex morphologic characteristics of human filiform papillae has hampered the histopathological characterization of disorders affecting tongue keratinization. To better define the 3-dimensional cytoarchitecture of tongue epithelium, we performed detailed immunohistochemical analyses of normal and black hairy tongue tissues using a panel of antikeratin antibodies. The dome-shaped base of the human filiform papilla (primary papilla) is surmounted by 3 to 8 elongated structures (secondary papillae). These secondary papillae are composed of a central column of epithelial cells expressing hair-type keratins and an outer rim of cells expressing skin-type keratins. The epithelium overlying the primary papillae and between the individual primary papillae express esophageal-type keratins. In black hairy tongue disease, there is a marked retention of secondary papillary cells expressing hair-type keratins. Using a panel of antikeratin probes, we define the precise topographical localization of cell populations undergoing 3 distinct differentiation programs in dorsal tongue epithelium. Comparative analyses of black hairy tongue specimens indicate that defective desquamation of the cells in the central column of filiform papillae results in the formation of highly elongated, cornified spines or, "hairs"--the hallmark of this disease.

  13. Ammonium sulphate induced stress related alterations in the respiratory epithelium of the airbreathing organ of the catfish Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paul, V.I.; Banerjee, T.K.

    In this paper, histopathological changes in the inner lining of the accessory respiratory organ of Heteropneustes fossilis following exposure to sublethal concentration (0.2 gl sup(-1)) of ammonium sulphate (3 mg l sup(-1) total ammonia-N) has been...

  14. Visual and Quantitative Analysis Methods of Respiratory Patterns for Respiratory Gated PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Hye Joo; Jeong, Young Jin; Yoon, Hyun Jin; Park, Jong-Hwan; Kang, Do-Young

    2016-01-01

    We integrated visual and quantitative methods for analyzing the stability of respiration using four methods: phase space diagrams, Fourier spectra, Poincaré maps, and Lyapunov exponents. Respiratory patterns of 139 patients were grouped based on the combination of the regularity of amplitude, period, and baseline positions. Visual grading was done by inspecting the shape of diagram and classified into two states: regular and irregular. Quantitation was done by measuring standard deviation of x and v coordinates of Poincaré map (SD x , SD v ) or the height of the fundamental peak ( A 1 ) in Fourier spectrum or calculating the difference between maximal upward and downward drift. Each group showed characteristic pattern on visual analysis. There was difference of quantitative parameters (SD x , SD v , A 1 , and MUD-MDD) among four groups (one way ANOVA, p = 0.0001 for MUD-MDD, SD x , and SD v , p = 0.0002 for A 1 ). In ROC analysis, the cutoff values were 0.11 for SD x (AUC: 0.982, p quantitative indices of respiratory stability and determining quantitative cutoff value for differentiating regular and irregular respiration.

  15. Monitoring and Analysis of Respiratory Patterns Using Microwave Doppler Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathirana, Pubudu N.; Steinfort, Christopher Louis; Caelli, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Noncontact detection characteristic of Doppler radar provides an unobtrusive means of respiration detection and monitoring. This avoids additional preparations, such as physical sensor attachment or special clothing, which can be useful for certain healthcare applications. Furthermore, robustness of Doppler radar against environmental factors, such as light, ambient temperature, interference from other signals occupying the same bandwidth, fading effects, reduce environmental constraints and strengthens the possibility of employing Doppler radar in long-term respiration detection, and monitoring applications such as sleep studies. This paper presents an evaluation in the of use of microwave Doppler radar for capturing different dynamics of breathing patterns in addition to the respiration rate. Although finding the respiration rate is essential, identifying abnormal breathing patterns in real-time could be used to gain further insights into respiratory disorders and refine diagnostic procedures. Several known breathing disorders were professionally role played and captured in a real-time laboratory environment using a noncontact Doppler radar to evaluate the feasibility of this noncontact form of measurement in capturing breathing patterns under different conditions associated with certain breathing disorders. In addition to that, inhalation and exhalation flow patterns under different breathing scenarios were investigated to further support the feasibility of Doppler radar to accurately estimate the tidal volume. The results obtained for both experiments were compared with the gold standard measurement schemes, such as respiration belt and spirometry readings, yielding significant correlations with the Doppler radar-based information. In summary, Doppler radar is highlighted as an alternative approach not only for determining respiration rates, but also for identifying breathing patterns and tidal volumes as a preferred nonwearable alternative to the conventional

  16. VIRAL PATTERN OF RESPIRATORY DISEASES AMONG PILGRIMS OF HAJJ, SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Jafar Panahi, Sajjad Panahi, Arezoo Sabbagh Hadi, Mohamad Reza Havasian*

    2017-01-01

    The respiratory system infections have been one of the biggest problems for the pilgrims and the medical organizations of hajj in the recent years. Viral agents play an important role in these diseases; more than 200 viral agents can cause infection in the respiratory system. This research aimed to study of viral pattern of respiratory diseases among pilgrims of hajj- Mecca. A comprehensive review of all studies conducted on respiratory diseases among Hajj pilgrims from 2000 to 2017 was carri...

  17. Deglutition and respiratory patterns during sleep in the aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kiminori; Chitose, Shun-Ichi; Sato, Kiminobu; Umeno, Hirohito

    2016-12-01

    Deglutition was extremely infrequent and displayed unique patterns during sleep in the aged. The deglutition and respiratory phase patterns during sleep in the healthy aged were investigated in this study. Ten aged adults (average age = 71 years) were examined via time-matched digital recordings of polysomnography and surface electromyography of the muscles (thyrohyoid and suprahyoid muscles) related to swallowing. During sleep, swallowing was extremely infrequent and absent for long periods in the aged. The median number of swallows per hour during total sleep time was 0.6, and the median longest deglutition-free period was 134.8 minutes. Most deglutition occurred in association with spontaneous electroencephalographic arousal both in REM and non-REM sleep. Deglutition was related to the sleep stage. The deeper the sleep stage, the lower the mean deglutition frequency. There was no deglutition during deep sleep. Overall muscle tone is inhibited during REM sleep. However, deglutition also occurred in association with spontaneous EEG arousal. The deeper the sleep stage, the lower the mean arousal frequency, and the lower the mean ratio of arousal with deglutition to arousal. Approximately one-third of swallows occurred after inspiration and were followed by inspiration.

  18. Deglutition and respiratory patterns during sleep in younger adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kiminori; Umeno, Hirohito; Chitose, Shun-Ichi; Nakashima, Tadashi

    2011-02-01

    Deglutition was infrequent and displayed unique patterns during sleep in healthy younger adults. The deglutition, electroencephalographic arousal, and respiratory phase patterns during sleep in younger adults were investigated. Ten younger adults were examined via time-matched recordings of polysomnography and surface electromyography. During sleep, swallowing was infrequent and absent for long periods. The mean number of swallows per hour during the total sleep time was 2.4 ± 1.0. The mean longest deglutition-free period was 68.8 ± 24.8 min. Most deglutition occurred in association with spontaneous electroencephalographic arousal. Deglutition was related to the sleep stage. The mean number of swallows per hour was 11.2 ± 8.1 during stage 1 sleep, 1.9 ± 1.0 during stage 2 sleep, 0.5 ± 1.5 during stage 3 sleep, and 0.2 ± 0.5 during stage 4 sleep. The deeper the sleep stage, the lower the mean deglutition frequency. The mean number of swallows per hour was 1.9 ± 1.7 during rapid eye movement sleep. The deeper the sleep stage, the lower the mean arousal frequency and the lower the mean ratio of arousal with deglutition to arousal. Approximately 60% of swallows were followed by arrested breathing and approximately 25% by expiration.

  19. Firing patterns of muscle vasoconstrictor neurones in respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan G Macefield

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Because the cardiovascular system and respiration are so intimately coupled, disturbances in respiratory control often lead to disturbances in cardiovascular control. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD and Bronchiectasis (BE are all associated with a greatly elevated muscle vasoconstrictor drive (muscle sympathetic nerve activity; MSNA. Indeed, the increase in MSNA is comparable to that seen in congestive heart failure (CHF, in which the increase in MSNA compensates for the reduced cardiac output and thereby assists in maintaining blood pressure. However, in OSA – but not COPD or BE – the increase in MSNA can lead to hypertension. Here, the features of the sympathoexcitation in OSA, COPD and BE are reviewed in terms of the firing properties of post-ganglionic muscle vasoconstrictor neurones. Compared to healthy subjects with low levels of resting MSNA, single-unit recordings revealed that the augmented MSNA seen in OSA, BE, COPD and CHF were each associated with an increase in firing probability and mean firing rates of individual neurones. However, unlike patients with heart failure, all patients with respiratory disease exhibited an increase in multiple within-burst firing which, it is argued, reflects an increase in central sympathetic drive. Similar patterns to those seen in OSA, COPD and BE were seen in healthy subjects during an acute increase in muscle vasoconstrictor drive. These observations emphasise the differences by which the sympathetic nervous system grades its output in health and disease, with an increase in firing probability of active neurones and recruitment of additional neurones being the dominant mechanisms.

  20. Prognosis in Acute Cerebrovascular Accidents in Relation to Respiratory Pattern and Blood—gas Tensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, M. W.; Lane, D. J.; Wollner, L.

    1971-01-01

    Respiratory pattern and arterial blood gas tensions were assessed in patients with acute cerebrovascular accidents. Hyperventilation, low Pco2, and high arterial pH were associated with a poor prognosis, whereas patients with normal respiratory pattern and blood gas tensions survived. Periodic and Cheyne-Stokes breathing carried an intermediate prognosis. PMID:5091916

  1. Vitamin D receptor agonists inhibit pro-inflammatory cytokine production from the respiratory epithelium in cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNally, P

    2011-07-22

    BACKGROUND: 1,25-Dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) has been shown to mitigate epithelial inflammatory responses after antigen exposure. Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at particular risk for vitamin D deficiency. This may contribute to the exaggerated inflammatory response to pulmonary infection in CF. METHODS: CF respiratory epithelial cell lines were exposed to Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Pseudomonas conditioned medium (PCM) in the presence or absence of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) or a range of vitamin D receptor (VDR) agonists. Levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were measured in cell supernatants, and cellular total and phosphorylated IκBα were determined. Levels of human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (hCAP18) mRNA and protein were measured in cells after treatment with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3). RESULTS: Pretreatment with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) was associated with significant reductions in IL-6 and IL-8 protein secretion after antigen exposure, a finding reproduced with a range of low calcaemic VDR agonists. 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) treatment led to a decrease in IκBα phosphorylation and increased total cellular IκBα. Treatment with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) was associated with an increase in hCAP18\\/LL-37 mRNA and protein levels. CONCLUSIONS: Both 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and other VDR agonists significantly reduce the pro-inflammatory response to antigen challenge in CF airway epithelial cells. VDR agonists have significant therapeutic potential in CF.

  2. In-silico insights on the prognostic potential of immune cell infiltration patterns in the breast lobular epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, J. C. L.; Schaadt, N. S.; Schönmeyer, R.; Brieu, N.; Forestier, G.; Wemmert, C.; Feuerhake, F.; Hatzikirou, H.

    2016-09-01

    Scattered inflammatory cells are commonly observed in mammary gland tissue, most likely in response to normal cell turnover by proliferation and apoptosis, or as part of immunosurveillance. In contrast, lymphocytic lobulitis (LLO) is a recurrent inflammation pattern, characterized by lymphoid cells infiltrating lobular structures, that has been associated with increased familial breast cancer risk and immune responses to clinically manifest cancer. The mechanisms and pathogenic implications related to the inflammatory microenvironment in breast tissue are still poorly understood. Currently, the definition of inflammation is mainly descriptive, not allowing a clear distinction of LLO from physiological immunological responses and its role in oncogenesis remains unclear. To gain insights into the prognostic potential of inflammation, we developed an agent-based model of immune and epithelial cell interactions in breast lobular epithelium. Physiological parameters were calibrated from breast tissue samples of women who underwent reduction mammoplasty due to orthopedic or cosmetic reasons. The model allowed to investigate the impact of menstrual cycle length and hormone status on inflammatory responses to cell turnover in the breast tissue. Our findings suggested that the immunological context, defined by the immune cell density, functional orientation and spatial distribution, contains prognostic information previously not captured by conventional diagnostic approaches.

  3. Analysis of toxicity produced by inhalation of trichloroethylene within rat and mice`s respiratory epithelium; Comparazione del danno indotto dall`inalazione di tricloroetilene nell`epitelio nasale e tracheobronchiale del ratto e del topo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancuso, M.T.; Fravolini, M.E.; Parasacchi, P.; Lombardi, C.C.; Giovanetti, A. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Area Energia Ambiente e Salute

    1994-05-01

    The aim of this study was to define the sites of cytotoxicity within the respiratory tract (nasal cavity and tracheobronchial tree) after acute inhalation of trichloroethylene (TCE), an organic solvent requiring metabolic activation by cytochrome P-450 enzymatic system to exert its toxic effects. Two animals species, rats and mice, were exposed to 3500 and 7000 ppm of TCE for 30 minutes. The morphological analysis of the respiratory epithelium has underlined a species-specific difference in the cellular sensitivity after treatment with TCE. This work is a part of ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment) INTO program, environmental department, sector of effects on man and ecosystem.

  4. Comparison of realistic and idealized breathing patterns in computational models of airflow and vapor dosimetry in the rodent upper respiratory tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colby, Sean M.; Kabilan, Senthil; Jacob, Richard E.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-03-17

    Abstract Context: Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of airflows coupled with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling of respiratory tissue doses of airborne materials have traditionally used either steady-state inhalation or a sinusoidal approximation of the breathing cycle for airflow simulations despite their differences from normal breathing patterns. Objective: Evaluate the impact of realistic breathing patterns, including sniffing, on predicted nasal tissue concentrations of a reactive vapor that targets the nose in rats as a case study. Materials and methods: Whole-body plethysmography measurements from a free-breathing rat were used to produce profiles of normal breathing, sniffing and combinations of both as flow inputs to CFD/PBPK simulations of acetaldehyde exposure. Results: For the normal measured ventilation profile, modest reductions in time- and tissue depth-dependent areas under the curve (AUC) acetaldehyde concentrations were predicted in the wet squamous, respiratory and transitional epithelium along the main airflow path, while corresponding increases were predicted in the olfactory epithelium, especially the most distal regions of the ethmoid turbinates, versus the idealized profile. The higher amplitude/frequency sniffing profile produced greater AUC increases over the idealized profile in the olfactory epithelium, especially in the posterior region. Conclusions: The differences in tissue AUCs at known lesion-forming regions for acetaldehyde between normal and idealized profiles were minimal, suggesting that sinusoidal profiles may be used for this chemical and exposure concentration. However, depending upon the chemical, exposure system and concentration and the time spent sniffing, the use of realistic breathing profiles, including sniffing, could become an important modulator for local tissue dose predictions.

  5. Respiratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The words "respiratory" and "respiration" refer to the lungs and breathing. ... Boron WF. Organization of the respiratory system. In: Boron WF, Boulpaep EL, eds. Medical Physiology . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 26.

  6. Respiratory Symptoms and Lung Function Patterns in Workers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: 'Mai suya' is a common job in the most northern Nigeria in which there is significant exposures to wood smoke and oil fumes. The respiratory impact of these dual exposures on workers engaged in this work has not been previously documented, hence this study was carried out. Aim: The aim is to study the ...

  7. Pattern of Presentation and Risk Factors of Acute Respiratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    70% of the subjects were between 3 and 5 years old. The prevalence of Acute Respiratory Infection was 52.9% with peak prevalence in the age range 4 to 5 years. Cough was present in 61.1% of the subjects while coryza was the most frequent symptom with a prevalence of 95%. The risk factors identified included contract ...

  8. Respiratory Symptoms and Lung Function Patterns in Workers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of harmful effects. Wood smoke and cooking oil fumes is a complex mixture of substances.[1] Both contains toxic products as well as carcinogens such as aldehydes, alkanoic, polycyclic aromatic ... Respiratory functions workers exposed to cooking oil Nigeria ..... not accounted for by smoking cigarette and previous history.

  9. Spatial organization and state-dependent mechanisms for respiratory rhythm and pattern generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybak, Ilya A.; Abdala, Ana P.L.; Markin, Sergey N.; Paton, Julian F.R.; Smith, Jeffrey C.

    2008-01-01

    The brainstem respiratory network can operate in multiple functional states engaging different state-dependent neural mechanisms. These mechanisms were studied in the in situ perfused rat brainstem–spinal cord preparation using sequential brainstem transections and administration of riluzole, a pharmacological blocker of persistent sodium current (INaP). Dramatic transformations in the rhythmogenic mechanisms and respiratory motor pattern were observed after removal of the pons and subsequent medullary transactions down to the rostral end of pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC). A computational model of the brainstem respiratory network was developed to reproduce and explain these experimental findings. The model incorporates several interacting neuronal compartments, including the ventral respiratory group (VRG), pre-BötC, Bötzinger complex (BötC), and pons. Simulations mimicking the removal of circuit components following transections closely reproduce the respiratory motor output patterns recorded from the intact and sequentially reduced brainstem preparations. The model suggests that both the operating rhythmogenic mechanism (i.e., network-based or pacemaker-driven) and the respiratory pattern generated (e.g., three-phase, two-phase, or one-phase) depend on the state of the pre-BötC (expression of INaP-dependent intrinsic rhythmogenic mechanisms) and the BötC (providing expiratory inhibition in the network). At the same time, tonic drives from pons and multiple medullary chemoreceptive sites appear to control the state of these compartments and hence the operating rhythmogenic mechanism and motor pattern. Our results suggest that the brainstem respiratory network has a spatial (rostral-to-caudal) organization extending from the rostral pons to the VRG, in which each functional compartment is controlled by more rostral compartments. The model predicts a continuum of respiratory network states relying on different contributions of intrinsic cellular

  10. Evaluation of breathing pattern: comparison of a Manual Assessment of Respiratory Motion (MARM) and respiratory induction plethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Rosalba; van Dixhoorn, Jan; Cohen, Marc

    2008-06-01

    Altered breathing pattern is an aspect of dysfunctional breathing but few standardised techniques exist to evaluate it. This study investigates a technique for evaluating and quantifying breathing pattern, called the Manual Assessment of Respiratory Motion (MARM) and compares it to measures performed with Respiratory Induction Plethysmography (RIP). About 12 subjects altered their breathing and posture while 2 examiners assessed their breathing using the MARM. Simultaneous measurements with RIP were taken. Inter-examiner agreement and agreement between MARM and RIP were assessed. The ability of the measurement methods to differentiate between diverse breathing and postural patterns was compared. High levels of agreement between examiners were found with the MARM for measures of the upper rib cage relative to lower rib cage/abdomen motion during breathing but not for measures of volume. The measures of upper rib cage dominance during breathing correlated with similar measures obtained from RIP. Both RIP and MARM measures methods were able to differentiate between abdominal and thoracic breathing patterns, but only MARM was able to differentiate between breathing changes occurring as result of slumped versus erect sitting posture. This study suggests that the MARM is a reliable clinical tool for assessing breathing pattern.

  11. Respiratory pattern of diaphragmatic breathing and pilates breathing in COPD subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina M. Cancelliero-Gaiad

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diaphragmatic breathing (DB is widely used in pulmonary rehabilitation (PR of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, however it has been little studied in the scientific literature. The Pilates breathing (PB method has also been used in the rehabilitation area and has been little studied in the scientific literature and in COPD. OBJECTIVES: To compare ventilatory parameters during DB and PB in COPD patients and healthy adults. METHOD: Fifteen COPD patients (COPD group and fifteen healthy patients (healthy group performed three types of respiration: natural breathing (NB, DB, and PB, with the respiratory pattern being analyzed by respiratory inductive plethysmography. The parameters of time, volume, and thoracoabdominal coordination were evaluated. After the Shapiro-Wilk normality test, ANOVA was applied followed by Tukey's test (intragroup analysis and Student's t-test (intergroup analysis; p<0.05. RESULTS: DB promoted increase in respiratory volumes, times, and SpO2 as well as decrease in respiratory rate in both groups. PB increased respiratory volumes in healthy group, with no additional benefits of respiratory pattern in the COPD group. With respect to thoracoabdominal coordination, both groups presented higher asynchrony during DB, with a greater increase in the healthy group. CONCLUSIONS: DB showed positive effects such as increase in lung volumes, respiratory motion, and SpO2 and reduction in respiratory rate. Although there were no changes in volume and time measurements during PB in COPD, this breathing pattern increased volumes in the healthy subjects and increased oxygenation in both groups. In this context, the acute benefits of DB are emphasized as a supporting treatment in respiratory rehabilitation programs.

  12. Electronic fetal monitoring patterns associated with respiratory morbidity in term neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lucy; Tuuli, Methodius G; Roehl, Kimberly A; Odibo, Anthony O; Macones, George A; Cahill, Alison G

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify electronic fetal monitoring patterns that are associated with neonatal respiratory morbidity. In an on-going prospective cohort study of >8000 consecutive term, vertex, nonanomalous singleton pregnancies during labor, we performed this analysis within the first 5000 women as a representative sample. Electronic fetal monitoring patterns in the 30 minutes preceding delivery were extracted by trained obstetrics research nurses, who were blinded to clinical data, using the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development system; the data were compared between those with respiratory morbidity and healthy infants (no morbidities). The primary outcome was neonatal respiratory morbidity, which was defined as either oxygen requirement at ≥6 hours of life or any mechanical ventilation in the first 24 hours. Multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust for confounders. Of 4736 neonates, 175 (3.4%) experienced respiratory morbidity. Most electronic fetal monitoring patterns were category II (96.6%; n = 4575). Baseline tachycardia (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9-4.4), marked variability (aOR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.5-5.0), and prolonged decelerations (aOR,2.7; 95% CI, 1.5-5.0) were significantly associated with an increased likelihood of term neonatal respiratory morbidity. Accelerations and persistent moderate variability were both significantly associated with a decreased likelihood of respiratory morbidity. Specific features of category II electronic fetal monitoring patterns make respiratory morbidity more likely in nonanomalous term infants. Tachycardia, marked variability, or prolonged decelerations before delivery can assist providers in anticipating the potential need for neonatal respiratory support. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sport-specific influences on respiratory patterns in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmic, Tijana; Lazovic, Biljana; Djelic, Marina; Lazic, Jelena Suzic; Zikic, Dejan; Zugic, Vladimir; Dekleva, Milica; Mazic, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    To examine differences in lung function among sports that are of a similar nature and to determine which anthropometric/demographic characteristics correlate with lung volumes and flows. This was a cross-sectional study involving elite male athletes (N = 150; mean age, 21  4 years) engaging in one of four different sports, classified according to the type and intensity of exercise involved. All athletes underwent full anthropometric assessment and pulmonary function testing (spirometry). Across all age groups and sport types, the elite athletes showed spirometric values that were significantly higher than the reference values. We found that the values for FVC, FEV1, vital capacity, and maximal voluntary ventilation were higher in water polo players than in players of the other sports evaluated (p type of sport played has a significant impact on the physiological adaptation of the respiratory system. That knowledge is particularly important when athletes present with respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea, cough, and wheezing. Because sports medicine physicians use predicted (reference) values for spirometric parameters, the risk that the severity of restrictive disease or airway obstruction will be underestimated might be greater for athletes.

  14. Sport-specific influences on respiratory patterns in elite athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijana Durmic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To examine differences in lung function among sports that are of a similar nature and to determine which anthropometric/demographic characteristics correlate with lung volumes and flows. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving elite male athletes (N = 150; mean age, 21 4 years engaging in one of four different sports, classified according to the type and intensity of exercise involved. All athletes underwent full anthropometric assessment and pulmonary function testing (spirometry. RESULTS: Across all age groups and sport types, the elite athletes showed spirometric values that were significantly higher than the reference values. We found that the values for FVC, FEV1, vital capacity, and maximal voluntary ventilation were higher in water polo players than in players of the other sports evaluated (p < 0.001. In addition, PEF was significantly higher in basketball players than in handball players (p < 0.001. Most anthropometric/demographic parameters correlated significantly with the spirometric parameters evaluated. We found that BMI correlated positively with all of the spirometric parameters evaluated (p < 0.001, the strongest of those correlations being between BMI and maximal voluntary ventilation (r = 0.46; p < 0.001. Conversely, the percentage of body fat correlated negatively with all of the spirometric parameters evaluated, correlating most significantly with FEV1 (r = −0.386; p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the type of sport played has a significant impact on the physiological adaptation of the respiratory system. That knowledge is particularly important when athletes present with respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea, cough, and wheezing. Because sports medicine physicians use predicted (reference values for spirometric parameters, the risk that the severity of restrictive disease or airway obstruction will be underestimated might be greater for athletes.

  15. Dietary patterns are associated with lung function among Spanish smokers without respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorli-Aguilar, Mar; Martin-Lujan, Francisco; Flores-Mateo, Gemma; Arija-Val, Victoria; Basora-Gallisa, Josep; Sola-Alberich, Rosa

    2016-11-25

    Diet can help preserve lung function in smokers, in addition to avoidance of smoking. The study aimed to evaluate associations between dietary patterns and lung function in smokers without respiratory disease. This cross-sectional study analysed baseline data from randomised representative smokers without respiratory disease (n = 207, aged 35-70 years), selected from 20 primary health-care centres. Participants completed a validated semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Dietary patterns were identified by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Impaired lung function was defined as FVC function was associated with the Alcohol-consumption pattern (OR 4.56, 95% CI 1.58-13.18), especially in women (OR 11.47, 95% CI 2.25-58.47), and with the Westernised pattern in women (OR 5.62, 95% CI 1.17-27.02), whereas it not was associated with the Mediterranean-like pattern (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.28-1.79). In smokers without respiratory disease, the Alcohol-consumption pattern and the Westernised pattern are associated with impaired lung function, especially in women. The Mediterranean-like pattern appears to be associated with preserved lung function because no statistical association is observed with impaired lung function. In addition to smoking cessation, modifying dietary patterns has possible clinical application to preserve lung function.

  16. Emotions and respiratory patterns. Review and critical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boiten, F.A.; Frijda, N.H.; Wientjes, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the effects of (induced) emotions on breathing patterns in normal individuals. After the early years of experimental psychology, attention to this relationship has been sparse, presumably due to difficulties in adequate measurement of respiration. The available data suggest

  17. Pattern of Respiratory Deterioration in Sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis According to Onset Lesion by Using Respiratory Function Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Gun; Hong, Yoon-Ho; Shin, Je-Young; Lee, Kwang-Woo; Park, Kyung Seok; Seong, Seung-Yong; Sung, Jung-Joon

    2015-12-01

    Most amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients show focal onset of upper and lower motor neuron signs and spread of symptoms to other regions or the other side clinically. Progression patterns of sporadic ALS are unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pattern of respiratory deterioration in sporadic ALS according to the onset site by using respiratory function tests. Study participants included 63 (42 cervical-onset [C-ALS] and 21 lumbosacral-onset [L-ALS]) ALS patients and 31 healthy controls. We compared respiratory function test parameters among the 3 groups. Age was 57.4±9.6 (mean±SD), 60.8±9, and 60.5±7 years, and there were 28, 15, and 20 male participants, in the C-ALS, L-ALS, and control groups, respectively. Disease duration did not differ between C-ALS and L-ALS patients. Sniff nasal inspiratory pressure (SNIP) was significantly low in C-ALS patients compared with controls. Maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) and forced vital capacity percent predicted (FVC% predicted) were significantly low in C-ALS and L-ALS patients compared with controls. Maximal inspiratory pressure to maximal expiratory pressure (MIP:MEP) ratio did not differ among the 3 groups. Eighteen C-ALS and 5 L-ALS patients were followed up. ΔMIP, ΔMEP, ΔSNIP, ΔPEF, and ΔFVC% predicted were higher in C-ALS than L-ALS patients without statistical significance. Fourteen C-ALS (77.8%) and 3 L-ALS (60%) patients showed a constant MIP:MEP ratio above or below 1 from the first to the last evaluation. Our results suggest that vulnerability of motor neurons in sporadic ALS might follow a topographic gradient.

  18. A semi-Markov chain approach to modeling respiratory patterns prior to extubation in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, Charles C; Kanbar, Lara J; Shalish, Wissam; Brown, Karen A; Sant'Anna, Guilherme M; Kearney, Robert E; Precup, Doina

    2017-07-01

    After birth, extremely preterm infants often require specialized respiratory management in the form of invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). Protracted IMV is associated with detrimental outcomes and morbidities. Premature extubation, on the other hand, would necessitate reintubation which is risky, technically challenging and could further lead to lung injury or disease. We present an approach to modeling respiratory patterns of infants who succeeded extubation and those who required reintubation which relies on Markov models. We compare the use of traditional Markov chains to semi-Markov models which emphasize cross-pattern transitions and timing information, and to multi-chain Markov models which can concisely represent non-stationarity in respiratory behavior over time. The models we developed expose specific, unique similarities as well as vital differences between the two populations.

  19. Characteristics of respiratory pattern and anxiety in rhythmic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akai, Lena; Ishizaki, Sakuko; Matsuoka, Masao; Homma, Ikuo

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore characteristics of breathing pattern and anxiety levels of athletes involved in women's rhythmic gymnastics. We tested 13 college level female rhythmic gymnasts (GG) from the same team, and compared their results with those of 26 non-athlete medical students (RG). Subjects were tested by a CO(2) rebreathing method using a gas mixture of 5% CO(2) and 95% O(2). The trait and state anxiety levels of the subjects were tested using the Spielberger's trait and state anxiety inventory (STAI). GG was significantly higher in both trait and state anxiety levels and, in comparison with RG, they also exhibited significantly less variance in the % contribution of change in frequency to the overall increase in minute ventilation during CO(2) rebreathing when compared to RG. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between both trait and state anxiety and % contribution of frequency change in the RG.

  20. The effects of seating position on the respiratory patterns of preschoolers with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redstone, Fran

    2004-12-01

    This study investigated the respiratory patterns in upright and semi-reclining seating positions in 10 preschoolers with cerebral palsy (CP) and 10 typical children. The duration of inhalation, exhalation, total cycle, subcycles and phase lags were calculated during rest and during imitation of 3-, 7-, and 10-syllable utterances on one breath. The Respitrace was used to gather respiratory data on duration and chest wall usage. Tidal breathing demonstrated a faster rate of breathing in reclining for both groups. A difference between the groups in the use of the regions of the chest wall was also evident with the CP group having longer abdominal cycles than the control group. During speech, the groups differed in duration of respiratory cycle and region initiating movement. The duration of the 3- and 7-syllable tasks were significantly longer for the group with cerebral palsy. Indications of strategies to control the recoil forces of the chest wall for speech are discussed.

  1. Physiological and pathophysiological interactions between the respiratory central pattern generator and the sympathetic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Zoccal, Daniel B; Baekey, David M; Abdala, Ana P L; Machado, Benedito H; Dick, Thomas E; Paton, Julian F R; Rybak, Ilya A

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory modulation seen in the sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) implies that the respiratory and sympathetic networks interact. During hypertension elicited by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), the SNA displays an enhanced respiratory modulation reflecting strengthened interactions between the networks. In this chapter, we review a series of experimental and modeling studies that help elucidate possible mechanisms of sympatho-respiratory coupling. We conclude that this coupling significantly contributes to both the sympathetic baroreflex and the augmented sympathetic activity after exposure to CIH. This conclusion is based on the following findings. (1) Baroreceptor activation results in perturbation of the respiratory pattern via transient activation of postinspiratory neurons in the Bötzinger complex (BötC). The same BötC neurons are involved in the respiratory modulation of SNA, and hence provide an additional pathway for the sympathetic baroreflex. (2) Under hypercapnia, phasic activation of abdominal motor nerves (AbN) is accompanied by synchronous discharges in SNA due to the common source of this rhythmic activity in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN). CIH conditioning increases the CO2 sensitivity of central chemoreceptors in the RTN which results in the emergence of AbN and SNA discharges under normocapnic conditions similar to those observed during hypercapnia in naïve animals. Thus, respiratory-sympathetic interactions play an important role in defining sympathetic output and significantly contribute to the sympathetic activity and hypertension under certain physiological or pathophysiological conditions, and the theoretical framework presented may be instrumental in understanding of malfunctioning control of sympathetic activity in a variety of disease states. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. ATP and astrocytes play a prominent role in the control of the respiratory pattern generator in the lamprey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinelli, Elenia; Iovino, Ludovica; Mutolo, Donatella

    2017-12-01

    The paratrigeminal respiratory group (pTRG) is responsible for the respiratory pattern generation in the lamprey. The role of ATP and astrocytes, known to control respiratory activity in mammals, was investigated in the lamprey respiratory network. ATP microinjected into the pTRG induces a biphasic response consisting of marked increases in respiratory frequency mediated by P2X receptors followed by a decrease in the respiratory motor output due to the ATP metabolite adenosine. We provide evidence that astrocytes are involved in the genesis of the normal respiratory pattern, ATP-induced responses and acidification-induced increases of the respiratory activity. The function of astrocytes in rhythmic networks appears to be phylogenetically conserved. The role of ATP and astrocytes in respiratory rhythm modulation has been recently investigated in neonatal rodents. However, no information on the role of ATP and astrocytes within the respiratory network of the lamprey is available, particularly within the paratrigeminal respiratory group (pTRG), the proposed respiratory central pattern generator. To address these issues, the present study was carried out on isolated brainstems of the adult lamprey. Bath application of ATP caused marked increases in respiratory frequency followed by decreases in the respiratory motor output, mediated by the ATP metabolite adenosine at the level of the pTRG. Bath applications and microinjections of agonists and antagonists of purinergic receptors showed that ATP increased respiratory activity through an action on pTRG P2X receptors. To disclose the respiratory role of astrocytes, we used bath application of the gliotoxin aminoadipic acid, which dramatically depressed the respiratory motor output that, however, promptly recovered following glutamine application. Furthermore, the excitatory responses to ATP-γ-S (a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue), but not to substance P, microinjected into the pTRG, were abolished. Finally, we also

  3. A Device for Respiratory Monitoring during Nutritive Sucking: Response to Neonatal Breathing Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rosi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative monitoring of breathing, sucking, and swallowing is required to predict newborns’ neurodevelopmental outcomes. In particular, the coordination of breathing timing with respect to sucking cycle is crucial. In this work, we present the characterization of a low-cost flowmeter designed for noninvasive recording of breathing pattern during bottle feeding. The transducer is designed to be integrated on a commercial feeding bottle also instrumented with a system for sucking monitoring. The flowmeter consists of two transistors (hot bodies supplied at constant current, which are placed in a duct used to convey the inspiratory and expiratory flow coming from the newborn’s nostrils. The transducer design, its static calibration, and its response time are discussed. Moreover, a custom-made active lung simulator was used to perform a feasibility assessment of the proposed flowmeter for respiratory monitoring of neonatal respiratory patterns. The flowmeter has a discrimination threshold <0.5 L·min−1 and a response time of 347±12 ms. The breathing period estimated by the proposed transducer was compared with the one measured by a high performance flowmeter, used as reference: the mean absolute error was <11%. Results highlighted the ability of the device to track respiratory patterns at frequencies typical of neonatal breathing.

  4. Respiratory Patterns in Students Enrolled in Schools for Disruptive Behaviour before, during, and after "Yoga Nidra" Relaxation

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    Jensen, P. S.; Stevens, P. J.; Kenny, D. T.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of one session of "Yoga Nidra" (relaxation technique) on the breathing patterns/respiratory effort in the thoracic and abdominal chest regions of boys with disruptive behaviour using a Respiratory Inductive Plethysmography (RIP). The participants (n = 7) were aged 10-15 years and attending NSW, Department of…

  5. Respiratory patterns reflect different levels of aggressiveness and emotionality in Wild-type Groningen rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevali, Luca; Nalivaiko, Eugene; Sgoifo, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Respiratory patterns represent a promising physiological index for assessing emotional states in preclinical studies. Since disturbed emotional regulation may lead to forms of excessive aggressiveness, in this study we investigated the hypothesis that rats that differ largely in their level of aggressive behavior display matching alterations in respiration. Respiration was recorded in male high-aggressive (HA, n = 8) and non-aggressive (NA, n = 8) Wild-type Groningen rats using whole-body plethysmography. Subsequently, anxiety-related behaviors were evaluated in the elevated plus maze and social avoidance-approach tests. During respiratory testing, HA rats showed elevated basal respiratory rate, reduced sniffing, exaggerated tachypnoeic response to an acoustic stimulus and a larger incidence of sighs. In addition, HA rats spent less time in the open arms of the plus maze and displayed higher levels of social avoidance behavior compared to NA rats. These findings indicate that HA rats are characterized by alterations in respiratory functioning and behavior that are overall indicative of an anxiety-like phenotype. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Distribution patterns of influenza virus receptors and viral attachment patterns in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of seven avian species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Taiana

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study assessed the presence of sialic acid α-2,3 and α-2,6 linked glycan receptors in seven avian species. The respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, golden pheasant, ostrich, and mallard were tested by means of lectin histochemistry, using the lectins Maackia amurensis agglutinin II and Sambucus nigra agglutinin, which show affinity for α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors, respectively. Additionally, the pattern of virus attachment (PVA was evaluated with virus histochemistry, using an avian-origin H4N5 virus and a human-origin seasonal H1N1 virus. There was a great variation of receptor distribution among the tissues and avian species studied. Both α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors were present in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, and golden pheasant. In ostriches, the expression of the receptor was basically restricted to α-2,3 in both the respiratory and intestinal tracts and in mallards the α-2,6 receptors were absent from the intestinal tract. The results obtained with the lectin histochemistry were, in general, in agreement with the PVA. The differential expression and distribution of α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors among various avian species might reflect a potentially decisive factor in the emergence of new viral strains.

  7. Expression of an X-family DNA polymerase, pol lambda, in the respiratory epithelium of non-small cell lung cancer patients with habitual smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Taro; Kometani, Takurou; Shoji, Fumihiro; Yano, Tokujiro; Yoshino, Ichiro; Ichiro, Yoshino; Taguchi, Kenichi; Kuraoka, Isao; Oda, Shinya; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    DNA polymerase lambda, pol lambda, is a eukaryotic member of the X-family DNA polymerases that is involved in two modes of DNA repair, i.e. base excision repair (BER) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Using immunohistochemical approaches, we have observed pol lambda expression in human tissues, particularly in the respiratory system of lung cancer patients. pol lambda proteins were distributed in the nuclei of the epithelial cells in the bronchi, bronchioles and alveoli. Intriguingly, the level of pol lambda expression in the bronchiolar epithelia significantly correlated with the amount of habitual smoking in the individuals. Conversely, pol lambda expression in cancer tissues did not correlate with the smoking status of the patients. Pol lambda expression was sometimes discrepant between the tumor tissues and adjacent bronchioles. More importantly, tumors without pol lambda expression that occurred in heavy smokers significantly tended to be at an advanced clinical stage. Pol lambda may thus be involved in the DNA repair processes counteracting DNA damage caused by tobacco smoke in the respiratory system.

  8. Smart textile for respiratory monitoring and thoraco-abdominal motion pattern evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaroni, Carlo; Venanzi, C; Silvatti, A P; Lo Presti, D; Saccomandi, P; Formica, D; Giurazza, F; Caponero, M A; Schena, Emiliano

    2018-01-03

    The use of wearable systems for monitoring vital parameters has gained wide popularity in several medical fields. The focus of the present study is the experimental assessment of a smart textile based on twelve fiber Bragg grating sensors for breathing monitoring and thoraco-abdominal motion pattern analysis. The feasibility of the smart textile for monitoring several temporal respiratory parameters (i.e., breath-by-breath respiratory period, breathing frequency, duration of inspiratory and expiratory phases), volume variations of the whole chest wall and of its compartments is performed on eight healthy male volunteers. Values gathered by the textile are compared to the data obtained by a motion analysis system, used as reference instrument. Good agreement between the two systems on both respiratory period (bias of 0.01 s), breathing frequency (bias of -0.02 breaths∙min -1 ) and tidal volume (bias of 0.09 L) values is demonstrated. Smart textile shows good performance in the monitoring of thoraco-abdominal pattern and its variation, as well. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Modulation of respiratory sinus arrhythmia in rats with central pattern generator hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogaret, Alain; Zhao, Le; Moraes, Davi J A; Paton, Julian F R

    2013-01-15

    We report on the modulation of respiratory sinus arrhythmia in rats with central pattern generator (CPG) hardware made of silicon neurons. The neurons are made to compete through mutually inhibitory synapses to provide timed electrical oscillations that stimulate the peripheral end of vagus nerve at specific points of the respiratory cycle: the inspiratory phase (φ(1)), the early expiratory phase (φ(2)) and the late expiratory phase (φ(3)). In this way the CPG hardware mimics the neuron populations in the brainstem which through connections with cardiac vagal motoneurones control respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). Here, we time the output of the CPG hardware from the phrenic nerve activity recorded from rats while monitoring heart rate changes evoked by vagal nerve stimulation (derived from ECG) controlled by the CPG. This neuroelectric stimulation has the effect of reducing the heart rate and increasing the arterial pressure. The artificially induced RSA strongly depends on the timing of pulses within the breathing cycle. It is strongest when the vagus nerve is stimulated during the inspiratory phase (φ(1)) or the early expiratory phase (φ(2)) in which case the heart rate slows by 50% of the normal rate. Heart rate modulation is less when the same exact stimulus is applied during the late expiratory phase (φ(3)). These trials show that neurostimulation by CPG hardware can augment respiratory sinus arrhythmia. The CPG hardware technology opens a new line of therapeutic possibilities for prosthetic devices that restore RSA in patients where respiratory-cardiac coupling has been lost. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Respiratory and Mayer wave-related discharge patterns of raphé and pontine neurons change with vagotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, K F; Nuding, S C; Segers, L S; Baekey, D M; Shannon, R; Lindsey, B G; Dick, T E

    2010-07-01

    Previous models have attributed changes in respiratory modulation of pontine neurons after vagotomy to a loss of pulmonary stretch receptor "gating" of an efference copy of inspiratory drive. Recently, our group confirmed that pontine neurons change firing patterns and become more respiratory modulated after vagotomy, although average peak and mean firing rates of the sample did not increase (Dick et al., J Physiol 586: 4265-4282, 2008). Because raphé neurons are also elements of the brain stem respiratory network, we tested the hypotheses that after vagotomy raphé neurons have increased respiratory modulation and that alterations in their firing patterns are similar to those seen for pontine neurons during withheld lung inflation. Raphé and pontine neurons were recorded simultaneously before and after vagotomy in decerebrated cats. Before vagotomy, 14% of 95 raphé neurons had increased activity during single respiratory cycles prolonged by withholding lung inflation; 13% exhibited decreased activity. After vagotomy, the average index of respiratory modulation (eta(2)) increased (0.05 +/- 0.10 to 0.12 +/- 0.18 SD; Student's paired t-test, P waves. These "Mayer wave-related oscillations" (MWROs) were coupled with central respiratory drive and became synchronized with the central respiratory rhythm after vagotomy (7 of 10 animals). Cross-correlation analysis identified functional connectivity in 52 of 360 pairs of neurons with MWROs. Collectively, the results suggest that a distributed network participates in the generation of MWROs and in the coordination of respiratory and vasomotor rhythms.

  11. Impact of respiratory pattern on lung mechanics and interstitial proteoglycans in spontaneously breathing anaesthetized healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriondo, A; Marcozzi, C; Bianchin, F; Passi, A; Boschetti, F; Lattanzio, S; Severgnini, P; Pelosi, P; Negrini, D

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different pattern of spontaneous breathing on the respiratory mechanics and on the integrity of the pulmonary extracellular matrix. Experiments were performed on adult healthy rats in which different spontaneously breathing pattern was elicited through administration of two commonly used anaesthetic mixtures: pentobarbital/urethane (P/U) and ketamine/medetomidine (K/M). The animals (five per group) were randomized and left to spontaneously breath for 10 min (P/U-sham; K/M-sham) or for 4h (P/U-4h; K/M-4h), targeting the anaesthesia level to obtain a tidal volume of about 8 mL kg(-1) body wt. At the end of the experiment, lung matrix integrity was assessed through determination of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) content in the lung parenchyma. Compared with K/M, anaesthesia with P/U cocktail induced: (1) a higher respiratory rate and minute ventilation attained with lower P(a) CO(2) ; (2) a higher pressure-time-product and work of breathing per minute; (3) a lower static lung compliance; (4) an increased activation of lung tissue metalloproteases; and (5) greater extraction of pulmonary interstitial GAGs. This study suggests that the breathing pattern induced by the different anaesthetic regimen may damage the pulmonary interstitium even during spontaneous breathing at physiological tidal volumes. © 2011 The Authors. Acta Physiologica © 2011 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  12. Trends and Patterns of Differences in Chronic Respiratory Disease Mortality Among US Counties, 1980-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer-Lindgren, Laura; Bertozzi-Villa, Amelia; Stubbs, Rebecca W; Morozoff, Chloe; Shirude, Shreya; Naghavi, Mohsen; Mokdad, Ali H; Murray, Christopher J L

    2017-09-26

    Chronic respiratory diseases are an important cause of death and disability in the United States. To estimate age-standardized mortality rates by county from chronic respiratory diseases. Validated small area estimation models were applied to deidentified death records from the National Center for Health Statistics and population counts from the US Census Bureau, National Center for Health Statistics, and Human Mortality Database to estimate county-level mortality rates from 1980 to 2014 for chronic respiratory diseases. County of residence. Age-standardized mortality rates by county, year, sex, and cause. A total of 4 616 711 deaths due to chronic respiratory diseases were recorded in the United States from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2014. Nationally, the mortality rate from chronic respiratory diseases increased from 40.8 (95% uncertainty interval [UI], 39.8-41.8) deaths per 100 000 population in 1980 to a peak of 55.4 (95% UI, 54.1-56.5) deaths per 100 000 population in 2002 and then declined to 52.9 (95% UI, 51.6-54.4) deaths per 100 000 population in 2014. This overall 29.7% (95% UI, 25.5%-33.8%) increase in chronic respiratory disease mortality from 1980 to 2014 reflected increases in the mortality rate from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (by 30.8% [95% UI, 25.2%-39.0%], from 34.5 [95% UI, 33.0-35.5] to 45.1 [95% UI, 43.7-46.9] deaths per 100 000 population), interstitial lung disease and pulmonary sarcoidosis (by 100.5% [95% UI, 5.8%-155.2%], from 2.7 [95% UI, 2.3-4.2] to 5.5 [95% UI, 3.5-6.1] deaths per 100 000 population), and all other chronic respiratory diseases (by 42.3% [95% UI, 32.4%-63.8%], from 0.51 [95% UI, 0.48-0.54] to 0.73 [95% UI, 0.69-0.78] deaths per 100 000 population). There were substantial differences in mortality rates and changes in mortality rates over time among counties, and geographic patterns differed by cause. Counties with the highest mortality rates were found primarily in central Appalachia

  13. Social Mixing Patterns Within a South African Township Community: Implications for Respiratory Disease Transmission and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone-Robertson, Simon P.; Mark, Daniella; Morrow, Carl; Middelkoop, Keren; Chiswell, Melika; Aquino, Lisa D. H.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Wood, Robin

    2011-01-01

    A prospective survey of social mixing patterns relevant to respiratory disease transmission by large droplets (e.g., influenza) or small droplet nuclei (e.g., tuberculosis) was performed in a South African township in 2010. A total of 571 randomly selected participants recorded the numbers, times, and locations of close contacts (physical/nonphysical) and indoor casual contacts met daily. The median number of physical contacts was 12 (interquartile range (IQR), 7–18), the median number of close contacts was 20 (IQR, 13–29), and the total number of indoor contacts was 30 (IQR, 12–54). Physical and close contacts were most frequent and age-associative in youths aged 5–19 years. Numbers of close contacts were 40% higher than in corresponding populations in industrialized countries (P < 0.001). This may put township communities at higher risk for epidemics of acute respiratory illnesses. Simulations of an acute influenza epidemic predominantly involved adolescents and young adults, indicating that control strategies should be directed toward these age groups. Of all contacts, 86.2% occurred indoors with potential exposure to respiratory droplet nuclei, of which 27.2%, 20.1%, 20.0%, and 8.0% were in transport, own household, crèche/school, and work locations, respectively. Indoor contact time was long in households and short during transport. High numbers of indoor contacts and intergenerational mixing in households and transport may contribute to exceptionally high rates of tuberculosis transmission reported in the community. PMID:22071585

  14. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Soleas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990. In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium.

  15. Effect of respiratory pattern on automated clinical blood pressure measurement: an observational study with normotensive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herakova, Natalia; Nwobodo, Nnenna Harmony Nzeribe; Wang, Ying; Chen, Fei; Zheng, Dingchang

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that deep breathing could reduce blood pressures (BP) in general. It is also known that BP is decreased during inhalation and increased during exhalation. Therefore, the measured BPs could be potentially different during deep breathing with different lengths of inhalation and exhalation. This study aimed to quantitatively investigate the effect of different respiratory patterns on BPs. Forty healthy subjects (20 males and 20 females, aged from 18 to 60 years) were recruited. Systolic and diastolic BPs (SBP and DBP) were measured using a clinically validated automated BP device. There were two repeated measurement sessions for each subject. Within each session, eight BP measurements were performed, including 4 measurements during deep breathing with different respiratory patterns (Pattern 1: 4.5 s vs 4.5 s; Patter 2: 6 s vs 2 s; Pattern 3: 2 s vs 6 s; and Pattern 4: 1.5 s vs 1.5 s, respectively for the durations of inhalation and exhalation) and additional 4 measurements from 1 min after the four different respiratory patterns. At the beginning and end of the two repeated measurement sessions, there were two baseline BP measurements under resting condition. The key experimental results showed that overall automated SBP significantly decreased by 3.7 ± 5.7 mmHg, 3.9 ± 5.2 mmHg, 1.7 ± 5.9 mmHg and 3.3 ± 5.3 mmHg during deep breathing, respectively for Patterns 1, 2, 3 and 4 (all p Pattern 3). Similarly, the automated DBPs during deep breathing in pattern 1, 2 and 4 decreased by 3.7 ± 5.0 mmHg, 3.7 ± 4.9 mmHg and 4.6 ± 3.9 mmHg respectively (all p Pattern 3 with a decrease of 1.0 ± 4.3 mmHg, p = 0.14). Correspondingly, after deep breathing, automated BPs recovered back to normal with no significant difference in comparison with baseline BP (all p > 0.05, except for SBP in Pattern 4). In summary, this study has quantitatively demonstrated that the measured automated BPs decreased

  16. Influence of the respiratory flow pattern on rebreathing in Mapleson A and D circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, L O; Zetterström, H

    1987-02-01

    In a lung model the rebreathing effects of different respiratory flow patterns (RFP) were studied in the coaxial Mapleson A (Lack) and D (Bain, Coax-II) systems during spontaneous breathing. In the Mapleson A system RFP was not found to have any impact. In the D systems FACO2 was higher with an RFP typical of halothane-anaesthetized patients than with an RFP with an exponentially decreasing expiratory flow and an end-expiratory flow pause (FTEP). The difference in FACO2 was 26% with a VF corresponding to 100 ml X min-1 X kg-1 body weight. The RFP in a non-anaesthetized volunteer was intermediate between these two patterns. Rebreathing decreased in the D systems with prolongation of FTEP and when a decelerating expiratory flow was used.

  17. Pathogens, patterns of pneumonia, and epidemiologic risk factors associated with respiratory disease in recently weaned cattle in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Gerard M; More, Simon J; Sammin, Dónal; Casey, Mìcheàl J; McElroy, Máire C; O'Neill, Rónan G; Byrne, William J; Earley, Bernadette; Clegg, Tracy A; Ball, Hywel; Bell, Colin J; Cassidy, Joseph P

    2017-01-01

    We examined the pathogens, morphologic patterns, and risk factors associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in 136 recently weaned cattle ("weanlings"), 6-12 mo of age, that were submitted for postmortem examination to regional veterinary laboratories in Ireland. A standardized sampling protocol included routine microbiologic investigations as well as polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Lungs with histologic lesions were categorized into 1 of 5 morphologic patterns of pneumonia. Fibrinosuppurative bronchopneumonia (49%) and interstitial pneumonia (48%) were the morphologic patterns recorded most frequently. The various morphologic patterns of pulmonary lesions suggest the involvement of variable combinations of initiating and compounding infectious agents that hindered any simple classification of the etiopathogenesis of the pneumonias. Dual infections were detected in 58% of lungs, with Mannheimia haemolytica and Histophilus somni most frequently recorded in concert. M. haemolytica (43%) was the most frequently detected respiratory pathogen; H. somni was also shown to be frequently implicated in pneumonia in this age group of cattle. Bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3) and Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (16% each) were the viral agents detected most frequently. Potential respiratory pathogens (particularly Pasteurella multocida, BPIV-3, and H. somni) were frequently detected (64%) in lungs that had neither gross nor histologic pulmonary lesions, raising questions regarding their role in the pathogenesis of BRD. The breadth of respiratory pathogens detected in bovine lungs by various detection methods highlights the diagnostic value of parallel analyses in respiratory disease postmortem investigation.

  18. Prevalence and susceptibility patterns of bacteria causing respiratory tract infections in North Waziristan, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Said Nasir; Ullah, Bait; Basit, Abdul; Begum, Asia; Tabassum, Anum; Zafar, Shaista; Saleha, Shamim

    2016-03-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are the most common infectious diseases in humans and are the major cause of mortality and morbidity in Pakistan. These infections are the leading causes of consultations in primary care in Pakistan. Therefore, this study was aimed at determining bacterial pathogens of respiratory tract infections and the susceptibility patterns of bacterial isolates to antibiotics. The study was conducted between February, 2013 and March, 2014 in North Waziristan region of Pakistan. Sputum specimens were collected aseptically from 227 patients and cultured on the appropriate bacteriological media. Bacterial isolates were identified by biochemical tests and their antibiotics susceptibility patterns were determined by standard methods. Out of 227, various species of bacteria were isolated from 152 (75%) specimens. The prevalence of bacteria species isolated were as follows Pseudomonas aeruginosa (42.8%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (26.7%), Corynebacterium diphtheria (10.6%), Staphylococcus aureus (5.9%), Proteus vulgaris (4.6%), Micrococcus species (3.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (2.6%) and Bacillus species (2.6%). The susceptibility patterns varied among bacterial species depending on the antibiotics. For the susceptibility test 11 commercially available antibiotics against bacterial isolates were used. The results revealed that generally the bacterial isolates were susceptible to gentamicin (80.9%), meropenem (75 %), ceftazidime (62.5%), cefotaxime (57.9%) and ceftriazone (57.9%) and resistant to penicillin (84.9%) and doxycycline (78.9%). The antibiotics gentamicin (100%) meropenem (100%), ceftriaxone (58.5%), ciprofloxacin (60%) trimethoprim (60%), ceftazidime (66.2%) and cefotaxime (64.6%) were observed effective against the P. aeruginosa isolates. The findings of our study provide significant information for empiric therapy of patients with RTIs in North Waziristan region of Pakistan.

  19. Bidirectional plasticity of pontine pneumotaxic postinspiratory drive: implication for a pontomedullary respiratory central pattern generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Chi-Sang; Song, Gang

    2014-01-01

    The "pneumotaxic center" in the rostral dorsolateral pons as delineated by Lumsden nine decades ago is known to play an important role in promoting the inspiratory off-switch (IOS) for inspiratory-expiratory phase transition as a fail-safe mechanism for preventing apneusis in the absence of vagal input. Traditionally, the pontine pneumotaxic mechanism has been thought to contribute a tonic descending input that lowers the IOS threshold in medullary respiratory central pattern generator (rCPG) circuits, but otherwise does not constitute part of the rCPG. Recent evidence indicates that descending input from the Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KFN) within the pneumotaxic center is essential for gating the postinspiratory phase of the three-phase respiratory rhythm to control the IOS in vagotomized animals. A critical question arising is whether such a descending pneumotaxic input from KFN that drives postinspiratory activity is tonic (null hypothesis) or rhythmic with postinspiratory phase modulation (alternative hypothesis). Here, we show that multifarious evidence reported in the literature collectively indicates that the descending pneumotaxic input may exhibit NMDA receptor-dependent short-term plasticity in the form of a biphasic neural differentiator that bidirectionally and phase-selectively modulates postinspiratory phase duration in response to vagal and peripheral chemoreceptor inputs independent of the responses in inspiratory and late-expiratory activities. The phase-selectivity property of the descending pneumotaxic input implicates a population of pontine early-expiratory (postinspiratory/expiratory-decrementing) neurons as the most likely neural correlate of the pneumotaxic mechanism that drives post-I activity, suggesting that the pontine pneumotaxic mechanism may be an integral part of a pontomedullary rCPG that underlies the three-phase respiratory rhythm. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Sagittal and vertical aspects of Class II division 1 subjects according to the respiratory pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura de Castro Cabrera

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The teeth position, specially maxillary and mandibular incisors, in relation to basal bone and surrounding soft tissues must be considered in the elaboration of diagnosis, treatment planning and execution to obtain alignment, leveling, intercuspation, facial balance and harmony with stability of results. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the modifications in the positioning of incisors in individuals with Angle Class II, division 1 malocclusion in two distinct moments of dentocraniofacial development, with mean interval of 2 years and 5 months. METHODS: The measures were obtained by means of lateral cephalograms of 40 individuals, being 23 nasal breathers (NB and 17 mouth breathers (MB. The analyzed measures were overjet, overbite, UCI-NA, LCI-NB, UCI.NA, LCI.NB, UCI.SN, LCI.GoGn, UCI.LCI, ANB, GoGn.SN, and OccPl.SN. Statistical analysis (2-way repeated-measures ANOVA was applied to verify intergroups differences. RESULTS: Overjet, UCI-NA, LCI-NB, ANB, GoGn.SN, and OccPl.SN demonstrated statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 when observed the moment or the respiratory method. CONCLUSION: There is alteration in the positioning of incisors during growth with interference of the respiratory pattern.

  1. Sagittal and vertical aspects of Class II division 1 subjects according to the respiratory pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Laura de Castro; Retamoso, Luciana Borges; Mei, Raul Magnoler Sampaio; Tanaka, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    The teeth position, specially maxillary and mandibular incisors, in relation to basal bone and surrounding soft tissues must be considered in the elaboration of diagnosis, treatment planning and execution to obtain alignment, leveling, intercuspation, facial balance and harmony with stability of results. To evaluate the modifications in the positioning of incisors in individuals with Angle Class II, division 1 malocclusion in two distinct moments of dentocraniofacial development, with mean interval of 2 years and 5 months. The measures were obtained by means of lateral cephalograms of 40 individuals, being 23 nasal breathers (NB) and 17 mouth breathers (MB). The analyzed measures were overjet, overbite, UCI-NA, LCI-NB, UCI.NA, LCI.NB, UCI.SN, LCI.GoGn, UCI.LCI, ANB, GoGn.SN, and OccPl.SN. Statistical analysis (2-way repeated-measures ANOVA) was applied to verify intergroups differences. Overjet, UCI-NA, LCI-NB, ANB, GoGn.SN, and OccPl.SN demonstrated statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) when observed the moment or the respiratory method. There is alteration in the positioning of incisors during growth with interference of the respiratory pattern.

  2. [Respiratory infections: etiology and patterns of resistance in the hospital general of Ciudad Real].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Inés; Dolores Mañas, María; Martínez, Jose; María Alarcón, Jose; Monroy, Carmen; Sidahi, Maryam; Yanes, Jaime

    2012-03-01

    Understanding the impact on our work place of increasing antibiotic resistance in respiratory infections. We have performed a retrospective observational study on patients with significant sputum culture admitted to Internal Medicine Service Hospital General in Ciudad Real from January to December 2008. Information has been collected on the epidemiological, microbiological features, resistance patterns and treatment. The total number of patients included in this study was 60. In 83.3% there was a predisposing factor. In 43 cases the diagnosis was made in spring and summer months. The exacerbation of COPD was the most frequent diagnosis (61.7%). The most frequently isolated organism was Pseudomonas spp. (41.7%). In our hospital the most commonly used antimicrobials in the initial treatment are levofloxacin (36.7%) and amoxicillinclavulanate (26.7%). The antibiotics with the highest percentage of antibiotic resistance were ciprofloxacin in E. coli (66.7%) and Pseudomonas spp. (60%), penicillin for S. pneumoniae (100%). The results of this study demonstrate the significant presence of resistance to most commonly used antibiotics in microorganisms which cause respiratory infections.

  3. Sleep-related respiratory abnormalities and arousal pattern in achondroplasia during early infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ednick, Mathew; Tinkle, Brad T; Phromchairak, Jungrak; Egelhoff, John; Amin, Raouf; Simakajornboon, Narong

    2009-10-01

    To assess sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), sleep architecture, and arousal pattern in infants with achondroplasia and to evaluate the relationship between foramen magnum size and the severity of SDB. A retrospective review of polysomnographic recordings and medical records was performed in infants with achondroplasia and in aged-matched control subjects. All studies were re-scored with the emphasis on respiratory events, sleep state, and arousals. In addition, the neuroimaging study of the brain (magnetic resonance imaging) was reviewed to evaluate foramen magnum diameters and to assess their relationship to SDB. Twenty-four infants met the criteria for entry into analysis, 12 infants with achondroplasia (A) and 12 control infants (C). There was no significant difference in age or sex. Infants with achondroplasia had a significant increase in total respiratory disturbance index (RDI; A, 13.9 +/- 10.8 versus C, 2.0 +/- 0.9; P achondroplasia had a significant decrease in both spontaneous arousal index (A, 10.5 +/- 3.5/hr versus C, 18.6 +/- 2.7; P achondroplasia have significant SDB during early infancy. SDB in infants with achondroplasia is not associated with alteration in sleep architecture, possibly because of attenuation of the arousal response. We speculate that the concomitant increased apneic events and decreased arousal response will lead to vulnerability in these infants and may underlie the pathophysiologic mechanism of sudden unexpected death in this population.

  4. Investigating the complexity of respiratory patterns during recovery from severe hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Metin; Sekine, Noriko

    2004-03-01

    Progressive hypoxemia in anesthetized, peripherally chemodenervated piglets results in initial depression of the phrenic neurogram (PN) culminating in phrenic silence and, eventually, gasping. These changes reverse after the 30 min reoxygenation (recovery) period. To determine if changes in the PN patterns correspond to changes in temporal patterning, we have used the approximate entropy (ApEn) method to examine the effects of maturation on the complexity of breathing patterns in chemodenervated, vagotomized and decerebrated piglets during severe hypoxia and reoxygenation. The phrenic neurogram in piglets was recorded during eupnea (normal breathing), severe hypoxia (gasping) and recovery from severe hypoxia in 31 piglets (2 35 days). Nonlinear dynamical analysis of the phrenic neurogram was performed using the ApEn method. The mean ApEn values for a recording of five consecutive breaths during eupnea, a few phrenic neurogram signals during gasping, the beginning of the recovery period, and five consecutive breaths at every 5 min interval for the 30 min recovery period were calculated. Our data suggest that gasping resulted in reduced duration of the phrenic neurogram, and the gasp-like patterns exist at the beginning of the recovery. But, the durations of phrenic neurograms during recovery were increased after 10 min postreoxygenation, but were restored 30 min post recovery. The ApEn (complexity) values of the phrenic neurogram during eupnea were higher than those of gasping and the early (the onset of) recovery from severe hypoxia (p statistically different than 5 min post recovery regardless of the maturation stages. These results suggest that hypoxia results in a reversible reconfiguration of the central respiratory pattern generator.

  5. Patterns of antimicrobial use for respiratory tract infections in older residents of long-term care facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE: To describe patterns of antimicrobial use for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) among elderly residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs). DESIGN: Data from a prospective, randomized, controlled study conducted from April 1998 through August 2001 to investigate the effect of vitamin ...

  6. Distinct patterns of innate immune activation by clinical isolates of respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitz, Ruth; Gao, Yajing; Dozmorov, Igor; Song, Ran; Wakeland, Edward K; Kahn, Jeffrey S

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major respiratory pathogen of infants and young children. Multiple strains of both subgroup A and B viruses circulate during each seasonal epidemic. Genetic heterogeneity among RSV genomes, in large part due to the error prone RNA-dependent, RNA polymerase, could mediate variations in pathogenicity. We evaluated clinical strains of RSV for their ability to induce the innate immune response. Subgroup B viruses were used to infect human pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) and primary monocyte-derived human macrophages (MDM) from a variety of donors. Secretions of IL-6 and CCL5 (RANTES) from infected cells were measured following infection. Host and viral transcriptome expression were assessed using RNA-SEQ technology and the genomic sequences of several clinical isolates were determined. There were dramatic differences in the induction of IL-6 and CCL5 in both A549 cells and MDM infected with a variety of clinical isolates of RSV. Transcriptome analyses revealed that the pattern of innate immune activation in MDM was virus-specific and host-specific. Specifically, viruses that induced high levels of secreted IL-6 and CCL5 tended to induce cellular innate immune pathways whereas viruses that induced relatively low level of IL-6 or CCL5 did not induce or suppressed innate immune gene expression. Activation of the host innate immune response mapped to variations in the RSV G gene and the M2-1 gene. Viral transcriptome data indicated that there was a gradient of transcription across the RSV genome though in some strains, RSV G was the expressed in the highest amounts at late times post-infection. Clinical strains of RSV differ in cytokine/chemokine induction and in induction and suppression of host genes expression suggesting that these viruses may have inherent differences in virulence potential. Identification of the genetic elements responsible for these differences may lead to novel approaches to antiviral agents and vaccines.

  7. Distinct patterns of innate immune activation by clinical isolates of respiratory syncytial virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitz, Ruth; Wakeland, Edward K.

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major respiratory pathogen of infants and young children. Multiple strains of both subgroup A and B viruses circulate during each seasonal epidemic. Genetic heterogeneity among RSV genomes, in large part due to the error prone RNA-dependent, RNA polymerase, could mediate variations in pathogenicity. We evaluated clinical strains of RSV for their ability to induce the innate immune response. Subgroup B viruses were used to infect human pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) and primary monocyte-derived human macrophages (MDM) from a variety of donors. Secretions of IL-6 and CCL5 (RANTES) from infected cells were measured following infection. Host and viral transcriptome expression were assessed using RNA-SEQ technology and the genomic sequences of several clinical isolates were determined. There were dramatic differences in the induction of IL-6 and CCL5 in both A549 cells and MDM infected with a variety of clinical isolates of RSV. Transcriptome analyses revealed that the pattern of innate immune activation in MDM was virus-specific and host-specific. Specifically, viruses that induced high levels of secreted IL-6 and CCL5 tended to induce cellular innate immune pathways whereas viruses that induced relatively low level of IL-6 or CCL5 did not induce or suppressed innate immune gene expression. Activation of the host innate immune response mapped to variations in the RSV G gene and the M2-1 gene. Viral transcriptome data indicated that there was a gradient of transcription across the RSV genome though in some strains, RSV G was the expressed in the highest amounts at late times post-infection. Clinical strains of RSV differ in cytokine/chemokine induction and in induction and suppression of host genes expression suggesting that these viruses may have inherent differences in virulence potential. Identification of the genetic elements responsible for these differences may lead to novel approaches to antiviral agents and vaccines

  8. Patterns of Sedation Weaning in Critically Ill Children Recovering From Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Kaitlin M; Asaro, Lisa A; Franck, Linda S; Wypij, David; Curley, Martha A Q

    2016-01-01

    To characterize sedation weaning patterns in typical practice settings among children recovering from critical illness. A descriptive secondary analysis of data that were prospectively collected during the prerandomization phase (January to July 2009) of a clinical trial of sedation management. Twenty-two PICUs across the United States. The sample included 145 patients, aged 2 weeks to 17 years, mechanically ventilated for acute respiratory failure who received at least five consecutive days of opioid exposure. None. Group comparisons were made between patients with an intermittent weaning pattern, defined as a 20% or greater increase in daily opioid dose after the start of weaning, and the remaining patients defined as having a steady weaning pattern. Demographic and clinical characteristics, tolerance to sedatives, and iatrogenic withdrawal symptoms were evaluated. Sixty-six patients (46%) were intermittently weaned; 79 patients were steadily weaned. Prior to weaning, intermittently weaned patients received higher peak and cumulative doses and longer exposures to opioids and benzodiazepines, demonstrated more sedative tolerance (58% vs 41%), and received more chloral hydrate and barbiturates compared with steadily weaned patients. During weaning, intermittently weaned patients assessed for withdrawal had a higher incidence of Withdrawal Assessment Tool-version 1 scores of greater than or equal to 3 (85% vs 46%) and received more sedative classes compared with steadily weaned patients. This study characterizes sedative administration practices for pediatric patients prior to and during weaning from sedation after critical illness. It provides a novel methodology for describing weaning in an at-risk pediatric population that may be helpful in future research on weaning strategies to prevent iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome.

  9. Bacteria etiological agents causing respiratory tract infections in children and their resistance patterns to a panel of ten antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nweze EI

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the bacteria etiological agents of respiratory tract infection among 280 school children in South East Nigeria, and to determine their antimicrobial resistance patterns to a panel of ten antibiotics. Methods: Throat swabs (280 were collected from students in four boarding schools located in Enugu and Onitsha metropolis. Standard microbiological procedures were used to screen these swabs to determine the prevalence of respiratory pathogens while the disc diffusion test was used to determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns of the recovered isolates. Results: Of the 280 samples screened, 57.1% were positive. Haemophilus influenzae was the most prevalent (16.1%, followed by Streptococcus pyogenes (13.9%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (12.5%, Streptococcus pneumoniae (6.8%, Staphylococcus aureus (5.4% and Corynebacterium diphtheriae (2.5%. More isolates were recovered in the two male schools investigated. However, there was no significant difference in the overall prevalence of isolates according to sex or school location of the subjects. Greater number of isolates (56% was recovered from those aged 11-14 years. This was statistically significant (P<0.05, compared to the other two age groups (15-18 years and 19-23 years. The pattern of resistance varied according to the bacteria species. There were multi-resistant isolates. Since these students stand the risk of contracting respiratory tract infection particularly from reservoirs among them, there is need to increase surveillance and develop better strategies to curb the increasing prevalence of respiratory tract infection in this and other similar regions of Africa. Conclusions: The spectrum of bacteria causing respiratory tract infection is still wide in Nigeria. Many isolates showed appreciable levels of antibiotic resistance apparently due to antibiotic abuse. Development of new strategies to curb this increasing prevalence of respiratory tract infection is warranted.

  10. Evaluation of breathing patterns for respiratory-gated radiation therapy using the respiration regularity index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Lee, MeYeon; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Park, SoAh; Hwang, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Kim, KyoungJu; Han, Tae Jin; Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-01-01

    suitable for respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT). Fluctuations in the breathing cycle and the amplitude were especially determinative of ρ. If the respiration regularity of a patient's first session was known, it could be estimated through subsequent sessions. Notably, the breathing patterns of the lung cancer patients were more irregular than those of the liver cancer patients. Respiration regularity could be objectively determined by using a composite index, ρ. Such a single-index testing of respiration regularity can facilitate determination of RGRT availability in clinical settings, especially for free-breathing cases.

  11. Effects of ion channel noise on neural circuits: an application to the respiratory pattern generator to investigate breathing variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Dhingra, Rishi R; Dick, Thomas E; Galán, Roberto F

    2017-01-01

    Neural activity generally displays irregular firing patterns even in circuits with apparently regular outputs, such as motor pattern generators, in which the output frequency fluctuates randomly around a mean value. This "circuit noise" is inherited from the random firing of single neurons, which emerges from stochastic ion channel gating (channel noise), spontaneous neurotransmitter release, and its diffusion and binding to synaptic receptors. Here we demonstrate how to expand conductance-based network models that are originally deterministic to include realistic, physiological noise, focusing on stochastic ion channel gating. We illustrate this procedure with a well-established conductance-based model of the respiratory pattern generator, which allows us to investigate how channel noise affects neural dynamics at the circuit level and, in particular, to understand the relationship between the respiratory pattern and its breath-to-breath variability. We show that as the channel number increases, the duration of inspiration and expiration varies, and so does the coefficient of variation of the breath-to-breath interval, which attains a minimum when the mean duration of expiration slightly exceeds that of inspiration. For small channel numbers, the variability of the expiratory phase dominates over that of the inspiratory phase, and vice versa for large channel numbers. Among the four different cell types in the respiratory pattern generator, pacemaker cells exhibit the highest sensitivity to channel noise. The model shows that suppressing input from the pons leads to longer inspiratory phases, a reduction in breathing frequency, and larger breath-to-breath variability, whereas enhanced input from the raphe nucleus increases breathing frequency without changing its pattern. A major source of noise in neuronal circuits is the "flickering" of ion currents passing through the neurons' membranes (channel noise), which cannot be suppressed experimentally. Computational

  12. Levodropropizine does not affect P0.1 and breathing pattern in healthy volunteers and patients with chronic respiratory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, C; Crotti, P; Dacosto, E; Fanfulla, F; Daffonchio, L; Novellini, R

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate whether the peripherally acting antitussive levodropropizine could affect the respiratory drive and the breathing pattern, we performed a double-blind, randomised, cross-over trial in 12 healthy volunteers and 12 patients with chronic respiratory impairment associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Levodropropizine 6% drops (at the recommended dose for adults) or placebo were administered orally t.i.d. for 10 consecutive administrations. Mouth occlusion pressure (P0.1), minute ventilation (V(e)), tidal volume (V(t)), respiratory rate (RR), mean inspiratory flow (V(t)/T(i)), end-tidal CO(2) (EtCO(2)), oxygen saturation (SaO(2)), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)), and the response to a hypercapnic stimulus were measured before and 1 h after the first and the last drug administration. Levodropropizine did not modify P0.1 in basal conditions and after a hypercapnic stimulus, either in healthy volunteers or in patients. In parallel, levodropropizine did not significantly affect V(t), RR, V(e), V(t)/T(i) and EtCO(2) in both the populations. Minor changes were induced by levodropropizine on SaO(2) in healthy volunteers, which despite a statistical difference, were too low to gain a clinical significance. These results confirmed the respiratory safety of levodropropizine 6% drops administered at the recommended dosage either in healthy volunteers or patients with chronic respiratory impairment.

  13. Cd4 count levels and pattern of respiratory complications in hiv ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic productive cough topped the list of respiratory symptoms (89%) followed by chest pain (74%) and dyspnea (62%). Lung consolidation was the commonest respiratory sign as seen in 44% of the cases. Hilar lymphadenopathy was seen in (35%), Pleural effusion (32%), lung fibrosis (21%) and finger clubbing (15%).

  14. Reversal of the pattern of respiratory variation of Doppler inflow velocities in constrictive pericarditis during mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, I A; Murray, R D; Awad, H E; Stewart, W J; Thomas, J D; Klein, A L

    2000-09-01

    Spontaneous inspiration causes a characteristic decrease of the mitral valve (MV) and pulmonary venous (PV) flow velocities obtained by Doppler echocardiography in patients with constrictive pericarditis (CP). This has been explained by the decrement it causes in the intrathoracic pressure. Positive pressure ventilation (PPV) causes an increment of intrathoracic pressure with mechanical inspiration. Therefore the pattern of respiratory variation produced during PPV may differ from that seen during spontaneous breathing. Our goal was to describe the effect of PPV on the pattern and magnitude of respiratory variation of MV and PV flow velocities in CP. We performed intraoperative pulsed Doppler transesophageal echocardiography on 15 patients (13 men, mean age 52+/-15 years) with CP after general anesthesia and before sternotomy and pericardial stripping. The peak velocity and time-velocity integral (TVI) of the mitral inflow E and A waves and the PV systolic and diastolic waves were measured at onset of inspiration and expiration for 3 to 6 respiratory cycles. Respiratory phase was monitored with a heat-sensitive nasal thermistor. The percent change in Doppler flow velocities from mechanical inspiration (INS) to mechanical expiration (EXP) was calculated with the formula %change = INS - EXP / INS x 100. The peak velocity of the mitral inflow E wave was significantly higher during mechanical inspiration than expiration (57 +/-14.5 versus 47+/-13.9 cm/s, Pmechanical inspiration than expiration (P = .02). The peak velocity of the PV D wave was higher during mechanical inspiration than expiration (39+/-17.8 versus 28+/-14.7 cm/s, Pmechanical inspiration than expiration (P ventilation reverses the pattern of respiratory variation of the MV and PV flow velocities in CP. The percent change in the peak velocities of the MV and PV flows produced by PPV is the same range reported in CP during spontaneous breathing.

  15. Bronchial epithelium in children: a key player in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsin, Ania; Mazenq, Julie; Ilstad, Alexandra; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Chanez, Pascal; Gras, Delphine

    2016-06-01

    Bronchial epithelium is a key element of the respiratory airways. It constitutes the interface between the environment and the host. It is a physical barrier with many chemical and immunological properties. The bronchial epithelium is abnormal in asthma, even in children. It represents a key component promoting airway inflammation and remodelling that can lead to chronic symptoms. In this review, we present an overview of bronchial epithelium and how to study it, with a specific focus on children. We report physical, chemical and immunological properties from ex vivo and in vitro studies. The responses to various deleterious agents, such as viruses or allergens, may lead to persistent abnormalities orchestrated by bronchial epithelial cells. As epithelium dysfunctions occur early in asthma, reprogramming the epithelium may represent an ambitious goal to induce asthma remission in children. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  16. Physiotherapy Practice Patterns for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Intensive Care Unit in India – A Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Rashmi Nigam; Gopala Krishna Alaparthi; Shyam Krishnan K; Zulfeequer CP

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the practice patterns of physiotherapists for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in the Intensive care unit in India. Materials and methods: A cross sectional survey was conducted across India, in which 600 questionnaires were sent via email to cardio-pulmonary physiotherapists. The questionnaire addressed assessment and treatment techniques of ventilated and non-ventilated ARDS patients. Results: A total of 252 completed questionnaires were returned with a res...

  17. Breathing pattern recordings using respiratory inductive plethysmography, before and after a physiotherapy breathing retraining program for asthma: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrany, Rokhsaneh; DeVos, Ruth; Bruton, Anne

    2017-11-10

    Breathing retraining (BR) improves symptoms, psychological well-being and quality of life in adults with asthma; but there remains uncertainty as to mechanism of effect. One of the intuitively logical theories is that BR works through altering breathing pattern. There is currently no evidence, however, that BR does result in measurable changes in breathing pattern. In this case report we describe the effects of physiotherapy BR on a 57-year-old female with a 10-year history of asthma. Data were collected before and after a physiotherapy BR program comprising three sessions over 18 weeks: breathing pattern (respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP); physiology (end tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), heart rate, oxygen saturations, spirometric lung function); questionnaires (Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score, Nijmegen Questionnaire); and medication usage. After BR, the patient's symptoms improved. Her physiology was largely unchanged, although her FEV1 increased by 0.12L, peak flow by 21L/min. The patient reported using less Salbutamol, yet her asthma control improved (ACQ down 1.5). Her Nijmegen score dropped from positive to negative for hyperventilation (from 39 to 7). Her anxiety-depression levels both reduced into 'normal' ranges. The patient's expiratory time increased, with longer respiratory cycles and slower respiratory rate. No changes were seen in relative contributions of ribcage and abdomen. Controlled trials are now needed to determine the generalizability of these findings.

  18. Respiratory pattern and rebreathing in the Mapleson A, C and D breathing systems with spontaneous ventilation. A theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, L B

    1996-04-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented of the Mapleson A, C and D breathing systems when used in spontaneous respiration. The influence of the respiratory pattern is explained diagrammatically. Simple equations are derived, predicting the fresh gas flow required to prevent rebreathing with different respiratory patterns. Further equations allow the degree of rebreathing caused by inadequate fresh gas flow to be quantified. These are used to examine the effects of different respiratory patterns on the efficiency of the three systems. It is demonstrated that the single most important determinant of efficiency is the duration of the expiratory pause. The nature of the inspiratory and expiratory waveforms is less important and the I:E ratio far less important. The analysis suggests that the Mapleson A system will always be the most efficient of the three systems. The Mapleson C system will be efficient if inspiration is long and the expiratory pause is minimal. The Mapleson D system will be efficient if the expiratory pause is sufficiently long.

  19. Corneal epithelium in penetrating keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, R F; Bobb, K C

    1980-08-01

    We studied corneal epithelium in 66 patients with bullous keratopathy treated with penetrating keratoplasty using McCarey-Kaufman stored donor corneas. Epithelium was evaluated at times of storage, surgery, and postoperative dressing changes. Epithelium was intact in 43 of the donor corneas at storage, and 23 had 5 to 100% (median, 50%) epithelium missing. At the end of the keratoplasty procedure, 16 grafts had epithelium intact, and 50 had 5 to 100% (median, 20%) epithelium missing. Postoperative epithelial healing time ranged from one to 12 days, with a median of two days. Postoperative healing was significantly prolonged when donor corneal epithelium was missing at keratoplasty. As the amount of epithelium intact at the end of surgery decreased, the number of days to heal postoperatively increased. We found that donor corneas could be stored as long as 79 hours, with 63 hours in McCarey-Kaufman medium, and still have epithelium intact at the end of the keratoplasty procedure.

  20. Infant feeding patterns and risk of acute respiratory infections in Baghdad/Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shatha S. Al-Sharbatti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: exclusive breastfeeding has been shown to protect infants from contracting various diseases. The aims of this study were: to examine the relationships between infant feeding patterns and the risk of Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI, and to assess the importance of some factors that can increase such risk.

    Methods: a case-control study was carried out during the period between February 1st 2005 - May 1st 2005. The study included 137 infants who were hospitalized in the Children Welfare Teaching Hospital for ARIs during the period of study (a case definition of acute lower respiratory infection as given by the WHO (1995 was used. The Control group included 157 healthy infants who were randomly selected from two primary health care centers of the AI-Karkh sector of Baghdad for immunization. The risk of various factors thought to be associated to ARI were studied, these being: non-modifiable (age, gender, birth order, parent education, crowded residence, family history of asthma and history of ARIs in household members in previous 2 weeks and modifiable (short duration of breastfeeding, cigarette smoking in proximity to the infant, delayed immunization and malnutrition. Logistic regression was used to adjust for confounders and for calculating adjusted odds ratios.

    Results: formula fed infants had a 2.7 times higher risk (CI:1.6-4.68 for ARIs compared to breast fed infants. Infants who had undergone a short duration of breastfeeding (<3 months had a 1.4 times increased risk or ARI (CI: 0.89—2.23. Additional factors that were associated with higher ARIs were, female gender (OR= 2.0, CI:1.3-3.3, low educational level of mothers (OR= 6.4, CI:3.2-12.7 and fathers (OR=4.5, CI:2.27-8.78, crowded residence (OR= 4.5, CI: 2.6-7.8, positive history of ARIs in household members in the 2 weeks prior to the study (OR= 5.5, CI:3.3-9.3, family history of asthma (OR = 2.6, CI:1

  1. Handling and Use of Oxygen by Pancrustaceans: Conserved Patterns and the Evolution of Respiratory Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jon F

    2015-11-01

    The handling and use of oxygen are central to physiological function of all pancrustaceans. Throughout the Pancrustacea, ventilation is controlled by a central oxygen-sensitive pattern generator. The ancestral condition was likely to achieve ventilation of the gills via leg-associated or mouth-associated muscles, but in insects and some air-breathing crustaceans, new muscles were recruited for this purpose, including intersegmental muscles likely used previously for posture and locomotion. Many aspects of the sensing of oxygen and the occurrence of responses to hypoxia (increased ventilation, depressed growth and metabolic rate, developmental changes that enhance the delivery of oxygen) appear common across most pancrustaceans, but there is tremendous variation across species. Some of this can be explained by habitat (e.g., ventilation of the internal medium occurs in terrestrial species and of the external medium in aquatic species; rearing under hypoxia induces tracheal proliferation in terrestrial insects and hemocyanin production in aquatic crustaceans); some plausibly by evolutionary origin of some responses to hypoxia within the Pancrustacea (the most basal arthropods may lack a ventilatory response to hypoxia); and some by the availability of environmental oxygen (animals adapted to survive hypoxia turn on the response to hypoxia at a lower PO2). On average, crustaceans and insects have similar tolerances to prolonged anoxia, but species or life stages from habitats with a danger of being trapped in hypoxia can tolerate longer durations of anoxia. Lactate is the primary anaerobic end-product in crustaceans but some insects have evolved a more diverse array of anaerobic end-products, including ethanol, alanine, succinate, and acetate. Most clades of Pancrustacea are small and lack obvious respiratory structures. Gilled stem-pancrustaceans likely evolved in the Cambrian, and gills persist in large Ostracoda, Malacostraca, and Branchiopoda. Based on currently

  2. Comparison of contact patterns relevant for transmission of respiratory pathogens in Thailand and The Netherlands using respondent-driven sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mart L Stein

    Full Text Available Understanding infection dynamics of respiratory diseases requires the identification and quantification of behavioural, social and environmental factors that permit the transmission of these infections between humans. Little empirical information is available about contact patterns within real-world social networks, let alone on differences in these contact networks between populations that differ considerably on a socio-cultural level. Here we compared contact network data that were collected in The Netherlands and Thailand using a similar online respondent-driven method. By asking participants to recruit contact persons we studied network links relevant for the transmission of respiratory infections. We studied correlations between recruiter and recruited contacts to investigate mixing patterns in the observed social network components. In both countries, mixing patterns were assortative by demographic variables and random by total numbers of contacts. However, in Thailand participants reported overall more contacts which resulted in higher effective contact rates. Our findings provide new insights on numbers of contacts and mixing patterns in two different populations. These data could be used to improve parameterisation of mathematical models used to design control strategies. Although the spread of infections through populations depends on more factors, found similarities suggest that spread may be similar in The Netherlands and Thailand.

  3. Human iPS-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells exhibit ion transport, membrane potential, polarized VEGF secretion and gene expression pattern similar to native RPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinaki, Maria; Sahibzada, Niaz; Golestaneh, Nady

    2012-01-01

    Aged-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the major causes of blindness in aging population and progresses with death of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptor degeneration inducing impairment of central vision. Discovery of human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells has opened new avenues for the treatment of degenerative diseases using patient specific stem cells to generate tissues and cells for autologous cell-based therapy. Recently, RPE cells were generated from hiPS cells. However, there is no evidence that those hiPS-derived RPE possess specific RPE functions that fully distinguish them from other type of cells. Here we show for the first time that RPE generated from hiPS under defined conditions exhibit ion transport, membrane potential, polarized VEGF secretion and gene expression profile similar to those of native RPE. The hiPS-RPE could therefore be a very good candidate for RPE replacement therapy in AMD. However, these cells show rapid telomere shortening, DNA chromosomal damage and increased p21 expression that cause cell growth arrest. This rapid senescence might affect the survival of the transplanted cells in vivo and therefore, only the very early passages should be used for regeneration therapies. Future research needs to focus on the generation of “safe” as well as viable hiPS-derived somatic cells. PMID:21480547

  4. Excretion patterns of human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus among young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, M-L; Eugen-Olsen, J; Koch, A

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) cause serious respiratory tract infections, the routes of transmission of these viruses are important to elucidate. We examined the modes of virus shedding and shedding duration of RSV and hMPV in young children...... of the infected children showed to have an upper respiratory tract infection when following up. CONCLUSION: Viral RNA was present in nasal secretions, saliva, sweat, and faeces, but whether or not the virions were infectious and constitute a potential mode of transmission remains to be shown in future studies........ METHODS: From each child in a group of 44 children (37 RSV-positive, 6 hMPV-positive, and 1 co-infected child), aged between 0.5-38 months, hospitalised at Hvidovre Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark, one nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA), saliva, urine, and faeces sample were collected at inclusion and weekly...

  5. Comparing the Effect of Resistive Inspiratory Muscle Training and Incentive Spirometry on Respiratory Pattern of COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossien Ahmadi Hosseini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resistive Inspiratory Muscle Training (RIMT is a well-known technique for rehabilitation of patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD. Incentive spirometry is another technique with potential viability for this application, but there is limited evidence in support of its efficacy in the rehabilitation of COPD patients. Aim: The objective of this study was to compare the effect ofresistive inspiratory muscle training and incentive spirometry on respiratory pattern of COPD patients. Method: This study was a randomized clinical trial on 30 patients with moderate COPD who were referred, in 2011, to the pulmonary clinic of Emamreza Hospital of Mashhad (Iran. The patients were randomly divided into the RIMT and the IS treatment group. In both groups, exercise regimen consisted of two 15-minute sessions of exercise per day, in the morning and evening, four days a week for 4 weeks. Respiratory pattern (respiratory rate and depth and dyspnea (at rest and during activity were measured before and after exercise. Data was analyzed with the Mann-Whitney and ratio difference tests using SPSS v.11.5. Results: The average age was 50.8±10.7 in the IS group and 51±10.8 in the RIMT group. The statistical tests found no significant difference between the groups in terms of post-intervention exertional dyspnea, dyspnea at rest, tidal volume, and respiratory rate (P>0.05; but post-intervention maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal voluntary ventilation in the two groups were found to be significantly different (P

  6. Control of Vocal and Respiratory Patterns in Birdsong: Dissection of Forebrain and Brainstem Mechanisms Using Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fee, Michale S.

    2011-01-01

    Learned motor behaviors require descending forebrain control to be coordinated with midbrain and brainstem motor systems. In songbirds, such as the zebra finch, regular breathing is controlled by brainstem centers, but when the adult songbird begins to sing, its breathing becomes tightly coordinated with forebrain-controlled vocalizations. The periods of silence (gaps) between song syllables are typically filled with brief breaths, allowing the bird to sing uninterrupted for many seconds. While substantial progress has been made in identifying the brain areas and pathways involved in vocal and respiratory control, it is not understood how respiratory and vocal control is coordinated by forebrain motor circuits. Here we combine a recently developed technique for localized brain cooling, together with recordings of thoracic air sac pressure, to examine the role of cortical premotor nucleus HVC (proper name) in respiratory-vocal coordination. We found that HVC cooling, in addition to slowing all song timescales as previously reported, also increased the duration of expiratory pulses (EPs) and inspiratory pulses (IPs). Expiratory pulses, like song syllables, were stretched uniformly by HVC cooling, but most inspiratory pulses exhibited non-uniform stretch of pressure waveform such that the majority of stretch occurred late in the IP. Indeed, some IPs appeared to change duration by the earlier or later truncation of an underlying inspiratory event. These findings are consistent with the idea that during singing the temporal structure of EPs is under the direct control of forebrain circuits, whereas that of IPs can be strongly influenced by circuits downstream of HVC, likely in the brainstem. An analysis of the temporal jitter of respiratory and vocal structure suggests that IPs may be initiated by HVC at the end of each syllable and terminated by HVC immediately before the onset of the next syllable. PMID:21980466

  7. Acute effects of transcutaneous electrical diaphragmatic stimulation on respiratory pattern in COPD patients: cross-sectional and comparative clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina M. Cancelliero-Gaiad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcutaneous electrical diaphragmatic stimulation (TEDS has been used to improve respiratory muscle strength in patients with respiratory muscle weakness. However, this physical therapy resource has not been studied in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the respiratory pattern during one session of TEDS in COPD patients. METHOD: Fifteen COPD patients participated in one TEDS session for plethysmographic analysis and assessment of peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2 and heart rate (HR. After the session, patients were divided into two groups: Responder (R; n=9 and Non-Responder (NR; n=6 to TEDS. Statistic analysis was performed using the Shapiro-Wilk normality test and two-way ANOVA. For the parameters that showed interaction, the Student t test was used (P<0.05. RESULTS: R group consisted mainly of men, with lower SpO2 and higher HR than NR group. When time (before and during and groups (R and NR were compared (interaction, there were differences in the parameters minute ventilation (Vent, inspiratory tidal volume (ViVol, expiratory tidal volume (VeVol, and respiratory rate (Br/M. In the intergroup comparison, differences were observed in the parameters Vent, ViVol, and VeVol. A significant effect was also observed for time in change in end-expiratory lung volume level (qDEEL, phase relation during inspiration (PhRIB; phase relation during expiration (PhREB; phase relation of entire breath (PhRTB, and phase angle (PhAng. During TEDS, there was an increase in SpO2 and a reduction in HR in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: The most hypoxemic group with greater HR responded to TEDS and there was interaction between group and time of analysis for the pulmonary volumes. The time factor had an influence on the two groups with an increase in thoracoabdominal asynchrony.

  8. [Antibiotic prescribing patterns for pediatric inpatients with acute respiratory tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escorihuela Esteban, R; Fernández Merchán, J A; Millán Jiménez, A; Carrión Mera, T; Gadea Gironés, I

    2000-02-01

    Children with acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) represent an important target group for efforts aimed at reducing unnecessary antibiotic use. To present the epidemiological data and evaluate the effect of clinical, laboratory, radiological and microbiological data on the decision to prescribe antibiotics to pediatric patients with ARTI as well as to seek criteria that would justify antibiotic use. A retrospective review was made of the clinical histories of 147 previously healthy children, consecutively admitted to our hospital with ARTI for 1 year (May 1996-April 1997). Patients were divided in two groups: those not treated with antibiotics (n = 92) and those treated (n = 55). Data from the two groups were compared with a statistical computer program (R-Sigma). Of the 147 patients studied, mean age was 2.5 years (range 0-14 years) and 85 (58%) males. One-hundred-and-five patients (72%) had previously been attended to in the emergency room, and 45 patients (30%) had been treated with antibiotics. Upper respiratory tract infection was diagnosed in 81 patients (54%), bronchitis in 28 (18%), bronchiolitis in 23 (15%) and pneumonia in 15 (10%). Ninety-seven patients (66%) had viral infection and only two (1%) had bacterial infection. Syncytial respiratory virus was isolated in 41 patients (28%) and adenovirus in 30 (20%). In the untreated group, the longer duration of symptoms before admission, lymphocytosis, clinical diagnosis of bronchiolitis and normal thorax X-ray, were statistically significant. In the treated group, fever, leukocytosis, neutrophilia and a diagnosis of pneumonia were statistically significant. Length of stay was longer in this group than in the untreated group. It is difficult to prescribe antibiotics on the basis of bacteriologic data. Laboratory, analytic and radiological data can be helpful in the rational use of antibiotics.

  9. Locomotor behaviours and respiratory pattern of the Mediterranean fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafortuna, Claudio L; Jahoda, Maddalena; Azzellino, Arianna; Saibene, Franco; Colombini, Angelo

    2003-10-01

    Twenty-four Mediterranean fin whales were tracked in open sea with a method based on the assessment of the animal differential position in respect of the observer's absolute position aboard a vessel, with the concomitant recording of the respiratory activity. Short distance video recording was also performed in two whales, permitting the simultaneous determination of single breath expiratory (TE) and inspiratory (TI) durations. In the 24 whales swimming at an average velocity of 1.39 (0.47) m.s(-1) [mean (SD), range: 0.62-2.44 m.s(-1)], 2068 breaths organized in 477 respiratory cycles were observed. Each cycle entailed a prolonged apnoea dive phase [225 (91) s, Tdive) followed by a period near the surface [62 (28) s, surfacing], during which a series of breaths [4.6 (1.8)] was performed at short intervals. On the basis of track length and swimming velocity, two groups of animals were devised differing for convolution of the course (p<0.001), extension of ranging territory (p<0.01) and horizontal swimming velocity (p<0.05), which may represent two distinct behaviours. A possibly general mechanism of control of breathing in cetaceans was found, consistent with a model of constant tidal volume and variable respiratory frequency. Coherently with this model, TE was independent of TI or Tdive, in line with a passive expiration, while TI appeared to be negatively correlated with Tdive (p<0.05), otherwise suggesting, similarly with terrestrial mammals, a significant role of hypercapnic stimulation. The estimated O2 consumption of about 150 l.min(-1) is in line with the general allometric regression for mammals and corresponds to an energetic expenditure of 85-95 kJ.kg(-1).day(-1).

  10. Foraging behavior of humpback whales: kinematic and respiratory patterns suggest a high cost for a lunge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbogen, Jeremy A; Calambokidis, John; Croll, Donald A; Harvey, James T; Newton, Kelly M; Oleson, Erin M; Schorr, Greg; Shadwick, Robert E

    2008-12-01

    Lunge feeding in rorqual whales is a drag-based feeding mechanism that is thought to entail a high energetic cost and consequently limit the maximum dive time of these extraordinarily large predators. Although the kinematics of lunge feeding in fin whales supports this hypothesis, it is unclear whether respiratory compensation occurs as a consequence of lunge-feeding activity. We used high-resolution digital tags on foraging humpback whales (Megaptera novaengliae) to determine the number of lunges executed per dive as well as respiratory frequency between dives. Data from two whales are reported, which together performed 58 foraging dives and 451 lunges. During one study, we tracked one tagged whale for approximately 2 h and examined the spatial distribution of prey using a digital echosounder. These data were integrated with the dive profile to reveal that lunges are directed toward the upper boundary of dense krill aggregations. Foraging dives were characterized by a gliding descent, up to 15 lunges at depth, and an ascent powered by steady swimming. Longer dives were required to perform more lunges at depth and these extended apneas were followed by an increase in the number of breaths taken after a dive. Maximum dive durations during foraging were approximately half of those previously reported for singing (i.e. non-feeding) humpback whales. At the highest lunge frequencies (10 to 15 lunges per dive), respiratory rate was at least threefold higher than that of singing humpback whales that underwent a similar degree of apnea. These data suggest that the high energetic cost associated with lunge feeding in blue and fin whales also occurs in intermediate sized rorquals.

  11. Excretion patterns of human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus among young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Koch, A

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) cause serious respiratory tract infections, the routes of transmission of these viruses are important to elucidate. We examined the modes of virus shedding and shedding duration of RSV and hMPV in young children...... of the five children shedding RNA in faeces had diarrhoea and children shedding RNA in sweat were either less than five weeks of age or had a chronic lung disease. RSV and hMPV RNA was shed in nasal secretions for a median of 11.5 and 5.0 days respectively (p = 0.001). More than 75% of the family members....... METHODS: From each child in a group of 44 children (37 RSV-positive, 6 hMPV-positive, and 1 co-infected child), aged between 0.5-38 months, hospitalised at Hvidovre Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark, one nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA), saliva, urine, and faeces sample were collected at inclusion and weekly...

  12. Scaling of respiratory variables and the breathing pattern in birds: an allometric and phylogenetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frappell, P B; Hinds, D S; Boggs, D F

    2001-01-01

    Allometric equations can be useful in comparative physiology in a number of ways, not the least of which include assessing whether a particular species deviates from the norm for its size and phylogenetic group with respect to some specific physiological process or determining how differences in design among groups may be reflected in differences in function. The allometric equations for respiratory variables in birds were developed 30 yr ago by Lasiewski and Calder and presented as "preliminary" because they were based on a small number of species. With the expanded data base now available to reconstruct these allometries and the call for taking account of the nonindependence of species in this process through a phylogenetically independent contrasts (PIC) approach, we have developed new allometric equations for respiratory variables in birds using both the traditional and PIC approaches. On the whole, the new equations agree with the old ones with only minor changes in the coefficients, and the primary difference between the traditional and PIC approaches is in the broader confidence intervals given by the latter. We confirm the lower VE/VO2 ratio for birds compared to mammals and observe a common scaling of inspiratory flow and oxygen consumption for birds as has been reported for mammals. Use of allometrics and comparisons among avian groups are also discussed.

  13. Developmental Origin of Vaginal Epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    The developmental origin of vaginal epithelium has been controversial for nearly a century, with speculation that vaginal epithelium originates from the Müllerian duct, Wolffian duct, and/or urogenital sinus. None of these possibilities has been definitively proven or disproven by direct scientific data. To define precisely the origin of vaginal epithelium, epithelial cells of the Müllerian duct, Wolffian duct, or urogenital sinus were fluorescently labeled in mouse embryos by crossing tdTomato-EGFP dual-reporter transgenic mice with transgenic mouse lines that express Cre recombinase in each type of epithelium. In embryos and newborn mice, the vagina consisted of fused Müllerian ducts plus the sinus vagina of urogenital sinus origin. However, the proportion of the sinus vagina was significantly reduced as the Müllerian vagina grew caudally. By postpartum day 7, the Müllerian vagina extended to the caudal end of the body, whereas the sinus vagina remained only at the junction between the vagina and perineal skin. As the vagina opened in puberty, urogenital sinus epithelium was detected only in the vulva, but not in the vagina. Additionally, from embryo to adult stages, residual Wolffian duct epithelium was present in the dorsolateral stromal wall of the vagina, but not within vaginal or vulvar epithelium. In conclusion, adult mouse vaginal epithelium is derived solely from Müllerian duct epithelium. PMID:20638775

  14. Optimizing Photosynthetic and Respiratory Parameters Based on the Seasonal Variation Pattern in Regional Net Ecosystem Productivity Obtained from Atmospheric Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z.; Chen, J.; Zheng, X.; Jiang, F.; Zhang, S.; Ju, W.; Yuan, W.; Mo, G.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we explore the feasibility of optimizing ecosystem photosynthetic and respiratory parameters from the seasonal variation pattern of the net carbon flux. An optimization scheme is proposed to estimate two key parameters (Vcmax and Q10) by exploiting the seasonal variation in the net ecosystem carbon flux retrieved by an atmospheric inversion system. This scheme is implemented to estimate Vcmax and Q10 of the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) to improve its NEP simulation in the Boreal North America (BNA) region. Simultaneously, in-situ NEE observations at six eddy covariance sites are used to evaluate the NEE simulations. The results show that the performance of the optimized BEPS is superior to that of the BEPS with the default parameter values. These results have the implication on using atmospheric CO2 data for optimizing ecosystem parameters through atmospheric inversion or data assimilation techniques.

  15. Use of postictal respiratory pattern to discriminate between convulsive psychogenic nonepileptic seizures and generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemergy, Ian; Frith, Richard; Herath, Samantha; Walker, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    Distinguishing between generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCSs) and convulsive psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs) can be difficult at the bedside, and this distinction has important implications for patient care. This study used a fully blinded method to examine postictal breathing parameters to identify features distinguishing between generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCSs) and convulsive psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs). Three blinded readers examined edited video recordings of the postictal phase of 72 convulsive seizure episodes recorded from 56 patients. There were 59 GTCS episodes and 13 PNES episodes. Postictal breathing after a PNES episode was more rapid than after a GTCS episode and, thereafter, normalized more rapidly. Postictal breathing after a GTCS episode was more likely to be characterized by stertorous respirations. Postictal breathing after a PNES episode was very unlikely to be characterized by stertorous respirations. Postictal respiratory pattern can assist in discriminating between GTCS and convulsive PNES. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A longitudinal study of serological patterns of respiratory infections in nine infected Danish swine herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Margit; Nielsen, Jens; Bækbo, Poul

    2000-01-01

    Sixteen litters of seven pigs from each of nine Danish farrow-to-finish herds were followed to investigate the serological patterns caused by natural infection with Mycoplasma hyponeumoniae, Pasteurella multocida toxin and Actinobacillus pleuroneumoniae serotypes 2, 5-7, 12. In seven of the herds....... hyopneumoniae (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), P. multocida toxin (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 2, 5-7, 12 (complement-fixation tests). The most-common pattern (28%) of seroconversion was that of pigs first seroconverting to A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2, followed...

  17. Physiotherapy Practice Patterns for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Intensive Care Unit in India – A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Nigam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the practice patterns of physiotherapists for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in the Intensive care unit in India. Materials and methods: A cross sectional survey was conducted across India, in which 600 questionnaires were sent via email to cardio-pulmonary physiotherapists. The questionnaire addressed assessment and treatment techniques of ventilated and non-ventilated ARDS patients. Results: A total of 252 completed questionnaires were returned with a response rate of 42%. The assessment and treatment techniques used were almost similar for ventilated and non-ventilated patients. More than 75% of the responders monitored vital and ventilatory parameters and respiratory impairments for both ventilated and non-ventilated patients. An objective measure of dyspnea was taken by less than 70% responders with minimal attention given to functional exercise capacity, measures of function and health related quality of life measures. Supine Positioning (81.7%was used more in ventilated patients whereas upright position (75% was used more in non-ventilated patients. 75% of responders use secretion clearance and manual techniques for both ventilated and non-ventilated patients. In non-ventilated patients, breathing strategies were used by 85% responders, 86.1% performed ambulation and more than 60% physiotherapists used strength training. Conclusion:Assessment predominately focuses on monitoring vital signs and ventilator parameters, and taking impairment measures for ventilated and non-ventilated patients, with little attention given to functional exercise capacity, measures of function and health related quality of life measures. Treatment predominately focuses on body positioning, airway clearance techniques, manual techniques and range of motion exercises for ventilated patients and in addition to all aforementioned breathing strategies and functional training for non-ventilated patients.

  18. Efeitos do cigarro sobre o epitélio respiratório e sua participação na rinossinusite crônica Effects of cigarette smoking on the respiratory epithelium and its role in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis

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    Edwin Tamashiro

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O crescente consumo de cigarro tem despertado preocupações com o desenvolvimento e agravamento de doenças, em especial às relacionadas ao trato respiratório. OBJETIVO: Neste artigo revisamos as evidências que apontam os efeitos da fumaça de cigarro sobre o epitélio respiratório bem como o seu papel na fisiopatogenia na rinossinusite crônica. CONCLUSÃO: Embora existam dados que fortaleçam um vínculo entre o hábito de fumar e a RSC, em seu conjunto, os estudos demonstram que deve haver grande dependência da susceptibilidade individual na resposta à fumaça de cigarro para o desenvolvimento ou manutenção da RSC. Uma adequada orientação a esses pacientes para interrupção do consumo de cigarro, assim como o reforço de campanhas de combate ao tabagismo, são de extrema importância para o controle dessa doença de grande impacto sócio-econômico.The increasing consumption of cigarettes has aroused concerns about the development and worsening of diseases, particularly those related to the respiratory tract. AIM: In this paper we review the evidence suggesting the effects of cigarette smoking on the respiratory epithelium and its role in the pathogenesis in chronic rhinosinusitis. CONCLUSIONS: Although there is evidence supporting a link between smoking and CRS, studies suggest that there might be individual susceptibility to cigarette smoking causing the development and/or maintenance of CRS. Proper patient educations to quit smoking as well as reinforcement of antismoking campaigns are extremely important to control this disease of major socio-economic impact.

  19. Resistance patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from HIV and Non-HIV patients with lower respiratory tract infections

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    Anitha Chandrahausan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in occurrence of infections due to opportunistic gram-negative bacilli in patients with impaired host defences emphasizes the need for information on the antibiotic susceptibility of the organisms that infects such patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa are becoming increasingly resistant to antimicrobial agents, and serious infections caused by these organisms often require immediate attention as they cause treatment failures. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility data are required for successful therapy because acquired resistance to such antimicrobials as β-lactams, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides is so prevalent in P. aeruginosa. The study was carried out in Chennai during the period May 2007 and March 2009. 69 isolates of Pseudomonas were isolated from HIV and 24 isolates were isolated from Non-HIV populations with lower respiratory tract infections. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern of all the isolates was studied for 12 antibiotics to find the multi drug resistant (MDR isolates for which the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC were studied according to CLSI (2009.

  20. Patterns of Human Respiratory Viruses and Lack of MERS-Coronavirus in Patients with Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Southwestern Province of Saudi Arabia

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    Ahmed A. Abdulhaq

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We undertook enhanced surveillance of those presenting with respiratory symptoms at five healthcare centers by testing all symptomatic outpatients between November 2013 and January 2014 (winter time. Nasal swabs were collected from 182 patients and screened for MERS-CoV as well as other respiratory viruses using RT-PCR and multiplex microarray. A total of 75 (41.2% of these patients had positive viral infection. MERS-CoV was not detected in any of the samples. Human rhinovirus (hRV was the most detected pathogen (40.9% followed by non-MERS-CoV human coronaviruses (19.3%, influenza (Flu viruses (15.9%, and human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV (13.6%. Viruses differed markedly depending on age in which hRV, Flu A, and hCoV-OC43 were more prevalent in adults and RSV, hCoV-HKU1, and hCoV-NL63 were mostly restricted to children under the age of 15. Moreover, coinfection was not uncommon in this study, in which 17.3% of the infected patients had dual infections due to several combinations of viruses. Dual infections decreased with age and completely disappeared in people older than 45 years. Our study confirms that MERS-CoV is not common in the southwestern region of Saudi Arabia and shows high diversity and prevalence of other common respiratory viruses. This study also highlights the importance and contribution of enhanced surveillance systems for better infection control.

  1. Study of the distribution patterns of the constituent herbs in classical Chinese medicine prescriptions treating respiratory disease by data mining methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xian-Jun; Song, Xu-Xia; Wei, Lin-Bo; Wang, Zhen-Guo

    2013-08-01

    To provide the distribution pattern and compatibility laws of the constituent herbs in prescriptions, for doctor's convenience to make decision in choosing correct herbs and prescriptions for treating respiratory disease. Classical prescriptions treating respiratory disease were selected from authoritative prescription books. Data mining methods (frequent itemsets and association rules) were used to analyze the regular patterns and compatibility laws of the constituent herbs in the selected prescriptions. A total of 562 prescriptions were selected to be studied. The result exhibited that, Radix glycyrrhizae was the most frequently used in 47.2% prescriptions, other frequently used were Semen armeniacae amarum, Fructus schisandrae Chinese, Herba ephedrae, and Radix ginseng. Herbal ephedrae was always coupled with Semen armeniacae amarum with the confidence of 73.3%, and many herbs were always accompanied by Radix glycyrrhizae with high confidence. More over, Fructus schisandrae Chinese, Herba ephedrae and Rhizoma pinelliae was most commonly used to treat cough, dyspnoea and associated sputum respectively besides Radix glycyrrhizae and Semen armeniacae amarum. The prescriptions treating dyspnoea often used double herb group of Herba ephedrae & Radix glycyrrhizae, while prescriptions treating sputum often used double herb group of Rhizoma pinelliae & Radix glycyrrhizae and Rhizoma pinelliae & Semen armeniacae amarum, triple herb groups of Rhizoma pinelliae & Semen armeniacae amarum & Radix glycyrrhizae and Pericarpium citri reticulatae & Rhizoma pinelliae & Radix glycyrrhizae. The prescriptions treating respiratory disease showed common compatibility laws in using herbs and special compatibility laws for treating different respiratory symptoms. These principle patterns and special compatibility laws reported here could be useful for doctors to choose correct herbs and prescriptions in treating respiratory disease.

  2. Spatial patterns of Bovine Corona Virus and Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus in the Swedish beef cattle population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björkman Camilla

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both bovine coronavirus (BCV and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV infections are currently wide-spread in the Swedish dairy cattle population. Surveys of antibody levels in bulk tank milk have shown very high nationwide prevalences of both BCV and BRSV, with large variations between regions. In the Swedish beef cattle population however, no investigations have yet been performed regarding the prevalence and geographical distribution of BCV and BRSV. A cross-sectional serological survey for BCV and BRSV was carried out in Swedish beef cattle to explore any geographical patterns of these infections. Methods Blood samples were collected from 2,763 animals located in 2,137 herds and analyzed for presence of antibodies to BCV and BRSV. Moran's I was calculated to assess spatial autocorrelation, and identification of geographical cluster was performed using spatial scan statistics. Results Animals detected positive to BCV or BRSV were predominately located in the central-western and some southern parts of Sweden. Moran's I indicated global spatial autocorrelation. BCV and BRSV appeared to be spatially related: two areas in southern Sweden (Skaraborg and Skåne had a significantly higher prevalence of BCV (72.5 and 65.5% respectively; almost the same two areas were identified as being high-prevalence clusters for BRSV (69.2 and 66.8% respectively. An area in south-east Sweden (Kronoberg-Blekinge had lower prevalences for both infections than expected (23.8 and 20.7% for BCV and BRSV respectively. Another area in middle-west Sweden (Värmland-Dalarna had also a lower prevalence for BRSV (7.9%. Areas with beef herd density > 10 per 100 km2 were found to be at significantly higher risk of being part of high-prevalence clusters. Conclusion These results form a basis for further investigations of between-herds dynamics and risk factors for these infections in order to design effective control strategies.

  3. Perturbations of Respiratory Rhythm and Pattern by Disrupting Synaptic Inhibition within Pre-Bötzinger and Bötzinger Complexes123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Hidehiko; Mosher, Bryan; Tariq, Mohammad F.; Zhang, Ruli; Molkov, Yaroslav I.

    2016-01-01

    The pre-Bötzinger (pre-BötC) and Bötzinger (BötC) complexes are the brainstem compartments containing interneurons considered to be critically involved in generating respiratory rhythm and motor pattern in mammals. Current models postulate that both generation of the rhythm and coordination of the inspiratory-expiratory pattern involve inhibitory synaptic interactions within and between these regions. Both regions contain glycinergic and GABAergic neurons, and rhythmically active neurons in these regions receive appropriately coordinated phasic inhibition necessary for generation of the normal three-phase respiratory pattern. However, recent experiments attempting to disrupt glycinergic and GABAergic postsynaptic inhibition in the pre-BötC and BötC in adult rats in vivo have questioned the critical role of synaptic inhibition in these regions, as well as the importance of the BötC, which contradicts previous physiological and pharmacological studies. To further evaluate the roles of synaptic inhibition and the BötC, we bilaterally microinjected the GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine and glycinergic receptor antagonist strychnine into the pre-BötC or BötC in anesthetized adult rats in vivo and in perfused in situ brainstem–spinal cord preparations from juvenile rats. Muscimol was microinjected to suppress neuronal activity in the pre-BötC or BötC. In both preparations, disrupting inhibition within pre-BötC or BötC caused major site-specific perturbations of the rhythm and disrupted the three-phase motor pattern, in some experiments terminating rhythmic motor output. Suppressing BötC activity also potently disturbed the rhythm and motor pattern. We conclude that inhibitory circuit interactions within and between the pre-BötC and BötC critically regulate rhythmogenesis and are required for normal respiratory motor pattern generation. PMID:27200412

  4. Epidemiology, Patterns of Care, and Mortality for Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Intensive Care Units in 50 Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellani, Giacomo; Laffey, John G.; Pham, Tài; Fan, Eddy; Brochard, Laurent; Esteban, Andres; Gattinoni, Luciano; van Haren, Frank; Larsson, Anders; McAuley, Daniel F.; Ranieri, Marco; Rubenfeld, Gordon; Thompson, B. Taylor; Wrigge, Hermann; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Pesenti, Antonio; Francois, Guy M.; Rabboni, Francesca; Madotto, Fabiana; Conti, Sara; Sula, Hektor; Nunci, Lordian; Cani, Alma; Zazu, Alan; Dellera, Christian; Insaurralde, Carolina S.; Alejandro, Risso V.; Daldin, Julio; Vinzio, Mauricio; Fernandez, Ruben O.; Cardonnet, Luis P.; Bettini, Lisandro R.; Bisso, Mariano Carboni; Osman, Emilio M.; Setten, Mariano G.; Lovazzano, Pablo; Alvarez, Javier; Villar, Veronica; Pozo, Norberto C.; Grubissich, Nicolas; Plotnikow, Gustavo A.; Vasquez, Daniela N.; Ilutovich, Santiago; Tiribelli, Norberto; Chena, Ariel; Pellegrini, Carlos A.; Saenz, María G.; Estenssoro, Elisa; Brizuela, Matias; Gianinetto, Hernan; Gomez, Pablo E.; Cerrato, Valeria I.; Bezzi, Marco G.; Borello, Silvina A.; Loiacono, Flavia A.; Fernandez, Adriana M.; Knowles, Serena; Reynolds, Claire; Inskip, Deborah M.; Miller, Jennene J.; Kong, Jing; Whitehead, Christina; Bihari, Shailesh; Seven, Aylin; Krstevski, Amanda; Rodgers, Helen J.; Millar, Rebecca T.; Mckenna, Toni E.; Bailey, Irene M.; Hanlon, Gabrielle C.; Aneman, Anders; Lynch, Joan M.; Azad, Raman; Neal, John; Woods, Paul W.; Roberts, Brigit L.; Kol, Mark R.; Wong, Helen S.; Riss, Katharina C.; Staudinger, Thomas; Wittebole, Xavier; Berghe, Caroline; Bulpa, Pierre A.; Dive, Alain M.; Verstraete, Rik; Lebbinck, Herve; Depuydt, Pieter; Vermassen, Joris; Meersseman, Philippe; Ceunen, Helga; Rosa, Jonas I.; Beraldo, Daniel O.; Piras, Claudio; Rampinelli, Adenilton M.; Nassar, Antonio P.; Mataloun, Sergio; Moock, Marcelo; Thompson, Marlus M.; Gonçalves, Claudio H.; Antônio, Ana Carolina P.; Ascoli, Aline; Biondi, Rodrigo S.; Fontenele, Danielle C.; Nobrega, Danielle; Sales, Vanessa M.; Shindhe, Suresh; Ismail, Dk Maizatul Aiman B. Pg Hj; Laffey, John; Beloncle, Francois; Davies, Kyle G.; Cirone, Rob; Manoharan, Venika; Ismail, Mehvish; Goligher, Ewan C.; Jassal, Mandeep; Ferguson, Niall D.; Nishikawa, Erin; Javeed, Areej; Curley, Gerard; Rittayamai, Nuttapol; Parotto, Matteo; Mehta, Sangeeta; Knoll, Jenny; Pronovost, Antoine; Canestrini, Sergio; Bruhn, Alejandro R.; Garcia, Patricio H.; Aliaga, Felipe A.; Farías, Pamela A.; Yumha, Jacob S.; Ortiz, Claudia A.; Salas, Javier E.; Saez, Alejandro A.; Vega, Luis D.; Labarca, Eduardo F.; Martinez, Felipe T.; Carreño, Nicolás G.; Lora, Pilar; Liu, Haitao; Qiu, Haibo; Liu, Ling; Tang, Rui; Luo, Xiaoming; An, Youzhong; Zhao, Huiying; Gao, Yan; Zhai, Zhe; Ye, Zheng L.; Wang, Wei; Li, Wenwen; Li, Qingdong; Zheng, Ruiqiang; Yu, Wenkui; Shen, Juanhong; Li, Xinyu; Yu, Tao; Lu, Weihua; Wu, Ya Q.; Huang, Xiao B.; He, Zhenyang; Lu, Yuanhua; Han, Hui; Zhang, Fan; Sun, Renhua; Wang, Hua X.; Qin, Shu H.; Zhu, Bao H.; Zhao, Jun; Liu, Jian; Li, Bin; Liu, Jing L.; Zhou, Fa C.; Li, Qiong J.; Zhang, Xing Y.; Li-Xin, Zhou; Xin-Hua, Qiang; Jiang, Liangyan; Gao, Yuan N.; Zhao, Xian Y.; Li, Yuan Y.; Li, Xiao L.; Wang, Chunting; Yao, Qingchun; Yu, Rongguo; Chen, Kai; Shao, Huanzhang; Qin, Bingyu; Huang, Qing Q.; Zhu, Wei H.; Hang, Ai Y.; Hua, Ma X.; Li, Yimin; Xu, Yonghao; Di, Yu D.; Ling, Long L.; Qin, Tie H.; Wang, Shou H.; Qin, Junping; Han, Yi; Zhou, Suming; Vargas, Monica P.; Jimenez, Juan I. Silesky; Rojas, Manuel A. González; Solis-Quesada, Jaime E.; Ramirez-Alfaro, Christian M.; Máca, Jan; Sklienka, Peter; Gjedsted, Jakob; Christiansen, Aage; Nielsen, Jonas; Villamagua, Boris G.; Llano, Miguel; Burtin, Philippe; Buzancais, Gautier; Beuret, Pascal; Pelletier, Nicolas; Mortaza, Satar; Mercat, Alain; Chelly, Jonathan; Jochmans, Sébastien; Terzi, Nicolas; Daubin, Cédric; Carteaux, Guillaume; de Prost, Nicolas; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Daviaud, Fabrice; Fartoukh, Muriel; Barberet, Guillaume; Biehler, Jerome; Dellamonica, Jean; Doyen, Denis; Arnal, Jean-Michel; Briquet, Anais; Klasen, Fanny; Papazian, Laurent; Follin, Arnaud; Roux, Damien; Messika, Jonathan; Kalaitzis, Evangelos; Dangers, Laurence; Combes, Alain; Au, Siu-Ming; Béduneau, Gaetan; Carpentier, Dorothée; Zogheib, Elie H.; Dupont, Herve; Ricome, Sylvie; Santoli, Francesco L.; Besset, Sebastien L.; Michel, Philippe; Gelée, Bruno; Danin, Pierre-Eric; Goubaux, Bernard; Crova, Philippe J.; Phan, Nga T.; Berkelmans, Frantz; Badie, Julio C.; Tapponnier, Romain; Gally, Josette; Khebbeb, Samy; Herbrecht, Jean-Etienne; Schneider, Francis; Declercq, Pierre-Louis M.; Rigaud, Jean-Philippe; Duranteau, Jacques; Harrois, Anatole; Chabanne, Russell; Marin, Julien; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Thibault, Sandrine; Ghazi, Mohammed; Boukhazna, Messabi; Zein, Salem Ould; Richecoeur, Jack R.; Combaux, Daniele M.; Grelon, Fabien; Le Moal, Charlene; Sauvadet, Elise P.; Robine, Adrien; Lemiale, Virginie; Reuter, Danielle; Dres, Martin; Demoule, Alexandre; Goldgran-Toledano, Dany; Baboi, Loredana; Guérin, Claude; Lohner, Ralph; Kraßler, Jens; Schäfer, Susanne; Zacharowski, Kai D.; Meybohm, Patrick; Reske, Andreas W.; Simon, Philipp; Hopf, Hans-Bernd F.; Schuetz, Michael; Baltus, Thomas; Papanikolaou, Metaxia N.; Papavasilopoulou, Theonymfi G.; Zacharas, Giannis A.; Ourailogloy, Vasilis; Mouloudi, Eleni K.; Massa, Eleni V.; Nagy, Eva O.; Stamou, Electra E.; Kiourtzieva, Ellada V.; Oikonomou, Marina A.; Avila, Luis E.; Cortez, Cesar A.; Citalán, Johanna E.; Jog, Sameer A.; Sable, Safal D.; Shah, Bhagyesh; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K.; Memon, Mohammedfaruk; Muthuchellappan, Radhakrishnan; Ramesh, Venkatapura J.; Shenoy, Anitha; Unnikrishnan, Ramesh; Dixit, Subhal B.; Rhayakar, Rachana V.; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Bhardwaj, Vallish K.; Mahto, Heera L.; Sagar, Sudha V.; Palaniswamy, Vijayanand; Ganesan, Deeban; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammadreza; Jamaati, Hamidreza; Heidari, Farshad; Meaney, Edel A.; Nichol, Alistair; Knapman, Karl M.; O'Croinin, Donall; Dunne, Eimhin S.; Breen, Dorothy M.; Clarkson, Kevin P.; Jaafar, Rola F.; Dwyer, Rory; Amir, Fahd; Ajetunmobi, Olaitan O.; O'Muircheartaigh, Aogan C.; Black, Colin S.; Treanor, Nuala; Collins, Daniel V.; Altaf, Wahid; Zani, Gianluca; Fusari, Maurizio; Spadaro, Savino; Volta, Carlo A.; Graziani, Romano; Brunettini, Barbara; Palmese, Salvatore; Formenti, Paolo; Umbrello, Michele; Lombardo, Andrea; Pecci, Elisabetta; Botteri, Marco; Savioli, Monica; Protti, Alessandro; Mattei, Alessia; Schiavoni, Lorenzo; Tinnirello, Andrea; Todeschini, Manuel; Giarratano, Antonino; Cortegiani, Andrea; Sher, Sara; Rossi, Anna; Antonelli, Massimo M.; Montini, Luca M.; Casalena, Paolo; Scafetti, Sergio; Panarello, Giovanna; Occhipinti, Giovanna; Patroniti, Nicolò; Pozzi, Matteo; Biscione, Roberto R.; Poli, Michela M.; Raimondi, Ferdinando; Albiero, Daniela; Crapelli, Giulia; Beck, Eduardo; Pota, Vincenzo; Schiavone, Vincenzo; Molin, Alexandre; Tarantino, Fabio; Monti, Giacomo; Frati, Elena; Mirabella, Lucia; Cinnella, Gilda; Fossali, Tommaso; Colombo, Riccardo; Pattarino, Pierpaolo Terragni Ilaria; Mojoli, Francesco; Braschi, Antonio; Borotto, Erika E.; Cracchiolo, Andrea N.; Palma, Daniela M.; Raponi, Francesco; Foti, Giuseppe; Vascotto, Ettore R.; Coppadoro, Andrea; Brazzi, Luca; Floris, Leda; Iotti, Giorgio A.; Venti, Aaron; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Takagi, Shunsuke; Maeyama, Hiroki N.; Watanabe, Eizo; Yamaji, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Kazuyoshi; Shiozaki, Kyoko; Futami, Satoru; Ryosuke, Sekine; Saito, Koji; Kameyama, Yoshinobu; Ueno, Keiko; Izawa, Masayo; Okuda, Nao; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Harasawa, Tomofumi; Nasu, Michitaka; Takada, Tadaaki; Ito, Fumihito; Nunomiya, Shin; Koyama, Kansuke; Abe, Toshikazu; Andoh, Kohkichi; Kusumoto, Kohei; Hirata, Akira; Takaba, Akihiro; Kimura, Hiroyasu; Matsumoto, Shuhei; Higashijima, Ushio; Honda, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Nobumasa; Imai, Hiroshi; Ogino, Yasuaki; Mizuguchi, Ichiko; Ichikado, Kazuya; Nitta, Kenichi; Mochizuki, Katsunori; Hashida, Tomoaki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Niimi, Daisuke; Ueda, Takeshi; Kashiwa, Yozo; Uchiyama, Akinori; Sabelnikovs, Olegs; Oss, Peteris; Haddad, Youssef; Liew, Kong Y.; Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A.; Jarquin-Badiola, Yves D.; Sanchez-Hurtado, Luis A.; Gomez-Flores, Saira S.; Marin, Maria C.; Villagomez, Asisclo J.; Lemus, Jordana S.; Fierro, Jonathan M.; Cervantes, Mavy Ramirez; Mejia, Francisco Javier Flores; Dector, Dulce; Dector, Dulce M.; Gonzalez, Daniel R.; Estrella, Claudia R.; Sanchez-Medina, Jorge R.; Ramirez-Gutierrez, Alvaro; George, Fernando G.; Aguirre, Janet S.; Buensuseso, Juan A.; Poblano, Manuel; Dendane, Tarek; Zeggwagh, Amine Ali; Balkhi, Hicham; Elkhayari, Mina; Samkaoui, Nacer; Ezzouine, Hanane; Benslama, Abdellatif; Amor, Mourad; Maazouzi, Wajdi; Cimic, Nedim; Beck, Oliver; Bruns, Monique M.; Schouten, Jeroen A.; Rinia, Myra; Raaijmakers, Monique; Heunks, Leo M.; van Wezel, Hellen M.; Heines, Serge J.; Strauch, Ulrich; Buise, Marc P.; Simonis, Fabienne D.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Goodson, Jennifer C.; Browne, Troy S.; Navarra, Leanlove; Hunt, Anna; Hutchison, Robyn A.; Bailey, Mathew B.; Newby, Lynette; Mcarthur, Colin; Kalkoff, Michael; Mcleod, Alex; Casement, Jonathan; Hacking, Danielle J.; Andersen, Finn H.; Dolva, Merete S.; Laake, Jon H.; Barratt-Due, Andreas; Noremark, Kim Andre L.; Søreide, Eldar; Sjøbø, Brit Å; Guttormsen, Anne B.; Yoshido, Hector H. Leon; Aguilar, Ronald Zumaran; Oscanoa, Fredy A. Montes; Alisasis, Alain U.; Robles, Joanne B.; Pasanting-Lim, Rossini Abbie B.; Tan, Beatriz C.; Andruszkiewicz, Pawel; Jakubowska, Karina; Coxo, Cristina M.; Alvarez, António M.; Oliveira, Bruno S.; Montanha, Gustavo M.; Barros, Nelson C.; Pereira, Carlos S.; Messias, António M.; Monteiro, Jorge M.; Araujo, Ana M.; Catorze, Nuno T.; Marum, Susan M.; Bouw, Maria J.; Gomes, Rui M.; Brito, Vania A.; Castro, Silvia; Estilita, Joana M.; Barros, Filipa M.; Serra, Isabel M.; Martinho, Aurelia M.; Tomescu, Dana R.; Marcu, Alexandra; Bedreag, Ovidiu H.; Papurica, Marius; Corneci, Dan E.; Negoita, Silvius Ioan; Grigoriev, Evgeny; Gritsan, Alexey I.; Gazenkampf, Andrey A.; Almekhlafi, Ghaleb; Albarrak, Mohamad M.; Mustafa, Ghanem M.; Maghrabi, Khalid A.; Salahuddin, Nawal; Aisa, Tharwat M.; Al Jabbary, Ahmed S.; Tabhan, Edgardo; Arabi, Yaseen M.; Trinidad, Olivia A.; Al Dorzi, Hasan M.; Tabhan, Edgardo E.; Bolon, Stefan; Smith, Oliver; Mancebo, Jordi; Aguirre-Bermeo, Hernan; Lopez-Delgado, Juan C.; Esteve, Francisco; Rialp, Gemma; Forteza, Catalina; de Haro, Candelaria; Artigas, Antonio; Albaiceta, Guillermo M.; de Cima-Iglesias, Sara; Seoane-Quiroga, Leticia; Ceniceros-Barros, Alexandra; Ruiz-Aguilar, Antonio L.; Claraco-Vega, Luis M.; Soler, Juan Alfonso; Lorente, Maria del Carmen; Hermosa, Cecilia; Gordo, Federico; Prieto-González, Miryam; López-Messa, Juan B.; Perez, Manuel P.; Perez, Cesar P.; Allue, Raquel Montoiro; Roche-Campo, Ferran; Ibañez-Santacruz, Marcos; Temprano, Susana; Pintado, Maria C.; de Pablo, Raul; Gómez, Pilar Ricart Aroa; Ruiz, Silvia Rodriguez; Moles, Silvia Iglesias; Jurado, Ma Teresa; Arizmendi, Alfons; Piacentini, Enrique A.; Franco, Nieves; Honrubia, Teresa; Cheng, Meisy Perez; Losada, Elena Perez; Blanco, Javier; Yuste, Luis J.; Carbayo-Gorriz, Cecilia; Cazorla-Barranquero, Francisca G.; Alonso, Javier G.; Alda, Rosa S.; Algaba, Ángela; Navarro, Gonzalo; Cereijo, Enrique; Diaz-Rodriguez, Esther; Marcos, Diego Pastor; Montero, Laura Alvarez; Para, Luis Herrera; Sanchez, Roberto Jimenez; Navalpotro, Miguel Angel Blasco; Abad, Ricardo Diaz; González, Raquel Montiel; Toribio, Dácil Parrilla; Castro, Alejandro G.; Artiga, Maria Jose D.; Penuelas, Oscar; Roser, Tomas P.; Olga, Moreno F.; Curto, Elena Gallego; Sánchez, Rocío Manzano; Imma, Vallverdu P.; Elisabet, Garcia M.; Claverias, Laura; Magret, Monica; Pellicer, Ana M.; Rodriguez, Lucia L.; Sánchez-Ballesteros, Jesús; González-Salamanca, Ángela; Jimenez, Antonio G.; Huerta, Francisco P.; Diaz, Juan Carlos J. Sotillo; Lopez, Esther Bermejo; Moya, David D. Llinares; Alfonso, Alec A. Tallet; Luis, Palazon Sanchez Eugenio; Cesar, Palazon Sanchez; Rafael, Sánchez I.; Virgilio, Corcoles G.; Recio, Noelia N.; Adamsson, Richard O.; Rylander, Christian C.; Holzgraefe, Bernhard; Broman, Lars M.; Wessbergh, Joanna; Persson, Linnea; Schiöler, Fredrik; Kedelv, Hans; Tibblin, Anna Oscarsson; Appelberg, Henrik; Hedlund, Lars; Helleberg, Johan; Eriksson, Karin E.; Glietsch, Rita; Larsson, Niklas; Nygren, Ingela; Nunes, Silvia L.; Morin, Anna-Karin; Kander, Thomas; Adolfsson, Anne; Piquilloud, Lise; Zender, Hervé O.; Leemann-Refondini, Corinne; Elatrous, Souheil; Bouchoucha, Slaheddine; Chouchene, Imed; Ouanes, Islem; Ben Souissi, Asma; Kamoun, Salma; Demirkiran, Oktay; Aker, Mustafa; Erbabacan, Emre; Ceylan, Ilkay; Girgin, Nermin Kelebek; Ozcelik, Menekse; Ünal, Necmettin; Meco, Basak Ceyda; Akyol, Onat O.; Derman, Suleyman S.; Kennedy, Barry; Parhar, Ken; Srinivasa, Latha; McNamee, Lia; McAuley, Danny; Steinberg, Jack; Hopkins, Phil; Mellis, Clare; Kakar, Vivek; Hadfield, Dan; Vercueil, Andre; Bhowmick, Kaushik; Humphreys, Sally K.; Ferguson, Andrew; Mckee, Raymond; Raj, Ashok S.; Fawkes, Danielle A.; Watt, Philip; Twohey, Linda; Jha, Rajeev R.; Thomas, Matthew; Morton, Alex; Kadaba, Varsha; Smith, Mark J.; Hormis, Anil P.; Kannan, Santhana G.; Namih, Miriam; Reschreiter, Henrik; Camsooksai, Julie; Kumar, Alek; Rugonfalvi, Szabolcs; Nutt, Christopher; Oneill, Orla; Seasman, Colette; Dempsey, Ged; Scott, Christopher J.; Ellis, Helen E.; McKechnie, Stuart; Hutton, Paula J.; Di Tomasso, Nora N.; Vitale, Michela N.; Griffin, Ruth O.; Dean, Michael N.; Cranshaw, Julius H.; Willett, Emma L.; Ioannou, Nicholas; Gillis, Sarah; Csabi, Peter; Macfadyen, Rosaleen; Dawson, Heidi; Preez, Pieter D.; Williams, Alexandra J.; Boyd, Owen; de Gordoa, Laura Ortiz-Ruiz; Bramall, Jon; Symmonds, Sophie; Chau, Simon K.; Wenham, Tim; Szakmany, Tamas; Toth-Tarsoly, Piroska; Mccalman, Katie H.; Alexander, Peter; Stephenson, Lorraine; Collyer, Thomas; Chapman, Rhiannon; Cooper, Raphael; Allan, Russell M.; Sim, Malcolm; Wrathall, David W.; Irvine, Donald A.; Zantua, Kim S.; Adams, John C.; Burtenshaw, Andrew J.; Sellors, Gareth P.; Welters, Ingeborg D.; Williams, Karen E.; Hessell, Robert J.; Oldroyd, Matthew G.; Battle, Ceri E.; Pillai, Suresh; Kajtor, Istvan; Sivashanmugavel, Mageswaran; Okane, Sinead C.; Donnelly, Adrian; Frigyik, Aniko D.; Careless, Jon P.; May, Martin M.; Stewart, Richard; Trinder, T. John; Hagan, Samantha J.; Wise, Matt P.; Cole, Jade M.; MacFie, Caroline C.; Dowling, Anna T.; Hurtado, Javier; Nin, Nicolás; Nuñez, Edgardo; Pittini, Gustavo; Rodriguez, Ruben; Imperio, María C.; Santos, Cristina; França, Ana G.; Ebeid, Alejandro; Deicas, Alberto; Serra, Carolina; Uppalapati, Aditya; Kamel, Ghassan; Banner-Goodspeed, Valerie M.; Beitler, Jeremy R.; Mukkera, Satyanarayana Reddy; Kulkarni, Shreedhar; Lee, Jarone; Mesar, Tomaz; Shinn, John O.; Gomaa, Dina; Tainter, Christopher; Yeatts, Dale J.; Warren, Jessica; Lanspa, Michael J.; Miller, Russel R.; Grissom, Colin K.; Brown, Samuel M.; Bauer, Philippe R.; Gosselin, Ryan J.; Kitch, Barrett T.; Cohen, Jason E.; Beegle, Scott H.; Stoger, John H.; Gueret, Renaud M.; Tulaimat, Aiman; Choudry, Shazia; Stigler, William; Batra, Hitesh; Huff, Nidhi G.; Lamb, Keith D.; Oetting, Trevor W.; Mohr, Nicholas M.; Judy, Claine; Saito, Shigeki; Kheir, Fayez M.; Kheir, Fayez; Schlichting, Adam B.; Delsing, Angela; Crouch, Daniel R.; Elmasri, Mary; Ismail, Dina; Dreyer, Kyle R.; Blakeman, Thomas C.; Baron, Rebecca M.; Grijalba, Carolina Quintana; Hou, Peter C.; Seethala, Raghu; Aisiku, Imo; Henderson, Galen; Frendl, Gyorgy; Hou, Sen-Kuang; Owens, Robert L.; Schomer, Ashley; Bumbasirevic, Vesna; Jovanovic, Bojan; Surbatovic, Maja; Veljovic, Milic

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Limited information exists about the epidemiology, recognition, management, and outcomes of patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). OBJECTIVES To evaluate intensive care unit (ICU) incidence and outcome of ARDS and to assess clinician recognition, ventilation

  5. Early immune response patterns to pathogenic bacteria are associated to increased risk of lower respiratory infections in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, N. H.; Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Rasmussen, Mette Annelie

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal colonisation of the airways with respiratory pathogens is associated with increased risk of lower respiratory infections (LRI) in early childhood (1). Therefore, we hypothesized that children developing LRI have an abnormal immune response to pathogenic bacteria in infancy. We aimed...... to characterise the systemic immune response to pathogenic bacteria at the age of 6 months and study the association with incidence of LRI during the first 3 years of life....

  6. Microbes and Gut-Epithelium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 6. Microbes and Gut-Epithelium : More than ... Author Affiliations. Sarita Ahlawat1. Research Associate Malaria Group International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (ICGEB) Aruna Asaf Ali Marg New Delhi 110067, India.

  7. Impact of anesthetic regimen on the respiratory pattern, EEG microstructure and sleep in the rat model of cholinergic Parkinson's disease neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, K; Petrovic, J; Ciric, J; Kalauzi, A; Saponjic, J

    2015-09-24

    We hypothesized that the impact of distinct anesthetic regimens could be differently expressed during anesthesia and on post-anesthesia sleep in the neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, we followed the impact of ketamine/diazepam and pentobarbital anesthesia in a rat model of the severe Parkinson's disease cholinergic neuropathology on the electroencephalographic (EEG) microstructure and respiratory pattern during anesthesia, and on the post-anesthesia sleep. We performed the experiments on adult, male, spontaneously breathing Wistar rats chronically instrumented for sleep recording. The bilateral pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) lesion was done by ibotenic acid microinfusion. Following postoperative recovery, we recorded sleep for 6h, induced anesthesia 24h later using ketamine/diazepam or pentobarbital, and repeated sleep recordings sessions 48h and 6days later. During 20min of each anesthesia we recorded both the EEG and respiratory movements. For sleep and EEG analysis, Fourier analysis was applied on 6-h recordings, and each 10-s epoch was differentiated as a state of wakefulness (Wake), non-rapid eye movement (NREM) or rapid eye movement (REM). Additionally, the group probability density distributions of all EEG frequency band relative amplitudes were calculated for each state, with particular attention during anesthesia. For respiratory pattern analysis we used Monotone Signal Segments Analysis. The PPT lesion was identified through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) diaphorase histochemistry. Our data show that the ketamine/diazepam anesthetic regimen in the PPT-lesioned rats induces more alterations in the EEG microstructure and respiratory pattern than does the pentobarbital anesthesia. In addition, the equal time required to establish an anesthetized state, and the long-term effect on post-anesthesia sleep in the PPT-lesioned vs. control rats suggest this anesthetic regimen as potentially more beneficial both for anesthesia

  8. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: 30 Years Later?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Lesur

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS was first described about 30 years ago. Modern definitions and statements have recently been proposed to describe ARDS accurately, but none is perfect. Diffuse alveolar damage is the basic pathological pattern most commonly observed in ARDS, and the term includes permeability edema. The alveolar epithelium of the alveolar-capillary barrier is clearly a key component requiring repair, given its multipotent functional activity. Lung inflammation and neutrophil accumulation are essential markers of disease in ARDS, and a wide variety of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been described in the alveolar fluid and blood of patients. These molecules still have to prove their value as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers of ARDS.

  9. Hypoxemic Patients With Bilateral Infiltrates Treated With High-Flow Nasal Cannula Present a Similar Pattern of Biomarkers of Inflammation and Injury to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-de-Acilu, Marina; Marin-Corral, Judith; Vázquez, Antonia; Ruano, Laura; Magret, Mònica; Ferrer, Ricard; Masclans, Joan R; Roca, Oriol

    2017-11-01

    or length of stay were observed. All biomarkers (with the exception of interleukin-33) were higher in both groups of matched acute respiratory distress syndrome patients than in both control groups. Acute hypoxemic patients with bilateral infiltrates treated with high-flow nasal cannula presented a similar pattern of biomarkers of inflammation and injury to acute respiratory distress syndrome patients undergoing direct mechanical ventilation. The results suggest that these high-flow nasal cannula patients should be considered as acute respiratory distress syndrome patients.

  10. Expression patterns of cadherin genes in Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zartman, Jeremiah J; Kanodia, Jitendra S; Yakoby, Nir; Schafer, Xenia; Watson, Colin; Schlichting, Karin; Dahmann, Christian; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y

    2009-01-01

    In Drosophila oogenesis, the follicular epithelium that envelops the oocyte is patterned by a small set of inductive signals and gives rise to an elaborate three-dimensional eggshell. Several eggshell structures provide sensitive readouts of the patterning signals, but the formation of these structures is still poorly understood. In other systems, epithelial morphogenesis is guided by the spatial patterning of cell adhesion and cytoskeleton genes. As a step towards developing a comprehensive description of patterning events leading to eggshell morphogenesis, we report the expression of Drosophila cadherins, calcium-dependent adhesion molecules that are repeatedly used throughout development. We found that 9/17 of Drosophila cadherins are expressed in the follicular epithelium in dynamic patterns during oogenesis. In late oogenesis, the expression patterns of cadherin genes in the main body follicle cells is summarized using a compact set of simple geometric shapes, reflecting the integration of the EGFR and DPP inductive signals. The multi-layered composite patterning of the cadherins is hypothesized to play a key role in the formation of the eggshell. Of particular note is the complex patterning of the region of the follicular epithelium that gives rise to the dorsal appendages, which are tubular structures that serve as respiratory organs for the developing embryo.

  11. Respiratory acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory ... Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and COPD ) Diseases of the lung tissue (such as ...

  12. Corneal epithelium following penetrating keratoplasty.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsubota, K; Mashima, Y; Murata, H; Yamada, M.; Sato, N.

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--This study was designed to observe any changes to the corneal epithelium after penetrating keratoplasty. METHODS--The corneal epithelia of 26 patients were observed by specular microscopy 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months following penetrating keratoplasty. RESULTS--After re-epithelialisation was confirmed by biomicroscopy 1 week after surgery, specular microscopy revealed many abnormal cells, including spindle shaped cells, nucleated cells, large cells, as well as irregular cell ...

  13. The cytological status of the nasal mucosa and the buccal epithelium in coal miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.T. Bazeliuk; B.M. Salimbaeva

    2006-11-15

    Sixty-four persons were examined. The examination was undertaken to study the cytomophological parameters of the cells of the nasal mucosa and the buccal epithelium in coal miners. Group 1 consisted of 18 donors without contact with industrial dust; Group 2 comprised 24 apparently healthy miners; Group 3 included 22 workers (drift miners) with Stage 1 anthracosilicosis, grade 1 respiratory failure. The patients with Stage 1 anthracosilicosis had noticeably worse morphofunctional characteristics of the epithelium that displayed extensive fields with pronounced structural changes, such as destruction and desquamation of the integumentary epithelium of the nasal mucosa. Nasal mucosal atrophic changes were observed in 50% of the examined miners. Examination of the buccal epithelium in apparently healthy miners (code 0) and in workers with Stage I anthracosilicosis revealed the increased proportion of microfloral (Streptococcus) contamination by 79% and 3.7 times, respectively.

  14. Lentivirus vector-mediated gene transfer to the developing bronchiolar airway epithelium in the fetal lamb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ze-Yan; McKay, Karen; van Asperen, Peter; Zheng, Maolin; Fleming, Jane; Ginn, Samantha L; Kizana, Eddy; Latham, Margot; Feneley, Michael P; Kirkland, Peter D; Rowe, Peter B; Lumbers, Eugenie R; Alexander, Ian E

    2007-06-01

    Development of effective and durable gene therapy for treatment of the respiratory manifestations of cystic fibrosis remains a formidable challenge. Obstacles include difficulty in achieving efficient gene transfer to mature airway epithelium and the need to stably transduce self-renewing epithelial progenitor cells in order to avoid loss of transgene expression through epithelial turnover. Targeting the developing airway epithelium during fetal life offers the prospect of circumventing these challenges. In the current study we investigated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVg)-pseudotyped HIV-1-derived lentivirus vector-mediated gene transfer to the airway epithelium of mid-gestation fetal lambs, both in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro studies epithelial sheet explants and lung organ culture were used to examine transduction of the proximal and more distal airway epithelium, respectively. For the in vivo studies, vector was delivered directly into the proximal airway. We found that even during the early pseudoglandular and canalicular phases of lung development, occurring through mid-gestation, the proximal bronchial airway epithelium was relatively mature and highly resistant to lentivirus-mediated transduction. In contrast, the more distal bronchiolar airway epithelium was relatively permissive for transduction although the absolute levels achieved remained low. This result is promising as the bronchiolar airway epithelium is a major site of pathology in the cystic fibrosis airway, and much higher levels of transduction are likely to be achieved by developing strategies that increase the amount of vector reaching the more distal airway after intratracheal delivery.

  15. The midbrain periaqueductal gray changes the eupneic respiratory rhythm into a breathing pattern necessary for survival of the individual and of the species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Hari H; Holstege, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of respiration is a prerequisite for survival of the individual and of the species. For example, respiration has to be adjusted in case of speech, strenuous exercise, laughing, crying, or sudden escape from danger. Respiratory centers in pons and medulla generate the basic respiratory rhythm or eupnea, but they cannot modulate breathing in the context of emotional challenges, for which they need input from higher brain centers. In simple terms, the prefrontal cortex integrates visual, auditory, olfactory, and somatosensory information and informs subcortical structures such as amygdala, hypothalamus, and finally the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) about the results. The PAG, in turn, generates the final motor output for basic survival, such as setting the level of all cells in the brain and spinal cord. Best known in this framework is determining the level of pain perception. The PAG also controls heart rate, blood pressure, micturition, sexual behavior, vocalization, and many other basic motor output systems. Within this context, the PAG also changes the eupneic respiratory rhythm into a breathing pattern necessary for basic survival. This review examines the latest developments regarding of how the PAG controls respiration. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of an alternative calibration technique to record breathing pattern and its variability with respiratory inductive plethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wai Leung Ambrose; Huang, Dong Feng

    2017-08-01

    Recent literature has raised doubts on the existing calibration methods for respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP) which can lead to erroneous estimation of tidal volume. This study sought to validate an alternative calibration method to record tidal volume and tidal volume variability during rest and exercise by comparing the measurements obtained from a RIP device against a pneumotachograph (PT) for breath-by-breath analysis. 11 healthy individuals were recruited. Tidal volume and variability were simultaneously recorded during 30 min of rest and 20 min of exercises. Pearson correlation coefficients for group mean tidal volume between PT and RIP were 0.8 during rest and exercises. No statistical significant difference was observed in tidal volume variability between devices during rest and exercises. This study provides support for an alternative calibration method, which addresses existing limitations. The simplicity of equipment set up process and no need to perform subject cooperated calibration procedure will improve the respiratory monitoring process.

  17. Contributions of the pre-Bötzinger complex and the Kölliker-fuse nuclei to respiratory rhythm and pattern generation in awake and sleeping goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Hubert; Bonis, Josh; Krause, Katie; Wenninger, Julie; Neumueller, Suzanne; Hodges, Matthew; Pan, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    We investigated in three groups of awake and sleeping goats whether there are differences in ventilatory responses after injections of Ibotenic acid (IA, glutamate receptor agonist and neurotoxin) into the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC), lateral parabrachial (LPBN), medial (MPBN) parabrachial, or Kölliker-Fuse nuclei (KFN). In one group, within minutes after bilateral injection of 10μl IA (50mM) into the preBötC, there was a 10-fold increase in breathing frequency, but 1.5h later, the goats succumbed to terminal apnea. These data are consistent with findings in reduced preparations that the preBötC is critical to sustaining normal breathing. In a second group, increasing volumes (0.5-10μl) of IA injected at weekly intervals into the preBötC elicited a near-dose-dependent tachypnea and irregular breathing that lasted at least 5h. There were apneas restricted to wakefulness, but none were terminal. Postmortem histology revealed that the preBötC was 90% destroyed, but there was a 25-40% above normal number of neurons in the presumed parafacial respiratory group that may have contributed to maintenance of arterial blood gas homeostasis. In a third group, bilateral injections (1 and 10μl) of IA into the LPBN, MPBN, or KFN did not significantly increase breathing in any group, and there were no terminal apneas. However, 3-5h after the injections into the KFN, breathing frequency was decreased and the three-phase eupneic breathing pattern was eliminated. Between 10 and 15h after the injections, the eupneic breathing pattern was not consistently restored to normal, breathing frequency remained attenuated, and there were apneas during wakefulness. Our findings during wakefulness and NREM sleep warrant concluding that (a) the preBötC is a primary site of respiratory rhythm generation; (b) the preBötC and the KFN are determinants of respiratory pattern generation; (c) after IA-induced lesions, there is time-dependent plasticity within the respiratory control

  18. The multi-tasking gut epithelium of insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jia-Hsin; Jing, Xiangfeng; Douglas, Angela E

    2015-12-01

    The insect gut epithelium plays a vital role in multiple processes, including nutrition, immunity and osmoregulation. Recent research is revealing the molecular and biochemical basis of these functions. For example, the pattern of nutrient acquisition by the gut epithelium is integrated into the overall regulation of nutrient allocation, as illustrated by evidence for systemic controls over expression of key genes coding digestive enzymes and transporters in carbohydrate acquisition; and the abundance and diversity of microorganisms in the gut lumen is regulated by multiple molecular properties of the gut epithelial cells, including the synthesis of enzymes that produce reactive oxygen species and anti-microbial peptides. These traits are underpinned by the function of the gut epithelium as a selective barrier which mediates the controlled movement of water, ions, metabolites and macromolecules between the gut lumen and insect tissues. Breakdown of the gut epithelial barrier has been implicated in muscle paralysis of insects at low temperatures (chill coma) and in aging. The key challenge for future research is to understand how the multiple functions of the insect gut epithelium are integrated by signaling interactions among epithelial cells, the gut microbiota and other insect organs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Respiratory alkalosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkalosis - respiratory ... leads to shortness of breath can also cause respiratory alkalosis (such as pulmonary embolism and asthma). ... Treatment is aimed at the condition that causes respiratory alkalosis. Breathing into a paper bag -- or using ...

  20. Spectral entropy analysis of the respiratory signal and its relationship with the cyclic alternating pattern during sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Sanchez, E.; Alba, A.; Méndez, M. O.; Milioli, G.; Parrino, L.

    2016-07-01

    A-phases consist of transient cortical events that normally occur during NREM sleep and can be observed directly in the EEG signals. One particular kind of A-phases, namely, A3-phases are related to arousals from sleep during which increased activity in other systems (such as the cardiovascular and respiratory systems) can also be observed. This study aims to characterize disruptions in the oscillations of the airflow signal during A3-phases of sleep. Spectral entropy was used to quantify the bandwidth of the airflow signal, which under baseline conditions (prior to an A3-phase) resembles a sinusoidal wave with a frequency of about 0.25 Hz and has low spectral entropy values. It was found that during most A3-phases the spectral entropy increases significantly in 70% of the test subjects. These changes occur with higher probability during A3-phases that are longer than 10s, suggesting a delay between the onset of an A3-phase and the effect it has on the respiratory system.

  1. Respiratory syncytial virus a and b display different temporal patterns in a 4-year prospective cross-sectional study among children with acute respiratory infection in a tropical city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzas, Maiara L; Oliveira, Juliana R; Fukutani, Kiyoshi F; Borges, Igor C; Barral, Aldina; Van der Gucht, Winke; Wollants, Elke; Van Ranst, Marc; de Oliveira, Camila I; Van Weyenbergh, Johan; Nascimento-Carvalho, Cristiana M

    2016-10-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most common etiological agents of childhood respiratory infections globally. Information on seasonality of different antigenic groups is scarce. We aimed to describe the frequency, seasonality, and age of children infected by RSV antigenic groups A (RSVA) and B (RSVB) among children with ARI in a 4-year period.Children (6-23 months old) with respiratory infection for ≤7 days were enrolled in a prospective cross-sectional study, from September, 2009 to October, 2013, in Salvador, in a tropical region of Brazil. Upon recruitment, demographic, clinical data, and nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) were collected. A multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with a group-specific primer and probeset for RSVA and RSVB was used. Seasonal distribution of infection by RSV different antigenic groups was evaluated by Prais-Wisten regression.Of 560 cases, the mean age was 11.4 ± 4.5 months and there were 287 (51.3%) girls. Overall, RSV was detected in 139 (24.8%; 95% CI: 21.4%-28.5%) cases, RSVA in 74 (13.2%; 95% CI: 10.6%-16.2%) cases, and RSVB in 67 (12.0%; 95% CI: 9.5%-14.9%) cases. Two (0.4%; 95% CI: 0.06%-1.2%) cases had coinfection. RSVA frequency was 9.6%, 18.4%, 21.6%, and 3.1% in 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013, respectively. RSVB frequency was 19.2%, 0.7%, 1.4%, and 35.4% in the same years. RSVA was more frequently found from August to January than February to July (18.2% vs. 6.4%, P infection showed seasonal distribution and positive association with humidity (P = 0.02) whereas RSVA did not. RSVA was more common among children ≥1-year-old (17.8% vs. 1.8%; P = 0.02), as opposed to RSVB (11.5% vs. 12.2%; P = 0.8).One quarter of patients had RSV infection. RSVA compromised more frequently children aged ≥1 year. RSVA predominated in 2011 and 2012 whereas RSVB predominated in 2010 and 2013. In regard to months, RSVA was more frequent from August to January whereas RSVB was more often detected

  2. Differential expression of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus receptor in the upper respiratory tracts of humans and dromedary camels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Widagdo; V.S. Raj (Stalin); D. Schipper (Debby); K. Kolijn (Kimberley); G.J.H.L. Leenders (Geert); B.J. Bosch (Berend Jan); A. Bensaid (Albert); J. Segalés (Joaquim); W. Baumgärtner (Wolfgang); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); J.M.A. van den Brand (Judith); B.L. Haagmans (Bart)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMiddle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is not efficiently transmitted between humans, but it is highly prevalent in dromedary camels. Here we report that the MERS-CoV receptor-dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4)-is expressed in the upper respiratory tract epithelium of camels

  3. A concept for classification of optimal breathing pattern for use in radiotherapy tracking, based on respiratory tumor kinematics and minimum jerk analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anetai, Yusuke; Sumida, Iori; Takahashi, Yutaka; Yagi, Masashi; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Ota, Seiichi; Suzuki, Osamu; Tamari, Keisuke; Seo, Yuji; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    During radiotherapy, maintaining the patient in a relaxed and comfortable state helps ensure respiratory regularity and reproducibility, thereby supports accurate respiratory tracking/gating treatment. Criteria to evaluate respiratory naturalness, regularity, and phase robustness are therefore needed to aid for the treatment system numerically and medical observers visually. This study introduces a new concept of respiratory tumor kinematics that describes the trajectory of tumor motion with respiration, leading to the minimum jerk theory. Using this theory, this study proposes novel respiratory criteria for respiratory naturalness, regularity, and phase robustness. According to respiratory tumor kinematics, tumor motion follows the minimum curvature/jerk trajectory in 4D spacetime. Using this theory, the following three respiratory criteria are proposed: (1) respiratory naturalness Us, the residual sum of the squared difference between the normalized average free respiratory wave (single inhalation/exhalation averaged over each 10 phases) and the normalized minimum jerk theoretical respiratory wave; (2) respiratory regularity Cj16, the cumulative jerk squared cost function sampling every 0.2 s with a peak adjustment coefficient, 16; and (3) respiratory phase robustness (LΔ), a second-order partial differential in the respiratory position for regarded Cj16 as the respiratory position function. To verify these respiratory criteria, values obtained from CyberKnife tracking marker log data for 15 patients were compared with regard to the correlation error between the correlation model and the imaged tumor position, as well as with the number of remodels. The Cj16 growth curve was also compared between 15 patients and 15 healthy volunteers. In the 15 patients, data with Us respiratory naturalness) and higher Cj16(60 s) values (less respiratory regularity) demonstrated more than 3 mm average/5 mm maximum correlation errors and an increased number of remodels. The data

  4. Effect of carbonated drinks on wound healing of oral epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahim, Ayesha; Ilyas, Muhammad Sharjeel; Jafari, Fahim Haider; Farzana, Fauzia

    2016-01-01

    Carbonated drinks are the second most consumed non-alcoholic beverages in the world after tea. The effects of these drinks on hard tissues and vital organs of the body have been proved beyond doubt. This study, however, explains the effect of these drinks on wound healing of oral epithelium. Thirty-six male Wistar rats were considered for the study. A circular wound of 3.0 mm was created on the buccal mucosa of all animals and they were divided into two groups. Animals in group 1 were fed with chow pellet and water, while those in group 2 were fed with a commercially available carbonated drink instead of water. Six animals from each group were euthanized at 0, 7, and 21 days. Wound site was histologically assessed for differences in thickness and characteristics of the regenerating epithelium between two groups. There was a marked difference in the healing pattern between the two groups. Animals in group 1 showed a normal healing pattern at the end of day 21. In the group 2, the regenerated epithelium showed hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis along with acanthosis at the end of the experiment with a subsequent delayed inflammatory reaction at day 21. Consumption of carbonated drinks can disrupt oral wound healing. The contents in carbonated drinks have a proinflammatory action on the soft tissue. Results suggest that epithelial changes seen in experimental group 2 could be a result of constant irritation by the acidic and fizzy nature of carbonated drinks.

  5. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural analysis of dysplastic epithelium of human ocular surface: basement membrane and intermediate filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saika, S; Kawashima, Y; Okada, Y; Ohkawa, K; Yamanaka, O; Katoh, T; Ohnishi, Y; Ooshima, A; Kao, W W

    1999-05-01

    The dysplastic corneal epithelium is characterized by the abnormal proliferation of epithelial cells. The phenotypes of these cells have not been elucidated. We investigated whether such epithelium expresses the phenotypes of corneal or conjunctival epithelial cells. The corneas and conjunctivae from four normal subjects and from one patient with epithelial dysplasia of the central cornea were immunostained for IV and VII collagens and for cytokeratins. Monoclonal antibodies against collagen IV reacted to the [alpha1(IV)]2alpha2(IV) or alpha5(IV) molecule. Anti-cytokeratin antibodies were used to define epithelial cell types. The ultrastructure of the basement membrane (BM) of each specimen also was examined. Type VII collagen immunoreactivity was detected in all the specimens of epithelial BM. The anti-collagen IV [alpha1(IV)]2alpha2(IV) antibody labeled the conjunctival BMs, not the BMs of the corneal epithelia, of each subject. The normal corneal epithelial BM, not the BM of the conjunctival or dysplastic corneal epithelium, was immunolabeled with anti-alpha5(IV) antibody. The pattern of cytokeratin expression in the corneal epithelial dysplasia resembled that seen in the normal conjunctivae. Small breaks in the BM of dysplastic corneal epithelium were ultrastructurally revealed. The number of hemidesmosomes in the dysplastic corneal epithelium was decreased as compared with that in the normal BM. The composition of collagen types within the BM and the cellular phenotype of the dysplastic epithelium in the cornea resembled those of conjunctival epithelium, not of the cornea.

  6. Reinstatement of "germinal epithelium" of the ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Naoyo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The existing dogma that the former term ovarian "germinal epithelium" resulted from a mistaken belief that it could give rise to new germ cells is now strongly challenged. Discussion Two years ago, a research group of the University of Tennessee led by Antonin Bukovsky successfully demonstrated the oogenic process from the human ovarian covering epithelium now commonly called the ovarian surface epithelium. They showed the new oocyte with zona pellucida and granulosa cells, both originated from the surface epithelium arising from mesenchymal cells in the tunica albuginea, and stressed that the human ovary could form primary follicles throughout the reproductive period. This gives a big impact not only to the field of reproductive medicine, but also to the oncologic area. The surface epithelium is regarded as the major source of ovarian cancers, and most of the neoplasms exhibit the histology resembling müllerian epithelia. Since the differentiating capability of the surface epithelium has now expanded, the histologic range of the neoplasms in this category may extend to include both germ cell tumors and sex cord-stromal cell tumors. Summary Since the oogenic capability of ovarian surface cells has been proven, it is now believed that the oocytes can originate from them. The term "germinal epithelium", hence, might reasonably be reinstated.

  7. Different Cell Types In the Lower Respiratory Tract of the Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L. - A Transmission Electron Microscopical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seppo A.m. Saari

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available The epithelium of the trachea and distal airways of 12 healthy adult reindeer were studied with transmission electron microscopy. The ultrastructure of the reindeer respiratory tract corresponded to the findings of previous investigators studying other mammalian species. The epithelium of the trachea and bronchi, down to the level of the distal bronchioli, was composed of three main types of cell: ciliated, goblet, and basal. In the distal brochioli, non-ciliated cells similar to those known as Clara cells were predominant. Numerous electron-dense granules and the cell organelle pattern resembled the Clara cell type observed in laboratory rodents, rabbit, sheep, pig, horse, and llama. Pneumocyte 1 and pneumocyte 2 cells were readily identified in the alveoli. The pneumocyte 2 cells possessed short microvilli and granules with lamellar content. Micropinocytotic vesicles were very numerous in the alveolar wall, and a small number of alveolar macrophages occasionally seen in the alveolar lumen.

  8. Corneal epithelium following penetrating keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, K; Mashima, Y; Murata, H; Yamada, M; Sato, N

    1995-03-01

    This study was designed to observe any changes to the corneal epithelium after penetrating keratoplasty. The corneal epithelia of 26 patients were observed by specular microscopy 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months following penetrating keratoplasty. After re-epithelialisation was confirmed by biomicroscopy 1 week after surgery, specular microscopy revealed many abnormal cells, including spindle shaped cells, nucleated cells, large cells, as well as irregular cell configurations. Although these abnormal findings tended to decrease with time, they were still present in some cases as much as 6 months postoperatively. Computerised morphometric analysis yielded mean cell areas of 1121 (SD 168) microns 2, 1139 (675) microns 2, 1712 (496) microns 2, and 1400 (377) microns 2 at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months respectively, all significantly greater than that of age matched controls (710 (151) microns 2). The shape factor decreased with time, but was still greater than the control level at 6 months. This study demonstrates that epithelial abnormalities persist longer than expected after penetrating keratoplasty, and that these subtle changes can be detected by specular microscopic observation, potentially allowing for modification and enhancement of the wound healing process.

  9. Association of serum Clara cell protein CC16 with respiratory infections and immune response to respiratory pathogens in elite athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Respiratory epithelium integrity impairment caused by intensive exercise may lead to exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Clara cell protein (CC16) has anti-inflammatory properties and its serum level reflects changes in epithelium integrity and airway inflammation. This study aimed to investigate serum CC16 in elite athletes and to seek associations of CC16 with asthma or allergy, respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and immune response to respiratory pathogens. Methods The study was performed in 203 Olympic athletes. Control groups comprised 53 healthy subjects and 49 mild allergic asthmatics. Serum levels of CC16 and IgG against respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae were assessed. Allergy questionnaire for athletes was used to determine symptoms and exercise pattern. Current versions of ARIA and GINA guidelines were used when diagnosing allergic rhinitis and asthma, respectively. Results Asthma was diagnosed in 13.3% athletes, of whom 55.6% had concomitant allergic rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis without asthma was diagnosed in 14.8% of athletes. Mean CC16 concentration was significantly lower in athletes versus healthy controls and mild asthmatics. Athletes reporting frequent RTIs had significantly lower serum CC16 and the risk of frequent RTIs was more than 2-fold higher in athletes with low serum CC16 (defined as equal to or less than 4.99 ng/ml). Athletes had significantly higher anti-adenovirus IgG than healthy controls while only non-atopic athletes had anti-parainfluenza virus IgG significantly lower than controls. In all athletes weak correlation of serum CC16 and anti-parainfluenza virus IgG was present (R = 0.20, p athletes a weak positive correlations of CC16 with IgG specific for respiratory syncytial virus (R = 0.29, p = 0.009), parainfluenza virus (R = 0.31, p = 0.01) and adenovirus (R = 0.27, p = 0.02) were seen as well. Conclusions Regular high-load exercise is associated with decrease in serum CC16

  10. The 3-layered ductal epithelium in gynecomastia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornegoor, Robert; Verschuur-Maes, Anoek H J; Buerger, Horst; van Diest, Paul J

    2012-05-01

    Gynecomastia is the most common abnormality in the male breast and has been associated with male breast cancer, but whether there is an etiological role remains unknown. In the present study we conducted an immunohistochemical investigation to further characterize gynecomastia. A total of 46 cases of gynecomastia were immunohistochemically stained on tissue microarrays for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, HER2, androgen receptor, cytokeratins (CK5, CK14, CK7, and CK8/18), p63, E-cadherin, BRST2, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, p53, p16, p21, and Ki67. In addition, 8 cases of male ductal carcinoma in situ and normal breast tissue obtained from autopsies (n=10) and adjacent to male breast cancer (n=5) were studied. Normal ductal male breast epithelial cells were very often ER and Bcl-2 positive (>69%), and progesterone receptor and androgen receptor expression was also common (>39%). Gynecomastia showed a consistent 3-layered pattern: 1 myoepithelial and 2 epithelial cell layers with a distinctive immunohistochemical staining pattern. The intermediate luminal layer, consisting of vertically oriented cuboidal-to-columnar cells, is hormone receptor positive and expresses Bcl-2 and cyclin D1. The inner luminal layer is composed of smaller cells expressing CK5 and often CK14 but is usually negative for hormone receptors and Bcl-2. Male ductal carcinoma in situ was consistently ER positive and CK5/CK14 negative. In conclusion, for the first time we describe the 3-layered ductal epithelium in gynecomastia, which has a distinctive immunohistochemical profile. These results indicate that different cellular compartments exist in gynecomastia, and therefore gynecomastia does not seem to be an obligate precursor lesion of male breast cancer.

  11. Regional variations of cell surface carbohydrates in human oral stratified epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedtofte, P; Dabelsteen, Erik; Hakomori, S

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of blood group carbohydrate chains with antigen A, B, H type 2 chain (A and B precursor), and N-acetyllactosamine (H type 2 precursor) specificity was studied in human oral epithelium from different anatomical regions. These represented various epithelial differentiation patterns...... epithelium from nine blood group A, two blood group B, and nine blood group O individuals. The blood group carbohydrate chains were examined in tissue sections by immunofluorescence microscopy. The A and B blood group antigens were detected by human blood group sera, and antigen H type 2 chains and N...... antigen H type 2 chains in metaplastically keratinized buccal epithelium was found to differ significantly from that seen in normal non-keratinized buccal epithelium. The regional variations demonstrated in cell surface carbohydrates are suggested to reflect differences in tissue differentiation....

  12. A case of foregut gastric duplication cyst with pseudostratified columnar ciliated epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosomura, Naohiro; Kono, Hiroshi; Kawaida, Hiromichi; Amemiya, Hidetake; Itakura, Jun; Fujii, Hideki

    2012-02-01

    Gastrointestinal duplication is a congenital rare disease. Duplication cyst of the stomach with pseudostratified columnar ciliated epithelium is extremely rare. A 44-year-old Japanese woman visited University of Yamanashi Hospital for evaluation of an abnormal tumor detected by abdominal ultrasonography at an annual general health examination. Abdominal computed tomography indicated a subserosal cystic lesion 6 cm in diameter on the posterior wall of the stomach. The cystic lesion was resected through partial resection of the stomach. Histopathology showed that the cyst did not communicate with the gastric lumen, was covered with gastric epithelium and pseudostratified columnar ciliated epithelium with circular muscle layers, and did not contain cartilaginous tissue. Consequently, the patient was diagnosed as having foregut duplication cyst of the stomach. Gastrointestinal duplication can occur in any region of the gastrointestinal tract, but foregut duplication cyst of the stomach is rare. The present case was a subserosal cyst on the greater curvature that did not communicate with the gastric lumen and was covered with gastric epithelium and pseudostratified columnar ciliated epithelium, suggesting a foregut cyst caused by an aberrant respiratory organ.

  13. Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  14. A Pediatric Patient With an Orbital Respiratory Epithelial Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Jason E; Bahrami, Arash; Monteleone, Christina; Pascasio, Judy Mae; Davis, Wellington J

    2017-11-01

    Respiratory epithelial cysts are rare orbital cysts that can arise secondary to choristomatous rests of respiratory epithelium. Approximately 15 congenital cases have been described in the literature, making it a rare disease entity. We present a case of a 14-month-old Middle Eastern male with a right infraorbital respiratory epithelial cyst. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and orbits revealed a right infraorbital cyst hyperintense on T1-weighted images and followed fluid density on T2-weighted images. This cyst was noted to displace the globe superiorly and inferior rectus muscle laterally. This cyst was excised using a transconjunctival approach. Histologically, the cyst wall was lined by ciliated columnar cells with interspersed mucus-containing cells and ciliated transitional epithelium was present, establishing the diagnosis of respiratory epithelial cyst. To our knowledge, this is the youngest patient with a respiratory epithelial cyst of the orbit reported in the literature.

  15. Effects of device‑guided slow breathing training on exercise capacity, cardiac function, and respiratory patterns during sleep in male and female patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Bilo, Grzegorz; Drożdż, Tomasz; Dębicka-Dąbrowska, Dorota; Kiełbasa, Grzegorz; Malfatto, Gabriella; Styczkiewicz, Katarzyna; Lombardi, Carolina; Bednarek, Agnieszka; Salerno, Sabrina; Czarnecka, Danuta; Parati, Gianfranco

    2017-01-10

    INTRODUCTION Slow breathing training (SBT) has been proposed as a new nonpharmacologic treatment in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to assess the effects of SBT on exercise capacity, hemodynamic parameters, and sleep respiratory patterns in a relatively large sample of CHF patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS A crossover open study was conducted. Patients completed, in a random order, 10- to 12‑week SBT, with 2 15‑minute sessions of device‑guided SBT each day, reaching 6 breaths/ min, and a 10- to 12‑week follow‑up under standard care. Clinical data collection, polysomnography, echocardiography, 6‑minute walk test (6MWT), and laboratory tests were performed. RESULTS A total of 96 patients (74 men, 22 women) in New York Heart Association classes I-III, with an average age of 65 years and an ejection fraction (EF) of 31%, completed the study. Home‑based SBT was safe. After training, EF and 6MWT distance improved (EF: 31.3% ±7.3% vs 32.3% ±7.7%; P = 0.030; 6MWT: 449.9 ±122.7 m vs 468.3 ±121.9 m; P sleep disturbances. The results support the benefits of SBT as a novel component of cardiorespiratory rehabilitation programs in patients with CHF.

  16. Oxidative stress induces dysregulated autophagy in corneal epithelium of keratoconus patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevour, Priyanka; Padmajan, Neeraja; Dhamodaran, Kamesh; Jayadev, Chaitra; M. M. A. Nuijts, Rudy; Ghosh, Arkasubhra

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the key factors that contributes to the pathogenesis of keratoconus (KC). Macroautophagy is a vital cellular mechanism that is activated in response to oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to understand the role of the autophagic lysosomal pathway in the oxidative damage of KC corneal epithelium and the human corneal epithelial cell line (HCE).The corneal epithelium was collected from 78 KC patients undergoing corneal cross-linking or topography guided photorefractive keratectomy. We performed microarray, qPCR and western blot analysis for the expression of autophagy markers on this epithelium from patients with different clinical grades of KC. A differential expression pattern of autophagy related markers was observed in the diseased corneal cone-specific epithelium compared to matched peripheral epithelium from KC patients with increasing clinical severity. Human corneal epithelial cells exposed to oxidative stress were analyzed for the expression of key proteins associated with KC pathogenesis and the autophagic pathway. Oxidative stress led to an increase in reactive oxygen species and an imbalanced expression of autophagy markers in the HCE cells. Further, reduced levels of Akt/p70S6 Kinase, which is a known target of the mTOR pathway was observed in HCE cells under oxidative stress as well as in KC epithelium. Our results suggest that an altered expression of proteins suggestive of defective autophagy and is a consequence of oxidative damage. This could play a possible role in the pathogenesis of KC. PMID:28902914

  17. Sialic acid receptor detection in the human respiratory tract: evidence for widespread distribution of potential binding sites for human and avian influenza viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Yi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza virus binds to cell receptors via sialic acid (SA linked glycoproteins. They recognize SA on host cells through their haemagglutinins (H. The distribution of SA on cell surfaces is one determinant of host tropism and understanding its expression on human cells and tissues is important for understanding influenza pathogenesis. The objective of this study therefore was to optimize the detection of α2,3-linked and α2,6-linked SA by lectin histochemistry by investigating the binding of Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA for SAα2,6Gal and Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA for SAα2,3Gal in the respiratory tract of normal adults and children. Methods We used fluorescent and biotinylated SNA and MAA from different suppliers on archived and prospectively collected biopsy and autopsy specimens from the nasopharynx, trachea, bronchus and lungs of fetuses, infants and adults. We compared different methods of unmasking for tissue sections to determine if these would affect lectin binding. Using serial sections we then compared the lectin binding of MAA from different suppliers. Results We found that unmasking using microwave treatment in citrate buffer produced increased lectin binding to the ciliated and glandular epithelium of the respiratory tract. In addition we found that there were differences in tissue distribution of the α2,3 linked SA when 2 different isoforms of MAA (MAA1 and MAA2 lectin were used. MAA1 had widespread binding throughout the upper and lower respiratory tract and showed more binding to the respiratory epithelium of children than in adults. By comparison, MAA2 binding was mainly restricted to the alveolar epithelial cells of the lung with weak binding to goblet cells. SNA binding was detected in bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells and binding of this lectin was stronger to the paediatric epithelium compared to adult epithelium. Furthermore, the MAA lectins from 2 suppliers (Roche and EY Labs tended

  18. Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Golubev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a common complication of many diseases. Its polyetiological pattern determines the specific features of lung morphological changes and the clinical course of ARDS. Objective: to analyze the pathogenesis of ARDS in the context of the general pathological processes underlying its development. Material and methods. More than 200 lungs from the people who had died from severe concomitant injury or ARDS-complicated pneumonia were investigated. More than 150 rat experiments simulated various types of lung injury: ventilator-induced lung injury with different ventilation parameters; reperfusion injuries (systemic circulation blockade due to 12-minute vascular fascicle ligation, followed by the recovery of cardiac performance and breathing; microcirculatory disorder (injection of a thromboplastin solution into the jugular vein; blood loss; betaine-pepsin aspiration; and closed chest injury. Different parts of the right and left lungs were histologically examined 1 and 3 hours and 1 and 3 days after initiation of the experiment. Lung pieces were fixed in 10% neutral formalin solution and embedded in paraffin. Histological sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and using the van Gieson and Weigert procedures; the Schiff test was used. Results. The influence of aggression factors (trauma, blood loss, aspiration, infection, etc. results in damage to the lung and particularly air-blood barrier structures (endothelium, alveolar epithelium, their basement membrane. In turn the alteration of cellular and extracellular structures is followed by the increased permeability of hemomicrocirculatory bed vessels, leading to the development of non-cardiogenic (interstitial, alveolar pulmonary edema that is a central component in the pathogenesis of ARDS. Conclusion. The diagnosis of the early manifestations of ARDS must account for the nature of an aggression factor, the signs confirming the alteration of the lung

  19. Endogenous expression pattern of resolvin D1 in a rat model of self-resolution of lipopolysaccharide-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Wang, Zai-ping; Gui, Ping; Xia, Weiyi; Xia, Zhengyuan; Zhang, Xing-cai; Deng, Qing-zhu; Xuan, Wei; Marie, Christelle; Wang, Lin-lin; Wu, Qing-ping; Wang, Tingting; Lin, Yun

    2014-11-01

    Resolvin D1 (RvD1), an endogenous lipid mediator derived from docosahexaenoic acid, has been reported to promote a biphasic activity in anti-inflammatory response and regulate inflammatory resolution. The present study aimed to determine the endogenous expression pattern of RvD1 in a rat model of self-resolution of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and inflammation. The ARDS model was induced by administrating LPS (2mg/kg) via tracheotomy in 138 male Sprague-Dawley rats. At specified time points, lung injury and inflammation were respectively assessed by lung histology and analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and cytokine levels. The expression of endogenous RvD1 was detected by high performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The results showed that histological lung injury peaked between 6h (LPS6h) and day 3, followed by recovery over 4-10 days after LPS administration. Lung tissue polymorph nuclear cell (PMN) was significantly increased at LPS6h, and peaked between 6h to day 2. The levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 were significantly increased at LPS6h and remained higher over day 10 as compared to baseline. Intriguingly, the endogenous RvD1 expression was decreased gradually during the first 3 days, followed by almost completely recovery over days 9-10. The finding indicated that endogenous RvD1 underwent a decrease in expression followed by gradual increase that was basically coincident with the lung injury recovery in a rat model of self-resolution LPS-induced ARDS and inflammation. Our results may help define the optimal therapeutic window for endogenous RvD1 to prevent or treat LPS-induced ARDS and inflammation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Patient-specific three-dimensional explant spheroids derived from human nasal airway epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthin, June Kehlet; Stevens, Elizabeth Munkebjerg; Larsen, Lars Allan

    2017-01-01

    surface facing the outside and accessible for analysis of ciliary function. METHODS: We performed a two-group comparison study of ciliary beat pattern and ciliary beat frequency in spheroids derived from nasal airway epithelium in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and in healthy controls...

  1. [Quantitative image analysis in pulmonary pathology - digitalization of preneoplastic lesions in human bronchial epithelium (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, T; Müller, K M; Kämper, H

    1979-01-01

    The report concerns the first phase of a quantitative study of normal and abnormal bronchial epithelium with the objective of establishing the digitalization of histologic patterns. Preparative methods, data collecting and handling, and further mathematical analysis are described. In cluster and discriminatory analysis the digitalized histologic features can be used to separate and classify the individual cases into the respective diagnostic groups.

  2. Ciliary function of the frog oro-pharyngeal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, E; Sleigh, M

    1977-03-09

    The palate epithelium of the frog was examined by scanning electron microscopy, light microscopy and high speed cine micrography. The cilia remain stationary for much of time in the end-of-effective stroke position. Each beat cycle begins with a forwardly-directed recovery stroke lasting about 60 ms, followed by an effective stroke towards the oesophagus lasting about 12 ms. Activity can often be correlated with the presence of mucus, which is carried as strands on the tips of the ciliary effective strokes whilst the recovery strokes move beneath the mucus. Coordination of ciliary activity was very variable; local antiplectic metachrony of the recovery strokes could almost always be seen, and on very active epithelia effective strokes were associated with approximately diaplectic waves (either to left or right), but any particular pattern of coordinated activity was transient and quickly transformed to another pattern. Beating and coordination of these short cilia were compared with those of cilia propelling water.

  3. Analysis of Cell Turnover in the Bronchiolar Epithelium Through the Normal Aging Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Martínez, Marta; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E; Ancer-Arellano, Adriana; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; de-la-Garza-González, Carlos; Ancer-Rodríguez, Jesús; Jaramillo-Rangel, Gilberto

    2016-08-01

    Aging is associated with changes in the lung that leads to a decrease in its function. Alterations in structure and function in the small airways are well recognized in chronic lung diseases. The aim of this study was the assessment of cell turnover in the bronchiolar epithelium of mouse through the normal aging process. Lungs from CD1 mice at the age of 2, 6, 12, 18, or 24 months were fixed in neutral-buffered formalin and paraffin-embedded. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen was examined by immunohistochemistry. Apoptosis was analyzed by in situ end-labeling of fragmented DNA. Epithelial dimensions were analyzed by morphometry. The 2-month-old mice showed significantly higher number of proliferating cells when compared with mice at all other age groups. The number of apoptotic cells in mice at 24 months of age was significantly greater than in mice at all other age groups. Thus, the number of epithelial cells decreased as the age of the subject increased. We also found reductions in both area and height of the bronchiolar epithelium in mice at 18 and 24 months of age. We found a decrease in the total number of epithelial cells in the aged mice, which was accompanied by a thinning of the epithelium. These changes reflect a dysregulated tissue regeneration process in the bronchiolar epithelium that might predispose to respiratory diseases in elderly subjects.

  4. Respiratory mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  5. Human Reconstituted Nasal Epithelium, a promising in vitro model to assess impacts of environmental complex mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardet, Gaëlle; Mignon, Virginie; Momas, Isabelle; Achard, Sophie; Seta, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Considering the impact of respiratory diseases around the world, appropriate experimental tools to help understand the mechanisms involved in such diseases are becoming essential. Our aim was to investigate the cellular and morphological reactivity of a human Reconstituted Nasal Epithelium (hRNE) to evaluate the impact of environmental complex mixture (ECM), with tobacco smoke as a model, after three weeks of repeated exposures. Staining of hRNE showed a multilayered ciliated epithelium, with a regular cilia beats, and a mucus production. When hRNE was exposed to ECM for 5 min once or twice a week, during 3 weeks, significant changes occurred: IL-8 production significantly increased 24h after the first exposure compared with Air-exposure and only during the first week, without any loss of tissue integrity. Immunostaining of F-actin cytoskeleton showed a modification in cellular morphology (number and diameter). Taken together our results indicate that hRNE is well suited to study the cellular and morphological effects of repeated exposures to an environmental complex mixture. Human reconstituted epithelium models are currently the best in vitro representation of human respiratory tract physiology, and also the most robust for performing repeated exposures to atmospheric pollutants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Transport across the choroid plexus epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praetorius, Jeppe; Damkier, Helle Hasager

    2017-06-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium is a secretory epithelium par excellence. However, this is perhaps not the most prominent reason for the massive interest in this modest-sized tissue residing inside the brain ventricles. Most likely, the dominant reason for extensive studies of the choroid plexus is the identification of this epithelium as the source of the majority of intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid. This finding has direct relevance for studies of diseases and conditions with deranged central fluid volume or ionic balance. While the concept is supported by the vast majority of the literature, the implication of the choroid plexus in secretion of the cerebrospinal fluid was recently challenged once again. Three newer and promising areas of current choroid plexus-related investigations are as follows: 1) the choroid plexus epithelium as the source of mediators necessary for central nervous system development, 2) the choroid plexus as a route for microorganisms and immune cells into the central nervous system, and 3) the choroid plexus as a potential route for drug delivery into the central nervous system, bypassing the blood-brain barrier. Thus, the purpose of this review is to highlight current active areas of research in the choroid plexus physiology and a few matters of continuous controversy. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Lobar collapse with respiratory syncytial virus pneumonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, S.F.; Erickson, S.; Oshman, D.; Hayden, F.

    1985-05-01

    In a study of 30 children with uncomplicated respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) pneumonias, a high incidence of lobar collapse (8/30-26%) was noted. This involved the right upper lobe in seven patients and the left upper lobe in one patient. It is probably attributable to anatomical predispositions, sloughing of necrotic epithelium, and stimulation of mucus production. Lobar collapse should be considered part of the spectrum of RSV pneumonitis.

  8. deltaNp63 has a role in maintaining epithelial integrity in airway epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Jon Arason

    Full Text Available The upper airways are lined with a pseudostratified bronchial epithelium that forms a barrier against unwanted substances in breathing air. The transcription factor p63, which is important for stratification of skin epithelium, has been shown to be expressed in basal cells of the lungs and its ΔN isoform is recognized as a key player in squamous cell lung cancer. However, the role of p63 in formation and maintenance of bronchial epithelia is largely unknown. The objective of the current study was to determine the expression pattern of the ΔN and TA isoforms of p63 and the role of p63 in the development and maintenance of pseudostratified lung epithelium in situ and in culture. We used a human bronchial epithelial cell line with basal cell characteristics (VA10 to model bronchial epithelium in an air-liquid interface culture (ALI and performed a lentiviral-based silencing of p63 to characterize the functional and phenotypic consequences of p63 loss. We demonstrate that ΔNp63 is the major isoform in the human lung and its expression was exclusively found in the basal cells lining the basement membrane of the bronchial epithelium. Knockdown of p63 affected proliferation and migration of VA10 cells and facilitated cellular senescence. Expression of p63 is critical for epithelial repair as demonstrated by wound healing assays. Importantly, generation of pseudostratified VA10 epithelium in the ALI setup depended on p63 expression and goblet cell differentiation, which can be induced by IL-13 stimulation, was abolished by the p63 knockdown. After knockdown of p63 in primary bronchial epithelial cells they did not proliferate and showed marked senescence. We conclude that these results strongly implicate p63 in the formation and maintenance of differentiated pseudostratified bronchial epithelium.

  9. Neoplasia versus hyperplasia of the retinal pigment epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Steffen; Larsen, J.N.B.; Fledelius, Hans C.

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, retinal pigment epithelium, adenoma, tumor-like hyperplasia, histology, immunohistochemistry, tumor, neoplasm, ultrasonography......ophthalmology, retinal pigment epithelium, adenoma, tumor-like hyperplasia, histology, immunohistochemistry, tumor, neoplasm, ultrasonography...

  10. Respiratory protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Howard J; Birkner, Jeffrey S

    2012-12-01

    Respiratory protection is used as a method of protecting individuals from inhaling harmful airborne contaminants and in some cases to supply them with breathable air in oxygen-deficient environments. This article focuses on the use and types of personal respiratory protection (respirators) worn by individuals at workplaces where airborne hazardous contaminants may exist. Respirators are increasingly also being used in nonindustrial settings such as health care facilities, as concerns regarding infectious epidemics and terrorist threats grow. Pulmonologists and other clinicians should understand fundamental issues regarding respiratory protection against airborne contaminants and the use of respirators. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Buccal Epithelium, Cigarette Smoking, and Lung Cancer: Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Raya; Halytskyy, Oleksandr; Saleem, Nasir; Oliff, Ira A

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is currently the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among men and women in the United States, and optimal screening methods are still lacking. The field effect is a well-supported phenomenon wherein a noxious stimulus triggers genetic, epigenetic and molecular changes that are widespread throughout the entire exposed organ system. The buccal epithelium is an easily accessible part of the respiratory tree that has good potential of yielding a surrogate marker for the field effect in cigarette smokers, and thus, a noninvasive, reliable lung cancer screening method. Herein, we review the literature on the relationship between the buccal epithelium, cigarette smoking, and lung cancer. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. The location of olfactory receptors within olfactory epithelium is independent of odorant volatility and solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeFazio Anthony R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our objective was to study the pattern of olfactory receptor expression within the dorsal and ventral regions of the mouse olfactory epithelium. We hypothesized that olfactory receptors were distributed based on the chemical properties of their ligands: e.g. receptors for polar, hydrophilic and weakly volatile odorants would be present in the dorsal region of olfactory epithelium; while receptors for non-polar, more volatile odorants would be distributed to the ventral region. To test our hypothesis, we used micro-transplantation of cilia-enriched plasma membranes derived from dorsal or ventral regions of the olfactory epithelium into Xenopus oocytes for electrophysiological characterization against a panel of 100 odorants. Findings Odorants detected by ORs from the dorsal and ventral regions showed overlap in volatility and water solubility. We did not find evidence for a correlation between the solubility and volatility of odorants and the functional expression of olfactory receptors in the dorsal or ventral region of the olfactory epithelia. Conclusions No simple clustering or relationship between chemical properties of odorants could be associated with the different regions of the olfactory epithelium. These results suggest that the location of ORs within the epithelium is not organized based on the physico-chemical properties of their ligands.

  13. Transcriptional responses in the rat nasal epithelium following subchronic inhalation of naphthalene vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clewell, H.J., E-mail: hclewell@thehamner.org; Efremenko, A.; Campbell, J.L.; Dodd, D.E.; Thomas, R.S.

    2014-10-01

    Male and female Fischer 344 rats were exposed to naphthalene vapors at 0 (controls), 0.1, 1, 10, and 30 ppm for 6 h/d, 5 d/wk, over a 90-day period. Following exposure, the respiratory epithelium and olfactory epithelium from the nasal cavity were dissected separately, RNA was isolated, and gene expression microarray analysis was conducted. Only a few significant gene expression changes were observed in the olfactory or respiratory epithelium of either gender at the lowest concentration (0.1 ppm). At the 1.0 ppm concentration there was limited evidence of an oxidative stress response in the respiratory epithelium, but not in the olfactory epithelium. In contrast, a large number of significantly enriched cellular pathway responses were observed in both tissues at the two highest concentrations (10 and 30 ppm, which correspond to tumorigenic concentrations in the NTP bioassay). The nature of these responses supports a mode of action involving oxidative stress, inflammation and proliferation. These results are consistent with a dose-dependent transition in the mode of action for naphthalene toxicity/carcinogenicity between 1.0 and 10 ppm in the rat. In the female olfactory epithelium (the gender/site with the highest incidences of neuroblastomas in the NTP bioassay), the lowest concentration at which any signaling pathway was significantly affected, as characterized by the median pathway benchmark dose (BMD) or its 95% lower bound (BMDL) was 6.0 or 3.7 ppm, respectively, while the lowest female olfactory BMD values for pathways related to glutathione homeostasis, inflammation, and proliferation were 16.1, 11.1, and 8.4 ppm, respectively. In the male respiratory epithelium (the gender/site with the highest incidences of adenomas in the NTP bioassay), the lowest pathway BMD and BMDL were 0.4 and 0.3 ppm, respectively, and the lowest male respiratory BMD values for pathways related to glutathione homeostasis, inflammation, and proliferation were 0.5, 0.7, and 0.9 ppm

  14. Respiratory Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saturated with workers, and other areas (more often, rural areas) will be in need of respiratory therapists’ ... workers in the occupation, including what tools and equipment they use and how closely they are supervised. ...

  15. Potential contribution of mitochondrial DNA damage associated molecular patterns in transfusion products to the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome after multiple transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Jon D; Lee, Yann-Leei L; Pastukh, Viktor M; Capley, Gina; Muscat, Cherry A; Muscat, David C; Marshall, Michael L; Brevard, Sidney B; Gillespie, Mark N

    2017-06-01

    Massive transfusions are accompanied by an increased incidence of a particularly aggressive and lethal form of acute lung injury (delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury) which occurs longer than 24 hours after transfusions. In light of recent reports showing that mitochondrial (mt)DNA damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are potent proinflammatory mediators, and that their abundance in the sera of severely injured or septic patients is predictive of clinical outcomes, we explored the idea that mtDNA DAMPs are present in transfusion products and are associated with the occurrence of delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury. We prospectively enrolled fourteen consecutive severely injured patients that received greater than three units of blood transfusion products and determined if the total amount of mtDNA DAMPs delivered during transfusion correlated with serum mtDNA DAMPs measured after the last transfusion, and whether the quantity of mtDNA DAMPs in the serum-predicted development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We found detectable levels of mtDNA DAMPs in packed red blood cells (3 ± 0.4 ng/mL), fresh frozen plasma (213.7 ± 65 ng/mL), and platelets (94.8 ± 69.2), with the latter two transfusion products containing significant amounts of mtDNA fragments. There was a linear relationship between the mtDNA DAMPs given during transfusion and the serum concentration of mtDNA fragments (R = 0.0.74, p DAMPs in serum measured at 24 hours after transfusion predicted the occurrence of ARDS (9.9 ± 1.4 vs. 3.3 ± 0.9, p DAMPs administered during transfusion may be a determinant of serum mtDNA DAMP levels, and that serum levels of mtDNA DAMPs after multiple transfusions may predict the development of ARDS. Collectively, these findings support the idea that mtDNA DAMPs in transfusion products significantly contribute to the incidence of ARDS after massive transfusions. Prognostic study, level II; therapeutic study, level II.

  16. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eCoskun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs that are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  17. Visualization of ex vivo human ciliated epithelium and induced flow using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yuye; Gamm, Uta A.; Yao, Xinwen; Arteaga-Solis, Emilio; Emala, Charles W.; Choma, Michael A.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2017-04-01

    The ciliated epithelium is important to the human respiratory system because it clears mucus that contains harmful microorganisms and particulate matter. We report the ex vivo visualization of human trachea/bronchi ciliated epithelium and induced flow characterized by using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). A total number of 17 samples from 7 patients were imaged. Samples were obtained from Columbia University Department of Anesthesiology's tissue bank. After excision, the samples were placed in Gibco Medium 199 solution with oxygen at 4°C until imaging. The samples were maintained at 36.7°C throughout the experiment. The imaging protocol included obtaining 3D volumes and 200 consecutive B-scans parallel to the head-to-feet direction (superior-inferior axis) of the airway, using Thorlabs Telesto system at 1300 nm at 28 kHz A-line rate and a custom built high resolution SDOCT system at 800nm at 32 kHz A-line rate. After imaging, samples were processed with H and E histology. Speckle variance of the time resolved datasets demonstrate significant contrast at the ciliated epithelium sites. Flow images were also obtained after injecting 10μm polyester beads into the solution, which shows beads traveling trajectories near the ciliated epithelium areas. In contrary, flow images taken in the orthogonal plane show no beads traveling trajectories. This observation is in line with our expectation that cilia drive flow predominantly along the superior-inferior axis. We also observed the protective function of the mucus, shielding the epithelium from the invasion of foreign objects such as microspheres. Further studies will be focused on the cilia's physiological response to environmental changes such as drug administration and physical injury.

  18. Prostaglandin E2 release from dermis regulates sodium permeability of frog skin epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytved, Klaus A.; Brodin, Birger; Nielsen, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Arachidonic acid, cAMP, epithelium, frog skin, intracellular calcium, prostaglandin E*U2, sodium transport, tight epithelium.......Arachidonic acid, cAMP, epithelium, frog skin, intracellular calcium, prostaglandin E*U2, sodium transport, tight epithelium....

  19. Efficient Biodistribution and Gene Silencing in the Lung epithelium via Intravenous Liposomal Delivery of siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskill, Jana; Singhania, Richa; Burgess, Melinda; Allavena, Rachel; Wu, Sherry; Blumenthal, Antje; McMillan, Nigel Aj

    2013-06-04

    RNA interference (RNAi) may provide a therapeutic solution to many pulmonary epithelium diseases. However, the main barrier to the clinical use of RNAi remains the lack of efficient delivery vectors. Research has mainly concentrated on the intranasal route of delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA) effector molecules for the treatment of respiratory diseases. However, this may be complicated in a diseased state due to the increased fluid production and tissue remodeling. Therefore, we investigated our hydration of a freeze-dried matrix (HFDM) formulated liposomes for systemic delivery to the lung epithelium. Here, we show that 45 ± 2% of epithelial murine lung cells receive siRNA delivery upon intravenous (IV) liposomal administration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that liposomal siRNA delivery resulted in targeted gene and protein knockdown throughout the lung, including lung epithelium. Taken together, this is the first description of lung epithelial delivery via cationic liposomes, and provides a proof of concept for the use of IV liposomal RNAi delivery to specifically knockdown targeted genes in the respiratory system. This approach may provide an attractive alternate therapeutic delivery strategy for the treatment of lung epithelium diseases.Molecular Therapy - Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e96; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.22; published online 4 June 2013.

  20. Efficient Biodistribution and Gene Silencing in the Lung epithelium via Intravenous Liposomal Delivery of siRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana McCaskill

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi may provide a therapeutic solution to many pulmonary epithelium diseases. However, the main barrier to the clinical use of RNAi remains the lack of efficient delivery vectors. Research has mainly concentrated on the intranasal route of delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA effector molecules for the treatment of respiratory diseases. However, this may be complicated in a diseased state due to the increased fluid production and tissue remodeling. Therefore, we investigated our hydration of a freeze-dried matrix (HFDM formulated liposomes for systemic delivery to the lung epithelium. Here, we show that 45 ± 2% of epithelial murine lung cells receive siRNA delivery upon intravenous (IV liposomal administration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that liposomal siRNA delivery resulted in targeted gene and protein knockdown throughout the lung, including lung epithelium. Taken together, this is the first description of lung epithelial delivery via cationic liposomes, and provides a proof of concept for the use of IV liposomal RNAi delivery to specifically knockdown targeted genes in the respiratory system. This approach may provide an attractive alternate therapeutic delivery strategy for the treatment of lung epithelium diseases.

  1. Nasal-associated lymphoid tissue and olfactory epithelium as portals of entry for Burkholderia pseudomallei in murine melioidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Suzzanne J; Batzloff, Michael; Chehrehasa, Fatemeh; Meedeniya, Adrian; Casart, Yveth; Logue, Carie-Anne; Hirst, Robert G; Peak, Ian R; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Beacham, Ifor R

    2009-06-15

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is generally considered to be acquired via inhalation of dust or water droplets from the environment. In this study, we show that infection of the nasal mucosa is potentially an important portal of entry in melioidosis. After intranasal inoculation of mice, infection was monitored by bioluminescence imaging and by immunohistological analysis of coronal sections. The bacterial loads in organ and tissue specimens were also monitored. Bioluminescence imaging showed colonization and replication in the nasal cavity, including the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Analysis of coronal sections and immunofluorescence microscopy further demonstrated the presence of infection in the respiratory epithelium and the olfactory epithelium (including associated nerve bundles), as well as in the NALT. Of significance, the olfactory epithelium and the brain were rapidly infected before bacteria were detected in blood, and a capsule-deficient mutant infected the brain without significantly infecting blood. These data suggest that the olfactory nerve is the route of entry into the brain and that this route of entry may be paralleled in cases of human neurologic melioidosis. This study focuses attention on the upper respiratory tract as a portal of entry, specifically focusing on NALT as a route for the development of systemic infection via the bloodstream and on the olfactory epithelium as a direct route to the brain.

  2. The structure of the middle ear epithelium of the rat and the effect of Eustachian tube obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers, W; van der Beek, J M; Jap, P H; Tonnaer, E L

    1984-08-01

    The middle ear cavity of the rat is lined with ciliated and squamous epithelium. The arrangement of the ciliated cells, interspersed with secretory cells, in distinct tracts and their continuity with the ciliated epithelium of the Eustachian tube, suggests the existence of a mucociliary transport system for cleaning the middle ear cleft. The secretory cells produce either neutral or sulphated glycoproteins, dependent on their location. In addition to these secretions, the epithelium of the lower part of the Eustachian tube is bathed with secretory products of seromucous glands. Also in the areas with squamous epithelium, numerous small secretory cells, the character of which is only identifiable with the electronmicroscope, are present. It is concluded that the middle ear lining can be considered as a locally modified respiratory epithelium. Blockade of the mucociliary transport system, supposedly a crucial aetiological factor in secretory otitis media, by obstruction of the Eustachian tube, induces pathogenic behaviour of microorganisms normally present in the middle ear. This results in either a transient or a longstanding infective middle ear disease, associated with a large variety of changes of the mucosa, especially with respect to the secretory activity. The data obtained indicate that the increased secretory activity encountered in secretory otitis media cannot be attributed to the isolated effect of tubal occlusion, but rather to an infective process.

  3. Repair of tracheal epithelium by basal cells after chlorine-induced injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    consistent with a model where surviving basal cells function as progenitor cells to repopulate the tracheal epithelium after chlorine injury. In areas with few remaining basal cells, repair is inefficient, leading to airway fibrosis. These studies establish a model for understanding regenerative processes in the respiratory epithelium useful for testing therapies for airway injury. PMID:23170909

  4. Repair of tracheal epithelium by basal cells after chlorine-induced injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musah Sadiatu

    2012-11-01

    The data are consistent with a model where surviving basal cells function as progenitor cells to repopulate the tracheal epithelium after chlorine injury. In areas with few remaining basal cells, repair is inefficient, leading to airway fibrosis. These studies establish a model for understanding regenerative processes in the respiratory epithelium useful for testing therapies for airway injury.

  5. Efficient Biodistribution and Gene Silencing in the Lung epithelium via Intravenous Liposomal Delivery of siRNA

    OpenAIRE

    McCaskill, Jana; Singhania, Richa; Burgess, Melinda; Allavena, Rachel; Wu, Sherry; Blumenthal, Antje; McMillan, Nigel AJ

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) may provide a therapeutic solution to many pulmonary epithelium diseases. However, the main barrier to the clinical use of RNAi remains the lack of efficient delivery vectors. Research has mainly concentrated on the intranasal route of delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA) effector molecules for the treatment of respiratory diseases. However, this may be complicated in a diseased state due to the increased fluid production and tissue remodeling. Therefore, we inves...

  6. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion Changes the Landscape of the Alveolar Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles A. Downs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Similar to effects of alcohol on the heart, liver, and brain, the effects of ethanol (EtOH on lung injury are preventable. Unlike other vital organ systems, however, the lethal effects of alcohol on the lung are underappreciated, perhaps because there are no signs of overt pulmonary disorder until a secondary insult, such as a bacterial infection or injury, occurs in the lung. This paper provides overview of the complex changes in the alveolar environment known to occur following both chronic and acute alcohol exposures. Contemporary animal and cell culture models for alcohol-induced lung dysfunction are discussed, with emphasis on the effect of alcohol on transepithelial transport processes, namely, epithelial sodium channel activity (ENaC. The cascading effect of tissue and phagocytic Nadph oxidase (Nox may be triggered by ethanol exposure, and as such, alcohol ingestion and exposure lead to a prooxidative environment; thus impacting alveolar macrophage (AM function and oxidative stress. A better understanding of how alcohol changes the landscape of the alveolar epithelium can lead to improvements in treating acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS for which hospitalized alcoholics are at an increased risk.

  7. Seminal epithelium in prostate biopsy can mimic malignant and premalignant prostatic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arista-Nasr, J; Trolle-Silva, A; Aguilar-Ayala, E; Martínez-Benítez, B

    2016-01-01

    In most prostate biopsies, the seminal epithelium is easily recognised because it meets characteristic histological criteria. However, some biopsies can mimic malignant or premalignant prostatic lesions. The aims of this study were to analyse the histological appearance of the biopsies that mimic adenocarcinomas or preneoplastic prostatic lesions, discuss the differential diagnosis and determine the frequency of seminal epithelia in prostate biopsies. We consecutively reviewed 500 prostate puncture biopsies obtained using the sextant method and selected those cases in which we observed seminal vesicle or ejaculatory duct epithelium. In the biopsies in which the seminal epithelium resembled malignant or premalignant lesions, immunohistochemical studies were conducted that included prostate-specific antigen and MUC6. The most important clinical data were recorded. Thirty-six (7.2%) biopsies showed seminal epithelium, and 7 of them (1.4%) resembled various prostate lesions, including high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical acinar proliferations, adenocarcinomas with papillary patterns and poorly differentiated carcinoma. The seminal epithelium resembled prostate lesions when the lipofuscin deposit, the perinuclear vacuoles or the nuclear pseudoinclusions were inconspicuous or missing. Five of the 7 biopsies showed mild to moderate cellular atypia with small and hyperchromatic nuclei, and only 2 showed cellular pleomorphism. The patients were alive and asymptomatic after an average of 6 years of progression. The seminal epithelium resembles prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical acinar proliferations and various types of prostatic adenocarcinomas in approximately 1.4% of prostate biopsies. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Smoking and respiratory irregularity in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldirola, Daniela; Bellodi, Laura; Cammino, Stefania; Perna, Giampaolo

    2004-09-15

    The biological mechanisms underlying the link between smoking and panic attacks are unknown. Smoking might increase the risk of panic by impairing respiratory system function. We evaluated the effect of smoking on respiratory irregularity in patients with panic disorder (PD) and healthy comparison subjects and the role of the respiratory disorders in this effect. We applied the Approximate Entropy index (ApEn), a nonlinear measure of irregularity, to study breath-by-breath baseline respiratory patterns in our sample. Both smoker and nonsmoker patients had more irregular respiratory patterns than healthy subjects. Smoker patients showed higher ApEn indices of baseline respiratory rate and tidal volume than nonsmoker patients (R = 5.4, df = 2,55, p smoking in healthy subjects did not influence the regularity of respiratory patterns. Respiratory disorders did not account for the influence of smoking on respiratory irregularity. Smokers had more severe panic attacks than nonsmokers. Smoking may impair vulnerable respiratory function and act as disruptive factor on intrinsic baseline respiratory instability in patients with PD, possibly influencing the onset or maintenance of the disorder.

  9. Respiratory Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Martin R. Miller

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory Mechanics by Theodore Wilson is a slim paperback volume (64 pages) describing three aspects of the way the lungs work: 1) pressure?volume relationships with regard to the lungs, 2) chest wall and muscles with regard to how the respiratory pump works, and 3) gas flow and transport. Relevant details about the author are missing, which I think is a loss. He is Emeritus Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics and this background and his expertise was a perfect fit for the inv...

  10. Transdifferentiation of pigmented epithelium induced by the influence of lens epithelium in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopashov, G V

    1983-01-01

    The influence of lens epithelium (LE) of adult frogs on the character of transdifferentiation of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) of adult frogs and tadpoles of Rana temporaria has been studied. After a period of intense proliferation RPE cultured in vivo in contact with LE in the tadpole orbit almost exclusively transforms into retina. RPE precultivated in vitro in contact with LE for three days in protein-free medium does not manifest cell divisions and mostly transdifferentiates into lentoids. The problem of the relative significance of inducing determinants and the role of activation or inhibition of proliferation in transdifferentiation is discussed.

  11. Respiratory Support

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    can be caused by inappropriate mechanical ventilation. This soft-cover review of the current practice of appropriate respiratory support is not controversia(it describes in an easily readable and concise fashio-n the development, physiological implications, mechanical and technological basis, safety aspects and careful ...

  12. Imprinting of the COPD airway epithelium for dedifferentiation and mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohy, Sophie T; Hupin, Cloé; Fregimilicka, Chantal; Detry, Bruno R; Bouzin, Caroline; Gaide Chevronay, Héloïse; Lecocq, Marylène; Weynand, Birgit; Ladjemi, Maha Z; Pierreux, Christophe E; Birembaut, Philippe; Polette, Myriam; Pilette, Charles

    2015-05-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), epithelial changes and subepithelial fibrosis are salient features in conducting airways. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been recently suggested in COPD, but the mechanisms and relationship to peribronchial fibrosis remain unclear. We hypothesised that de-differentiation of the COPD respiratory epithelium through EMT could participate in airway fibrosis and thereby, in airway obstruction. Surgical lung tissue and primary broncho-epithelial cultures (in air-liquid interface (ALI)) from 104 patients were assessed for EMT markers. Cell cultures were also assayed for mesenchymal features and for the role of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. The bronchial epithelium from COPD patients showed increased vimentin and decreased ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression. Increased vimentin expression correlated with basement membrane thickening and airflow limitation. ALI broncho-epithelial cells from COPD patients also displayed EMT phenotype in up to 2 weeks of culture, were more spindle shaped and released more fibronectin. Targeting TGF-β1 during ALI differentiation prevented vimentin induction and fibronectin release. In COPD, the airway epithelium displays features of de-differentiation towards mesenchymal cells, which correlate with peribronchial fibrosis and airflow limitation, and which are partly due to a TGF-β1-driven epithelial reprogramming. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  13. Living with Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  14. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  15. Analysis of ethanol effects on corneal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Joo Youn; Yu, Ji Min; Ko, Jung Hwa

    2013-06-04

    Ethanol is widely used in ocular surface surgeries and for the treatment of corneal diseases. However, ethanol is a toxic agent that is related to the development of a number of alcohol-related diseases. Despite the common use of ethanol for therapeutic purposes in ophthalmology, effects of ethanol on the ocular surface have been poorly defined. Hence, we performed this study to investigate effects of ethanol on corneal epithelium from various aspects. We exposed corneal epithelial cells in culture to different concentrations of ethanol for 30 seconds and evaluated the cells for toxicity, survival, and expression of cell-specific markers and inflammatory cytokines at 24, 48, and 72 hours after ethanol exposure. We found that ethanol markedly decreased the viability of cells in a concentration-dependent manner by causing cell lysis, suppressing proliferation, and inducing apoptosis. Also, expression of corneal epithelial cell-specific markers, both stem cell and differentiation markers, was significantly reduced by ethanol exposure. Expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines was highly increased in corneal epithelial and stromal cells that were exposed to ethanol. Together, data suggest that brief exposure of the corneal surface to ethanol may have long-term effects by disrupting the integrity of corneal epithelium and generating inflammation, both of which are precursors to a number of ocular surface diseases.

  16. Differential activities of peroxisomes along the mouse intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvay, Petruta L; Baes, Myriam; Van Veldhoven, Paul P

    2017-04-01

    The presence of peroxisomes in mammalian intestine has been revealed formerly by catalase staining combined with electron microscopy. Despite the central role of intestine in lipid uptake and the established importance of peroxisomes in different lipid-related pathways, few data are available on the physiological role of peroxisomes in intestinal metabolism, more specifically, α-, β-oxidation, and etherlipid synthesis. Hence, the peroxisomal compartment was analyzed in more detail in mouse intestine. On the basis of immunohistochemistry, the organelles are mainly confined to the epithelial cells. The expression of the classical peroxisome marker catalase was highest in the proximal part of jejunum and decreased along the tract. PEX14 showed a similar profile, but was still substantial expressed in large intestinal epithelium. Immunoblotting of epithelial cells, isolated from the different segments, showed also such gradient for some enzymes, ie, catalase, ACOX1, and D-specific multifunctional protein 2, and for the ABCD1 transporter, being high in small and low or absent in large intestine. Other peroxisomal enzymes (PHYH, HACL1, and ACAA1), the ABCD2 and ABCD3 transporters, and peroxins PEX13 and PEX14, however, did not follow this pattern, displaying rather constant signals throughout the intestinal epithelium. The small intestine displayed the highest peroxisomal β-oxidation activity and is particularly active on dicarboxylic acids. Etherlipid synthesis was high in the large intestine, and colonic cells had the highest content of plasmalogens. Overall, these data suggest that peroxisomes exert different functions according to the intestinal segment. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Spatiotemporal expression of Ezh2 in the developing mouse cochlear sensory epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Li, Wenyan; Li, Wen; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-09-01

    The enhancer of zeste 2 polycomb repressive complex 2 subunit (Ezh2) is a histone-lysine Nmethyltransferase enzyme that participates in DNA methylation. Ezh2 has also been reported to play crucial roles in stem cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the detailed expression profile of Ezh2 during mouse cochlear development has not been investigated. Here, we examined the spatiotemporal expression of Ezh2 in the cochlea during embryonic and postnatal development. Ezh2 expression began to be observed in the whole otocyst nuclei at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5). At E12.5, Ezh2 was expressed in the nuclei of the cochlear prosensory epithelium. At E13.5 and E15.5, Ezh2 was expressed from the apical to the basal turns in the nuclei of the differentiating cochlear epithelium. At postnatal day (P) 0 and 7, the Ezh2 expression was located in the nuclei of the cochlear epithelium in all three turns and could be clearly seen in outer and inner hair cells, supporting cells, the stria vascularis, and spiral ganglion cells. Ezh2 continued to be expressed in the cochlear epithelium of adult mice. Our results provide the basic Ezh2 expression pattern and might be useful for further investigating the detailed role of Ezh2 during cochlear development.

  18. Epithelial Cell Damage Activates Bactericidal/Permeability Increasing-Protein (BPI Expression in Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Balakrishnan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As the first line of defense against invading pathogen, intestinal epithelium produces various antimicrobial proteins (AMP that help in clearance of pathogen. Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI is a 55 kDa AMP that is expressed in intestinal epithelium. Dysregulation of BPI in intestinal epithelium is associated with various inflammatory diseases like Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative colitis, and Infectious enteritis’s. In this paper, we report a direct correlation between intestinal damage and BPI expression. In Caco-2 cells, we see a significant increase in BPI levels upon membrane damage mediated by S. aureus infection and pore-forming toxins (Streptolysin and Listeriolysin. Cells detect changes in potassium level as a Danger-associated molecular pattern associated with cell damage and induce BPI expression in a p38 dependent manner. These results are further supported by in vivo findings that the BPI expression in murine intestinal epithelium is induced upon infection with bacteria which cause intestinal damage (Salmonella Typhimurium and Shigella flexneri whereas mutants that do not cause intestinal damage (STM ΔfliC and STM ΔinvC did not induce BPI expression. Our results suggest that epithelial damage associated with infection act as a signal to induce BPI expression.

  19. Glycoproteins of mouse vaginal epithelium: differential expression related to estrous cyclicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horvat, B; Multhaupt, H A; Damjanov, I

    1993-01-01

    in proestrus, coincident with the transformation of two superficial layers of vaginal squamous epithelium into mucinous cuboidal cells. Electron microscopic lectin histochemistry revealed the glycoproteins in the mucinous granules of surface cuboidal cells and in the lumen of the vagina. Our results illustrate...... the complexity of glycoconjugate synthesis in mouse vagina and reveal the distinct cycle-specific patterns of individual glycoprotein expression. These cyclic glycoproteins could serve as vaginal biochemical markers for the specific phases of the estrous cycle....

  20. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavada Abhay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  1. Disruption of zonula occludens-1 localization in the rabbit corneal epithelium by contact lens-induced hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Ryoji; Ko, Ji-Ae; Morishige, Naoyuki; Chikama, Tai-ichiro; Ichijima, Hideji; Nishida, Teruo

    2009-10-01

    Hypoxia impairs the barrier function of the corneal epithelium. This function depends on tight junctions, of which zonula occludens (ZO)-1 is a major component. The authors have investigated the effects of hypoxia on ZO-1 localization and expression in the rabbit corneal epithelium in vivo. A polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or rigid gas-permeable (RGP) lens was applied to one eye each of albino rabbits for 24 hours. The structure of the corneal epithelium was examined by in vivo confocal microscopy, and epithelial barrier function was evaluated by measurement of central corneal thickness. The distribution and expression of ZO-1 in the corneal epithelium were examined by immunofluorescence analysis and by immunoblot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses, respectively. Application of a PMMA lens, but not that of an RGP lens, resulted in a reduction in cell size at the surface of the corneal epithelium, compared with that in control eyes, and an increase in central corneal thickness. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed a continuous pattern of ZO-1 immunoreactivity around the perimeter of superficial corneal epithelial cells in control eyes or in eyes treated with an RGP lens. In contrast, the pattern of ZO-1 staining was discontinuous and patchy in eyes treated with a PMMA lens. Amounts of ZO-1 mRNA and protein in the corneal epithelium were reduced by application of a PMMA lens but not by that of an RGP lens. Hypoxia at the ocular surface induced the disruption of tight junctions between superficial cells in the rabbit corneal epithelium in vivo.

  2. Deterioration of epithelium mediated mechanisms in diabetic-antigen sensitized airways of guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bano, Saidullah; Swati, Omanwar; Kambadur, Muralidhar; Mohammad, Fahim

    2016-01-01

    The onset of diabetes causes disruption of respiratory epithelial mediators. The present study investigates whether diabetes modifies the epithelium mediated bronchial responses in hyper-reactive airway smooth muscle (ASM) primarily through nitric oxide (NO), cyclooxygenase (COX), and epithelium derived hyperpolarizing factor (EpDHF) pathways. Experimental model of guinea pigs having hyper-reactive airways with or without diabetes were developed. The responses of tracheal rings to cumulative concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh) and isoproterenol (IP) in the presence and absence of epithelium and before and after incubation with NO, K+ATP and COX inhibitors, N-(ω)-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 100 μM), glybenclamide (10 μM) and indomethacin (100 μM) were assessed. In diabetic guinea pigs with hyper-reactive airways, a decrease in ACh induced bronchoconstriction was observed after epithelium removal and after incubation with L-NAME/indomethacin, suggesting damage to NO/COX pathways. Hyper-reactivity did not alter the response of trachea to ACh but affected the response to IP which was further reduced in hyper-reactive animals with diabetes. The ASM response to IP after glybenclamide treatment did not alter in hyper-reactive guinea pigs and diabetic guinea pigs with hyper-reactive airways, suggesting damage to the EpDHF pathway. Treatment with indomethacin reduced IP response in the hyper-reactive model, and did not produce any change in diabetic model with hyper-reactive airways, indicating further disruption of the COX pathway. EpDHF pathway is damaged in hyper-reactive guinea pigs and in diabetic guinea pigs with hyper-reactive airways. Diabetes further aggravates the NO and COX mediated pathways in diabetic guinea pigs with hyper-reactive airways.

  3. Differential expression of the MERS-coronavirus receptor in the upper respiratory tract of humans and dromedary camels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widagdo, W; Raj, V Stalin; Schipper, Debby; Kolijn, Kimberley; van Leenders, Geert J L H; Bosch, Berend J; Bensaid, Albert; Segalés, Joaquim; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Koopmans, Marion P; van den Brand, Judith M A; Haagmans, Bart L

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is not efficiently transmitted between humans, but it is highly prevalent in dromedary camels. Here we report that the MERS-CoV receptor - dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) - is expressed in the upper respiratory tract epithelium of camels but not

  4. Quantification and visualization of injury and regeneration in the developing ciliated epithelium using quantitative flow imaging and speckle variance optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamm, Ute A.; Huang, Brendan K.; Mis, Emily K.; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Choma, Michael A.

    2017-02-01

    Premature infants are at a high risk for respiratory diseases owing to an underdeveloped respiratory system that is very susceptible to infection and inflammation. One aspect of respiratory health is the state of the ciliated respiratory epithelium which lines the trachea and bronchi. The ciliated epithelium is responsible for trapping and removing pathogens and pollutants from the lungs and an impairment of ciliary functionality can lead to recurring respiratory infections and subsequent lung damage. Mechanisms of cilia-driven fluid flow itself but also factors influenced by development like ciliary density and flow generation are incompletely understood. Furthermore, medical interventions like intubation and accidental aspiration can lead to focal or diffuse loss of cilia and disruption of flow. In this study we use two animal models, Xenopus embryo and ex vivo mouse trachea, to analyze flow defects in the injured ciliated epithelium. Injury is generated either mechanically with a scalpel or chemically by calcium chloride (CaCl2) shock, which efficiently but reversibly deciliates the embryo skin. In this study we used optical coherence tomography (OCT) and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) to quantify cilia driven fluid flow over the surface of the Xenopus embryo. We additionally visualized damage to the ciliated epithelium by capturing 3D speckle variance images that highlight beating cilia. Mechanical injury disrupted cilia-driven fluid flow over the injured site, which led to a reduction in cilia-driven fluid flow over the whole surface of the embryo (n=7). The calcium chloride shock protocol proved to be highly effective in deciliating embryos (n=6). 3D speckle variance images visualized a loss of cilia and cilia-driven flow was halted immediately after application. We also applied CaCl2-shock to cultured ex vivo mouse trachea (n=8) and found, similarly to effects in Xenopus embryo, an extensive loss of cilia with resulting cessation of flow. We

  5. Mucosal inflammation at the respiratory interface: a zebrafish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Progatzky, Fränze; Cook, H Terence; Lamb, Jonathan R; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J

    2016-03-15

    Inflammatory diseases of the respiratory system such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are increasing globally and remain poorly understood conditions. Although attention has long focused on the activation of type 1 and type 2 helper T cells of the adaptive immune system in these diseases, it is becoming increasingly apparent that there is also a need to understand the contributions and interactions between innate immune cells and the epithelial lining of the respiratory system. Cigarette smoke predisposes the respiratory tissue to a higher incidence of inflammatory disease, and here we have used zebrafish gills as a model to study the effect of cigarette smoke on the respiratory epithelium. Zebrafish gills fulfill the same gas-exchange function as the mammalian airways and have a similar structure. Exposure to cigarette smoke extracts resulted in an increase in transcripts of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and MMP9 in the gill tissue, which was at least in part mediated via NF-κB activation. Longer term exposure of fish for 6 wk to cigarette smoke extract resulted in marked structural changes to the gills with lamellar fusion and mucus cell formation, while signs of inflammation or fibrosis were absent. This shows, for the first time, that zebrafish gills are a relevant model for studying the effect of inflammatory stimuli on a respiratory epithelium, since they mimic the immunopathology involved in respiratory inflammatory diseases of humans. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Padrões ventilatórios na espirometria em pacientes adolescentes e adultos com fibrose cística Respiratory patterns in spirometric tests of adolescents and adults with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Ziegler

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os padrões dos distúrbios ventilatórios observados na espirometria em pacientes com fibrose cística (FC e suas relações com a gravidade funcional e com o comportamento dos fluxos máximos expiratórios a baixos volumes. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal e retrospectivo, incluindo pacientes adolescentes e adultos com FC. Todos os pacientes foram submetidos à espirometria. Os pacientes foram classificados como tendo função ventilatória preservada, distúrbio ventilatório obstrutivo (DVO, DVO com CVF reduzida, sugestivo de distúrbio ventilatório restritivo (DVR ou distúrbio ventilatório combinado (DVC. Os fluxos máximos expiratórios a baixos volumes foram avaliados utilizando-se FEF25-75%, FEF75%e FEF75%/CVF. O grupo controle incluiu 65 indivíduos normais, também submetidos à espirometria. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos 65 pacientes no grupo de estudo: 8 (12,3% com função pulmonar preservada, 18 (27,7% com DVO, 24 (36,9% com DVO com CVF reduzida, 5 (7,7% com padrão sugestivo de DVR e 10 (15,4% com DVC. O VEF1 foi significativamente menor nos grupos DVO com CVF reduzida e DVC, comparados com os outros grupos (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate spirometric patterns of respiratory disorders and their relationship with functional severity and maximal expiratory flows at low lung volumes in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. METHODS: A retrospective cross-sectional study including adolescents and adults with CF. All of the patients were submitted to spirometry. Patients were classified as having preserved respiratory function, obstructive lung disease (OLD, OLD with reduced FVC, presumptive restrictive lung disease (RLD or mixed obstructive and restrictive lung disease (MORLD. Maximal expiratory flows at low lung volumes were assessed using FEF25-75%, FEF75% and FEF75%/FVC. We included 65 normal subjects, also submitted to spirometry, as a control group. RESULTS: The study group included 65 patients: 8 (12.3% with preserved lung

  7. Prescribing patterns for upper respiratory tract infections: a prescription-review of primary care practice in Kedah, Malaysia, and the implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezal, Rabiatul Salmi; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Alrasheedy, Alian A; Saleem, Fahad; Yusof, Faridah Aryani Md; Kamal, Mardhiyah; Mohd Din, Rosminah; Godman, Brian

    2015-01-01

    It is necessary to ascertain current prescribing of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) to address potential overuse. A retrospective analysis was conducted of all prescriptions for URTIs among 10 public primary healthcare centers in Kedah, Malaysia, from 1 January to 31 March 2014. A total of 123,524 prescriptions were screened and analyzed. Of these, 7129 prescriptions were for URTI, with 31.8% (n = 2269) containing antibiotics. Macrolides were the most commonly prescribed antibiotic, constituting 61% (n = 1403) of total antibiotics prescribed. There was a statistically significant association between different prescribers and diagnoses (p = 0.001) and a weak positive trend suggesting family medicine specialists are more competent in antibiotic prescribing, followed by medical officers and assistant medical officers (τ = 0.122). Prescribing practices of some prescribers were inconsistent with current guidelines encouraging resistance development. National antimicrobial stewardship programs and further educational initiatives are ongoing in Malaysia to improve antibiotic use.

  8. Epidemiological pattern of community-acquired respiratory tract infections of the conscripts in the North Fleet during a vaccine-challenged period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lobzin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the new military units in the North fleet is accompanied by vaccination using Exhausted diphtheria tetanus vaccine, modified. The accination coincides with periods of a rising number of army conscripts being taken ill with community-acquired infection of respiratory tracts: acute tonsillitis, acute bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia. We need to study is to ascertain whether there is the correlation between the periods of the increase in the number of ervicemen fallen ill with community-acquired infection of respiratory tracts and the diphtheria and tetanus vaccination. The study was carried out on the North fleet conscripts who were drawn blood samples from the ulnar vein before and after the vaccination using Exhausted diphtheria tetanus vaccine, modified. The blood was examined for the presence of antibodies to diphtheria and tetanus using direct hemagglutination test. The health status of the vaccinated conscripts was under observation for 4 months, during which acute illnesses (acute tonsillitis, acute bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia were registered. Serologic testing demonstrated a high rate of immunological protection against diphtheria and tetanus before vaccination. After the diphtheria and tetanus vaccination, the number of conscripts, who were taken ill in the first month, was significantly higher compared to the following months. The conscripts, who fell ill, had high antibody titers against diphtheria and tetanus in the vaccine-challenged period. Vaccination of the servicemen using Exhausted diphtheria tetanus vaccine, modified, is serologically unfounded; it leads to complications such as acute tonsillitis, acute bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia during the vaccinechallenged period especially during the first month and less considerably during the following months.

  9. Epidemiology of Respiratory Disease in Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Respiratory Disease in Malawi 135. Pneumonia is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected children." HIV infection of children alters the pattern of respiratory il,l.ness.('*l>8 HIV .... infection, Vitamin A deficiency and concomitant viral ..... d ifferences between developing and developed countriesi.

  10. [Cytokeratins and transitional epithelium of the bladder. Particular distribution of cytokeratins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetissof, F; Serres, G; Haillot, O

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the tissue distribution of certain cytokeratins in the urothelium. A series of ten cystectomy specimens containing normal tissues was investigated by immunocytochemical labeling with specific antibodies against cytokeratins 19, 18, 8, 7, 10. Monoclonal antibodies were used on frozen sections. Distribution of keratin was correlated with morphologic changes. All specimens were lined by a normal transitional epithelium. Low molecular weight cytokeratins (polypeptides 19, 18, 8, 7) were detected in all cell layers. Anticytokeratin 19 stained epithelium in a rather uniform way. Different antibodies specific for cytokeratin 18 reacted differently on the same tissue. With certain anticytokeratins 18 and 8, a higher staining intensity was found in superficial layers as compared with intermediate cell layers. So-called "umbrella" cells were strongly stained. Anticytokeratin 10 revealed very rare endocrine-like cells. This normal urothelial pattern is in agreement with previous reports. This pattern of expression of cytokeratin polypeptides differs from that of nonkeratinizing squamous epithelium. Therefore, histological differentiation of epithelia is accompanied by pronounced changes in the expression of cytokeratin polypeptides.

  11. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome- SARS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome- SARS · PowerPoint Presentation · Slide 3 · Global pattern of SARS epidemic · Slide 5 · SARS – clinical features ... SARS virus · SARS – Koch´Postulates proved. SARS – virus jumps species · How infectious is SARS virus · SARS – Global Distribution- 10th July 2003.

  12. File list: Unc.Oth.05.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Unc.Oth.20.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Oth.20.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium mm9 Unclassified Others Olfactory epithelium ...SRX112960 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Oth.20.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium.bed ...

  16. The pattern of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in Saudi Arabia: a descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from the Saudi Ministry of Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghamdi IG

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim G Alghamdi,1,2 Issam I Hussain,1 Shaia S Almalki,2 Mohamed S Alghamdi,3 Mansour M Alghamdi,4 Mohammed A El-Sheemy5 1University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, UK; 2University of Al-Baha, 3General Directorate of Health Affairs, Ministry of Health, Al-Baha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 4King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 5Research and Development, Lincoln Hospital, United Lincolnshire Hospitals National Health Service Trust, Lincoln, UK Purpose: This study describes the epidemiology of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV in Saudi Arabia. Patients and methods: Epidemiological analysis was performed on data from all MERS-CoV cases recorded by the Saudi Ministry of Health between June 6, 2013 and May 14, 2014. The frequency of cases and deaths was calculated and adjusted by month, sex, age group, and region. The average monthly temperature and humidity of infected regions throughout the year was also calculated. Results: A total of 425 cases were recorded over the study period. The highest number of cases and deaths occurred between April and May 2014. Disease occurrence among men (260 cases [62%] was higher than in women (162 cases [38%], and the case fatality rate was higher for men (52% than for women (23%. In addition, those in the 45–59 years and ≥60 years age groups were most likely to be infected, and the case fatality rate for these people was higher than for other groups. The highest number of cases and deaths were reported in Riyadh (169 cases; 43 deaths, followed by Jeddah (156 cases; 36 deaths and the Eastern Region (24 cases; 22 deaths. The highest case fatality rate was in the Eastern Region (92%, followed by Medinah (36% and Najran (33%. MERS-CoV infection actively causes disease in environments with low relative humidity (<20% and high temperature (15°C–35°C. Conclusion: MERS-CoV is considered an epidemic in Saudi Arabia. The frequency of cases and deaths is higher among

  17. Biomechanical and Histopathologic Effects of Pulsed-Light Accelerated Epithelium-On/-Off Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Sun, Ling; Shen, Yang; Tian, Mi; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yu; Li, Meiyan; Zhou, Xingtao

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to compare the biomechanical and histopathologic effects of transepithelial and accelerated epithelium-off pulsed-light accelerated corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL). A total of 24 New Zealand rabbits were analyzed after sham operation (control) or transepithelial or epithelium-off operation (45 mW/cm for both). The transepithelial group was treated with pulsed-light ultraviolet A for 5 minutes 20 seconds, and the epithelium-off group was treated for 90 seconds. Biomechanical testing, including ultimate stress, Young modulus, and the physiological modulus, was analyzed. Histological changes were evaluated by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The stress-strain curve was nonlinear in both accelerated transepithelial and epithelium-off CXL groups. The stress and elastic moduli were all significantly higher in both experimental groups compared with the control group (P 0.05). Six months after the operation, hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy showed that the subcutaneous collagen fibers were arranged in a regular pattern, and the fiber density was higher in the experimental groups. Both transepithelial and accelerated epithelium-off CXL produced biomechanical and histopathologic improvements, which were not significantly different between the 2 pulsed-light accelerated CXL treatments.

  18. Ion channels and transporters of the retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichhart, Nadine; Strauss, Olaf

    2014-09-01

    Ion channels and ion transporters play essential roles in the function of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The use of cell cultures has been exploited as a key method for successfully identifying and studying ion channels and transporters of the RPE. Cultured RPE cells enable robust and long-lasting patch-clamp recordings, Ussing chamber investigations of the transepithelial transport within the isolated RPE, and analyses of the intracellular Ca(2+) or pH with fluorescent probes. Furthermore, cultured RPE can be transfected at high success rates, permitting the easy use of siRNA to study the involvement of ion channels on the molecular level. However, the expression patterns of the ion channels in the RPE appear to be a very sensitive marker reflecting the extent of RPE differentiation in vitro. Having originated from the neuroectoderm, cultured RPE cells seem to retain some capacity to change into a more neuronal phenotype expressing TTX-blockable Na(+) channels or synaptic Ca(2+) channels. Therefore, the identification of ion channels and transporters in cultured cells should be verified in freshly isolated RPE cells and in situ preparations of the RPE, via immunohistochemistry and the analysis of RPE-specific signals in the electroretinogram from transgenic animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-05-10

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

  20. Oral epithelium in diabetics: A cytomorphometric correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K P Nandita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study aims to establish an etiological association between diabetes and precancerous lesions of the oral cavity by cytomorphometric analysis of the oral epithelium. Study Design: Smears were obtained from three distinct oral sites - buccal mucosa, dorsum of the tongue and the floor of the mouth in ten controls and ten patients previously diagnosed with type II diabetes. The oral smears were stained with Papanicolaou SA-36 solution. An eye - piece graticule was used to obtain the cytoplasm and nuclear dimension; where larger dimension was denoted as "D" and the smaller dimension was denoted as "d". The nuclear area (NA, nuclear diameter (ND, cytoplasmic area (CA and the cytoplasmic / nuclear ratio (C/N were evaluated from 50 cells predominant in each oral site. Statistical Analysis: The cytomorphometric data obtained was compared between the group of diabetic patients and the control groups using the student′s t- test (SPSS version 11.0. Results: Results showed that the nuclear area and the nuclear diameter of oral epithelial cells were increased in diabetic patients, as compared to non- diabetics, while the non- diabetic patients demonstrated an increase in nuclear ratio. Conclusions: The results from this study suggest that diabetes mellitus can cause alterations in oral epithelial cells that are detectable with exfoliative cytology.

  1. Primary culture of chinchilla middle ear epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, A; DeMaria, T F; Lim, D J; van Blitterswijk, C A

    1991-09-01

    Chinchilla middle ear epithelium was successfully cultured in medium containing Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, Ham's F12 mixture, and fetal bovine serum. After 3 to 5 days, the explants produced outgrowths of primarily flat polygonal and ciliated cells that persisted for up to 10 days in culture. These cells in the outgrowth often formed a "dome" indicating the presence of functional polarization and fluid transportation capability. The ciliated cells were more frequently found near the explant, and were fewer in number in the area distant from the explant. This finding suggests that the ciliated cells in the outgrowth are migrated ciliated cells deriving from the explant. That secretory cells were not identified in the outgrowth indicated that the present culture technique did not support secretory activity. Using the present culture technique, we were able to maintain the explants and primary cultured cells for up to 14 days in a majority of cases; hence, these techniques appear to be applicable to a number of in vitro studies.

  2. Glucose metabolism in rat retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2006-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the major transport pathway for exchange of metabolites and ions between choroidal blood supply and the neural retina. To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling glucose metabolism in RPE and its possible relationship to retinopathy, we studied the influence of different glucose concentrations on glycogen and lactate levels and CO(2) production in RPE from normal and streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats. Incubation of normal RPE in the absence of glucose caused a decrease in lactate production and glycogen content. In normal RPE, increasing glucose concentrations from 5.6 mM to 30 mM caused a four-fold increase in glucose accumulation and CO(2) yield, as well as reduction in lactate and glycogen production. In RPE from diabetic rats glucose accumulation did not increase in the presence of high glucose substrate, but it showed a four- and a seven-fold increase in CO(2) production through the mitochondrial and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. We found high glycogen levels in RPE which can be used as an energy reserve for RPE itself and/or neural retina. Findings further show that the RPE possesses a high oxidative capacity. The large increase in glucose shunting to the pentose phosphate pathway in diabetic retina exposed to high glucose suggests a need for reducing capacity, consistent with increased oxidative stress.

  3. Lungs and Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Parents > Lungs and Respiratory System Print ... have taken at least 600 million breaths. Respiratory System Basics All of this breathing couldn't happen ...

  4. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs between days ...

  5. Intranasal location and immunohistochemical characterization of the equine olfactory epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Kupke

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The olfactory epithelium (OE is the only body site where neurons contact directly the environment and are therefore exposed to a broad variation of substances and insults. It can serve as portal of entry for neurotropic viruses which spread via the olfactory pathway to the central nervous system (CNS. For horses, it has been proposed and concluded mainly from rodent studies that different viruses, e.g. Borna disease virus (BoDV, equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1, hendra virus, influenza virus, rabies virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV can use this route. However, little is yet known about cytoarchitecture, protein expression and the intranasal location of the equine OE. Revealing differences in cytoarchitecture or protein expression pattern in comparison to rodents, canines or humans might help to explain varying susceptibility to certain intranasal virus infections. On the other hand, disclosing similarities especially between rodents and other species, e.g. horses would help to underscore transferability of rodent models. Analysis of the complete noses of 5 adult horses revealed that in the equine OE two epithelial subtypes with distinct marker expression exist, designated as types a and b which resemble those previously described in dogs. Detailed statistical analysis was carried out to confirm the results obtained on the descriptive level. The equine OE was predominantly located in caudodorsal areas of the nasal turbinates with a significant decline in rostroventral direction, especially for type a. Immunohistochemically, olfactory marker protein (OMP and doublecortin (DCX expression was found in more cells of OE type a, whereas expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA and tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA was present in more cells of type b. Accordingly, type a resembles the mature epithelium, in contrast to the more juvenile type b. Protein expression profile was comparable to canine and rodent OE but equine type a and b were

  6. Smoking-induced gene expression changes in the bronchial airway are reflected in nasal and buccal epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaohui

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoking is a leading cause of preventable death and a significant cause of lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prior studies have demonstrated that smoking creates a field of molecular injury throughout the airway epithelium exposed to cigarette smoke. We have previously characterized gene expression in the bronchial epithelium of never smokers and identified the gene expression changes that occur in the mainstem bronchus in response to smoking. In this study, we explored relationships in whole-genome gene expression between extrathorcic (buccal and nasal and intrathoracic (bronchial epithelium in healthy current and never smokers. Results Using genes that have been previously defined as being expressed in the bronchial airway of never smokers (the "normal airway transcriptome", we found that bronchial and nasal epithelium from non-smokers were most similar in gene expression when compared to other epithelial and nonepithelial tissues, with several antioxidant, detoxification, and structural genes being highly expressed in both the bronchus and nose. Principle component analysis of previously defined smoking-induced genes from the bronchus suggested that smoking had a similar effect on gene expression in nasal epithelium. Gene set enrichment analysis demonstrated that this set of genes was also highly enriched among the genes most altered by smoking in both nasal and buccal epithelial samples. The expression of several detoxification genes was commonly altered by smoking in all three respiratory epithelial tissues, suggesting a common airway-wide response to tobacco exposure. Conclusion Our findings support a relationship between gene expression in extra- and intrathoracic airway epithelial cells and extend the concept of a smoking-induced field of injury to epithelial cells that line the mouth and nose. This relationship could potentially be utilized to develop a non-invasive biomarker for

  7. Lectin-binding sites in the epithelium of normal human appendix vermiformis and in acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinck, U; Bosbach, R; Korabiowska, M; Schauer, A; Gabius, H J

    1995-01-01

    By using histochemical methods, the binding pattern of various lectins in the epithelium of normal human appendix vermiformis was assessed. In addition to plant and invertebrate sugar receptors with nominal monosaccharide specificity for alpha-L-Fuc (UEA-I), alpha-D-Man and alpha-D-Gluc (Con A), alpha-D-GalNAc (DBA), D-GalNAc (SBA, HPA) beta-D-Gal (RCA-I) and D-Gal (VAA), a mammalian beta-galactoside-specific lectin (MW, 14 kDa) was included in the applied panel. The apical surface of enterocytes presented binding sites for RCA-I on all cells, binding sites of UEA-I, DBA, SBA, HPA and VAA heterogeneously and no binding sites of Con A and 14 kDa. Binding sites of DBA, SBA, HPA, VAA and RCA-I within enterocytes were located primarily focally in a supranuclear position, whereas Con A and 14 kDa bound to the cytoplasm both in apical and basal cell parts. In the follicle-associated epithelium more enterocytes expressed SBA- and VAA-binding sites than in the crypt epithelium. No differences between the lectin-binding pattern of M-cells and enterocytes were found in the follicle-associated epithelium. Intraepithelial macrophages were heterogeneously positive for the full panel of applied lectins. In contrast, intraepithelial lymphatic cells expressed binding sites only for RCA-I and less prominently for Con A, VAA and 14 kDa. Goblet cell mucus contained lectin-binding sites in a heterogeneous manner: binding sites for Con A were not detected in goblet cells for DBA, SBA, VAA and 14 kDa in less than 20%, for UEA-I in 20-40%, for HPA in 40-60% and for RCA-I in 60-100% of the goblet cells. Secreted mucus differed in its lectin-binding capacity from intracellular goblet cell mucus selectively by an increase of UEA-I, SBA- and RCA-I-binding sites and a lack of 14 kDa-binding sites. Comparative study of lectin binding to goblet cell mucin in another region of the large intestine, namely the rectosigmoid, demonstrated that DBA, SBA and 14 kDa bound mainly to the distal colon

  8. The pattern of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in Saudi Arabia: a descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from the Saudi Ministry of Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Ibrahim G; Hussain, Issam I; Almalki, Shaia S; Alghamdi, Mohamed S; Alghamdi, Mansour M; El-Sheemy, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study describes the epidemiology of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in Saudi Arabia. Patients and methods Epidemiological analysis was performed on data from all MERS-CoV cases recorded by the Saudi Ministry of Health between June 6, 2013 and May 14, 2014. The frequency of cases and deaths was calculated and adjusted by month, sex, age group, and region. The average monthly temperature and humidity of infected regions throughout the year was also calculated. Results A total of 425 cases were recorded over the study period. The highest number of cases and deaths occurred between April and May 2014. Disease occurrence among men (260 cases [62%]) was higher than in women (162 cases [38%]), and the case fatality rate was higher for men (52%) than for women (23%). In addition, those in the 45–59 years and ≥60 years age groups were most likely to be infected, and the case fatality rate for these people was higher than for other groups. The highest number of cases and deaths were reported in Riyadh (169 cases; 43 deaths), followed by Jeddah (156 cases; 36 deaths) and the Eastern Region (24 cases; 22 deaths). The highest case fatality rate was in the Eastern Region (92%), followed by Medinah (36%) and Najran (33%). MERS-CoV infection actively causes disease in environments with low relative humidity (<20%) and high temperature (15°C–35°C). Conclusion MERS-CoV is considered an epidemic in Saudi Arabia. The frequency of cases and deaths is higher among men than women, and those above 45 years of age are most affected. Low relative humidity and high temperature can enhance the spread of this disease in the entire population. Further analytical studies are required to determine the source and mode of infection in Saudi Arabia. PMID:25187734

  9. Post-autotomy regeneration of respiratory trees in the holothurian Apostichopus japonicus (Holothuroidea, Aspidochirotida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmatov, Igor Y; Ginanova, Talia T

    2009-04-01

    Specialised respiratory organs, viz. the respiratory trees attached to the dorsal part of the cloaca, are present in most holothurians. These organs evolved within the class Holothuroidea and are absent in other echinoderms. Some holothurian species can regenerate their respiratory trees but others lack this ability. Respiratory trees therefore provide a model for investigating the origin and evolution of repair mechanisms in animals. We conducted a detailed morphological study of the regeneration of respiratory trees after their evisceration in the holothurian Apostichopus japonicus. Regeneration of the respiratory trees occurred rapidly and, on the 15th day after evisceration, their length reached 15-20 mm. Repair involved cells of the coelomic and luminal epithelia of the cloaca. Peritoneocytes and myoepithelial cells behaved differently during regeneration: the peritoneocytes kept their intercellular junctions and migrated as a united layer, whereas groups of myoepithelial cells disaggregated and migrated as individual cells. Although myoepithelial cells did not divide during regeneration, the peritoneocytes proliferated actively. The contractile system of the respiratory trees was assumed to develop during regeneration by the migration of myoepithelial cells from the coelomic epithelium of the cloaca. The luminal epithelium of the respiratory trees formed as a result of dedifferentiation, migration and transformation of cells of the cloaca lining. The mode of regeneration of holothurian respiratory trees is discussed.

  10. Human ovarian surface epithelium in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auersperg, N; Siemens, C H; Myrdal, S E

    1984-10-01

    The ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) represents a minute fraction of the cell mass of the ovary but gives rise to over 80% of human ovarian carcinomas. No experimental models for the study of human OSE exist. To characterize OSE cells in culture, explants of ovarian surface from normal ovary of premenopausal women were grown on plastic, glass, and collagen gel in 25% fetal bovine serum/Waymouth's medium 752/1. About 25% of explants produced epithelial outgrowths. Morphologically, these outgrowths resembled OSE in vivo and endothelial and mesothelial cells in culture, but they differed from cultured ovarian stromal, granulosa, and luteal cells. Only OSE among ovarian cell types were intensely keratin positive by immunofluorescence. Keratin also distinguished OSE cells from the keratin-negative endothelial cells. Most but not all OSE colonies tested showed 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) activity, which was absent in peritoneal mesothelial cells. Colonies from most patients were limited to a few millimetres and became stationary within a few weeks. Changes that accompanied cessation of growth included senescence, increased keratin content, or the formation of multicellular papillary aggregates. With time, OSE cells tended to assume a fibroblast-like morphology but remained keratin positive and continued to resemble OSE by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Subcultured OSE cells persisted in a stationary keratin-positive form for many weeks. Throughout this study, all pavementlike epithelial outgrowths that were contiguous with an explant stained for keratin; thus, such colonies can be assumed to be OSE. Conversely, fibroblast-shaped cells may represent OSE as indicated by keratin content and SEM appearance. The methods presented here permit culture of normal human OSE under conditions in which the cells exhibit morphologic plasticity, variable 17 beta-HSD activity, and presence of keratin.

  11. Buccal Epithelium in treating Ocular Surface Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas KR

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Background - Ocular surface disorders due to limbal stem cell deficiency are an important cause of ocular morbidity and visual loss. Although autologous limbal stem cell transplants have helped in the management of unilateral disease, allografts in those with bilateral disease often fail due to immunological reasons. The use of autologous buccal epithelium cultivated on amniotic membrane has been described as a useful approach in the management of this condition. It is the purpose of this study to explore the feasibility of using a novel thermo-gelatin polymer (TGP as a substrate to culture these cells, and to characterize them using RNA extraction and RT-PCR. Methods - Oral cheek mucosal biopsies were obtained from 5 adult patients undergoing Modified Osteo-Odonto Keratoprosthesis surgery. The specimens were transported to the laboratory in transport medium. The cells were released using enzymatic digestion and seeded in both convention culture medium and TGP. The resulting cellular growth was characterized using RNA extraction and RT-PCR. Results - Cells could be cultured from 4 of the 5 specimens. In one specimen, contamination occurred and this was discarded. In the other specimens, the cheek epithelial cells could be cultured in both the conventional culture medium and TGP, with equal ease. RT-PCR revealed the presence of K3, a marker for epithelial cells, and GAPDH indicating the presence of some adipose tissue as well. Conclusions - It is possible to culture autologous cheek mucosal epithelial cells using TGP, a synthetic scaffold, without the need for other biological substrates. Since the specimens are obtained from the oral cavity, stringent asepsis is required. Further studies are required for histopathological characterization of the cultured cells and to create a model for delivery onto the ocular surface of eyes with bilateral surface disease due to limbal stem cell deficiency.

  12. STUDIES ON HUMAN FALLOPIAN TUBAL EPITHELIUM IN DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jayasri; Tribeni

    2016-01-01

    .... The aim of the study is to ascertain any histological difference of tubal epithelium in different age groups and the research work could be utilized for investigation and management of infertility...

  13. Bronchial epithelium: morphology, function and pathophysiology in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, van der V.H.J.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Versnel, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Summary : Human bronchial epithelium has a number of mechanical functions, including mucociliary clearance and protection against noxious agents. Bronchial epithelial cells are also able to release a variety of mediators, including cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and arachidonic acid

  14. [Tissue culture of middle ear epithelium of the guinea pig--differences of the cellular growth activity in the middle ear cavity using collagen gel culture method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeno, S

    1990-12-01

    Primary tissue culture system from the middle ear and the tracheal epithelium of the guinea pig was established using collagen gel method. The cultured epithelium was studied by phase-contrast microscopy, light and scanning electron microscopy. The outgrowth area of the epithelium was quantitatively measured for period of up to ten days. In the middle ear cavity, the mucosal explants were sampled from various sites in order to compare their differential and proliferative activities. The mucosal explants attached on collagen substrates were composed of ciliated, non-ciliated, goblet and basal cells. This basic structure was similar to the natural middle ear epithelium. The ciliated cells showed well organized cilia. Most of the outgrowth cells devoid of fibroblastic cells in the monolayer were polygonal shaped with numerous microvilli. The morphology of the outgrowth cells changed from columnar or cuboidal to squamous shapes in the area away from the explants. There was a correlation between the distribution of the ciliated cells in the outgrowths and these in the explants. The explants with columnar or cuboidal ciliated epithelia sampled from the opening of the eustachian tube or its neighborhood formed more than eightfold outgrowth sheets in vitro. This is comparable to tracheal epithelia. On the other hand, the explants with simple squamous epithelia sampled from the area distal to the eustachian tube showed about fourfold proliferative activity. We concluded that this culture system would be useful for the study of cellular multiplication and differentiation mechanisms of the respiratory tract epithelium.

  15. Biosensor analysis of natural and artificial sweeteners in intact taste epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fenni; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Diming; Lu, Yanli; Liu, Qingjun; Wang, Ping

    2014-04-15

    Sweeteners are commonly used as food additives in our daily life, which, however, have been causing a number of undesirable diseases since the last century. Therefore, the detection and quantification of sweeteners are of great value for food safety. In this study, we used a taste biosensor to measure and analyze different sweeteners, both natural and artificial sweeteners included. Electrophysiological activities from taste epithelium were detected by the multi-channel biosensors and analyzed with spatiotemporal methods. The longtime signal result showed different temporal-frequency properties with stimulations of individual sweeteners such as glucose, sucrose, saccharin, and cyclamate, while the multi-channel results in our study revealed the spatial expression of taste epithelium to sweet stimuli. Furthermore, in the analysis of sweetener with different concentrations, the result showed obvious dose-dependent increases in signal responses of the taste epithelium, which indicated promising applications in sweetness evaluation. Besides, the mixture experiment of two natural sweeteners with a similar functional unit (glucose and sucrose) presented two signal patterns, which turned out to be similar with responses of each individual stimulus involved. The biosensor analysis of common sweeteners provided new approaches for both natural and artificial sweeteners evaluation. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. DHT deficiency perturbs the integrity of the rat seminiferous epithelium by disrupting tight and adherens junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Wiszniewska

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In rats with a DHT deficiency induced by finasteride, morphological changes in the seminiferous epithelium were observed. The structural alterations were manifested by the premature germ cells sloughing into the lumen of seminiferous tubules. The etiology of this disorder could be connected with intercellular junctions disintegration. We showed in the immunohistochemical study the changes in expression of some proteins building tight and adherens junctions. The depression of N-cadherin, β-catenin and occludin immunoexpressions could be the reason for the release of immature germ cells from the seminiferous epithelium. However, the observed increase of the immunohistochemical reaction intensity of vinculin, one of the cadherin/catenin complex regulators, could be insufficient to maintain the proper function of adherens junctions. The hormonal imbalance appears to influence the pattern of expression of junctional proteins in the seminiferous epithelium. It could lead to untimely germ cells sloughing, and ultimately could impair fertility. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011, Vol. 49, No. 1, 62–71

  17. Unraveling the contact patterns and network structure of pig shipments in the United States and its association with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyuyoung; Polson, Dale; Lowe, Erin; Main, Rodger; Holtkamp, Derald; Martínez-López, Beatriz

    2017-03-01

    The analysis of the pork value chain is becoming key to understanding the risk of infectious disease dissemination in the swine industry. In this study, we used social network analysis to characterize the swine shipment network structure and properties in a typical multisite swine production system in the US. We also aimed to evaluate the association between network properties and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus (PRRSV) transmission between production sites. We analyzed the 109,868 swine shipments transporting over 93 million swine between more than 500 production sites from 2012 to 2014. A total of 248 PRRSV positive occurrences were reported from 79 production sites during those 3 years. The temporal dynamics of swine shipments was evaluated by computing network properties in one-month and three-month networks. The association of PRRS occurrence in sow farms with centrality properties from one-month and three-month networks was assessed by using the multilevel logistic regression. All monthly networks showed a scale-free network topology with positive degree assortativity. The regression model revealed that out-degree centrality had a negative association with PRRS occurrence in sow farms in both one-month and three-month networks [OR=0.79 (95% CI, 0.63-0.99) in one-month network and 0.56 (95% CI, 0.36, 0.88) in three-month network] and in-closeness centrality model was positively associated with PRRS occurrence in sow farms in the three-month network [OR=2.45 (95% CI, 1.14-5.26)]. We also describe how the occurrence of porcine epidemic diarrheac (PED) outbreaks severely affected the network structure as well as the PRRS occurrence reports and its association with centrality measures in sow farms. The structure of the swine shipment network and the connectivity between production sites influenced on the PRRSV transmission. The use of network topology and characteristics combining with spatial analysis based on fine scale geographical location

  18. Cytotoxic effects of sulfuric acid mist, carbon particulates, and their mixtures on hamster tracheal epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiff, L.J. (IIT Research Inst., Chicago, IL); Bryne, M.M.; Fenters, J.D.; Graham, J.A.; Gardner, D.E.

    1979-08-01

    Hamster tracheal tissue was used to study the effects of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ mist, carbon particles, and mixtures of the two on cilia beating frequency and morphological alterations of respiratory epithelium. Hamsters were exposed for 3 h to 1.1 mg/m/sup 3/ H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (mean size, 0.12 ..mu..m) and 1.5 mg/m/sup 3/ carbon (mean size, 0.3 ..mu..m) particle aerosols alone or in combination. Trachea of animals exposed in vivo to the mixture and held in vivo showed cytotoxic effects in the epithelium that were greater than those produced by either the acid mist or carbon alone. In tracheas of hamsters exposed in vivo and maintained in vitro the damage produced by acid mist-carbon mixture did not differ significantly from that produced by acid mist per se but was greater than that observed after exposure to carbon. Organ cultures of tracheal rings exposed for 3 h to a 1:10/sup 6/ dilution of concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and 100 ..mu..g/ml carbon produced epithelial damage in vitro similar to that seen in in vivo exposures. The extent of recovery over a period of 72 h was also studied following different combinations of in vivo and in vitro exposure and/or maintenance.

  19. Glutathione and glutathione S-transferases in Barrett's epithelium.

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, W. H.; Roelofs, H. M.; Hectors, M P; Nagengast, F. M.; Jansen, J B

    1993-01-01

    Glutathione content, enzyme activity and isoenzyme composition of glutathione S-transferases were assayed in normal and Barrett's esophageal epithelium of ten patients with Barrett's esophagus. In addition, gastric and duodenal specimens from the same patients were also investigated. Glutathione content, glutathione S-transferase enzyme activity as well as glutathione S-transferase pi content were all significantly lower in Barrett's epithelium as compared to normal esophageal mucosa. In cont...

  20. Structure and function of the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptors and cornea in the eye of Sardinella aurita (Clupeidae, Teleostei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Ali Salem

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the pigment epithelium, photoreceptors and the cornea in the eye of a teleost, Sardinella aurita was examined by light and electron microscopy. The retinal pigment epithelium forms a single layer of cells joined laterally by cell junctions. Centrally in the retina these cells are columnar, while more peripherally they become cuboidal in shape. The basal (scleral border of the pigment epithelial cells is not infolded but is relatively smooth. Phagosomes containing lysosome-like bodies are also common features of the retinal pigment epithelium. Numerous melanosomes (pigment granules are abundant throughout the epithelial cells. These melanosomes probably absorb light which has passed through the photoreceptor layer. Four photoreceptor cells were identified; rods, long single cones, short single cones and double cones. The presence of these types suggests a diversity of photoreceptor function. Square mosaic pattern of cones and well-developed choroid gland are also main features of the eye. The inner segment of rods and cones were rich in organelles indicating much synthetic activity. Calycal processes projecting from cone outer segments are also observed. The cornea includes an epithelium with a complex pattern of surface microplicae, a basement membrane, dermal stroma, an iridescent layer, scleral stroma, Descemet’s membrane and endothelium. The autochthonous layer which is seen in some teleosts has not been observed in the cornea of this species. These and other observations were discussed in relation to the photic environment and habits of this fish.

  1. A Method for Quantification of Epithelium Colonization Capacity by Pathogenic Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micha Pedersen, Rune; Grønnemose, Rasmus Birkholm; Stærk, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    layers is then performed by in situ time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and automatic detection of bacterial surface coverage. The method is demonstrated in three different infection models, simulating Staphylococcus aureus endothelial infection and Escherichia coli intestinal- and uroepithelial infection......Most bacterial infections initiate at the mucosal epithelium lining the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and urogenital tracts. At these sites, bacterial pathogens must adhere and increase in numbers to effectively breach the outer barrier and invade the host. If the bacterium succeeds in reaching...... a method in which epithelia/endothelia are simulated by flow chamber-grown human cell layers, and infection is induced by seeding of pathogenic bacteria on these surfaces under conditions that simulate the physiological microenvironment. Quantification of bacterial adhesion and colonization of the cell...

  2. TU-F-17A-04: Respiratory Phase-Resolved 3D MRI with Isotropic High Spatial Resolution: Determination of the Average Breathing Motion Pattern for Abdominal Radiotherapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z; Pang, J; Yang, W; Yue, Y; Tuli, R; Fraass, B; Li, D; Fan, Z [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a retrospective 4D-MRI technique (respiratory phase-resolved 3D-MRI) for providing an accurate assessment of tumor motion secondary to respiration. Methods: A 3D projection reconstruction (PR) sequence with self-gating (SG) was developed for 4D-MRI on a 3.0T MRI scanner. The respiration-induced shift of the imaging target was recorded by SG signals acquired in the superior-inferior direction every 15 radial projections (i.e. temporal resolution 98 ms). A total of 73000 radial projections obtained in 8-min were retrospectively sorted into 10 time-domain evenly distributed respiratory phases based on the SG information. Ten 3D image sets were then reconstructed offline. The technique was validated on a motion phantom (gadolinium-doped water-filled box, frequency of 10 and 18 cycles/min) and humans (4 healthy and 2 patients with liver tumors). Imaging protocol included 8-min 4D-MRI followed by 1-min 2D-realtime (498 ms/frame) MRI as a reference. Results: The multiphase 3D image sets with isotropic high spatial resolution (1.56 mm) permits flexible image reformatting and visualization. No intra-phase motion-induced blurring was observed. Comparing to 2D-realtime, 4D-MRI yielded similar motion range (phantom: 10.46 vs. 11.27 mm; healthy subject: 25.20 vs. 17.9 mm; patient: 11.38 vs. 9.30 mm), reasonable displacement difference averaged over the 10 phases (0.74mm; 3.63mm; 1.65mm), and excellent cross-correlation (0.98; 0.96; 0.94) between the two displacement series. Conclusion: Our preliminary study has demonstrated that the 4D-MRI technique can provide high-quality respiratory phase-resolved 3D images that feature: a) isotropic high spatial resolution, b) a fixed scan time of 8 minutes, c) an accurate estimate of average motion pattern, and d) minimal intra-phase motion artifact. This approach has the potential to become a viable alternative solution to assess the impact of breathing on tumor motion and determine appropriate treatment margins

  3. Culture and characterization of rat middle-ear epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Blitterswijk, C A; Ponec, M; van Muijen, G N; Wijsman, M C; Koerten, H K; Grote, J J

    1986-01-01

    This study was performed to design a method for the culture of rat middle-ear epithelium and to apply the method to investigate the characteristics of this epithelium. Culture of explants of middle-ear epithelium in the presence of the epidermal growth factor was successful, whereas serial cultivation required 3T3 feeder cells in addition to the epidermal growth factor. Cultured middle-ear epithelium was studied by phase-contrast microscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and combined light and scanning electron microscopy (LM/SEM). These techniques showed similarity between the cultured and the natural middle-ear epithelium. Explants and outgrowths showed both flat polygonal and ciliated epithelial cells. In serial cultivation, however, only the first of these cell types was observed. Frequently, a single primary cilium was found on the cell surface. Transmission electron microscopy showed cross-linked envelopes whose formation was promoted by ionophore X537A. Cytokeratin was demonstrated by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence, and immunoperoxidase methods, using an anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody. The model described here permits study of the differentiation of middle-ear epithelium in vitro and may be of future value for the study of chronic middle-ear diseases.

  4. Identification of tumor epithelium and stroma in tissue microarrays using texture analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to assess whether texture analysis is feasible for automated identification of epithelium and stroma in digitized tumor tissue microarrays (TMAs). Texture analysis based on local binary patterns (LBP) has previously been used successfully in applications such as face recognition and industrial machine vision. TMAs with tissue samples from 643 patients with colorectal cancer were digitized using a whole slide scanner and areas representing epithelium and stroma were annotated in the images. Well-defined images of epithelium (n = 41) and stroma (n = 39) were used for training a support vector machine (SVM) classifier with LBP texture features and a contrast measure C (LBP/C) as input. We optimized the classifier on a validation set (n = 576) and then assessed its performance on an independent test set of images (n = 720). Finally, the performance of the LBP/C classifier was evaluated against classifiers based on Haralick texture features and Gabor filtered images. Results The proposed approach using LPB/C texture features was able to correctly differentiate epithelium from stroma according to texture: the agreement between the classifier and the human observer was 97 per cent (kappa value = 0.934, P features and Gabor-filter images were 0.976 and 0.981 respectively. Conclusions The method illustrates the capability of automated segmentation of epithelial and stromal tissue in TMAs based on texture features and an SVM classifier. Applications include tissue specific assessment of gene and protein expression, as well as computerized analysis of the tumor microenvironment. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/4123422336534537 PMID:22385523

  5. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-07

    This podcast discusses Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, a viral respiratory illness caused by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus—MERS-CoV.  Created: 7/7/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/7/2014.

  6. The histopathological comparison on the destruction of the periodontal tissue between normal junctional epithelium and long junctional epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, S; Ukai, T; Kuramoto, A; Yoshinaga, Y; Nakamura, H; Takamori, Y; Yamashita, Y; Hara, Y

    2017-02-01

    The barrier function of long junctional epithelium is thought to be important after periodontal initial therapy and periodontal surgery. Although the difference between long junctional epithelium and normal junctional epithelium regarding their resistance to destruction of periodontal tissue has been investigated, the mechanism still remains unclear. Using our rat experimental periodontitis model in which loss of attachment and resorption of alveolar bone is induced by the formation of immune complexes, we investigated the resistance of periodontal tissue containing long junctional epithelium and normal junctional epithelium to destruction. Rats were divided into four groups. In the immunized long junctional epithelium (I-LJE) group, rats were immunized with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and curettage and root planing procedures were performed on the palatal gingiva of the maxillary first molars to obtain reattachment by long junctional epithelium. In the immunized normal junctional epithelium (I-JE) group, rats were immunized without curettage and root planing procedures. In the nonimmunized long junctional epithelium (nI-LJE) group, rats were not immunized but curettage and root-planing procedures were performed. In the control group, neither immunization nor curettage and root-planing was performed. In all rats, periodontal inflammation was induced by topical application of LPS into the palatal gingival sulcus of maxillary first molars. The rats were killed at baseline and after the third and fifth applications of LPS. Attachment loss and the number of inflammatory cells and osteoclasts in the four groups were compared histopathologically and histometrically. After the third application of LPS in the I-LJE group, attachment loss showed a greater increase than in control and nI-LJE groups, and inflammatory cell infiltration and osteoclasts were increased more than in the other groups. After the fifth application of LPS, attachment loss was greater and there was a

  7. Respiratory care manpower issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Paul; Drumheller, Lois; Carlow, John J

    2006-03-01

    ,589 in 2002). In survey 1, we looked at the institution of mandatory overtime policies and their use in 30 size-stratified hospitals. Mandatory overtime was selected as a survey topic under the supposition that manpower shortages might lead to the development of such procedures and also to their utilization. Fourteen of the 30 hospitals responding indicated that they had a policy addressing mandatory over time. Of the 14 hospitals with policies, only ten had disciplinary actions specific to refusing the overtime. Seven of the 30 hospitals indicated that they used mandatory overtime monthly of more frequently. Survey 2 data revealed that there was a wide variation in bed size, number of ICUs, and number of RCP staff assigned to the ICU. Serendipitously, our 51 responding centers were distributed among small (16), medium (19), and large (16) hospitals in a manner that appeared to reflect the national distribution pattern. We were able to use these data to develop a closeness of fit diagram ICU beds to preferred numbers of RCPs (DF=48; p<.0001; RSq=0.77; RMSE=4.114). The number of beds per preferred number of RCPs was 9.445 to 1.0 while the actual bed to RCP ratio was 10.75 to 1. This article provides a short history of the development of respiratory care and its historical relationship with critical care. We have, perhaps for the first time, provided a unified data set of key demographic information from the three professional bodies guiding the development of the respiratory therapy profession. This data set provides time-linked data on admissions and graduations from the CoARC, membership numbers for the AARC, and the numbers of active credentialed RCP from the NBRC. By two focused surveys, we were able to show that while mandatory overtime is a common practice in respiratory care departments, it was not overwhelming utilized. We also learned that in most hospitals, regardless of bed size, there is a perceived need for 1.3 RCPs more than the actual staff and that it

  8. Modulation of Circadian Rhythms Affects Corneal Epithelium Renewal and Repair in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yunxia; Liu, Peng; Wang, Hanqing; Xiao, Chengju; Lin, Cuipei; Liu, Jun; Dong, Dong; Fu, Ting; Yang, Yabing; Wang, Zhaorui; Pan, Hongwei; Chen, Jiansu; Li, Yangqiu; Cai, Dongqing; Li, Zhijie

    2017-03-01

    In mammalian corneal epithelium, mitosis shows a distinct circadian pattern. However, how this circadian pattern is maintained, and how it or its disruption influence renewal and regeneration remain unclear. C57BL/6 mice were maintained under 12-hour light/12-hour dark (LD), 12-hour light/12-hour light (LL), 12-hour dark/12-hour dark (DD), or reversed LD (DL, 12-hour dark/12-hour light; jet-lag defined as a shift of 12 hours) conditions. Mitotic cells in corneal epithelium were enumerated and analyzed via immunofluorescence at different zeitgeber times (ZTs). Expression of core clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Period2, Cry1, and Rev-erbα) was qualified via quantitative RT-PCR. The rate and quality of healing at different ZT times and after administration of two small-molecule modifiers of the circadian clock, KL001 and SR8278, was evaluated. In this study, photic cues were found to influence the 24-hour rhythm of corneal clock gene expression and epithelial cell mitosis in mice. Disruption of the circadian clock by exposure to constant light, constant dark, or jet-lag conditions modified the normal 24-hour patterns of corneal epithelial mitosis and corneal clock gene expression. The time of day of wound occurrence affected the rate and quality of corneal healing, with both of these parameters peaking during the more mitotically active hours of the morning. The two small-molecule modifiers of the circadian clock, KL001 and SR8278, had negative and positive effects on corneal wound healing, respectively. Circadian rhythms significantly influence corneal epithelium renewal and repair in mice. Our findings reveal possible opportunities for biological rhythm-based interventional strategies to control corneal healing and restore corneal homeostasis.

  9. [Ultrastructure of the epithelium of the major pancreatic duct in sheep].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyrauch, K D; Schnorr, B

    1976-01-01

    Light-and electron-microscopic and some histochemical investigations on the epithelium or the ductus pancreaticus major were carried out in sheep. At least six different cell types are recognizable: (1) nondifferentiated duct cells; (2) cells containing apical secretory granules; (3) goblet cells; the mucosubstances of type 2 and 3 are PAS- and Alcian-blue-positive, also reacting wih methenamine silver; (4) ciliated cells, containing a single cilium with the microtubular pattern 9+2; (5) tuft cells with extremely long and wide microvilli and a pear-shaped cell body; (6) migrating cells, mainly lymphocytes and some assumed eosinophils, showing reaction to Mg++-activated ATPase.

  10. Optical modulation of transgene expression in retinal pigment epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanker, D.; Lavinsky, D.; Chalberg, T.; Mandel, Y.; Huie, P.; Dalal, R.; Marmor, M.

    2013-03-01

    Over a million people in US alone are visually impaired due to the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The current treatment is monthly intravitreal injections of a protein which inhibits Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, thereby slowing progression of the disease. The immense financial and logistical burden of millions of intravitreal injections signifies an urgent need to develop more long-lasting and cost-effective treatments for this and other retinal diseases. Viral transfection of ocular cells allows creation of a "biofactory" that secretes therapeutic proteins. This technique has been proven successful in non-human primates, and is now being evaluated in clinical trials for wet AMD. However, there is a critical need to down-regulate gene expression in the case of total resolution of retinal condition, or if patient has adverse reaction to the trans-gene products. The site for genetic therapy of AMD and many other retinal diseases is the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We developed and tested in pigmented rabbits, an optical method to down-regulate transgene expression in RPE following vector delivery, without retinal damage. Microsecond exposures produced by a rapidly scanning laser vaporize melanosomes and destroy a predetermined fraction of the RPE cells selectively. RPE continuity is restored within days by migration and proliferation of adjacent RPE, but since the transgene is not integrated into the nucleus it is not replicated. Thus, the decrease in transgene expression can be precisely determined by the laser pattern density and further reduced by repeated treatment without affecting retinal structure and function.

  11. The Immunoexpression of Glucocorticoid Receptors in Breast Carcinomas, Lactational Change, and Normal Breast Epithelium and Its Possible Role in Mammary Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Alyusuf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer biology is well established. In contrast, other steroid hormones are less well studied. Glucocorticoids (GCs are known to play a role in mammary development and differentiation; thus, it is of interest to attempt to delineate their immunoexpression across a spectrum of mammary epithelia. Aim. To delineate the distribution pattern of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs in malignant versus nonmalignant epithelium with particular emphasis on lactational epithelium. Materials and Methods. Immunohistochemistry (IHC for GRs was performed on archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of 96 cases comprising 52 invasive carcinomas, 21 cases with lactational change, and 23 cases showing normal mammary tissue histology. Results. Results reveal an overexpression of GRs in mammary malignant epithelium as compared to both normal and lactational groups individually and combined. GR overexpression is significantly more pronounced in HER-2-negative cancers. Discussion. This is the first study to compare GR expression in human lactating epithelium versus malignant and normal epithelium. The article discusses the literature related to the pathobiology of GCs in the breast with special emphasis on breast cancer. Conclusion. The lactational epithelium did not show overexpression of GR, while GR was overexpressed in mammary NST (ductal carcinoma, particularly HER-2-negative cancers.

  12. A Comparative Immunohistochemical Study of Anal Canal Epithelium in Humans and Swine, Focusing on the Anal Transitional Zone Epithelium and the Anal Glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaka, Futoshi; Nakajima, Tomoyuki; Iwaya, Mai; Ishii, Keiko; Higuchi, Kayoko; Ogiwara, Naoko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Ota, Hiroyoshi

    2017-12-12

    To better understand the cellular origins and differentiation of anal canal epithelial neoplasms, the immunohistochemical profiles of the anal canal epithelium in humans and swine were evaluated. Formalin-fixed tissue sections were immunostained for mucin (MUC: MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC5B), desmoglein 3 (DGS3), p63, CDX2, SOX2, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). The anal transitional zone (ATZ) epithelium covered the anal sinus and consisted of a stratified epithelium with mucous cells interspersed within the surface lining. Anal glands opened into the anal sinus. Ducts and acini of intraepithelial or periepithelial mucous type were the main structures of human anal glands, whereas those of swine were compound tubuloacinar mixed glands. Distal to the ATZ epithelium, non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium merged with the keratinized stratified squamous epithelium of the perianal skin. MUC5AC expression predominated over MUC5B expression in the ATZ epithelium, while MUC5B expression was higher in the anal glands. SOX2 was positive in the ATZ epithelium, anal glands, and squamous epithelium except in the perianal skin. In humans, DGS3 was expressed in the ATZ epithelium, anal gland ducts, and squamous epithelium. p63 was detected in the ATZ epithelium, anal glands, and squamous epithelium. Myoepithelial cells positive for α-SMA and p63 were present in the anal glands of swine. Colorectal columnar cells were MUC5B+ /MUC2+ /CDX2+ /MUC5AC- /SOX2- . The ATZ epithelium seems to be a distinctive epithelium, with morphological and functional features allowing smooth defecation. The MUC5AC+ /SOX2+ /MUC2- /CDX2- profile of the ATZ epithelium and anal glands is a useful feature for diagnosing adenocarcinoma arising from these regions. Anat Rec, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Hyperopic correction: clinical validation with epithelium-on and epithelium-off protocols, using variable fluence and topographically customized collagen corneal crosslinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanellopoulos AJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anastasios John Kanellopoulos,1,2 George Asimellis1 1LaserViison.gr Clinical and Research Eye Institute, Athens, Greece; 2Department of Ophthalmology, New York University Medical School, New York, NY, USAPurpose: To report novel application of topographically-customized collagen crosslinking aiming to achieve hyperopic refractive changes. Two approaches were evaluated, one based on epithelium-off and one based on epithelium-on (transepithelial. Methods: A peripheral annular-shaped topographically customizable design was employed for high-fluence ultraviolet (UV-A irradiation aiming to achieve hyperopic refractive changes. A total of ten eyes were involved in this study. In group-A (five eyes, a customizable ring pattern was employed to debride the epithelium by excimer laser ablation, while in group-B (also five eyes, the epithelium remained intact. In both groups, specially formulated riboflavin solutions were applied. Visual acuity, cornea clarity, keratometry, topography, and pachymetry with a multitude of modalities, as well as endothelial cell counts were evaluated. Results: One year postoperatively, the following changes have been noted: in group-A, average uncorrected distance visual acuity changed from 20/63 to 20/40. A mean hyperopic refractive increase of +0.75 D was achieved. There was some mild reduction in the epithelial thickness. In group-B, average uncorrected distance visual acuity changed from 20/70 to 20/50. A mean hyperopic refractive increase of +0.85 D was achieved. Epithelial thickness returned to slightly reduced levels (compared to baseline in group-A, whereas to slightly increased levels in group-B. Conclusion: We introduce herein the novel application of a topographically-customizable collagen crosslinking to achieve a hyperopic refractive effect. This novel technique may be applied either with epithelial removal, offering a more stable result or with a non-ablative and non-incisional approach, offering a minimally

  14. Azithromycin ameliorates airway remodeling via inhibiting airway epithelium apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanqi; Pu, Yue; Li, Diandian; Zhou, Liming; Wan, Lihong

    2017-02-01

    Azithromycin can benefit treating allergic airway inflammation and remodeling. In the present study, we hypothesized that azithromycin alleviated airway epithelium injury through inhibiting airway epithelium apoptosis via down regulation of caspase-3 and Bax/Bcl2 ratio in vivo and in vitro. Ovalbumin induced rat asthma model and TGF-β1-induced BEAS-2B cell apoptosis model were established, respectively. In vivo experiments, airway epithelium was stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) to histologically evaluate the airway inflammation and remodeling. Airway epithelium apoptotic index (AI) was further analyzed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), while expression of apoptosis related gene (Bax, Bcl2, Caspase-3) in lungs were measured by qRT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. In vitro experiments, apoptosis were evaluated by Flow cytometry (FCM) and TUNEL. Above apoptosis related gene were also measured by qRT-PCR and western blotting. Compared with the OVA group, azithromycin significantly reduced the inflammation score, peribronchial smooth muscle layer thickness, epithelial thickening and goblet cell metaplasia (Pazithromycin-treated rats (Pazithromycin significantly suppressed TGF-β1-induced BEAS-2B cells apoptosis (PAzithromycin is an attractive treatment option for reducing airway epithelial cell apoptosis by improving the imbalance of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and inhibiting Caspase-3 level in airway epithelium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased polysomy of chromosome 7 in bronchial epithelium from patients at high risk for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinsky, S.A.; Neft, R.E.; Lechner, J.F. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Current models of carcinogenesis suggest that tissues progress through multiple genetic and epigenetic changes which ultimately lead to development of invasive cancer. Epidemiologic studies of Peto, R.R. and J.A. Doll indicate that the accumulation of these genetic changes over time, rather than any single unique genetic change, is probably responsible for development of the malignant phenotype. The bronchial epithelium of cigarette smokers is diffusely exposed to a broad spectrum of carcinogens, toxicants, and tumor promoters contained in tobacco smoke. This exposure increases the risk of developing multiple, independent premalignant foci throughout the lower respiratory tract that may contain independent gene aberrations. This {open_quotes}field cancerization{close_quotes} theory is supported by studies that have demonstrated progressive histologic changes distributed throughout the lower respiratory tract of smokers. A series of autopsy studies demonstrated that cigarette smokers exhibit premalignant histologic changes ranging from hyperplasia and metaplasia to severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ diffusely throughout the bronchial mucosa. The proximal bronchi appear to exhibit the greatest number of changes, particularly at bifurcations. The results described are the first to quantitate the frequency for a chromosome aberration in {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} bronchial epithelial cells.

  16. Three viruses of the bovine respiratory disease complex apply different strategies to initiate infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, Jana; Uhlenbruck, Sabine; Goris, Katherina; Keil, Günther M; Herrler, Georg

    2014-02-18

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the major cause of serious respiratory tract infections in calves. The disease is multifactorial, with either stress or reduced immunity allowing several pathogens to emerge. We investigated the susceptibility of bovine airway epithelial cells (BAEC) to infection by the three major viruses associated with the BRDC: bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) and bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3). For this purpose, two culture systems for well-differentiated BAEC were used: the air-liquid interface (ALI) system, where filter-grown BAEC differentiate into a pseudostratified respiratory epithelium and precision-cut lung slices (PCLS) where BAEC are maintained in the original tissue organisation. Comparative infection studies demonstrated that entry and release of BPIV3 occurred specifically via the apical membrane with ciliated cells being the major target cells. By contrast, airway epithelial cells were largely resistant to infection by BHV-1. When the epithelial barrier was abolished by opening tight junctions or by injuring the cell monolayer, BHV-1 infected mainly basal cells. Respiratory epithelial cells were also refractory to infection by BRSV. However, this virus infected neither differentiated epithelial cells nor basal cells when the integrity of the epithelial barrier was destroyed. In contrast to cells of the airway epithelium, subepithelial cells were susceptible to infection by BRSV. Altogether, these results indicate that the three viruses of the same disease complex follow different strategies to interact with the airway epithelium. Possible entry mechanisms are discussed.

  17. The respiratory microbiome and respiratory infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unger, Stefan A.; Bogaert, Debby|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/264105834

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances over the past ten years lower respiratory tract infections still comprise around a fifth of all deaths worldwide in children under five years of age with the majority in low- and middle-income countries. Known risk factors for severe respiratory infections and poor chronic

  18. Non-Thermal Electromagnetic Radiation Damage to Lens Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Bormusov, Elvira; P.Andley, Usha; Sharon, Naomi; Sch?chter, Levi; Lahav, Assaf; Dovrat, Ahuva

    2008-01-01

    High frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones and other modern devices has the potential to damage eye tissues, but its effect on the lens epithelium is unknown at present. The objective of this study was to investigate the non-thermal effects of high frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation (1.1GHz, 2.22 mW) on the eye lens epithelium in situ. Bovine lenses were incubated in organ culture at 35?C for 10-15 days. A novel computer-controlled microwave source was us...

  19. Expression of connexin 57 in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunbo

    2011-11-01

    In the visual system, deletion of connexin 57 (Cx57) reduces gap junction coupling among horizontal cells and results in smaller receptive fields. To explore potential functions of Cx57 in olfaction, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry methods were used to investigate expression of Cx57 in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb. Hybridization signal was stronger in the olfactory epithelial layer compared to the connective tissue underneath. Within the sensory epithelial layer, hybridization signal was visible in sublayers containing cell bodies of basal cells and olfactory neurons but not evident at the apical sublayer comprising cell bodies of sustentacular cells. These Cx57 positive cells were clustered into small groups to form different patterns in the olfactory epithelium. However, individual patterns did not associate with specific regions of olfactory turbinates or specific olfactory receptor zones. Patched distribution of hybridization positive cells was also observed in the olfactory bulb and accessory olfactory bulb in layers where granule cells, mitral cells, and juxtaglomerular cells reside. Immunostaining was observed in the cell types described above but the intensity was weaker than that in the retina. This study has provided anatomical basis for future studies on the function of Cx57 in the olfactory system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000103.htm Acute respiratory distress syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung ...

  1. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    RSV; Palivizumab; Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin; Bronchiolitis - RSV ... Crowe JE. Respiratory syncytial virus. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ...

  2. MSFC Respiratory Protection Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    CoVan, James P.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the Marshall Space Flight Center Respiratory Protection program is provided in this poster display. Respiratory protection personnel, building, facilities, equipment, customers, maintenance and operational activities, and Dynatech fit testing details are described and illustrated.

  3. Avian respiratory system disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating respiratory diseases in avian species requires a basic knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of this system in birds. Differences between mammalian and avian respiratory system function, diagnosis, and treatment are highlighted.

  4. Quantification and visualization of injury and regeneration to the ciliated epithelium using quantitative flow imaging and speckle variance optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamm, Ute A.; Huang, Brendan K.; Mis, Emily K.; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Choma, Michael A.

    2017-04-01

    Mucociliary flow is an important defense mechanism in the lung to remove inhaled pathogens and pollutants. A disruption of ciliary flow can lead to respiratory infections. Even though patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) either have or are very susceptible to respiratory infections, mucociliary flow is not well understood in the ICU setting. We recently demonstrated that hyperoxia, a consequence of administering supplemental oxygen to a patient in respiratory failure, can lead to a significant reduction of cilia-driven fluid flow in mouse trachea. There are other factors that are relevant to ICU medicine that can damage the ciliated tracheal epithelium, including inhalation injury and endotracheal tube placement. In this study we use two animal models, Xenopus embryo and ex vivo mouse trachea, to analyze flow defects in the injured ciliated epithelium. Injury is generated either mechanically with a scalpel or chemically by calcium chloride (CaCl2) shock, which efficiently but reversibly deciliates the embryo skin. In this study we used optical coherence tomography (OCT) and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) to quantify cilia driven fluid flow over the surface of the Xenopus embryo. We additionally visualized damage to the ciliated epithelium by capturing 3D speckle variance images that highlight beating cilia. Mechanical injury disrupted cilia-driven fluid flow over the injured site, which led to a reduction in cilia-driven fluid flow over the whole surface of the embryo (n=7). The calcium chloride shock protocol proved to be highly effective in deciliating embryos (n=6). 3D speckle variance images visualized a loss of cilia and cilia-driven flow was halted immediately after application. We also applied CaCl2-shock to cultured ex vivo mouse trachea (n=8) and found, similarly to effects in Xenopus embryo, an extensive loss of cilia with resulting cessation of flow. We investigated the regeneration of the ciliated epithelium after an 8 day incubation period

  5. Respiratory Protection in Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Grisso, Robert D. (Robert Dwight), 1956-

    2014-01-01

    Farm workers can encounter a variety of respiratory problems ranging from temporary discomfort caused by allergic reactions to fatal asphyxiation. However, the risk of contracting serious lung diseases or death can be significantly decreased by using respiratory protection. This publication lists farm work that requires respiratory protection and equipment that will help prevention of future problems.

  6. How Is Respiratory Failure Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  7. How Is Respiratory Failure Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  8. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SARS; Respiratory failure - SARS ... Complications may include: Respiratory failure Liver failure Heart failure ... 366. McIntosh K, Perlman S. Coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). ...

  9. What Is Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Respiratory Distress Syndrome Respiratory Distress Syndrome What Is Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) ... This condition is called apnea (AP-ne-ah). Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complications Depending on the severity of ...

  10. Type I collagen as an extracellular matrix for the in vitro growth of human small intestinal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyad Jabaji

    Full Text Available We previously reported in vitro maintenance and proliferation of human small intestinal epithelium using Matrigel, a proprietary basement membrane product. There are concerns over the applicability of Matrigel-based methods for future human therapies. We investigated type I collagen as an alternative for the culture of human intestinal epithelial cells.Human small intestine was procured from fresh surgical pathology specimens. Small intestinal crypts were isolated using EDTA chelation. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts were isolated from a pediatric sample and expanded in vitro. After suspension in Matrigel or type I collagen gel, crypts were co-cultured above a confluent layer of myofibroblasts. Crypts were also grown in monoculture with exposure to myofibroblast conditioned media; these were subsequently sub-cultured in vitro and expanded with a 1∶2 split ratio. Cultures were assessed with light microscopy, RT-PCR, histology, and immunohistochemistry.Collagen supported viable human epithelium in vitro for at least one month in primary culture. Sub-cultured epithelium expanded through 12 passages over 60 days. Histologic sections revealed polarized columnar cells, with apical brush borders and basolaterally located nuclei. Collagen-based cultures gave rise to monolayer epithelial sheets at the gel-liquid interface, which were not observed with Matrigel. Immunohistochemical staining identified markers of differentiated intestinal epithelium and myofibroblasts. RT-PCR demonstrated expression of α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin in myofibroblasts and E-Cadherin, CDX2, villin 1, intestinal alkaline phosphatase, chromogranin A, lysozyme, and Lgr5 in epithelial cells. These markers were maintained through several passages.Type I collagen gel supports long-term in vitro maintenance and expansion of fully elaborated human intestinal epithelium. Collagen-based methods yield familiar enteroid structures as well as a new pattern of sheet

  11. Different roles for Pax6 in the optic vesicle and facial epithelium mediate early morphogenesis of the murine eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, J M; Hill, R E; West, J D

    2000-03-01

    Chimaeric mice were made by aggregating Pax6(-/-) and wild-type mouse embryos, in order to study the interaction between the optic vesicle and the prospective lens epithelium during early stages of eye development. Histological analysis of the distribution of homozygous mutant cells in the chimaeras showed that the cell-autonomous removal of Pax6(-/-) cells from the lens, shown previously at E12.5, is nearly complete by E9.5. Most mutant cells are eliminated from an area of facial epithelium wider than, but including, the developing lens placode. This result suggests a role for Pax6 in maintaining a region of the facial epithelium that has the tissue competence to undergo lens differentiation. Segregation of wild-type and Pax6(-/-) cells occurs in the optic vesicle at E9.5 and is most likely a result of different adhesive properties of wild-type and mutant cells. Also, proximo-distal specification of the optic vesicle (as assayed by the elimination of Pax6(-/-) cells distally), is disrupted in the presence of a high proportion of mutant cells. This suggests that Pax6 operates during the establishment of patterning along the proximo-distal axis of the vesicle. Examination of chimaeras with a high proportion of mutant cells showed that Pax6 is required in the optic vesicle for maintenance of contact with the overlying lens epithelium. This may explain why Pax6(-/-) optic vesicles are inefficient at inducing a lens placode. Contact is preferentially maintained when the lens epithelium is also wild-type. Together, these results demonstrate requirements for functional Pax6 in both the optic vesicle and surface epithelia in order to mediate the interactions between the two tissues during the earliest stages of eye development.

  12. Mechanisms underlying epithelium-dependent relaxation in rat bronchioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroigaard, Christel; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Simonsen, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    (SK(Ca)) and intermediate (IK(Ca))-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, NS309 (6,7-dichloro-1H-indole-2,3-dione 3-oxime) was used to induce EpDHF-type relaxation. IK(Ca) and SK(Ca)3 positive immunoreactions were observed mainly in the epithelium and endothelium of bronchioles and arteries...

  13. Role of airway epithelium in engulfing apoptotic eosinophils | Alenzi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Role of airway epithelium in engulfing apoptotic eosinophils. FQ Alenzi. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/njm.v18i2.45054 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for ...

  14. Adhesion of Porphyromonas gingivalis serotypes to pocket epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierickx, K; Pauwels, M; Laine, ML; Van Eldere, J; Cassiman, JJ; van Winkelhoff, AJ; van Steenberghe, D; Quirynen, M

    Background: Porphyromonas gingivalis, a key pathogen in periodontitis, is able to adhere to and invade the pocket epithelium. Different capsular antigens of P gingivalis have been identified (K-serotyping). These P gingivalis capsular types show differences in adhesion capacity to human cell lines

  15. DIFFERENTIAL HISTOMORPHOMETRIC CHANGES IN NORMAL AND INFLAMED GINGIVAL EPITHELIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaskovic Stankovic Sanja

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and aim: In recent decades, many factors such as smoking, unhealthy diet as well as high alcohol intake were marked as risk factors that can lead to increased incidence of malignant alterations, gingivitis, periodontal disease and other oral epithelium pathological changes. Having in mind that in the group of non-malignant and non-dental oral pathology gingivitis and periodontal disease are the most common oral mucosa alterations aim of our research was to investigate histomorphometric characteristics of healthy and altered oral and gingival epithelium. Material and methods: Tissue samples of 24 oral and gingival mucosa specimens were collected. Samples were fixed in 10% buffered paraformaldehyde, routinely processed and embedded in paraffin blocks. From each block sections 5 micrometer thin were made and standard H/E staining as well as immunocytochemical detection of Ki-67 proliferation marker and CD79a lymphocyte marker were performed. Measurements and image analysis was performed with Image Pro Plus software (Media Cybernetics, USA and Axiovision (Ziess, USA. Results: We showed that inflamed gingival epithelium is increasing its thickness in proportion to the severity of adjacent inflammation. Furthermore, mitotic index is rising (up to 132% in the same manner as well as basal lamina length (up to 70% when normal and inflamed gingiva is compared. Architecture of epithelial ridges is changed from straightforward to mesh-like. Conclusion: Assessment of the free gingival epithelium thickness is directly related to the severity of the inflammation process i

  16. Structure and development of the saccular sensory epithelium in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Structure and development of the saccular sensory epithelium in relation to otolith growth in the perch Perca fluviatilis (Telostei) ... Electron microscopy indicated: 1) The apical surface of each hair cell is covered with a ciliary bundle which varies in length in different epithelial regions. Each bundle is formed from a long ...

  17. Functional annotation of the human retinal pigment epithelium transcriptome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Booij (Judith); S. van Soest (Simone); S.M.A. Swagemakers (Sigrid); A.H.W. Essing (Anke); J.H.M. Verkerk (Annemieke); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); T.G.M.F. Gorgels (Theo); A.A.B. Bergen (Arthur)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To determine level, variability and functional annotation of gene expression of the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the key tissue involved in retinal diseases like age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Macular RPE cells from six selected healthy

  18. The distribution of free calcium ions in the cholesteatoma epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane-Knudsen, Viggo; Rasmussen, Gurli; Ottosen, Peter D

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of free calcium ions in normal skin and cholesteatoma epithelium was investigated using the oxalate precipitation method. In agreement with previous observations, we could demonstrate a calcium ion gradient in normal epidermis where the cells in stratum basale and spinosum reside...

  19. Vitamin A and ciliated cells. I. Respiratory epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesalski, H K; Stofft, E; Wellner, U; Niederauer, U; Bässler, K H

    1986-06-01

    To estimate the role of vitamin A on ciliated cells we investigated whether ciliated cells undergo any alteration during vitamin A deficiency. The epithelia examined include the ciliated cells of the respiratory tract and the ciliated sensory cells of the inner ear, the tongue, and the olfactory cells. This part of the paper will describe the ciliated epithelium of the tracheobronchial tract and its relation to vitamin A status. During vitamin A deficiency a partial loss of ciliae can be observed before any squamous metaplasia (which usually occurs during longer lasting vitamin A deficiency) develops. The scanning electron microscopic data illustrate the altered surface of the epithelium during vitamin A deficiency better than transmission electron microscopy.

  20. E-cadherin regulators are differentially expressed in the epithelium and stroma of keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Lia Pontes Arruda; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Figueiredo, Andreia Leal; Carneiro Júnior, Bráulio; Gurgel, Clarissa Araújo; Paiva, Katiúcia Batista Silva; Xavier, Flávia Caló Aquino

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is the process where cells lose their epithelial features and acquire properties of typical mesenchymal cells. The dissociation of tumor cells due to changes in cell-cell adhesion is one of the key principles of tumor invasion and EMT. Thus, the knowledge of the molecular features of EMT in keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KOT) can provide useful markers to aid in the diagnosis and prognosis and perhaps contribute to an alternative therapeutic approach as it shows an aggressive clinical behavior and high recurrence rates. This study aimed to evaluate the EMT in KOT by the immunoexpression of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, Snail, and Slug and comparing to radicular cysts and dental follicles. Thirty-two KOTs, 15 radicular cysts, and 08 dental follicles were used for immunohistochemistry, evaluating the extent, intensity, labeling pattern, cellular compartment in the epithelium and stroma, and the presence of inflammation. E-cadherin was preserved in most cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. N-cadherin was increased in the tumor epithelium, a result that was positively correlated with the heterogeneous and nuclear immunoexpression of Slug in the epithelium; Slug also correlated with high Snail immunoexpression. N-cadherin was positively correlated with Slug in the stroma of keratocystic odontogenic tumors. The high immunoexpression of Snail and nuclear Slug in keratocystic odontogenic tumors suggests these proteins as transcription factors without necessarily participating in 'cadherin switching'. However, the knowledge of their induction of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in odontogenic tumors is still limited. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. APR-246/PRIMA-1Met Inhibits and Reverses Squamous Metaplasia in Human Conjunctival Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Li, Cheng; Wang, Guoliang; Liu, Zhen; Chen, Pei; Yang, Qichen; Dong, Nuo; Wu, Huping; Liu, Zuguo; Li, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Squamous metaplasia is a common pathologic condition in ocular surface diseases for which there is no therapeutic medication in clinic. In this study, we investigated the effect of a small molecule, APR-246/PRIMA-1(Met), on squamous metaplasia in human conjunctival epithelium. Human conjunctival explants were cultured for up to 12 days under airlifting conditions. Epithelial cell differentiation and proliferation were assessed by Cytokeratin 10 (K10), K14, K19, Pax6, MUC5AC, and p63 immunostaining patterns. β-catenin and TCF-4 immunofluorescent staining and real-time PCR characterized Wnt signaling pathway involvement. Pterygium clinical samples were cultured under airlifting conditions with or without APR-246 for 4 days. p63, K10, β-catenin, and TCF-4 expression in pterygial epithelium was determined by immunofluorescent staining and real-time PCR. Airlift conjunctival explants resulted in increased stratification and intrastromal epithelial invagination. Such pathology was accompanied by increases in K10, K14, and p63 expression, whereas K19 and Pax6 levels declined when compared to those in freshly isolated tissue. On the other hand, APR-246 reversed all of these declines in K10, K14, and p63 expression. Furthermore, K19 and Pax6 increased along with rises in goblet cell density. These effects of APR-246 were accompanied by near restoration of normal conjunctival epithelial histology. APR-246 also reversed squamous metaplasia in pterygial epithelium that had developed after 4 days in ex vivo culture. Reductions in squamous metaplasia induced by APR-246 suggest it may provide a novel therapeutic approach in different squamous metaplasia-associated ocular surface diseases.

  2. Toll-like receptor 4 expression in the epithelium of inflammatory periapical lesions. An immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Leonardi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLR are essential for the innate immune response against invading pathogens and have been described in immunocompetent cells of areas affected by periapical disease. Besides initiating the inflammatory response, they also directly regulate epithelial cell proliferation and survival in a variety of settings. This study evaluates the in situ expression of TLR4 in periapical granulomas (PG and radicular cysts, focusing on the epithelial compartment. Twenty-one periapical cysts (PC and 10 PG were analyzed; 7 dentigerous non-inflamed follicular cyst (DC served as control. TLR4 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. TLR4 immunoreaction products were detected in the epithelium of all specimens, with a higher percentage of immunostained cells in PG. Although TLR4 overexpression was detected in both PG and PC, there were differences that seemed to be related to the nature of the lesion, since in PG all epithelial cells of strands, islands and trabeculae were strongly immunoreactive for TLR4, whereas in PC only some areas of the basal and suprabasal epithelial layers were immunostained. This staining pattern is consistent with the action of TLR4: in PG it could promote formation of epithelial cell rests of Malassez and in epithelial strands and islands the enhancement of cell survival, proliferation and migration, whereas in PC TLR4 could protect the lining epithelium from extensive apoptosis. These findings go some way towards answering the intriguing question of why many epithelial strands or islands in PG and the lining epithelium of apical cysts regress after non-surgical endodontic therapy, and suggest that TLR4 plays a key role in the pathobiology of the inflammatory process related to periapical disease.

  3. Field cancerization in the intestinal epithelium of patients with Crohn's ileocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galandiuk, Susan; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Jeffery, Rosemary; Nicholson, Anna M; Cheng, Yong; Oukrif, Dahmane; Elia, George; Leedham, Simon J; McDonald, Stuart A C; Wright, Nicholas A; Graham, Trevor A

    2012-04-01

    Tumors that develop in patients with Crohn's disease tend be multifocal, so field cancerization (the replacement of normal cells with nondysplastic but tumorigenic clones) might contribute to intestinal carcinogenesis. We investigated patterns of tumor development from pretumor intestinal cell clones. We performed genetic analyses of multiple areas of intestine from 10 patients with Crohn's disease and intestinal neoplasia. Two patients had multifocal neoplasia; longitudinal sections were collected from 3 patients. Individual crypts were microdissected and genotyped; clonal dependency analysis was used to determine the order and timing of mutations that led to tumor development. The same mutations in KRAS, CDKN2A(p16), and TP53 that were observed in neoplasias were also present in nontumor, nondysplastic, and dysplastic epithelium. In 2 patients, carcinogenic mutations were detected in nontumor epithelium 4 years before tumors developed. The same mutation (TP53 p.R248W) was detected at multiple sites along the entire length of the colon from 1 patient; it was the apparent founder mutation for synchronous tumors and multiple dysplastic areas. Disruption of TP53, CDKN2A, and KRAS were all seen as possible initial events in tumorigenesis; the sequence of mutations (the tumor development pathway) differed among lesions. Pretumor clones can grow extensively in the intestinal epithelium of patients with Crohn's disease. Segmental resections for neoplasia in patients with Crohn's disease might therefore leave residual pretumor disease, and dysplasia might be an unreliable biomarker for cancer risk. Characterization of the behavior of pretumor clones might be used to predict the development of intestinal neoplasia. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Human upper airway epithelium produces nitric oxide in response to Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Ryan M; Chen, Bei; Adappa, Nithin D; Palmer, James N; Kennedy, David W; Lee, Robert J; Cohen, Noam A

    2016-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is produced by sinonasal epithelial cells as part of the innate immune response against bacteria. We previously described bitter-taste-receptor-dependent and -independent NO responses to product(s) secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. We hypothesized that sinonasal epithelium would be able to detect the gram-positive, coagulase-negative bacteria Staphylococcus epidermidis and mount a similar NO response. Sinonasal air-liquid interface cultures were treated with conditioned medium (CM) from lab strains and clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci and S aureus. NO production was quantified by fluorescence imaging. Bitter taste receptor signaling inhibitors were utilized to characterize the pathway responsible for NO production in response to S epidermidis CM. S epidermidis CM contains a low-molecular-weight, heat, and protease-stabile product that induces an NO synthase (NOS)-mediated NO production that is less robust than the response triggered by S aureus CM. The S epidermidis CM-stimulated NO response is not inhibited by antagonists of phospholipase C isoform β-2 nor the transient receptor potential melastatin isoform 5 ion channel, both critical to bitter taste signaling. This study identifies an NO-mediated innate defense response in sinonasal epithelium elicited by S epidermidis product(s). The active bacterial product is likely a small, nonpeptide molecule that stimulates a pathway independent of bitter taste receptors. Although the NO response to S epidermidis is less vigorous compared with S aureus, the product(s) share similar characteristics. Together, the responses to staphylococci species may help explain the pathophysiology of upper respiratory infections. © 2016 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  5. k-t accelerated aortic 4D flow MRI in under two minutes: Feasibility and impact of resolution, k-space sampling patterns, and respiratory navigator gating on hemodynamic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollache, Emilie; Barker, Alex J; Dolan, Ryan Scott; Carr, James C; van Ooij, Pim; Ahmadian, Rouzbeh; Powell, Alex; Collins, Jeremy D; Geiger, Julia; Markl, Michael

    2018-01-01

    To assess the performance of highly accelerated free-breathing aortic four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI acquired in under 2 minutes compared to conventional respiratory gated 4D flow. Eight k-t accelerated nongated 4D flow MRI (parallel MRI with extended and averaged generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition kernels [PEAK GRAPPA], R = 5, TRes = 67.2 ms) using four ky -kz Cartesian sampling patterns (linear, center-out, out-center-out, random) and two spatial resolutions (SRes1 = 3.5 × 2.3 × 2.6 mm3 , SRes2 = 4.5 × 2.3 × 2.6 mm3 ) were compared in vitro (aortic coarctation flow phantom) and in 10 healthy volunteers, to conventional 4D flow (16 mm-navigator acceptance window; R = 2; TRes = 39.2 ms; SRes = 3.2 × 2.3 × 2.4 mm3 ). The best k-t accelerated approach was further assessed in 10 patients with aortic disease. The k-t accelerated in vitro aortic peak flow (Qmax), net flow (Qnet), and peak velocity (Vmax) were lower than conventional 4D flow indices by ≤4.7%, ≤ 11%, and ≤22%, respectively. In vivo k-t accelerated acquisitions were significantly shorter but showed a trend to lower image quality compared to conventional 4D flow. Hemodynamic indices for linear and out-center-out k-space samplings were in agreement with conventional 4D flow (Qmax ≤ 13%, Qnet ≤ 13%, Vmax ≤ 17%, P > 0.05). Aortic 4D flow MRI in under 2 minutes is feasible with moderate underestimation of flow indices. Differences in k-space sampling patterns suggest an opportunity to mitigate image artifacts by an optimal trade-off between scan time, acceleration, and k-space sampling. Magn Reson Med 79:195-207, 2018. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. Kinetics of corneal epithelium turnover in vivo. Studies of lovastatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cenedella, R.J.; Fleschner, C.R. (Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, MO (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The authors developed a direct chemical approach for estimating the rate of turnover of the corneal epithelium in vivo. The method was used to examine the effects of lovastatin, a potent inhibitor of cholesterol biosynthesis, on proliferation and turnover of the epithelium. Corneal DNA was labeled by pulse injection (IP) of the rat with 3H-thymidine, and 3H-labeled DNA was recovered from peripheral and central corneas over the next 15 days. Only the epithelium became labeled, and the loss of label by cell desquamation began 3 days after injection. The loss of 3H-DNA from the cornea (peripheral plus central region) followed first-order kinetics. The half-life of the disappearance was about 3 days. The peripheral cornea became more highly labeled than the central cornea and began to lose 3H-DNA before the central cornea. These observations support the possibility of a higher mitotic rate in the peripheral region and the centripetal movement of a population of peripheral epithelial cells in the normal cornea. The half-lives of the disappearance of 3H-DNA from peripheral and central corneas measured between days 5 and 15 postinjection were identical, both at 3 days. Complete turnover of the corneal epithelium would, therefore, require about 2 weeks (4-5 half-lives). Treatment of the rat with lovastatin had no obvious effects upon the proliferation or turnover of the corneal epithelium. Although lovastatin inhibited corneal 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the key regulatory enzyme of cholesterol synthesis, the cornea compensated by induction of this enzyme so that there was no net inhibition of cholesterol synthesis in the cornea.

  7. A simplified classification for describing colposcopic vaginal patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indraccolo, Ugo; Baldoni, Angelo

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to highlight that colposcopic vaginal patterns are not specific, unlike cervical colposcopic patterns, and to provide a simpler classification of vaginal colposcopic patterns. A total of 223 patients who underwent colposcopy with Schiller test were assessed (hierarchical log-linear model) retrospectively. The greatest predictability for histologically confirmed warts and cancers is represented by colposcopic patterns of wart and cancer. Lugol-negative area is strongly predictive of koilocytosis, even if it is found in other vaginal lesions. Thickened epithelium seems to better predict a severe vaginal lesion, whereas thin white epithelium better suggests a mild vaginal lesion. Colposcopic patterns were simplified as follows: Lugol-negative area, white epithelia (thin white epithelium and white thickened epithelium), vascular lesions (regular and irregular mosaicisms and punctations), wart, and cancer. Thus, koilocytosis is predicted by the Lugol-negative area, whereas white epithelia patterns and vascular patterns are not specific, suggesting overall vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias. Wart and cancer patterns are pathognomonic for histologically confirmed warts and cancers. Vaginal colposcopy poorly predicts the severity of vaginal lesions. By including each type of white epithelium within a new category called "white epithelia patterns" and each type of vascular pattern within a new category called "vascular patterns," it is possible to simplify vaginal colposcopy without compromising its accuracy.

  8. THE ROLE OF THE VIRUS RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF THE ASTHMATIC EXARCEBATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Djindjic

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The virus infections of the respiratory pathways represent an important cause of the emergence of the symptoms of the puffing (wheezing in the lungs of the patients of all age groups. In the patients suffering from asthma the virus respiratory infections are the main causes of asthmatic exarcebations. In 80 to 85 % of the school children and in 50 % of the adult asthmatics, the exarcebations are caused by the respiratory virus infection while the most frequent cause is the rhinovirus. It is believed that in the pathogenesis of the virus-induced asthmatic exarcebations the following mechanisms are involved: the damage of the epithelium, the inflammation increase in the respiratory pathways, the disturbance of the small respiratory pathways' geometry, the disturbance of the nerve controlling mechanisms and the disturbance of the IgE synthesis regulation.

  9. Histochemical and morpho-metrical study of mouse intestine epithelium after a long term diet containing genetically modified soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistelli, S.; Citterio, B.; Baldelli, B.; Parlani, C.; Malatesta, M.

    2010-01-01

    Diet can influence the structural characteristics of both small and large intestine. In this study, we investigated the duodenum and colon of mice fed on genetically modified (GM) soybean during their whole life span (1–24 months) by focusing our attention on the histological and ultrastructural characteristics of the epithelium, the histochemical pattern of goblet cell mucins, and the growth profile of the coliform population. Our results demonstrate that controls and GM-soybean fed mice are similarly affected by ageing. Moreover, the GM soybean-containing diet does not induce structural alterations in duodenal and colonic epithelium or in coliform population, even after a long term intake. On the other hand, the histochemical approach revealed significant diet-related changes in mucin amounts in the duodenum. In particular, the percentage of villous area occupied by acidic and sulpho-mucin granules decreased from controls to GM-fed animals, whereas neutral mucins did not change. PMID:20819774

  10. Cytological evaluation of spermatogenesis and organization of the germinal epithelium in the male slider turtle, Trachemys scripta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribbins, Kevin M; Gist, Daniel H; Congdon, Justin D

    2003-03-01

    The germ cell development in the slider turtle (Trachemys scripta) testis was investigated by viewing the histology of the seminiferous epithelium in plastic sections with a light microscope. Germ cell morphologies in the slider turtle testis were similar to the morphologies of other vertebrate germ cell types. However, the slider turtle seminiferous epithelium contained germ cells that progress through spermatogenesis in a temporal rather than a spatial pattern, resulting in a single spermatogenic event that climaxed with one massive sperm release in November. Mature sperm then are stored within the epididymis until breeding commences in the following spring. The germ cell development strategy in the slider turtle is different from that of other amniotes and is more reminiscent of the developmental strategy found in the anamniotic testis. This temporal progression of germ cells through spermatogenesis within a tubular testis represents a transitional model that may be evolutionarily significant. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Dissociation of rod and cone sensitivity by acute localized retinal pigment epithelium loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøyer, Kristian; la Cour, Morten; Larsen, Michael

    2008-01-01

    To assess the impact of acute retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) loss on photopic and scotopic sensitivity.......To assess the impact of acute retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) loss on photopic and scotopic sensitivity....

  12. The neurology of acutely failing respiratory mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2017-04-01

    Forces involved in breathing-which effectively pull in air-are the diaphragmatic, intercostal, spine, and neck muscles. Equally important is the bulbar musculature maintaining the architecture of a patent airway conduit and abdominal wall and internal intercostal muscles providing cough. Acute injury along a neural trajectory from brainstem to muscle will impair the coordinated interaction between these muscle groups. Acutely failing respiratory mechanics can be caused by central and peripheral lesions. In central lesions, the key lesion is in the nucleus ambiguus innervating the dilator muscles of the soft palate, pharynx, and larynx, but abnormal respiratory mechanics rarely coincide with abnormalities of the respiratory pattern generator. In peripheral lesions, diaphragmatic weakness is a main element, but in many neuromuscular disorders mechanical upper airway obstruction from oropharyngeal weakness contributes equally to an increased respiratory load. The neurology of breathing involves changes in respiratory drive, rhythm, mechanics, and dynamics. This review focuses on the fundamentals of abnormal respiratory mechanics in acute neurologic conditions, bedside judgment, interpretation of additional laboratory tests, and initial stabilization, with practical solutions provided. Many of these respiratory signs are relevant to neurologists, who in acute situations may see these patients first. Ann Neurol 2017;81:485-494. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  13. [The respiratory therapist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karg, O; Bubulj, C; Esche, B; Geiseler, J; Bonnet, R; Mäder, I

    2008-11-01

    Because of the expected significant growth in the elderly population and respiratory diseases, the topic of "delegation of physician's duties" is of increasing importance to the German health-care system. In 2004 the German Respiratory Society (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Pneumologie und Beatmungsmedizin e. V. (DGP)) established the new profession: respiratory therapist. A curriculum was defined which offers training for certified nurses and physiotherapists. Respiratory therapists evaluate, treat, document and care for patients with pulmonary disorders. Under appropriate supervision a licensed respiratory therapist performs some of the work previously done by physicians at the same quality of care. The first respiratory therapists have finished their professional training in Germany. Most of these respiratory therapists are now employed in hospital-based positions requiring their specific skills. Generally, the increased medical responsibility and the increased degree of decision-making possibilities associated with the new profession contribute to a better job satisfaction. However, this is not yet true for all the newly employed respiratory therapists. Only few of the new graduate respiratory therapists were awarded higher salaries. It is a strongly recommendation to the heads of medical departments and the human resources managers of hospitals that they should recognise the increased qualifications of nurses and physiotherapists who become respiratory therapists by appropriate remuneration.

  14. The ultrastructural localization of gross cystic disease fluid protein (GCDFP-15) in breast epithelium.

    OpenAIRE

    Mazoujian, G.; Warhol, M. J.; Haagensen, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    GCDFP-15 is a major constituent protein of 15,000-dalton monomer size present in breast gross cystic disease fluid. Immunoperoxidase staining of GCDFP-15 has shown the protein to be present in normal apocrine epithelium, metaplastic apocrine epithelium of the breast, and breast carcinomas with apocrine features. To delineate ultrastructurally the localization of GCDFP-15 in benign breast epithelium, a low-temperature embedding colloidal gold technique was used. Metaplastic apocrine epithelium...

  15. Localization of Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) in the developing gustatory epithelium of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Ryo; Shi, Lei; Honma, Shiho; Fujii, Masae; Ueda, Katsura; El-Sharaby, Ashraf; Wakisaka, Satoshi

    2004-09-01

    To understand the development of the gustatory structures necessitates a reliable marker for both immature and mature taste buds. It has been reported that the intragemmal cells within the taste buds of adult rats were bound to Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), a specific lectin for alpha-linked fucose, but it has not been determined whether immature taste buds, i.e. taste buds without an apparent taste pore, are labeled with UEA-I. The present study was conducted to examine the UEA-I binding pattern during the development of the rat gustatory epithelium. In adult animals, UEA-I bound to the membrane of taste buds in all examined regions of the gustatory epithelium. Within the individual taste buds, UEA-I labeled almost all intragemmal cells. The binding of UEA-I was occasionally detected below the keratinized layer of the trench wall epithelium but could not be found in the lingual epithelium of the adult animal. During the development of circumvallate papilla, some cells within the immature taste buds were also labeled with UEA-I. The developmental changes in the UEA-I binding pattern in fungiform papillae were almost identical to those in the circumvallate papilla: both immature and mature taste buds were labeled with UEA-I. The present results indicate that UEA-I is a specific lectin for the intragemmal cells of both immature and mature taste buds and, thus, UEA-I can be used as a reliable marker for all taste buds in the rat.

  16. High correlation of the response of upper and lower lobe small airway epithelium to smoking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben-Gary Harvey

    Full Text Available The distribution of lung disease induced by inhaled cigarette smoke is complex, depending on many factors. With the knowledge that the small airway epithelium (SAE is the earliest site of smoking-induced lung disease, and that the SAE gene expression is likely sensitive to inhaled cigarette smoke, we compared upper vs. lower lobe gene expression in the SAE within the same cigarette smokers to determine if the gene expression patterns were similar or different. Active smokers (n = 11 with early evidence of smoking-induced lung disease (normal spirometry but low diffusing capacity underwent bronchoscopy and brushing of the upper and lower lobe SAE in order to compare upper vs lower lobe genome-wide and smoking-responsive gene expression by microarray. Cluster and principal component analysis demonstrated that, for each individual, the expression of the known SAE smoking-responsive genes were highly correlated in upper and lower lobe pairs, although, as expected, there were differences in the smoking-induced changes in gene expression from individual to individual. These observations support the concept that the heterogeneity observed among smokers in the anatomic distribution of smoking-induced disease are not secondary to the topographic differences in the effects of cigarette smoke on the airway epithelium.

  17. Induction of ectopic taste buds by SHH reveals the competency and plasticity of adult lingual epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, David; Seidel, Kerstin; Salcedo, Ernesto; Ahn, Christina; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Klein, Ophir D.; Barlow, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    Taste buds are assemblies of elongated epithelial cells, which are innervated by gustatory nerves that transmit taste information to the brain stem. Taste cells are continuously renewed throughout life via proliferation of epithelial progenitors, but the molecular regulation of this process remains unknown. During embryogenesis, sonic hedgehog (SHH) negatively regulates taste bud patterning, such that inhibition of SHH causes the formation of more and larger taste bud primordia, including in regions of the tongue normally devoid of taste buds. Here, using a Cre-lox system to drive constitutive expression of SHH, we identify the effects of SHH on the lingual epithelium of adult mice. We show that misexpression of SHH transforms lingual epithelial cell fate, such that daughter cells of lingual epithelial progenitors form cell type-replete, onion-shaped taste buds, rather than non-taste, pseudostratified epithelium. These SHH-induced ectopic taste buds are found in regions of the adult tongue previously thought incapable of generating taste organs. The ectopic buds are composed of all taste cell types, including support cells and detectors of sweet, bitter, umami, salt and sour, and recapitulate the molecular differentiation process of endogenous taste buds. In contrast to the well-established nerve dependence of endogenous taste buds, however, ectopic taste buds form independently of both gustatory and somatosensory innervation. As innervation is required for SHH expression by endogenous taste buds, our data suggest that SHH can replace the need for innervation to drive the entire program of taste bud differentiation. PMID:24993944

  18. Reduced MBD2 expression enhances airway inflammation in bronchial epithelium in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng ZL

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Zhilin Zeng,1,2 Miao Li,1 Jinkun Chen,3 Qinghai Li,1 Qin Ning,2 Jianping Zhao,1 Yongjian Xu,1 Jungang Xie,1 Jun Yu4 1Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, National Clinical Research Center of Respiratory Disease, 2Department of Infectious Disease, Institute of Infectious Disease, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; 3Acadia Junior High School, Winnipeg, MB, Canada; 4Department of Thoracic Surgery, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a common inflammatory lung disease characterized by inflammatory cells activation and production of inflammatory mediators. Methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 (MBD2 plays an important role in diverse immunological disorders by regulating immune cell functions, such as differentiation and mediator secretion. However, the role of MBD2 in COPD remains unknown.Methods: MBD2 protein expression in lung tissues of patients with COPD and cigarette smoke (CS-exposed mice were evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The role of MBD2 in cigarette smoke extract (CSE-induction of inflammatory mediator expression in the human bronchial epithelial (HBE cell line was assessed by silencing MBD2 expression in vitro. The involvement of signaling pathways in mediation of inflammation was tested with signaling inhibitors.Results: Compared with controls, MBD2 expression was distinctly reduced in the bronchial epithelium of both patients with COPD and CS-exposed mice. Moreover, MBD2 expression was decreased in HBE after CSE stimulation in vitro. Moreover, MBD2 knockdown enhanced interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8 expression in HBE in the presence and absence of CSE treatment by the ERK signaling pathway.Conclusion: MBD2 protein expression was reduced in the airway epithelium of COPD. In

  19. File list: Pol.Oth.05.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. File list: InP.Oth.05.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  18. File list: DNS.Oth.20.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  2. File list: Pol.Oth.20.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. File list: ALL.Oth.20.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  5. File list: NoD.Oth.10.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  6. Respiratory physiology at altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, C; Naylor, J

    2011-03-01

    The changes in respiratory physiology that occur with increasing altitude are driven by the fall in the partial pressure of oxygen that occurs with decreasing barometric pressure. At altitude, respiratory system changes occur which impact on each step of the oxygen cascade that occurs within the body. These changes are pivotal to the process of acclimatisation to altitude. The study of human respiratory physiology at altitude has the potential to produce research that will be translational to disease states characterised by hypoxaemia.

  7. Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis: The Korle-Bu experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis is a benign disease of the aero digestive tract which is caused by the human papilloma virus type 6 and 11 and mainly affects children. Objective: The aim of this study is to describe the pattern of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis at the E.N.T Unit Korle Bu Teaching ...

  8. Neurological Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Rudrappa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus infection in humans is mostly asymptomatic. Less than 1% of neuro-invasive cases show a fatality rate of around 10%. Acute flaccid paralysis of respiratory muscles leading to respiratory failure is the most common cause of death. Although the peripheral nervous system can be involved, isolated phrenic nerve palsy leading to respiratory failure is rare and described in only two cases in the English literature. We present another case of neurological respiratory failure due to West Nile virus-induced phrenic nerve palsy. Our case reiterates the rare, but lethal, consequences of West Nile virus infection, and the increase of its awareness among physicians.

  9. Managing respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Sarah; Restrick, Louise; Stern, Myra

    2017-02-01

    The diverse and evolving role of a psychologist within a respiratory multidisciplinary team (MDT) is described, providing a working model for service provision. The rationale for appointing a psychologist within a respiratory MDT is presented first, citing relevant policy and research and outlining the wider psychosocial impact of respiratory disease. This is followed by an insight into the psychologist's role by highlighting important areas, including key therapy themes and the challenge of patient engagement. The way in which the psychologist supports the collective aims and aspirations of respiratory colleagues to provide a more holistic package of care is illustrated throughout.

  10. Barrier function of the coelomic epithelium in the developing pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ping; Preuett, Barry; Krishna, Prasadan; Xiao, Xiangwei; Shiota, Chiyo; Wiersch, John; Gaffar, Iliana; Tulachan, Sidhartha; El-Gohary, Yousef; Song, Zewen; Gittes, George

    2014-11-01

    Tight spatial regulation of extracellular morphogen signaling within the close confines of a developing embryo is critical for proper organogenesis. Given the complexity of extracellular signaling in developing organs, together with the proximity of adjacent organs that use disparate signaling pathways, we postulated that a physical barrier to signaling may exist between organs in the embryo. Here we describe a previously unrecognized role for the embryonic coelomic epithelium in providing a physical barrier to contain morphogenic signaling in the developing mouse pancreas. This layer of cells appears to function both to contain key factors required for pancreatic epithelial differentiation, and to prevent fusion of adjacent organs during critical developmental windows. During early foregut development, this barrier appears to play a role in preventing splenic anlage-derived activin signaling from inducing intestinalization of the pancreas-specified epithelium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Entamoeba histolytica: Host parasite interactions at the colonic epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornick, Steve; Chadee, Kris

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Entamoeba histolytica (Eh) is the protozoan parasite responsible for intestinal amebiasis and interacts dynamically with the host intestinal epithelium during disease pathogenesis. A multifaceted pathogenesis profile accounts for why 90% of individuals infected with Eh are largely asymptomatic. For 100 millions individuals that are infected each year, key interactions within the intestinal mucosa dictate disease susceptibility. The ability for Eh to induce amebic colitis and disseminate into extraintestinal organs depends on the parasite competing with indigenous bacteria and overcoming the mucus barrier, binding to host cells inducing their cell death, invasion through the mucosa and outsmarting the immune system. In this review we summarize how Eh interacts with the intestinal epithelium and subverts host defense mechanisms in disease pathogenesis. PMID:28452682

  12. Lateral cell membranes and shunt resistance in rabbit esophageal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobey, Nelia A; Djukic, Zorka; Brighton, Luisa E; Gambling, Todd M; Carson, John L; Orlando, Roy C

    2010-07-01

    The structures that contribute to shunt resistance (Rs) in esophageal epithelium are incompletely understood, with 35-40% of Rs known to be calcium-dependent, reflecting the role of e-cadherin. Two calcium-independent candidates for the remaining approximately 60% of Rs have been identified: the glycoprotein matrix (GPM) within stratum corneum of esophageal epithelium, and the lateral cell membranes (LCMs) from neighboring cells. To determine the contribution of GPM and LCMs to Rs, rabbit esophageal epithelium was mounted in Ussing chambers so that transepithelial resistance (R(T)), a marker of Rs, could be monitored during luminal exposure to either glycosidases for disruption of the GPM or to hypertonic urea for separation of the LCMs. Glycosidases had no effect on R(T). In contrast, hypertonic urea reduced R(T), increased fluorescein flux and widened the intercellular spaces. That urea reduced R(T), and so Rs, by widening the intercellular spaces, and not by altering the e-cadherin-dependent apical junctional complex, was supported by the ability of: (a) calcium-free solution to reduce R(T) beyond that produced by urea, (b) hypertonic urea to reduce R(T) beyond that produced by calcium free solution, (c) hypertonic sucrose to collapse the intercellular spaces and raise R(T), and (d) empigen, a zwitterionic detergent, to non-osmotically widen the intercellular spaces and reduce R(T). These data indicate that the LCMs from neighboring cells are a major contributor to shunt resistance in esophageal epithelium. As resistor, they are distinguishable from the apical junctional complex by their sensitivity to (luminal) hypertonicity and insensitivity to removal of calcium.

  13. Respiratory carbon fluxes in leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcherkez, Guillaume; Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Mahé, Aline; Hodges, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Leaf respiration is a major metabolic process that drives energy production and growth. Earlier works in this field were focused on the measurement of respiration rates in relation to carbohydrate content, photosynthesis, enzymatic activities or nitrogen content. Recently, several studies have shed light on the mechanisms describing the regulation of respiration in the light and in the dark and on associated metabolic flux patterns. This review will highlight advances made into characterizing respiratory fluxes and provide a discussion of metabolic respiration dynamics in relation to important biological functions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nerve endings in the epithelium and submucosa of human epiglottis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, R; Pastor, L M; Calvo, A; Ferrán, A; Sprekelsen, C

    1994-07-01

    An electron-microscopic study of the sensory innervation of human epiglottis was undertaken. The nerve supply of this structure was abundant; numerous free unmyelinated nerve endings of 2.5-3 microns were observed in the stratified epithelium of the epiglottis associated with clear cells containing mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum, microtubules and dense-cored granules. The nerve and cell complex resembled a corpuscular structure, probably of a quimiosensitive character. In the submucosa, unmyelinated nerves were observed which may come from deeper myelinated trunks, and some of them entered the epithelium. Encapsulated corpuscles were also found in the submucosa. Four elements could be distinguished: nerve endings, lamellar cells, interlamellar substance, and capsule. Our observations at an ultrastructural level complete previous observations by means of light microscopy indicating that the epiglottis is a zone with an important innervation in the epithelium as well as in the submucosa. This sensory innervation probably bears a relation to reflexes, such as cough and deglution, to protect the airways.

  15. Genes associated with MUC5AC expression in small airway epithelium of human smokers and non-smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Guoqing

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucus hypersecretion contributes to the morbidity and mortality of smoking-related lung diseases, especially chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, which starts in the small airways. Despite progress in animal studies, the genes and their expression pattern involved in mucus production and secretion in human airway epithelium are not well understood. We hypothesized that comparison of the transcriptomes of the small airway epithelium of individuals that express high vs low levels of MUC5AC, the major macromolecular component of airway mucus, could be used as a probe to identify the genes related to human small airway mucus production/secretion. Methods Flexible bronchoscopy and brushing were used to obtain small airway epithelium (10th to 12th order bronchi from healthy nonsmokers (n=60 and healthy smokers (n=72. Affymetrix HG-U133 plus 2.0 microarrays were used to assess gene expression. Massive parallel sequencing (RNA-Seq was used to verify gene expression of small airway epithelium from 5 nonsmokers and 6 smokers. Results MUC5AC expression varied 31-fold among the healthy nonsmokers. Genome-wide comparison between healthy nonsmokers (n = 60 grouped as “high MUC5AC expressors” vs “low MUC5AC expressors” identified 528 genes significantly up-regulated and 15 genes significantly down-regulated in the high vs low expressors. This strategy identified both mucus production and secretion related genes under control of a network composed of multiple transcription factors. Based on the literature, genes in the up-regulated list were used to identify a 73 “MUC5AC-associated core gene” list with 9 categories: mucus component; mucus-producing cell differentiation-related transcription factor; mucus-producing cell differentiation-related pathway or mediator; post-translational modification of mucin; vesicle transport; endoplasmic reticulum stress-related; secretory granule-associated; mucus secretion

  16. Assessment of respiratory involvement in children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data showed no association between the presence of scoliosis or the presence of organomegaly and the pattern of pulmonary function abnormalities. Conclusions: Evaluation and follow up of patients with MPS using pulmonary function tests are essential to detect early involvement of respiratory system and hence start ...

  17. Respiratory syncytial virus can infect basal cells and alter human airway epithelial differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B David Persson

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing severe respiratory illness in infants and immune compromised patients. The ciliated cells of the human airway epithelium have been considered to be the exclusive target of RSV, although recent data have suggested that basal cells, the progenitors for the conducting airway epithelium, may also become infected in vivo. Using either mechanical or chemical injury models, we have demonstrated a robust RSV infection of p63+ basal cells in air-liquid interface (ALI cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells. In addition, proliferating basal cells in 2D culture were also susceptible to RSV infection. We therefore tested the hypothesis that RSV infection of this progenitor cell would influence the differentiation status of the airway epithelium. RSV infection of basal cells on the day of seeding (MOI≤0.0001, resulted in the formation of an epithelium that showed a profound loss of ciliated cells and gain of secretory cells as assessed by acetylated α-tubulin and MUC5AC/MUC5B immunostaining, respectively. The mechanism driving the switch in epithelial phenotype is in part driven by the induced type I and type III interferon response that we demonstrate is triggered early following RSV infection. Neutralization of this response attenuates the RSV-induced loss of ciliated cells. Together, these data show that through infection of proliferating airway basal cells, RSV has the potential to influence the cellular composition of the airway epithelium. The resulting phenotype might be expected to contribute towards both the severity of acute infection, as well as to the longer-term consequences of viral exacerbations in patients with pre-existing respiratory diseases.

  18. Innate immune signalling at the intestinal epithelium in homeostasis and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, Johanna; Hornef, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium—which constitutes the interface between the enteric microbiota and host tissues—actively contributes to the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis and defends against pathogenic microbes. The recognition of conserved microbial products by cytosolic or transmembrane pattern recognition receptors in epithelial cells initiates signal transduction and influences effector cell function. However, the signalling pathways, effector molecules and regulatory mechanisms involved are not yet fully understood, and the functional outcome is poorly defined. This review analyses the complex and dynamic role of intestinal epithelial innate immune recognition and signalling, on the basis of results in intestinal epithelial cell-specific transgene or gene-deficient animals. This approach identifies specific epithelial cell functions within the diverse cellular composition of the mucosal tissue, in the presence of the complex and dynamic gut microbiota. These insights have thus provided a more comprehensive understanding of the role of the intestinal epithelium in innate immunity during homeostasis and disease. PMID:22801555

  19. Germline and somatic vitelline proteins colocalize in aggregates in the follicular epithelium of Drosophila ovaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furriols, Marc; Casanova, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Nasrat and Polehole, two Drosophila proteins related functionally and by sequence, are secreted from the oocyte and incorporated into the vitelline membrane, where they play a role in the integrity of the same and in the activation of embryonic Torso RTK. In addition, they also accumulate in a punctate pattern in the follicular epithelium. Here we show that their accumulation at the follicle cells depends on their gene expression in the germline, indicating that these proteins move from the oocyte to the follicle cells in a process that does not require endocytosis. Finally we used cell markers to examine the distribution of these proteins at the follicle cells and show they accumulated in aggregates with vitelline membrane proteins in close association with the plasmatic membrane. We propose that these aggregates represent spatially restricted sinks for vitelline membrane proteins that fail to be incorporated into vitelline bodies and later on into the vitelline membrane. PMID:25483249

  20. Cell density and actomyosin contractility control the organization of migrating collectives within an epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loza, Andrew J.; Koride, Sarita; Schimizzi, Gregory V.; Li, Bo; Sun, Sean X.; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying collective migration are important for understanding development, wound healing, and tumor invasion. Here we focus on cell density to determine its role in collective migration. Our findings show that increasing cell density, as might be seen in cancer, transforms groups from broad collectives to small, narrow streams. Conversely, diminishing cell density, as might occur at a wound front, leads to large, broad collectives with a distinct leader–follower structure. Simulations identify force-sensitive contractility as a mediator of how density affects collectives, and guided by this prediction, we find that the baseline state of contractility can enhance or reduce organization. Finally, we test predictions from these data in an in vivo epithelium by using genetic manipulations to drive collective motion between predicted migratory phases. This work demonstrates how commonly altered cellular properties can prime groups of cells to adopt migration patterns that may be harnessed in health or exploited in disease. PMID:27605707

  1. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  2. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H.; Deatly, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesenchymal tissue-like assemblies (3D hLEM TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infection with the virus. Therefore, we assert TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host s immune system.

  3. Surveillance of respiratory viruses.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surveillance of respiratory viruses. A 10-year laboratory-based study. J. M. McAnerney, S. Johnson, B. D. Schoub. Respiratory virus isolates made at the National Institute for. Virology from 1982 to 1991 were studied. An active virus surveillance programme, 'viral watch', which recruits throat swab specimens from a network ...

  4. Technology in respiratory medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    Respiratory medicine is the subspecialty in medicine which requires the most regu- lar and precise evaluation of physiological function for complete assessment of the patient. The very nature of respiratory physiology requires the availability of a range of technological devices. Physiological measurements that may be.

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis of cell lines and scrapings of the human intestinal epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renes Johan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vitro models are indispensable study objects in the fields of cell and molecular biology, with advantages such as accessibility, homogeneity of the cell population, reproducibility, and growth rate. The Caco-2 cell line, originating from a colon carcinoma, is a widely used in vitro model for small intestinal epithelium. Cancer cells have an altered metabolism, making it difficult to infer their representativity for the tissue from which they are derived. This study was designed to compare the protein expression pattern of Caco-2 cells with the patterns of intestinal epithelial cells from human small and large intestine. HT-29 intestinal cells, Hep G2 liver cells and TE 671 muscle cells were included too, the latter two as negative controls. Results Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was performed on each tissue and cell line protein sample. Principal component and cluster analysis revealed that global expression of intestinal epithelial scrapings differed from that of intestinal epithelial cell lines. Since all cultured cell lines clustered together, this finding was ascribed to an adaptation of cells to culture conditions and their tumor origin, and responsible proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. When investigating the profiles of Caco-2 cells and small intestinal cells in detail, a considerable overlap was observed. Conclusion Numerous proteins showed a similar expression in Caco-2 cells, HT-29 cells, and both the intestinal scrapings, of which some appear to be characteristic to human intestinal epithelium in vivo. In addition, several biologically significant proteins are expressed at comparable levels in Caco-2 cells and small intestinal scrapings, indicating the usability of this in vitro model. Caco-2 cells, however, appear to over-express as well as under-express certain proteins, which needs to be considered by scientists using this cell line. Hence, care should be taken to prevent misinterpretation of

  6. Transduction efficiencies of novel AAV vectors in mouse airway epithelium in vivo and human ciliated airway epithelium in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberis, Maria P; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Zhang, Liqun; Pickles, Raymond J; Wilson, James M

    2009-02-01

    We have characterized the ability of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes 1-9 in addition to nineteen novel vectors isolated from various tissues, to transduce mouse and human ciliated airway epithelium (HAE). Vectors expressing alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) and beta-galactosidase were co-instilled into the mouse lung. Of all the vectors tested rh.64R1, AAV5 and AAV6 were the most efficient. The high transduction observed in mouse was reproduced in HAE cell cultures for both rh.64R1 and AAV6 but not for AAV5. Since AAV6 was the most efficient vector in mouse and HAE we also tested the transduction efficiencies of the AAV6 singleton vectors (i.e., AAV6 variants with targeted mutations) in these models. Of these, AAV6.2 transduced mouse airway epithelium and HAE with greater efficiency than all other AAV vectors tested. We demonstrated that AAV6.2 exhibits improved transduction efficiency compared to previously reported AAVs in mouse airways and in culture models of human airway epithelium and that this vector requires further development for preclinical and clinical testing.

  7. Realistic respiratory motion margins for external beam partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Leigh; Quirk, Sarah [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Smith, Wendy L., E-mail: wendy.smith@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Respiratory margins for partial breast irradiation (PBI) have been largely based on geometric observations, which may overestimate the margin required for dosimetric coverage. In this study, dosimetric population-based respiratory margins and margin formulas for external beam partial breast irradiation are determined. Methods: Volunteer respiratory data and anterior–posterior (AP) dose profiles from clinical treatment plans of 28 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) PBI patient plans were used to determine population-based respiratory margins. The peak-to-peak amplitudes (A) of realistic respiratory motion data from healthy volunteers were scaled from A = 1 to 10 mm to create respiratory motion probability density functions. Dose profiles were convolved with the respiratory probability density functions to produce blurred dose profiles accounting for respiratory motion. The required margins were found by measuring the distance between the simulated treatment and original dose profiles at the 95% isodose level. Results: The symmetric dosimetric respiratory margins to cover 90%, 95%, and 100% of the simulated treatment population were 1.5, 2, and 4 mm, respectively. With patient set up at end exhale, the required margins were larger in the anterior direction than the posterior. For respiratory amplitudes less than 5 mm, the population-based margins can be expressed as a fraction of the extent of respiratory motion. The derived formulas in the anterior/posterior directions for 90%, 95%, and 100% simulated population coverage were 0.45A/0.25A, 0.50A/0.30A, and 0.70A/0.40A. The differences in formulas for different population coverage criteria demonstrate that respiratory trace shape and baseline drift characteristics affect individual respiratory margins even for the same average peak-to-peak amplitude. Conclusions: A methodology for determining population-based respiratory margins using real respiratory motion patterns and dose profiles in the AP direction was

  8. A microengineered collagen scaffold for generating a polarized crypt-villus architecture of human small intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuli; Gunasekara, Dulan B; Reed, Mark I; DiSalvo, Matthew; Bultman, Scott J; Sims, Christopher E; Magness, Scott T; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2017-06-01

    The human small intestinal epithelium possesses a distinct crypt-villus architecture and tissue polarity in which proliferative cells reside inside crypts while differentiated cells are localized to the villi. Indirect evidence has shown that the processes of differentiation and migration are driven in part by biochemical gradients of factors that specify the polarity of these cellular compartments; however, direct evidence for gradient-driven patterning of this in vivo architecture has been hampered by limitations of the in vitro systems available. Enteroid cultures are a powerful in vitro system; nevertheless, these spheroidal structures fail to replicate the architecture and lineage compartmentalization found in vivo, and are not easily subjected to gradients of growth factors. In the current work, we report the development of a micropatterned collagen scaffold with suitable extracellular matrix and stiffness to generate an in vitro self-renewing human small intestinal epithelium that replicates key features of the in vivo small intestine: a crypt-villus architecture with appropriate cell-lineage compartmentalization and an open and accessible luminal surface. Chemical gradients applied to the crypt-villus axis promoted the creation of a stem/progenitor-cell zone and supported cell migration along the crypt-villus axis. This new approach combining microengineered scaffolds, biophysical cues and chemical gradients to control the intestinal epithelium ex vivo can serve as a physiologically relevant mimic of the human small intestinal epithelium, and is broadly applicable to model other tissues that rely on gradients for physiological function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Restoring pulmonary surfactant membranes and films at the respiratory surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echaide, Mercedes; Autilio, Chiara; Arroyo, Raquel; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2017-09-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex of lipids and proteins assembled and secreted by the alveolar epithelium into the thin layer of fluid coating the respiratory surface of lungs. There, surfactant forms interfacial films at the air-water interface, reducing dramatically surface tension and thus stabilizing the air-exposed interface to prevent alveolar collapse along respiratory mechanics. The absence or deficiency of surfactant produces severe lung pathologies. This review describes some of the most important surfactant-related pathologies, which are a cause of high morbidity and mortality in neonates and adults. The review also updates current therapeutic approaches pursuing restoration of surfactant operative films in diseased lungs, mainly through supplementation with exogenous clinical surfactant preparations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Respiratory protease/antiprotease balance determines susceptibility to viral infection and can be modified by nutritional antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Megan; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-06-15

    The respiratory epithelium functions as a central orchestrator to initiate and organize responses to inhaled stimuli. Proteases and antiproteases are secreted from the respiratory epithelium and are involved in respiratory homeostasis. Modifications to the protease/antiprotease balance can lead to the development of lung diseases such as emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Furthermore, altered protease/antiprotease balance, in favor for increased protease activity, is associated with increased susceptibility to respiratory viral infections such as influenza virus. However, nutritional antioxidants induce antiprotease expression/secretion and decrease protease expression/activity, to protect against viral infection. As such, this review will elucidate the impact of this balance in the context of respiratory viral infection and lung disease, to further highlight the role epithelial cell-derived proteases and antiproteases contribute to respiratory immune function. Furthermore, this review will offer the use of nutritional antioxidants as possible therapeutics to boost respiratory mucosal responses and/or protect against infection. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth through dysregulation of nutritional immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Matthew R; Lashua, Lauren P; Fischer, Douglas K; Flitter, Becca A; Eichinger, Katherine M; Durbin, Joan E; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Coyne, Carolyn B; Empey, Kerry M; Bomberger, Jennifer M

    2016-02-09

    Clinical observations link respiratory virus infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in chronic lung disease, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The development of P. aeruginosa into highly antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities promotes airway colonization and accounts for disease progression in patients. Although clinical studies show a strong correlation between CF patients' acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infections and respiratory virus infection, little is known about the mechanism by which chronic P. aeruginosa infections are initiated in the host. Using a coculture model to study the formation of bacterial biofilm formation associated with the airway epithelium, we show that respiratory viral infections and the induction of antiviral interferons promote robust secondary P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. We report that the induction of antiviral IFN signaling in response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection induces bacterial biofilm formation through a mechanism of dysregulated iron homeostasis of the airway epithelium. Moreover, increased apical release of the host iron-binding protein transferrin during RSV infection promotes P. aeruginosa biofilm development in vitro and in vivo. Thus, nutritional immunity pathways that are disrupted during respiratory viral infection create an environment that favors secondary bacterial infection and may provide previously unidentified targets to combat bacterial biofilm formation.

  12. A role for airway taste receptor modulation in the treatment of upper respiratory infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jennifer E.; Saunders, Cecil J.; Reed, Danielle R.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Taste receptors, initially identified in the oral epithelium, have since been shown to be widely distributed, being found in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, gastrointestinal epithelium, thyroid, and brain. The presence of taste receptors in the nasal epithelium has led to the discovery of their role in innate immunity, defending the paranasal sinuses against pathogens. This article addresses the current paradigm for understanding the role of extraoral taste receptors, specifically the T2R38 bitter taste receptor and the T1R2+3 sweet taste receptor, in respiratory innate defenses and presents evidence for the use of these and other taste receptors as therapeutic targets in the management of chronic rhinosinusitis. Future studies should focus on understanding the polymorphisms of taste receptors beyond T2R38 to fully elucidate their potential therapeutic use and lay the groundwork for their modulation in a clinical setting to decrease the health impact and economic burden of upper respiratory disease. PMID:26731661

  13. Cytoarchitecture of the normal rat olfactory epithelium: light and scanning electron microscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Sugata; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2004-06-01

    The three-dimensional cytoarchitecture of the normal rat olfactory epithelium was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of KOH digested tissues as well as by light and transmission electron microscopy of plastic sections. Observations specimens from the lateral side of the olfactory epithelium allowed identification of four cell types by their surface structure: olfactory neurons, supporting cells, basal cells, and duct cells of the Bowman's gland. The olfactory neurons were characterized by the presence of a thick apical process (i.e., dendrite) and a thin basal process (i.e., axon). These olfactory neurons tended to be aligned along the vertical axis of the epithelium. Immature olfactory neurons were present at the basal part of the epithelium and had a pear-shaped cell body with a thin and long axon and a short dendrite which failed to reach the epithelial surface. Supporting cells were roughly columnar in shape and occupied the full length of the epithelium. They became thinner in the basal two thirds of their length but had branched foot processes spreading on the basal surface of the epithelium. Basal cells located in the basal epithelial region were oval, round or cuboidal and present among the foot processes of the supporting cells. The ducts of the Bowman's gland entered the epithelium from the lamina propria and took straight, perpendicular courses within the epithelium. These intraepithelial ducts were composed of several slender cells. The acinar cells are sometimes present in the epithelium and appeared as a globular bulge of the duct at the basal part of the epithelium. SEM observation of the basal surface of the olfactory epithelium also clearly showed that axon bundles were surrounded by the sheet-like processes of Schwann cells, the investment being found at the base of the epithelium just before axon bundles leave the epithelium.

  14. Airway epithelium directed gene therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, April F; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2006-09-01

    Gene therapy is a promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF). Despite a better understanding of the molecular organization of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and mutations resulting in pathophysiological and phenotypic alterations, several forms of treatments including gene therapy have failed to yield clinical success. Major limitations for the delivery of drugs and gene therapy vectors from reaching target cells in CF patients lie in physical and immunological barriers of airway epithelium. Over the last decade, non-viral and viral gene therapy approaches have been tested in preclinical studies and human clinical trials of CF. Outcomes of these studies have helped to identify hurdles that need to be overcome before such approaches can be routinely applied to patients. In addition to the physiological and immunological barriers of airway epithelium, vector transduction is also impaired by the absence or low-abundance of cellular receptors and co-receptors for viral binding and internalization. Thus, the initial enthusiasm for gene replacement therapy for CF following cloning of the CFTR gene dampened, as more limitations were recognized. Research directed towards improving the efficiency of gene transfer technology in CF, is focused on testing of compounds to enhance vector permeability and trafficking, identification and development of vectors which can transduce through alternate pathways, identification of airway epithelium-specific targeting ligands, and the identification of stem cells for combining cell therapy and gene therapy by ex vivo methods. Details provided in this article will give a comprehensive analysis of the prospects and limitations in CF gene therapy using viral and non-viral vectors.

  15. TRPM5-expressing microvillous cells in the main olfactory epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liman Emily R

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main olfactory epithelium (MOE in the nasal cavity detects a variety of air borne molecules that provide information regarding the presence of food, predators and other relevant social and environmental factors. Within the epithelium are ciliated sensory neurons, supporting cells, basal cells and microvillous cells, each of which is distinct in morphology and function. Arguably, the least understood, are the microvillous cells, a population of cells that are small in number and whose function is not known. We previously found that in a mouse strain in which the TRPM5 promoter drives expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP, a population of ciliated olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs, as well as a population of cells displaying microvilli-like structures is labeled. Here we examined the morphology and immunocytochemical properties of these microvillous-like cells using immunocytochemical methods. Results We show that the GFP-positive microvillous cells were morphologically diversified and scattered throughout the entire MOE. These cells immunoreacted to an antibody against TRPM5, confirming the expression of this ion channel in these cells. In addition, they showed a Ca2+-activated non-selective cation current in electrophysiological recordings. They did not immunoreact to antibodies that label cell markers and elements of the transduction pathways from olfactory sensory neurons and solitary chemosensory cells of the nasal cavity. Further, the TRPM5-expressing cells did not display axon-like processes and were not labeled with a neuronal marker nor did trigeminal peptidergic nerve fibers innervate these cells. Conclusion We provide morphological and immunocytochemical characterization of the TRPM5-expressing microvillous cells in the main olfactory epithelium. Our data demonstrate that these cells are non-neuronal and in terms of chemosensory transduction do not resemble the TRPM5-expressing olfactory sensory neurons

  16. STUDIES ON HUMAN FALLOPIAN TUBAL EPITHELIUM IN DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS The “fallopian tubes” (oviducts or uterine tubes are long paired flexuous reproductive organ which transports ova, spermatozoa, zygotes, the pre-implantation morulae and blastocyst. It has major role during reproductive period, but it remains as if vestigial organ before puberty and after menopause. Due to increasing rate of tubal block and infertility, oviducts and their structures gaining importance and have become a subject of research in present days particularly epithelium. The aim of the study is to ascertain any histological difference of tubal epithelium in different age groups and the research work could be utilized for investigation and management of infertility. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seven samples of each group i.e., prereproductive, reproductive & postmenopausal were collected from fresh unembalmed human cadavers received in the department of Anatomy, FAA Medical College, Barpeta, Assam. The slides were prepared using the standard laboratory procedure. Under low and high power objectives the type of cells were observed and epithelial height was measured in the different segments. Stress was given for any significant difference of epithelial height between the different age groups. RESULTS Study revealed that among the groups within the same segment, epithelial height was recorded highest (33.57µm in reproductive group as against the lowest (22.91µm in post-menopausal group. Epithelial structures of the prereproductive and reproductive groups were significantly differed (p<0.01 from the postmenopausal group. CONCLUSIONS From the findings of the present study it can be concluded that: 1. In all the groups fallopian tubal epithelium is of simple columnar type and contains three types of cells. Cells are ciliated, secretory & peg (intercalary cells. 2. In all the groups same type of increasing trend of epithelial height from intramural segment to ampullary segment was recorded. 3. In intergroup comparison of

  17. Respiratory medicine of reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Juergen

    2011-05-01

    Noninfectious and infectious causes have been implicated in the development of respiratory tract disease in reptiles. Treatment modalities in reptiles have to account for species differences in response to therapeutic agents as well as interpretation of diagnostic findings. Data on effective drugs and dosages for the treatment of respiratory diseases are often lacking in reptiles. Recently, advances have been made on the application of advanced imaging modalities, especially computed tomography for the diagnosis and treatment monitoring of reptiles. This article describes common infectious and noninfectious causes of respiratory disease in reptiles, including diagnostic and therapeutic regimen. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Immune defense mechanisms in the Caenorhabditis elegans intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukkila-Worley, Read; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2012-02-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells provide an essential line of defense for Caernohabditis elegans against ingested pathogens. Because nematodes consume microorganisms as their food source, there has presumably been selection pressure to evolve and maintain immune defense mechanisms within the intestinal epithelium. Here we review recent advances that further define the immune signaling network within these cells and suggest mechanisms used by the nematode to monitor for infection. In reviewing studies of pathogenesis that use this simple model system, we hope to illustrate some of the basic principles of epithelial immunity that may also be of relevance in higher order hosts. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Retinoid metabolism in cultured human retinal pigment epithelium.

    OpenAIRE

    S. R. Das; Gouras, P.

    1988-01-01

    Uptake, esterification and release of all-trans-retinol in primary cultures of human retinal epithelium were studied. Cultured cells were supplemented with 3H-labelled 11,12-all-trans-retinol, using fatty-acid-free albumin as the carrier. This led to incorporation of retinal and the formation of all-trans- and 11-cis-retinyl palmitate. The metabolism of the all-trans ester was monitored in a medium containing various concentrations of foetal-bovine serum (FBS). In 20% (v/v) FBS, the ester was...

  20. ISOLATION AND PRIMARY CULTURES OF HUMAN INTRAHEPATIC BILE DUCTULAR EPITHELIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetris, A. J.; Markus, B. H.; Saidman, S.; Fung, J. J.; Makowka, L.; Graner, S.; Duquesnoy, R.; Starzl, T. E.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY A technique for the isolation of human intrahepatic bile ductular epithelium, and the establishment of primary cultures using a serum- and growth-factor-supplemented medium combined with a connective tissue substrata is described. Initial cell isolates and monolayer cultures display phenotypic characteristics of biliary epithelial cells (low molecular weight prekeratin positive; albumin, alphafetoprotein, and Factor VIII-related antigen negative). Ultrastructural features of the cultured cells show cell polarization with surface microvilli, numerous interepithelial junctional complexes and cytoplasmic intermediate prekeratin filaments. PMID:3131298

  1. Diurnal rhythm of mitosis in rabbit corneal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogle, J A; Yoza, B K; Neufeld, A H

    1980-01-01

    Incorporation of 3H-thymidine by rabbit corneal epithelium during the course of a one-hour incubation in vitro varies according to the time of day, suggesting a diurnal rhythm of mitotic activity. Adrenergic decentralization of the cornea does not affect this rhythm. Furthermore, there is no diurnal variation in the basal or sympathomimetically-stimulated cyclic AMP production by freshly excised rabbit corneas, incubated in vitro. Therefore, the diurnal rhythm of corneal epithelial mitotsis in the rabbit is not paced by catecholamines.

  2. Papillary cystadenoma of the lower lip exhibiting ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium: report of a bizarre case and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, Panagiotis; Gagari, Eleni

    2013-09-01

    Salivary gland tumors are uncommon and constitute 2-6.5 % of all head and neck neoplasms. Tumors of minor salivary gland origin account for less than 25 % of all salivary gland neoplasms. Papillary cystadenoma of salivary glands is a rare benign epithelial neoplasm characterized by multicystic growth in which the epithelium exhibits adenomatous proliferation. Papillary cystadenoma of minor salivary glands most frequently involves the lip, buccal mucosa, and palate. This tumor typically presents as a slow-growing, painless mass, usually with diameter of less than 1 cm and clinical resemblance to a mucocele. Although most papillary cystadenomas are predominantly of one cell type, a regional variability may be present. We present a case of papillary cystadenoma of the minor salivary glands in a 58-year-old patient exhibiting an upper respiratory tract epithelium, a profoundly atypical benign tumor. This type of minor salivary gland tumor epithelium in the lower lip may be the result of a metaplastic process or simply another neoplastic manifestation of papillary cystadenoma. As far as the differential diagnosis of this entity is concerned, it is important to distinguish it from papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum (Warthin's tumor), low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma, the papillary-cystic variant of acinic cell carcinoma, and cystadenocarcinoma Recognition of this lesion is important for the clinician since the differential diagnosis includes lesions with similar clinical appearance and infiltrative behavior.

  3. Increased tidal volume variability in children is a better marker of opioid-induced respiratory depression than decreased respiratory rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Sean J; Vandebeek, Christine A; Ansermino, J Mark

    2004-06-01

    During opioid administration, decreasing respiratory rate is typically used as a predictor of respiratory depression. Prior to opioid-induced apnea, progressively irregular breathing patterns have been noticed. We hypothesize that opioid administration to children will increase tidal volume variability (TV(var)) and that this will be a better predictor of respiratory depression than a decrease in respiratory rate. We recruited 32 children aged 2-8 years scheduled to undergo surgery. During spontaneous ventilation, flow rates and respiratory rates were continuously recorded, while remifentanil was infused at stepwise increasing doses each lasting 10 min. The infusion was continued until the patient showed signs of respiratory depression. Flow data from each dose was used to calculate tidal volumes, from which TV(var) was calculated. The respiratory rate and TV(var) during the last (D(last)), second to last (D-2), and third to last (D-3), administered doses were compared to those during baseline (fourth to last dose). We chose a threshold of TV(var) increase and compared it to a decrease in respiratory rate below 10 breaths per min as predictors of respiratory depression. Compared to baseline, the TV(var) increased by 336% and 668% during D(-2) and D(last), respectively, whereas respiratory rate decreased by 14.3%, 31.7%, and 55.5% during D(-3), D(-2), and D(last), respectively. A threshold increase in TV(var) of 150% over baseline correctly predicted respiratory depression in 41% of patients, compared to a drop in respiratory rate correctly predicting 22% of patients. TV(var) increases as children approach opioid-induced respiratory depression. This is a more useful predictor of respiratory depression than a fall in respiratory rate because the TV(var) increase is 10 times the drop in respiratory rate. A TV(var) increase also correctly predicts respiratory depression twice as often as decreased respiratory rate and is independent of age-related alterations in

  4. Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... When to Call the Doctor en español Virus respiratorio sincitial About RSV Respiratory syncytial (sin-SISH-ul) ... diseases that affect the lungs, heart, or immune system , RSV infections can lead to other more serious ...

  5. Respiratory disease in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Niharika; Chen, Kenneth; Hardy, Erica; Powrie, Raumond

    2015-07-01

    Many physiological and anatomical changes of pregnancy affect the respiratory system. These changes often affect the presentation and management of the various respiratory illnesses in pregnancy. This article focuses on several important respiratory issues in pregnancy. The management of asthma, one of the most common chronic illnesses in pregnancy, remains largely unchanged compared to the nonpregnant state. Infectious respiratory illness, including pneumonia and tuberculosis, are similarly managed in pregnancy with antibiotics, although special attention may be needed for antibiotic choices with more pregnancy safety data. When mechanical ventilation is necessary, consideration should be given to the maternal hemodynamics of pregnancy and fetal oxygenation. Maintaining maternal oxygen saturation above 95% is recommended to sustain optimal fetal oxygenation. Cigarette smoking has known risks in pregnancy, and current practice guidelines recommend offering cognitive and pharmacologic interventions to pregnant women to assist in smoking cessation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Upper respiratory tract (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mouth, throat (pharynx), and voice box (larynx). The respiratory system is lined with a mucous membrane that secretes mucus. The mucus traps smaller particles like pollen or smoke. Hairlike structures called cilia line the mucous membrane ...

  7. The microbiota of the respiratory tract: gatekeeper to respiratory health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Wing Ho; de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Bogaert, Debby

    2017-05-01

    The respiratory tract is a complex organ system that is responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The human respiratory tract spans from the nostrils to the lung alveoli and is inhabited by niche-specific communities of bacteria. The microbiota of the respiratory tract probably acts as a gatekeeper that provides resistance to colonization by respiratory pathogens. The respiratory microbiota might also be involved in the maturation and maintenance of homeostasis of respiratory physiology and immunity. The ecological and environmental factors that direct the development of microbial communities in the respiratory tract and how these communities affect respiratory health are the focus of current research. Concurrently, the functions of the microbiome of the upper and lower respiratory tract in the physiology of the human host are being studied in detail. In this Review, we will discuss the epidemiological, biological and functional evidence that support the physiological role of the respiratory microbiota in the maintenance of human health.

  8. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Dudas, Robert A; Karron, Ruth A.

    1998-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of viral lower respiratory tract illness (LRI) in infants and children worldwide and causes significant LRI in the elderly and in immunocompromised patients. The goal of RSV vaccination is to prevent serious RSV-associated LRI. There are several obstacles to the development of successful RSV vaccines, including the need to immunize very young infants, who may respond inadequately to vaccination; the existence of two antigenically d...

  9. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-04

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.  Created: 2/4/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases (DVD).   Date Released: 2/13/2013.

  10. Alexithymia in respiratory rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarella, Federica; Alesii, Annalisa; Dall'armi, Valentina; Rubino, Salvatore; Ferri, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    To date, there are no studies that have investigated the role of alexithymia in respiratory rehabilitation. We aimed to observe the prevalence of alexithymia in patients attending respiratory rehabilitation and to verify the presence of a difference between alexithymics and non-alexithymics responsiveness to the respiratory rehabilitation standard protocol. A prospective cohort study evaluating the influence of alexithymia on functional recovery of in-patients afferent to the Respiratory Rehabilitation Unit of IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana. Sixty patients were consecutively enrolled into the study and evaluated for alexithymia, anxiety and depression. Functional recovery was assessed with the six-minute walking test (6MWT). Prior and post-completion of this test dyspnoea, oxygen saturation and cardiac frequency were recorded. Alexithymia was not found to be significantly affecting the functional recovery of participants in respiratory rehabilitation. The distance walked at the 6MWT (6MWD) increased in both alexithymics and non-alexithymics (p(alexithymics) = 0.014; p(non-alexithymics) respiratory rehabilitation.

  11. Tissue-engineered epithelium transplantation for severe ocular surface burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; Pi, Yuli; Dong, Ying; Zhu, Jing

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes of tissue-engineered epithelium transplantation for severe ocular surface burns. This was a retrospective observational case series. From October 2005 to May 2011, 19 eyes of 19 patients with grade IV to VI ocular surface burns (Dua Classification) were treated by autologous transplantation of corneal stem cells cultivated on a fibrin gel membrane, with a mean follow-up of 16.2 months (range 12-36 months). Postoperative corneal surface stability, visual acuity (VA), corneal opacity, and neovascularization were evaluated. No corneal perforations occurred and the entire corneal surface was free from epithelial defects in all eyes. At the final follow-up visit, VA in 17 eyes was improved after surgery, with 6 eyes achieving a VA of 20/100 or better. Corneal vascularization was significantly reduced in 17 (89.5%) eyes. Corneal opacity was also improved in 12 (63.2%) eyes. All donor eyes remained healthy. Tissue-engineered epithelium transplantation can promote rapid reepithelialization of the ocular surface, inhibit corneal neovascularization, and improve vision for patients with severe ocular surface burns.

  12. Cultured human ocular surface epithelium on therapeutic contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Girolamo, Nick; Chui, Jeanie; Wakefield, Denis; Coroneo, Minas T

    2007-04-01

    This study was initiated after observation of some intriguing epithelial growth properties of contact lenses used as a bandage for patients after pterygium surgery. To determine the efficacy of culturing human ocular surface epithelial cells on therapeutic contact lenses in autologous serum with a view of using this system to transfer epithelial cells to patients with persistent corneal or limbal defects. Excess graft tissue resected from patients undergoing pterygium surgery (n = 3) consisting of limbal epithelium was placed on siloxane-hydrogel contact lenses (lotrafilcon A and balafilcon A). Limbal explants were cultured in media with 10% autologous serum. Morphology, proliferative capacity and cytokeratin profile were determined by phase contrast, light and electron microscopy, and immunohistochemical analysis. Lotrafilcon A contact lenses sustained proliferation and migration from limbal tissue. Cells became confluent after 10-14 days and consisted of 2-3 layers with a corneal phenotype (CK3(+)/CK12(+)/CK19(-)) and a propensity to proliferate (p63(+)). Electron microscopy showed microvilli on the apical surface with adhesive projections, indicating that these cells were stable and likely to survive for a long term. Growth was not observed from limbal explants cultured on balafilcon A contact lenses. A method for culturing human ocular surface epithelium on contact lenses that may facilitate expansion and transfer of autologous limbal epithelial cells while avoiding the risks associated with transplanting allogeneic tissue has been developed. This technique may be potentially useful for the treatment of patients with limbal stem cell deficiency.

  13. An in vitro model of murine middle ear epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apoorva Mulay

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Otitis media (OM, or middle ear inflammation, is the most common paediatric disease and leads to significant morbidity. Although understanding of underlying disease mechanisms is hampered by complex pathophysiology it is clear that epithelial abnormalities underpin the disease. There is currently a lack of a well-characterised in vitro model of the middle ear (ME epithelium that replicates the complex cellular composition of the middle ear. Here, we report the development of a novel in vitro model of mouse middle ear epithelial cells (mMECs at an air–liquid interface (ALI that recapitulates the characteristics of the native murine ME epithelium. We demonstrate that mMECs undergo differentiation into the varied cell populations seen within the native middle ear. Proteomic analysis confirmed that the cultures secrete a multitude of innate defence proteins from their apical surface. We showed that the mMECs supported the growth of the otopathogen, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi, suggesting that the model can be successfully utilised to study host–pathogen interactions in the middle ear. Overall, our mMEC culture system can help to better understand the cell biology of the middle ear and improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of OM. The model also has the potential to serve as a platform for validation of treatments designed to reverse aspects of epithelial remodelling that underpin OM development.

  14. Clinical outcome of autologous cultivated limbal epithelium transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangwan Virender

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of autologous cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation. Methods: Eighty-six patients′ records and their clinical photographs were reviewed for demographics, primary etiology, type of limbal transplantation, ocular surface stability, visual acuity, final outcome, and possible factors affecting outcome and complications. Results: Eighty-eight eyes of 86 patients with limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD underwent autologous cultivated limbal epithelium transplantation between March 2001 and May 2003, with a mean follow-up of 18.3 months. The etiology of LSCD was alkali burns in 64% patients. Sixty-one eyes had total LSCD. Thirty-two of the 88 eyes had undergone amniotic membrane transplantation and 10 eyes had previously undergone limbal transplantation with unfavorable outcome. Nineteen eyes underwent penetrating keratoplasty, of which 11 grafts survived at the final follow-up. Finally, 57 eyes (73.1%, 95% CI: 63.3-82.9 had a successful outcome with a stable ocular surface without conjunctivalization, 21 eyes (26.9%, 95%CI: 17.1-36.7 were considered failures, and 10 patients were lost to follow-up. Conclusion: LSCD can be successfully treated by autologous cultivated limbal epithelium transplantation in majority of the cases.

  15. Endolymphatic sodium homeostasis by extramacular epithelium of the saccule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Huhn; Marcus, Daniel C

    2009-12-16

    The saccule is a vestibular sensory organ that depends upon regulation of its luminal fluid, endolymph, for normal transduction of linear acceleration into afferent neural transmission. Previous studies suggested that endolymph in the saccule was merely derived from cochlear endolymph. We developed and used a preparation of isolated mouse saccule to measure transepithelial currents from the extramacular epithelium with a current density probe. The direction and pharmacology of transepithelial current was consistent with Na(+) absorption by the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) and was blocked by the ENaC-specific inhibitors benzamil and amiloride. Involvement of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and K(+) channels was demonstrated by reduction of the current by ouabain and the K(+) channel blockers Ba(2+), XE991, and 4-AP. Glucocorticoids upregulated the current via glucocorticoid receptors. Dexamethasone stimulated the current after 24 h and the stimulation was blocked by mifepristone but not spironolactone. No acute response was observed to elevated cAMP in the presence of amiloride nor to bumetanide, a blocker of Na(+),K(+),2Cl(-) cotransporter. The results are consistent with a canonical model of corticosteroid-regulated Na(+) absorption that includes entry of luminal Na(+) through apical membrane Na(+) channels and active basolateral exit of Na(+) via a Na(+) pump, with recycling of K(+) at the basolateral membrane via K(+)-permeable channels. These observations provide our first understanding of the active role played by saccular epithelium in the local regulation of the [Na(+)] of endolymph for maintenance of our sense of balance.

  16. Nasal epithelium biomarkers in children and adolescents : associations with allergic sensitization and environmental stressors

    OpenAIRE

    Sardella, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    In this project we have used biomarkers to investigate the effects of environmental stressors, to which we are daily exposed, on the nasal epithelium integrity and explored the possible associations between nasal epithelium changes and the development of allergic sensitization. The integrity of the nasal epithelium of children was assessed non-invasively by measuring two proteins in nasal lavage fluid (NALF). The first protein is albumin, a plasma-derived albumin that is a well-established bi...

  17. Respiratory gating in cardiac PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Martin Lyngby; Rasmussen, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory motion due to breathing during cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) results in spatial blurring and erroneous tracer quantification. Respiratory gating might represent a solution by dividing the PET coincidence dataset into smaller respiratory phase subsets. The aim...... stress (82)RB-PET. Respiratory rates and depths were measured by a respiratory gating system in addition to registering actual respiratory rates. Patients undergoing adenosine stress showed a decrease in measured respiratory rate from initial to later scan phase measurements [12.4 (±5.7) vs 5.6 (±4.......7) min(-1), P PET...

  18. Respiratory care informatics and the practice of respiratory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussa, Constance C

    2008-04-01

    Recently I reported the results of a study that was conducted to determine how respiratory care information is managed and processed in respiratory care departments. Data obtained from the respiratory care departments surveyed indicated that their information systems (paper-based or automated) do not manage and process respiratory care information effectively or efficiently. Since the goal of an information system is to improve delivery of services, any useful information system must mirror business processes (or professional activities) to achieve that goal. Consequently, I suggested that, in addition to inadequate database management systems, the shortcomings of the information systems surveyed may have stemmed from a failure to accurately define and describe the data, information, and knowledge unique to the respiratory care profession. Accurate description and definition of respiratory care data, information, and knowledge, however, require a formal language and taxonomy for the respiratory care profession. This article explores the concept of respiratory care informatics and its relevance to the practice of respiratory care.

  19. Notch signaling in the epididymal epithelium regulates sperm motility and is transferred at a distance within epididymosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murta, D; Batista, M; Silva, E; Trindade, A; Henrique, D; Duarte, A; Lopes-da-Costa, L

    2016-03-01

    Spermatozoa undergo sequential maturation changes during their transit along the epididymis. These changes are modulated by the epididymal epithelium and require a finely tuned gene expression. The Notch cell signaling pathway is a major regulator of cell fate decisions in several tissues, including the testis. Here, we evaluated the transcription and expression patterns of Notch components (Notch1-3, Dll1, Dll4, and Jagged1) and effectors (Hes1-2 and Hes5) in the adult mouse epididymis, and evaluated the role of Notch signaling in the epididymis through its in vivo blockade following administration of an inhibitor (DAPT). Notch components and effectors were dynamically transcribed and expressed in the epididymis and vas deferens, each segment exhibiting a specific combination of epithelial receptor/ligand/effector expression patterns. Nuclear detection of Notch effectors indicates that Notch signaling was active. Notch components (but not effectors) were identified in the cytoplasmic droplet of spermatozoa, in a dynamic and specific pattern along the epididymis. In addition, Notch components were identified within large and small vesicles in the epididymal lumen. A purified population of these membranous vesicles from different epididymal segments was obtained, and through dot blot analysis, it was confirmed that Notch components were carried within these vesicles in a dynamic pattern along the epididymal lumen. We hypothesize that these vesicles (epididymosomes) allow Notch signaling at distance from epididymal epithelial cells to spermatozoa. DAPT-induced in vivo Notch signaling blockade, although showing a low efficiency, disrupted the expression patterns of Notch components and effectors in the epididymal epithelium and in spermatozoa, and significantly decreased sperm motility, although not affecting male fertility. These results prompt for a regulatory role of Notch signaling in epididymal epithelial function and sperm maturation. © 2016 American Society of

  20. Non-thermal electromagnetic radiation damage to lens epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormusov, Elvira; P Andley, Usha; Sharon, Naomi; Schächter, Levi; Lahav, Assaf; Dovrat, Ahuva

    2008-05-21

    High frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones and other modern devices has the potential to damage eye tissues, but its effect on the lens epithelium is unknown at present. The objective of this study was to investigate the non-thermal effects of high frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation (1.1GHz, 2.22 mW) on the eye lens epithelium in situ. Bovine lenses were incubated in organ culture at 35°C for 10-15 days. A novel computer-controlled microwave source was used to investigate the effects of microwave radiation on the lenses. 58 lenses were used in this study. The lenses were divided into four groups: (1) Control lenses incubated in organ culture for 10 to15 days. (2) Electromagnetic radiation exposure group treated with 1.1 GHz, 2.22 mW microwave radiation for 90 cycles of 50 minutes irradiation followed by 10 minutes pause and cultured up to 10 days. (3) Electromagnetic radiation exposure group treated as group 2 with 192 cycles of radiation and cultured for 15 days. (4) Lenses exposed to 39.5°C for 2 hours 3 times with 24 hours interval after each treatment beginning on the second day of the culture and cultured for 11 days. During the culture period, lens optical quality was followed daily by a computer-operated scanning laser beam. At the end of the culture period, control and treated lenses were analyzed morphologically and by assessment of the lens epithelial ATPase activity. Exposure to 1.1 GHz, 2.22 mW microwaves caused a reversible decrease in lens optical quality accompanied by irreversible morphological and biochemical damage to the lens epithelial cell layer. The effect of the electromagnetic radiation on the lens epithelium was remarkably different from those of conductive heat. The results of this investigation showed that electromagnetic fields from microwave radiation have a negative impact on the eye lens. The lens damage by electromagnetic fields was distinctly different from that caused by conductive heat.

  1. Clinical patterns and seasonal trends in respiratory syncytial virus hospitalizations in São Paulo, Brazil Padrões clínicos e sazonalidade das hospitalizações causadas pelo vírus respiratório sincicial em São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra E. VIEIRA

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The respiratory viruses are recognized as the most frequent lower respiratory tract pathogens for infants and young children in developed countries but less is known for developing populations. The authors conducted a prospective study to evaluate the occurrence, clinical patterns, and seasonal trends of viral infections among hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract disease (Group A. The presence of respiratory viruses in children's nasopharyngeal was assessed at admission in a pediatric ward. Cell cultures and immunofluorescence assays were used for viral identification. Complementary tests included blood and pleural cultures conducted for bacterial investigation. Clinical data and radiological exams were recorded at admission and throughout the hospitalization period. To better evaluate the results, a non- respiratory group of patients (Group B was also constituted for comparison. Starting in February 1995, during a period of 18 months, 414 children were included- 239 in Group A and 175 in Group B. In Group A, 111 children (46.4% had 114 viruses detected while only 5 children (2.9% presented viruses in Group B. Respiratory Syncytial Virus was detected in 100 children from Group A (41.8%, Adenovirus in 11 (4.6%, Influenza A virus in 2 (0.8%, and Parainfluenza virus in one child (0.4%. In Group A, aerobic bacteria were found in 14 cases (5.8%. Respiratory Syncytial Virus was associated to other viruses and/or bacteria in six cases. There were two seasonal trends for Respiratory Syncytial Virus cases, which peaked in May and June. All children affected by the virus were younger than 3 years of age, mostly less than one year old. Episodic diffuse bronchial commitment and/or focal alveolar condensation were the clinical patterns more often associated to Respiratory Syncytial Virus cases. All children from Group A survived. In conclusion, it was observed that Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most frequent pathogen found in hospitalized

  2. Obesity and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Zammit

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Zammit, Helen Liddicoat, Ian Moonsie, Himender MakkerSleep and Ventilation Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, North Middlesex University Hospital, London, UKAbstract: The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ producing systemic inflammation and effecting central respiratory control. Obesity plays a key role in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Asthma is more common and often harder to treat in the obese population, and in this study, we review the effects of obesity on airway inflammation and respiratory mechanics. We also discuss the compounding effects of obesity on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and the paradoxical interaction of body mass index and COPD severity. Many practical challenges exist in caring for obese patients, and we highlight the complications faced by patients undergoing surgical procedures, especially given the increased use of bariatric surgery. Ultimately, a greater understanding of the effects of obesity on the respiratory disease and the provision of adequate health care resources is vital in order to care for this increasingly important patient population.Keywords: obesity, lung function, obstructive sleep apnea, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, anesthesia

  3. Ex-vivo Potential of Cadaveric and Fresh Limbal Tissues to Regenerate Cultured Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vemuganti Geeta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate and compare the ex-vivo growth potential and formation of cultured corneal epithelium from residual corneo-limbal rings obtained from the operating room after penetrating keratoplasty, and fresh limbal tissues from patients undergoing routine cataract surgery. Methods: With the approval of the Institutional Review Board and informed consent from patients, 1-2mm of limbal tissues from 15 patients and 31 tissues from the cadaveric limbal ring preserved in MK medium (16 tissues and Optisol (15 tissues were used for the study. Donor data included age, time lapse between death and collection, collection and preservation and preservation and culture. Tiny bits of the limbal tissue were explanted on the de-epithelialised human amniotic membrane prepared following standard guidelines, and cultured using Human Corneal Epithelial cell medium. Radial growth from the explant was observed and measured by phase contrast microscopy over 2-4 weeks. After adequate confluent growth, whole mount preparation of the membrane was made and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. Part of the membrane was fixed in formalin and processed for routine histologic examination. The sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin. Results: Forty-six tissues were evaluated from 42 eyes (15 from patients, 31 from cadaveric eyes with a mean age of 55.3 years ± 21.23 years (range 18 years - 110 years. The growth pattern observed was similar in all the positive cases with clusters of cells budding from the explant over 24- 72 hours, and subsequent formation of a monolayer over the next 2-3 weeks. The stained whole mount preparation showed a radial growth of cells around explants with diameter ranging from 5 to 16mm. Histologic evaluation of the membrane confirmed the growth of 2-3 cell-layered epithelium over the amniotic membrane. Cultivated epithelium around explant cell cultures was observed in 100% (15/15 of limbal tissue obtained from patients, as against

  4. Intermediate Filaments and Polarization in the Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Coch

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The cytoplasmic intermediate filament cytoskeleton provides a tissue-specific three-dimensional scaffolding with unique context-dependent organizational features. This is particularly apparent in the intestinal epithelium, in which the intermediate filament network is localized below the apical terminal web region and is anchored to the apical junction complex. This arrangement is conserved from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to humans. The review summarizes compositional, morphological and functional features of the polarized intermediate filament cytoskeleton in intestinal cells of nematodes and mammals. We emphasize the cross talk of intermediate filaments with the actin- and tubulin-based cytoskeleton. Possible links of the intermediate filament system to the distribution of apical membrane proteins and the cell polarity complex are highlighted. Finally, we discuss how these properties relate to the establishment and maintenance of polarity in the intestine.

  5. Intermediate Filaments and Polarization in the Intestinal Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coch, Richard A; Leube, Rudolf E

    2016-07-15

    The cytoplasmic intermediate filament cytoskeleton provides a tissue-specific three-dimensional scaffolding with unique context-dependent organizational features. This is particularly apparent in the intestinal epithelium, in which the intermediate filament network is localized below the apical terminal web region and is anchored to the apical junction complex. This arrangement is conserved from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to humans. The review summarizes compositional, morphological and functional features of the polarized intermediate filament cytoskeleton in intestinal cells of nematodes and mammals. We emphasize the cross talk of intermediate filaments with the actin- and tubulin-based cytoskeleton. Possible links of the intermediate filament system to the distribution of apical membrane proteins and the cell polarity complex are highlighted. Finally, we discuss how these properties relate to the establishment and maintenance of polarity in the intestine.

  6. Gelsolin Restores Aβ-Induced Alterations in Choroid Plexus Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teo Vargas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Histologically, Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by senile plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits. In previous studies we demonstrated that in AD patients, amyloid-β (Aβ peptide also accumulates in choroid plexus, and that this process is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and epithelial cell death. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Aβ accumulation at the choroid plexus epithelium remain unclear. Aβ clearance, from the brain to the blood, involves Aβ carrier proteins that bind to megalin, including gelsolin, a protein produced specifically by the choroid plexus epithelial cells. In this study, we show that treatment with gelsolin reduces Aβ-induced cytoskeletal disruption of blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF barrier at the choroid plexus. Additionally, our results demonstrate that gelsolin plays an important role in decreasing Aβ-induced cytotoxicity by inhibiting nitric oxide production and apoptotic mitochondrial changes. Taken together, these findings make gelsolin an appealing tool for the prophylactic treatment of AD.

  7. Gelsolin Restores Aβ-Induced Alterations in Choroid Plexus Epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Teo; Antequera, Desiree; Ugalde, Cristina; Spuch, Carlos; Carro, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Histologically, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by senile plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits. In previous studies we demonstrated that in AD patients, amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide also accumulates in choroid plexus, and that this process is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and epithelial cell death. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Aβ accumulation at the choroid plexus epithelium remain unclear. Aβ clearance, from the brain to the blood, involves Aβ carrier proteins that bind to megalin, including gelsolin, a protein produced specifically by the choroid plexus epithelial cells. In this study, we show that treatment with gelsolin reduces Aβ-induced cytoskeletal disruption of blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier at the choroid plexus. Additionally, our results demonstrate that gelsolin plays an important role in decreasing Aβ-induced cytotoxicity by inhibiting nitric oxide production and apoptotic mitochondrial changes. Taken together, these findings make gelsolin an appealing tool for the prophylactic treatment of AD. PMID:20369065

  8. Druse-Induced Morphology Evolution in Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzitello, K I; Chrenek, M A; Family, F; Grossniklaus, H E; Nickerson, J M; Jiang, Y

    2016-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a key site of pathogenesis for many retina diseases. The formation of drusen in the retina is characteristic of retinal degeneration. We investigate morphological changes in the RPE in the presence of soft drusen using an integrated experimental and modeling approach. We collect RPE flat mount images from donated human eyes and develop 1) statistical tools to quantify the images and 2) a cell-based model to simulate the morphology evolution. We compare three different mechanisms of RPE repair evolution, cell apoptosis, cell fusion, and expansion, and Simulations of our RPE morphogenesis model quantitatively reproduce deformations of human RPE morphology due to drusen, suggesting that a purse-string mechanism is sufficient to explain how RPE heals cell loss caused by drusen-damage. We found that drusen beneath tissue promote cell death in a number that far exceeds the cell numbers covering the drusen. Tissue deformations are studied using area distributions, Voronoi doma...

  9. Piezoelectric materials mimic the function of the cochlear sensory epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaoka, Takatoshi; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kawano, Satoyuki; Ogita, Hideaki; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Hamanishi, Shinji; Wada, Hiroshi; Ito, Juichi

    2011-01-01

    Cochlear hair cells convert sound vibration into electrical potential, and loss of these cells diminishes auditory function. In response to mechanical stimuli, piezoelectric materials generate electricity, suggesting that they could be used in place of hair cells to create an artificial cochlear epithelium. Here, we report that a piezoelectric membrane generated electrical potentials in response to sound stimuli that were able to induce auditory brainstem responses in deafened guinea pigs, indicating its capacity to mimic basilar membrane function. In addition, sound stimuli were transmitted through the external auditory canal to a piezoelectric membrane implanted in the cochlea, inducing it to vibrate. The application of sound to the middle ear ossicle induced voltage output from the implanted piezoelectric membrane. These findings establish the fundamental principles for the development of hearing devices using piezoelectric materials, although there are many problems to be overcome before practical application. PMID:22025702

  10. Transcriptome of the human retina, retinal pigmented epithelium and choroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lifeng; Kazmierkiewicz, Krista L; Bowman, Anita S; Li, Mingyao; Curcio, Christine A; Stambolian, Dwight E

    2015-01-01

    The retina and its adjacent supporting tissues -- retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and choroid -- are critical structures in human eyes required for normal visual perception. Abnormal changes in these layers have been implicated in diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. With the advent of high-throughput methods, such as serial analysis of gene expression, cDNA microarray, and RNA sequencing, there is unprecedented opportunity to facilitate our understanding of the normal retina, RPE, and choroid. This information can be used to identify dysfunction in age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. In this review, we describe the current status in our understanding of these transcriptomes through the use of high throughput techniques. PMID:25645700

  11. Alcohol-assisted versus Mechanical Epithelium Removal in Photorefractive Keratectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ghoreishi,

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the outcomes and complications of alcohol-assisted versus mechanical corneal epithelial debridement for photorefractive keratectomy (PRK. Methods: This randomized controlled trial included 1,250 eyes of 625 patients undergoing PRK for correction of myopia and myopic astigmatism. Each patient was randomly assigned to alcohol-assisted or mechanical epithelial removal. Results: A total of 658 eyes underwent alcohol-assisted epithelial removal while the epithelium was removed mechanically in 592 eyes. Mean spherical equivalent was ‑4.37}2.3 D in the alcohol group and ‑3.8}1.3 D in the mechanical group (P = 0.78. There was no significant difference in postoperative pain between the study groups (P = 0.22. Uncorrected visual acuity ≥ 20/20 and ≥ 20/40 was achieved in 90.9% versus 93.4% (P = 0.08, and 98.9% versus 99.5% (P = 0.36 of eyes in the alcohol and mechanical groups, respectively. Final refractive error within 1D of emmetropia was achieved in 90% versus 92.2% of eyes in the alcohol and mechanical groups, respectively (P = 0.23. Alcohol-assisted debridement required less time than mechanical debridement (96±18 vs. 118±26 seconds, P=0.035. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of early and late postoperative complications. Conclusion: Alcohol-assisted and mechanical epithelium removal are comparable in terms of efficacy and side effects. The method of epithelial debridement in PRK may be left to the surgeon′s choice.

  12. Waterpipe smoking induces epigenetic changes in the small airway epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Walters

    Full Text Available Waterpipe (also called hookah, shisha, or narghile smoking is a common form of tobacco use in the Middle East. Its use is becoming more prevalent in Western societies, especially among young adults as an alternative form of tobacco use to traditional cigarettes. While the risk to cigarette smoking is well documented, the risk to waterpipe smoking is not well defined with limited information on its health impact at the epidemiologic, clinical and biologic levels with respect to lung disease. Based on the knowledge that airway epithelial cell DNA methylation is modified in response to cigarette smoke and in cigarette smoking-related lung diseases, we assessed the impact of light-use waterpipe smoking on DNA methylation of the small airway epithelium (SAE and whether changes in methylation were linked to the transcriptional output of the cells. Small airway epithelium was obtained from 7 nonsmokers and 7 light-use (2.6 ± 1.7 sessions/wk waterpipe-only smokers. Genome-wide comparison of SAE DNA methylation of waterpipe smokers to nonsmokers identified 727 probesets differentially methylated (fold-change >1.5, p<0.05 representing 673 unique genes. Dominant pathways associated with these epigenetic changes include those linked to G-protein coupled receptor signaling, aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and xenobiotic metabolism signaling, all of which have been associated with cigarette smoking and lung disease. Of the genes differentially methylated, 11.3% exhibited a corresponding significant (p<0.05 change in gene expression with enrichment in pathways related to regulation of mRNA translation and protein synthesis (eIF2 signaling and regulation of eIF4 and p70S6K signaling. Overall, these data demonstrate that light-use waterpipe smoking is associated with epigenetic changes and related transcriptional modifications in the SAE, the cell population demonstrating the earliest pathologic abnormalities associated with chronic cigarette smoking.

  13. Waterpipe smoking induces epigenetic changes in the small airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Matthew S; Salit, Jacqueline; Ju, Jin Hyun; Staudt, Michelle R; Kaner, Robert J; Rogalski, Allison M; Sodeinde, Teniola B; Rahim, Riyaad; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Mezey, Jason G; Almulla, Ahmad M; Sattar, Hisham; Mahmoud, Mai; Crystal, Ronald G

    2017-01-01

    Waterpipe (also called hookah, shisha, or narghile) smoking is a common form of tobacco use in the Middle East. Its use is becoming more prevalent in Western societies, especially among young adults as an alternative form of tobacco use to traditional cigarettes. While the risk to cigarette smoking is well documented, the risk to waterpipe smoking is not well defined with limited information on its health impact at the epidemiologic, clinical and biologic levels with respect to lung disease. Based on the knowledge that airway epithelial cell DNA methylation is modified in response to cigarette smoke and in cigarette smoking-related lung diseases, we assessed the impact of light-use waterpipe smoking on DNA methylation of the small airway epithelium (SAE) and whether changes in methylation were linked to the transcriptional output of the cells. Small airway epithelium was obtained from 7 nonsmokers and 7 light-use (2.6 ± 1.7 sessions/wk) waterpipe-only smokers. Genome-wide comparison of SAE DNA methylation of waterpipe smokers to nonsmokers identified 727 probesets differentially methylated (fold-change >1.5, pepigenetic changes include those linked to G-protein coupled receptor signaling, aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and xenobiotic metabolism signaling, all of which have been associated with cigarette smoking and lung disease. Of the genes differentially methylated, 11.3% exhibited a corresponding significant (psmoking is associated with epigenetic changes and related transcriptional modifications in the SAE, the cell population demonstrating the earliest pathologic abnormalities associated with chronic cigarette smoking.

  14. A Method for Quantification of Epithelium Colonization Capacity by Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune M. Pedersen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Most bacterial infections initiate at the mucosal epithelium lining the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and urogenital tracts. At these sites, bacterial pathogens must adhere and increase in numbers to effectively breach the outer barrier and invade the host. If the bacterium succeeds in reaching the bloodstream, effective dissemination again requires that bacteria in the blood, reestablish contact to distant endothelium sites and form secondary site foci. The infectious potential of bacteria is therefore closely linked to their ability to adhere to, colonize, and invade epithelial and endothelial surfaces. Measurement of bacterial adhesion to epithelial cells is therefore standard procedure in studies of bacterial virulence. Traditionally, such measurements have been conducted with microtiter plate cell cultures to which bacteria are added, followed by washing procedures and final quantification of retained bacteria by agar plating. This approach is fast and straightforward, but yields only a rough estimate of the adhesive properties of the bacteria upon contact, and little information on the ability of the bacterium to colonize these surfaces under relevant physiological conditions. Here, we present a method in which epithelia/endothelia are simulated by flow chamber-grown human cell layers, and infection is induced by seeding of pathogenic bacteria on these surfaces under conditions that simulate the physiological microenvironment. Quantification of bacterial adhesion and colonization of the cell layers is then performed by in situ time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and automatic detection of bacterial surface coverage. The method is demonstrated in three different infection models, simulating Staphylococcus aureus endothelial infection and Escherichia coli intestinal- and uroepithelial infection. The approach yields valuable information on the fitness of the bacterium to successfully adhere to and colonize epithelial surfaces and can be used

  15. Respiratory manifestations of hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Jesper Roed; Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypothyroidism has been associated with increased pulmonary morbidity and overall mortality. We conducted a systematic review to identify the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of respiratory problems among patients with thyroid insufficiency. METHODS: PubMed and EMBASE databases were...... searched for relevant literature from January 1950 through January 2015 with study eligibility criteria: English-language publications; Adult subclinical or overt hypothyroid patients; Intervention, observational or retrospective studies; and respiratory manifestations. We followed the PRISMA statement...... and used the Cochrane's risk of bias tool. RESULTS: A total of 1699 papers were screened by two independent authors for relevant titles. Of 109 relevant abstracts, 28 papers underwent full text analyses, of which 22 were included in the review. We identified possible mechanisms explaining respiratory...

  16. Chemoreception and neuroplasticity in respiratory circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, William H; Abdala, Ana P; Paton, Julian F R; Rybak, Ilya A; Zoccal, Daniel B; Molkov, Yaroslav I

    2017-01-01

    The respiratory central pattern generator must respond to chemosensory cues to maintain oxygen (O 2 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) homeostasis in the blood and tissues. To do this, sensorial cells located in the periphery and central nervous system monitor the arterial partial pressure of O 2 and CO 2 and initiate respiratory and autonomic reflex adjustments in conditions of hypoxia and hypercapnia. In conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), repeated peripheral chemoreceptor input mediated by the nucleus of the solitary tract induces plastic changes in respiratory circuits that alter baseline respiratory and sympathetic motor outputs and result in chemoreflex sensitization, active expiration, and arterial hypertension. Herein, we explored the hypothesis that the CIH-induced neuroplasticity primarily consists of increased excitability of pre-inspiratory/inspiratory neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex. To evaluate this hypothesis and elucidate neural mechanisms for the emergence of active expiration and sympathetic overactivity in CIH-treated animals, we extended a previously developed computational model of the brainstem respiratory-sympathetic network to reproduce experimental data on peripheral and central chemoreflexes post-CIH. The model incorporated neuronal connections between the 2nd-order NTS neurons and peripheral chemoreceptors afferents, the respiratory pattern generator, and sympathetic neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla in order to capture key features of sympathetic and respiratory responses to peripheral chemoreflex stimulation. Our model identifies the potential neuronal groups recruited during peripheral chemoreflex stimulation that may be required for the development of inspiratory, expiratory and sympathetic reflex responses. Moreover, our model predicts that pre-inspiratory neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex experience plasticity of channel expression due to excessive excitation during peripheral chemoreflex. Simulations

  17. Enhanced Analgesic Responses After Preferential Delivery of Morphine and Fentanyl to the Olfactory Epithelium in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekman, John D.; Ho, Rodney J.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background Centrally acting opioid analgesics such as morphine and fentanyl are effective, but their efficacy is often limited by a delayed response or side effects resulting from systemic first-pass before reaching the brain and the central nervous system (CNS). It is generally accepted that drugs applied to the nasal cavity can directly access the brain and the CNS, which could provide therapeutic advantages such as rapid onset and lower systemic exposure. The olfactory region of the nasal cavity has been implicated in facilitating this direct nose-to-CNS transfer. If the fraction of opioid administered to the olfactory region could be improved, there could be a larger fraction of drug directly delivered to the CNS, mediating greater therapeutic benefit. Methods We have developed a pressurized olfactory delivery (POD) device to consistently and non-invasively deposit a majority of drug on the olfactory region of the nasal cavity in Sprague-Dawley rats. Using the tail-flick latency test and analysis of plasma and CNS tissue drug exposure, we compared distribution and efficacy of the opioids morphine and fentanyl administered to the nasal olfactory region with the POD device or the nasal respiratory region with nose drops or systemically via intraperitoneal (IP) injection. Results Compared to nose drop, POD administration of morphine resulted in significantly higher overall therapeutic effect (AUCeffect) without a significant increase in plasma drug exposure (AUCplasma). POD delivery of morphine resulted in a nose-to-CNS direct transport percentage of 38–55%. POD delivery of fentanyl led to a faster (5 min vs. 10 min) and more intense analgesic effect compared to nasal respiratory administration. Unlike IP injection or nose drop administration, both morphine and fentanyl given by the POD device to olfactory nasal epithelium exhibited clockwise [plasma] versus effect hysteresis after nasal POD administration, consistent with direct nose-to-CNS drug transport

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum chaperone GRP78 mediates cigarette smoke-induced necroptosis and injury in bronchial epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Yong Wang,1 Jie-Sen Zhou,1 Xu-Chen Xu,1 Zhou-Yang Li,1 Hai-Pin Chen,1 Song-Min Ying,1 Wen Li,1 Hua-Hao Shen,1,2 Zhi-Hua Chen1 1Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, 2State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Introduction: Bronchial epithelial cell death and airway inflammation induced by cigarette smoke (CS have been involved in the pathogenesis of COPD. GRP78, belonging to heat shock protein 70 family, has been implicated in cell death and inflammation, while little is known about its roles in COPD. Here, we demonstrate that GRP78 regulates CS-induced necroptosis and injury in bronchial epithelial cells.Materials and methods: GRP78 and necroptosis markers were examined in human bronchial epithelial (HBE cell line, primary mouse tracheal epithelial cells, and mouse lungs. siRNA targeting GRP78 gene and necroptosis inhibitor were used. Expression of inflammatory cytokines, mucin MUC5AC, and related signaling pathways were detected.Results: Exposure to CS significantly increased the expression of GRP78 and necroptosis markers in HBE cell line, primary mouse tracheal epithelial cells, and mouse lungs. Inhibition of GRP78 significantly suppressed CS extract (CSE-induced necroptosis. Furthermore, GRP78–necroptosis cooperatively regulated CSE-induced inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 6 (IL6, IL8, and mucin MUC5AC in HBE cells, likely through the activation of nuclear factor (NF-κB and activator protein 1 (AP-1 pathways, respectively.Conclusion: Taken together, our results demonstrate that GRP78 promotes CSE-induced inflammatory response and mucus hyperproduction in airway epithelial cells, likely through upregulation of necroptosis and subsequent activation of NF-κB and AP-1 pathways. Thus, inhibition of GRP78 and/or inhibition of necroptosis could be the effective therapeutic approaches for the

  19. Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kênia KP Menezes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: After stroke, does respiratory muscle training increase respiratory muscle strength and/or endurance? Are any benefits carried over to activity and/or participation? Does it reduce respiratory complications? Design: Systematic review of randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Participants: Adults with respiratory muscle weakness following stroke. Intervention: Respiratory muscle training aimed at increasing inspiratory and/or expiratory muscle strength. Outcome measures: Five outcomes were of interest: respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle endurance, activity, participation and respiratory complications. Results: Five trials involving 263 participants were included. The mean PEDro score was 6.4 (range 3 to 8, showing moderate methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses showed that respiratory muscle training increased maximal inspiratory pressure by 7 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 14 and maximal expiratory pressure by 13 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 25; it also decreased the risk of respiratory complications (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.96 compared with no/sham respiratory intervention. Whether these effects carry over to activity and participation remains uncertain. Conclusion: This systematic review provided evidence that respiratory muscle training is effective after stroke. Meta-analyses based on five trials indicated that 30 minutes of respiratory muscle training, five times per week, for 5 weeks can be expected to increase respiratory muscle strength in very weak individuals after stroke. In addition, respiratory muscle training is expected to reduce the risk of respiratory complications after stroke. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether the benefits are carried over to activity and participation. Registration: PROSPERO (CRD42015020683. [Menezes KKP, Nascimento LR, Ada L, Polese JC, Avelino PR, Teixeira-Salmela LF (2016 Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory

  20. [Cell-molecular mechanisms of nitrogen dioxide-induced damaging effect on bronchial epithelium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titova, O N; Lebedeva, E S; Kuzubova, N A; Preobrazhenskaia, T N

    2014-08-01

    Nitrogen dioxide and reactive nitrogen species play a key role in the development environment related diseases by initiation of cell death and damage of bronchoalveolar epithelium. This review examines the possible cell-molecular mechanisms of nitrogen dioxide-induced damaging effect on bronchial epithelium.

  1. A mathematical model of amphibian skin epithelium with two types of transporting cellular units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Rasmussen, B E

    1985-01-01

    A computer model of ion transport across amphibian skin epithelium containing two types of cellular units, their relative number and sizes, and a paracellular pathway has been developed. The two cellular units are, a large Na+ transporting compartment representing the major epithelium from stratum...

  2. ACTA-EVER lecture 2007 - The retinal pigment epithelium: friend or foe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Cour, Morten

    2008-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the physiology and pathophysiology of the vertebrate retina. The RPE absorbs fluid from the retinal extracellular space, via a proton-lactate-water co-transport mechanism located in the apical membrane of the epithelium. This mechanism...

  3. Spatial Localization of A2E in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Grey, Angus C.; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Koutalos, Yiannis; Schey, Kevin L.; Ablonczy, Zsolt

    2011-01-01

    The spatial distribution of A2E across the murine retinal pigment epithelium was determined using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization imaging mass spectrometry. This is the first technique to allow mapping of specific lipofuscin components in native retinal pigment epithelium tissue with high spatial resolution and to allow spatial correlation of lipofuscin fluorescence with A2E distribution.

  4. Content of Trans Fatty Acids in Human Cheek Epithelium: Comparison with Serum and Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ransi A. Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies pertaining to trans fatty acids (TFA, which have been implicated in development of chronic diseases, are more relevant in developing countries where nutrition transition is changing traditional habits and practices. Measuring TFA is an arduous task because of the need for fat biopsies. This study identifies a tissue, which can be easily accessed for analytical measurement of trans fatty acid. In this cross-sectional study, fatty acid in adipose tissue, cheek epithelium, and blood samples were assessed by gas chromatography. Spearman correlation coefficient was computed to study the correlation of fatty acid distribution among the three tissues. The correlation coefficient of total trans fatty acid between cheek epithelium and serum was 0.30 ( and between cheek epithelium and adipose tissue was 0.33 (. This study is the first to report trans fatty acid profile in cheek epithelium giving scope for utilizing the cheek epithelium as a tissue for objective assessment of trans fatty acid intake.

  5. [Antibiotic prescribing in acute respiratory tract infections in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo, S; Bjerrum, L; Feja, C; Lallana, M J; Poncel, A; Rabanaque, M J

    2015-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a worldwide threat to public health. Acute respiratory tract infections are the main reason for antibiotic prescribing in the Spanish paediatric population. The aim of the study was to describe the frequency of antibiotic prescription and their pattern of use in acute respiratory tract infections diagnosed in children in Primary Care in Aragón (Spain). A study was conducted over a 1-year period on children between 0 and 14 years-old, recording all episodes of acute otitis, acute pharyngotonsillitis, non-specific upper respiratory infection, and acute bronchitis. The proportion of episodes within each diagnosis receiving an antibiotic prescription was calculated, and the prescribing pattern was determined. Half (50%) of the children in Aragón were diagnosed with a respiratory tract infection during the study period. Non-specific upper respiratory infection was the most frequent diagnosis. An antibiotic was prescribed in 75% of pharyngotonsillitis episodes, 72% of otitis, 27% of bronchitis, and 16% of non-specific upper respiratory infections. Broad spectrum antibiotics, mainly amoxicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanic, were predominantly prescribed. Antibiotic prescribing in respiratory tract infections in children was generally high, and the choice of antibiotics was probably inappropriate in a high percentage of cases. Therefore an improvement in antibiotic prescribing in children appears to be needed. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. The generation of respiratory rhythms in birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granada, A.; Gabitto, M.; García, G.; Alliende, J.; Méndez, J.; Trevisan, M. A.; Mindlin, G. B.

    2006-11-01

    The generation of precise respiratory rhythms is vital for birds, which must generate specific pressure patterns to perform several activities, song being one of the most demanding ones. These rhythms emerge as the interaction between a peripheral system and a set of neural nuclei which control the action of expiratory and inspiratory muscles. A computational model was proposed recently to account for this interaction. In this work, we describe the set of solutions that this model can display as its parameters are varied, and compare experimental records of air sac pressure patterns with the predictions of the model.

  7. Mucous cell metaplasia in rat nasal epithelium after a 20-month exposure to ozone: A morphometric study of epithelial differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkema, J.R.; Hotchkiss, J.A.; Griffith, W.C. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)]|[Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The present study was designed to examine the effects of long-term ozone exposure on nasal epithelia and intraepithelial mucosubstances (IM) throughout the nasal airways of F344/N rats. Animals were exposed to 0 (controls). 0. 12. 0.5, or 1.0 ppm ozone. 6 h/day, 5 days/wk. for 20 mo. Rats were killed 1 wk after the end of the exposure. and nasal tissues were processed for light and electron microscopy. Standard morphometric techniques were used to determine epithelial cell densities and the amounts of IM in the surface epithelium lining the nasal airways. No mucous cells or IM were present in the epithelia lining the nasal lateral meatus and maxillary sinus of rats exposed to 0 or 0.12 ppm ozone. In contrast, rats exposed to 0.5 or 1.0 ppm ozone had marked mucous cell metaplasia (MCM) with numerous mucous cells and conspicuous amounts of IM in the surface epithelium lining these upper airways. Ozone-induced increases in total epithelial cells (i.e., epithelial hyperplasia) were present only in rats exposed to 1.0 ppm. The results of this study indicate that rats chronically exposed to 1.0 or 0.5 ppm, but not 0. 121 ppm. ozone can develop marked MCM with significant increases in IM in both proximal and distal nasal airways. The epithelial chances observed throughout the nasal passages of ozone-exposed rats may be adaptive responses in an attempt to protect the upper and lower respiratory tract from further ozone-induced injury.

  8. Topical retinoic acid changes the epidermal cell surface glycosylation pattern towards that of a mucosal epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griffiths, C E; Dabelsteen, Erik; Voorhees, J J

    1996-01-01

    separate areas of buttock skin, with single applications of 0.1% RA, 2% SLS, or vehicle creams, followed by 4-day occlusion. Biopsies were assessed immunohistologically using highly specific monoclonal antibodies to cell surface carbohydrates (types 1, 2 and 3 chain structures), previously demonstrated...... for carbohydrate synthesis, are influenced by retinoids. Thus, we investigated whether epidermal cell surface glycosylation is altered in skin treated with topical RA, and contrasted it with changes induced by topical SLS. Skin biopsies were obtained from seven normal volunteers who had been treated, on three...

  9. The microbiota of the respiratory tract : Gatekeeper to respiratory health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Man, Wing Ho; De Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413982653; Bogaert, Debby|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/264105834

    2017-01-01

    The respiratory tract is a complex organ system that is responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The human respiratory tract spans from the nostrils to the lung alveoli and is inhabited by niche-specific communities of bacteria. The microbiota of the respiratory tract probably acts

  10. Therapy for respiratory tract infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, J.; Kimpen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in infancy and young children. No effective treatment for RSV lower respiratory tract infection (RSV-LRTI) exists. Ribavirin initially proved to be an effective anti-viral drug for RSV-LTRI.

  11. Therapy for respiratory tract infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, J; Kimpen, J

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in infancy and young children. No effective treatment for RSV lower respiratory tract infection (RSV-LRTI) exists. Ribavirin initially proved to be an effective anti-viral drug for RSV-LTRI.

  12. [Nutrition and respiratory insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, M; Burgos, R

    2000-01-01

    Unlike other pathologies, not much attention has been paid to the relationship between nutrition and respiratory disease. This is probably because some of these diseases, such as cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, are closely associated with smoking while others that could be more directly linked with nutrition such as cystic fibrosis and emphysema are not directly caused by nutrition disorders. Not all patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are undernourished. When malnutrition is present in these patients it is because of multiple reasons and is associated with an increase in both mortality and morbidity. In patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, malnutrition is often secondary to a heightened catabolic state leading to the severe fundamental illness. We also know that nutritional treatment may not only correct malnutrition but also help in improving the respiratory function. This nutritional therapy is not normally easy to comply with. It must be accompanied by other non-pharmacological therapies such as rehabilitation. Renourishment may also entail risks for patients with respiratory diseases so it is very important to know as closely as possible their nutritional requirements and to focus on specific actions.

  13. Respiratory transfusion reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Marić

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory transfusion-related reactions are not very frequent, partly also because recognition and reporting transfusion reactions is still underemphasized. Tis article describes the most important respiratory transfusion reactions, their pathophysiology, clinical picture and treatment strategies. Respiratory transfusion related reactions can be primary or secondary. The most important primary transfusion-related reactions are TRALI - transfusion-related acute lung injury, TACO – transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and TAD - transfusion-associated dyspnea. TRALI is immuneassociated injury of alveolar basal membrane, which becomes highly permeable and causes noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Treatment of TRALI is mainly supportive with oxygen, fluids (in case of hypotension and in cases of severe acute respiratory failure also mechanic ventilation. TACO is caused by volume overload in predisposed individuals, such as patients with heart failure, the elderly, infants, patients with anemia and patients with positive fluid balance. Clinical picture is that of a typical pulmonary cardiogenic edema, and the therapy is classical: oxygen and diuretics, and in severe cases also non-invasive or invasive mechanical ventilation. TAD is usually a mild reaction of unknown cause and cannot be classified as TACO or TRALI, nor can it be ascribed to patient’s preexisting diseases. Although the transfusion-related reactions are not very common, knowledge about them can prevent serious consequences. On the one hand preventive measures should be sought, and on the other early recognition is beneficial, so that proper treatment can take place.

  14. Surveillance of respiratory viruses.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Respiratory virus isolates made at the National Institute for. Virology from 1982 to 1991 were studied. An active virus surveillance programme, 'viral watch', which recruits throat swab specimens from a network of monitoring centres - mainly in the Witwatersrand and Vereeniging area with one centre in Middelburg - that ...

  15. Respiratory effects of trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Orianne; Despreaux, Thomas; Perros, Frédéric; Lau, Edmund; Andujar, Pascal; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Descatha, Alexis

    2018-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a chlorinated solvent that has been used widely around the world in the twentieth century for metal degreasing and dry cleaning. Although TCE displays general toxicity and is classified as a human carcinogen, the association between TCE exposure and respiratory disorders are conflicting. In this review we aimed to systematically evaluate the current evidence for the respiratory effects of TCE exposure and the implications for the practicing clinician. There is limited evidence of an increased risk of lung cancer associated with TCE exposure based on animal and human data. However, the effect of other chlorinated solvents and mixed solvent exposure should be further investigated. Limited data are available to support an association between TCE exposure and respiratory tract disorders such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, or rhinitis. The most consistent data is the association of TCE with autoimmune and vascular diseases such as systemic sclerosis and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Although recent data are reassuring regarding the absence of an increased lung cancer risk with TCE exposure, clinicians should be aware of other potential respiratory effects of TCE. In particular, occupational exposure to TCE has been linked to less common conditions such as systemic sclerosis and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Respiratory Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Control Preventing infections can help the respiratory home care patient stay as healthy as possible. Hand-washing is the single most important thing for patients and caregivers to perform on a routine basis. Use a liquid soap and lots of warm running water. Work up a good lather and scrub for at ...

  17. Respiratory Symptoms in Firefighters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greven, Frans E.; Rooyackers, Jos M.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Heederik, Dick J.

    Background The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with respiratory symptoms in common firefighters in the Netherlands. Methods A total of 1,330 firefighters from the municipal fire brigades of three provinces of the Netherlands were included in the

  18. Postharvest changes and respiratory pattern of bacuri fruit (Platonia insignis Mart. at different maturity stages during ambient storage Mudanças pós-colheita e padrão respiratório de frutos de bacuri (Platonia insignis Mart. em diferentes estádios de maturação durante o armazenamento no ambiente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Henrique de Almeida Teixeira

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacuri (Platonia insignis, Mart. is one of the most important among Amazonian fruits. However, little is known about its postharvest physiology, such as maturity stages, changes during ambient storage, and respiratory pattern. Fruits were harvested at three maturity stages based on epicarp colour: dark green, light green, and turning (50% yellow, in order to determine colour modification and respiratory pattern during ambient storage (25.2 ºC, 75.1 % RH. Fruit of all maturity stages showed, after three days of harvest, a non-climacteric respiratory pattern, with turning fruit presenting the highest CO2 production rate until the fourth storage day (177.63 mg.CO2.kg-1.h-1. Yellowing increased throughout storage as related to lightness, chromaticity, and hue angle reductions. Turning fruit can be stored at ambient conditions for up to 10 days without any loss in marketability.O bacuri (Platonia insignis, Mart. é um dos mais importantes entre os frutos da Amazônia. Todavia, pouco se sabe sobre sua fisiologia pós-colheita, bem como, estádio de maturação, mudanças durante o armazenamento sob condições ambientais e padrão respiratório. Os frutos foram colhidos em três estádios de maturação baseados na coloração do epicarpo: verde-escuro, verde-claro e "de vez" (50% amarelo, com o objetivo de se determinar as modificações de coloração e padrão respiratório durante armazenamento sob condições de ambiente (25,2 ºC, 75,1 % UR. Os frutos de todos os estádios de maturação apresentaram, a partir do terceiro dia de colheita, comportamento respiratório não climatérico, com os frutos "de vez" apresentando maior taxa de produção de CO2 até o quarto dia de armazenamento (177,63 mg CO2.kg-1.h-1. O amarelecimento aumentou durante o armazenamento e foi relacionado com a diminuição da luminosidade (L, cromaticidade e ângulo hue. Os frutos "de vez" podem ser armazenados sob condições de ambiente por até 10 dias sem nenhuma

  19. Respiratory Constraints in Verbal and Non-verbal Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Włodarczak

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we address the old question of respiratory planning in speech production. We recast the problem in terms of speakers' communicative goals and propose that speakers try to minimize respiratory effort in line with the H&H theory. We analyze respiratory cycles coinciding with no speech (i.e., silence, short verbal feedback expressions (SFE's as well as longer vocalizations in terms of parameters of the respiratory cycle and find little evidence for respiratory planning in feedback production. We also investigate timing of speech and SFEs in the exhalation and contrast it with nods. We find that while speech is strongly tied to the exhalation onset, SFEs are distributed much more uniformly throughout the exhalation and are often produced on residual air. Given that nods, which do not have any respiratory constraints, tend to be more frequent toward the end of an exhalation, we propose a mechanism whereby respiratory patterns are determined by the trade-off between speakers' communicative goals and respiratory constraints.

  20. 3-chlorotyrosine and 3,5-dichlorotyrosine as biomarkers of respiratory tract exposure to chlorine gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochaski, Mark A; Jarabek, Annie M; Murphy, John; Andersen, Melvin E

    2008-01-01

    Modification of tyrosine by reactive chlorine can produce both 3-chlorotyrosine (CY) and 3,5-dichlorotyrosine (dCY). Both of these amino acids have proven to be promising biomarkers for assessing the extent of myeloperoxidase-catalyzed chlorine stress in a number of adverse physiological conditions. To date, there has been no application of these biomarkers for determining the extent of exposure to environmentally present gaseous chlorinating chemicals. In this manuscript, we present a method using selective ion monitoring gas chromatography for the simultaneous analysis of both CY and dCY in nasal tissue excised from Fisher 344 rats exposed to varying concentrations of chlorine gas. Using this method, we were able to demonstrate the following: 1. a dose-dependent increase in the conversion of tyrosine to CY and dCY in the respiratory epithelium tissue; 2. preferential formation of CY and dCY in the respiratory and transitional epithelium versus the olfactory epithelium of the nasal cavity of the rat; and 3. similar rates of formation for CY and dCY when exposed to chlorine gas based on a strong [CY] versus [dCY] correlation (slope = 1.001, r(2) = 0.912).

  1. ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics / ARDS ARDS What Is ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a lung condition that leads ... treat ARDS. Other Names Acute lung injury Adult respiratory distress syndrome Increased-permeability pulmonary edema Noncardiac pulmonary ...

  2. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus; MERS-CoV; Novel coronavirus; nCoV ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS): Frequently Asked Questions and Answers. Updated ...

  3. Acute respiratory infections at children

    OpenAIRE

    Delyagin, V.

    2009-01-01

    The common signs of virus respiratory diseases, role of pathological inclination to infections, value of immunodeficiency are presented at lecture. Features of most often meeting respiratory virus infections are given.

  4. Characteristics of mucosal glottic wave analyzed with HSDI-kymography, regional FFT, and red-color pattern after recurrent respiratory papillomatosis treated with laser surgery and intra-lesion bevacizumab injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Raul M.; Izdebski, Krzysztof; Yan, Yuling

    2012-02-01

    Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis (RRP) is a devastating disorder- especially in a performing professional voice user. The mainstay of treatment is based on immaculate serial removal of regrowing papillomas, usually with a laser. Repetitive laser excisions can cause significant scarring and webbing. The risks of post-operative sequela are exponentially increased with anterior location of papilloma clusters. The resultant dysphonia is not amenable to physiological voice therapy protocols. Additional or adjunctive treatments are eagerly sought by patients to avoid complications. Many of these treatments remain unproven. Recently, bevacizumab (Avastin) has been advocated as potentially useful. Consequently, we report a case treated with KTP lasering of papillomas with adjunctive intralesional bevacizumab injections. Current outcome of the case is analyzed with both traditional LVS and High Speed Digital Imaging (HSDI).

  5. Resistance patterns of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resistance patterns of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from the upper respiratory tract of persons attending various clinics of a University Teaching Hospital in Lagos, Nigeria - a preliminary study.

  6. Epidemiology of coronavirus respiratory infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacs, D; Flowers, D; Clarke, J R; Valman, H B; MacNaughton, M R

    1983-01-01

    Human coronaviruses were found by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in upper respiratory tract secretions taken during 30% of 108 acute respiratory infections experienced by 30 children under age 6 years with recurrent respiratory infections (index group), and during 29% of 51 acute infections experienced by their siblings. Lower respiratory tract infection--predominantly wheezy bronchitis--occurred in 30% of the index children's coronavirus positive infections but in none of their siblings' ...

  7. Epithelium percentage estimation facilitates epithelial quantitative protein measurement in tissue specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Toghi Eshghi, Shadi; Bova, George Steven; Li, Qing Kay; Li, Xingde; Zhang, Hui

    2013-12-01

    The rapid advancement of high-throughput tools for quantitative measurement of proteins has demonstrated the potential for the identification of proteins associated with cancer. However, the quantitative results on cancer tissue specimens are usually confounded by tissue heterogeneity, e.g. regions with cancer usually have significantly higher epithelium content yet lower stromal content. It is therefore necessary to develop a tool to facilitate the interpretation of the results of protein measurements in tissue specimens. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and cathepsin L (CTSL) are two epithelial proteins whose expressions in normal and tumorous prostate tissues were confirmed by measuring staining intensity with immunohistochemical staining (IHC). The expressions of these proteins were measured by ELISA in protein extracts from OCT embedded frozen prostate tissues. To eliminate the influence of tissue heterogeneity on epithelial protein quantification measured by ELISA, a color-based segmentation method was developed in-house for estimation of epithelium content using H&E histology slides from the same prostate tissues and the estimated epithelium percentage was used to normalize the ELISA results. The epithelium contents of the same slides were also estimated by a pathologist and used to normalize the ELISA results. The computer based results were compared with the pathologist's reading. We found that both EpCAM and CTSL levels, measured by ELISA assays itself, were greatly affected by epithelium content in the tissue specimens. Without adjusting for epithelium percentage, both EpCAM and CTSL levels appeared significantly higher in tumor tissues than normal tissues with a p value less than 0.001. However, after normalization by the epithelium percentage, ELISA measurements of both EpCAM and CTSL were in agreement with IHC staining results, showing a significant increase only in EpCAM with no difference in CTSL expression in cancer tissues. These results

  8. Disclosing respiratory coinfections: a Broad-Range Panel Assay for Avian Respiratory Pathogens on a Nanofluidic PCR Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croville, Guillaume; Foret, Charlotte; Heuillard, Pauline; Senet, Alexis; Delpont, Mattias; Mouahid, Mohammed; Ducatez, Mariette F; Kichou, Faouzi; Guerin, Jean-Luc

    2018-01-19

    Respiratory syndromes (RS) are among the most significant pathological conditions in food animals and are caused by complex coactions of pathogens and environmental factors. In poultry, low pathogenic avian Influenza A viruses, metapneumoviruses, infectious bronchitis virus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus, Mycoplasma spp. Escherichia coli and/or Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT) in turkeys, are considered as key co-infectious agents of respiratory syndromes. Aspergillus sp., Pasteurella multocida, Avibacterium paragallinarum or Chlamydia psittaci may also be involved in respiratory outbreaks. An innovative quantitative PCR method, based on a nanofluidic technology, has the ability to screen up to 96 samples with 96 pathogen-specific PCR primers, at the same time, in one run of real-time quantitative PCR (RTqPCR). This platform was used for the screening of avian respiratory pathogens: 15 respiratory agents, including viruses, bacteria and fungi potentially associated with respiratory infections of poultry were targeted. Primers were designed and validated for SYBR green RTqPCR and subsequently validated on the Biomark high throughput PCR nanofluidic platform (Fluidigm©). As a clinical assessment, tracheal swabs were sampled on turkeys showing respiratory syndromes and submitted to this panel assay. Beside systematic detection of E. coli, avian metapneumovirus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae were frequently detected, with distinctive co-infection patterns between French and Moroccan flocks. This proof-of-concept study illustrates the potential of such panel assay for unveiling respiratory co-infections profiles in poultry.

  9. Immunohistological features of basement membrane formation of uterine cervical epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, K

    1996-07-01

    The state of the basement membrane (BM) was investigated in the normal epithelium, dysplasia/carcinoma in situ (CIS) and invasive carcinoma of the uterine cervix as well as metastatic lymph nodes by performing immunohistological staining for the presence of laminin (LN) and type IV collagen (CIV) and periodic acid-methenamine silver (PAM) staining of the BM. Moreover, to clarify the relationship between the epithelial cells and the BM, simultaneous staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was performed on the repaired tissue after punch biopsy. In the normal tissues, positive linear staining was observed beneath the epithelium with both PAM staining and LN.C IV staining. Some of the cases of dysplasia/CIS were continuously positive with PAM staining. However, there were sites which showed weakening and disruption of the continuity of positive staining for LN and C IV. As a function of the histological type of invasive carcinoma, the intensity of staining for LN and C IV decreased in the order of keratinizing (K), large cell non-keratinizing (LNK) and small cell non-keratinizing (SNK) histological types. However, no correlation was found between the stage of the carcinoma and the intensity of staining. In addition, the staining of the metastatic lymph nodes was similar to that of the primary lesion, and cancer foci that were in direct contact with lymphocytes were also stained for LN and C IV. During the process of reformation of the BM, LN and C IV were already present at the time when the epithelial interstitium was still negative for PAM staining. Moreover, at the time when the epithelial basal cells were PCNA-positive, LN and C IV could not be detected, and, conversely, when PCNA was negative, LN and C IV were detected. The BM is a structure which is formed when the interstitium is in a static state, and it was surmised that the production of LN and C IV is carried out by epithelial cells, including cancerous cells. Furthermore, it was surmised

  10. How Is Respiratory Distress Syndrome Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Respiratory Distress Syndrome Respiratory Distress Syndrome What Is Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) ... This condition is called apnea (AP-ne-ah). Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complications Depending on the severity of ...

  11. Expression of HIV receptors, alternate receptors and co-receptors on tonsillar epithelium: implications for HIV binding and primary oral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Diane M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary HIV infection can develop from exposure to HIV in the oral cavity. In previous studies, we have documented rapid and extensive binding of HIV virions in seminal plasma to intact mucosal surfaces of the palatine tonsil and also found that virions readily penetrated beneath the tissue surfaces. As one approach to understand the molecular interactions that support HIV virion binding to human mucosal surfaces, we have examined the distribution of the primary HIV receptor CD4, the alternate HIV receptors heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HS and galactosyl ceramide (GalCer and the co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5 in palatine tonsil. Results Only HS was widely expressed on the surface of stratified squamous epithelium. In contrast, HS, GalCer, CXCR4 and CCR5 were all expressed on the reticulated epithelium lining the tonsillar crypts. We have observed extensive variability, both across tissue sections from any tonsil and between tonsils, in the distribution of epithelial cells expressing either CXCR4 or CCR5 in the basal and suprabasal layers of stratified epithelium. The general expression patterns of CXCR4, CCR5 and HS were similar in palatine tonsil from children and adults (age range 3–20. We have also noted the presence of small clusters of lymphocytes, including CD4+ T cells within stratified epithelium and located precisely at the mucosal surfaces. CD4+ T cells in these locations would be immediately accessible to HIV virions. Conclusion In total, the likelihood of oral HIV transmission will be determined by macro and micro tissue architecture, cell surface expression patterns of key molecules that may bind HIV and the specific properties of the infectious inoculum.

  12. [Respiratory Rehabilitation to Reduce Respiratory Complications after Cardiovascular Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Saiki, Yoshikatsu

    2017-07-01

    The number of cardiovascular surgical operations has been increasing, accompanied by an increase in the number of patients with an aging patient and various comorbidities. For this reason, the risk of respiratory complications after cardiovascular surgery is high, and ingenuity to alleviate this is necessary. We evaluated preoperative respiratory function and examined whether there is a difference in the onset of postoperative respiratory complications with or without respiratory rehabilitation from preoperative. As a result, the incidence of respiratory complications was significantly reduced in the group subjected to preoperative respiratory rehabilitation. Also, the intensive care unit stay was significantly shortened. From this, it is important to perform respiratory rehabilitation from preoperative time. And as a breathing exercise method, active cycle breathing technique is safe and highly effective.

  13. Carcinoid tumor associated with adjacent dysplastic columnar epithelium in the renal pelvis: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Sun; Choi, Chan; Kang, Taek Won; Choi, Yoo Duk

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are well documented in the pulmonary and gastrointestinal systems, but very rare in the urinary tract, especially in the renal pelvis. We report on a 60-year-old female patient who presented with left flank pain and fever. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a heterogeneously enhancing mass in the left renal pelvis and a stone at the left proximal ureter. Multiple parenchymal lesions were also observed, which were identified as uneven caliectasis displaying air-fluid levels and renal parenchymal atrophy. The patient underwent simple nephro-ureterectomy. Macroscopically, a polypoid mass was observed in the renal pelvis. Microscopically, the tumor revealed acinar, tubular, and solid pattern and was composed of small, monotonous and hyperchromatic cells. Lining epithelia in renal pelvis and ureter revealed columnar epithelia with dysplastic change. The tumor cells were positive for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, CD56, and focally positive for cytokeratin. Immunohistochemical staining of synaptophysin and chromogranin A highlighted the neuroendocrine cells in the columnar epithelium. Ki-67 (1:50; MIB-1) labeling index was less than 1% in the area with highest uptake. We report here a case of carcinoid tumor of the renal pelvis that was associated with adjacent dysplastic columnar epithelium. © 2015 Japanese Society of Pathology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Regulation of Autophagy by High Glucose in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium

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    Jin Yao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autophagy is a self-degradative process that is important for balancing sources of energy at critical times in development and in response to nutrient stress. Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE works as the outer blood retina barrier and is vulnerable to energy stress-induced injury. However, the effect of high glucose treatment on autophagy is still unclear in RPE. Methods: Transmission electron microscopy was used to detect the generation of autophagosome. Small interfering RNA (siRNA and MTT was used to determine the effect of autophagy on cell viability. Western blots and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression pattern of autophagic markers, including LC3 and p62. Results: High glucose treatment results in a significant increase in the generation of autophagosome and altered expression of LC3 and p62. High glucose-induced autophagy is independent of mTOR signaling, but is mainly regulated via ROS-mediated ER stress signaling. Conclusion: In the scenario of high glucose-induced oxidative stress, autophagy may be required for the removal of damaged proteins, and provide a default mechanism to prevent high glucose-induced injury in RPE.

  15. Transmigration of macrophages across the choroid plexus epithelium in response to the feline immunodeficiency virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Rick B.; Bragg, D. C.; Poulton, Winona; Hudson, Lola

    2013-01-01

    Although lentiviruses such as human, feline and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV, FIV, SIV) rapidly gain access to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the mechanisms that control this entry are not well understood. One possibility is that the virus may be carried into the brain by immune cells that traffic across the blood–CSF barrier in the choroid plexus. Since few studies have directly examined macrophage trafficking across the blood–CSF barrier, we established transwell and explant cultures of feline choroid plexus epithelium and measured trafficking in the presence or absence of FIV. Macrophages in co-culture with the epithelium showed significant proliferation and robust trafficking that was dependent on the presence of epithelium. Macrophage migration to the apical surface of the epithelium was particularly robust in the choroid plexus explants where 3-fold increases were seen over the first 24 h. Addition of FIV to the cultures greatly increased the number of surface macrophages without influencing replication. The epithelium in the transwell cultures was also permissive to PBMC trafficking, which increased from 17 to 26% of total cells after exposure to FIV. Thus, the choroid plexus epithelium supports trafficking of both macrophages and PBMCs. FIV significantly enhanced translocation of macrophages and T cells indicating that the choroid plexus epithelium is likely to be an active site of immune cell trafficking in response to infection. PMID:22281685

  16. Modelling apical columnar epithelium mechanics from circumferential contractile fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, A R B; Moore, S; Sader, J E; Lee, P V S

    2017-10-01

    Simple columnar epithelia are formed by individual epithelial cells connecting together to form single cell high sheets. They are a main component of many important body tissues and are heavily involved in both normal and cancerous cell activities. Prior experimental observations have identified a series of contractile fibres around the circumference of a cross section located in the upper (apical) region of each cell. While other potential mechanisms have been identified in both the experimental and theoretical literature, these circumferential fibres are considered to be the most likely mechanism controlling movement of this cross section. Here, we investigated the impact of circumferential contractile fibres on movement of the cross section by creating an alternate model where movement is driven from circumferential contractile fibres, without any other potential mechanisms. In this model, we utilised a circumferential contractile fibre representation based on investigations into the movement of contractile fibres as an individual system, treated circumferential fibres as a series of units, and matched our model simulation to experimental geometries. By testing against laser ablation datasets sourced from existing literature, we found that circumferential fibres can reproduce the majority of cross-sectional movements. We also investigated model predictions related to various aspects of cross-sectional movement, providing insights into epithelium mechanics and demonstrating the usefulness of our modelling approach.

  17. Glucose, epithelium, and enteric nervous system: dialogue in the dark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfannkuche, H; Gäbel, G

    2009-06-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelium is in close contact with the various components of the chymus, including nutrients, bacteria and toxins. The epithelial barrier has to decide which components are effectively absorbed and which components are extruded. In the small intestine, a nutrient like glucose is mainly absorbed by the sodium linked glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) and the glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2). The expression and activity of both transport proteins is directly linked to the amount of intraluminal glucose. Besides the direct interaction between glucose and the enterocytes, glucose also stimulates different sensory mechanisms within the intestinal wall. The most important types of cells involved in the sensing of intraluminal contents are enteroendocrine cells and neurones of the enteric nervous system. Regarding glucosensing, a distinct type of enteroendocrine cells, the enterochromaffine (EC) cells are involved. Excitation of EC cells by intraluminal glucose results in the release of serotonin (5-HT), which modulates epithelial functions and activates enteric secretomotorneurones. Enteric neurones are not only activated by 5-HT, but also directly by glucose. The activation of different cell types and the subsequent crosstalk between these cells may trigger appropriate absorptive and secretory processes within the intestine.

  18. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Restores Retinal Pigment Epithelium Function in Hyperglycemia.

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    Danielle Desjardins

    Full Text Available In diabetic individuals, macular edema is a major cause of vision loss. This condition is refractory to insulin therapy and has been attributed to metabolic memory. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is central to maintaining fluid balance in the retina, and this function is compromised by the activation of advanced glycation end-product receptors (RAGE. Here we provide evidence that acute administration of the RAGE agonist, glycated-albumin (gAlb or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, increased histone deacetylase (HDAC activity in RPE cells. The administration of the class I/II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin-A (TSA, suppressed gAlb-induced reductions in RPE transepithelial resistance (in vitro and fluid transport (in vivo. Systemic TSA also restored normal RPE fluid transport in rats with subchronic hyperglycemia. Both gAlb and VEGF increased HDAC activity and reduced acetyl-α-tubulin levels. Tubastatin-A, a relatively specific antagonist of HDAC6, inhibited gAlb-induced changes in RPE cell resistance. These data are consistent with the idea that RPE dysfunction following exposure to gAlb, VEGF, or hyperglycemia is associated with increased HDAC6 activity and decreased acetyl-α-tubulin. Therefore, we propose inhibiting HDAC6 in the RPE as a potential therapy for preserving normal fluid homeostasis in the hyperglycemic retina.

  19. Smoking influences on the thickness of marginal gingival epithelium

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    Villar Cristina Cunha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Smoking patients show reduction of inflammatory clinical signs that might be associated with local vasoconstriction and an increased gingival epithelial thickness. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the thickness of the marginal gingival oral epithelium in smokers and non-smokers, with clinically healthy gingivae or with gingivitis. Twenty biopsies were obtained from four different groups. Group I: non-smokers with clinically healthy gingivae (n = 5. Group II: non-smokers with gingivitis (n = 5. Group III: smokers with clinically healthy gingivae (n = 5. Group IV: smokers with gingivitis (n = 5. These biopsies were histologically processed, serially sectioned at 5 mm, stained with H. E., and examined by image analysis software (KS400, which was used to perform the morphometric evaluation and the quantification of the major epithelial thickness, the epithelial base thickness and the external and internal epithelial perimeters. Differences between the four groups were analyzed using ANOVA test and Tukey's test. The criteria for statistical significance were accepted at the probability level p < 0.05. A greater epithelial thickness was observed in smokers independent of the gingival health situation.

  20. Abl suppresses cell extrusion and intercalation during epithelium folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodoin, Jeanne N.; Martin, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue morphogenesis requires control over cell shape changes and rearrangements. In the Drosophila mesoderm, linked epithelial cells apically constrict, without cell extrusion or intercalation, to fold the epithelium into a tube that will then undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Apical constriction drives tissue folding or cell extrusion in different contexts, but the mechanisms that dictate the specific outcomes are poorly understood. Using live imaging, we found that Abelson (Abl) tyrosine kinase depletion causes apically constricting cells to undergo aberrant basal cell extrusion and cell intercalation. abl depletion disrupted apical–basal polarity and adherens junction organization in mesoderm cells, suggesting that extruding cells undergo premature EMT. The polarity loss was associated with abnormal basolateral contractile actomyosin and Enabled (Ena) accumulation. Depletion of the Abl effector Enabled (Ena) in abl-depleted embryos suppressed the abl phenotype, consistent with cell extrusion resulting from misregulated ena. Our work provides new insight into how Abl loss and Ena misregulation promote cell extrusion and EMT. PMID:27440923

  1. Surface characteristics of isopod digestive gland epithelium studied by SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millaku, Agron; Leser, Vladka; Drobne, Damjana; Godec, Matjaz; Torkar, Matjaz; Jenko, Monika; Milani, Marziale; Tatti, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    The structure of the digestive gland epithelium of a terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber has been investigated by conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), and light microscopy in order to provide evidence on morphology of the gland epithelial surface in animals from a stock culture. We investigated the shape of cells, extrusion of lipid droplets, shape and distribution of microvilli, and the presence of bacteria on the cell surface. A total of 22 animals were investigated and we found some variability in the appearance of the gland epithelial surface. Seventeen of the animals had dome-shaped digestive gland "normal" epithelial cells, which were densely and homogeneously covered by microvilli and varying proportions of which extruded lipid droplets. On the surface of microvilli we routinely observed sparsely distributed bacteria of different shapes. Five of the 22 animals had "abnormal" epithelial cells with a significantly altered shape. In three of these animals, the cells were much smaller, partly or completely flat or sometimes pyramid-like. A thick layer of bacteria was detected on the microvillous border, and in places, the shape and size of microvilli were altered. In two animals, hypertrophic cells containing large vacuoles were observed indicating a characteristic intracellular infection. The potential of SEM in morphological investigations of epithelial surfaces is discussed.

  2. Selenium compound protects corneal epithelium against oxidative stress.

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    Akihiro Higuchi

    Full Text Available The ocular surface is strongly affected by oxidative stress, and anti-oxidative systems are maintained in corneal epithelial cells and tear fluid. Dry eye is recognized as an oxidative stress-induced disease. Selenium compound eye drops are expected to be a candidate for the treatment of dry eye. We estimated the efficacy of several selenium compounds in the treatment of dry eye using a dry eye rat model. All of the studied selenium compounds were uptaken into corneal epithelial cells in vitro. However, when the selenium compounds were administered as eye drops in the dry eye rat model, most of the selenium compounds did not show effectiveness except for Se-lactoferrin. Se-lactoferrin is a lactoferrin that we prepared that binds selenium instead of iron. Se-lactoferrin eye drops suppressed the up-regulated expression of heme oxygenase-1, cyclooxygenase-2, matrix metallopeptidase-9, and interleukin-6 and also suppressed 8-OHdG production in the cornea induced by surgical removal of the lacrimal glands. Compared with Se-lactoferrin, apolactoferrin eye drops weakly improved dry eye in high dose. The effect of Se-lactoferrin eye drops on dry eye is possibly due to the effect of selenium and also the effect of apolactoferrin. Se-lactoferrin is a candidate for the treatment of dry eye via regulation of oxidative stress in the corneal epithelium.

  3. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  4. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneijber, M.C.J.; van Heerde, M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Plotz, F.; Markhorst, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  5. Process of tight junction recovery in the injured vocal fold epithelium: Morphological and paracellular permeability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Katsuno, Tatsuya; Kishimoto, Yo; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Mizuta, Masanobu; Suehiro, Atsushi; Yamashita, Masaru; Nakamura, Tatsuo; Tateya, Ichiro; Omori, Koichi

    2017-10-31

    The vocal fold epithelium that includes tight junction (TJ)-based barrier function protects underlying connective tissues from external insults. TJs play an important role to control paracellular permeability of not only solutes but also ions, and preserve the vocal fold homeostasis. However, the distribution of TJs and paracellular diffusion barrier across the entire vocal fold epithelium are still unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the distribution of TJs in the vocal fold epithelium and to characterize the recovery process of TJ-based paracellular diffusion barrier in a rat model of vocal fold injury. Animal experiments with controls. Normal and vocal fold-injured rats were used. Larynges were harvested for immunohistochemical examination of TJ proteins. For functional analysis, a tracer permeability assay was performed using EZ-Link Sulfo-NHS-LC-Biotin. TJ proteins occludin and zonula occludens 1 signals were localized to the junctional regions of the most luminal cell layers of the vocal fold epithelium. The injured region had been recovered with epithelium at 5 days postinjury, but the paracellular diffusion barrier assays revealed that biotinylation reagents diffused into the lamina propria at 5 days postinjury, and were blocked at the epithelium at 14 and 28 days postinjury. It was strongly suggested that TJs in the vocal fold epithelium exist at the junctional regions of the first layer of stratified squamous epithelium. TJ-based paracellular diffusion barrier following vocal fold injury is recovered by 14 days postinjury, and this period corresponds with the time course of structural changes in the regenerating epithelium layer. NA Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, M J; Lemen, R J

    1997-03-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis is associated with the clinical signs and symptoms of small airway obstruction. A major public health problem throughout the world, this condition is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Management is primarily preventive, through strict hand washing, avoidance of exposure during the respiratory illness season and intravenously administered prophylactic anti-RSV Immune globulin, especially in selected small infants with underlying cardiopulmonary disease. Supportive measures, including fluid hydration, good nutrition, aerosolized bronchodilators and steroids, may be helpful. Ribavirin may be useful in severely ill children or those with underlying cardiopulmonary disease. A significant number of patients have recurrent episodes of bronchiolitis and wheezing, and may develop asthma later in life. Avoidance of exposure to tobacco smoke, cold air and air pollutants is also beneficial to long-term recovery from RSV bronchiolitis. A number of vaccines to prevent this infection are currently being studied.

  7. Respiratory fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotberg, James B

    2011-02-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from "capillary-elastic instabilities," as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the "oscillating butter knife;" liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the Grotberg-Borgas-Gaver shock.

  8. Local immunity of the respiratory mucosal system in chickens and turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiałek, M; Tykałowski, B; Stenzel, T; Koncicki, A

    2011-01-01

    This review article presents fundamental mechanisms of the local mucosal immunity in selected regions of the respiratory tract in healthy birds and in some pathological conditions. The respiratory system, whose mucosa come into direct contact with microorganisms contaminating inhaled air, has some associated structures, such as Harderian gland (HG), conjunctive-associated lymphoid tissue (CALT) and paranasal glands (PG), whose participation in local mechanisms of the mucosal immunity has been corroborated by numerous scientific studies. The nasal mucosa, with structured clusters of lymphoid tissue (NALT - nasal-associated lymphoid tissue) is the first to come into contact with microorganisms which contaminate inhaled air. Lymphoid nodules, made up of B cells with frequently developed germinal centres (GC), surrounded by a coat of CD4+ cells, are the major NALT structures in chickens, whereas CD8+ cells are situated in the epithelium and in the lamina propria of the nasal cavity mucosa. Studies into respiratory system infections (e.g. Mycoplasma gallisepticum) have shown the reactivity of the tracheal mucosa to infection, despite a lack of essential lymphoid tissue. Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) takes part in bronchial immune processes and its structure, topography and ability to perform defensive function in birds is largely age-dependent. Mature BALT is covered by a delicate layer of epithelial cells, called follicle-associated epithelium (FAE). Germinal centres (GC), surrounded by CD4+ cells are developed in most mature BALT nodules, while CD8+ lymphocytes are dispersed among lymphoid nodules and in the epithelium, and they are rarely present in GC. Macrophages make up the first line of defence mechanisms through which the host rapidly responds to microorganisms and their products in the respiratory mucosal system. Another very important element are polymorphonuclear cells, with heterophils being the most important of them. Phagocytic cells obtained

  9. PRODUCTION OF OVOGONIA BY GERMINATIVE EPITHELIUM OF THE OVARY AT SOME MAMMALIA AND BIRDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Sincai

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available The studies were effected on ovaries from sows, cows, bitches, dous and hens. Our investigations revealed the generation of cellular rows of germinative epithelium into the cortex not only during the embrionary period but also in the adult ovary. The histological investigations revealed an intense proliferative process of the germinative epithelium of adult ovary which generated groups of ovogonia under the lamina basalis. From ovogonia developed oocytes and then ovarian follicles. The cause for the proliferation of ovary germinative epithelium could be: the multiple folliculary dehiscences, the premature degeneration of ovarian follicles and formation of the corpus luteum, phenomena that reduce continually the number of embrionary ovogonia.

  10. Ocular tropism of respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belser, Jessica A; Rota, Paul A; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism.

  11. Nanotechnology in respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omlor, Albert Joachim; Nguyen, Juliane; Bals, Robert; Dinh, Quoc Thai

    2015-05-29

    Like two sides of the same coin, nanotechnology can be both boon and bane for respiratory medicine. Nanomaterials open new ways in diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases. Nanoparticle based drug delivery systems can help against diseases such as lung cancer, tuberculosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, nanoparticles can be loaded with DNA and act as vectors for gene therapy in diseases like cystic fibrosis. Even lung diagnostics with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profits from new nanoparticle based contrast agents. However, the risks of nanotechnology also have to be taken into consideration as engineered nanomaterials resemble natural fine dusts and fibers, which are known to be harmful for the respiratory system in many cases. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles in the respiratory tract can influence the immune system, can create oxidative stress and even cause genotoxicity. Another important aspect to assess the safety of nanotechnology based products is the absorption of nanoparticles. It was demonstrated that the amount of pulmonary nanoparticle uptake not only depends on physical and chemical nanoparticle characteristics but also on the health status of the organism. The huge diversity in nanotechnology could revolutionize medicine but makes safety assessment a challenging task.

  12. Antitussive activity and respiratory system effects of levodropropizine in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, R; Braga, P C; Centanni, S; Legnani, D; Moavero, N E; Allegra, L

    1988-08-01

    Antitussive activity of the new antitussive drug, levodropropizine (S(-)-3-(4-phenyl-piperazin-1-yl)-propane-1,2-diol, DF 526), was evaluated in healthy volunteers by the classical method of citric acid-induced coughing. Levodropropizine dose-dependently reduced cough frequency. Maximal inhibition was observed at 6 h after administration. Cough intensity was also reduced, as shown by the analysis of cough noise. Levodropropizine, at the dosage of 60 mg t.i.d., had no adverse effects on respiratory function nor on airway clearance mechanisms: in fact, it did not affect spirometric parameters. Levodropropizine had no effects on the rheological properties of mucus nor on ciliary activity of airway epithelium.

  13. Interaction between telencephalic signals and respiratory dynamics in songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Jorge M; Mindlin, Gabriel B; Goller, Franz

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms by which telencephalic areas affect motor activities are largely unknown. They could either take over motor control from downstream motor circuits or interact with the intrinsic dynamics of these circuits. Both models have been proposed for telencephalic control of respiration during learned vocal behavior in birds. The interactive model postulates that simple signals from the telencephalic song control areas are sufficient to drive the nonlinear respiratory network into producing complex temporal sequences. We tested this basic assumption by electrically stimulating telencephalic song control areas and analyzing the resulting respiratory patterns in zebra finches and in canaries. We found strong evidence for interaction between the rhythm of stimulation and the intrinsic respiratory rhythm, including naturally emerging subharmonic behavior and integration of lateralized telencephalic input. The evidence for clear interaction in our experimental paradigm suggests that telencephalic vocal control also uses a similar mechanism. Furthermore, species differences in the response of the respiratory system to stimulation show parallels to differences in the respiratory patterns of song, suggesting that the interactive production of respiratory rhythms is manifested in species-specific specialization of the involved circuitry.

  14. The seasonality of respiratory viruses in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Jesse T; Paula, Flavia E; Proença-Modena, José L; Demarco, Ricardo C; Buzatto, Guilherme P; Saturno, Tamara H; Delcaro, Luana S; Tamashiro, Edwin; Valera, Fabiana C P; Arruda, Eurico; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma T

    2015-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a common illness, yet little is known about its pathogenesis, including the role played by respiratory viruses. A transversal prospective study was conducted to analyze the seasonality of CRS using real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect respiratory virus genomes in secretions and tissue samples from patients with CRS with and without nasal polyps. The frequency of viral detection was 41% (31/75). The respiratory virus most frequently detected was human rhinovirus, found in 18 patients (24%), followed by human metapneumovirus, human enterovirus, human respiratory sincicial virus, human adenovirus, human bocavirus, human coronavirus, and human influenza virus, detected in 12 (16%), five (6.6%), four (5.3%), four (5.3%), two (2.6%), two (2.6%), and one (1.3%) patient(s), respectively. Although none of the patients presented symptoms when the samples were collected, there was a peak in detection of the most prevalent virus in the autumn and winter seasons of both years, similar to the pattern that occurs in acute conditions. The pattern of respiratory virus seasonality found in nasal mucosa, polyps, and paranasal sinus samples in patients with CRS reinforces the possibility of asymptomatic respiratory viral infections.

  15. Combined effects of ventilation mode and positive end-expiratory pressure on mechanics, gas exchange and the epithelium in mice with acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammanomai, Apiradee; Hamakawa, Hiroshi; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Suki, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The accepted protocol to ventilate patients with acute lung injury is to use low tidal volume (V(T)) in combination with recruitment maneuvers or positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). However, an important aspect of mechanical ventilation has not been considered: the combined effects of PEEP and ventilation modes on the integrity of the epithelium. Additionally, it is implicitly assumed that the best PEEP-V(T) combination also protects the epithelium. We aimed to investigate the effects of ventilation mode and PEEP on respiratory mechanics, peak airway pressures and gas exchange as well as on lung surfactant and epithelial cell integrity in mice with acute lung injury. HCl-injured mice were ventilated at PEEPs of 3 and 6 cmH(2)O with conventional ventilation (CV), CV with intermittent large breaths (CV(LB)) to promote recruitment, and a new mode, variable ventilation, optimized for mice (VV(N)). Mechanics and gas exchange were measured during ventilation and surfactant protein (SP)-B, proSP-B and E-cadherin levels were determined from lavage and lung homogenate. PEEP had a significant effect on mechanics, gas exchange and the epithelium. The higher PEEP reduced lung collapse and improved mechanics and gas exchange but it also down regulated surfactant release and production and increased epithelial cell injury. While CV(LB) was better than CV, VV(N) outperformed CV(LB) in recruitment, reduced epithelial injury and, via a dynamic mechanotransduction, it also triggered increased release and production of surfactant. For long-term outcome, selection of optimal PEEP and ventilation mode may be based on balancing lung physiology with epithelial injury.

  16. Combined Effects of Ventilation Mode and Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on Mechanics, Gas Exchange and the Epithelium in Mice with Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammanomai, Apiradee; Hamakawa, Hiroshi; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Suki, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The accepted protocol to ventilate patients with acute lung injury is to use low tidal volume (VT) in combination with recruitment maneuvers or positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). However, an important aspect of mechanical ventilation has not been considered: the combined effects of PEEP and ventilation modes on the integrity of the epithelium. Additionally, it is implicitly assumed that the best PEEP-VT combination also protects the epithelium. We aimed to investigate the effects of ventilation mode and PEEP on respiratory mechanics, peak airway pressures and gas exchange as well as on lung surfactant and epithelial cell integrity in mice with acute lung injury. HCl-injured mice were ventilated at PEEPs of 3 and 6 cmH2O with conventional ventilation (CV), CV with intermittent large breaths (CVLB) to promote recruitment, and a new mode, variable ventilation, optimized for mice (VVN). Mechanics and gas exchange were measured during ventilation and surfactant protein (SP)-B, proSP-B and E-cadherin levels were determined from lavage and lung homogenate. PEEP had a significant effect on mechanics, gas exchange and the epithelium. The higher PEEP reduced lung collapse and improved mechanics and gas exchange but it also down regulated surfactant release and production and increased epithelial cell injury. While CVLB was better than CV, VVN outperformed CVLB in recruitment, reduced epithelial injury and, via a dynamic mechanotransduction, it also triggered increased release and production of surfactant. For long-term outcome, selection of optimal PEEP and ventilation mode may be based on balancing lung physiology with epithelial injury. PMID:23326543

  17. Effects of current clamp on chick retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, S; Hughes, B A; Steinberg, R H

    1991-06-01

    The basal membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the origin of two components of the electroretinogram, the fast oscillation and the light peak. Both of these responses originate from changes in basal membrane potential (Vba), and both are associated with changes in basal membrane resistance (Rba). In addition, many experimental manipulations that alter Vba also produce apparent changes in Rba. These findings raise the possibility that the basal membrane contains a voltage-sensitive conductance that operates in the physiologic range and is involved causally in light-evoked and other responses. We report the results of current clamp experiments on the isolated retina-RPE-choroid of chick that were designed to test for the presence of such a voltage-sensitive conductance in the basal membrane. Depolarizing Vba by 15 mV with retina-to-choroid current had essentially no effect on either the ratio of membrane resistances (Rap/Rba) or the transtissue resistance (RTotal), indicating no alteration in Rba. In contrast, hyperpolarizing Vba by 15 mV with choroid-to-retina current caused a gradual decrease in RTotal and increase in Rap/Rba. Analysis of accompanying changes in membrane voltages and changes in intracellular c-wave amplitude suggested that the most likely cause of the decrease in RTotal is a decrease in paracellular resistance. Voltage-sensitive conductances of the basal membrane appear to play little or no role in the resistance changes that accompany changes in Vba in the physiologic range. The conductance changes underlying the fast oscillation and light peak probably result from either the modulation of channels by second messengers or changes in intracellular ion concentration.

  18. Functional annotation of the human retinal pigment epithelium transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgels Theo GMF

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine level, variability and functional annotation of gene expression of the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, the key tissue involved in retinal diseases like age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Macular RPE cells from six selected healthy human donor eyes (aged 63–78 years were laser dissected and used for 22k microarray studies (Agilent technologies. Data were analyzed with Rosetta Resolver, the web tool DAVID and Ingenuity software. Results In total, we identified 19,746 array entries with significant expression in the RPE. Gene expression was analyzed according to expression levels, interindividual variability and functionality. A group of highly (n = 2,194 expressed RPE genes showed an overrepresentation of genes of the oxidative phosphorylation, ATP synthesis and ribosome pathways. In the group of moderately expressed genes (n = 8,776 genes of the phosphatidylinositol signaling system and aminosugars metabolism were overrepresented. As expected, the top 10 percent (n = 2,194 of genes with the highest interindividual differences in expression showed functional overrepresentation of the complement cascade, essential in inflammation in age-related macular degeneration, and other signaling pathways. Surprisingly, this same category also includes the genes involved in Bruch's membrane (BM composition. Among the top 10 percent of genes with low interindividual differences, there was an overrepresentation of genes involved in local glycosaminoglycan turnover. Conclusion Our study expands current knowledge of the RPE transcriptome by assigning new genes, and adding data about expression level and interindividual variation. Functional annotation suggests that the RPE has high levels of protein synthesis, strong energy demands, and is exposed to high levels of oxidative stress and a variable degree of inflammation. Our data sheds new light on the molecular composition of BM, adjacent to the

  19. Pigment epithelium-derived factor protects retinal ganglion cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleenor Debra L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs are responsible for the transmission of visual signals to the brain. Progressive death of RGCs occurs in glaucoma and several other retinal diseases, which can lead to visual impairment and blindness. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF is a potent antiangiogenic, neurotrophic and neuroprotective protein that can protect neurons from a variety of pathologic insults. We tested the effects of PEDF on the survival of cultured adult rat RGCs in the presence of glaucoma-like insults, including cytotoxicity induced by glutamate or withdrawal of trophic factors. Results Cultured adult rat RGCs exposed to glutamate for 3 days showed signs of cytotoxicity and death. The toxic effect of glutamate was concentration-dependent (EC50 = 31 μM. In the presence of 100 μM glutamate, RGC number decreased to 55 ± 4% of control (mean ± SEM, n = 76; P 50 values of 13.6 ng/mL (glutamate and 3.4 ng/mL (trophic factor withdrawal, respectively. At 100 ng/mL, PEDF completely protected the cells from both insults. Inhibitors of the nuclear factor κB (NFκB and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 significantly reduced the protective effects of PEDF. Conclusion We demonstrated that PEDF potently and efficaciously protected adult rat RGCs from glutamate- and trophic factor withdrawal-mediated cytotoxicity, via the activation of the NFκB and ERK1/2 pathways. The neuroprotective effect of PEDF represents a novel approach for potential treatment of retinopathies, such as glaucoma.

  20. Human Milk Hyaluronan Enhances Innate Defense of the Intestinal Epithelium*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David R.; Rho, Hyunjin K.; Kessler, Sean P.; Amin, Ripal; Homer, Craig R.; McDonald, Christine; Cowman, Mary K.; de la Motte, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Breast-feeding is associated with enhanced protection from gastrointestinal disease in infants, mediated in part by an array of bioactive glycan components in milk that act through molecular mechanisms to inhibit enteric pathogen infection. Human milk contains hyaluronan (HA), a glycosaminoglycan polymer found in virtually all mammalian tissues. We have shown that synthetic HA of a specific size range promotes expression of antimicrobial peptides in intestinal epithelium. We hypothesize that hyaluronan from human milk also enhances innate antimicrobial defense. Here we define the concentration of HA in human milk during the first 6 months postpartum. Importantly, HA isolated from milk has a biological function. Treatment of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA at physiologic concentrations results in time- and dose-dependent induction of the antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin 2 and is abrogated by digestion of milk HA with a specific hyaluronidase. Milk HA induction of human β-defensin 2 expression is also reduced in the presence of a CD44-blocking antibody and is associated with a specific increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting a role for the HA receptor CD44. Furthermore, oral administration of human milk-derived HA to adult, wild-type mice results in induction of the murine Hβ D2 ortholog in intestinal mucosa and is dependent upon both TLR4 and CD44 in vivo. Finally, treatment of cultured colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA enhances resistance to infection by the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Together, our observations suggest that maternally provided HA stimulates protective antimicrobial defense in the newborn. PMID:23950179

  1. Homeostatic capabilities of the choroid plexus epithelium in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan John

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As the secretory source of vitamins, peptides and hormones for neurons, the choroid plexus (CP epithelium critically provides substances for brain homeostasis. This distributive process of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF volume transmission reaches many cellular targets in the CNS. In ageing and ageing-related dementias, the CP-CSF system is less able to regulate brain interstitial fluid. CP primarily generates CSF bulk flow, and so its malfunctioning exacerbates Alzheimers disease (AD. Considerable attention has been devoted to the blood-brain barrier in AD, but more insight is needed on regulatory systems at the human blood-CSF barrier in order to improve epithelial function in severe disease. Using autopsied CP specimens from AD patients, we immunocytochemically examined expression of heat shock proteins (HSP90 and GRP94, fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFr and a fluid-regulatory protein (NaK2Cl cotransporter isoform 1 or NKCC1. CP upregulated HSP90, FGFr and NKCC1, even in end-stage AD. These CP adjustments involve growth factors and neuropeptides that help to buffer perturbations in CNS water balance and metabolism. They shed light on CP-CSF system responses to ventriculomegaly and the altered intracranial pressure that occurs in AD and normal pressure hydrocephalus. The ability of injured CP to express key regulatory proteins even at Braak stage V/VI, points to plasticity and function that may be boosted by drug treatment to expedite CSF dynamics. The enhanced expression of human CP 'homeostatic proteins' in AD dementia is discussed in relation to brain deficits and pharmacology.

  2. The ultrastructure of the midgut epithelium in millipedes (Myriapoda, Diplopoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosinka, A; Rost-Roszkowska, M M; Vilimova, J; Tajovský, K; Kszuk-Jendrysik, M; Chajec, Ł; Sonakowska, L; Kamińska, K; Hyra, M; Poprawa, I

    2014-09-01

    The midgut epithelia of the millipedes Polyxenus lagurus, Archispirostreptus gigas and Julus scandinavius were analyzed under light and transmission electron microscopies. In order to detect the proliferation of regenerative cells, labeling with BrdU and antibodies against phosphohistone H3 were employed. A tube-shaped midgut of three millipedes examined spreads along the entire length of the middle region of the body. The epithelium is composed of digestive, secretory and regenerative cells. The digestive cells are responsible for the accumulation of metals and the reserve material as well as the synthesis of substances, which are then secreted into the midgut lumen. The secretions are of three types - merocrine, apocrine and microapocrine. The oval or pear-like shaped secretory cells do not come into contact with the midgut lumen and represent the closed type of secretory cells. They possess many electron-dense granules (J. scandinavius) or electron-dense granules and electron-lucent vesicles (A. gigas, P. lagurus), which are accompanied by cisterns of the rough endoplasmic reticulum. The regenerative cells are distributed individually among the basal regions of the digestive cells. The proliferation and differentiation of regenerative cells into the digestive cells occurred in J. scandinavius and A. gigas, while these processes were not observed in P. lagurus. As a result of the mitotic division of regenerative cells, one of the newly formed cells fulfills the role of a regenerative cell, while the second one differentiates into a digestive cell. We concluded that regenerative cells play the role of unipotent midgut stem cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Rectification of oxygen transfer through the rat colonic epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraví, Fernando D; Carra, Graciela E; Matus, Daniel A; Ibáñez, Jorge E

    2017-05-15

    To assess whether higher sensitivity of colonic epithelium to hypoxia at the serosal side is associated with oxygen transfer asymmetry. Rats were fed either with normal chow or a low-sodium diet. Tissues were mounted as flat sheets in a modified, airtight Ussing chamber with oxygen meters in each hemichamber. Mucosal samples from normal diet animals were studied under control conditions, in low-chloride solution and after adding chloride secretion inhibitors and chloride secretagogues. Samples from sodium-deprived rats were studied before and after ouabain addition. In separate experiments, the correlation between short-circuit current and oxygen consumption was analyzed. Finally, hypoxia was induced in one hemichamber to assess the relationship between its oxygen content and the oxygen pressure difference between both hemichambers. In all studied conditions, oxygen consumption was larger in the serosal hemichamber than in the mucosal one (P = 0.0025 to P circuit current showed significant correlation with both total oxygen consumption (r = 0.765; P = 0.009) in normoxia and oxygen consumption in the serosal hemichamber (r = 0.754; P = 0.011) during mucosal hypoxia, but not with oxygen consumption in the mucosal hemichamber. When hypoxia was induced in the mucosal hemichamber, an oxygen pressure difference of 13 kPa with the serosal hemichamber was enough to keep its oxygen content constant. However, when hypoxia was induced in the serosal hemichamber, the oxygen pressure difference with the mucosal hemichamber necessary to keep its oxygen content constant was 40 kPa (P circuit current. This may be partly due to a rectifying behavior of transepithelial oxygen transfer.

  4. [Mathematical Modeling of the Stretching-induced Elongation of an Embryonic Epithelium Layer in the Absence of External Load].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logvenkov, S A; Stein, A A

    2015-01-01

    A clue to understanding the deformation of a plane embryonic epithelium layer unloaded after a short time uniaxial stretch and fixation in a stretched state over different time periods is found. The first steps in the understanding of this process come from the knowledge about the uniform stretching of the tissue fragment (explantate) with the subsequent stretching at a fixed length. In this study we used the earlier developed continuum model that describes the stress-strain state of the epithelial tissue taking into account the parameters that characterize the shape of the cells and their stress state, and also the active stresses they exert when interact with one another. The experimentally observed continuation of deformation of the stretched tissue after the cessation of action of the external force is described theoretically as a result of active cell reactions to the mechanical stress. The strong effect of the duration of explantate fixation on its further elongation and the cell activity pattern is demonstrated.

  5. [Cytological and cytogenetic studies of cells of Mongolian gerbils' retinal epithelium and marrow following 12-day space flight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorozhtsova, S V; Abrosimova, A N; Fedorenko, B S; Rakov, D V

    2011-01-01

    The paper report the results of studying mitotic activity and cytogenetic disorders in marrow and retinal epithelium cells of Mongolian gerbils in 21 - 23 hrs. of landing space apparatus Foton-M3, and the animals of synchronous and vivarium controls. Cells of the space flown gerbils displayed a statistically significant (p vivarium controls, where the ratio made up 0.6 +/- 0.1 and 0.7 +/- 0.1, respectively. Frequency of aberrant mytoses in the form of bridges was increased equally in both types of cells. Patterns of chromosome damages occurred in flight infer that the major portion of changes was not due to chromosome breakage but adhesion and ensuing wrong disjunction. These results seem to have been caused by acute g-stress to organism during re-entry and return from micro-g to the normal gravity.

  6. Anterior lens epithelium in cataract patients with retinitis pigmentosa - scanning and transmission electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelic, Sofija; Drašlar, Kazimir; Hvala, Anastazija; Hawlina, Marko

    2017-05-01

    In retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients, relatively minor lens opacity in central part of posterior pole of the lens may cause disproportionate functional symptoms requiring cataract operation. To investigate the possible structural reasons for this opacity development, we studied the structure of the lens epithelium of patients with RP. The anterior lens capsule (aLC: basement membrane and associated lens epithelial cells, LECs) was obtained from cataract surgery and prepared for scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Both SEM and TEM show a number of abnormal features in the anterior lens epithelium of cataract patients with RP. The abnormalities appear mainly as holes, thinning and degradation of the epithelium, with the dimensions from cataractous lens. We suggest that the lens epithelium has a role in the development of the cataract in patients with RP. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Transport mechanism of lipid covered saquinavir pure drug nanoparticles in intestinal epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Dengning; He, Yuan; Li, Qiuxia

    2018-01-01

    Pure drug nanoparticles (NPs) represent a promising formulation for improved drug solubility and controlled dissolution velocity. However, limited absorption by the intestinal epithelium remains challenge to their clinical application, and little is known about how these NPs within the cells...

  8. MODULAR APPLICATION OF COMPUTATIONAL MODELS OF INHALED REACTIVE GAS DOSIMETRY FOR RISK ASSESSMENT OF RESPIRATORY TRACT TOXICITY: CHLORINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhaled reactive gases typically cause respiratory tract toxicity with a prominent proximal to distal lesion pattern. This pattern is largely driven by airflow and interspecies differences between rodents and humans result from factors such as airway architecture, ventilation ra...

  9. Scale morphology of Prochilodus lineatus with emphasis on the scale epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    RMS. Alves; BF. Pereira; DL. Pitol; JA. Senhorini; RCG. Alcântara-Rocha; FH. Caetano

    2013-01-01

    The fish body is entirely covered by a thin, smooth and glandular epidermis, closely attached to the scales inserted on the dermis. The descriptive work on this tissue dates to twenty or thirty years ago, bears very little photographic record and does not focus on the scale epithelium, despite the fact that it is in direct contact with the environment. Thereupon, the present study characterizes the scale epithelium of Prochilodus lineatus, a robust species of fish. The observations show that ...

  10. Discrete movements of foot epithelium during adhesive locomotion of a land snail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrakowski, Tomasz; Kaczorowski, Piotr; Pawłowicz, Wojciech; Ziółkowski, Marcin; Smuszkiewicz, Piotr; Trojanowska, Iwona; Marszałek, Andrzej; Zebrowska, Małgorzata; Lutowska, Monika; Kopczyńska, Ewa; Lampka, Magdalena; Hołyńska-Iwan, Iga; Piskorska, Elzbieta

    2012-01-01

    During the adhesive locomotion of land snails a series of short dark transverse bands, called pedal or foot waves, is visible ifa moving snail's ventral surface is observed through a sheet of glass. Moreover, the mucus secreted from the pedal glands and some pedal epithelial cells forms a thin layer which acts as a glue augmenting adherence, while also acting as a lubricant under the moving parts of the snail's foot. The relationships between velocity and the frequency of pedal waves as well as changes in the volume of small air bubbles under foot waves were analyzed by means of digital recordings made through a glass sheet on which the snails were moving. On the ventral surface of a moving snail foot, the adhering parts of the foot constituted about 80% of the total area, while several moving parts only about 20%. The single moving region of the foot (the pedal wave) amounted to about 3% of snail length. The epithelium in the region of the pedal wave was arched above the substrate and was also more wrinkled than the stationary epithelium, which enabled the forward motion of each specific point of epithelium during the passage of a pedal wave above it. The actual area of epithelium engaged by a pedal wave was at least 30% greater than the area of the epithelium as recorded through a glass sheet. In the region of the pedal wave, the tiny subepithelial muscles acting on the epithelium move it up in the front part of the wave, and then down at the end of the wave, operating vertically in relation to the substrate. In the middle part of the wave, the epithelium only moves forward. In summary, during the adhesive locomotion of snails, the horizontal movement of the ventral surface epithelium proceeds as temporally separate phases of upward, forward and downward movement.

  11. Mechanisms and Treatment of Deployment-Related Lung Injury: Repair of the Injured Epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-2-0018 TITLE: Mechanisms and Treatment of Deployment-Related Lung Injury: Repair of the Injured Epithelium PRINCIPAL...AND SUBTITLE Mechanisms and Treatment of Deployment-Related Lung Injury: Repair of the Injured Epithelium 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...initial experiments confirm our preliminary data that pretreatment with PM from Iraq or Afghanistan (5- 10 µg/cm2) significantly delay wound closure in

  12. Acinar cell cystadenoma of the pancreas: a benign neoplasm or non-neoplastic ballooning of acinar and ductal epithelium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Aatur D; Norwood, Stephanie; Liu, Ta-Chiang; Sharma, Rajni; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Schulick, Richard D; Zeh, Herbert J; Hruban, Ralph H

    2013-09-01

    Acinar cell cystadenoma (ACA) of the pancreas was initially described as a non-neoplastic cyst of the pancreas and, at that time, referred to as "acinar cystic transformation." In subsequent studies, these lesions were given the designation of "-oma," despite the relative lack of evidence supporting a neoplastic process. To characterize these lesions further, we examined the clinical, pathologic, and immunohistochemical features of 8 ACAs. The majority of patients were female (7 of 8, 88%) and ranged in age from 18 to 57 years (mean, 43 y). Grossly, the cysts involved the head (n=5), body (n=1), or the entire pancreas (n=2). ACAs were either multilocular (n=4) or unilocular (n=4) and ranged in size from 1.8 to 15 cm (mean, 6.8 cm). Histologically, multilocular ACAs were lined by patches of acinar and ductal epithelium. Immunolabeling, including double-labeling for cytokeratin 19 and chymotrypsin, highlighted the patchy pattern of the ductal and acinar cells lining the cysts. In some areas, the cysts with patches of acinar and ductal differentiation formed larger locules with incomplete septa as they appeared to fuse with other cysts. In contrast, the unilocular cases were lined by 1 to 2 cell layers of acinar cells with little intervening ductal epithelium. Nuclear atypia, mitotic figures, necrosis, infiltrative growth, and associated invasive carcinoma were absent in all cases. In addition, we assessed the clonal versus polyclonal nature of ACAs, occurring in women, using X-chromosome inactivation analysis of the human androgen receptor (AR) gene. Five of 7 cases were informative and demonstrated a random X-chromosome inactivation pattern. Clinical follow-up information was available for all patients, and follow-up ranged from 10 months to 7.8 years (mean, 3.6 y), with no evidence of recurrence or malignant transformation. We hypothesize that early lesions are marked by acinar dilatation that expands into and incorporates smaller ductules and later larger ducts

  13. Changes of Respiratory Mechanics in COPD Patients from Stable State to Acute Exacerbations with Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriana, Piero; Vitacca, Michele; Carlucci, Annalisa; Paneroni, Mara; Pisani, Lara; Nava, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Symptoms, clinical course, functional and biological data during an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (EXCOPD) have been investigated, but data on physiological changes of respiratory mechanics during a severe exacerbation with respiratory acidosis requiring noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) are scant. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes of respiratory mechanics in COPD patients comparing data observed during EXCOPD with those observed during stable state in the recovery phase. In 18 COPD patients having severe EXCOPD requiring NIMV for global respiratory failure, we measured respiratory mechanics during both EXCOPD (T0) and once the patients achieved a stable state (T1). The diaphragm and inspiratory muscles effort was significantly increased under relapse, as well as the pressure-time product of the diaphragm and the inspiratory muscle (PTPdi and PTPes). The resistive loads to breathe (i.e., PEEPi,dyn, compliance and inspiratory resistances) were also markedly increased, while the maximal pressures generated by the diaphragm and the inspiratory muscles, together with forced expired volumes were decreased. All these indices statistically improved but with a great intrasubject variability in stable condition. Moreover, tension-time index (TTdi) significantly improved from the EXCOPD state to the condition of clinical stability (0.156 ± 0.04 at T0 vs. 0.082 ± 0.02 at T1 p respiratory pump is impaired, and although the patients exhibit a rapid shallow breathing pattern, this does not necessarily correlate with a TTdi ≥ 0.15. These changes are reverted once they recover from the EXCOPD, despite a large variability between patients.

  14. Topographical organization of TRPV1-immunoreactive epithelium and CGRP-immunoreactive nerve terminals in rodent tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kawashima

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1 is activated by capsaicin, acid, and heat and mediates pain through peripheral nerves. In the tongue, TRPV1 expression has been reported also in the epithelium. This indicates a possibility that sensation is first received by the epithelium. However, how nerves receive sensations from the epithelium remains unclear. To clarify the anatomical basis of this interaction, we performed immunohistochemical studies in the rodent tongue to detect TRPV1 and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, a neural marker. Strong expression of TRPV1 in the epithelium was observed and was restricted to the apex of the tongue. Double immunohistochemical staining revealed that CGRP-expressing nerve terminals were in close apposition to the strongly TRPV1-expressing epithelium of fungiform papilla in the apex of rodent tongues. These results suggest that the TRPV1-expressing epithelium monitors the oral environment and acquired information may then be conducted to the adjacent CGRPexpressing terminals.

  15. Ciliated Cells of Pseudostratified Airway Epithelium Do Not Become Mucous Cells after Ovalbumin Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Law, Brandon M.; Gonzalez-Celeiro, Meryem; Vinarsky, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Mucous cell metaplasia is a hallmark of airway diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The majority of human airway epithelium is pseudostratified, but the cell of origin of mucous cells has not been definitively established in this type of airway epithelium. There is evidence that ciliated, club cell (Clara), and basal cells can all give rise to mucus-producing cells in different contexts. Because pseudostratified airway epithelium contains distinct progenitor cells from simple columnar airway epithelium, the lineage relationships of progenitor cells to mucous cells may be different in these two epithelial types. We therefore performed lineage tracing of the ciliated cells of the murine basal cell–containing airway epithelium in conjunction with the ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine model of allergic lung disease. We genetically labeled ciliated cells with enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein (eYFP) before the allergen challenge, and followed the fate of these cells to determine whether they gave rise to newly formed mucous cells. Although ciliated cells increased in number after the OVA challenge, the newly formed mucous cells were not labeled with the eYFP lineage tag. Even small numbers of labeled mucous cells could not be detected, implying that ciliated cells make virtually no contribution to the new goblet cell pool. This demonstrates that, after OVA challenge, new mucous cells do not originate from ciliated cells in a pseudostratified basal cell–containing airway epithelium. PMID:23239495

  16. Cultivated Oral Mucosa Epithelium in Ocular Surface Reconstruction in Aniridia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Orzechowska-Wylegala, Boguslawa; Wowra, Bogumil; Wroblewska-Czajka, Ewa; Grolik, Maria; Szczubialka, Krzysztof; Nowakowska, Maria; Puzzolo, Domenico; Wylegala, Edward A; Micali, Antonio; Aragona, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Efficacy of cultivated oral mucosa epithelial transplantation (COMET) procedure in corneal epithelium restoration of aniridia patients. Study subjects were aniridia patients (13 patients; 17 eyes) with irregular, vascular conjunctival pannus involving visual axis who underwent autologous transplantation of cultivated epithelium. For the procedure oral mucosa epithelial cells were obtained from buccal mucosa with further enzymatic treatment. Suspension of single cells was seeded on previously prepared denuded amniotic membrane. Cultures were carried on culture dishes inserts in the presence of the inactivated with Mitomycin C monolayer of 3T3 fibroblasts. Cultures were carried for seven days. Stratified oral mucosa epithelium with its amniotic membrane carrier was transplanted on the surgically denuded corneal surface of aniridia patients with total or subtotal limbal stem cell deficiency. Outcome Measures. Corneal surface, epithelial regularity, and visual acuity improvement were evaluated. At the end of the observation period, 76.4% of the eyes had regular transparent epithelium and 23.5% had developed epithelial defects or central corneal haze; in 88.2% of cases visual acuity had increased. VA range was from HM 0.05 before the surgery to HM up to 0.1 after surgery. Application of cultivated oral mucosa epithelium restores regular epithelium on the corneal surface with moderate improvement in quality of vision.

  17. Usefulness of GATA-3 as a marker of seminal epithelium in prostate biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rey, J A; Chantada-de la Fuente, D; Peteiro-Cancelo, M Á; Gómez-de María, C; San Miguel-Fraile, M P

    2017-11-01

    The incidental presence of seminal vesicle epithelium in prostate needle biopsies is generally recognisable through routine microscopy. However, the biopsy can sometimes be erroneously interpreted as malignant due to its architectural and cytological characteristics, and immunohistochemistry can be useful for correctly identifying the biopsy. Our objective was to analyse the potential usefulness of GATA-3 as a marker of seminal epithelium. Through immunohistochemistry with a monoclonal anti-GATA-3 antibody (clone L50-823), we studied seminal vesicle sections from 20 prostatectomy specimens, 12 prostate needle biopsies that contained seminal vesicle tissue and 68 prostate biopsies without seminal vesicle epithelium, 36 of which showed adenocarcinoma. Staining for GATA-3 was intense in the 20 seminal vesicles of the prostatectomy specimens and in the 12 prostate needle biopsies that contained seminal epithelium. In the 60 biopsies without a seminal vesicle, GATA-3 was positive in the prostate basal cells and even in the secretory cells (57 cases), although with less intensity in 55 of the cases. One of the 36 prostatic adenocarcinomas tested positive for GATA-3. The intense immunohistochemical expression of GATA-3 in the seminal vesicle epithelium can help identify the epithelium in prostate biopsies. This marker is also positive in the basal cells of healthy prostates and, with less intensity, in the secretory cells. Positivity, weak or moderate, is observed on rare occasions in prostatic adenocarcinomas. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Cultivated Oral Mucosa Epithelium in Ocular Surface Reconstruction in Aniridia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Dobrowolski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Efficacy of cultivated oral mucosa epithelial transplantation (COMET procedure in corneal epithelium restoration of aniridia patients. Methods. Study subjects were aniridia patients (13 patients; 17 eyes with irregular, vascular conjunctival pannus involving visual axis who underwent autologous transplantation of cultivated epithelium. For the procedure oral mucosa epithelial cells were obtained from buccal mucosa with further enzymatic treatment. Suspension of single cells was seeded on previously prepared denuded amniotic membrane. Cultures were carried on culture dishes inserts in the presence of the inactivated with Mitomycin C monolayer of 3T3 fibroblasts. Cultures were carried for seven days. Stratified oral mucosa epithelium with its amniotic membrane carrier was transplanted on the surgically denuded corneal surface of aniridia patients with total or subtotal limbal stem cell deficiency. Outcome Measures. Corneal surface, epithelial regularity, and visual acuity improvement were evaluated. Results. At the end of the observation period, 76.4% of the eyes had regular transparent epithelium and 23.5% had developed epithelial defects or central corneal haze; in 88.2% of cases visual acuity had increased. VA range was from HM 0.05 before the surgery to HM up to 0.1 after surgery. Conclusion. Application of cultivated oral mucosa epithelium restores regular epithelium on the corneal surface with moderate improvement in quality of vision.

  19. Paediatric respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L. Everard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary infections remain a major cause of infant and child mortality worldwide and are responsible for a substantial burden of morbidity. During the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, some of the main findings from peer-reviewed articles addressing this topic that were published in the preceding 12 months were reviewed in a Paediatric Clinical Year in Review session. The following article highlights some of the insights provided by these articles into the complex interactions of the human host with the extensive and dynamic populations of microorganisms that call an individual “home”.

  20. Paediatric respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Mark L

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary infections remain a major cause of infant and child mortality worldwide and are responsible for a substantial burden of morbidity. During the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, some of the main findings from peer-reviewed articles addressing this topic that were published in the preceding 12 months were reviewed in a Paediatric Clinical Year in Review session. The following article highlights some of the insights provided by these articles into the complex interactions of the human host with the extensive and dynamic populations of microorganisms that call an individual "home". Copyright ©ERS 2016.