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Sample records for respective interaction effect

  1. Ethanol and phencyclidine interact with respect to nucleus accumbens dopamine release: differential effects of administration order and pretreatment protocol

    Chris Pickering

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Executive dysfunction is a common symptom among alcohol-dependent individuals. Phencyclidine (PCP injection induces dysfunction in the prefrontal cortex of animals but little is known about how PCP affects the response to ethanol. Using the in vivo microdialysis technique in male Wistar rats, we investigated how systemic injection of 5 mg/kg PCP would affect the dopamine release induced by local infusion of 300 mM ethanol into the nucleus accumbens. PCP given 60 min before ethanol entirely blocked ethanol-induced dopamine release. However, when ethanol was administered 60 min before PCP, both drugs induced dopamine release and PCP’s effect was potentiated by ethanol (180% increase vs 150%. To test the role of prefrontal cortex dysfunction in ethanol reinforcement, animals were pre-treated for 5 days with 2.58 mg/kg PCP according to previously used ‘PFC hypofunction protocols’. This, however, did not change the relative response to PCP or ethanol compared to saline-treated controls. qPCR illustrated that this PCP dose did not significantly change expression of glucose transporters Glut1 (SLC2A1 or Glut3 (SLC2A3, monocarboxylate transporter MCT2 (SLC16A7, glutamate transporters GLT-1 (SLC1A2 or GLAST (SLC1A3, the immediate early gene Arc (Arg3.1 or GABAergic neuron markers GAT-1 (SLC6A1 and parvalbumin. Therefore, we concluded that PCP at a dose of 2.58 mg/kg for 5 days did not induce hypofunction in Wistar rats. However, PCP and ethanol do have overlapping mechanisms of action and these drugs differentially affect mesolimbic dopaminergic transmission depending on the order of administration.

  2. RESPECT

    Teyeb, Oumer; Boussif, Malek; Sørensen, Troels Bundgaard

    2005-01-01

    the performance from an end-2-end (E2E), user-perceived Quality Of Service (QoS) point of view. In this paper, the design and implementation of RESPECT, an easily configurable network emulator is described. RESPECT was originally geared towards Universal Mobile Communications System (UMTS) networks, but thanks...... to its modular and scalable design, it is being extended for generic heterogeneous networks. Using RESPECT, QoS studies can be carried out to study the behavior of different services in different network conditions, identify generalized service dependent performance metrics for already existing services...

  3. The effects of mineral nitrogen limitation, competition, arbuscular mycorrhiza, and their respective interactions, on morphological and chemical plant traits of Plantago lanceolata.

    Pankoke, Helga; Höpfner, Ingo; Matuszak, Agnieszka; Beyschlag, Wolfram; Müller, Caroline

    2015-10-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that suffer from a multitude of challenges such as abiotic stress or the interactions with competitors, antagonists and symbionts, which influence their performance as well as their eco-physiological and biochemical responses in complex ways. In particular, the combination of different stressors and their impact on plant biomass production and the plant's ability to metabolically adjust to these challenges are less well understood. To study the effects of mineral nitrogen (N) availability, interspecific competition and the association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on biomass production, biomass allocation patterns (root/shoot ratio, specific leaf area) and metabolic responses, we chose the model organism Plantago lanceolata L. (Plantaginaceae). Plants were grown in a full factorial experiment. Biomass production and its allocation patterns were assessed at harvest, and the influence of the different treatments and their interactions on the plant metabolome were analysed using a metabolic fingerprinting approach with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. Limited supply of mineral N caused the most pronounced changes with respect to plant biomass and biomass allocation patterns, and altered the concentrations of more than one third of the polar plant metabolome. Competition also impaired plant biomass production, yet affected the plant metabolome to a much lesser extent than limited mineral N supply. The interaction of competition and limited mineral N supply often caused additive changes on several traits. The association with AMF did not enhance biomass production, but altered biomass allocation patterns such as the root/shoot ratio and the specific leaf area. Interestingly, we did not find significant changes in the plant metabolome caused by AMF. A targeted analysis revealed that only limited mineral N supply reduced the concentrations of one of the main target defence

  4. Evaluation of the dynamic responses of high rise buildings with respect to the direct methods for soil-foundation-structure interaction effects and comparison with the approximate methods

    Jahangir Khazaei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In dynamic analysis, modeling of soil medium is ignored because of the infinity and complexity of the soil behavior and so the important effects of these terms are neglected, while the behavior of the soil under the structure plays an important role in the response of the structure during an earthquake. In fact, the soil layers and soil foundation structure interaction phenomena can increase the applied seismic forces during earthquakes that has been examined with different methods. In this paper, effects of soil foundation structure interaction on a steel high rise building has been modeled using Abaqus software for nonlinear dynamic analysis with finite element direct method and simulation of infinite boundary condition for soil medium and also approximate Cone model. In the direct method, soil, structure and foundation are modeled altogether. In other hand, for using Cone model as a simple model, dynamic stiffness coefficients have been employed to simulate soil with considering springs and dashpots in all degree of freedom. The results show that considering soil foundation structure interaction cause increase in maximum lateral displacement of structure and the friction coefficient of soil-foundation interface can alter the responses of structure. It was also observed that the results of the approximate methods have good agreement for engineering demands.

  5. To be liked versus respected: Divergent goals in interracial interactions.

    Bergsieker, Hilary B; Shelton, J Nicole; Richeson, Jennifer A

    2010-08-01

    Pervasive representations of Blacks and Latinos as unintelligent and of Whites as racist may give rise to divergent impression management goals in interracial interactions. We present studies showing that in interracial interactions racial minorities seek to be respected and seen as competent more than Whites do, whereas Whites seek to be liked and seen as moral more than racial minorities do. These divergent impression management goals are reflected in Whites' and racial minorities' self-report responses (Studies 1a, 1b, 2, and 4) and behaviors (Studies 3a and 3b). Divergent goals are observed in pre-existing relationships (Study 2), as well as in live interactions (Studies 3a, 3b, and 4), and are associated with higher levels of negative other-directed affect (Study 4). Implications of these goals for interracial communication and misunderstandings are discussed.

  6. Effective interactions

    Elliott, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    This chapter attempts to describe and compare some of the more important nucleon-nucleon interactions that have been used in nuclear structure calculations, and to relate them where possible to the real nucleon-nucleon interaction. Explains that different interactions have been used depending on whether one is fitting to total binding energies and densities with a Hartree Fock (HF) calculation or fitting to spectra and spectroscopic data in a shell model calculation. Examines both types of calculation after two preliminary sections concerned with notation and with the philosophy underlying the use of model spaces and effective interactions. Discusses Skyrme interactions, finite range interactions, small model space, large model space, and the Sussex potential matrix elements. Focuses on the more empirical approaches in which a simple form is chosen for the effective interaction in a given model space and the parameters are deduced from fitting many-body data

  7. Respective effects of sodium and chloride ion on physiological ...

    Respective effects of sodium and chloride ion on growth, cell morphological changes, membrane disorganization, ion homeostasis, exoenzyme activities and fermentation performance in Zymomonas mobilis232B cultures were presented. In batch cultures containing 0.15 M NaCl, Z. mobilis232B developed filaments, and ...

  8. Investigation of human teeth with respect to the photon interaction, energy absorption and buildup factor

    Kurudirek, Murat, E-mail: mkurudirek@gmail.co [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Topcuoglu, Sinan [Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Endodontic, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2011-05-15

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of human teeth have been calculated for total photon interaction (Z{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}},Ne{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}}) and photon energy absorption (Z{sub PEA{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}},Z{sub RW{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}}Ne{sub PEA{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}}) in the energy region 1 keV-20 MeV. Besides, the energy absorption (EABF) and exposure (EBF) buildup factors have been calculated for these samples by using the geometric progression fitting approximation in the energy region 0.015-15 MeV up to 40 mfp (mean free path). Wherever possible the results were compared with experiment. Effective atomic numbers (Z{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}}) of human teeth were calculated using different methods. Discrepancies were noted in Z{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}} between the direct and interpolation methods in the low and high energy regions where absorption processes dominate while good agreement was observed in intermediate energy region where Compton scattering dominates. Significant variations up to 22% were observed between Z{sub PI{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}} and Z{sub PEA{sub e{sub f{sub f}}}} in the energy region 30-150 keV which is the used energy range in dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) X-ray machines. The Z{sub eff} values of human teeth were found to relatively vary within 1% if different laser treatments are applied. In this variation, the Er:YAG laser treated samples were found to be less effected than Nd:YAG laser treated ones when compared with control group. Relative differences between EABF and EBF were found to be significantly high in the energy region 60 keV-1 MeV even though they have similar variations with respect to the different parameters viz. photon energy, penetration depth.

  9. Respective effects of sodium and chloride ion on physiological ...

    Manure

    strongly suggested that the inhibitory effects of growth, fermentation performance and morphology changes of Z. ... Cell growth was measured by monitoring the optical density of the ... The electronic conductivity was measured by the electrical.

  10. Density dependent effective interactions

    Dortmans, P.J.; Amos, K.

    1994-01-01

    An effective nucleon-nucleon interaction is defined by an optimal fit to select on-and half-off-of-the-energy shell t-and g-matrices determined by solutions of the Lippmann-Schwinger and Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone equations with the Paris nucleon-nucleon interaction as input. As such, it is seen to better reproduce the interaction on which it is based than other commonly used density dependent effective interactions. The new (medium modified) effective interaction when folded with appropriate density matrices, has been used to define proton- 12 C and proton- 16 O optical potentials. With them elastic scattering data are well fit and the medium effects identifiable. 23 refs., 8 figs

  11. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Chinese Comfort, Afford, Respect, and Expect scale of caring nurse-patient interaction competence.

    Chung, Hui-Chun; Hsieh, Tsung-Cheng; Chen, Yueh-Chih; Chang, Shu-Chuan; Hsu, Wen-Lin

    2017-11-29

    To investigate the construct validity and reliability of the Chinese Comfort, Afford, Respect, and Expect scale, which can be used to determine clinical nurses' competence. The results can also serve to promote nursing competence and improve patient satisfaction. Nurse-patient interaction is critical for improving nursing care quality. However, to date, no relevant validated instrument has been proposed for assessing caring nurse-patient interaction competence in clinical practice. This study adapted and validated the Chinese version of the caring nurse-patient interaction scale. A cross-cultural adaptation and validation study. A psychometric analysis of the four major constructs of the Chinese Comfort, Afford, Respect, and Expect scale was conducted on a sample of 356 nurses from a medical centre in China. Item analysis and exploratory factor analysis were adopted to extract the main components, both the internal consistency and correlation coefficients were used to examine reliability and a confirmatory factor analysis was adopted to verify the construct validity. The goodness-of-fit results of the model were strong. The standardised factor loadings of the Chinese Comfort, Afford, Respect, and Expect scale ranged from 0.73-0.95, indicating that the validity and reliability of this instrument were favourable. Moreover, the 12 extracted items explained 95.9% of the measured content of the Chinese Comfort, Afford, Respect, and Expect scale. The results serve as empirical evidence regarding the validity and reliability of the Chinese Comfort, Afford, Respect, and Expect scale. Hospital nurses increasingly demand help from patients and their family members in identifying health problems and assisting with medical decision-making. Therefore, enhancing nurses' competence in nurse-patient interactions is crucial for nursing and hospital managers to improve nursing care quality. The Chinese caring nurse-patient interaction scale can serve as an effective tool for nursing

  12. Spectroscopic analyses and studies on respective interaction of cyanuric acid and uric acid with bovine serum albumin and melamine

    Chen, Dandan; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Wang, Qi; Qiao, Heng

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the fluorescence quenching was used to study the interaction of cyanuric acid (CYA) and uric acid (UA) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) at two different temperatures (283 K and 310 K). The bimolecular quenching constant (Kq), apparent quenching constant (Ksv), effective binding constant (KA) and corresponding dissociation constant (KD), binding site number (n) and binding distance (r) were calculated by adopting Stern-Volmer, Lineweaver-Burk, Double logarithm and overlap integral equations. The results show that CYA and UA are both able to obviously bind to BSA, but the binding strength order is BSA + CYA < BSA + UA. And then, the interactions of CYA and UA with melamine (MEL) under the same conditions were also studied by using similar methods. The results indicates that both CYA and UA can bind together closely with melamine (MEL). It is wished that these research results would facilitate the understanding the formation of kidney stones and gout in the body after ingesting excess MEL.

  13. Effectiveness of physical activity programs at worksites with respect to work-related outcomes

    Proper, K.I.; Staal, B.J.; Hildebrandt, V.H.; Beek, A.J. van der; Mechelen, W. van

    2002-01-01

    This paper systematically reviews the literature on the effectiveness of physical activity programs at worksites with respect to work-related outcomes. A computerized literature search, a reference search, and a manual search of personal databases were performed using the following inclusion

  14. Restricted Variance Interaction Effects

    Cortina, Jose M.; Köhler, Tine; Keeler, Kathleen R.

    2018-01-01

    Although interaction hypotheses are increasingly common in our field, many recent articles point out that authors often have difficulty justifying them. The purpose of this article is to describe a particular type of interaction: the restricted variance (RV) interaction. The essence of the RV int...

  15. The doormat effect: when forgiving erodes self-respect and self-concept clarity.

    Luchies, Laura B; Finkel, Eli J; McNulty, James K; Kumashiro, Madoka

    2010-05-01

    We build on principles from interdependence theory and evolutionary psychology to propose that forgiving bolsters one's self-respect and self-concept clarity if the perpetrator has acted in a manner that signals that the victim will be safe and valued in a continued relationship with the perpetrator but that forgiving diminishes one's self-respect and self-concept clarity if the perpetrator has not. Study 1 employed a longitudinal design to demonstrate that the association of marital forgiveness with trajectories of self-respect over the first 5 years of marriage depends on the spouse's dispositional tendency to indicate that the partner will be safe and valued (i.e., agreeableness). Studies 2 and 3 employed experimental procedures to demonstrate that the effects of forgiveness on self-respect and self-concept clarity depend on the perpetrator's event-specific indication that the victim will be safe and valued (i.e., amends). Study 4 employed a longitudinal design to demonstrate that the association of forgiveness with subsequent self-respect and self-concept clarity similarly depends on the extent to which the perpetrator has made amends. These studies reveal that, under some circumstances, forgiveness negatively impacts the self. 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  16. Dose effect comparisons between HFR and BMRR irradiated dogs with respect to healthy tissue tolerance

    Huiskamp, R.; Philipp, K.H.I.; Gavin, P.R.; Wheeler, F.J.; Siefert, A.

    1993-01-01

    Epithermal neutron beams are being developed for the application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of deep seated tumors, like glioblastoma and astrocytomas, through the intact skin. Epithermal neutrons will be moderated by the tissue mass between skin and tumour to produce the thermal neutrons necessary for the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction in the target tissue. Although the neutron capture cross-sections of elements in normal tissue are several orders of magnitude lower that for boron, the high abundance of hydrogen and nitrogen will cause a significant contribution to the total absorbed radiation dose through the 1 H(n,γ) 2 H and the 14 N(n,p) 14 C reaction, respectively. Due to inevitable incomplete filtration, an epithermal beam will also contain a fast neutron component, i.e. neutrons with energies ≥ 10 keV, and a γ-photon component originating from the reactor and produced in structural and filter materials. Therefore, the resultant radiation consists of a complex of low and high LET radiation of which the constitutents vary rapidly with depth in tissue. Based on the ongoing canine healthy tissue tolerance study at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) using the epithermal beam without BSH, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the fast neutron beam component has been determined for skin reactions. In addition, a open-quotes compound factorclose quotes, i.e geometry x RBE, for the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction was derived for dogs irradiated at the BMRR with the epithermal beam and BSH (Gavin et al.). Currently, a healthy tissue tolerance study with BSH is being carried out at the HB11 epithermal beam of the High Flux Reactor at Petten. The present paper describes preliminary dose effect comparisons between High Flux Reactor (HFR) and BMRR irradiated dogs with respect to healthy tissue tolerance in order to refine the BSH compound factors and the fast neutron RBE for skin and brain

  17. Respective Functions of Two Distinct Siwi Complexes Assembled during PIWI-Interacting RNA Biogenesis in Bombyx Germ Cells

    Kazumichi M. Nishida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA biogenesis consists of two sequential steps: primary piRNA processing and the ping-pong cycle that depends on reciprocal Slicer-mediated RNA cleavage by PIWI proteins. However, the molecular functions of the factors involved remain elusive. Here, we show that RNAs cleaved by a Bombyx mori PIWI, Siwi, remain bound to the protein upon cleavage but are released by a DEAD box protein BmVasa. BmVasa copurifies with Siwi but not another PIWI BmAgo3. A lack of BmVasa does not affect primary piRNA processing but abolishes the ping-pong cycle. Siwi also forms a complex with BmSpn-E and BmQin. This complex is physically separable from the Siwi/BmVasa complex. BmSpn-E, unlike BmVasa, is necessary for primary piRNA production. We propose a model for piRNA biogenesis, where the BmSpn-E/BmQin dimer binds Siwi to function in primary piRNA processing, whereas BmVasa, by associating with Siwi, ensures target RNA release upon cleavage to facilitate the ping-pong cycle.

  18. Iterative approach to effective interactions in nuclei

    Heiss, W.D.

    1982-01-01

    Starting from a non-linear equation for the effective interaction in a model space, various iteration procedures converge to a correct solution irrespective of the presence of intruder states. The physical significance of the procedures and the respective solution is discussed

  19. Critical Analysis of an e-Learning and Interactive Teaching Module with Respect to the Interpretation of Emergency Computed Tomography of the Brain.

    Groth, Michael; Barthe, Käthe Greta; Riemer, Martin; Ernst, Marielle; Herrmann, Jochen; Fiehler, Jens; Buhk, Jan-Hendrik

    2018-04-01

     To compare the learning benefit of three different teaching strategies on the interpretation of emergency cerebral computed tomography (CT) pathologies by medical students.  Three groups of students with different types of teaching (e-learning, interactive teaching, and standard curricular education in neuroradiology) were tested with respect to the detection of seven CT pathologies. The test results of each group were compared for each CT pathology using the chi-square test. A p-value ≤ 0.05 was considered to be significant.  Opposed to the results of the comparison group (curricular education), the e-learning group and interactive teaching tutorial group both showed a significantly better performance in detecting hyperdense middle cerebral artery sign (p = 0.001 and p e-learning group, with statistical significance in the latter (p = 0.03 and p e-learning module group with respect to reading CT scans with slightly different advantages. Thus, the introduction of new learning methods in radiological education might be reasonable at an undergraduate stage but requires learning content-based considerations.   · E-learning can offer benefits regarding the reading of cerebral CT scans by students. · Interactive tutorial can offer benefits regarding the reading of cerebral CT scans by students. · E-learning and interactive tutorial feature different strengths for student learning in radiology. · Application of interactive teaching methods in radiology requires learning content-based considerations. · Groth M, Barthe KG, Riemer M et al. Critical Analysis of an e-Learning and Interactive Teaching Module with Respect to the Interpretation of Emergency Computed Tomography of the Brain. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 190: 334 - 340. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Radiation and their deleterious effects: special respect to X-ray

    Purohit, R.K.; Joshi, Pankaj Kumar; Basu, Arindam; Chakarwati, Aruna; Agarwal, Manisha

    2012-01-01

    Radiation have been influencing the living and non living systems on earth, since their evolution from simple, humble beginnings to diversely complex system of the present day biological world. Most of the radiations have been the basis for conduction and completion of vital life processes like photosynthesis which form the base and initiation point of flow of energy within the biological world. However there are some radiation called as ionizing radiation with energy content of more then 124 eV, which have the capacity to cause deleterious effects in livings system ranging from simple unicellular organisms to the large and complex animals and plants. The discovery of X-ray by William Conrad Roentgen in 1898 provided the originating point for radiation biology as a well defined discipline. Together with the discovery of X-ray radioactivity and new radioactive elements the biological effects of ionizing radiation began to be studied immediately after the discovery of X-ray. By the year 1896 press reports regarding the skin injuries involved skin erythemas and ulceration in persons who experienced the frequent and prolonged action of X-ray had appeared. By 1959, 359 radiologists were known to have died of X-ray induced cancer of skin or of leukemia. The deleterious effects of radiation on a large scale became evident when a large number of deaths, approximately 10,300 had occurred when USA dropped atom bomb on the Japanese towns of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, leaving about 80,000 persons injured. The effects of these two explosions are still evident in generation of today and also these twin incidents evoked awareness among the researchers to investigate the nature and effects of radiation which they cause in living beings. (author)

  1. Lead-lag effects between Brent Crude Futures and its respective spot prices

    Diego Garcia Angelico

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims the analyses of the causality and temporal precedence relationships between the spot and futures prices of Brent oil, those last ones inherent to financial markets. In order to achieve this objective, the main tools used were: Johansen cointegration test; Granger causality/Block Exogeneity Wald test (GCBEW; generalized impulse response function and variance decomposition of forecast errors, those three last ones were estimated based in a Vector Error Correction Model (VEC, adjusted to the analyzed variables. The results indicated that, for the stipulated period, there was a pricing lightweight leadership from the futures contracts to the prices of spot market. However, as a conclusion of the article, the understanding is that this small difference, calculated in several econometric tools, cannot be considered enough to indicate that the Brent oil future market would be distorting its respective spot prices, despite the economic fundamentals of the physical market, such as production, consumption and stockpiling processes. Therefore, management decisions in industries exposed to crude oil prices should be aware of both physical and future markets’ prospections.

  2. Nuclear reaction inputs based on effective interactions

    Hilaire, S.; Peru, S.; Dubray, N.; Dupuis, M.; Bauge, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Goriely, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, CP-226, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-11-15

    Extensive nuclear structure studies have been performed for decades using effective interactions as sole input. They have shown a remarkable ability to describe rather accurately many types of nuclear properties. In the early 2000 s, a major effort has been engaged to produce nuclear reaction input data out of the Gogny interaction, in order to challenge its quality also with respect to nuclear reaction observables. The status of this project, well advanced today thanks to the use of modern computers as well as modern nuclear reaction codes, is reviewed and future developments are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Irradiation induced creep in graphite with respect to the flux effect and the high fluence behaviour

    Cundy, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    In accelerated irradiation creep tests, performed in the HFR Petten, in a fast neutron flux of about 2x10 4 cm -2 s -1 and at temperatures of 300 and 500 0 C, a fast neutron fluence in excess of 20x10 21 cm -2 (EDN) has been attained so far. As a supplement to this, an analogous creep test was conducted in a fast neutron flux lower by a factor of four which is more typical for the service conditions in a HTR, with a maximum fast fluence of only 4x10 21 cm -2 (EDN). This experiment was aimed at answering the question if, for equal fast fluence, enhanced irradiation creep and Wigner dimensional change would take place in a reduced fast neutron flux. This problem has more generally been addressed to as the ''flux effect'' or the ''equivalent temperature concept''. (orig./IHOE)

  4. Mean stress sensitivity of ductile iron with respect to technological and statistical size effect considering defects

    Kainzinger Paul

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Specimens of two sizes have been taken from two sampling locations within a wind turbine hub made of nodular cast iron (EN-GJS-400-18-LT for constant amplitude fatigue testing. The sampling positions exhibit varying cooling conditions, resulting in different microstructures. Fatigue tests have been carried out at R-ratios of R = −1 and R = 0. The coarse microstructure as well as the larger specimens yielded in lower fatigue strengths. No effect of the microstructure or the specimen size on the mean stress sensitivity has been found. Fractographic analysis of the fractured specimen's surface revealed micro-shrinkages to be the source of crack initiation for all specimens. Micro-shrinkage size increases from fine to coarse microstructure and with increasing specimen size. The El-Haddad equation using the √area parameter was used to describe the fatigue limit. The results were in good agreement with the experiments.

  5. Effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation on bridging exercises with respect to deep muscle changes.

    Zhou, Bin; Huang, QiuChen; Zheng, Tao; Huo, Ming; Maruyama, Hitoshi

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of neuromuscular joint facilitation on bridging exercises by assessing the cross-sectional area of the multifidus muscle and thickness of the musculus transversus abdominis. [Subjects] Twelve healthy men. [Methods] Four exercises were evaluated: (a) supine resting, (b) bridging resistance exercise involving posterior pelvic tilting, (c) bridging resistance exercise involving anterior pelvic tilting, and (d) bridging resistance exercise involving neuromuscular joint facilitation. The cross-sectional area of the multifidus muscle and thickness of the musculus transversus abdominis were measured during each exercise. [Results] The cross-sectional area of the multifidus muscle and thickness of the musculus transversus abdominis were significantly greater in the neuromuscular joint facilitation group than the others. [Conclusion] Neuromuscular joint facilitation intervention improves the function of deep muscles such as the multifidus muscle and musculus transversus abdominis. Therefore, it can be recommended for application in clinical treatments such as that for back pain.

  6. The effect of dynamic stretching on hamstrings flexibility with respect to the spino-pelvic rhythm.

    Hasebe, Kiyotaka; Okubo, Yu; Kaneoka, Koji; Takada, Kohei; Suzuki, Daisuke; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    To ascertain the dynamic stretch effects of flexibility of the hamstrings on lumbar spine and pelvic kinematics. Tight hamstrings are positively correlated with low back pain. However, it is unclear how flexibility of the hamstrings affects spino-pelvic rhythm. Twelve healthy men participated in the study. The straight leg raising (SLR) angle, finger floor distance (FFD), and spino-pelvic rhythm was measured before and after the 6-week stretching protocol. The forward bending task was divided into 4 phases. The paired t-test was used to determine significant differences before and after the FFD, SLR angle, lumbar motion, and pelvic motion, and spino-pelvic rhythm in each phase (phamstrings are important for preventing low back pain.

  7. Effects of introducing heterologous pathways on microbial metabolism with respect to metabolic optimality

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Kim, Byoungjin; Seung, Do Young

    2014-01-01

    reactions are more frequently introduced into various microbial hosts. The genome-scale metabolic simulations of Escherichia coli strains engineered to produce 1,4-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, and amorphadiene suggest that microbial metabolism shows much different responses to the introduced heterologous...... reactions in a strain-specific manner than typical gene knockouts in terms of the energetic status (e.g., ATP and biomass generation) and chemical production capacity. The 1,4-butanediol and 1,3-propanediol producers showed greater metabolic optimality than the wild-type strains and gene knockout mutants...... for the energetic status, while the amorphadiene producer was metabolically less optimal. For the optimal chemical production capacity, additional gene knockouts were most effective for the strain producing 1,3-propanediol, but not for the one producing 1,4-butanediol. These observations suggest that strains having...

  8. Ionizing radiation effect on sensory changes in feeds with respect to their usability by dogs

    Smid, K.; Dvorak, J.; Hrusovsky, J.

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of ionizing radiatin on sensory changes in feeds, four groups of experimental animals were formed. Two groups were fed a ration where the main component (meat feed mixture VETACAN and loose feed mixture VETAVIT) was irradiated with 60 Co to a dose of 25 kGy/kg for a period of 90 days. In the remaining two groups a non-irradited ration was used for the same period. For both diets, control groups of dogs were formed and the feed ration was biologically fortified with a vitamin-mineral supplement to the physiological standard. The observations showed that the effect of radiation caused a significant qualitative decrease in the level of energy nutrients, particularly in proteins and lipids. It is assumed that the extent of damage of the lipid fraction is also accompanied by deficient vitamin activity and by significant changes in taste and aromatic properties felt by animals. Irradiation of the feed ration caused a significant 20 to 25% decrease in food intake with a subsequent decrease in live weight and deterioration of physical condition. Irradiated diets without biological fortification caused significant losses of weight from the initial value x-bar = 39.5 kg to x-bar = 35.33 kg, in comparison with the non-irradiated rations through which the live weight was stabilized, and at biological fortification positively influenced. Irradiation of the feed ration during the period of study did not cause a response of the organism displayed by changes in the pysiological values of body temperature and heart and respiration rates in experimental animals. Radiosterilization of feeds any significant decrease in training ability and performance of the dogs. (author)

  9. The effectiveness of the ELSY concept with respect to minor actinide transmutation capability

    Grasso, Giacomo; Rocchi, Federico; Sumini, Marco; Artioli, Carlo; Monti, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    The task of partitioning and transmutation (PT) aims at the sustainability of new global nuclear scenarios for energy production, required by a continuously growing demand. The nuclear renaissance boosted by the breaking need of a reduction in CO 2 emissions, together with increasing safety and security requirements, is creating a clear interest in the Generation-IV philosophy. In particular, an effective management of minor actinides (MA) and their multi-recycling in innovative fast spectrum systems can lead to a minimisation of high-level wastes (HLW) to be disposed of in geological repositories. This study presents a PT application based on the European Lead-cooled System (ELSY), the 600 MWe Gen-IV lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) under investigation in Europe within the 6. EURATOM Framework Programme. An 'adiabatic' core configuration is investigated here, for a system which can maintain a constant amount of both MA and plutonium during the whole fuel cycle, even without either axial or radial blankets. It is shown that an equilibrium concentration of MA exists, for which its production rate is exactly compensated by its transmutation rate. Any other concentration may enhance either their production or removal in such a way as to allow the system to evolve almost exponentially towards the equilibrium state. The practical feasibility of such an equilibrium core is then analysed: acceptable operative conditions might lead to a 'sustainable' nuclear system, the overall net outcome of which is the production of energy by burning a feed stream of uranium from one side, and the discharge of fission products (FP) only from the other side. (authors)

  10. Unified theory of effective interaction

    Takayanagi, Kazuo, E-mail: k-takaya@sophia.ac.jp

    2016-09-15

    We present a unified description of effective interaction theories in both algebraic and graphic representations. In our previous work, we have presented the Rayleigh–Schrödinger and Bloch perturbation theories in a unified fashion by introducing the main frame expansion of the effective interaction. In this work, we start also from the main frame expansion, and present various nonperturbative theories in a coherent manner, which include generalizations of the Brandow, Brillouin–Wigner, and Bloch–Horowitz theories on the formal side, and the extended Krenciglowa–Kuo and the extended Lee–Suzuki methods on the practical side. We thus establish a coherent and comprehensive description of both perturbative and nonperturbative theories on the basis of the main frame expansion.

  11. Casimir effect for interacting fields

    Kay, B.S.

    1982-01-01

    The author discusses some recent work on the Casimir effect: that is the problem of renormalizing Tsub(μγ) on locally-flat space-times. That is on space-times which, while topologically non-trivial are locally Minkowskian - with vanishing local curvature. The author has developed a systematic method for calculating this Casimir effect for interacting fields to arbitrary order in perturbation theory - and for arbitrary components of Tsub(μγ) which he describes in general and then illustrates it by describing first order perturbation theory calculations for a lambdaphi 4 theory for the two models: the cylinder space-time and the parallel plates. (Auth.)

  12. Interindividual testing of water-soluble oral contrast media in respect of diagnostic ranking, side effects and taste

    Staebler, A.; Fink, U.; Siuda, S.; Neville, S.

    1989-01-01

    Three groups of patients (n = 55, 52 and 54) were examined with the X-ray contrast media Gastrografin, Peritrast-Oral GI, and Telebrix Gastro to assess the diagnostic ranking, side effects and taste of watersoluble oral contrast media. No significant differences were seen in respect of diagnostic ranking and side effects. Side effects were exclusively abdominal symptoms; there was no difference with regard to laxative action. Telebrix Gastroas accepted significantly better in respect of taste than Gastrografin and Peritrast-Oral GI. (orig.) [de

  13. The nonlinear gyroresonance interaction between energetic electrons and coherent VLF waves propagating at an arbitrary angle with respect to the earth's magnetic field

    Bell, T. F.

    1984-01-01

    A theory is presented of the nonlinear gyroresonance interaction that takes place in the magnetosphere between energetic electrons and coherent VLF waves propagating in the whistler mode at an arbitrary angle psi with respect to the earth's magnetic field B-sub-0. Particularly examined is the phase trapping (PT) mechanism believed to be responsible for the generation of VLF emissions. It is concluded that near the magnetic equatorial plane gradients of psi may play a very important part in the PT process for nonducted waves. Predictions of a higher threshold value for PT for nonducted waves generally agree with experimental data concerning VLF emission triggering by nonducted waves.

  14. 40 CFR 610.23 - Operator interaction effects.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operator interaction effects. 610.23 Section 610.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL... Analysis § 610.23 Operator interaction effects. The device will also be evaluated with respect to: (a) The...

  15. The effects of workplace respect and violence on nurses’ job satisfaction in Ghana: a cross-sectional survey

    Boafo, Isaac Mensah

    2018-01-01

    Background Studies have established the negative effects of workplace disrespect and violence on the personal and professional well-being of nurses. In spite of this, only a few have directly investigated the effects of these issues on nurses’ job satisfaction. In Africa, research on nurses’ job satisfaction continues to focus largely on economic factors. The aim of this paper was, therefore, to investigate the impact of the non-economic factors of workplace violence and respect on the job sa...

  16. Effective lagrangian for strong interactions

    Jain, P.

    1988-01-01

    We attempt to construct a realistic phenomenological Lagrangian in order to describe strong interactions. This is in general a very complicated problem and we shall explore its various aspects. We first include the vector mesons by writing down the most general chiral invariant terms proportional to the Levi-Civita symbol ε μναβ . These terms involve three unknown coefficients, which are calculated by using the experimental results of strong interaction processes. We then calculate the static nucleon properties by finding the solitonic excitations of this model. The results turn out to be, as is also the case for most other vector-pseudoscalar Lagrangians, better than the Skyrme model but are still somewhat different from the experiments. Another aspect that we shall study is the incorporation of scale anomaly of QCD into the Skyrme model. We thus introduce a scalar glueball in our Lagrangian. Here we find an interesting result that the effective glue field dynamically forms a bag for the soliton. Depending on the values of the parameters, we get either a deep bag or a shallow bag. However by including the scalar meson, we find that to get realistic scalar sector we must have the shallow bag. Finally we show some intriguing connections between the chiral quark model, in which the nucleon is described as a solitonic excitation, and the ordinary potential binding quark model

  17. A comparison study between sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium dodecyl sulfonate with respect to the thermodynamic properties, micellization, and interaction with poly(ethylene glycol) in aqueous solutions

    Sadeghi, Rahmat; Shahabi, Somayyeh

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Apparent molar volume against molality: o, ·, and Δ, respectively in water, (1 and 4) wt% PEG solution at 293.15 K; x, Δ, and lozenge, respectively in water, (1 and 4) wt% PEG solution at 313.15 K. Research highlights: → C 12 H 25 SO 3 Na(SDSn) was seen to interact with PEG more weakly than C 12 H 25 SO 4 Na(SDS). → The constraints on molecular mobility of SDS micelles are larger than those of SDSn. → Entropy change on micellization for SDSn is larger than those for SDS. → Micelle formation of SDS is less endothermic and more spontaneous than that of SDSn. → Micelles of SDS have smaller aggregation number than that of SDSn. - Abstract: The density, sound velocity, and conductivity measurements were performed on aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (C 12 H 25 SO 4 Na) or sodium dodecyl sulfonate (C 12 H 25 SO 3 Na) in the absence and presence of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) at different temperatures. Changes in the apparent molar volumes and isentropic compressibilities upon micellization were derived using a pseudophase-transition approach and the infinite dilution apparent molar properties of the monomer and micellar form of C 12 H 25 SO 4 Na and C 12 H 25 SO 3 Na were determined. Variations of the critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) of both surfactants in the solutions investigated with temperature were obtained from which thermodynamic parameters of micellization were estimated. It was found that at low temperature the micelle formation process is endothermic and therefore, this process must be entropically driven. However, upon increasing the temperature, the enthalpic factor becomes more significant and, at temperatures higher than 303.15 K the micellization is enthalpy driven. The interactions between C 12 H 25 SO 4 Na/C 12 H 25 SO 3 Na and PEG were studied and it was found that sodium alkyl sulfonates were seen to interact more weakly than their sulfate analogues.

  18. A comparison study between sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium dodecyl sulfonate with respect to the thermodynamic properties, micellization, and interaction with poly(ethylene glycol) in aqueous solutions

    Sadeghi, Rahmat, E-mail: rsadeghi@uok.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahabi, Somayyeh [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Apparent molar volume against molality: o, {center_dot}, and {Delta}, respectively in water, (1 and 4) wt% PEG solution at 293.15 K; x, {Delta}, and lozenge, respectively in water, (1 and 4) wt% PEG solution at 313.15 K. Research Highlights: > C{sub 12}H{sub 25}SO{sub 3}Na(SDSn) was seen to interact with PEG more weakly than C{sub 12}H{sub 25}SO{sub 4}Na(SDS). > The constraints on molecular mobility of SDS micelles are larger than those of SDSn. > Entropy change on micellization for SDSn is larger than those for SDS. > Micelle formation of SDS is less endothermic and more spontaneous than that of SDSn. > Micelles of SDS have smaller aggregation number than that of SDSn. - Abstract: The density, sound velocity, and conductivity measurements were performed on aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (C{sub 12}H{sub 25}SO{sub 4}Na) or sodium dodecyl sulfonate (C{sub 12}H{sub 25}SO{sub 3}Na) in the absence and presence of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) at different temperatures. Changes in the apparent molar volumes and isentropic compressibilities upon micellization were derived using a pseudophase-transition approach and the infinite dilution apparent molar properties of the monomer and micellar form of C{sub 12}H{sub 25}SO{sub 4}Na and C{sub 12}H{sub 25}SO{sub 3}Na were determined. Variations of the critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) of both surfactants in the solutions investigated with temperature were obtained from which thermodynamic parameters of micellization were estimated. It was found that at low temperature the micelle formation process is endothermic and therefore, this process must be entropically driven. However, upon increasing the temperature, the enthalpic factor becomes more significant and, at temperatures higher than 303.15 K the micellization is enthalpy driven. The interactions between C{sub 12}H{sub 25}SO{sub 4}Na/C{sub 12}H{sub 25}SO{sub 3}Na and PEG were studied and it was found that sodium alkyl sulfonates were seen

  19. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Golan, Tomasz [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Juszczak, Cezary [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Sobczyk, Jan T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  20. Protective properties of the plasma of burnt and irradiated rats with respect to the lethal effect of endotoxins in vivo

    Budagov, R.S.; Chureeva, L.N.

    1984-01-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of endotoxins s. typhimurium and E. coli to preliminarily irradiated rats resulted in death of 80% of animals during 24 hours. At combined injection of endoxins with heterologic plasma of intact rats death decreased to 12 and 19% respectively. Deep burn of skin, acute radiation sickness and combined radiation-thermal injury did not eliminate the given phenomenon of humoral detoxication; at different periods after thermal, radiation and combined effects plasma of test rats produced protective effect practically the same as at the control

  1. Soliton-soliton effective interaction

    Maki, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    A scheme of semi-phenomenological quantization is proposed for the collision process of two equal size envelopes-solitons provided by nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The time advance due to two envelopes-solitons collision was determined. Considering the solitons as puntual particles and using the description of classical mechanics, the effective envelope soliton-envelope soliton attractive potential, denominated modified Poschl-Teller potential. The obtainment of this potential was possible using the information in from of system memory, done by an analytical expression of time delay. Such system was quantized using this effective potential in Schroeding equation. The S col matrix of two punctual bodies was determined, and it is shown that, in the limit of 1 2 2 /mN 4 it reproduces the exact S 2N matrix obtained from soliton packet wich incurs on another soliton packet. Every ones have the same mass, interacts by contact force between two bodies. These packets have only one bound state, i e, do not have excited states. It was verified that, using the S col matrix, the binding energy of ground state of the system can be obtained, which is coincident with 2N particles in the 1/N approximation. In this scheme infinite spurious bound states are found (M.C.K.) [pt

  2. The effects of workplace respect and violence on nurses' job satisfaction in Ghana: a cross-sectional survey.

    Boafo, Isaac Mensah

    2018-01-15

    Studies have established the negative effects of workplace disrespect and violence on the personal and professional well-being of nurses. In spite of this, only a few have directly investigated the effects of these issues on nurses' job satisfaction. In Africa, research on nurses' job satisfaction continues to focus largely on economic factors. The aim of this paper was, therefore, to investigate the impact of the non-economic factors of workplace violence and respect on the job satisfaction levels of nurses in Ghana. The study employed a cross-sectional questionnaire survey. It involved 592 qualified practising nurses working in public hospitals in Ghana. Data were collected between September 2013 and April 2014. The results showed that, overall, nurses were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with their jobs (M = 3.19, SD = .54). More than half (52.7%) of the participants had been abused verbally, and 12% had been sexually harassed in the 12 months prior to the study. The majority of nurses, however, believed they were respected at the workplace (M = 3.77, SD = .70, Mode = 4). Multiple regression analyses showed that verbal abuse and perceived respect were statistically significant predictors of nurses' job satisfaction. Nurses who experienced verbal abuse and low level of respect were more likely to report low job satisfaction scores. It is concluded that non-financial strategies such as safe work environments which are devoid of workplace violence may enhance nurses' job satisfaction levels. A policy of "zero tolerance" for violence and low tolerance for disrespect could be put in place to protect nurses and healthcare professionals in general.

  3. Moderating influences on interactivity effects

    Voorveld, H.; van Noort, G.

    2012-01-01

    Research on website interactivity is widespread and there are two important reasons for this popularity. The first is that interactivity is assumed to be the key characteristic that distinguishes communication in traditional media from communication in new media such as websites (Chung and Zhao,

  4. Warfarin Side Effects: Watch for Interactions

    Warfarin side effects: Watch for interactions Although commonly used to treat blood clots, warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) can have dangerous side effects or ... bleeding. Here are precautions to take to avoid warfarin side effects. By Mayo Clinic Staff If you' ...

  5. Effectiveness of assigning BI-RADS category-3 to breast lesion with respect to follow-up

    Masroor, I.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of assigning BI-RADS category-3 to breast lesion with respect to follow-up. Women undergoing X-ray mammography and assigned BI-RADS category-3 and recommended short-term (6-monthly) follow-up were included. Out of these, 44 patients were lost to follow-up and were excluded from the study. The lesions that remained stable after short-term follow-up were recommended routine (annual) follow-up. Needle localization and open surgical biopsy was performed, if the lesion progressed or calcifications increased in number/size and/or on physician or patient preference. The effectiveness of this approach was analyzed by determining the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value for BI-RADS category-3. Of the 65 lesions, 55 remained stable. Of the remaining 10 lesions, two showed increase in number of microcalcification prompting biopsy. Both turned out to be ductal carcinoma in situ. Eight biopsies were performed on clinician or patient preference which turned out to be benign. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 100%, 87%, 20% and 100% respectively. Assessment with short-interval mammographic follow-up is useful to confirm the nature of most non-palpable breast lesions considered probably benign and permits detection of a small number of breast cancers at an early stage. The local setup, patient compliance is a major limitation for performing a follow-up study, as the available numbers can have a profound effect on the determined accuracy value. (author)

  6. A study on the barrier effect with respect to the condition of solid insulation materials in GN{sub 2}

    Lee, Hong Seok; Mo, Young Kyu; Lee, On You; Kim, Jun Il; Bang, Seung Min; Kang, Jong O; Kang, Hyoung Ku [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Korea National University of Transportation, Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Seo Ho [Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Applied Superconductivity Lab., Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    High voltage superconducting apparatuses have been developed presently around the world under AC and DC sources. In order to improve electrical reliability of superconducting apparatuses with AC and DC networks, a study on the DC as well as the AC electrical breakdown characteristics of cryogenic insulations should be conducted for developing a high voltage superconducting apparatus. Recently, a sub-cooled liquid nitrogen cooling system is known to be promising method for developing a high voltage superconducting apparatus. A sub-cooled liquid nitrogen cooling system uses gaseous nitrogen to control the pressure and enhance the dielectric characteristics. However, the dielectric characteristics of gaseous nitrogen are not enough to satisfy the grade of insulation for a high voltage superconducting apparatus. In this case, the application of solid insulating barriers is regarded as an effective method to reinforce the dielectric characteristics of a high voltage superconducting apparatus. In this paper, it is dealt with a barrier effect on the DC and AC dielectric characteristics of gaseous nitrogen with respect to the position and number of solid insulating barriers. As results, the DC and AC electrical breakdown characteristics by various barrier effects is verified.

  7. Hyperfine interactions by Moessbauer effect

    Constantinescu, S.

    1980-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy has been used to investigate hyperfine interactions in materials endowed with complex electromagnetic crystallographic structures. Such structures (Me 3 B 7 O 13 X boracite-type systems, for instance), equally interesting from both scientific and applications viewpoint, are drawing a special attention lately on account of their being examined by means of increasingly refined experimental techniques. In view of the wide prospects of using these materials in various practical fields, this thesis counts among the studies aiming to ameliorate the methods of processing and determining the Moessbauer spectra parameters, characterized by complex hyperfine interactions, as well as among the studies of electric, magnetic and crystallographic investigation of the Moessbauer nucleus neighbourhood, in boracite-type structures. (author)

  8. Screening for interaction effects in gene expression data.

    Peter J Castaldi

    Full Text Available Expression quantitative trait (eQTL studies are a powerful tool for identifying genetic variants that affect levels of messenger RNA. Since gene expression is controlled by a complex network of gene-regulating factors, one way to identify these factors is to search for interaction effects between genetic variants and mRNA levels of transcription factors (TFs and their respective target genes. However, identification of interaction effects in gene expression data pose a variety of methodological challenges, and it has become clear that such analyses should be conducted and interpreted with caution. Investigating the validity and interpretability of several interaction tests when screening for eQTL SNPs whose effect on the target gene expression is modified by the expression level of a transcription factor, we characterized two important methodological issues. First, we stress the scale-dependency of interaction effects and highlight that commonly applied transformation of gene expression data can induce or remove interactions, making interpretation of results more challenging. We then demonstrate that, in the setting of moderate to strong interaction effects on the order of what may be reasonably expected for eQTL studies, standard interaction screening can be biased due to heteroscedasticity induced by true interactions. Using simulation and real data analysis, we outline a set of reasonable minimum conditions and sample size requirements for reliable detection of variant-by-environment and variant-by-TF interactions using the heteroscedasticity consistent covariance-based approach.

  9. Some progress towards ''universal'' effective interactions

    Gomez, J.M.G.

    1983-01-01

    The approximation methods introduced to treat the nuclear many-body problem usually imply that the appropriate nuclear force is an effective interaction, different from the free nucleon-nucleon interaction. An effective interaction is thus intimately related to a given nuclear model and its scope is generally confined to the description of a limited number of nuclei or nuclear states. However, in recent years there has been some progress towards ''universal'' effective nucleon-nucleon interactions, in the sense that they may be reasonably suitable to describe bulk properties of nuclear ground states throughout the periodic table and also properties of excited states. The authors conclude that a finite-range density-dependent effective interaction of the Gogny's type is capable of describing a large number of static and dynamical nuclear properties throughout the periodic table, including open-shell nuclei. Hopefully it may provide clues for the definition of some ''universal'' effective force

  10. Effects of economic interactions on credit risk

    Hatchett, J P L; Kuehn, R

    2006-01-01

    We study a credit-risk model which captures effects of economic interactions on a firm's default probability. Economic interactions are represented as a functionally defined graph, and the existence of both cooperative and competitive business relations is taken into account. We provide an analytic solution of the model in a limit where the number of business relations of each company is large, but the overall fraction of the economy with which a given company interacts may be small. While the effects of economic interactions are relatively weak in typical (most probable) scenarios, they are pronounced in situations of economic stress, and thus lead to a substantial fattening of the tails of loss distributions in large loan portfolios. This manifests itself in a pronounced enhancement of the value at risk computed for interacting economies in comparison with their non-interacting counterparts

  11. Effect of embryo density on in vitro developmental characteristics of bovine preimplantative embryos with respect to micro and macroenvironments.

    Hoelker, M; Rings, F; Lund, Q; Phatsara, C; Schellander, K; Tesfaye, D

    2010-10-01

    To overcome developmental problems as a consequence of single embryo culture, the Well of the Well (WOW) culture system has been developed. In this study, we aimed to examine the effect of embryo densities with respect to both microenvironment and macroenvironment on developmental rates and embryo quality to get a deeper insight into developmentally important mechanisms. WOW diameter and depth significantly affected developmental rates (p < 0.05). WOWs with diameter of 500 μm reached significantly higher blastocyst rates (32.5 vs 21.1% vs 20.3%) compared to embryos cultured in WOWs of 300 μm diameter or plain cultured controls. Embryos cultured in WOWs with 700 μm depth reached significant higher developmental rates compared with embryos cultured in WOWs of 300 μm depth and control embryos (30.6 vs 22.6% vs 20.3%). Correlation of the embryo per WOW volume with developmental rates was higher (r(2) = 0.92, p = 0.0004) than correlation of WOW diameter or WOW depth with developmental rates. However, the embryo per WOW volume did not affect differential cell counts. An embryo per culture dish volume of 1 : 30 μl was identified to be optimal when the embryo per WOW volume was 1 : 0.27 μl increasing developmental rates up to the level of mass embryo production. Giving the opportunity to track each embryo over the complete culture period while keeping high developmental rates with normal mitotic dynamics, the results of this work will provide benefit for the single culture of embryos in human assisted reproduction, mammalian embryos with high economic interest as well as for scientific purpose. © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Hyperspherical effective interaction for nonlocal potentials

    Barnea, N.; Leidemann, W.; Orlandini, G.

    2010-01-01

    The effective interaction hyperspherical-harmonics method, formulated for local forces, is generalized to accommodate nonlocal interactions. As for local potentials this formulation retains the separation of the hyper-radial part leading solely to a hyperspherical effective interaction. By applying the method to study ground-state properties of 4 He with a modern effective-field-theory nucleon-nucleon potential model (Idaho-N3LO), one finds a substantial acceleration in the convergence rate of the hyperspherical-harmonics series. Also studied are the binding energies of the six-body nuclei 6 He and 6 Li with the JISP16 nuclear force. Again an excellent convergence is observed.

  13. A parametrisation scheme for effective interactions

    Geramb, H.V. von; Amos, K.; Berge, L.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm is developed by which two nucleon effective interactions are constructed to fit on- and off-shell t- and/or g-matrix elements. The effective interaction is defined as plane wave matrix elements of local operators that may have explicit energy and medium dependencies. It comprises central, tensor, spin-orbit, quadratic spin-orbit and angular momentum square operators, all with Yukawa form factors. As examples, the Paris and Bonn potentials are used to construct t-matrices for projection onto chosen forms of effective interactions. 23 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs

  14. Interaction Effects of Students, Drugs and Alienation

    Jones, Woodrow, Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This study examined the interaction effect of students, drugs, and alienation in a large university, i.e., the linkages of both social and political alienation with drug behavior. The interaction terms which composed these forms of alienation were evaluated as to their comparative ability to produce drug behavior. (Author)

  15. Modeling of interaction effects in granular systems

    El-Hilo, M.; Shatnawy, M.; Al-Rsheed, A.

    2000-01-01

    Interaction effects on the magnetic behavior of granular solid systems are examined using a numerical model which is capable of predicting the field, temperature and time dependence of magnetization. In this work, interaction effects on the temperature dependence of time viscosity coefficient S(T) and formation of minor hysteresis loops have been studied. The results for the time- and temperature dependence of remanence ratio have showed that the distribution of energy barriers f(ΔE) obtained depend critically on the strength and nature of interactions. These interactions-based changes in f(ΔE) can easily give a temperature-independent behavior of S(T) when these changes give a 1/ΔE behavior to the distribution of energy barriers. Thus, conclusions about macroscopic quantum tunneling must be carefully drawn when the temperature dependence of S(T) is used to probe for MQT effects. For minor hysteresis effects, the result shows that for the non-interacting case, no minor hysteresis loops occur and the loops are only predicted when the interaction field is positive. From these predictions, minor loops will form when the interaction field is strong enough to magnetize some moments during the recoil process back to zero field. Thus, these minor loops are originated from interaction driving irreversible changes along the recoil curve and the irreversible component of magnetization has no direct influence on the formation of these minor loops

  16. Effective interactions and coupling schemes in nuclei

    Talmi, I.

    1994-01-01

    Eigenstates of the shell model are obtained by diagonalization of the Hamiltonian submatrix defined by a given shell model subspace. Matrix elements of the effective nuclear interaction can be determined from experiment in a consistent way. This approach was introduced in 1956 with the 38 Cl- 40 K spectra, has been applied in many cases and its latest success is in the s, d shell. This way, general features of the effective interaction have been determined. The T=1 interaction is diagonal in the seniority scheme as clearly demonstrated in proton 1g 9/2 n and 1h 11/2 n configurations and in the description of semimagic nuclei by generalized seniority. Apart from a strong and attractive pairing term, T=1 interactions are repulsive on the average. The T=0 interaction is attractive and is the origin of the central potential well in which nucleons are bound. It breaks seniority in a major way leading to deformed nuclei and rotational spectra. Such an interaction may be approximated by a quadrupole-quadrupole interaction which is the basis of the interacting boson model. Identical nucleons with pairing and quadrupole interactions cannot be models of actual nuclei. Symmetry properties of states with maximum T are very different from those of ground states of actual nuclei. The T=1 interaction between identical nucleons cannot be approximated by pairing and quadrupole interactions. The rich variety of nuclear spectra is due to the competition between seniority conserving T=1 interactions and the T=0 quadrupole interaction between protons and neutrons. (orig.)

  17. Meissner effect and a stringlike interaction

    Chatterjee, Chandrasekhar [Keio University, Department of Physics at Hiyoshi, and Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Choudhury, Ishita Dutta; Lahiri, Amitabha [S N Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Kolkata, Salt Lake (India)

    2017-05-15

    We find that a recently proposed interaction involving the vorticity current of electrons, which radiatively induces a photon mass in 3 + 1 dimensions in the low-energy effective theory, corresponds to confining strings (linear potential) between electrons. (orig.)

  18. The respective effects of soil heavy metal fractions by sequential extraction procedure and soil properties on the accumulation of heavy metals in rice grains and brassicas.

    Xiao, Ling; Guan, Dongsheng; Peart, M R; Chen, Yujuan; Li, Qiqi

    2017-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine heavy metal accumulation in rice grains and brassicas and to identify the different controls, such as soil properties and soil heavy metal fractions obtained by the Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction, in their accumulation. In Guangdong Province, South China, rice grain and brassica samples, along with their rhizospheric soil, were collected from fields on the basis of distance downstream from electroplating factories, whose wastewater was used for irrigation. The results showed that long-term irrigation using the electroplating effluent has not only enriched the rhizospheric soil with Cd, Cr, Cu, and Zn but has also increased their mobility and bioavailability. The average concentrations of Cd and Cr in rice grains and brassicas from closest to the electroplating factories were significantly higher than those from the control areas. Results from hybrid redundancy analysis (hRDA) and redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that the BCR fractions of soil heavy metals could explain 29.0 and 46.5 % of total eigenvalue for heavy metal concentrations in rice grains and brassicas, respectively, while soil properties could only explain 11.1 and 33.4 %, respectively. This indicated that heavy metal fractions exerted more control upon their concentrations in rice grains and brassicas than soil properties. In terms of metal interaction, an increase of residual Zn in paddy soil or a decrease of acid soluble Cd in the brassica soil could enhance the accumulation of Cd, Cu, Cr, and Pb in both rice grains and brassicas, respectively, while the reducible or oxidizable Cd in soil could enhance the plants' accumulation of Cr and Pb. The RDA showed an inhibition effect of sand content and CFO on the accumulation of heavy metals in rice grains and brassicas. Moreover, multiple stepwise linear regression could offer prediction for Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn concentrations in the two crops by soil heavy metal fractions and soil properties.

  19. The effect of dipolar interaction on the magnetic isotope effect

    Mojaza, Matin; Pedersen, Jørgen Boiden; Lukzen, Nikita

    2010-01-01

    A multi-channel kinetic description is used to study the magnetic isotope effect (MIE) in zero magnetic field. The maximal isotope effect is equal to the number of channels, two for the hyperfine interaction but four for the electron spin dipole–dipole interaction of the intermediate radical pair....... Quantum mechanical calculations agree with these conclusion and show that large MIE may be obtained even in the presence of a strong exchange interaction. The observed magnesium isotope effect on the rate of enzymatic synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is approximately 3 implying that the dipolar...... interaction is responsible for the effect. Our calculations provide support for the proposed mechanism....

  20. Realistic effective interactions for nuclear systems

    Hjort-Jensen, M.; Osnes, E.; Kuo, T.T.S.

    1994-09-01

    A review of perturbative many-body descriptions of several nuclear systems is presented. Symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter and finite nuclei with few valence particles are examples of systems considered. The many-body description starts with the most recent meson-exchange potential models for the nucleon-nucleon interaction, an interaction which in turn is used in perturbative schemes to evaluate the effective interaction for finite nuclei and infinite nuclear matter. A unified perturbative approach based on time-dependent perturbation theory is elaborated. For finite nuclei new results are presented for the effective interaction and the energy spectra in the mass areas of oxygen, calcium and tin. 166 refs., 83 refs., 21 tabs

  1. Effective field theory for NN interactions

    Tran Duy Khuong; Vo Hanh Phuc

    2003-01-01

    The effective field theory of NN interactions is formulated and the power counting appropriate to this case is reviewed. It is more subtle than in most effective field theories since in the limit that the S-wave NN scattering lengths go to infinity. It is governed by nontrivial fixed point. The leading two body terms in the effective field theory for nucleon self interactions are scale invariant and invariant under Wigner SU(4) spin-isospin symmetry in this limit. Higher body terms with no derivatives (i.e. three and four body terms) are automatically invariant under Wigner symmetry. (author)

  2. Effect of situation on mother infant interaction

    Maas, A.J.B.M.; Vreeswijk, C.M.J.M.; van Bakel, H.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that the early parent–infant relationship is of critical importance for children's developmental outcomes. While the effect of different settings on mother–infant interactive behavior is well studied, only few researchers systematically examined the effect of situational variables

  3. Respective roles and interactions of T-lymphocyte and PGE2-mediated monocyte suppressive activities in human newborns and mothers at the time of delivery

    Durandy, A.; Fischer, A.; Mamas, S.; Dray, F.; Griscelli, C.

    1982-01-01

    Recently the concept of a poorly functional humoral immune response in the newborn was proposed. Data have been presented indicating that the impaired newborn B cell maturation, as shown in vitro in a pokeweed mitogen-induced B cell maturation system, is due both to an immaturity of lymphocyte subsets and to an increased suppressive T activity. In the present work, we present evidence that there exists a predominance of a naturally occurring T lymphocyte suppressive activity in the cord blood in that the removal of the suppressive activity by irradiation allows a normal maturation of newborn B cells. Such normal maturation of newborn B cells can also be obtained using mixed cultures of adult T cells and newborn B cells. Newborn suppressor T cells belong to both EA gamma (+) and EA gamma (-) fractions, and it is not known whether these two groups do or do not belong to different subsets. The PGE2-dependent monocyte suppressive activity does not play any role in the suppression observed in newborns since newborn monocytes are poorly suppressive and since they produce a smaller amount of PGE2 than adult monocytes. Some observations suggest, on the contrary, that the suppressive T lymphocytes can regulate the level of the PGE2-dependent monocyte suppressive activity. It should be noticed that similar observations about T lymphocyte and PGE2-dependent monocyte suppressive activities have been made at the same time using mothers' cells. These observations suggest the possibility that such changes in B cell immune regulation may result from an interaction between maternal and fetal lymphoid cells

  4. Effect of Zingiber officinale Supplementation on Obesity Management with Respect to the Uncoupling Protein 1 -3826A>G and ß3-adrenergic Receptor Trp64Arg Polymorphism.

    Ebrahimzadeh Attari, Vahideh; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Zemestani, Maryam; Ostadrahimi, Alireza

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of ginger (Zingiber officinale) supplementation on some obesity-associated parameters, with nutrigenetics approach. Accordingly, 80 eligible obese women (aged 18-45 years) were randomly assigned to receive either ginger (2-g ginger rhizomes powder as two 1-g tablets per day) or placebo supplements (corn starch with the same amount) for 12 weeks. Subjects were tested for changes in body weight, body mass index, waist and hip circumferences, body composition, appetite score, and dietary intake. Moreover, participants were genotyped for the -3826A>G and Trp64Arg polymorphisms of uncoupling protein 1 and ß3-adrenergic receptor genes, respectively. Over 12 weeks, ginger supplementation resulted in a slight but statistically significant decrease in all anthropometric measurements and total appetite score as compared with placebo group, which were more pronounced in subjects with the AA genotype for uncoupling protein 1 and Trp64Trp genotype for ß3-adrenergic receptor gene. However, there was no significant difference in changes of body composition and total energy and macronutrients intake between groups. In conclusion, our findings suggest that ginger consumption has potential in managing obesity, accompanying with an intervention-genotype interaction effect. However, further clinical trials need to explore ginger's efficacy as an anti-obesity agent in the form of powder, extract, or its active components. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Bias with respect to socioeconomic status: A closer look at zip code matching in a pneumococcal vaccine effectiveness study

    Ruth Link-Gelles

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 was introduced in the US for prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease in children. Individual-level socioeconomic status (SES is a potential confounder of the estimated effectiveness of PCV13 and is often controlled for in observational studies using zip code as a proxy. We assessed the utility of zip code matching for control of SES in a post-licensure evaluation of the effectiveness of PCV13 (calculated as [1-matched odds ratio]*100. We used a directed acyclic graph to identify subsets of confounders and collected SES variables from birth certificates, geocoding, a parent interview, and follow-up with medical providers. Cases tended to be more affluent than eligible controls (for example, 48.3% of cases had private insurance vs. 44.6% of eligible controls, but less affluent than enrolled controls (52.9% of whom had private insurance. Control of confounding subsets, however, did not result in a meaningful change in estimated vaccine effectiveness (original estimate: 85.1%, 95% CI 74.8–91.9%; adjusted estimate: 82.5%, 95% CI 65.6–91.1%. In the context of a post-licensure vaccine effectiveness study, zip code appears to be an adequate, though not perfect, proxy for individual SES. Keywords: Socioeconomic status, PCV13, Pneumococcus, Pneumococcal vaccine, Vaccine effectiveness, Matched case-control

  6. Effective interactions in p-shell nuclei and the realistic interactions - I

    Upadhyaya, G.K.; Joshi, K.P.

    1984-04-01

    The effective interaction of Jain et al. derived from the Yale interaction by including the prominent core polarization diagrams is analyzed in terms of the interaction radial integrals and their spin tensor components. The interaction is also compared with some phenomenological effective interactions. The general features of the effective force in the 1 p shell region are discussed. (author)

  7. Modeling of interaction effects in granular systems

    El-Hilo, M; Al-Rsheed, A

    2000-01-01

    Interaction effects on the magnetic behavior of granular solid systems are examined using a numerical model which is capable of predicting the field, temperature and time dependence of magnetization. In this work, interaction effects on the temperature dependence of time viscosity coefficient S(T) and formation of minor hysteresis loops have been studied. The results for the time- and temperature dependence of remanence ratio have showed that the distribution of energy barriers f(DELTA E) obtained depend critically on the strength and nature of interactions. These interactions-based changes in f(DELTA E) can easily give a temperature-independent behavior of S(T) when these changes give a 1/DELTA E behavior to the distribution of energy barriers. Thus, conclusions about macroscopic quantum tunneling must be carefully drawn when the temperature dependence of S(T) is used to probe for MQT effects. For minor hysteresis effects, the result shows that for the non-interacting case, no minor hysteresis loops occur an...

  8. Early life stress determines the effects of glucocorticoids and stress on hippocampal function: Electrophysiological and behavioral evidence respectively.

    Pillai, Anup G; Arp, Marit; Velzing, Els; Lesuis, Sylvie L; Schmidt, Mathias V; Holsboer, Florian; Joëls, Marian; Krugers, Harm J

    2018-05-01

    Exposure to early-life adversity may program brain function to prepare individuals for adaptation to matching environmental contexts. In this study we tested this hypothesis in more detail by examining the effects of early-life stress - induced by raising offspring with limited nesting and bedding material from postnatal days 2-9 - in various behavioral tasks and on synaptic function in adult mice. Early-life stress impaired adult performance in the hippocampal dependent low-arousing object-in-context recognition memory task. This effect was absent when animals were exposed to a single stressor before training. Early-life stress did not alter high-arousing context and auditory fear conditioning. Early-life stress-induced behavioral modifications were not associated with alterations in the dendritic architecture of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons or principal neurons of the basolateral amygdala. However, early-life stress reduced the ratio of NMDA to AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents and glutamate release probability specifically in hippocampal CA1 neurons, but not in the basolateral amygdala. These ex vivo effects in the hippocampus were abolished by acute glucocorticoid treatment. Our findings support that early-life stress can hamper object-in-context learning via pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms that affect hippocampal function but these effects are counteracted by acute stress or elevated glucocorticoid levels. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Effective Interactions between Multilayered Ionic Microgels

    Clemens Hanel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Using a one-component reduction formalism, we calculate the effective interactions and the counterion density profiles for microgels that feature a multilayered shell structure. We follow a strategy that involves second order perturbation theory and obtain analytical expressions for the effective interactions by modeling the layers of the particles as linear superpostion of homogeneously charged spheres. The general method is applied to the important case of core–shell microgels and compared with the well-known results for a microgel that can be approximated by a macroscopic, and homogeneously charged, spherical macroion.

  10. Similarities and Differences between Parents and Children with Respect to Gender Prejudice: the Intertwinement between Family and Cultural Stereotype Effect

    Sara Alfieri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have investigated the similarities and differences in gender prejudice between parents and their offspring. This work is divided into two phases: our goal in Phase I was to investigate whether any similarity exists in the prejudice response profiles of parents and their young adult offspring. Phase II sought to uncover the levels of unique similarity between parents and child in gender prejudice (cultural stereotype effect. Participants were 293 Italian families (young adult child, mother and father, for a total of 879 people. Each participants completed the Ambivalent Sexism (Glick & Fiske, 1996 and Ambivalence toward Men (Glick & Fiske, 1999 scales. As our research included family data, specific analysis were used, such dyadic indexes (Kenny, Kashy & Cook, 2006. Results reveal that (1 the response profiles of parents and offspring are dissimilar, and (2 the slight shared variance between them is determined by the cultural stereotype effect.

  11. Respect changes your life!

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    CERN has recently joined the Geneva-based association "Le respect, ça change la vie" (Respect can change our lives). As its name suggests, the association promotes respect, in all its forms. This decision will enable CERN to share some of its values, those it has in common with the association, with the community at large.   The new bilingual logo of the "Le respect ça change la vie" association. "CERN has been a member of the Geneva-based association "Le respect, ça change la vie" since March," says Friedemann Eder, Head of the Relations with the Host States Service. Mutual respect, respecting the differences and the work of others, respect on the road, in the family, at school, etc. The association, which was founded in 2003 and now has a large number of members, promotes this universal value and encourages discussion on it. "CERN's history shows the importance and success o...

  12. Respect in Education

    Giesinger, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the educational significance of the moral demand for respect. In "Ethics and Education," Richard Peters presents a conception of educational respect that was recently taken up by Krassimir Stojanov. This article responds to both Peters' and Stojanov's contributions and proposes another understanding of educational respect:…

  13. Self-consistent velocity dependent effective interactions

    Kubo, Takayuki; Sakamoto, Hideo; Kammuri, Tetsuo; Kishimoto, Teruo.

    1993-09-01

    The field coupling method is extended to a system with a velocity dependent mean potential. By means of this method, we can derive the effective interactions which are consistent with the mean potential. The self-consistent velocity dependent effective interactions are applied to the microscopic analysis of the structures of giant dipole resonances (GDR) of 148,154 Sm, of the first excited 2 + states of Sn isotopes and of the first excited 3 - states of Mo isotopes. It is clarified that the interactions play crucial roles in describing the splitting of the resonant structure of GDR peaks, in restoring the energy weighted sum rule values, and in reducing B (Eλ) values. (author)

  14. Lignite pre-treatment and its effect on bio-stimulative properties of respective lignite humic acids

    Vlckova, Z.; Grasset, L.; Antosova, B.; Pekar, M.; Kucerik, J. [Brno University of Technology, Brno (Czech Republic). Faculty of Chemistry

    2009-09-15

    Humic acids originating from South-Moravian lignite were subjected to a comparative study with the aim to assess the alteration of their physico-chemical properties after various lignite pre-treatments. Physical modification was achieved with two organic acids, such as acetic acid and citric acid and chemical modification by nitric acid and hydrogene peroxide in various concentrations. Elemental analysis, solid-state NMR, GC-MS analysis of polyols and size exclusion chromatography were carried out for chemical-physical characterization of obtained humic acids. Their biological effect, in form of potassium and ammonium humates, was tested on maize (Zea mays) seedlings. In these tests, potassium humates achieved far better overall results than ammonium humates. Results were inter-correlated in order to appraise the influence of humic acids physical and chemical properties on biological activity. Surprisingly, fractions with the lowest molecular size (0-35 kDa) showed no correlation with bioactivity results (Pearson coefficient from 0.05 to -0.4). On the contrary, middle-sized fractions (35-175 kDa) showed highly significant positive correlation (Pearson coefficient up to 0.92) and the highest molecular-size-fractions (275-350 kDa) showed negative correlation (Pearson coefficient up to -0.75). These findings were identical for both potassium and ammonium humates. No connection was found between bioactivity of humates and polyols content which was remarkably high; it reached 150 mg per g of humic acids in the most extreme case of 5% hydrogene peroxide pre-treatment. In the final analysis, the preparation mode bore pivotal responsibility for the control of humic acids biological effect and showed the best results for potassium humates obtained from lignite pre-treated by acetic acid and by 2% hydrogen peroxide.

  15. Interaction effects in magnetic oxide nanoparticle systems

    The interaction effects in magnetic nanoparticle system were studied through a Monte Carlo simulation. The results of simulations were compared with two different magnetic systems, namely, iron oxide polymer nanocomposites prepared by polymerization over core and nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite thin films prepared by ...

  16. Ciprofibrate, clofibric acid and respective glycinate derivatives. Effects of a four-week treatment on male lean and obese Zucker rats.

    Lupp, Amelie; Karge, Elke; Deufel, Thomas; Oelschlägers, Herbert; Fleck, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Fibrates are widely prescribed in hyperlpidemic patients to prevent atherosclerosis. Their therapeutic use, however, can be associated with adverse effects like gastrointestinal disorders, myalgia, myositis and hepatotoxicity. In rodents large doses can even cause hepatocellular carcinoma. Additionally, interactions with the biotransformation of other compounds at the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system have been observed. Thus, the discovery of new substances or derivatives with less side effects is of great interest. In the present study the influence of a four-week daily oral administration of 2 mg/kg body weight ciprofibrate (CAS 52214-84-3) or of 100 mg/kg body weight clofibric acid (CAS 882-09-7) was compared to that of the respective doses of their newly synthesized glycine conjugates in adult male lean and obese Zucker rats. Although obese rats displayed distinctly higher serum lipid concentrations, after fibrate treatment values were significantly lowered in lean animals only. Livers of obese rats were significantly enlarged, histologically showing a fine-droplet like fatty degeneration and an increase in glycogen content, but no signs of inflammation. After fibrate administration histologically a hypertrophy, an eosinophilia, a reduced glycogen content and also hepatocyteapoptosis were observed. Livers of obese rats displayed higher CYP1A1 andCYP2E1 expression, but lower immunostaining for CYP2B1 and CYP3A2. No differences between the two groups of rats were seen with respect to CYP4A1 expression. Due to fibrate treatment especially CYP2E1 and CYP4A1, but also CYP1A1, 2B1 and 3A2 were induced. Resulting CYP mediated monooxygenase activities were also elevated in most cases. In general, effects of clofibric acid and clofibric acid glycinate (CAS 4896-55-3) were less distinct than those of ciprofibrate and its glycinate (CAS 640772-36-7). With no parameterinvestigated major differences were seen between the parent fibrates and their glycine conjugates. Thus, the

  17. Effects of Group Interactive Brainstorming on Creativity

    Park-Gates, Shari Lane

    2001-01-01

    Effects of Group Interactive Brainstorming on Creativity By Shari Park-Gates Committee Co Chairs: Anna Marshall-Baker and Jeanete E. Bowker Near Environments (ABSTRACT) Corporations spend a great deal of time and money trying to facilitate innovation in their employees. The act of introducing something new, a product or a service that is viable and innovative is often increased by enhancing or nurturing creativity. This experimental study investigated the effect o...

  18. Effective interactions for description of multistep processes

    Avrigeanu, M.; Stetcu, I.; Avrigeanu, V.; Antonov, A.N.; Lenske, H.

    2000-01-01

    The reliability of realistic M3Y effective NN interactions to describe multistep direct (MSD) processes is proved by analysing the corresponding real optical potentials. This trial is done in order to overcome the uncertainties of the effective NN-interaction strength V 0 obtained by direct fit to the experimental data. The microscopic potential for the nucleon-nucleus scattering at energies lower than 100 MeV has been calculated by using nucleonic and mesonic form factors. It has been analysed through (i) a comparison with phenomenological optical potentials, and (ii) its use for description of nucleon elastic scattering angular distributions. It results that the strongly simplified model interactions usually involved within MSD reaction theory, e.g. 1 fm range Yukawa (1Y) term, neglect important dynamical details of such processes. An 1Y-equivalent V 0 strength of a realistic effective NN interaction is determined by corresponding optical-potential volume integrals, and involved within Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin theory calculations with the final goal of MSD studies without any V 0 free parameter. (authors)

  19. Operator representation for effective realistic interactions

    Weber, Dennis; Feldmeier, Hans; Neff, Thomas [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We present a method to derive an operator representation from the partial wave matrix elements of effective realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials. This method allows to employ modern effective interactions, which are mostly given in matrix element representation, also in nuclear many-body methods requiring explicitly the operator representation, for example ''Fermionic Molecular Dynamics'' (FMD). We present results for the operator representation of effective interactions obtained from the Argonne V18 potential with the Uenitary Correlation Operator Method'' (UCOM) and the ''Similarity Renormalization Group'' (SRG). Moreover, the operator representation allows a better insight in the nonlocal structure of the potential: While the UCOM transformed potential only shows a quadratic momentum dependence, the momentum dependence of SRG transformed potentials is beyond such a simple polynomial form.

  20. Respect for rational autonomy.

    Walker, Rebecca L

    2009-12-01

    The standard notion of autonomy in medical ethics does not require that autonomous choices not be irrational. The paper gives three examples of seemingly irrational patient choices and discusses how a rational autonomy analysis differs from the standard view. It then considers whether a switch to the rational autonomy view would lead to overriding more patient decisions but concludes that this should not be the case. Rather, a determination of whether individual patient decisions are autonomous is much less relevant than usually considered in determining whether health care providers must abide by these decisions. Furthermore, respect for rational autonomy entails strong positive requirements of respect for the autonomy of the person as a rational decision maker. The rationality view of autonomy is conceptually stronger than the standard view, allows for a more nuanced understanding of the practical moral calculus involved in respecting patient autonomy, and promotes positive respect for patient autonomy.

  1. Pairing properties of realistic effective interactions

    Gargano A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the pairing properties of an effective shell-model interaction defined within a model space outside 132Sn and derived by means of perturbation theory from the CD-Bonn free nucleon-nucleon potential. It turns out that the neutron pairing component of the effective interaction is significantly weaker than the proton one, which accounts for the large pairing gap difference observed in the two-valence identical particle nuclei 134Sn and 134Te. The role of the contribution arising from one particle-one hole excitations in determining the pairing force is discussed and its microscopic structure is also analyzed in terms of the multipole decomposition.

  2. Nature of the effective interaction between dendrimers

    Mandal, Taraknath; Dasgupta, Chandan; Maiti, Prabal K.

    2014-01-01

    We have performed fully atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the effective interaction between two polyamidoamine dendrimers. Using the umbrella sampling technique, we have obtained the potential of mean force (PMF) between the dendrimers and investigated the effects of protonation level and dendrimer size on the PMF. Our results show that the interaction between the dendrimers can be tuned from purely repulsive to partly attractive by changing the protonation level. The PMF profiles are well-fitted by the sum of an exponential and a Gaussian function with the weight of the exponential function dominating over that of the Gaussian function. This observation is in disagreement with the results obtained in previous analytic [C. Likos, M. Schmidt, H. Löwen, M. Ballauff, D. Pötschke, and P. Lindner, Macromolecules 34, 2914 (2001)] and coarse-grained simulation [I. Götze, H. Harreis, and C. Likos, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 7761 (2004)] studies which predicted the effective interaction to be Gaussian

  3. Nature of the effective interaction between dendrimers

    Mandal, Taraknath, E-mail: taraknath@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Dasgupta, Chandan, E-mail: cdgupta@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Maiti, Prabal K., E-mail: maiti@physics.iisc.ernet.in [Centre for Condensed Matter Theory, Physics Department, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560012 (India)

    2014-10-14

    We have performed fully atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the effective interaction between two polyamidoamine dendrimers. Using the umbrella sampling technique, we have obtained the potential of mean force (PMF) between the dendrimers and investigated the effects of protonation level and dendrimer size on the PMF. Our results show that the interaction between the dendrimers can be tuned from purely repulsive to partly attractive by changing the protonation level. The PMF profiles are well-fitted by the sum of an exponential and a Gaussian function with the weight of the exponential function dominating over that of the Gaussian function. This observation is in disagreement with the results obtained in previous analytic [C. Likos, M. Schmidt, H. Löwen, M. Ballauff, D. Pötschke, and P. Lindner, Macromolecules 34, 2914 (2001)] and coarse-grained simulation [I. Götze, H. Harreis, and C. Likos, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 7761 (2004)] studies which predicted the effective interaction to be Gaussian.

  4. Toleration out of respect?

    Lægaard, Sune

    2013-01-01

    Under conditions of pluralism different cultures, interests or values can come into conflict, which raises the problem of how to secure peaceful co-existence. The idea of toleration historically emerged as an answer to this problem. Recently Rainer Forst has argued that toleration should not just...... be based on a modus vivendi designed to secure peaceful co-existence, but should be based on moral reasons. Forst therefore advances what he calls the ‘respect conception’ of toleration as an in itself morally desirable type of relationship, which is furthermore the only conception of toleration...... that avoids various so-called ‘paradoxes of toleration’. The paper first examines whether Forst’s respect conception can be applied descriptively to distinguish between actual patterns of behaviour and classify different acts of toleration. Then the focus is shifted to toleration out of respect as a normative...

  5. Ombud's Corner: Respect @ CERN

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010 CERN has been a member of the Geneva-based association "Le respect, ça change la vie". Four years later and in conjunction with CERN’s celebration of its 60 years of ‘science for peace’, it is time to launch a new respectful workplace awareness campaign under the auspices of the Ombud.   Mutual respect is a basic pillar of peace. At CERN, we pride ourselves on our history, which started when a handful of Europe’s visionary scientists saw the opportunity that an international laboratory for fundamental research would present in bringing nations together. That idea has worked very well and, today, our success can be measured not only in terms of unprecedented scientific achievements but also in terms of training and education, and exemplary collaboration across borders, cultures and an extensive range of differences. In order for history to continue along these positive lines, and coming back to the awareness campai...

  6. Respect as an Incentive

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    Assuming that people care not only about what others do but also on what others think, we study respect as a non-monetary source of motivation in a context where the length of the employment relationship is endogenous.  In our three-stage gift-exchange experiment, the employer can express respect...... by giving the employee costly symbolic rewards after observing his level of effort. This experiment sheds light on the extent to which symbolic rewards are used, how they affect employees' further effort, the duration of relationships, and the profits of employers. Furthermore, we study whether employers...

  7. Respect or resignation?

    Liveng, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Students in the social- and health care worker education must learn to show "understanding" and "respect" for the seniors they help. How difficult it is to go from theory to practise becomes painfully obvious the forst time a student empties a bed pan.......Students in the social- and health care worker education must learn to show "understanding" and "respect" for the seniors they help. How difficult it is to go from theory to practise becomes painfully obvious the forst time a student empties a bed pan....

  8. Marginal and Interaction Effects in Ordered Response Models

    Debdulal Mallick

    2009-01-01

    In discrete choice models the marginal effect of a variable of interest that is interacted with another variable differs from the marginal effect of a variable that is not interacted with any variable. The magnitude of the interaction effect is also not equal to the marginal effect of the interaction term. I present consistent estimators of both marginal and interaction effects in ordered response models. This procedure is general and can easily be extended to other discrete choice models. I ...

  9. Toleration out of respect?

    Lægaard, Sune

    2014-01-01

    be based on a modus vivendi designed to secure peaceful co-existence, but should be based on moral reasons. Forst therefore advances what he calls the ‘respect conception’ of toleration as an in itself morally desirable type of relationship, which is furthermore the only conception of toleration...

  10. Stress Effects on Multiple Memory System Interactions

    Ness, Deborah; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Extensive behavioural, pharmacological, and neurological research reports stress effects on mammalian memory processes. While stress effects on memory quantity have been known for decades, the influence of stress on multiple memory systems and their distinct contributions to the learning process have only recently been described. In this paper, after summarizing the fundamental biological aspects of stress/emotional arousal and recapitulating functionally and anatomically distinct memory systems, we review recent animal and human studies exploring the effects of stress on multiple memory systems. Apart from discussing the interaction between distinct memory systems in stressful situations, we will also outline the fundamental role of the amygdala in mediating such stress effects. Additionally, based on the methods applied in the herein discussed studies, we will discuss how memory translates into behaviour. PMID:27034845

  11. Stress Effects on Multiple Memory System Interactions

    Deborah Ness

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive behavioural, pharmacological, and neurological research reports stress effects on mammalian memory processes. While stress effects on memory quantity have been known for decades, the influence of stress on multiple memory systems and their distinct contributions to the learning process have only recently been described. In this paper, after summarizing the fundamental biological aspects of stress/emotional arousal and recapitulating functionally and anatomically distinct memory systems, we review recent animal and human studies exploring the effects of stress on multiple memory systems. Apart from discussing the interaction between distinct memory systems in stressful situations, we will also outline the fundamental role of the amygdala in mediating such stress effects. Additionally, based on the methods applied in the herein discussed studies, we will discuss how memory translates into behaviour.

  12. Order effect in interactive information retrieval evaluation

    Clemmensen, Melanie Landvad; Borlund, Pia

    2016-01-01

    , and the good-subject effect shed light on how and why order effect may affect test participants’ IR system interaction and search behaviour. Research limitations/implications – Insight about order effect has implications for test design of IIR studies and hence the knowledge base generated on the basis...... of such studies. Due to the limited sample of 20 test participants (Library and Information Science (LIS) students) inference statistics is not applicable; hence conclusions can be drawn from this sample of test participants only. Originality/value – Only few studies in LIS focus on order effect and none from...... the perspective of IIR. Keywords Evaluation, Research methods, Information retrieval, User studies, Searching, Information searches...

  13. Stress Effects on Multiple Memory System Interactions.

    Ness, Deborah; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Extensive behavioural, pharmacological, and neurological research reports stress effects on mammalian memory processes. While stress effects on memory quantity have been known for decades, the influence of stress on multiple memory systems and their distinct contributions to the learning process have only recently been described. In this paper, after summarizing the fundamental biological aspects of stress/emotional arousal and recapitulating functionally and anatomically distinct memory systems, we review recent animal and human studies exploring the effects of stress on multiple memory systems. Apart from discussing the interaction between distinct memory systems in stressful situations, we will also outline the fundamental role of the amygdala in mediating such stress effects. Additionally, based on the methods applied in the herein discussed studies, we will discuss how memory translates into behaviour.

  14. International experience with the bundle behavior of fuel elements of sodium cooled reactors; derivation of a figure of merit for the judgement of fuel pin bundle parameters with respect to abrasion due to thermoelastic pin-pin interaction

    Toebbe, H.

    1987-10-01

    The report describes the status of experience with respect to the abrasion behavior of bundles in standard fuel elements and test elements with wire or grid spacing in the reactors Rapsodie fortissimo, Phenix, DFR, PFR, EBR-II, FFTF, JOYO and KNK II. With the help of simple considerations concerning thermoelastic pin-pin interactions a figure of merit is deduced from the different bundle parameters, which allows a comparative judgement of the parameters of different bundle concepts [de

  15. Modality shift effects mimic multisensory interactions

    Gondan, Matthias; Vorberg, D.; Greenlee, M.W.

    2007-01-01

    be avoided using an additional tactile stimulus (T) and evaluating the ERP difference (T + TAV) - (TA + TV). A second possible confound is the modality shift effect (MSE): for example, the auditory N1 is increased if an auditory stimulus follows a visual stimulus, whereas it is smaller if the modality......A frequent approach to study interactions of the auditory and the visual system is to measure event-related potentials (ERPs) to auditory, visual, and auditory-visual stimuli (A, V, AV). A nonzero result of the AV - (A + V) comparison indicates that the sensory systems interact at a specific...... processing stage. Two possible biases weaken the conclusions drawn by this approach: first, subtracting two ERPs from one requires that A, V, and AV do not share any common activity. We have shown before (Gondan and Röder in Brain Res 1073-1074:389-397, 2006) that the problem of common activity can...

  16. Grain interaction effects in polycrystalline Cu

    Thorning, C.; Somers, Marcel A.J.; Wert, John A.

    2005-01-01

    Crystal orientation maps for a grain in a deformed Cu polycrystal have been analysed with the goal of understanding the effect of grain interactions on orientation subdivision. The polycrystal was incrementally strained in tension to 5, 8, 15 and 25% extension; a crystal orientation map...... was measured after each strain increment. The measurements are represented as rotations from the initial crystal orientation. A coarse domain structure forms in the initial 5% strain increment and persists at higher strains. Crystal rotations for all coarse domains in the grain are consistent with the full...... range of Tailor solutions for axisymmetric strain; grain interactions are not required to account for the coarse domain structure. Special orientation domains extend 20-100 µm into the grain at various locations around its periphery. The special orientation domain morphologies include layers along...

  17. Contamination Effects Due to Space Environmental Interactions

    Chen, Philip T.; Paquin, Krista C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular and particulate contaminants are commonly generated from the orbital spacecraft operations that are under the influence of the space environment. Once generated, these contaminants may attach to the surfaces of the spacecraft or may remain in the vicinity of the spacecraft. In the event these contaminants come to rest on the surfaces of the spacecraft or situated in the line-of-sight of the observation path, they will create various degrees of contamination effect which may cause undesirable effects for normal spacecraft operations, There will be circumstances in which the spacecraft may be subjected to special space environment due to operational conditions. Interactions between contaminants and special space environment may alter or greatly increase the contamination effect due to the synergistic effect. This paper will address the various types of contamination generation on orbit, the general effects of the contamination on spacecraft systems, and the typical impacts on the spacecraft operations due to the contamination effect. In addition, this paper will explain the contamination effect induced by the space environment and will discuss the intensified contamination effect resulting from the synergistic effect with the special space environment.

  18. Experimental and modelling study of the effect of airflow orientation with respect to strip electrode on ozone production of surface dielectric barrier discharge

    Mikeš, J.; Pekárek, S.; Soukup, I.

    2016-11-01

    This study examines the effect of airflow orientation with respect to the strip active electrode on concentration of ozone and nitrogen dioxide produced in a planar generator based on the surface dielectric barrier discharge. The orientation of the airflow was tested in parallel and perpendicular with respect to the strips. It was found that in the investigated range of average discharge power, the ozone concentration increases approximately by 25% when airflow was oriented in parallel with respect to the strips in comparison with perpendicular orientation of the airflow. Similarly the increase of nitrogen dioxide concentration was observed for parallel orientation of the airflow with respect to the strips in comparison with the perpendicular orientation of the airflow. Within the range of wavelengths from 250 to 1100 nm, the changes of intensities of spectral lines associated with airflow orientation have been observed. A 3D numerical model describing ion trajectories and airflow patterns have also been developed.

  19. Respect as an Incentive

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    whether employers’ decisions to give symbolic rewards are driven by strategic considerations. We find that employers do make use of symbolic rewards and chiefly to express their satisfaction with the employee. Symbolic rewards are associated with higher profits and increased probability of continuing......In this paper we examine respect as a non-monetary source of motivation. Our experiment sheds light on the extent to which symbolic rewards are used, how they are valued by the employees, and how they affect employee effort, the duration of relationships, and profits of employers. We also study...

  20. Assessing Spurious Interaction Effects in Structural Equation Modeling

    Harring, Jeffrey R.; Weiss, Brandi A.; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have stressed the importance of simultaneously estimating interaction and quadratic effects in multiple regression analyses, even if theory only suggests an interaction effect should be present. Specifically, past studies suggested that failing to simultaneously include quadratic effects when testing for interaction effects could…

  1. Molecular effects: interactions with chemicals and viruses

    Hanawalt, P.C.

    1980-01-01

    Research focused upon an understanding of the cellular responses to the molecular effects of ionizing radiation should be an essential program component in the Federal Strategy for Research into the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation. Although we know that DNA is a principal target molecule for some highly significant biological effects of ionizing radiation, we need to learn which other target substances such as membrane components may also be important. Most of the emphasis should continue to be on DNA effects and highest priority should be assigned to the identification of the complete spectrum of products produced in DNA. Once the lesions are known we can proceed to determine how these behave as blocks to replication and transcription or as modulators on the fidelity of these crucial processes. Considerable work should be done on the repair of these lesions. High priority should be given to the search for mutants in mammalian cell systems with evident defects in the processing of specific lesions. Viruses should provide important tools for the research in this area, as probes for host cell repair responses and also for the isolation of mutants. Furthermore, it is important to consider the interaction of viruses and ionizing radiation with regard to possible modulating effects on repair processes and tumorigenesis. Finally we must consider the important problem of the modification of repair responses by environmental factors

  2. Towards a new effective interaction of the Gogny type

    Farine, M.; Von-Eiff, D.; Schuck, P.; Berger, J.F.; Decharge, J.; Girod, M.

    1999-01-01

    A new effective two-body interaction of the Gogny type (DIP) is presented. While the merits of the currently used parametrizations (D1 and D1S) remain practically untouched, significant improvements are achieved with respect to three of their main deficiencies: (i) the depth of the optical potential agrees with experiments to energies beyond 200 MeV, (ii) sum rules of Landau parameters are better fulfilled and cleaned from instabilities due to the isovector breathing mode at physical values of the density and (iii) a realistic behaviour for the neutron matter equation of state at high densities is achieved. (author)

  3. Constraints on effective interactions imposed by antisymmetry and charge independence

    Stringari, S [Trento Univ. (Italy). Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica; Brink, D M [Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Theoretical Physics

    1978-07-24

    Restrictions on the form of the energy functional following antisymmetry and charge independence have been investigated for a Hartree-Fock theory based on effective interactions. These restrictions impose severe constraints on density dependent effective interactions.

  4. Nuclear spectroscopy with density dependent effective interactions

    Krewald, S.

    1976-07-01

    The paper investigates excited nuclear states with density-dependent effective interactions. In the first part of the paper, the structure and the width of the multipole giant resonances discovered in 1972 are derived microscopically. Because of their high excitation energy, these giant resonances are unstable to particle emission and thus often have a considerable decay width. Due to their collective structure, the giant resonances can be described by RPA in good approximation. In this paper, the continuum RPA is applied to the spherical nuclei 16 O, 40 Ca, 90 Zr and 208 Pb. The experimental centroid energy are in very good agreement with the calculations performed in the paper. (orig./WL) [de

  5. Hadronization of QCD and effective interactions

    Frank, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    An introductory treatment of hadronization through functional integral calculus and bifocal Bose fields is given. Emphasis is placed on the utility of this approach for providing a connection between QCD and effective hadronic field theories. The hadronic interactions obtained by this method are nonlocal due to the QCD substructure, yet, in the presence of an electromagnetic field, maintain the electromagnetic gauge invariance manifest at the quark level. A local chiral model which is structurally consistent with chiral perturbation theory is obtained through a derivative expansion of the nonlocalities with determined, finite coefficients. Tree-level calculations of the pion form factor and π - π scattering, which illustrate the dual constituent-quark-chiral-model nature of this approach, are presented

  6. Quasiconfigurations and the theory of effective interactions

    Poves, A.; Zuker, A.

    1980-01-01

    Perturbation theory is reformulated. Schroedinger's equation is recast as a non linear integral equation which yields by Neumann expansion a linked cluster series for the degenerate, quasi degenerate or non degenerate problem. An effective interaction theory emerges that can be formulated in a biorthogonal basis leading to a non Hermitian secular problem. Hermiticity can be recovered in a clear and rigorous way. As the mathematical form of the theory is dictated by the request of physical clarity the latter is obtained naturally. When written in diagrammatic many body language, the integral equation produces a set of linked coupled equations for the degenerate case. The classic summations (Brueckner, Bethe-Faddeev and RPA) emerge naturally. Possible extensions of nuclear matter theory are suggested

  7. Teaching respect: a philosophical analysis

    L. van Rooyen

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available According to a Zulu proverb a human being can only become truly human because of others. Each person can only become more human, more himself- regardless of his sex - through the co-involvement of others. It is the love for one’s neighbour and the respect one has for him/her as a person which makes one consider the other party's feelings, viewpoints and circumstances. In order to arrive at a situation of peaceful coexistence it is important to realize that human attitudes and a mature life style evolve through a process of learning and interaction with others. It is a timeconsuming and costly process which starts at infancy and continues throughout someone's life. Instruction concerning interpersonal relations and the teaching of respect cannot be confined to individual lessons or working sessions at home or in school. Discussions and conversations concerning interpersonal relations need to form an integral and natural part of a child’s life within the home environment and throughout the pupil's school career. It is senseless if educators talk about the importance of teaching respect only to reveal disrespectful behaviour themselves, or to talk about the importance of self-esteem in the paying of respect whilst causing children to feel negative about themselves. To be able to express respect to other human beings, one needs to be respected. A child needs to experience how it feels when homage is paid. The following rule of life applies in this regard: one can never give if one has never received respect.

  8. Biochemical effects of lead exposure and toxicity on battery manufacturing workers of Western Maharashtra (India): with respect to liver and kidney function tests

    Mandakini Kshirsagar; Jyotsna Patil; Arun Patil; Ganesh Ghanwat; Ajit Sontakke; R.K. Ayachit

    2015-01-01

    Background: The battery recycling and manufacturing involves the use of metallic lead for making grids, bearing and solder. The process results in release of lead particles and lead oxide causing environmental pollution and severe lead poisoning. Aims and Objectives: To know the present scenario of the blood lead level and its biochemical effects on occupational lead-exposed population, mainly battery manufacturing workers in Western Maharashtra (India) with respect to liver and kidney functi...

  9. Spiritual Values and Spiritual Practices: Interactive Effects on Leadership Effectiveness

    Zakiyulfikri Ali

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between spirituality and leadership effectiveness has been discussed over decades. These relations have been separated in two big perspective—first, an esoteric realm of intangible ideas and emotions; and second, a practical area and scientific inquiry. This research tries to integrate these two different perspectives. Specifically, this research examines the effects of spiritual values and spiritual practices on leadership effectiveness. The findings indicate that spiritual values and spiritual practices have positive effects on leadership effectiveness. This research also shows that spiritual values and spiritual practices have interactive effects on leadership effectiveness. This result implies that organizations should enhance the spiritual values and practices. Discussion, practical, and theoretical implications for further researches are offered. DOI: 10.15408/etk.v17i1.6497

  10. Three Justifications for Effectively Teaching Exceptional Babies to Third Grade with Respect to Their Characteristics, an Effective Curricula, and an Exceptional-Research Data Base

    Jaramillo, James Anthony Montrose

    2013-01-01

    Both Pre-K and K-3rd grade exceptional or talented children/students not only want but need more of an "accommodative" ambiance where their senses are given novel multiple-intelligences data so that they can continue to intellectually grow with respect to Piaget, Erickson, and Vygotsky's developmental schemes. Thus, to do this requires us to…

  11. The effect of the interaction of various spawn grains and oil types on ...

    The results revealed that the interaction of the different spawn grains with the various oil types produced a highly significant effect (p<0.01) on the stipe length, dry weight, and stipe and pileus diameters of Lentinus squarrosulus. The interactions of corn x coconut and corn x butterfat, respectively produced stipe lengths that ...

  12. Interactive effects of pests increase seed yield.

    Gagic, Vesna; Riggi, Laura Ga; Ekbom, Barbara; Malsher, Gerard; Rusch, Adrien; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    Loss in seed yield and therefore decrease in plant fitness due to simultaneous attacks by multiple herbivores is not necessarily additive, as demonstrated in evolutionary studies on wild plants. However, it is not clear how this transfers to crop plants that grow in very different conditions compared to wild plants. Nevertheless, loss in crop seed yield caused by any single pest is most often studied in isolation although crop plants are attacked by many pests that can cause substantial yield losses. This is especially important for crops able to compensate and even overcompensate for the damage. We investigated the interactive impacts on crop yield of four insect pests attacking different plant parts at different times during the cropping season. In 15 oilseed rape fields in Sweden, we estimated the damage caused by seed and stem weevils, pollen beetles, and pod midges. Pest pressure varied drastically among fields with very low correlation among pests, allowing us to explore interactive impacts on yield from attacks by multiple species. The plant damage caused by each pest species individually had, as expected, either no, or a negative impact on seed yield and the strongest negative effect was caused by pollen beetles. However, seed yield increased when plant damage caused by both seed and stem weevils was high, presumably due to the joint plant compensatory reaction to insect attack leading to overcompensation. Hence, attacks by several pests can change the impact on yield of individual pest species. Economic thresholds based on single species, on which pest management decisions currently rely, may therefore result in economically suboptimal choices being made and unnecessary excessive use of insecticides.

  13. The role of complex formation between cytochrome c and nad in the manifestation of the protective effect of dinucleotide with respect to hemoprotein

    Artyukhov, V.G.; Loboda, T.

    1990-01-01

    UV-irradiation of free ferricytochrome solutions, pH 8, induces photorecovery of protein molecules. Hemoproteide photorecovery does not occur after irradiation of the ferricytochrome c/NAD mixture, pH 6 and 8: dinucleotide exerts a photoprotective effect with respect to ferricytochrome. This NAD effect is not observed afterexposure of the ferricytochrome c/NAD system, pH 4. With this pH value, each component of the above mixture is eluted from a gel-chromatogarphic column by its peak, whereas with pH 6 and 8, NAD and ferricytochrome c leave the column as one fraction. This indicates that the photoprotective effect of the coenzyme manifests itself upon formation of complex with hemoprotein

  14. Effective interactions for extreme isospin conditions; Interactions effectives pour des conditions extremes d`isospin

    Chabanat, E.

    1995-01-01

    One of the main goal in nuclear physics research is the study of nuclei in extreme conditions of spin and isospin. The more performing tools for theoretical predictions in this field are microscopic methods such as the Hartree-Fock one based on independent particle approximation. The main ingredient for such an approach is the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction. The actual trend being the study of nuclei more and more far from the stability valley, it is necessary to cast doubt over the validity of usual effective interaction. This work constitute a study on the way one can construct a new interaction allowing some theoretical predictions on nuclei far from the stability. We have thus made a complete study of symmetric infinite nuclear matter and asymmetric one up to pure neutron matter. One shows that the asymmetry coefficient, which was considered until now as fixing isospin properties, is not sufficient to have a correct description of very exotic isospin states. A new type of constraint is shown for fixing this degree of freedom: the neutron matter equation of state. One include this equation of state, taken from a theoretical model giving a good description of radii and masses of neutron stars. One can thus expect to build up new Skyrme interaction with realistic properties of ground state of very neutron-rich nuclei. (author). 63 refs., 68 figs., 15 tabs.

  15. Neutrino interactions, proton production and a nuclear effect

    Guy, J.; Allport, P.P.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Sansum, R.A.; Venus, W.; Berggren, M.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Parker, M.A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Clayton, E.F.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Hulth, P.O.; Katz, U.; Wittek, W.; Marage, P.; Sacton, J.; Matsinos, E.; Simopoulou, E.; Myatt, G.; Neveu, M.; Apeldoorn, G.W. van

    1989-01-01

    Neutrino interactions are classified by the presence or absence of protons with momentum below 600 MeV/c at the interaction vertex. Interactions producing protons have softer x distributions for hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as for neon. In contrast to a recent claim, the effect is therefore not directly related to any nuclear effect in neon. (orig.)

  16. Neutrino interactions, proton production and a nuclear effect

    Guy, J.; Allport, P. P.; Berggren, M.; Clayton, E. F.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Hulth, P. O.; Jones, G. T.; Katz, U.; Marage, P.; Matsinos, E.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Myatt, G.; Neveu, M.; O'Neale, S.; Parker, M. A.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, R. A.; Simopoulou, E.; van Apeldoorn, G. W.; Varvell, K.; Venus, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wittek, W.

    1989-10-01

    Neutrino interactions are classified by the presence or absence of protons with momentum below 600 MeV/c at the interaction vertex. Interactions producing protons have softer x distributions for hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as for neon. In contrast to a recent claim, the effect is therefore not directly related to any nuclear effect in neon.

  17. Designing Interactions for Learning: Physicality, Interactivity, and Interface Effects in Digital Environments

    Hoffman, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to better understand the role of physicality, interactivity, and interface effects in learning with digital content. Drawing on work in cognitive science, human-computer interaction, and multimedia learning, the study argues that interfaces that promote physical interaction can provide "conceptual leverage"…

  18. Genetic Allee effects and their interaction with ecological Allee effects.

    Wittmann, Meike J; Stuis, Hanna; Metzler, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that genetic processes such as inbreeding depression and loss of genetic variation can increase the extinction risk of small populations. However, it is generally unclear whether extinction risk from genetic causes gradually increases with decreasing population size or whether there is a sharp transition around a specific threshold population size. In the ecological literature, such threshold phenomena are called 'strong Allee effects' and they can arise for example from mate limitation in small populations. In this study, we aim to (i) develop a meaningful notion of a 'strong genetic Allee effect', (ii) explore whether and under what conditions such an effect can arise from inbreeding depression due to recessive deleterious mutations, and (iii) quantify the interaction of potential genetic Allee effects with the well-known mate-finding Allee effect. We define a strong genetic Allee effect as a genetic process that causes a population's survival probability to be a sigmoid function of its initial size. The inflection point of this function defines the critical population size. To characterize survival-probability curves, we develop and analyse simple stochastic models for the ecology and genetics of small populations. Our results indicate that inbreeding depression can indeed cause a strong genetic Allee effect, but only if individuals carry sufficiently many deleterious mutations (lethal equivalents). Populations suffering from a genetic Allee effect often first grow, then decline as inbreeding depression sets in and then potentially recover as deleterious mutations are purged. Critical population sizes of ecological and genetic Allee effects appear to be often additive, but even superadditive interactions are possible. Many published estimates for the number of lethal equivalents in birds and mammals fall in the parameter range where strong genetic Allee effects are expected. Unfortunately, extinction risk due to genetic Allee effects

  19. Effect of Interaction of Methanol Leaf Extract of Spondias mombin ...

    Purpose: To study the effect of interaction between methanol leaf extract of Spondias mombin and ... Keywords: Diarrheagenic E. coli, Drug interaction, Spondias mombin, Amoxicillin, ..... coli isolated from cattle, food, and children during a one-.

  20. The effect of interactive digital storytelling gamification on microbiology classroom interactions

    Molnar, Andreea

    2018-01-01

    In this research, we study the use of interactive digital storytelling in teaching microbiology. More specifically, we carried out an exploratory study assessing the effect of using the gamification of an interactive digital storytelling on classroom dynamics and students’ interaction. The results show that the presence of gamification led to an increase in classroom discussions and in students’ engagement with the learning objectives taught by the interactive digital storytelling.

  1. Self-consistency corrections in effective-interaction calculations

    Starkand, Y.; Kirson, M.W.

    1975-01-01

    Large-matrix extended-shell-model calculations are used to compute self-consistency corrections to the effective interaction and to the linked-cluster effective interaction. The corrections are found to be numerically significant and to affect the rate of convergence of the corresponding perturbation series. The influence of various partial corrections is tested. It is concluded that self-consistency is an important effect in determining the effective interaction and improving the rate of convergence. (author)

  2. Educating student midwives around dignity and respect.

    Hall, Jenny S; Mitchell, Mary

    2017-06-01

    There is currently limited information available on how midwifery students learn to provide care that promotes dignity and respect. In recent years the importance of dignity in healthcare and treating people with respect has received considerable emphasis in both a national and international context. The aim of this discussion paper is to describe an educational workshop that enables learning to promote dignity and respect in maternity care. An interactive workshop, using different creative methods as triggers for learning will be described. Provision of learning opportunities for students around dignity and respect is important to ensure appropriate care is provided in practice. The use of creative methods to inspire has contributed to deep learning within participants. An evaluation of the workshop illustrated how learning impacted on participants practice. Data to support this is presented in this paper. The use of creative teaching approaches in a workshop setting appears to provide an effective learning opportunity around dignified and respectful care. These workshops have evoked a deep emotional response for some participants, and facilitators must be prepared for this outcome to ensure a safe space for learning. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Strong interaction effects in hadronic atoms

    Kaufmann, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    The WKB method is applied to the calculation of strong interaction-induced level widths and shifts of hadronic atoms. The calculation, while elementary enough for undergraduate quantum mechanics students, gives a good account of kaonic and antiprotonic atom data

  4. Non-perturbative effective interactions in the standard model

    Arbuzov, Boris A

    2014-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the nonperturbative dynamics in the Standard Model (SM), the basic theory of all, but gravity, fundamental interactions in nature. The Standard Model is devided into two parts: the Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the Electro-weak theory (EWT) are well-defined renormalizable theories in which the perturbation theory is valid. However, for the adequate description of the real physics nonperturbative effects are inevitable. This book describes how these nonperturbative effects may be obtained in the framework of spontaneous generation of effective interactions. The well-known example of such effective interaction is provided by the famous Nambu--Jona-Lasinio effective interaction. Also a spontaneous generation of this interaction in the framework of QCD is described and applied to the method for other effective interactions in QCD and EWT. The method is based on N.N. Bogoliubov conception of compensation equations. As a result we then describe the principle feathures of the Standard...

  5. Effective interactions from q-deformed inspired transformations

    Timoteo, V.S.; Lima, C.L.

    2006-01-01

    From the mass term for the transformed quark fields, we obtain effective contact interactions of the NJL type. The parameters of the model that maps a system of non-interacting transformed fields into quarks interacting via NJL contact terms are discussed

  6. Effective interactions from q-deformed quark fields

    Timoteo, V. S.; Lima, C. L.

    2007-01-01

    From the mass term for q-deformed quark fields, we obtain effective contact interactions of the NJL type. The parameters of the model that maps a system of non-interacting deformed fields into quarks interacting via NJL contact terms is discussed

  7. Effects of interactions between humans and domesticated animals

    Bokkers, E.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Humans have many kinds of relationships with domesticated animals. To maintain relationships interactions are needed. Interactions with animals may be beneficial for humans but may also be risky. Scientific literature on effects of human¿animal relationships and interactions in a workplace,

  8. Reputation Effects in Public and Private Interactions

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Iwasa, Yoh; Nowak, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of cooperation in a model of indirect reciprocity where people interact in public and private situations. Public interactions have a high chance to be observed by others and always affect reputation. Private interactions have a lower chance to be observed and only occasionally affect reputation. We explore all second order social norms and study conditions for evolutionary stability of action rules. We observe the competition between “honest” and “hypocritical” strategies. The former cooperate both in public and in private. The later cooperate in public, where many others are watching, but try to get away with defection in private situations. The hypocritical idea is that in private situations it does not pay-off to cooperate, because there is a good chance that nobody will notice it. We find simple and intuitive conditions for the evolution of honest strategies. PMID:26606239

  9. Interatomic interactions in the effective medium theory

    Jacobsen, K.W.; Puska, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    An expression is derived for the total energy of a system of interacting atoms based on an ansatz for the total electron density of the system as a superposition of atom densities taken from calculations for the atoms embedded in a homogeneous electron gas. This leads to an expression for the interaction energy in terms of the embedding energy of the atoms in a homogeneous electron gas, and corrections accounting for instance for the d-d hybridization in the transition metals. The density of the homogeneous electron gas is chosen as the average of the density from the surrounding atoms. Due to the variational property of the total energy functional the errors in the interaction energy is second order in the deviation of the ansatz density from the true ground state values. The applicability of the approach is illustrated by calculations of the chohesive properties of some simple metals and all the 3d transition metals. The interaction energy can be expressed in a form simple enough to allow calculations for low symmetry systems and will be very well suited for simulations of time dependent and finite temperature problems. Preliminary results for the phonon dispersion relations and the surface energies and relaxations for Al are used to illustrate the versatility of the approach. The division of the total energy into a density dependent part, an electrostatic 'pair potential' part, and a hybridization part provides a very simple way of understanding a number of these phenomena. (orig.)

  10. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy with respect to psychological symptoms and recovering autobiographical memory in patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder

    Akbarian, Fatemehsadat; Bajoghli, Hafez; Haghighi, Mohammad; Kalak, Nadeem; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Brand, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Given the persistence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and its major impact on everyday life, it is important to identify effective treatments. In additional to pharmacological treatments, psychotherapeutic treatments are also highly effective. The aim of the present study was to investigate, among a sample of patients suffering from PTSD, the influence of an additional cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention on their symptoms of PTSD, depression, and anxiety, and on autobiographical memory. Methods A total of 40 patients suffering from PTSD (mean age: 31.64 years; 78.6% female patients) and under psychopharmacological treatment were randomly assigned to an intervention or control condition. The intervention consisted of ten group sessions (one 60–90 minute session per week) of CBT. At baseline and 10 weeks later, a series of self-rating and experts’-rating questionnaires were completed. Results Over time, symptoms of PTSD, depression, and anxiety decreased; however, greater improvement was observed in the experimental than the control condition. Likewise, as a general pattern of results, memory performance improved over time, though again this improvement was greater in the experimental condition. Conclusion Compared to a control condition, additional CBT improves the treatment of PTSD, with respect to both symptoms and autobiographical memory. PMID:25737635

  11. Environmental effects of ozone depletion and its interactions with climate change: progress report, 2015

    The Environmental Effects Assessment Panel (EEAP) is one of three Panels that regularly informs the Parties (countries) to the Montreal Protocol on the effects of ozone depletion and the consequences of climate change interactions with respect to human health, animals, plants, bi...

  12. Towards a better understanding of the respective effects of milk yield and body condition dynamics on reproduction in Holstein dairy cows.

    Cutullic, E; Delaby, L; Gallard, Y; Disenhaus, C

    2012-03-01

    The overall reproductive performance has decreased over the last decades, involving changes in cyclicity, oestrous behaviour and fertility. High milk yield (MY), low body condition score (BCS) and large body condition (BC) loss have been identified as risk factors. However, these effects are often confounded, as high MY and body lipid reserve mobilization are correlated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the respective effects of MY and BC on post-partum ovarian cyclicity, oestrus and fertility of Holstein cows. This study provides novel information, as MY and BC change were uncoupled in the overall dataset that included 98 lactations and milk progesterone profiles. Cows were assigned to two feeding-level groups: high feed, which achieved high MY and moderate BC loss throughout lactation (8410 kg, -1.17 unit from calving to nadir BCS), and low feed, which limited MY and triggered a large BC loss (5719 kg, -1.54 unit). MY and BC had different effects at different stages of the reproductive process. Cyclicity as well as non-fertilization and early embryo mortality were mainly driven by body lipid reserves, whereas oestrous behaviour and late embryo mortality were related to MY. The results point to possible uncoupling between cyclicity, oestrus and early and late embryo survival allowing compensation along the reproductive process and leading to similar final reproductive performance. In compact calving systems, which require high pregnancy rates within a short period, higher MY strategies appear unsuitable even where BCS is maintained, owing to depressed oestrous behaviour and probably increased late embryo mortality, which delays rebreeding. Similarly, strategies that compromise cyclicity and fertility by excessively low BCS are unsuitable.

  13. Effects of interactions between humans and domesticated animals

    Bokkers, E.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Humans have many kinds of relationships with domesticated animals. To maintain relationships interactions are needed. Interactions with animals may be beneficial for humans but may also be risky. Scientific literature on effects of human¿animal relationships and interactions in a workplace, health-care and residential context has been reviewed to develop ideas about the effects farm animals can have on humans. Although there are quite a few studies, the variety of methods, the complexity of t...

  14. Effects of instanton induced interactions on pentaquarks

    Shinozaki, Tetsuya; Oka, Makoto; Takeuchi, Sachiko

    2005-01-01

    Roles of instanton induced interactions (III) in the masses of pentaquark baryons, Θ + (J=1/2 and 3/2) and Ξ -- , and a dibaryon, H, are discussed using the MIT bag model. It is shown that the two-body terms in III give a strong attraction mainly due to the increase of the number of flavor antisymmetric quark pairs in multiquark systems. In contrast, the three-body u-d-s interaction is repulsive. It is found that III lowers the mass of negative-parity Θ + as much as 100 MeV from the mass predicted by the bag model without III. We also consider possible quark model configurations for positive-parity Θ + under III

  15. Spin effects in the weak interaction

    Freedman, S.J.; Chicago Univ., IL; Chicago Univ., IL

    1990-01-01

    Modern experiments investigating the beta decay of the neutron and light nuclei are still providing important constraints on the theory of the weak interaction. Beta decay experiments are yielding more precise values for allowed and induced weak coupling constants and putting constraints on possible extensions to the standard electroweak model. Here we emphasize the implications of recent experiments to pin down the strengths of the weak vector and axial vector couplings of the nucleon

  16. Effect of coulomb interaction on Anderson localization

    Waintal, X.

    1999-01-01

    We study the quantum mechanics of interacting particles in a disordered system, and in particular, what happens to Anderson localisation when interaction is taken into account. In the first part, one looks at the excited states of two particles in one dimension. For this model, it has been shown (Shepelyansky 1994) that a local repulsive interaction can partially destroy Anderson localisation. Here, we show that this model has similarities with the three-dimensional Anderson model at the metal-insulator transition. In particular, the maximum of rigidity obtained in the spectral statistics correspond to some intermediary statistics that cannot be described by random matrix theory neither by a Poisson statistics. The wave functions show a multifractal behaviour and the spreading of the center of mass of a wave packet is logarithmic in time. The second part deals with the ground state of a finite density of spinless fermions in two dimensions. After the scaling theory of localisation, it was commonly accepted that there was no metal in two dimensions. This idea has been challenged by the observation of a metal-insulator transition in low density electron gas (Kravchenko et al. 1994). We propose a scenario in which a metallic phase occurs between the Anderson insulator and the pinned Wigner crystal. This intermediate phase is characterized by an alignment of the local currents flowing in the system. (author)

  17. Explaining Interaction Effects within and across Levels of Analysis

    Andersson, Ulf; Cuervo-Cazurra, Alvaro; Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Many manuscripts submitted to the Journal of International Business Studies propose an interaction effect in their models in an effort to explain the complexity and contingency of relationships across borders. In this article, we provide guidance on how best to explain the interaction effects...

  18. Anticipated Ongoing Interaction versus Channel Effects of Relational Communication in Computer-Mediated Interaction.

    Walther, Joseph B.

    1994-01-01

    Assesses the related effects of anticipated future interaction and different communication media (computer-mediated versus face-to-face communication) on the communication of relational intimacy and composure. Shows that the assignment of long-term versus short-term partnerships has a larger impact on anticipated future interaction reported by…

  19. Evidence for multiple stressor interactions and effects on coral reefs.

    Ban, Stephen S; Graham, Nicholas A J; Connolly, Sean R

    2014-03-01

    Concern is growing about the potential effects of interacting multiple stressors, especially as the global climate changes. We provide a comprehensive review of multiple stressor interactions in coral reef ecosystems, which are widely considered to be one of the most sensitive ecosystems to global change. First, we synthesized coral reef studies that examined interactions of two or more stressors, highlighting stressor interactions (where one stressor directly influences another) and potentially synergistic effects on response variables (where two stressors interact to produce an effect that is greater than purely additive). For stressor-stressor interactions, we found 176 studies that examined at least 2 of the 13 stressors of interest. Applying network analysis to analyze relationships between stressors, we found that pathogens were exacerbated by more costressors than any other stressor, with ca. 78% of studies reporting an enhancing effect by another stressor. Sedimentation, storms, and water temperature directly affected the largest number of other stressors. Pathogens, nutrients, and crown-of-thorns starfish were the most-influenced stressors. We found 187 studies that examined the effects of two or more stressors on a third dependent variable. The interaction of irradiance and temperature on corals has been the subject of more research (62 studies, 33% of the total) than any other combination of stressors, with many studies reporting a synergistic effect on coral symbiont photosynthetic performance (n = 19). Second, we performed a quantitative meta-analysis of existing literature on this most-studied interaction (irradiance and temperature). We found that the mean effect size of combined treatments was statistically indistinguishable from a purely additive interaction, although it should be noted that the sample size was relatively small (n = 26). Overall, although in aggregate a large body of literature examines stressor effects on coral reefs and coral

  20. Technical meeting on lessons learned with respect to SAT implementation, including development of trainers and use of cost effective training methods

    2002-01-01

    The past years have brought some significant changes in the world energy market, where the nuclear power plants and utilities are operating. Part of NPPs is privatised now; the electricity markets are liberalized and become more and more international. Due to the increase of competition, the power production costs are now monitored more closely than before. The opening of electricity markets has led the nuclear power plants to be under the serious economic pressure with a demand for continuous cost reduction. All these require from NPPs to make their personnel training more cost-effective. In addition, based on modern technology, a great amount of new training tools, aids and technologies have been introduced during the last 2-3 years, these new opportunities can be quite useful for training cost optimization. On the basis of experience gained worldwide in the application of the systematic approach to training (SAT), SAT based training is now a broad integrated approach emphasizing not only technical knowledge and skills but also human factor related knowledge, skills and attitudes. In this way, all competency requirements for attaining and maintaining personnel competence and qualification can be met, thus promoting and strengthening quality culture and safety culture, which should be fostered throughout the initial and continuing training programmes. The subject of the present technical meeting was suggested by the members of the Technical Working Group on Training and Qualification of NPP Personnel (TWG-T and Q) and supported by a number of the IAEA meetings on NPP personnel training. The technical Meeting on 'Lessons Learned with Respect to SAT Implementation, Including Development of Trainers and Use of Cost Effective Training Methods' was organized by the IAEA in co-operation with the Tecnatom A.S. and was held from 21 to 24 October 2002 in San Sebastian de los Reyes/ Madrid, Spain. The main objective of the meeting was to provide an international forum for

  1. The effect of germination and metallic salts on the stability of enzymes of three high yielding varieties of maize (Zea mays L. in respect of Bangladesh

    Rupa, A.Z.,

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted with a view to determine the effect of germination and metallic salts on nutritional quality, enzymes activity and their stability of three high yielding varieties of maize (Zea mays L.. The protein content of BHM-3, BHM-5 and BHM-6 were increased 22.37%, 26.48%, and 20.34% respectively at 48 hours then decreased drastically from 72-96 hours of germination. Starch content was increased maximum 29.19% in BHM-6 at 0 hours (non-germinating seeds among the three varieties and then decreased gradually from 48-96 hours of germination. Total sugar and reducing sugar contents of BHM-3, BHM-5 and BHM-6 seeds were maximum at 96 hours than 24-72 hours of germination while BHM-3 showed boosting increase of total sugar (336.97% due to 96 hours of germination. BHM-5 showed a tremendous increase of α-amylase (189.83% and protease (144.44% activity whereas BHM-6 showed maximum invertase activity (175.27% at 48 hours then decreased gradually from 72-96 hours of germination. The activities of enzymes were increased in presence of metallic salts such as Ca2+, Mg2+, and Mn2+ while Fe2+, Zn2+ and Cu2+ inhibited the activities moderately.

  2. Effect of different bulking agents on water variation and thermal balance and their respective contribution to bio-generated heat during long-term storage sludge biodrying process.

    Liu, Tiantian; Cui, Chongwei; He, Junguo; Tang, Jian

    2018-04-17

    Biodrying was first used for the post-treatment of long-term storage sludge with vinasse as bulking agents. The effect of different bulking agents on water and heat variation and their respective contributions to bio-generated heat during storage sludge biodrying were investigated. Three different bulking agents (beer lees and distillers grains, with conventional straw used for comparison) were mixed with storage sludge for biodrying for an 18-day period. The results revealed the treatment with beer lees as bulking agent achieved the best performance with the highest water removal capacity (658 g kg -1 initial water). The extent of organic degradation in the mixture was related to the degradation ability of the bulking agents. The degradation of C- and H-containing materials (e.g., carboxylic acid) accounted for volatile solids (VS) loss. Water and thermal analyses showed that evaporation was the main way of water loss (accounting for 90%), while evaporation heat was the main component of heat consumption (accounting for 56.67-60.62%).The biodegradation of bulking agents contributed a high proportion of the bio-generated heat consumed by water evaporation (82.35-86.67%).

  3. Searching for native tree species and respective potential biomarkers for future assessment of pollution effects on the highly diverse Atlantic Forest in SE-Brazil

    Domingos, Marisa; Bulbovas, Patricia; Camargo, Carla Z.S.; Aguiar-Silva, Cristiane; Brandão, Solange E.; Dafré-Martinelli, Marcelle; Dias, Ana Paula L.; Engela, Marcela R.G.S.; Gagliano, Janayne; Moura, Barbara B.; Alves, Edenise S.; Rinaldi, Mirian C.S.; Gomes, Eduardo P.C.; Furlan, Claudia M.; Figueiredo, Ana Maria G.

    2015-01-01

    This study summarizes the first effort to search for bioindicator tree species and respective potential biomarkers for future assessment of potential mixed pollution effects on the highly diverse Atlantic Forest in SE-Brazil. Leaves of the three most abundant species inventoried in a phytosociological survey (Croton floribundus, Piptadenia gonoacantha and Astronium graveolens) were collected in four forest remnants during winter and summer (2012). Their potential bioindicator attributes were highlighted using a screening of morphological, chemical and biochemical markers. The leaf surface structure and/or epicuticular wax composition pointed the accumulator properties of C. floribundus and P. gonoacantha. C. floribundus is a candidate for assessing potential accumulation of Cu, Cd, Mn, Ni, S and Zn. P. gonoacantha is a candidate to monitor polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Increased levels of secondary metabolites and decreased antioxidant capacity in leaves of A. graveolens may support its value as a bioindicator for oxidative pollutants by visible dark stipplings. - Highlights: • We searched for tree species from Atlantic Forest for future air pollution monitoring in Brazil. • Croton floribundus, Astronium graveolens and Piptadenia gonoacantha were possible bioindicators. • P. gonoachanta was a potential bioindicator of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. • C. floribundus was a potential bioindicator of heavy metals and sulfur. • A. graveolens may be used for monitoring oxidative pollutants, due to its biochemical leaf traits. - Inherent characteristics of the most abundant native tree species were potential biomarkers for assessing pollution effects on the highly diverse Atlantic Forest in SE-Brazil

  4. Effect of stray current on corrosion behavior of reinforcing steel: importance of cell geometry and orientation with respect to the electrical field

    Chen, Zhipei; Koleva, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    Stray current circulating in reinforced concrete structures may initiate corrosion or accelerate existing corrosion processes on embedded reinforcement. In some cases, the range of dangerous or unwanted interactions of stray currents under favorable conditions (environment), is much broader than is

  5. Comparing the effect of the application of thin capitalization rules on the tax burden of taxpayers in the Czech Republic with respect to detailed definition of joint persons

    Veronika Sobotková

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin capitalization rules were introduced in the Czech law on income tax in 1993. During the time of their existence in the law, they however passed through numerous changes, which resulted in a non-uniform exercise of the rules and caused legislative chaos. Due to these reasons, lawmakers subjected them to an essential transformation in 2009 in effort to adjust a stricter regime for the application of thin capitalization rules and to enact their uniform assertion in all credit and loan contracts including annexes regardless of closing date from the beginning of taxing period 2010. In this connexion, a uniform definition was stipulated of joint persons concerned by the rules, which may in some cases adversely affect the assessment base of the taxpayer. The paper investigates the effect of a uniform application of thin capitalization rules including the definition of joint persons in the corporate assessment base in the tax period of 2010 and compares on the basis of comparative analysis whether the original application of rules prior to the tax period of 2010 was more favourable for taxpayers from the taxation point of view or not. The comparison is carried out on model examples on which we veri­fied which procedure is optimal for taxpayers from the taxation point of view. With respect to our findings, the paper also contains a proposal for amendment in the income tax law so that the appli­cation of thin capitalization rules in force since the tax period of 2010 does not impose excessive tax burden on taxpayers.

  6. Effective Coulomb interaction in multiorbital system

    Hase, Izumi; Yanagisawa, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Transition metal atom generally takes various valences, and sometimes there are some 'missing valences', for example Fe usually takes 2+, 3+ and 5+, but does not take other valences so often. We have calculated the atomic multiplet energies for the high-spin and lowspin configurations within the ligand-field theory and the Hartree-Fock approximation, and found that the Coulomb interaction energy (U eff ) becomes small when the valence is 'missing'. In case U eff B /Fe only when U eff increased in most cases, but in some special cases U eff decreases and falls below the value U − 3J, which is the least value of the undistorted system.

  7. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy with respect to psychological symptoms and recovering autobiographical memory in patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder

    Akbarian F

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fatemehsadat Akbarian,1 Hafez Bajoghli,2,3 Mohammad Haghighi,4 Nadeem Kalak,5 Edith Holsboer-Trachsler,5 Serge Brand5,6 1Psychology and Counseling Organization of Iran, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran; 2Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS, Iranian Institute for Reduction of High-Risk Behaviors, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 3ASEAN Institute for Health Development, Mahidol University, Nakhonpathom, Thailand; 4Research Center for Behavioral Disorders and Substances Abuse, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran; 5Center for Affective, Stress and Sleep Disorders, Psychiatric Clinics of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 6Department of Sport, Exercise and Health, Sport Science Section, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland Objectives: Given the persistence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and its major impact on everyday life, it is important to identify effective treatments. In additional to pharmacological treatments, psychotherapeutic treatments are also highly effective. The aim of the present study was to investigate, among a sample of patients suffering from PTSD, the influence of an additional cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT intervention on their symptoms of PTSD, depression, and anxiety, and on autobiographical memory. Methods: A total of 40 patients suffering from PTSD (mean age: 31.64 years; 78.6% female patients and under psychopharmacological treatment were randomly assigned to an intervention or control condition. The intervention consisted of ten group sessions (one 60–90 minute session per week of CBT. At baseline and 10 weeks later, a series of self-rating and experts’-rating questionnaires were completed. Results: Over time, symptoms of PTSD, depression, and anxiety decreased; however, greater improvement was observed in the experimental than the control condition. Likewise, as a general pattern of results, memory

  8. Interactive Intranet Portal for effective Management in Tertiary Institution

    Idogho O. Philipa; Akpado Kenneth; James Agajo

    2011-01-01

    Interactive Intranet Portal for effective management in Tertiary Institution is an enhanced and interactive method of managing and processing key issues in Tertiary Institution, Problems of result processing, tuition fee payment, library resources management are analyzed in this work. An interface was generated to handle this problem; the software is an interactive one. Several modules are involved in the paper, like: LIBRARY CONSOLE, ADMIN, STAFF, COURSE REGISTRATION, CHECKING OF RESULTS and...

  9. Stress Effects on Multiple Memory System Interactions

    Ness, Deborah; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Extensive behavioural, pharmacological, and neurological research reports stress effects on mammalian memory processes. While stress effects on memory quantity have been known for decades, the influence of stress on multiple memory systems and their distinct contributions to the learning process have only recently been described. In this paper, after summarizing the fundamental biological aspects of stress/emotional arousal and recapitulating functionally and anatomically distinct memory syst...

  10. Dynamic interaction effects in cooling tower groups

    Riera, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental determination of the dynamic response of reinforced concrete cooling towers, taking into consideration group effects, are described. The results for an individual tower are thoroughly examined. A complete analysis is then performed for the critical wind orientations, for each tower in a six towers group. It's shown that ignoring group effects in the analysis may lead to a significant underestimation of the structural response. (E.G.) [pt

  11. Edge-effect interactions in fragmented and patchy landscapes.

    Porensky, Lauren M; Young, Truman P

    2013-06-01

    Ecological edges are increasingly recognized as drivers of landscape patterns and ecosystem processes. In fragmented and patchy landscapes (e.g., a fragmented forest or a savanna with scattered termite mounds), edges can become so numerous that their effects pervade the entire landscape. Results of recent studies in such landscapes show that edge effects can be altered by the presence or proximity of other nearby edges. We considered the theoretical significance of edge-effect interactions, illustrated various landscape configurations that support them and reviewed existing research on this topic. Results of studies from a variety of locations and ecosystem types show that edge-effect interactions can have significant consequences for ecosystems and conservation, including higher tree mortality rates in tropical rainforest fragments, reduced bird densities in grassland fragments, and bush encroachment and reduced wildlife densities in a tropical savanna. To clarify this underappreciated concept and synthesize existing work, we devised a conceptual framework for edge-effect interactions. We first worked to reduce terminological confusion by clarifying differences among terms such as edge intersection and edge interaction. For cases in which nearby edge effects interact, we proposed three possible forms of interaction: strengthening (presence of a second edge causes stronger edge effects), weakening (presence of a second edge causes weaker edge effects), and emergent (edge effects change completely in the presence of a second edge). By clarifying terms and concepts, this framework enables more precise descriptions of edge-effect interactions and facilitates comparisons of results among disparate study systems and response variables. A better understanding of edge-effect interactions will pave the way for more appropriate modeling, conservation, and management in complex landscapes. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  12. Effects of CO2 and temperature on tritrophic interactions.

    Lee A Dyer

    Full Text Available There has been a significant increase in studies of how global change parameters affect interacting species or entire communities, yet the combined or interactive effects of increased atmospheric CO2 and associated increases in global mean temperatures on chemically mediated trophic interactions are mostly unknown. Thus, predictions of climate-induced changes on plant-insect interactions are still based primarily on studies of individual species, individual global change parameters, pairwise interactions, or parameters that summarize communities. A clear understanding of community response to global change will only emerge from studies that examine effects of multiple variables on biotic interactions. We examined the effects of increased CO2 and temperature on simple laboratory communities of interacting alfalfa, chemical defense, armyworm caterpillars, and parasitoid wasps. Higher temperatures and CO2 caused decreased plant quality, decreased caterpillar development times, developmental asynchrony between caterpillars and wasps, and complete wasp mortality. The effects measured here, along with other effects of global change on natural enemies suggest that biological control and other top-down effects of insect predators will decline over the coming decades.

  13. Holographic interaction effects on transport in Dirac semimetals

    Jacobs, V.P.J.; Vandoren, S.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2014-01-01

    Strongly interacting Dirac semimetals are investigated using a holographic model especially geared to compute the single-particle correlation function for this case, including both interaction effects and non-zero temperature. We calculate the (homogeneous) optical conductivity at zero chemical

  14. New effects in the interaction between electromagnetic sources mediated by nonminimal Lorentz violating interactions

    Borges, L.H.C.; Ferrari, A.F. [Universidade Federal do ABC, Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Barone, F.A. [Universidade Federal de Itajuba, IFQ, Itajuba, MG (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    This paper is dedicated to the study of interactions between external sources for the electromagnetic field in the presence of Lorentz symmetry breaking. We focus on a higher derivative, Lorentz violating interaction that arises from a specific model that was argued to lead to interesting effects in the low energy phenomenology of light pseudoscalars interacting with photons. The kind of higher derivative Lorentz violating interaction we discuss are called nonminimal. They are usually expected to be relevant only at very high energies, but we argue they might also induce relevant effects in low energy phenomena. Indeed, we show that the Lorentz violating background considered by us leads to several phenomena that have no counterpart in Maxwell theory, such as nontrivial torques on isolated electric dipoles, as well as nontrivial forces and torques between line currents and point like charges, as well as among Dirac strings and other electromagnetic sources. (orig.)

  15. Density and starting-energy dependent effective interaction

    Yamaguchi, Norio; Nagata, Sinobu; Kasuga, Teruo

    1979-01-01

    A new effective potential constructed from the reaction matrix calculation of nuclear matters is proposed, taking three-body effects into account. Starting from the two-body scattering equation for nuclear matters, an equation with averaged momentum is introduced as the definition of effective interaction. The parameters in the equation are the Fermi momentum and the starting energy. The nuclear density dependence and the starting energy dependence are independently treated in the potential. The effective interactions including three-body effects were calculated. The dependence on the starting energy is large. The effective interaction is more attractive in the triplet E state, and assures overall saturation without any artificial renormalization. The reaction matrix calculation can be well reproduced by the calculation with this effective potential. The results of calculation for the binding energy of He-4 and O-16 and the shell model matrix elements of O-16 are represented. (Kato, T.)

  16. Effects of dipole—dipole interaction on entanglement transfer

    Guo Hong; Xiong Hengna

    2008-01-01

    A system consisting of two different atoms interacting with a two-mode vacuum, where each atom is resonant only with one cavity mode, is considered. The effects of dipole—dipole (dd) interaction between two atoms on the atom-atom entanglement and mode-mode entanglement are investigated. For a weak dd interaction, when the atoms are initially separable, the entanglement between them can be induced by the dd interaction, and the entanglement transfer between the atoms and the modes occurs efficiently; when the atoms are initially entangled, the entanglement transfer is almost not influenced by the dd interaction. However, for a strong dd interaction, it is difficult to transfer the entanglement from the atoms to the modes, but the atom-atom entanglement can be maintained when the atoms are initially entangled

  17. Non-perturbative effective interactions in the standard model

    Arbuzov, Boris A. [Moscow Lomonosov State Univ. (Russian Federation). Skobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics

    2014-07-01

    This monograph is devoted to the nonperturbative dynamics in the Standard Model (SM), the basic theory of allfundamental interactions in natureexcept gravity. The Standard Model is divided into two parts: the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the electro-weak theory (EWT) are well-defined renormalizable theories in which the perturbation theory is valid. However, for the adequate description of the real physics nonperturbative effects are inevitable. This book describes how these nonperturbative effects may be obtained in the framework of spontaneous generation of effective interactions. The well-known example of such effective interaction is provided by the famous Nambu-Jona-Lasinio effective interaction. Also a spontaneous generation of this interaction in the framework of QCD is described and applied to the method for other effective interactions in QCD and EWT. The method is based on N.N. Bogolyubov's conception of compensation equations. As a result we then describe the principal features of the Standard Model, e.g. Higgs sector, and significant nonperturbative effects including recent results obtained at LHC and TEVATRON.

  18. Comparing interactive videodisc training effectiveness to traditional training methods

    Kenworthy, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    Videodisc skills training programs developed by Industrial Training Corporation are being used and evaluated by major industrial facilities. In one such study, interactive videodisc training programs were compared to videotape and instructor-based training to determine the effectiveness of videodisc in terms of performance, training time and trainee attitudes. Results showed that when initial training was done using the interactive videodisc system, trainee performance was superior to the performance of trainees using videotape, and approximately equal to the performance of those trained by an instructor. When each method was used in follow-up training, interactive videodisc was definitely the most effective. Results also indicate that training time can be reduced using interactive videodisc. Attitudes of both trainees and instructors toward the interactive videodisc training were positive

  19. Effects of Website Interactivity on Online Retail Shopping Behavior

    Islam, Hafizul

    Motivations to engage in retail online shopping can include both utilitarian and hedonic shopping dimensions. To cater to these consumers, online retailers can create a cognitively and esthetically rich shopping environment, through sophisticated levels of interactive web utilities and features, offering not only utilitarian benefits and attributes but also providing hedonic benefits of enjoyment. Since the effect of interactive websites has proven to stimulate online consumer’s perceptions, this study presumes that websites with multimedia rich interactive utilities and features can influence online consumers’ shopping motivations and entice them to modify or even transform their original shopping predispositions by providing them with attractive and enhanced interactive features and controls, thus generating a positive attitude towards products and services offered by the retailer. This study seeks to explore the effects of Web interactivity on online consumer behavior through an attitudinal model of technology acceptance.

  20. Effect of Interband Interaction on Isotope Effect Coefficient of Mg B2 Superconductors

    Udomsamuthirun, P.; Kumvongsa, C.; Burakorn, A.; Changkanarth, P.; Maneeratanakul, S.

    2005-10-01

    In this research, the exact formula of Tc s equation and the isotope effect coefficient of two-band s-wave superconductors in weak-coupling limit are derived by considering the influence of interband interaction .In each band ,our model consist of two paring interactions : the electron-phonon interaction and non-electron-phonon interaction . According to the numerical calculation, we find that the isotope effect coefficient of MgB 2 , α=3 . 0 with T c 40 K can be found in the weak coupling regime and interband interaction of electron-phonon show more effect on isotope effect coefficient than interband interaction of non-phonon-electron

  1. Aspects of statistical spectroscopy relevant to effective-interaction theory

    French, J.B.

    1975-01-01

    The three aspects of statistical spectroscopy discussed in this paper are the information content of complex spectra: procedures for spectroscopy in huge model spaces, useful in effective-interaction theory; and practical ways of identifying and calculating measurable parameters of the effective Hamiltonian and other operators, and of comparing different effective Hamiltonians. (4 figures) (U.S.)

  2. Disorder and Interaction Effects in Quantum Wires

    Smith, L W; Ritchie, D A; Farrer, I; Griffiths, J P; Jones, G A C; Thomas, K J; Pepper, M

    2012-01-01

    We present conductance measurements of quasi-one-dimensional quantum wires affected by random disorder in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. In addition to quantised conductance plateaux, we observe structure superimposed on the conductance characteristics when the channel is wide and the density is low. Magnetic field and temperature are varied to characterize the conductance features which depend on the lateral position of the 1D channel formed in a split-gate device. Our results suggest that there is enhanced backscattering in the wide channel limit, which gives rise to quantum interference effects. When the wires are free of disorder and wide, the confinement is weak so that the mutual repulsion of the electrons forces a single row to split into two. The relationship of this topological change to the disorder in the system will be discussed.

  3. Pion inelastic scattering and the pion-nucleus effective interaction

    Carr, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    This work examines pion inelastic scattering with the primary purpose of gaining a better understanding of the properties of the pion-nucleus interaction. The main conclusion of the work is that an effective interaction which incorporates the most obvious theoretical corrections to the impulse approximation does a good job of explaining pion elastic and inelastic scattering from zero to 200 MeV without significant adjustments to the strength parameters of the force. Watson's multiple scattering theory is used to develop a theoretical interaction starting from the free pion-nucleon interaction. Elastic scattering was used to calibrate the isoscalar central interaction. It was found that the impulse approximation did poorly at low energy, while the multiple scattering corrections gave good agreement with all of the data after a few minor adjustments in the force. The distorted wave approximation for the inelastic transition matrix elements are evaluated for both natural and unnatural parity excitations. The isoscalar natural parity transitions are used to test the reaction theory, and it is found that the effective interaction calibrated by elastic scattering produces good agreement with the inelastic data. Calculations are also shown for other inelastic and charge exchange reactions. It appears that the isovector central interaction is reasonable, but the importance of medium corrections cannot be determined. The unnatural parity transitions are also reasonably described by the theoretical estimate of the spin-orbit interaction, but not enough systematic data exists to reach a firm conclusion

  4. Hadronic interactions from effective chiral Lagrangians of quarks and gluons

    Krein, G.

    1996-06-01

    We discuss the combined used of the techniques of effective chiral field theory and the field theoretic method known as Fock-Tani representation to derive effective hadron interactions. The Fock-Tani method is based on a change of representation by means of a unitary transformation such that the composite hadrons are redescribed by elementary-particle field operators. Application of the unitary transformation on the microscopic quark-quark interaction derived from a chiral effective Lagrangian leads to chiral effective interactions describing all possible processes involving hadrons and their constituents. The formalism is illustrated by deriving the one-pion-exchange potential between the nucleons using the quark-gluon effective chiral Lagrangian of Manohar and Georgi. We also present the results of a study of the saturation properties of the nuclear matter using this formalism. (author). 9 refs., 2 figs

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of effects of contact angle on interfacial interactions and its implications for membrane fouling control.

    Chen, Jianrong; Shen, Liguo; Zhang, Meijia; Hong, Huachang; He, Yiming; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-02-01

    Concept of hydrophobicity always fails to accurately assess the interfacial interaction and membrane fouling, which calls for reliable parameters for this purpose. In this study, effects of contact angle on interfacial interactions related to membrane fouling were investigated based on thermodynamic analysis. It was found that, total interaction energy between sludge foulants and membrane monotonically decreases and increases with water and glycerol contact angle, respectively, indicating that these two parameters can be reliable indicators predicting total interaction energy and membrane fouling. Membrane roughness decreases interaction strength for over 20 times, and effects of membrane roughness on membrane fouling should consider water and glycerol contact angle on membrane. It was revealed existence of a critical water and glycerol contact angle for a given membrane bioreactor. Meanwhile, diiodomethane contact angle has minor effect on the total interaction, and cannot be regarded as an effective indicator assessing interfacial interactions and membrane fouling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Interaction mechanisms and biological effects of static magnetic fields

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems are described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving, ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecules structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary is also presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields. There is convincing experimental evidence for magnetoreception mechanisms in several classes of lower organisms, including bacteria and marine organisms. However, in more highly evolved species of animals, there is no evidence that the interactions of static magnetic fields with flux densities up to 2 Tesla (1 Tesla [T] = 10{sup 4} Gauss) produce either behavioral or physiolocical alterations. These results, based on controlled studies with laboratory animals, are consistent with the outcome of recent epidemiological surveys on human populations exposed occupationally to static magnetic fields.

  7. Biological interactions and human health effects of static magnetic fields

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-09-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems will be described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecular structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary will also be presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields studied in the laboratory and in natural settings. One aspect of magnetic field effects that merits special concern is their influence on implanted medical electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers. Several extensive studies have demonstrated closure of the reed switch in pacemakers exposed to relatively weak static magnetic fields, thereby causing them to revert to an asynchronous mode of operation that is potentially hazardous. Recommendations for human exposure limits are provided

  8. Hull-Propeller Interaction and Its Effect on Propeller Cavitation

    Regener, Pelle Bo

    In order to predict the required propulsion power for a ship reliably and accurately, it is not sufficient to only evaluate the resistance of the hull and the propeller performance in open water alone. Interaction effects between hull and propeller can even be a decisive factor in ship powering...... prediction and design optimization. The hull-propeller interaction coefficients of effective wake fraction, thrust deduction factor, and relative rotative efficiency are traditionally determined by model tests. Self-propulsion model tests consistently show an increase in effective wake fractions when using...... velocities. This offers an opportunity for additional insight into hull-propeller interaction and the propeller’s actual operating condition behind the ship, as the actual (effective) inflow is computed. Self-propulsion simulations at model and full scale were carried out for a bulk carrier, once...

  9. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Interactions at Low Momentum Transfer

    Miltenberger, Ethan Ryan [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This is a study to identify predicted effects of the carbon nucleus environment on neutrino - nucleus interactions with low momentum transfer. A large sample of neutrino interaction data collected by the MINERvA experiment is analyzed to show the distribution of charged hadron energy in a region with low momentum transfer. These distributions reveal a major discrepancy between the data and a popular interaction model with only the simplest Fermi gas nuclear effects. Detailed analysis of systematic uncertainties due to energy scale and resolution can account for only a little of the discrepancy. Two additional nuclear model effects, a suppression/screening effect (RPA), and the addition of a meson exchange current process (MEC), are shown to improve the description of the data.

  10. New results on strong-interaction effects in antiprotonic hydrogen

    Gotta, D; Augsburger, M A; Borchert, G L; Castelli, C M; Chatellard, D; El-Khoury, P; Egger, J P; Gorke, H; Hauser, P R; Indelicato, P J; Kirch, K; Lenz, S; Nelms, N; Rashid, K; Schult, O W B; Siems, T; Simons, L M

    1999-01-01

    Lyman and Balmer transitions of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at the low-energy antiproton ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. The X-rays were detected using charge-coupled devices (CCDs) and a reflection type crystal spectrometer. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction. (33 refs).

  11. New results on strong-interaction effects in antiprotonic hydrogen

    Anagnostopoulos, D. F.; Augsburger, M.; Borchert, G.; Castelli, C.; Chatellard, D.; El-Khoury, P.; Egger, J.-P.; Gorke, H.; Gotta, D.; Hauser, P.; Indelicato, P.; Kirch, K.; Lenz, S.; Nelms, N.; Rashid, K.; Schult, O. W. B.; Siems, Th.; Simons, L. M.

    1999-01-01

    Lyman and Balmer transitions of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. The X-rays were detected using Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) and a reflection type crystal spectrometer. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction

  12. Effective interactions for self-energy. I. Theory

    Ng, T.K.; Singwi, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic way of deriving effective interactions for self-energy calculations in Fermi-liquid systems is presented. The self-energy expression contains effects of density and spin fluctuations and also multiple scattering between particles. Results for arbitrarily polarized one-component Fermi-liquid systems and unpolarized two-component systems are explicitly given

  13. Side Effects and Interactions of the Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitor Febuxostat.

    Jordan, Andreas; Gresser, Ursula

    2018-05-25

    The paper addresses the safety of febuxostat and summarizes reports on side effects and interactions of febuxostat published by the cut-off date (last day of literature search) of 20 March 2018. Publications on side effects and the interactions of febuxostat were considered. Information concerning the occurrence of side effects and interactions in association with the treatment with febuxostat was collected and summarized in the review. The incidence of severe side effects was much less frequent than mild side effects (1.2⁻3.8% to 20.1⁻38.7%). The rate and range of febuxostat side effects are low at doses of up to 120 mg and only increase with a daily dose of over 120 mg. The publications reveal no age-dependent increase in side effects for febuxostat. In patients with impaired renal function, no increase in adverse events is described with a dose of up to 120 mg of febuxostat per day. Patients with impaired liver function had no elevated risk for severe side effects. A known allopurinol intolerance increases the risk of skin reactions during treatment with febuxostat by a factor of 3.6. No correlation between treatment with febuxostat and agranulocytosis has been confirmed. Possible interactions with very few medications (principally azathioprine) are known for febuxostat. Febuxostat is well tolerated and a modern and safe alternative to allopurinol therapy.

  14. Microscopic study of the α-16O interaction on the basis of the realistic effective interaction

    Yamaguchi, Shinichiro; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Yabana, Kazuhiro.

    1989-01-01

    We calculate the α- 16 O complex potential by the totally microscopic method where we use the many-body theory taking into account the Pauli principle explicitly and the realistic effective interactions. The comparison of the theoretical inter-nucleus potential with the phenomenological 'unique' optical potential is performed. (author)

  15. Measuring University students' understanding of the greenhouse effect - a comparison of multiple-choice, short answer and concept sketch assessment tools with respect to students' mental models

    Gold, A. U.; Harris, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The greenhouse effect comes up in most discussions about climate and is a key concept related to climate change. Existing studies have shown that students and adults alike lack a detailed understanding of this important concept or might hold misconceptions. We studied the effectiveness of different interventions on University-level students' understanding of the greenhouse effect. Introductory level science students were tested for their pre-knowledge of the greenhouse effect using validated multiple-choice questions, short answers and concept sketches. All students participated in a common lesson about the greenhouse effect and were then randomly assigned to one of two lab groups. One group explored an existing simulation about the greenhouse effect (PhET-lesson) and the other group worked with absorption spectra of different greenhouse gases (Data-lesson) to deepen the understanding of the greenhouse effect. All students completed the same assessment including multiple choice, short answers and concept sketches after participation in their lab lesson. 164 students completed all the assessments, 76 completed the PhET lesson and 77 completed the data lesson. 11 students missed the contrasting lesson. In this presentation we show the comparison between the multiple-choice questions, short answer questions and the concept sketches of students. We explore how well each of these assessment types represents student's knowledge. We also identify items that are indicators of the level of understanding of the greenhouse effect as measured in correspondence of student answers to an expert mental model and expert responses. Preliminary data analysis shows that student who produce concept sketch drawings that come close to expert drawings also choose correct multiple-choice answers. However, correct multiple-choice answers are not necessarily an indicator that a student produces an expert-like correlating concept sketch items. Multiple-choice questions that require detailed

  16. A survey on the knowledge, beliefs and behaviour of a general adult population in Malaysia with respect to the adverse effects of medicines.

    Jose, Jimmy; Chong, David; Lynn, Tay Szu; Jye, Goh Ee; Jimmy, Beena

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the study was to explore, in the Malaysian general population: knowledge and beliefs of the characteristics in general of medication-related side effects and side effects associated with different types of medicines; behaviour related to the safe use of drugs before and after taking a medication; and behaviour in the event of a medication-related side effect. A 24-item self-administered questionnaire was developed and used to survey the general public living or working in suburban Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Eight hundred questionnaires were distributed, face to face, by researchers using quota sampling. Respondents' knowledge, belief and behaviour were analysed and correlated with demographics, medical history and experience of side effects. Six hundred and ten respondents completed the questionnaire giving a response rate of 76.3%. The mean knowledge score for the respondents was 18.4±3.6 out of the maximum possible score of 26. Educational level and experience of side effect had an influence on the knowledge score obtained. Respondents had misconceptions regarding the safety of complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) and over-the-counter medications. Medication history and previous experience with side effects had a significant influence on the higher behaviour score obtained. The survey has shown moderate results with regard to the knowledge of public regarding safety of medications, and there was evidence of under-estimating the risk of medications, especially CAMs. The misconceptions among the public, and inappropriate behaviour on drug safety-related aspects, is a concern which needs to be addressed in the interventions designed. © 2011 The Authors. IJPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  17. Olive oil-diet improves the simvastatin effects with respect to sunflower oil-diet in men with increased cardiovascular risk: a preliminary study.

    Sánchez-Muniz, F J; Bastida, S; Gutiérrez-García, O; Carbajal, A

    2009-01-01

    Concomitant intake of statins together with certain foods may affect their therapeutic effects. The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine the modulating effect of two culinary oils on the hypolipemic effect of statins. Twenty-five men with severe hypercholesterolemia and high estimate cardiovascular risk (> 20% according to the Adult Treatment Panel III of USA National Institutes of Health, ATP-III) were enrolled in an observational follow-up study to test lipoprotein profile changes after ix month 20-mg/d Simvastatin treatment. Thirteen volunteers using sunflower oil as the habitual culinary fat, and 12 using olive oil, were selected by non-probabilistic incidental sampling. Volunteers consent in follow their habitual diets and to maintain diet characteristics throughout the study. Diet was evaluated through the study by three 24-h recalls and a food frequency questionnaire. The energy contribution of fat (P = 0.019) and MUFA (P alcohol (P = 0.005) was higher in the sunflower oil-group. TC/HDL-cholesterol and the ATP-III 10-year risk percent decreased more (P alcohol intakes were adjusted. Data suggest that although Simvastatin is a very effective hypolipemic drug, olive oil-diets in preference to sunflower oil-diets must be consumed in patients with high cardiovascular risk.

  18. Witnessman: The software tool to design, analyse and assess a witness pack with respect to military and medical effects on an (UN)protected (DIS)mounted soldier

    Verhagen, Th.L.A.; Kemper, R.; Huisjes, H.; Knijnenburg, S.G.; Pronk, A.; Klink, M.H. van

    2005-01-01

    Witness packs are widely used to enable the characterization of fragments generated during ballistic experiments. To assess the effect of fragment impact on an exposed (dis)mounted soldier a follow-up Vulnerability/ Lethality (V/L) simulation is essential. The overall process is elaborative and time

  19. Effect of germination moisture and time on pearl millet malt quality - with respect to its opaque and lager beer brewing potential

    Pelembe, LAM

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available .H., Effect of calcium ions in sor- ghum beer mashing. Journal of the Institute of Brewing, 1988, 94, 68?70. VOL. 110, NO. 4, 2004 325 29. Hardie, D.G., Manners, D.J. and Yellowlees, D., The limit dex- trinase from malted sorghum (Sorghum vulgare...

  20. Climate-chemical interactions and greenhouse effects of trace gases

    Shi, Guang-Yu; Fan, Xiao-Biao

    1994-01-01

    A completely coupled one-dimensional radiative-convective (RC) and photochemical-diffusion (PC) model has been developed recently and used to study the climate-chemical interactions. The importance of radiative-chemical interactions within the troposphere and stratosphere has been examined in some detail. We find that increases of radiatively and/or chemically active trace gases such as CO2, CH4 and N2O have both the direct effects and the indirect effects on climate change by changing the atmospheric O3 profile through their interaction with chemical processes in the atmosphere. It is also found that the climatic effect of ozone depends strongly on its vertical distribution throughout the troposphere and stratosphere, as well on its column amount in the atmosphere.

  1. Effective field theory of interactions on the lattice

    Valiente, Manuel; Zinner, Nikolaj T.

    2015-01-01

    We consider renormalization of effective field theory interactions by discretizing the continuum on a tight-binding lattice. After studying the one-dimensional problem, we address s-wave collisions in three dimensions and relate the bare lattice coupling constants to the continuum coupling consta...... constants. Our method constitutes a very simple avenue for the systematic renormalization in effective field theory, and is especially useful as the number of interaction parameters increases.......We consider renormalization of effective field theory interactions by discretizing the continuum on a tight-binding lattice. After studying the one-dimensional problem, we address s-wave collisions in three dimensions and relate the bare lattice coupling constants to the continuum coupling...

  2. Effective field theory of thermal Casimir interactions between anisotropic particles.

    Haussman, Robert C; Deserno, Markus

    2014-06-01

    We employ an effective field theory (EFT) approach to study thermal Casimir interactions between objects bound to a fluctuating fluid surface or interface dominated by surface tension, with a focus on the effects of particle anisotropy. The EFT prescription disentangles the constraints imposed by the particles' boundaries from the calculation of the interaction free energy by constructing an equivalent point particle description. The finite-size information is captured in a derivative expansion that encodes the particles' response to external fields. The coefficients of the expansion terms correspond to generalized tensorial polarizabilities and are found by matching the results of a linear response boundary value problem computed in both the full and effective theories. We demonstrate the versatility of the EFT approach by constructing the general effective Hamiltonian for a collection of particles of arbitrary shapes. Taking advantage of the conformal symmetry of the Hamiltonian, we discuss a straightforward conformal mapping procedure to systematically determine the polarizabilities and derive a complete description for elliptical particles. We compute the pairwise interaction energies to several orders for nonidentical ellipses as well as their leading-order triplet interactions and discuss the resulting preferred pair and multibody configurations. Furthermore, we elaborate on the complications that arise with pinned particle boundary conditions and show that the powerlike corrections expected from dimensional analysis are exponentially suppressed by the leading-order interaction energies.

  3. The Comparison of Hydrotreated Vegetable Oils With Respect to Petroleum Derived Fuels and the Effects of Transient Plasma Ignition in a Compression-Ignition Engine

    2012-09-01

    Content per Combustion J FAME Fatty Acid Methyl Ester FMEP Friction Mean Effective Pressure PSI or Bar FT Fischer-Tropsch h Heat...recently, algae-derived oils. Biodiesel has gained popularity in North America over the past decade, but the ester content of Fatty Acid Methyl ... Ester ( FAME ) fuel creates both cold weather and water- based operational issues. The Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process produces liquid fuels from “syngas,” a

  4. Pade approximants and the calculation of effective interactions

    Schucan, T.H.

    1975-01-01

    It is known that the series expansion of the effective interaction in nuclei diverges in practical applications due to the occurrence of low lying collective states. An approximation scheme which can be used to overcome the difficulties connected with this divergence is reviewed and it is shown that a continued fraction expansion can be used to calculate the eigenstate that has the larger overlap with the model space. An extension of this method is obtained by using Pade approximants (P.A.) which are then applied to the effective interaction, and to related matrices and matrix elements. Mathematical properties of the P.A. are discussed in light of these applications. 7 figures

  5. Membrane interactions and antimicrobial effects of layered double hydroxide nanoparticles

    Malekkhaiat Häffner, S; Nyström, L; Nordström, R

    2017-01-01

    Membrane interactions are critical for the successful use of inorganic nanoparticles as antimicrobial agents and as carriers of, or co-actives with, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In order to contribute to an increased understanding of these, we here investigate effects of particle size (42-208 nm...... into size-dependent synergistic effects with the antimicrobial peptide LL-37. Due to strong interactions with anionic lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan layers, direct membrane disruption of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria is suppressed. However, LDH nanoparticles cause size-dependent charge...

  6. Effect of modes interaction on the resistive wall mode stability

    Chen Longxi; Wu Bin

    2013-01-01

    Effects of modes interaction on the resistive wall mode (RWM) stability are studied. When considering the modes interaction effects, the linear growth rate of the most unstable (3, 1) mode decreases. After linear evolution, the RWM saturates at the nonlinear phase. The saturation can be attributed to flux piling up on the resistive wall. When some modes exist, the (3, 1) mode saturates at lower level compared with single mode evolution. Meanwhile, the magnetic energy of the (5, 2) mode increases correspondingly, but the magnetic energy saturation level of the (2, 1) mode changes weakly. (authors)

  7. Effect of orbital symmetry on the anisotropic superexchange interaction

    Kim, Beom Hyun; Min, B I

    2011-01-01

    Employing the microscopic superexchange model incorporating the effect of spin-orbit interaction, we have investigated the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya (DM) interaction in perovskite transition-metal (TM) oxides and explored the interplay between the DM interaction and the TM-3d orbital symmetry. For d 3 and d 5 systems with isotropic orbital symmetry, the DM vectors are well described by a simple symmetry analysis considering only the bond geometry. In contrast, the DM interaction for d 4 systems with anisotropic orbital symmetry shows slightly different behavior, which does not obey simple symmetry analysis. The direction as well as the strength of the DM vector varies depending on the occupied orbital shape. We have understood this behavior based on the orbital symmetry induced by local crystal field variation.

  8. Effects of non-standard interactions in the MINOS experiment

    Blennow, Mattias; Ohlsson, Tommy; Skrotzki, Julian

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the effects of non-standard interactions on the determination of the neutrino oscillation parameters Δm 31 2 , θ 23 , and θ 13 in the MINOS experiment. We show that adding non-standard interactions to the analysis lead to an extension of the allowed parameter space to larger values of Δm 31 2 and smaller θ 23 , and basically removes all predictability for θ 13 . In addition, we discuss the sensitivities to the non-standard interaction parameters of the MINOS experiment alone. In particular, we examine the degeneracy between θ 13 and the non-standard interaction parameter ε eτ . We find that this degeneracy is responsible for the removal of the θ 13 predictability and that the possible bound on |ε eτ | is competitive with direct bounds only if a more stringent external bound on θ 13 is applied

  9. Effective nucleon-nucleon interaction in the RPA

    Batista, E.F.; Carlson, B.V.; Conti, C. de; Frederico, T.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to study the properties of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, in a infinite system of mesons and baryons , using the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approximation. To derive the RHFB equations in a systematic fashion, we use Dyson's equation to sum to all orders the self-consistent tadpole and exchange contributions to the extended baryon Green's function (the Gorkov propagator). The meson propagator is computed as a sum over ring diagrams which consist in repeated insertions of the lowest-order proper polarization graph. The sum is the diagrammatic equivalent of the relativistic random phase approximation (RPA) that describes the well-known collective modes. In the nuclear medium, the σ and ω propagators are linked because of scalar-vector mixing, a density-dependent effect that generates a coupling between the Dyson's equation for the meson propagators. We use the dressed meson propagator to obtain the effective interaction and investigate its effect on the 1 S 0 pairing in nuclear matter. The effective interaction has title effect on the self-energy mean field, since the latter is dominated by the Hartree contribution, which is determined by the free meson propagators. The pairing field, however, is obtained from an exchange term, in which the effective interaction can play an important role. As the polarization corrections to the meson propagators tend to increase the σ-meson mass and decrease the ω-meson mass, they result in an effective interaction which is more repulsive than the bare one. We would expect this to result in a decrease in the 1 S 0 pairing, similar to that seen in nonrelativistic calculations. (author)

  10. Photobiological activity of 4-methylpsoralen and 4-methyl-4', 5'-dihydropsoralen with respect to lethal and mutagenic effects on E. coli, and prophage induction

    Fujita, H. (Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-06-01

    The lethal and mutagenic effects on E. coli as well as the induction of prophage lambda were determined after treatment with 4-methylpsoralen, 8-methoxypsoralen, psoralen or 4-methyl-4',5'-dihydropsoralen and UV-A irradiation. All psoralens used caused photokilling and photomutagenesis of strains H/r30R and Hs30R. 4-Methylpsoralen was more efficient for killing and for the induced mutation than 8-methoxypsoralen or psoralen in view of the dose modification factor. This finding can be explained by the methylation effect of psoralen. 4-Methylpsoralen induced more mutation in Hs30R than in H/r30R. Monofunctional 4-methyl-4',5'-dihydropsoralen required much higher fluence than bifunctional psoralens to kill cells and to induce the mutation. When the induced mutation frequency was expressed as a function of survival, mutagenic efficiency ranked in the following order: 8-methoxypsoralen > psoralen > 4-methylpsoralen > 4-methyl-4',5'-dihydropsoralen. 4-Methylpsoralen was 3-4-fold less mutagenic than 8-methoxypsoralen in this plot. Lytic growth of prophage in E. coli AB1157 (lambda) was induced by the treatment. When the bifunctional psoralens were used, the maximum induced fraction was larger than 20%. However, it was only 2% when 4-methyl-4',5'-dihydropsoralen was used.

  11. The Limited English Proficiency Patient Family Advocate Role: Fostering Respectful and Effective Care Across Language and Culture in a Pediatric Oncology Setting.

    Gil, Stephanie; Hooke, Mary C; Niess, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Patients and families with limited English proficiency (LEP) face a multitude of barriers both inside and outside the hospital walls. These barriers can contribute to difficulty accessing care and understanding/adhering to treatment recommendations, ultimately placing them at higher risk for poorer outcomes than their English-speaking counterparts. The LEP Patient Family Advocate role was created with the aim of improving access, promoting effective communication, and equalizing care for children with cancer from families with LEP. The goal of this mixed methods study was to describe the level of satisfaction and experiences of parents and health care providers who used the LEP Patient Family Advocate while receiving or providing care. Twelve parents and 15 health care providers completed quantitative surveys and an open-ended question about their experiences. High levels of satisfaction were reported. Themes about the role from qualitative responses included its positive effect on communication, trust, and connectedness between parents and staff. Continuity of care and safety were improved, and parents thought the role helped decrease their stress. The LEP Patient Family Advocate has a positive influence on family-centered cultural care. © 2015 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  12. Interacting effects of insects and flooding on wood decomposition.

    Michael D Ulyshen

    Full Text Available Saproxylic arthropods are thought to play an important role in wood decomposition but very few efforts have been made to quantify their contributions to the process and the factors controlling their activities are not well understood. In the current study, mesh exclusion bags were used to quantify how arthropods affect loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L. decomposition rates in both seasonally flooded and unflooded forests over a 31-month period in the southeastern United States. Wood specific gravity (based on initial wood volume was significantly lower in bolts placed in unflooded forests and for those unprotected from insects. Approximately 20.5% and 13.7% of specific gravity loss after 31 months was attributable to insect activity in flooded and unflooded forests, respectively. Importantly, minimal between-treatment differences in water content and the results from a novel test carried out separately suggest the mesh bags had no significant impact on wood mass loss beyond the exclusion of insects. Subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae: Reticulitermes spp. were 5-6 times more active below-ground in unflooded forests compared to flooded forests based on wooden monitoring stakes. They were also slightly more active above-ground in unflooded forests but these differences were not statistically significant. Similarly, seasonal flooding had no detectable effect on above-ground beetle (Coleoptera richness or abundance. Although seasonal flooding strongly reduced Reticulitermes activity below-ground, it can be concluded from an insignificant interaction between forest type and exclusion treatment that reduced above-ground decomposition rates in seasonally flooded forests were due largely to suppressed microbial activity at those locations. The findings from this study indicate that southeastern U.S. arthropod communities accelerate above-ground wood decomposition significantly and to a similar extent in both flooded and unflooded forests

  13. Interactions between the Isolated-Interactive Elements Effect and Levels of Learner Expertise: Experimental Evidence from an Accountancy Class

    Blayney, Paul; Kalyuga, Slava; Sweller, John

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated interactions between the isolated-interactive elements effect and levels of learner expertise with first year undergraduate university accounting students. The isolated-interactive elements effect occurs when learning is facilitated by initially presenting elements of information sequentially in an isolated form rather than…

  14. Interaction Induced Quantum Valley Hall Effect in Graphene

    E. C. Marino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We use pseudo-quantum electrodynamics in order to describe the full electromagnetic interaction of the p electrons in graphene in a consistent 2D formulation. We first consider the effect of this interaction in the vacuum polarization tensor or, equivalently, in the current correlator. This allows us to obtain the T→0 conductivity after a smooth zero-frequency limit is taken in Kubo’s formula. Thereby, we obtain the usual expression for the minimal conductivity plus corrections due to the interaction that bring it closer to the experimental value. We then predict the onset of an interaction-driven spontaneous quantum valley Hall effect below an activation temperature of the order of 2 K. The transverse (Hall valley conductivity is evaluated exactly and shown to coincide with the one in the usual quantum Hall effect. Finally, by considering the effects of pseudo-quantum electrodynamics, we show that the electron self-energy is such that a set of P- and T-symmetric gapped electron energy eigenstates are dynamically generated, in association with the quantum valley Hall effect.

  15. Effects of an electric field on interaction of aromatic systems.

    Youn, Il Seung; Cho, Woo Jong; Kim, Kwang S

    2016-04-30

    The effect of uniform external electric field on the interactions between small aromatic compounds and an argon atom is investigated using post-HF (MP2, SCS-MP2, and CCSD(T)) and density functional (PBE0-D3, PBE0-TS, and vdW-DF2) methods. The electric field effect is quantified by the difference of interaction energy calculated in the presence and absence of the electric field. All the post-HF methods describe electric field effects accurately although the interaction energy itself is overestimated by MP2. The electric field effect is explained by classical electrostatic models, where the permanent dipole moment from mutual polarization mainly determines its sign. The size of π-conjugated system does not have significant effect on the electric field dependence. We found out that PBE0-based methods give reasonable interaction energies and electric field response in every case, while vdW-DF2 sometimes shows spurious artifact owing to its sensitivity toward the real space electron density. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Interactive short-term effects of equivalent temperature and air pollution on human mortality in Berlin and Lisbon.

    Burkart, Katrin; Canário, Paulo; Breitner, Susanne; Schneider, Alexandra; Scherber, Katharina; Andrade, Henrique; Alcoforado, Maria João; Endlicher, Wilfried

    2013-12-01

    There is substantial evidence that both temperature and air pollution are predictors of mortality. Thus far, few studies have focused on the potential interactive effects between the thermal environment and different measures of air pollution. Such interactions, however, are biologically plausible, as (extreme) temperature or increased air pollution might make individuals more susceptible to the effects of each respective predictor. This study investigated the interactive effects between equivalent temperature and air pollution (ozone and particulate matter) in Berlin (Germany) and Lisbon (Portugal) using different types of Poisson regression models. The findings suggest that interactive effects exist between air pollutants and equivalent temperature. Bivariate response surface models and generalised additive models (GAMs) including interaction terms showed an increased risk of mortality during periods of elevated equivalent temperatures and air pollution. Cold effects were mostly unaffected by air pollution. The study underscores the importance of air pollution control in mitigating heat effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of composition interactions on the response of a turnbull blue radiochromic gel dosimeter

    Shieh, Jiunn-I; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Shyu, Huey-Lih; Yu, Yi-Chen; Hsieh, Ling-Ling

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Taguchi statistical method was used to design experiments for investigating the effects of interactions among compositions on the performance of a Turnbull blue gel (TBG) radiochromic dosimeter. Four parameters were considered as the design factors: (A) concentration of ferric chloride, (B) concentration of potassium ferricyanide, (C) concentration of sulfuric acid, and (D) amount of gelling agent added. Two levels were selected for each factor. The change in optical absorbance at 695 nm under UVA exposures was monitored to determine the response of the dosimeters. The results showed that the contributions of factors A–D on the absorbance were 20.01%, 23.16%, 27.03%, and 0.49%, respectively. The contributions of significant interaction effects were AC (8.60%), BC (5.61%), and ABC (10.56%). This finding indicated that sulfuric acid (C) was the most influential factor, whereas gelling agent (D) was the least influential factor. Sulfuric acid had an important function in two two-way interactions and one three-way interaction in the response of TBG to UV exposure. - Highlights: • Analysis of the composition that influence TBG dosimeters via the design of experiments. • Cross interactions between factors in the TBG dosimeters through multi-factor ANOVA. • Two two-way interactions and one three-way interaction in the TBG dosimeters are significant

  18. Effects of Interactivity between Audience and Urban Advertisement

    Mitra Manavirad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, advertisement plays an important and impressive role in our lives and we are witnessing different works in this field. The emergence of new technologies in this field has led to the arrival of a new style of advertising with different interactivity and administrative functions. Interactive advertising is considered as one of the most up to date urban advertising. With regard to the arrival of this new style of advertising and using them in different countries, this research investigates the effectiveness of an advertisement’s interaction with the audiences in urban advertising through a descriptive/analytical approach as well as field study with regard to the type of advertising usage including commercial, promotional, educational, social etc. It is assumed that an interactive advertising confronts the audience with many challenges and makes him from a static and watching audience to an actor and explorer audience. In such advertisements, the audience enters a path with interactivity where the advertisement guides him and audience responses positively to this action; after a simple activity and in some cases, he interacts and communicates with the advertisement just by passing by it. In interactivity advertisements in urban spaces, the artist pays much attention to audience participation for challenges or performing specific activity that will lead to a result. The use of interactive advertising in various forms such as billboards, stands, and advertisements at bus stops and so on has increased in recent years, developed countries, and countries that are more familiar to technologies. These works are considered a new step in the field of urban advertising. This research selects samples of using such creative advertisements, especially in commercial areas in different countries as well as Iran. It considers the producing method, ideation, and effectiveness of each in a specific period as well as their installation and commissioning

  19. Renewing the Respect for Similarity

    Shimon eEdelman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In psychology, the concept of similarity has traditionally evoked a mixture of respect, stemmingfrom its ubiquity and intuitive appeal, and concern, due to its dependence on the framing of the problemat hand and on its context. We argue for a renewed focus on similarity as an explanatory concept, bysurveying established results and new developments in the theory and methods of similarity-preservingassociative lookup and dimensionality reduction — critical components of many cognitive functions, aswell as of intelligent data management in computer vision. We focus in particular on the growing familyof algorithms that support associative memory by performing hashing that respects local similarity, andon the uses of similarity in representing structured objects and scenes. Insofar as these similarity-basedideas and methods are useful in cognitive modeling and in AI applications, they should be included inthe core conceptual toolkit of computational neuroscience.

  20. Associative Interactions in Crowded Solutions of Biopolymers Counteract Depletion Effects.

    Groen, Joost; Foschepoth, David; te Brinke, Esra; Boersma, Arnold J; Imamura, Hiromi; Rivas, Germán; Heus, Hans A; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2015-10-14

    The cytosol of Escherichia coli is an extremely crowded environment, containing high concentrations of biopolymers which occupy 20-30% of the available volume. Such conditions are expected to yield depletion forces, which strongly promote macromolecular complexation. However, crowded macromolecule solutions, like the cytosol, are very prone to nonspecific associative interactions that can potentially counteract depletion. It remains unclear how the cytosol balances these opposing interactions. We used a FRET-based probe to systematically study depletion in vitro in different crowded environments, including a cytosolic mimic, E. coli lysate. We also studied bundle formation of FtsZ protofilaments under identical crowded conditions as a probe for depletion interactions at much larger overlap volumes of the probe molecule. The FRET probe showed a more compact conformation in synthetic crowding agents, suggesting strong depletion interactions. However, depletion was completely negated in cell lysate and other protein crowding agents, where the FRET probe even occupied slightly more volume. In contrast, bundle formation of FtsZ protofilaments proceeded as readily in E. coli lysate and other protein solutions as in synthetic crowding agents. Our experimental results and model suggest that, in crowded biopolymer solutions, associative interactions counterbalance depletion forces for small macromolecules. Furthermore, the net effects of macromolecular crowding will be dependent on both the size of the macromolecule and its associative interactions with the crowded background.

  1. The Effects of Galaxy Interactions on Star Formation

    Beverage, Aliza; Weiner, Aaron; Ramos Padilla, Andres; Ashby, Matthew; Smith, Howard A.

    2018-01-01

    Galaxy interactions are key events in galaxy evolution, and are widely thought to trigger significant increases in star formation. However, the mechanisms and timescales for these increases are still not well understood. In order to probe the effects of mergers, we undertook an investigation based on the Spitzer Interacting Galaxies Survey (SIGS), a sample of 102 nearby galaxies in 48 systems ranging from weakly interacting to near coalescence. Our study is unique in that we use both broadband photometry and a large sample of objects chosen to be statistically meaningful. Our data come from 32 broad bands ranging from the UV to far-IR, and we model spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using the Code for Investigating Galaxy Emission (CIGALE) to estimate physical characteristics for each galaxy. We find marginal statistical correlations between galaxy interaction strength and dust luminosity and the distribution of dust mass as a function of heating intensity. The specific star formation rates, however, do not show any enhancement across the interaction stages. This result challenges conventional wisdom that mergers induce star formation throughout galaxy interaction.The SAO REU program is funded in part by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no. 1262851, and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  2. Effect of interband interaction on isotope effect exponent of MgB2 ...

    The interband interaction of the electron–phonon interaction shows more effect on the isotope exponent than on the non-phonon interaction. Acknowledgement. The authors would like to thank Thailand Research Fund for financial support and the University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce for partial financial support and.

  3. The Interactive Effect of Outdoor Activities and School Location on ...

    The Interactive Effect of Outdoor Activities and School Location on Senior Secondary Students' Environmental Problem Solving Skills in Biology. ... Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader. To download the PDF, click the Download link above.

  4. Final state interaction effect on correlations in narrow particles pairs

    Lednicky, R.; Lyuboshitz, V.L.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the dependence of the two-particle correlation function on the space-time dimensions of the particle production region is discussed. The basic formulae, taking into account he effects of quantum statistics and final state interaction, and the conditions of their applicability are given

  5. Main and interaction effects of extrusion temperature and usage ...

    The extruded full fat soybean (EFFSB) may be used in diet to satisfy the energy and protein requirements of fast growing broiler chickens. The main and interaction effects of three extrusion temperatures and two dietary levels of FFSB were studied on the performance, physiological enzymes and blood metabolites of broiler ...

  6. Effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation of proton transfer ...

    WINTEC

    We report here a theoretical study on the effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation .... has also been noted in the case of the mutant Lys- ... we outline the theoretical method used. ... The starting point of our analysis is a high-reso-.

  7. Interactive Distance Learning Effectively Provides Winning Sports Nutrition Workshops.

    Ricketts, Jennifer; Hoelscher-Day, Sharon; Begeman, Gale; Houtkooper, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Interactive distance-education (n=226) and face-to-face (n=129) continuing education workshops for health care and education professionals on sports nutrition were evaluated immediately and after 6 months. The well-designed distance-education format was as effective and acceptable as face to face and increased sports nutrition knowledge. (SK)

  8. Main and interaction effects of extrusion temperature and usage ...

    ali

    2012-10-30

    Oct 30, 2012 ... The main and interaction effects of three extrusion ... oil extraction and allow the use of a homegrown protein supplement in the .... Statistical analysis. The main and .... acceptable level of antitrypsin factor is 4 mg/g; this level.

  9. Effects of interacting variables on the release properties of ...

    Purpose: The individual and interaction effects of formulation variables on the release of suppositories were investigated using a 23 factorial experimental design. The variables studied were nature of base (B), type of drug (D), and presence of surfactant (S). Method: Suppositories were formulated with theobroma oil and ...

  10. Effective interaction: From nuclear reactions to neutron stars

    pact stars. The nuclear EoS for β-equilibrated neutron star (NS) matter obtained using density-dependent effective nucleon–nucleon interaction satisfies the constraints from the observed flow data from heavy-ion collisions. The energy density of quark matter is lower than that of the nuclear EoS at higher densities implying ...

  11. Independent and interactive effects of HIV infection, clinical stage ...

    Background. There is still limited to no evidence on the independent and interactive effects of HIV infection, disease stage, baseline disease severity and other important comorbidities on mortality risk among young children treated for severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in South Africa (SA, using the World Health Organization ...

  12. Effective buyer-supplier interaction patterns in ongoing service exchange

    Valk, van der W.; Wynstra, J.Y.F.; Axelsson, B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop theory on effective buyer-seller interaction for different types of business services. A classification of business services which identifies four service types based on how they are used by the buying company is used. Design/methodology/approach –

  13. Effects of Parallel Channel Interactions, Steam Flow, Liquid Subcool ...

    Tests were performed to examine the effects of parallel channel interactions, steam flow, liquid subcool and channel heat addition on the delivery of liquid from the upper plenum into the channels and lower plenum of Boiling Water Nuclear Power Reactors during reflood transients. Early liquid delivery into the channels, ...

  14. Group composition effects on aggressive interpack interactions of gray wolves in Yellowstone National Park

    Cassidy, Kira A.; MacNulty, Daniel R.; Stahler, Daniel R.; Smith, Douglas W.; Mech, L. David

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of characteristics that promote group success during intraspecific encounters is key to understanding the adaptive advantages of sociality for many group-living species. In addition, some individuals in a group may be more likely than others to influence intergroup conflicts, a relatively neglected idea in research on social animals. Here we use observations of aggressive interactions between wolf (Canis lupus) packs over an extended period and use pack characteristics to determine which groups had an advantage over their opponents. During 16 years of observation in Yellowstone National Park from 1995 to 2010, we documented 121 interpack aggressive interactions. We recorded pack sizes, compositions, and spatial orientation related to residency to determine their effects on the outcomes of interactions between packs. Relative pack size (RPS) improved the odds of a pack displacing its opponent. However, pack composition moderated the effect of RPS as packs with relatively more old members (>6.0 years old) or adult males had higher odds of winning despite a numerical disadvantage. The location of the interaction with respect to pack territories had no effect on the outcome of interpack interactions. Although the importance of RPS in successful territorial defense suggests the evolution and maintenance of group living may be at least partly due to larger packs’ success during interpack interactions, group composition is also an important factor, highlighting that some individuals are more valuable than others during interpack conflicts.

  15. Ginzburg criterion for ionic fluids: the effect of Coulomb interactions.

    Patsahan, O

    2013-08-01

    The effect of the Coulomb interactions on the crossover between mean-field and Ising critical behavior in ionic fluids is studied using the Ginzburg criterion. We consider the charge-asymmetric primitive model supplemented by short-range attractive interactions in the vicinity of the gas-liquid critical point. The model without Coulomb interactions exhibiting typical Ising critical behavior is used to calibrate the Ginzburg temperature of the systems comprising electrostatic interactions. Using the collective variables method, we derive a microscopic-based effective Hamiltonian for the full model. We obtain explicit expressions for all the relevant Hamiltonian coefficients within the framework of the same approximation, i.e., the one-loop approximation. Then we consistently calculate the reduced Ginzburg temperature t(G) for both the purely Coulombic model (a restricted primitive model) and the purely nonionic model (a hard-sphere square-well model) as well as for the model parameters ranging between these two limiting cases. Contrary to the previous theoretical estimates, we obtain the reduced Ginzburg temperature for the purely Coulombic model to be about 20 times smaller than for the nonionic model. For the full model including both short-range and long-range interactions, we show that t(G) approaches the value found for the purely Coulombic model when the strength of the Coulomb interactions becomes sufficiently large. Our results suggest a key role of Coulomb interactions in the crossover behavior observed experimentally in ionic fluids as well as confirm the Ising-like criticality in the Coulomb-dominated ionic systems.

  16. Interaction effects in liquids with low electron densities

    Warren, W.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses two complementary classes of systems in which strong electron-electron or electron-ion interactions appear at low electron densities. The first are the expanded liquid alkali metals (cesium) in which electron correlation effects have a profound effect on the magnetic properties on the metallic side of the metal-nonmetal transition. The second group are molten alkali halides containing low densities of localized electrons introduced, say, by dissolution of small amounts of excess metal. (Auth.)

  17. Depth of Field Effects for Interactive Direct Volume Rendering

    Schott, Mathias; Pascal Grosset, A.V.; Martin, Tobias; Pegoraro, Vincent; Smith, Sean T.; Hansen, Charles D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a method for interactive direct volume rendering is proposed for computing depth of field effects, which previously were shown to aid observers in depth and size perception of synthetically generated images. The presented technique extends those benefits to volume rendering visualizations of 3D scalar fields from CT/MRI scanners or numerical simulations. It is based on incremental filtering and as such does not depend on any precomputation, thus allowing interactive explorations of volumetric data sets via on-the-fly editing of the shading model parameters or (multi-dimensional) transfer functions. © 2011 The Author(s).

  18. Depth of Field Effects for Interactive Direct Volume Rendering

    Schott, Mathias

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a method for interactive direct volume rendering is proposed for computing depth of field effects, which previously were shown to aid observers in depth and size perception of synthetically generated images. The presented technique extends those benefits to volume rendering visualizations of 3D scalar fields from CT/MRI scanners or numerical simulations. It is based on incremental filtering and as such does not depend on any precomputation, thus allowing interactive explorations of volumetric data sets via on-the-fly editing of the shading model parameters or (multi-dimensional) transfer functions. © 2011 The Author(s).

  19. International science conference RESpect report

    Radim Rybár

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Report is dedicated to aspects of conceiving the number of scientific magazine Acta Montanistica Slovaca, which purpose wasto publish specific key reports from the sixth year of international science conference RESpect 2011. The main aspect in the decisionprocess was to cover the conference agenda, complexity of the global problematic understanding, the subject of examination actualityand the results achievement level. The choice at the same time points on the technological, evaluative, environmental, economicaland application aspects of the RES usage, with accent on the Middle Europe region conditions.

  20. Model-Mapped RPA for Determining the Effective Coulomb Interaction

    Sakakibara, Hirofumi; Jang, Seung Woo; Kino, Hiori; Han, Myung Joon; Kuroki, Kazuhiko; Kotani, Takao

    2017-04-01

    We present a new method to obtain a model Hamiltonian from first-principles calculations. The effective interaction contained in the model is determined on the basis of random phase approximation (RPA). In contrast to previous methods such as projected RPA and constrained RPA (cRPA), the new method named "model-mapped RPA" takes into account the long-range part of the polarization effect to determine the effective interaction in the model. After discussing the problems of cRPA, we present the formulation of the model-mapped RPA, together with a numerical test for the single-band Hubbard model of HgBa2CuO4.

  1. Effective pion--nucleon interaction in nuclear matter

    Celenza, L.S.; Liu, L.C.; Nutt, W.; Shakin, C.M.

    1976-01-01

    We discuss the modification of the interaction between a pion and a nucleon in the presence of an infinite medium of nucleons (nuclear matter). The theory presented here is covariant and is relevant to the calculation of the pion--nucleus optical potential. The specific effects considered are the modifications of the nucleon propagator due to the Pauli principle and the modification of the pion and nucleon propagators due to collisions with nucleons of the medium. We also discuss in detail the pion self-energy in the medium, paying close attention to off-shell effects. These latter effects are particularly important because of the rapid variation with energy of the fundamental pion--nucleon interaction. Numerical results are presented, the main feature being the appearance of a significant damping width for the (3, 3) resonance

  2. Effect of electron-photon interaction on the knight shift

    Tripathi, G.S.; Misra, C.M.; Tripathi, P.; Misra, P.K.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of electron-phonon interaction is considered on the spin (K s ), orbital (K o ) and spin-orbit (K so ) contributions to the Knight shift. In case of K s , it is found that the modifications caused due to the magnetic field dependence of electron self-energy in the presence of electron-phonon interaction is cancelled by the electron-phonon mass enhancement. However, in the presence of both electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions, the exchange enhancement parameter α is modified to α(1+γ) -1 where γ is the electron-phonon mass enhancement parameter. The orbital and spin-orbital contributions are mainly modified through the changes in the one-electron energies and wave functions. (orig.)

  3. Effects of electrostatic interactions on electron transfer reactions

    Hickel, B.

    1987-01-01

    The fast reactions of electron transfer are studied by pulse radiolysis. This technique allows the creation in about 10 -8 second radicals and radical ions with high redox potentials. For solvated electrons electrostatic interaction on the kinetics of reactions limited by diffusion is described by Debye's equation when ion mobility is known. Deviation from theory can occur in ion pairs formation. This is evidenced experimentally for anions by cation complexation with a cryptate. Relatively slow reactions are more sensitive to electrostatic interactions than limited by diffusion. If ion pairs are not formed kinetics constant depends on dielectric constant of solvent and reaction radius. Experimentally is studied the effect of electrostatic interaction on the rate constants of solvated electrons with anions and cations in water-ethanol mixtures where the dielectric constant change from 80 to 25 at room temperature. 17 refs

  4. Nuclear matter from effective quark-quark interaction.

    Baldo, M; Fukukawa, K

    2014-12-12

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces.

  5. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations with chiral effective field theory interactions

    Tews, Ingo

    2015-10-12

    The neutron-matter equation of state connects several physical systems over a wide density range, from cold atomic gases in the unitary limit at low densities, to neutron-rich nuclei at intermediate densities, up to neutron stars which reach supranuclear densities in their core. An accurate description of the neutron-matter equation of state is therefore crucial to describe these systems. To calculate the neutron-matter equation of state reliably, precise many-body methods in combination with a systematic theory for nuclear forces are needed. Chiral effective field theory (EFT) is such a theory. It provides a systematic framework for the description of low-energy hadronic interactions and enables calculations with controlled theoretical uncertainties. Chiral EFT makes use of a momentum-space expansion of nuclear forces based on the symmetries of Quantum Chromodynamics, which is the fundamental theory of strong interactions. In chiral EFT, the description of nuclear forces can be systematically improved by going to higher orders in the chiral expansion. On the other hand, continuum Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods are among the most precise many-body methods available to study strongly interacting systems at finite densities. They treat the Schroedinger equation as a diffusion equation in imaginary time and project out the ground-state wave function of the system starting from a trial wave function by propagating the system in imaginary time. To perform this propagation, continuum QMC methods require as input local interactions. However, chiral EFT, which is naturally formulated in momentum space, contains several sources of nonlocality. In this Thesis, we show how to construct local chiral two-nucleon (NN) and three-nucleon (3N) interactions and discuss results of first QMC calculations for pure neutron systems. We have performed systematic auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations for neutron matter using local chiral NN interactions. By

  6. Translationally invariant and non-translationally invariant empirical effective interactions

    Golin, M.; Zamick, L.

    1975-01-01

    In this work empirical deficiencies of the core-renormalized realistic effective interactions are examined and simple corrective potentials are sought. The inability of the current realistic interactions to account for the energies of isobaric analog states is noted, likewise they are unable to reproduce the changes in the single-particle energies, as one goes from one closed shell to another. It is noted that the Schiffer interaction gives better results for these gross properties and this is attributed to a combination of several facts. First, to the inclusion of long range terms in the Schiffer potential, then to the presence of relative p-state terms (l=1), in addition to the usual relative s-state terms (l=0). The strange shape of the above interaction is further attributed to the fact that it is translationally invariant whereas the theory of core-polarization yields non-translationally invariant potentials. Consequently, as a correction to the monopole deficiencies of the realistic interactions the term Vsub(mon)=ar 2 (1)r 2 (2)+r 2 (1)+β[r 4 (1)r 2 (2)r 4 (2) ] is proposed. (Auth.)

  7. Interaction effects and quantum phase transitions in topological insulators

    Varney, Christopher N.; Sun Kai; Galitski, Victor; Rigol, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    We study strong correlation effects in topological insulators via the Lanczos algorithm, which we utilize to calculate the exact many-particle ground-state wave function and its topological properties. We analyze the simple, noninteracting Haldane model on a honeycomb lattice with known topological properties and demonstrate that these properties are already evident in small clusters. Next, we consider interacting fermions by introducing repulsive nearest-neighbor interactions. A first-order quantum phase transition was discovered at finite interaction strength between the topological band insulator and a topologically trivial Mott insulating phase by use of the fidelity metric and the charge-density-wave structure factor. We construct the phase diagram at T=0 as a function of the interaction strength and the complex phase for the next-nearest-neighbor hoppings. Finally, we consider the Haldane model with interacting hard-core bosons, where no evidence for a topological phase is observed. An important general conclusion of our work is that despite the intrinsic nonlocality of topological phases their key topological properties manifest themselves already in small systems and therefore can be studied numerically via exact diagonalization and observed experimentally, e.g., with trapped ions and cold atoms in optical lattices.

  8. Interactional effect of irradiation and fertilization on susceptibility of wheat to septoria tritici

    Jawhar, M.; Arabi, M.I.E.

    1999-12-01

    The effect of low doses of gamma rays (0, 5, 10, 15 Gy), soil fertilizer (0, N, K, N+K), and their interaction on grain yield, and susceptibility to infection by Septoria Tritici blotch, of two wheat cultivars (Bohouth 6 and Bohouth 5), were studied. results showed that all treatments have a positive effect on traits studied. A positive effect on reducing the infection by Septoria Tritici was detected. In general doses of 10 and 15 Gy decreased the infection area by 24 and 35%, and increased grain yield by 25 and 14.9% respectively. (author)

  9. Prediction of Effective Drug Combinations by Chemical Interaction, Protein Interaction and Target Enrichment of KEGG Pathways

    Lei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug combinatorial therapy could be more effective in treating some complex diseases than single agents due to better efficacy and reduced side effects. Although some drug combinations are being used, their underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Therefore, it is of great interest to deduce a novel drug combination by their molecular mechanisms in a robust and rigorous way. This paper attempts to predict effective drug combinations by a combined consideration of: (1 chemical interaction between drugs, (2 protein interactions between drugs’ targets, and (3 target enrichment of KEGG pathways. A benchmark dataset was constructed, consisting of 121 confirmed effective combinations and 605 random combinations. Each drug combination was represented by 465 features derived from the aforementioned three properties. Some feature selection techniques, including Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance and Incremental Feature Selection, were adopted to extract the key features. Random forest model was built with its performance evaluated by 5-fold cross-validation. As a result, 55 key features providing the best prediction result were selected. These important features may help to gain insights into the mechanisms of drug combinations, and the proposed prediction model could become a useful tool for screening possible drug combinations.

  10. Effective interactions approach to phase stability in alloys under irradiation

    Enrique, R.A.; Bellon, P.

    1999-01-01

    Phase stability in alloys under irradiation is studied considering effective thermodynamic potentials. A simple kinetic model of a binary alloy with phase separation is investigated. Time evolution in the alloy results from two competing dynamics: thermal diffusion, and irradiation induced ballistic exchanges The dynamical (steady state) phase diagram is evaluated exactly performing Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The solution is then compared to two theoretical frameworks: the effective quasi-interactions model as proposed by Vaks and Kamishenko, and the effective free energy model as proposed by Martin. New developments of these models are proposed to allow for quantitative comparisons. Both theoretical frameworks yield fairly good approximations to the dynamical phase diagram

  11. Effective interactions approach to phase stability in alloys under irradiation

    Enrique, R.A.; Bellon, P.

    1999-01-01

    Phase stability in alloys under irradiation is studied considering effective thermodynamic potentials. A simple kinetic model of a binary alloy with phase separation is investigated. Time evolution in the alloy results form two competing dynamics: thermal diffusion, and irradiation induced ballistic exchanges. The dynamical (steady state) phase diagram is evaluated exactly performing Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The solution is then compared to two theoretical frameworks: the effective quasi-interactions model as proposed by Vaks and Kamishenko, and the effective free energy model as proposed by Martin. New developments of these models are proposed to allow for quantitative comparisons. Both theoretical frameworks yield fairly good approximations to the dynamical phase diagram

  12. Coronal mass ejection and stream interaction region characteristics and their potential geomagnetic effectiveness

    Lindsay, G.M.; Russell, C.T.; Luhmann, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the largest geomagnetic storms are caused by extraordinary increases in the solar wind velocity and/or southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) produced by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their associated interplanetary shocks. However, much more frequent small to moderate increases in solar wind velocity and compressions in the IMF can be caused by either coronal mass ejections or fast/slow stream interactions. This study examines the relative statistics of the magnitudes of disturbances associated with the passage of both interplanetary coronal mass ejections and stream interaction regions, using an exceptionally continuous interplanetary database from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter at 0.7 AU throughout most of solar cycle 21. It is found that both stream interaction and CMEs produce magnetic fields significantly larger than the nominal IMF. Increases in field magnitude that are up to 2 and 3 times higher than the ambient field are observed for stream interaction regions and CMEs, respectively. Both stream interactions and CMEs produce large positive and negative Β z components at 0.7 AU, but only CMEs produce Β z magnitudes greater than 35 nT. CMEs are often associated with sustained periods of positive or negative Β z whereas stream interaction regions are more often associated with fluctuating Β z . CMEs tend to produce larger solar wind electric fields than stream interactions. Yet stream interactions tend to produce larger dynamic pressures than CMEs. Dst predictions based on solar wind duskward electric field and dynamic pressure indicate that CMEs produce the largest geomagnetic disturbances while the low-speed portion of stream interaction regions are least geomagnetically effective. Both stream interaction regions and CMEs contribute to low and moderate levels of activity with relative importance determined by their solar-cycle-dependent occurrence rates

  13. Manipulating the Coffee-Ring Effect: Interactions at Work.

    Anyfantakis, Manos; Baigl, Damien

    2015-07-31

    The evaporation of a drop of colloidal suspension pinned on a substrate usually results in a ring of particles accumulated at the periphery of the initial drop. Intense research has been devoted to understanding, suppressing and ultimately controlling this so-called coffee-ring effect (CRE). Although the crucial role of flow patterns in the CRE has been thoroughly investigated, the effect of interactions on this phenomenon has been largely neglected. This Concept paper reviews recent works in this field and shows that the interactions of colloids with (and at) liquid-solid and liquid-gas interfaces as well as bulk particle-particle interactions drastically affect the morphology of the deposit. General rules are established to control the CRE by tuning these interactions, and guidelines for the rational physicochemical formulation of colloidal suspensions capable of depositing particles in desirable patterns are provided. This opens perspectives for the reliable control of the CRE in real-world formulations and creates new paradigms for flexible particle patterning at all kinds of interfaces as well for the exploitation of the CRE as a robust and inexpensive diagnostic tool. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Effective interactions in a quantum Bose-Bose mixture

    Utesov, O. I.; Baglay, M. I.; Andreev, S. V.

    2018-05-01

    We generalize the Beliaev diagrammatic theory of an interacting spinless Bose-Einstein condensate to the case of a binary mixture. We derive a set of coupled Dyson equations and find analytically the Green's functions of the system. The elementary excitation spectrum consists of two branches, one of which takes the characteristic parabolic form ω ∝p2 in the limit of a spin-independent interaction. We observe renormalization of the magnon mass and the spin-wave velocity due to the Andreev-Bashkin entrainment effect. For a three-dimensional weakly interacting gas the spectrum can be obtained by applying the Bogoliubov transformation to a second-quantized Hamiltonian in which the microscopic two-body potentials in each channel are replaced by the corresponding off-shell scattering amplitudes. The superfluid drag density can be calculated by considering a mixture of phonons and magnons interacting via the effective potentials. We show that this problem is identical to the second-order perturbative treatment of a Bose polaron. In two dimensions the drag contributes to the magnon dispersion already in the first approximation. Our consideration provides a basis for systematic study of emergent phases in quantum degenerate Bose-Bose mixtures.

  15. Interactive short-term effects of equivalent temperature and air pollution on human mortality in Berlin and Lisbon

    Burkart, Katrin; Canário, Paulo; Breitner, Susanne; Schneider, Alexandra; Scherber, Katharina; Andrade, Henrique; Alcoforado, Maria João; Endlicher, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that both temperature and air pollution are predictors of mortality. Thus far, few studies have focused on the potential interactive effects between the thermal environment and different measures of air pollution. Such interactions, however, are biologically plausible, as (extreme) temperature or increased air pollution might make individuals more susceptible to the effects of each respective predictor. This study investigated the interactive effects between equivalent temperature and air pollution (ozone and particulate matter) in Berlin (Germany) and Lisbon (Portugal) using different types of Poisson regression models. The findings suggest that interactive effects exist between air pollutants and equivalent temperature. Bivariate response surface models and generalised additive models (GAMs) including interaction terms showed an increased risk of mortality during periods of elevated equivalent temperatures and air pollution. Cold effects were mostly unaffected by air pollution. The study underscores the importance of air pollution control in mitigating heat effects. -- Highlights: • Interactive effects between air pollution and equivalent temperature result in augmented excess mortality. • High levels of ozone and particulate matter increase adverse heat effects on human mortality. • Cold effects are mostly unaffected by air pollution. • Findings underscore the importance of air pollution control in mitigating heat-related mortality. -- Interactive effects between air pollution and elevated (equivalent) temperatures underscore the importance of air pollution control in mitigating the adverse effects of heat

  16. Competing growth processes induced by next-nearest-neighbor interactions: Effects on meandering wavelength and stiffness

    Blel, Sonia; Hamouda, Ajmi BH.; Mahjoub, B.; Einstein, T. L.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we explore the meandering instability of vicinal steps with a kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (kMC) model including the attractive next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) interactions. kMC simulations show that increase of the NNN interaction strength leads to considerable reduction of the meandering wavelength and to weaker dependence of the wavelength on the deposition rate F. The dependences of the meandering wavelength on the temperature and the deposition rate obtained with simulations are in good quantitative agreement with the experimental result on the meandering instability of Cu(0 2 24) [T. Maroutian et al., Phys. Rev. B 64, 165401 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevB.64.165401]. The effective step stiffness is found to depend not only on the strength of NNN interactions and the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier, but also on F. We argue that attractive NNN interactions intensify the incorporation of adatoms at step edges and enhance step roughening. Competition between NNN and nearest-neighbor interactions results in an alternative form of meandering instability which we call "roughening-limited" growth, rather than attachment-detachment-limited growth that governs the Bales-Zangwill instability. The computed effective wavelength and the effective stiffness behave as λeff˜F-q and β˜eff˜F-p , respectively, with q ≈p /2 .

  17. Effective interactions and elementary excitations in quantum liquids

    Pines, D.

    1986-01-01

    The effective interactions which provide a wavevector and frequency dependent restoring force for collective modes in quantum liquids are derived for the helium liquids by means of physical arguments and sum rule and continuity considerations. A simple model is used to take into account mode-mode coupling between collective and multiparticle excitations, and the results for the zero-temperature liquid 4 He phonon-maxon-roton spectrum are shown to compare favorably with experiment and with microscopic calculation. The role played by spin-dependent backflow in liquid 3 He is analyzed, and a physical interpretation of its variation with density and spin-polarization is presented. A progress report is given on recent work on effective interactions and elementary excitations in nuclear matter, with particular attention to features encountered in the latter system which have no counterparts in the helium liquids

  18. Effective interactions, elementary excitations, and transport in the helium liquids

    Pines, D.

    1986-01-01

    Polarization potentials, the self-consistent fields which describe the primary consequences of the strong atom-atom interaction in the helium liquids, are developed for liquid 4 He and 3 He. Emphasis is placed on the common physical origin of the effective interactions in all helium liquids, and the hierarchy of physical effects (very short-range atomic correlations, zero point motion, and the Pauli principle) which determine their strength is reviewed. An overview is then given of the application of polarization potential theory to experiment, including the phonon-maxon-roton spectra of 4 He and 3 He- 4 He mixtures, the phonon-maxon spectrum of normal and spin-polarized 3 He, and the transport properties of superfluid 4 He and of normal and spin-polarized 3 He

  19. Electron correlation effects on the N2--N2 interaction

    Hay, P.J.; Pack, R.T.; Martin, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Ab initio self-consistent field, configuration interaction, and many-body perturbation theory methods are used to calculate the intermolecular potential between two nitrogen molecules. The emphasis is placed on the repulsive region important at the temperatures and pressures encountered in detonations. In addition, electron gas calculations are employed to fit and extend the ab initio data. We also generate effective spherical potentials which fit dilute gas virial, viscosity, and differential scattering data while being constrained by Hugoniot or ab initio data in the repulsive region. Finally, we discuss the roles of electron correlation and of many-body effects on the N 2 --N 2 interaction. Comparisons are also made to the Ar 2 potential where similar ab initio calculations are compared to an accurate empirical potential

  20. Interactive effects of temperature and habitat complexity on freshwater communities.

    Scrine, Jennifer; Jochum, Malte; Ólafsson, Jón S; O'Gorman, Eoin J

    2017-11-01

    Warming can lead to increased growth of plants or algae at the base of the food web, which may increase the overall complexity of habitat available for other organisms. Temperature and habitat complexity have both been shown to alter the structure and functioning of communities, but they may also have interactive effects, for example, if the shade provided by additional habitat negates the positive effect of temperature on understory plant or algal growth. This study explored the interactive effects of these two major environmental factors in a manipulative field experiment, by assessing changes in ecosystem functioning (primary production and decomposition) and community structure in the presence and absence of artificial plants along a natural stream temperature gradient of 5-18°C. There was no effect of temperature or habitat complexity on benthic primary production, but epiphytic production increased with temperature in the more complex habitat. Cellulose decomposition rate increased with temperature, but was unaffected by habitat complexity. Macroinvertebrate communities were less similar to each other as temperature increased, while habitat complexity only altered community composition in the coldest streams. There was also an overall increase in macroinvertebrate abundance, body mass, and biomass in the warmest streams, driven by increasing dominance of snails and blackfly larvae. Presence of habitat complexity, however, dampened the strength of this temperature effect on the abundance of macroinvertebrates in the benthos. The interactive effects that were observed suggest that habitat complexity can modify the effects of temperature on important ecosystem functions and community structure, which may alter energy flow through the food web. Given that warming is likely to increase habitat complexity, particularly at higher latitudes, more studies should investigate these two major environmental factors in combination to improve our ability to predict the

  1. Pade approximants and the calculation of effective interactions

    Schucan, T.H.

    1975-01-01

    The analytic properties of the effective interaction in nuclei have become increasingly well understood in the last few years. It has been found that the corresponding series expansion diverges in most practical applications due to the occurrence of low lying collective states. It is the purpose of this paper to review and discuss an approximation scheme that has been used to rearrange this series with the aim to overcome the difficulties connected with its divergence. (orig./WL) [de

  2. Universal relationship connecting various two-body effective residual interactions

    Knuepfer, W.; Huber, M.G.

    1976-01-01

    Starting from a momentum space analysis of the two-body matrix elements, a relation has been established between the size of the model space actually used in a specific calculation and the relevant properties of the effective residual interaction. It turns out that the two-body transition density acts like a filter function on the Fourier transform of the force; it exhibits a distinct structure which clearly reflects the size and the detailed properties of the configuration space actually used. From an investigation of this filter function an equivalence criterion for different effective residual two-body interactions has been established both for closed and open shell nuclei. This result can be used to construct simple although realistic effective forces. As an example, a model for a separable residual interaction is proposed in which the corresponding parameters are being clearly related to the nuclear radius (i.e., the mass number), to the quantum numbers (i.e., the angular momentum) of the state under consideration and to the size of the configuration space used. For a number of examples this force has been applied successfully for the description of low energy properties of both closed and open shell nuclei

  3. Interactive effects of N-acetylcysteine and antidepressants.

    Costa-Campos, Luciane; Herrmann, Ana P; Pilz, Luísa K; Michels, Marcus; Noetzold, Guilherme; Elisabetsky, Elaine

    2013-07-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a glutathione precursor and glutamate modulator, has been shown to possess various clinically relevant psychopharmacological properties. Considering the role of glutamate and oxidative stress in depressive states, the poor effectiveness of antidepressant drugs (ADs) and the benefits of drug combination for treating depression, the aim of this study was to explore the possible benefit of NAC as an add on drug to treat major depression. For that matter we investigated the combination of subeffective and effective doses of NAC with subeffective and effective doses of several ADs in the mice tail suspension test. The key finding of this study is that a subeffective dose of NAC reduced the minimum effective doses of imipramine and escitalopram, but not those of desipramine and bupropion. Moreover, the same subeffective dose of NAC increased the minimum effective dose of fluoxetine in the same model. In view of the advantages associated with using the lowest effective dose of antidepressant, the results of this study suggest the potential of a clinically useful interaction of NAC with imipramine and escitalopram. Further studies are necessary to better characterize the molecular basis of such interactions, as well as to typify the particular drug combinations that would optimize NAC as an alternative for treating depression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Spectator interactions in soft-collinear effective theory

    Hill, Richard J.; Neubert, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    Soft-collinear effective theory is generalized to include soft massless quarks in addition to collinear fields. This extension is necessary for the treatment of interactions with the soft spectator quark in a heavy meson. The power counting of the relevant fields and the construction of the effective Lagrangian are discussed at leading order in Λ/m b . Several novel effects occur in the matching of full-theory amplitudes onto effective-theory operators containing soft light quarks, such as the appearance of an intermediate mass scale and large non-localities of operators on scales of order 1/Λ. Important examples of effective-theory operators with soft light quarks are studied and their renormalization properties explored. The formalism presented here forms the basis for a systematic analysis of factorization and power corrections for any exclusive B-meson decay into light particles

  5. Spectator Interactions in Soft-Collinear Effective Theory

    Hill, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    Soft-collinear effective theory is generalized to include soft massless quarks in addition to collinear fields. This extension is necessary for the treatment of interactions with the soft spectator quark in a heavy meson. The power counting of the relevant fields and the construction of the effective Lagrangian are discussed at leading order in Λ/m b . Several novel effects occur in the matching of full-theory amplitudes onto effective-theory operators containing soft light quarks, such as the appearance of an intermediate mass scale and large non-localities of operators on scales of order 1/Λ. Important examples of effective-theory operators with soft light quarks are studied and their renormalization properties explored. The formalism presented here forms the basis for a systematic analysis of factorization and power corrections for any exclusive B-meson decay into light particles

  6. Effect of interactive metronome training on children with ADHD.

    Shaffer, R J; Jacokes, L E; Cassily, J F; Greenspan, S I; Tuchman, R F; Stemmer, P J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a specific intervention, the Interactive Metronome, on selected aspects of motor and cognitive skills in a group of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The study included 56 boys who were 6years to 12 years of age and diagnosed before they entered the study as having ADHD. The participants were pretested and randomly assigned to one of three matched groups. A group of 19 participants receiving 15 hr of Interactive Metronome training exercises were compared with a group receiving no intervention and a group receiving training on selected computer video games. A significant pattern of improvement across 53 of 58 variables favoring the Interactive Metronome treatment was found. Additionally, several significant differences were found among the treatment groups and between pretreatment and posttreatment factors on performance in areas of attention, motor control, language processing, reading, and parental reports of improvements in regulation of aggressive behavior. The Interactive Metronome training appears to facilitate a number of capacities, including attention, motor control, and selected academic skills, in boys with ADHD.

  7. Effective stochastic generator with site-dependent interactions

    Khamehchi, Masoumeh; Jafarpour, Farhad H.

    2017-11-01

    It is known that the stochastic generators of effective processes associated with the unconditioned dynamics of rare events might consist of non-local interactions; however, it can be shown that there are special cases for which these generators can include local interactions. In this paper, we investigate this possibility by considering systems of classical particles moving on a one-dimensional lattice with open boundaries. The particles might have hard-core interactions similar to the particles in an exclusion process, or there can be many arbitrary particles at a single site in a zero-range process. Assuming that the interactions in the original process are local and site-independent, we will show that under certain constraints on the microscopic reaction rules, the stochastic generator of an unconditioned process can be local but site-dependent. As two examples, the asymmetric zero-temperature Glauber model and the A-model with diffusion are presented and studied under the above-mentioned constraints.

  8. Nanoparticle-assay marker interaction: effects on nanotoxicity assessment

    Zhao, Xinxin; Xiong, Sijing; Huang, Liwen Charlotte; Ng, Kee Woei; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Protein-based cytotoxicity assays such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are commonly used in cytotoxic evaluation of nanoparticles (NPs) despite numerous reports on possible interactions with protein markers in these assays that can confound the results obtained. In this study, conventional cytotoxicity assays where assay markers may (LDH and TNF- α) or may not (PicoGreen and WST-8) come into contact with NPs were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of NPs. The findings revealed selective interactions between negatively charged protein assay markers (LDH and TNF- α) and positively charged ZnO NPs under abiotic conditions. The adsorption and interaction with these protein assay markers were strongly influenced by surface charge, concentration, and specific surface area of the NPs, thereby resulting in less than accurate cytotoxic measurements, as observed from actual cell viability measurements. An improved protocol for LDH assay was, therefore, proposed and validated by eliminating any effects associated with protein–particle interactions. In view of this, additional measures and precautions should be taken when evaluating cytotoxicity of NPs with standard protein-based assays, particularly when they are of opposite charges

  9. Nanoparticle-assay marker interaction: effects on nanotoxicity assessment

    Zhao, Xinxin; Xiong, Sijing; Huang, Liwen Charlotte; Ng, Kee Woei, E-mail: kwng@ntu.edu.sg; Loo, Say Chye Joachim, E-mail: joachimloo@ntu.edu.sg [Nanyang Technological University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (Singapore)

    2015-01-15

    Protein-based cytotoxicity assays such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are commonly used in cytotoxic evaluation of nanoparticles (NPs) despite numerous reports on possible interactions with protein markers in these assays that can confound the results obtained. In this study, conventional cytotoxicity assays where assay markers may (LDH and TNF- α) or may not (PicoGreen and WST-8) come into contact with NPs were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of NPs. The findings revealed selective interactions between negatively charged protein assay markers (LDH and TNF- α) and positively charged ZnO NPs under abiotic conditions. The adsorption and interaction with these protein assay markers were strongly influenced by surface charge, concentration, and specific surface area of the NPs, thereby resulting in less than accurate cytotoxic measurements, as observed from actual cell viability measurements. An improved protocol for LDH assay was, therefore, proposed and validated by eliminating any effects associated with protein–particle interactions. In view of this, additional measures and precautions should be taken when evaluating cytotoxicity of NPs with standard protein-based assays, particularly when they are of opposite charges.

  10. Nanoparticle-assay marker interaction: effects on nanotoxicity assessment

    Zhao, Xinxin; Xiong, Sijing; Huang, Liwen Charlotte; Ng, Kee Woei; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Protein-based cytotoxicity assays such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are commonly used in cytotoxic evaluation of nanoparticles (NPs) despite numerous reports on possible interactions with protein markers in these assays that can confound the results obtained. In this study, conventional cytotoxicity assays where assay markers may (LDH and TNF- α) or may not (PicoGreen and WST-8) come into contact with NPs were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of NPs. The findings revealed selective interactions between negatively charged protein assay markers (LDH and TNF- α) and positively charged ZnO NPs under abiotic conditions. The adsorption and interaction with these protein assay markers were strongly influenced by surface charge, concentration, and specific surface area of the NPs, thereby resulting in less than accurate cytotoxic measurements, as observed from actual cell viability measurements. An improved protocol for LDH assay was, therefore, proposed and validated by eliminating any effects associated with protein-particle interactions. In view of this, additional measures and precautions should be taken when evaluating cytotoxicity of NPs with standard protein-based assays, particularly when they are of opposite charges.

  11. Non-linear effective Lagrangian treatment of 'Penguin' interaction

    Pham, T.N.

    1984-01-01

    Using the non-linear effective lagrangian technique, we show explicitly that only derivative coupling is allowed for the K - π, K -> 2 π and K -> 3 π transitions induced by the ΔS = 1 Penguin operator of SVZ in agreement with chiral symmetry requirements. From a derivative coupling (3, anti 3) mass term and the SU(3) breaking effect for fsub(K)/fsub(π), we estimate the strength of the Penguin interactions and find it too small to account for the ΔI = 1/2 amplitude. (orig.)

  12. Non-standard interaction effects at reactor neutrino experiments

    Ohlsson, Tommy; Zhang, He

    2009-01-01

    We study non-standard interactions (NSIs) at reactor neutrino experiments, and in particular, the mimicking effects on θ 13 . We present generic formulas for oscillation probabilities including NSIs from sources and detectors. Instructive mappings between the fundamental leptonic mixing parameters and the effective leptonic mixing parameters are established. In addition, NSI corrections to the mixing angles θ 13 and θ 12 are discussed in detailed. Finally, we show that, even for a vanishing θ 13 , an oscillation phenomenon may still be observed in future short baseline reactor neutrino experiments, such as Double Chooz and Daya Bay, due to the existences of NSIs

  13. Interactive effect of herbivory and competition on the invasive plant Mikania micrantha.

    Li, Junmin; Xiao, Tao; Zhang, Qiong; Dong, Ming

    2013-01-01

    A considerable number of host-specific biological control agents fail to control invasive plants in the field, and exploring the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is important and helpful for the management of invasive plants. Herbivory and competition are two of the most common biotic stressors encountered by invasive plants in their recipient communities. We predicted that the antagonistic interactive effect between herbivory and competition would weaken the effect of herbivory on invasive plants and result in the failure of herbivory to control invasive plants. To examine this prediction, thus, we conducted an experiment in which both invasive Mikania micrantha and native Coix lacryma-job i were grown together and subjected to herbivory-mimicking defoliation. Both defoliation and competition had significantly negative effects on the growth of the invader. However, the negative effect of 75% respective defoliation on the above- and below-ground biomass of Mikania micrantha was alleviated by presence of Coix lacryma-jobi. The negative effect of competition on the above- and below-ground biomass was equally compensated at 25%, 50% and 100% defoliation and overcompensated at 75% defoliation. The interactive effect was antagonistic and dependent on the defoliation intensity, with the maximum effect at 75% defoliation. The antagonistic interaction between defoliation and competition appears to be able to release the invader from competition, thus facilitating the invasiveness of Mikania, a situation that might make herbivory fail to inhibit the growth of invasive Mikania in the invaded community.

  14. Potential effect of cationic liposomes on interactions with oral bacterial cells and biofilms.

    Sugano, Marika; Morisaki, Hirobumi; Negishi, Yoichi; Endo-Takahashi, Yoko; Kuwata, Hirotaka; Miyazaki, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2016-01-01

    Although oral infectious diseases have been attributed to bacteria, drug treatments remain ineffective because bacteria and their products exist as biofilms. Cationic liposomes have been suggested to electrostatically interact with the negative charge on the bacterial surface, thereby improving the effects of conventional drug therapies. However, the electrostatic interaction between oral bacteria and cationic liposomes has not yet been examined in detail. The aim of the present study was to examine the behavior of cationic liposomes and Streptococcus mutans in planktonic cells and biofilms. Liposomes with or without cationic lipid were prepared using a reverse-phase evaporation method. The zeta potentials of conventional liposomes (without cationic lipid) and cationic liposomes were -13 and 8 mV, respectively, and both had a mean particle size of approximately 180 nm. We first assessed the interaction between liposomes and planktonic bacterial cells with a flow cytometer. We then used a surface plasmon resonance method to examine the binding of liposomes to biofilms. We confirmed the binding behavior of liposomes with biofilms using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The interactions between cationic liposomes and S. mutans cells and biofilms were stronger than those of conventional liposomes. Microscopic observations revealed that many cationic liposomes interacted with the bacterial mass and penetrated the deep layers of biofilms. In this study, we demonstrated that cationic liposomes had higher affinity not only to oral bacterial cells, but also biofilms than conventional liposomes. This electrostatic interaction may be useful as a potential drug delivery system to biofilms.

  15. Estimating Effects of Species Interactions on Populations of Endangered Species.

    Roth, Tobias; Bühler, Christoph; Amrhein, Valentin

    2016-04-01

    Global change causes community composition to change considerably through time, with ever-new combinations of interacting species. To study the consequences of newly established species interactions, one available source of data could be observational surveys from biodiversity monitoring. However, approaches using observational data would need to account for niche differences between species and for imperfect detection of individuals. To estimate population sizes of interacting species, we extended N-mixture models that were developed to estimate true population sizes in single species. Simulations revealed that our model is able to disentangle direct effects of dominant on subordinate species from indirect effects of dominant species on detection probability of subordinate species. For illustration, we applied our model to data from a Swiss amphibian monitoring program and showed that sizes of expanding water frog populations were negatively related to population sizes of endangered yellow-bellied toads and common midwife toads and partly of natterjack toads. Unlike other studies that analyzed presence and absence of species, our model suggests that the spread of water frogs in Central Europe is one of the reasons for the decline of endangered toad species. Thus, studying population impacts of dominant species on population sizes of endangered species using data from biodiversity monitoring programs should help to inform conservation policy and to decide whether competing species should be subject to population management.

  16. Effects of threat management interactions on conservation priorities.

    Auerbach, Nancy A; Wilson, Kerrie A; Tulloch, Ayesha I T; Rhodes, Jonathan R; Hanson, Jeffrey O; Possingham, Hugh P

    2015-12-01

    Decisions need to be made about which biodiversity management actions are undertaken to mitigate threats and about where these actions are implemented. However, management actions can interact; that is, the cost, benefit, and feasibility of one action can change when another action is undertaken. There is little guidance on how to explicitly and efficiently prioritize management for multiple threats, including deciding where to act. Integrated management could focus on one management action to abate a dominant threat or on a strategy comprising multiple actions to abate multiple threats. Furthermore management could be undertaken at sites that are in close proximity to reduce costs. We used cost-effectiveness analysis to prioritize investments in fire management, controlling invasive predators, and reducing grazing pressure in a bio-diverse region of southeastern Queensland, Australia. We compared outcomes of 5 management approaches based on different assumptions about interactions and quantified how investment needed, benefits expected, and the locations prioritized for implementation differed when interactions were taken into account. Managing for interactions altered decisions about where to invest and in which actions to invest and had the potential to deliver increased investment efficiency. Differences in high priority locations and actions were greatest between the approaches when we made different assumptions about how management actions deliver benefits through threat abatement: either all threats must be managed to conserve species or only one management action may be required. Threatened species management that does not consider interactions between actions may result in misplaced investments or misguided expectations of the effort required to mitigate threats to species. © 2015 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc., on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology.

  17. Effects of Impeller-Diffuser Interaction on Centrifugal Compressor Performance

    Tan, Choon S.

    2003-01-01

    This research program focuses on characterizing the effect of impeller-diffuser interactions in a centrifugal compressor stage on its performance using unsteady threedimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations. The computed results show that the interaction between the downstream diffuser pressure field and the impeller tip clearance flow can account for performance changes in the impeller. The magnitude of performance change due to this interaction was examined for an impeller with varying tip clearance followed by a vaned or vaneless diffuser. The impact of unsteady impeller-diffuser interaction, primarily through the impeller tip clearance flow, is reflected through a time-averaged change in impeller loss, blockage and slip. The results show that there exists a tip clearance where the beneficial effect of the impeller-diffuser interaction on the impeller performance is at a maximum. A flow feature that consists of tip flow back leakage was shown to occur at design speed for the centrifugal compressor stage. This flow phenomenon is described as tip flow that originates in one passage, flows downstream of the impeller trailing edge and then returns to upstream of the impeller trailing edge of a neighboring passage. Such a flow feature is a source of loss in the impeller. A hypothesis is put forth to show that changing the diffuser vane count and changing impeller-diffuser gap has an analogous effect on the impeller performance. The centrifugal compressor stage was analyzed using diffusers of different vane counts, producing an impeller performance trend similar to that when the impeller-diffuser gap was varied, thus supporting the hypothesis made. This has the implication that the effect impeller performance associated with changing the impeller-diffuser gap and changing diffuser vane count can be described by the non-dimensional ratio of impeller-diffuser gap to diffuser vane pitch. A procedure is proposed and developed for isolating impeller passage

  18. Effect of electrostatic interactions on electron-transfer reactions

    Hickel, B.

    1987-01-01

    Fast reactions of electron transfer are studied by pulsed radiolysis. By this technique radicals and ionic radicals with high redox potentials are created homogeneously in the solution in about 10 -8 second. For solvated electron effect of electrostatic interaction on kinetics of reactions limited by diffusion is obtained with a good approximation by the Debye equation when ion mobility is known. Deviation from the theory occurs in ion pair formation, which is evidenced experimentally in reactions between anions when cations are complexed by a cryptate. Slow reactions k 8 M -1 s -1 are more sensitive to electrostatic interactions than reactions limited by diffusion. When there is no ion pair formation the velocity constant depends upon dielectric constant of the solvent and reaction distance. 17 refs

  19. Elderly people in many respects benefit from interaction with dogs

    2011-01-01

    Over the course of evolution, humans and animals have entered into a close relationship. By domesticating animals, humans were able to use them to their own advantage. However, animals should not only be seen as mere providers of material value; in fact, they actually enrich humans' lives on an emotional level. The classic examples for this evolution are dogs: they are considered loyal companions, particularly for children and elderly people. This relationship between humans and animals is the subject of this research study and is examined from a gerontological perspective by employing qualitative social research methods. Conclusion: The results of the study reveal the manifold meanings that pets - in particular dogs - can and do have to the elderly. At this point, it should also be noted that there is still a strong need for further research into this topic from a gerontological perspective. PMID:22112364

  20. Elderly people in many respects benefit from interaction with dogs

    Scheibeck R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over the course of evolution, humans and animals have entered into a close relationship. By domesticating animals, humans were able to use them to their own advantage. However, animals should not only be seen as mere providers of material value; in fact, they actually enrich humans' lives on an emotional level. The classic examples for this evolution are dogs: they are considered loyal companions, particularly for children and elderly people. This relationship between humans and animals is the subject of this research study and is examined from a gerontological perspective by employing qualitative social research methods. Conclusion: The results of the study reveal the manifold meanings that pets - in particular dogs - can and do have to the elderly. At this point, it should also be noted that there is still a strong need for further research into this topic from a gerontological perspective.

  1. Towards a First-Principles Determination of Effective Coulomb Interactions in Correlated Electron Materials: Role of Intershell Interactions.

    Seth, Priyanka; Hansmann, Philipp; van Roekeghem, Ambroise; Vaugier, Loig; Biermann, Silke

    2017-08-04

    The determination of the effective Coulomb interactions to be used in low-energy Hamiltonians for materials with strong electronic correlations remains one of the bottlenecks for parameter-free electronic structure calculations. We propose and benchmark a scheme for determining the effective local Coulomb interactions for charge-transfer oxides and related compounds. Intershell interactions between electrons in the correlated shell and ligand orbitals are taken into account in an effective manner, leading to a reduction of the effective local interactions on the correlated shell. Our scheme resolves inconsistencies in the determination of effective interactions as obtained by standard methods for a wide range of materials, and allows for a conceptual understanding of the relation of cluster model and dynamical mean field-based electronic structure calculations.

  2. Stigma's Effect on Social Interaction and Social Media Activity.

    Boudewyns, Vanessa; Himelboim, Itai; Hansen, Derek L; Southwell, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    Stigmatized topics, such as HIV/STD, likely constrain related information sharing in ways that should be apparent in social interactions both on and off the Internet. Specifically, the authors predicted that the more people perceive an issue as stigmatized, the less likely they are to talk about the issue both privately (with sexual partners and peers) and publicly (on Twitter). Study 1 tested the effect of stigma on conversations at the individual level: The authors asked a group of participants (N = 138) about perceived STD-testing stigma, interactions with a sexual partner, and conversations with peers about STD testing. Study 2 assessed whether health conditions, in the aggregate, were less likely to generate social media activity as a function of current stigmatization. Using 259,758 archived Twitter posts mentioning 13 medical conditions, the authors tested whether level of stigma predicted the volume of relevant social media conversation, controlling for each condition's amount of advocacy and Google search popularity from a user's perspective. Findings supported our hypotheses. Individuals who reported perceiving a given health conditions in more stigmatic ways also reported interacting less with others about that topic; Twitter results showed a similar pattern. Results also suggest a more complex story of influence, as funding from the National Institutes of Health (i.e., each conditions amount of advocacy) associated with the examined health conditions also predicted Twitter activity. Overall, these results indicated that stigma had a similar, dampening effect on face-to-face and Twitter interactions. Findings hold theoretical and practical implications, which are discussed.

  3. Gravitational interaction to one loop in effective quantum gravity

    Akhundov, A.

    1996-10-01

    The authors carry out the first step of a program conceived, in order to build a realistic model, having the particle spectrum of the standard model and renormalized masses, interaction terms and coupling, etc. which include the class of quantum gravity corrections, obtained by handling gravity as an effective theory. This provides an adequate picture at low energies, i.e. much less than the scale of strong gravity (the Planck mass). Hence the results are valid, irrespectively of any proposal for the full quantum gravity as a fundamental theory. The authors consider only non-analytic contributions to the one-loop scattering matrix elements, which provide the dominant quantum effect at long distance. These contributions are finite and independent from the finite value of the renormalization counter terms of the effective Lagrangian. The authors calculate the interaction of two heavy scalar particles, i.e. close to rest, due to the effective quantum gravity to the one loop order and compare with similar results in the literature

  4. Gravitational interaction to one loop in effective quantum gravity

    Akhundov, A. [Universitaet-gesamthochschule Siegen (Germany)]|[Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan). Institute of Physics; Bellucci, S. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Shiekh, A. [International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    1996-10-01

    The authors carry out the first step of a program conceived, in order to build a realistic model, having the particle spectrum of the standard model and renormalized masses, interaction terms and coupling, etc. which include the class of quantum gravity corrections, obtained by handling gravity as an effective theory. This provides an adequate picture at low energies, i.e. much less than the scale of strong gravity (the Planck mass). Hence the results are valid, irrespectively of any proposal for the full quantum gravity as a fundamental theory. The authors consider only non-analytic contributions to the one-loop scattering matrix elements, which provide the dominant quantum effect at long distance. These contributions are finite and independent from the finite value of the renormalization counter terms of the effective Lagrangian. The authors calculate the interaction of two heavy scalar particles, i.e. close to rest, due to the effective quantum gravity to the one loop order and compare with similar results in the literature.

  5. Environmental effects of ozone depletion and its interactions ...

    When considering the effects of climate change, it has become clear that processes resulting in changes in stratospheric ozone are more complex than previously believed. As a result of this, human health and environmental issues will be longer-lasting and more regionally variable. Like the other Panels, the EEAP produces a detailed report every four years; the most recent was published as a series of seven papers in 2015 (Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2015, 14, 1-184). In the years in between, the EEAP produces less detailed and shorter Progress Reports of the relevant scientific findings. The most recent of these was for 2015 (Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2016, 15, 141-147). The present Progress Report for 2016 assesses some of the highlights and new insights with regard to the interactive nature of the direct and indirect effects of UV radiation, atmospheric processes, and climate change. The report is also published in (Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2017, DOI: 10.1039/c7pp90001e). The more detailed Quadrennial Assessment will be made available in 2018. The Parties to the Montreal Protocol are informed by three Panels of experts. One of these is the Environmental Effects Assessment Panel (EEAP), which deals with two focal issues. The first focus is the effects on increased UV radiation on human health, animals, plants, biogeochemistry, air quality, and materials. The second focus is on interactions between UV radiation and global climate change and how these may

  6. Effective realistic interactions for low momentum Hilbert spaces

    Weber, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    method to calculate the operator representation is applied to different effective realistic potentials. In a first application the Argonne V18 potential, transformed by means of the Unitary Correlation Operator Method (UCOM), is considered. As second application an operator representation of the Similarity Renormalization Group (SRG) transformed Argonne potential is obtained. Finally an operator representation of the JISP16 interaction, which is specifically designed for the harmonic oscillator basis, is derived by using the same ansatz as for the SRG transformed Argonne potential.Summing up, there is no general set of operators which can be used to describe all the different effective interactions by just adjusting the particular radial functions. However, it is possible to find a suitable operator representation, even for effective operators that are specifically designed for numerical feasibility and are treating each partial wave separately.

  7. Eddy-Kuroshio Interactions: Local and Remote Effects

    Jan, Sen; Mensah, Vigan; Andres, Magdalena; Chang, Ming-Huei; Yang, Yiing Jang

    2017-12-01

    Quasi-geostrophic mesoscale eddies regularly impinge on the Kuroshio in the western North Pacific, but the processes underlying the evolution of these eddy-Kuroshio interactions have not yet been thoroughly investigated in the literature. Here this interaction is examined with results from a semi-idealized three-dimensional numerical model and observations from four pressure-sensor equipped inverted echo sounders (PIESs) in a zonal section east of Taiwan and satellite altimeters. Both the observations and numerical simulations suggest that, during the interaction of a cyclonic eddy with the Kuroshio, the circular eddy is deformed into an elliptic shape with the major axis in the northwest-southeast direction, before being dissipated; the poleward velocity and associated Kuroshio transport decrease and the sea level and pycnocline slopes across the Kuroshio weaken. In contrast, for an anticyclonic eddy during the eddy-Kuroshio interaction, variations in the velocity, sea level, and isopycnal depth are reversed; the circular eddy is also deformed to an ellipse but with the major axis parallel to the Kuroshio. The model results also demonstrate that the velocity field is modified first and consequently the SSH and isopycnal depth evolve during the interaction. Furthermore, due to the combined effect of impingement latitude and realistic topography, some eddy-Kuroshio interactions east of Taiwan are found to have remote effects, both in the Luzon Strait and on the East China Sea shelf northeast of Taiwan.Plain Language SummaryMesoscale eddies are everywhere in the ocean. These ocean swirls of either clockwise or counterclockwise spinning with diameter of about 100-300 km and rounding current speed of about 0.5 m/s, carrying energy and certain type of water mass, move westward and eventually reach the western boundary of each ocean. The evolution of these eddies and the interaction which occurs when they encounter the western boundary current, e.g. the Kuroshio in the

  8. Dynamic effects of interaction of composite projectiles with targets

    Zakharov, V. M. [Scientific Research Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics of Tomsk State University, 36, Lenin Avenue, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The process of high-speed impact of projectiles against targets of finite thickness is experimentally investigated. Medium-hard steel plates are used as targets. The objective of this research is to carry out a comparative analysis of dynamic effects of interaction of various types of projectiles with targets, such as characteristics of destruction of the target, the state of the projectile behind the target, and particularities of the after-penetration stream of fragments after the target has been pierced. The projectiles are made of composites on the basis of tungsten carbide obtained by caking and the SHS-technology. To compare effectiveness of composite projectiles steel projectiles are used. Their effectiveness was estimated in terms of the ballistic limit. High density projectiles obtained by means of the SHS-technology are shown to produce results comparable in terms of the ballistic limit with high-strength projectiles that contain tungsten received by caking.

  9. Weak interactions and cooperativity effects on disiloxane: a look at the building block of silicones

    Martín-Fernández, Carlos; Montero-Campillo, M. Merced; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2018-06-01

    The behaviour of disiloxane 1 towards a set of Lewis acids (LA) and Lewis bases (LB) forming complexes through its oxygen and silicon atoms, respectively, was studied at the MP2/aug‧-cc-pVTZ level of theory, exploring a wide variety of non-covalent interactions. Disiloxane is a moderate electron acceptor and a good electron donor, exhibiting in the latter case binding energies up to almost -100 kJ/mol with BeCl2. Cooperativity effects were also analysed by looking at ternary 1:LA:LB complexes. Shorter intermolecular distances than in the corresponding binary complexes and a negative contribution of the three-body term to the binding energy indicate that the non-covalent interactions allowed by disiloxane through its acid and basic centres cooperate between them to reinforce both donor-acceptor pairs. These effects are particularly strong in complexes involving beryllium and triel bonds, but are also relevant for complexes containing hydrogen bonds.

  10. Global fits of the dark matter-nucleon effective interactions

    Catena, Riccardo; Gondolo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The effective theory of isoscalar dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by heavy spin-one or spin-zero particles depends on 10 coupling constants besides the dark matter particle mass. Here we compare this 11-dimensional effective theory to current observations in a comprehensive statistical analysis of several direct detection experiments, including the recent LUX, SuperCDMS and CDMSlite results. From a multidimensional scan with about 3 million likelihood evaluations, we extract the marginalized posterior probability density functions (a Bayesian approach) and the profile likelihoods (a frequentist approach), as well as the associated credible regions and confidence levels, for each coupling constant vs dark matter mass and for each pair of coupling constants. We compare the Bayesian and frequentist approach in the light of the currently limited amount of data. We find that current direct detection data contain sufficient information to simultaneously constrain not only the familiar spin-independent and spin-dependent interactions, but also the remaining velocity and momentum dependent couplings predicted by the dark matter-nucleon effective theory. For current experiments associated with a null result, we find strong correlations between some pairs of coupling constants. For experiments that claim a signal (i.e., CoGeNT and DAMA), we find that pairs of coupling constants produce degenerate results

  11. Effective interactions in strongly-coupled quantum systems

    Chen, J.M.C.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis, they study the role of effective interactions in strongly-coupled Fermi systems where the short-range correlations introduce difficulties requiring special treatment. The correlated basis function method provides the means to incorporate the short-range correlations and generate the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian and identity operators in a nonorthogonal basis of states which are so important to their studies. In the first half of the thesis, the particle-hole channel is examined to elucidate the effects of collective excitations. Proceeding from a least-action principle, a generalization of the random-phase approximation is developed capable of describing such strongly-interacting Fermi systems as nuclei, nuclear matter, neutron-star matter, and liquid 3 He. A linear response of dynamically correlated system to a weak external perturbation is also derived based on the same framework. In the second half of the thesis, the particle-particle channel is examined to elucidate the effects of pairing in nuclear and neutron-star matter

  12. An experimental study on soil-structure interaction effects

    Mita, Akira; Kumagai, Shigeru

    1989-01-01

    The soil-structure interaction effects play an important role in the earthquake response of large scale structures such as nuclear power plants. Recent decades, many experimental and analytical studies have been conducted. Even though sophisticated analytical tools are ready to use, complicated soil-structure interaction problems such as those with a complex geometry can not be solved yet. For such problems a laboratory experiment is a powerful alternative. In the laboratory experiment, a device to absorb the reflected waves is always necessary to be attached on the boundaries of the soil model to simulate the semi-infiniteness of the actual ground. But unfortunately absorbing devices currently available are far from satisfactory. In this paper, a new experimental method is employed for soil-structure interaction problems to simulate the semi-infiniteness of the actual ground. The present method utilizes the characteristics of transient response to an impulse load so that no special treatment on the boundaries of the soil model is required. This technique is applicable to a linear elastic system whose impulse response decreases to a small enough value before observing the reflected waves. (author)

  13. Interactive Effects of Nitrogen and Climate Change on Biodiversity

    Porter, E. M.; Bowman, W. D.; Clark, C. M.; Compton, J. E.; Pardo, L. H.; Soong, J.

    2011-12-01

    example, in certain arid ecosystems of southern California, elevated nitrogen has promoted invasions of annual non-native grasses. At the same time, a period of above-normal precipitation years has exacerbated the grass invasions. Increased grass cover has altered the hydrologic cycle of these areas and increased fire risk, ultimately leading to conversion of the ecosystem from diverse shrublands to less diverse grasslands. In addition to empirical studies, modeling can be used to simulate climate change and nitrogen interactions. The ForSAFE-VEG model, for example, has been used to examine climate change and nitrogen interactions in Rocky Mountain alpine vegetation communities. Results from both empirical studies and modeling indicate that nitrogen and climate change interact to drive losses in biodiversity greater than those caused by either stressor alone. Reducing inputs of anthropogenic reactive nitrogen may be an effective mitigation strategy for protecting biodiversity in the face of climate change.

  14. Websites in brand communication: interactivity and cross-media effects

    Voorveld, H.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation gives insight into two elements that are critical for expanding our understanding of the websites of brands. The first element represents the key characteristic of websites: interactivity. The dissertation investigates two forms of interactivity: actual and perceived interactivity.

  15. Application of spectral distributions in effective interaction theory

    Chang, B.D.

    1980-01-01

    The calculation of observable quantities in a large many-particle space is very complicated and often impractical. In effective interaction theory, to simplify the calculation, the full many-particle space is truncated to a small, manageable model space and the operators associated with the observables are renormalized to accommodate the truncation effects. The operator that has been most extensively studied for renormalization is the Hamiltonian. The renormalized Hamiltonian, often called the effective Hamiltonian, can be defined such that it not only gives the eigenvalues, but also the projections of the full-space (true) eigen-functions onto the model space. These projected wave functions then provide a convenient basis for renormalization of other operators. The usual framework for renormalization is perturbation theory. Unfortunately, the conventional perturbation series for effective Hamiltonians have problems with convergence and their high order terms (especially 4th or higher) are also difficult to calculate. The characteristics of spectral distributions can be helptul in determining the model space and calculating the effective Hamiltonian. In this talk applications of spectral distributions are discussed in the following areas: (1) truncation of many particle spaces by selection of configurations; (2) orthogonal polynomial expansions for the effective Hamiltonian; and (3) establishing new criteria for the effective Hamiltonian

  16. Utilizing media arts principles for developing effective interactive neurorehabilitation systems.

    Rikakis, Thanassis

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses how interactive neurorehabilitation systems can increase their effectiveness through systematic integration of media arts principles and practice. Media arts expertise can foster the development of complex yet intuitive extrinsic feedback displays that match the inherent complexity and intuitive nature of motor learning. Abstract, arts-based feedback displays can be powerful metaphors that provide re-contextualization, engagement and appropriate reward mechanisms for mature adults. Such virtual feedback displays must be seamlessly integrated with physical components to produce mixed reality training environments that promote active, generalizable learning. The proposed approaches are illustrated through examples from mixed reality rehabilitation systems developed by our team.

  17. Can the hadron effective interaction be local in inclusive process

    Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvily, M.A.; Petrov, V.A.

    1974-01-01

    The behaviour of the inclusive spectrum fsub(ab→c) in the asymptotic region is discussed. On the basis of the Jost-Lehmann-Dyson representation it is shown that inclusive processes are described by some structure functions, depending only on ν, q 2 (ν=2psub(b)(psub(a)-psub(c)); q 2 =(psub(a)-psub(c)) 2 ) under certain restrictions on the J-L-D spectral functions. As these dynamical characteristics (structure functions) do not depend on the sum(psub(a)+psub(c)), the effective interaction of hadrons ''a'' and ''c'' is as if local

  18. INTERACT

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  19. Spatial interactions database development for effective probabilistic risk assessment

    Liming, J. K.; Dunn, R. F.

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for a subsequent probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) fire risk analysis update, the STP Nuclear Operating Company (STPNOC) is updating its spatial interactions database (SID). This work is being performed to support updating the spatial interactions analysis (SIA) initially performed for the original South Texas Project Electric Generating Station (STPEGS) probabilistic safely assessment (PSA) and updated in the STPEGS Level 2 PSA and IPE Report. S/A is a large-scope screening analysis performed for nuclear power plant PRA that serves as a prerequisite basis for more detailed location-dependent, hazard-spec analyses in the PRA, such as fire risk analysis, flooding risk analysis, etc. SIA is required to support the 'completeness' argument for the PRA scope. The objectives of the current SID development effort are to update the spatial interactions analysis data, to the greatest degree practical, to be consistent with the following: the as-built plant as of December 31, 2007 the in-effect STPNOC STPEGS Units 1 and 2 PRA the current technology and intent of NUREG/CR-6850 guidance for lire risk analysis database support the requirements for PRA SIA, including fire and flooding risk analysis, established by NRC Regulatory Guide 1.200 and the ASME PRA Standard (ASME RA-S-2002 updated through ASME RA-Sc-2007,) This paper presents the approach and methodology for state-of-the-art SID development and applications, including an overview of the SIA process for nuclear power plant PRA. The paper shows how current relational database technology and existing, conventional station information sources can be employed to collect, process, and analyze spatial interactions data for the plant in an effective and efficient manner to meet the often challenging requirements of industry guidelines and standards such as NUREG/CR-6850, NRC Regulatory Guide 1.200, and ASME RA-S-2002 (updated through ASME RA-Sc 2007). This paper includes tables and figures illustrating how SIA

  20. Effective dark energy equation of state in interacting dark energy models

    Avelino, P.P., E-mail: ppavelin@fc.up.pt [Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia da Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Silva, H.M.R. da, E-mail: hilberto.silva@gmail.com [Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia da Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2012-07-24

    In models where dark matter and dark energy interact non-minimally, the total amount of matter in a fixed comoving volume may vary from the time of recombination to the present time due to energy transfer between the two components. This implies that, in interacting dark energy models, the fractional matter density estimated using the cosmic microwave background assuming no interaction between dark matter and dark energy will in general be shifted with respect to its true value. This may result in an incorrect determination of the equation of state of dark energy if the interaction between dark matter and dark energy is not properly accounted for, even if the evolution of the Hubble parameter as a function of redshift is known with arbitrary precision. In this Letter we find an exact expression, as well as a simple analytical approximation, for the evolution of the effective equation of state of dark energy, assuming that the energy transfer rate between dark matter and dark energy is described by a simple two-parameter model. We also provide analytical examples where non-phantom interacting dark energy models mimic the background evolution and primary cosmic microwave background anisotropies of phantom dark energy models.

  1. Effective dark energy equation of state in interacting dark energy models

    Avelino, P.P.; Silva, H.M.R. da

    2012-01-01

    In models where dark matter and dark energy interact non-minimally, the total amount of matter in a fixed comoving volume may vary from the time of recombination to the present time due to energy transfer between the two components. This implies that, in interacting dark energy models, the fractional matter density estimated using the cosmic microwave background assuming no interaction between dark matter and dark energy will in general be shifted with respect to its true value. This may result in an incorrect determination of the equation of state of dark energy if the interaction between dark matter and dark energy is not properly accounted for, even if the evolution of the Hubble parameter as a function of redshift is known with arbitrary precision. In this Letter we find an exact expression, as well as a simple analytical approximation, for the evolution of the effective equation of state of dark energy, assuming that the energy transfer rate between dark matter and dark energy is described by a simple two-parameter model. We also provide analytical examples where non-phantom interacting dark energy models mimic the background evolution and primary cosmic microwave background anisotropies of phantom dark energy models.

  2. Interaction potentials and their effect on crystal nucleation and symmetry

    Hsu, C.S.; Rahman, A.

    1979-01-01

    Molecular dynamics technique has been used to study the effect of the interaction potential on crystal nucleation and the symmetry of the nucleated phase. Four systems, namely rubidium, Lennard-Jones, rubidium-truncated, and Lennard-Jones-truncated, have been studied each at reduced density 0.95. Two types of calculations were performed. Firstly, starting from a liquid state, each system was quenched rapidly to a reduced temperature of approx.0.1. The nucleation process for these systems was monitored by studying the time dependence of temperature and the pair correlation function, and the resulting crystalline structure analyzed using among other properties the Voronoi polyhedra. Only in the case of rubidium was a b.c.c. structure nucleated. In the other three cases we obtained a f.c.c. ordering. Secondly, we have studied the effect of changing the interaction potential in a system which has already achieved an ordered state under the action of some other potential. After establishing a b.c.c. structure in a rubidium system, the change in the symmetry of the system was studied when the pair potential was modified to one of the other three forms. The results from both types of calculations are consistent: the rubidium potential leads to a b.c.c. structure while the other three potentials give an f.c.c. structure. Metastable disordered structures were not obtained in any of the calculations. However, the time elapse between the moment when the system is quick-quenched and the moment when nucleation occurs appears to depend upon the potential of interaction

  3. Embedment Effect test on soil-structure interaction

    Nasuda, Toshiaki; Akino, Kinji; Izumi, Masanori.

    1991-01-01

    A project consisting of laboratory test and field test has been conducted to clarify the embedment effect on soil-structure interaction. The objective of this project is to obtain the data for improving and preparing seismic analysis codes regarding the behavior of embedded reactor buildings during earthquakes. This project was planned to study the effect of soil-structure interaction using small size soil-structure models as well as the large scale models. The project was started in April, 1986, and is scheduled to end in March, 1994. The laboratory test models and field test models, and the measurement with accelerometers and others are described. As the interim results, the natural frequency and damping factor increased, and the amplitude decreased by the embedment of the test models. Some earthquakes were recorded in a soft rock site. The epicenters of the earthquakes occurred in 1989 are shown. The field tests were carried out in three sites. Two sites were used for the dynamic test with four test models having 8 m x 8 m plane size and 10 m height. One site was used for the static test with one concrete block as a specimen. Two models represent BWR type reactor buildings, and two models represent PWR type buildings. (K.I.)

  4. Effective low-energy Hamiltonians for interacting nanostructures

    Kinza, Michael; Ortloff, Jutta; Honerkamp, Carsten

    2010-10-01

    We present a functional renormalization group (fRG) treatment of trigonal graphene nanodisks and composites thereof, modeled by finite-size Hubbard-like Hamiltonians with honeycomb lattice structure. At half filling, the noninteracting spectrum of these structures contains a certain number of half-filled states at the Fermi level. For the case of trigonal nanodisks, including interactions between these degenerate states was argued to lead to a large ground state spin with potential spintronics applications [M. Ezawa, Eur. Phys. J. B 67, 543 (2009)10.1140/epjb/e2009-00041-7]. Here we perform a systematic fRG flow where the excited single-particle states are integrated out with a decreasing energy cutoff, yielding a renormalized low-energy Hamiltonian for the zero-energy states that includes effects of the excited levels. The numerical implementation corroborates the results obtained with a simpler Hartree-Fock treatment of the interaction effects within the zero-energy states only. In particular, for trigonal nanodisks the degeneracy of the one-particle-states with zero energy turns out to be protected against influences of the higher levels. As an explanation, we give a general argument that within this fRG scheme the zero-energy degeneracy remains unsplit under quite general conditions and for any size of the trigonal nanodisk. We also discuss a second class of nanostructures, bow-tie-shaped systems, where the zero-energy states are not protected.

  5. Effects of Soil Quality Enhancement on Pollinator-Plant Interactions

    Yasmin J. Cardoza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Both biotic and abiotic factors can affect soil quality, which can significantly impact plant growth, productivity, and resistance to pests. However, the effects of soil quality on the interactions of plants with beneficial arthropods, such as pollinators, have not been extensively examined. We studied the effects of vermicompost (earthworm compost, VC soil amendment on behavioral and physiological responses of pollinators to flowers and floral resources, using cucumbers, Cucumis sativus, as our model system. Results from experiments conducted over three field seasons demonstrated that, in at least two out of three years, VC amendment significantly increased visit length, while reducing the time to first discovery. Bumblebee (Bombus impatiens workers that fed on flowers from VC-amended plants had significantly larger and more active ovaries, a measure of nutritional quality. Pollen fractions of flowers from VC-grown plants had higher protein compared to those of plants grown in chemically fertilized potting soil. Nectar sugar content also tended to be higher in flowers from VC-grown plants, but differences were not statistically significant. In conclusion, soil quality enhancement, as achieved with VC amendment in this study, can significantly affect plant-pollinator interactions and directly influences pollinator nutrition and overall performance.

  6. Simulation of Coulomb interaction effects in electron sources

    Rouse, John; Zhu Xieqing; Liu Haoning; Munro, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Over many years, we have developed electron source simulation software that has been used widely in the electron optics community to aid the development of rotationally symmetric electron and ion guns. The simulation includes the modelling of cathode emission and the effects of volumetric space charge. In the present paper we describe the existing software and explain how we have extended this software to include the effects of discrete Coulomb interactions between the electrons as they travel from the cathode surface to the exit of the gun. In the paper, we will describe the numerical models we have employed, the techniques we have used to maximize the speed of the Coulomb force computation and present several illustrative examples of cases analyzed using the new software, including thermal field emitters, LaB 6 guns and flat dispenser-type cathodes.

  7. Statistical effect of interactions on particle creation in expanding universe

    Kodama, Hideo

    1982-01-01

    The statistical effect of interactions which drives many-particle systems toward equilibrium is expected to change the qualitative and quantitative features of particle creation in expanding universe. To investigate this problem a simplified model called the finite-time reduction model is formulated and applied to the scalar particle creation in the radiation dominant Friedmann universe. The number density of created particles and the entropy production due to particle creation are estimated. The result for the number density is compared with that in the conventional free field theory. It is shown that the statistical effect increases the particle creation and lengthens the active creation period. As for the entropy production it is shown that it is negligible for scalar particles in the Friedmann universe. (author)

  8. Effect of bottom slope on the nonlinear triad interactions in shallow water

    Chen, Hongzhou; Tang, Xiaocheng; Zhang, Ri; Gao, Junliang

    2018-05-01

    This paper aims at investigating the effect of bottom slope to the nonlinear triad interactions for irregular waves propagating in shallow water. The physical experiments are conducted in a wave flume with respect to the transformation of waves propagating on three bottom slopes ( β = 1/15, 1/30, and 1/45). Irregular waves with different type of breaking that are mechanically generated based on JONSWAP spectra are used for the test. The obviously different variations of spectra measured on each bottom reveal a crucial role of slope effect in the energy transfer between harmonics. The wavelet-based bispectrum were used to examine the bottom slope effect on the nonlinear triad interactions. Results show that the different bottom slopes which waves are propagated on will cause a significant discrepancy of triad interactions. Then, the discussions on the summed bicoherence which denote the distribution of phase coupling on each frequency further clarify the effect of bottom slope. Furthermore, the summed of the real and imaginary parts of bispectrum which could reflect the intensity of frequency components participating in the wave skewness and asymmetry were also investigated. Results indicate that the value of these parameters will increase as the bottom slope gets steeper.

  9. Toxic effects of the interaction of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with chemicals or physical factors

    Liu, Kui; Lin, Xialu; Zhao, Jinshun

    2013-01-01

    Due to their chemical stability and nonallergic, nonirritant, and ultraviolet protective properties, titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in industries such as electronics, optics, and material sciences, as well as architecture, medicine, and pharmacology. However, increasing concerns have been raised in regards to its ecotoxicity and toxicity on the aquatic environment as well as to humans. Although insights have been gained into the effects of TiO2 NPs on susceptible biological systems, there is still much ground to be covered, particularly in respect of our knowledge of the effects of the interaction of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors. Studies suggest that interactions of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors may result in an increase in toxicity or adverse effects. This review highlights recent progress in the study of the interactive effects of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors. PMID:23901269

  10. CO2 EFFECTS ON MOJAVE DESERT PLANT INTERACTIONS

    L. A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; S. D. SMITH; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Seasonal and interannual droughts characteristic of deserts have the potential to modify plant interactions as atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations continue to rise. At the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility in the northern Mojave Desert, the effects of elevated atmospheric C02 (550 vs. ambient {approx}360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) on plant interactions were examined during two years of high and low rainfall. Results suggest that CO{sub 2} effects on the interaction between native species and their understory herbs are dependent on the strength of competition when rainfall is plentiful, but are unimportant during annual drought. Seasonal rainfall for 1999 was 23% the long-term average for the area, and neither elevated CO{sub 2} nor the low production of herbaceous neighbors had an effect on relative growth rate (RGR, d{sup -1}) and reproductive effort (RE, number of flowers g{sup -1}) for Achnatherum hymenoides (early season perennial C{sub 3} grass), Pleuraphis rigida (late season perennial C{sub 4} grass), and Larrea tridentata (evergreen C{sub 3} shrub). In contrast, 1998 received 213% the average rainfall. Consequently, the decrease in RGR and increase in RE for Achnatherum, whose period of growth overlaps directly with that of its neighbors, was exaggerated at elevated CO{sub 2}. However, competitive effects of neighbors on Eriogonum trichopes (a winter annual growing in shrub interspaces), Pleuraphis and Larrea were not affected by elevated CO{sub 2}, and possible explanations are discussed. Contrary to expectations, the invasive annual neighbor Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens had little influence on target plant responses because densities in 1998 and 1999 at this site were well below those found in other studies where it has negatively affected perennial plant growth. The extent that elevated CO{sub 2} reduces the performance of Achnatherum in successive years to cause its loss from the plant community depends more on future pressure

  11. Effect of interactive group discussion among physicians to promote rational prescribing.

    Garjani, A; Salimnejad, M; Shamsmohamadi, M; Baghchevan, V; Vahidi, R G; Maleki-Dijazi, N; Rezazadeh, H

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of an educational intervention (interactive group discussion) on the prescribing behaviour of 51 general physicians from the north-west of Tabriz. Prescriptions were analysed pre-intervention and post-intervention (control and intervention groups) using a proforma with 8 indicators of correct prescribing. The mean number of drugs per prescription pre-intervention was 3.82. The percentage of prescriptions with antibiotics, corticosteroids and injections were 40.8%, 25.9% and 58.0%, respectively. Following the intervention there were slight but not significant changes in the indicators in both intervention and control groups compared with pre-intervention results.

  12. Capturing the spectrum of interaction effects in genetic association studies by simulated evaporative cooling network analysis.

    Brett A McKinney

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from human genetic studies of several disorders suggests that interactions between alleles at multiple genes play an important role in influencing phenotypic expression. Analytical methods for identifying Mendelian disease genes are not appropriate when applied to common multigenic diseases, because such methods investigate association with the phenotype only one genetic locus at a time. New strategies are needed that can capture the spectrum of genetic effects, from Mendelian to multifactorial epistasis. Random Forests (RF and Relief-F are two powerful machine-learning methods that have been studied as filters for genetic case-control data due to their ability to account for the context of alleles at multiple genes when scoring the relevance of individual genetic variants to the phenotype. However, when variants interact strongly, the independence assumption of RF in the tree node-splitting criterion leads to diminished importance scores for relevant variants. Relief-F, on the other hand, was designed to detect strong interactions but is sensitive to large backgrounds of variants that are irrelevant to classification of the phenotype, which is an acute problem in genome-wide association studies. To overcome the weaknesses of these data mining approaches, we develop Evaporative Cooling (EC feature selection, a flexible machine learning method that can integrate multiple importance scores while removing irrelevant genetic variants. To characterize detailed interactions, we construct a genetic-association interaction network (GAIN, whose edges quantify the synergy between variants with respect to the phenotype. We use simulation analysis to show that EC is able to identify a wide range of interaction effects in genetic association data. We apply the EC filter to a smallpox vaccine cohort study of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and infer a GAIN for a collection of SNPs associated with adverse events. Our results suggest an important

  13. Effective interactions between inclusions in an active bath

    Zaeifi Yamchi, Mahdi; Naji, Ali

    2017-11-01

    We study effective two- and three-body interactions between non-active colloidal inclusions in an active bath of chiral or non-chiral particles, using Brownian dynamics simulations within a standard, two-dimensional model of disk-shaped inclusions and active particles. In a non-chiral active bath, we first corroborate previous findings on effective two-body repulsion mediated between the inclusions by elucidating the detailed non-monotonic features of the two-body force profiles, including a primary maximum and a secondary hump at larger separations that was not previously reported. We then show that these features arise directly from the formation, and sequential overlaps, of circular layers (or "rings") of active particles around the inclusions, as the latter are brought to small surface separations. These rings extend to radial distances of a few active-particle radii from the surface of inclusions, giving the hard-core inclusions relatively thick, soft, repulsive "shoulders," whose multiple overlaps then enable significant (non-pairwise) three-body forces in both non-chiral and chiral active baths. The resulting three-body forces can even exceed the two-body forces in magnitude and display distinct repulsive and attractive regimes at intermediate to large self-propulsion strengths. In a chiral active bath, we show that, while active particles still tend to accumulate at the immediate vicinity of the inclusions, they exhibit strong depletion from the intervening region between the inclusions and partial depletion from relatively thick, circular zones further away from the inclusions. In this case, the effective, predominantly repulsive interactions between the inclusions turn to active, chirality-induced, depletion-type attractions, acting over an extended range of separations.

  14. Magnon Hall effect without Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction.

    Owerre, S A

    2017-01-25

    Topological magnon bands and magnon Hall effect in insulating collinear ferromagnets are induced by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) even at zero magnetic field. In the geometrically frustrated star lattice, a coplanar/noncollinear [Formula: see text] magnetic ordering may be present due to spin frustration. This magnetic structure, however, does not exhibit topological magnon effects even with DMI in contrast to collinear ferromagnets. We show that a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the star plane induces a non-coplanar spin configuration with nonzero spin scalar chirality, which provides topological effects without the need of DMI. The non-coplanar spin texture originates from the topology of the spin configurations and does not need the presence of DMI or magnetic ordering, which suggests that this phenomenon may be present in the chiral spin liquid phases of frustrated magnetic systems. We propose that these anomalous topological magnon effects can be accessible in polymeric iron (III) acetate-a star-lattice antiferromagnet with both spin frustration and long-range magnetic ordering.

  15. A study of effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some vitamins for electron, H, He and C ion interactions

    Büyükyıldız, M.

    2017-09-01

    The radiological properties of some vitamins such as Retinol, Beta-carotene, Riboflavin, Niacin, Niacinamide, Pantothenic acid, Pyridoxine, Pyridoxamine, Pyridoxal, Biotin, Folic acid, Ascorbic acid, Cholecalciferol, Alpha-tocopherol, Gamma-tocopherol, Phylloquinone have been investigated with respect to total electron interaction and some heavy charged particle interaction as means of effective atomic numbers (Z_{eff}) and electron densities (N_{eff}) for the first time. Calculations were performed for total electron interaction and heavy ions such as H, He and C ion interactions in the energy region 10keV-10MeV by using a logarithmic interpolation method. Variations in Z_{eff}'s and N_{eff}'s of given vitamins have been studied according to the energy of electron or heavy charged particles, and significant variations have been observed for all types of interaction in the given energy region. The maximum values of Z_{eff} have been found in the different energy regions for different interactions remarkably and variations in N_{eff} seem approximately to be the same with variation in Z_{eff} for the given vitamins as expected. Z_{eff} values of some vitamins were plotted together and compared with each other for electron, H, He and C interactions and the ratios of Z_{eff}/ have been changed in the range of 0.25-0.36, 0.20-0.36, 0.22-0.35 and 0.20-0.35 for electron, H, He and C interactions, respectively.

  16. Centrifuge modelling of seismic soil structure interaction effects

    Ghosh, B.; Madabhushi, S.P.G.

    2007-01-01

    Proper understanding of the role of unbounded soil in the evaluation of dynamic soil structure interaction (SSI) problem is very important for structures used in the nuclear industry. In this paper, the results from a series of dynamic centrifuge tests are reported. These tests were performed on different types of soil stratifications supporting a rigid containment structure. Test results indicate that accelerations transmitted to the structure's base are dependent on the stiffness degradation in the supporting soil. Steady build up of excess pore pressure leads to softening of the soil, which decreases the shear modulus and shear strength and subsequently changes the dynamic responses. It is also shown that the presence of the structure reduces the translational component of the input base motion and induces rocking of the structure. The test results are compared with some standard formulae used for evaluating interaction in the various building codes. It was concluded that the dynamic shear modulus values used should be representative of the site conditions and can vary dramatically due to softening. Damping values used are still very uncertain and contain many factors, which cannot be accounted in the experiments. It is emphasized that simplified design processes are important to gain an insight into the behaviour of the physical mechanism but for a complete understanding of the SSI effects sophisticated methods are necessary to account for non-linear behaviour of the soil material

  17. Hydrodynamic interactions in metachronal paddling: effects of varying stroke kinematics

    Samaee, Milad; Kasoju, Vishwa; Lai, Hong Kuan; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2017-11-01

    Crustaceans such as shrimp and krill use a drag-based technique for propulsion, in which multiple pairs of limbs are paddled rhythmically from the tail to the head. Each limb is phase-shifted in time relative to its neighbor. Most studies of this type of metachronal swimming have focused on the jet formed in the animal's wake. However, synergistic hydrodynamic interactions between adjacent limbs in metachrony have received minimal attention. We used a dynamically scaled robotic model to experimentally investigate how variations in stroke kinematics impact inter-paddle hydrodynamic interactions and thrust generation. Physical models of limbs were fitted to the robot and paddled with two different motion profiles (MPs)-1) MP1: metachronal power stroke (PS) and metachronal recovery stroke (RS); and 2) MP2: metachronal PS and synchronous RS. Stroke frequency and amplitude were maintained constant across both MPs. Our results show that MP2 produced faster jets in the thrust-generating direction as compared to MP1. The necessity for a pause in MP2 after completion of PS by the paddles leading the motion, prior to executing the synchronous RS, aided in further downstream flow propagation. The effect of using asymmetric stroke kinematics on thrust generated will be discussed.

  18. Effects of electrostatic interactions on ligand dissociation kinetics

    Erbaş, Aykut; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera; Marko, John F.

    2018-02-01

    We study unbinding of multivalent cationic ligands from oppositely charged polymeric binding sites sparsely grafted on a flat neutral substrate. Our molecular dynamics simulations are suggested by single-molecule studies of protein-DNA interactions. We consider univalent salt concentrations spanning roughly a 1000-fold range, together with various concentrations of excess ligands in solution. To reveal the ionic effects on unbinding kinetics of spontaneous and facilitated dissociation mechanisms, we treat electrostatic interactions both at a Debye-Hückel (DH) (or implicit ions, i.e., use of an electrostatic potential with a prescribed decay length) level and by the more precise approach of considering all ionic species explicitly in the simulations. We find that the DH approach systematically overestimates unbinding rates, relative to the calculations where all ion pairs are present explicitly in solution, although many aspects of the two types of calculation are qualitatively similar. For facilitated dissociation (FD) (acceleration of unbinding by free ligands in solution) explicit-ion simulations lead to unbinding at lower free-ligand concentrations. Our simulations predict a variety of FD regimes as a function of free-ligand and ion concentrations; a particularly interesting regime is at intermediate concentrations of ligands where nonelectrostatic binding strength controls FD. We conclude that explicit-ion electrostatic modeling is an essential component to quantitatively tackle problems in molecular ligand dissociation, including nucleic-acid-binding proteins.

  19. Quantum Butterfly Effect in Weakly Interacting Diffusive Metals

    Aavishkar A. Patel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We study scrambling, an avatar of chaos, in a weakly interacting metal in the presence of random potential disorder. It is well known that charge and heat spread via diffusion in such an interacting disordered metal. In contrast, we show within perturbation theory that chaos spreads in a ballistic fashion. The squared anticommutator of the electron-field operators inherits a light-cone-like growth, arising from an interplay of a growth (Lyapunov exponent that scales as the inelastic electron scattering rate and a diffusive piece due to the presence of disorder. In two spatial dimensions, the Lyapunov exponent is universally related at weak coupling to the sheet resistivity. We are able to define an effective temperature-dependent butterfly velocity, a speed limit for the propagation of quantum information that is much slower than microscopic velocities such as the Fermi velocity and that is qualitatively similar to that of a quantum critical system with a dynamical critical exponent z>1.

  20. The effect of cultural interaction on cumulative cultural evolution.

    Nakahashi, Wataru

    2014-07-07

    Cultural transmission and cultural evolution are important for animals, especially for humans. I developed a new analytical model of cultural evolution, in which each newborn learns cultural traits from multiple individuals (exemplars) in parental generation, individually explores around learned cultural traits, judges the utility of known cultural traits, and adopts a mature cultural trait. Cultural evolutionary speed increases when individuals explore a wider range of cultural traits, accurately judge the skill level of cultural traits (strong direct bias), do not strongly conform to the population mean, increase the exploration range according to the variety of socially learned cultural traits (condition dependent exploration), and make smaller errors in social learning. Number of exemplars, population size, similarity of cultural traits between exemplars, and one-to-many transmission have little effect on cultural evolutionary speed. I also investigated how cultural interaction between two populations with different mean skill levels affects their cultural evolution. A population sometimes increases in skill level more if it encounters a less skilled population than if it does not encounter anyone. A less skilled population sometimes exceeds a more skilled population in skill level by cultural interaction between both populations. The appropriateness of this analytical method is confirmed by individual-based simulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Exploration of molecular interactions in cholesterol superlattices: effect of multibody interactions.

    Huang, Juyang

    2002-08-01

    Experimental evidences have indicated that cholesterol may adapt highly regular lateral distributions (i.e., superlattices) in a phospholipid bilayer. We investigated the formations of superlattices at cholesterol mole fraction of 0.154, 0.25, 0.40, and 0.5 using Monte Carlo simulation. We found that in general, conventional pairwise-additive interactions cannot produce superlattices. Instead, a multibody (nonpairwise) interaction is required. Cholesterol superlattice formation reveals that although the overall interaction between cholesterol and phospholipids is favorable, it contains two large opposing components: an interaction favoring cholesterol-phospholipid mixing and an unfavorable acyl chain multibody interaction that increases nonlinearly with the number of cholesterol contacts. The magnitudes of interactions are in the order of kT. The physical origins of these interactions can be explained by our umbrella model. They most likely come from the requirement for polar phospholipid headgroups to cover the nonpolar cholesterol to avoid the exposure of cholesterol to water and from the sharp decreasing of acyl chain conformation entropy due to cholesterol contact. This study together with our previous work demonstrate that the driving force of cholesterol-phospholipid mixing is a hydrophobic interaction, and multibody interactions dominate others over a wide range of cholesterol concentration.

  2. Effects of symmetry energy and momentum dependent interaction on low-energy reaction mechanisms

    Zheng H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the dipole response associated with the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR and the Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance (IVGDR, in connection with specific properties of the nuclear effective interaction (symmetry energy and momentum dependence, in the neutron-rich systems 68Ni, 132Sn and 208Pb. We perform our investigation within a microscopic transport model based on the Landau-Vlasov kinetic equation.We observe that the peak energies of PDR and IVGDR are shifted to higher values when employing momentum dependent interactions, with respect to the results obtained neglecting momentum dependence. The calculated energies are close to the experimental values and similar to the results obtained in Hartree-Fock (HF with Random Phase Approximation (RPA calculations.

  3. Learning from instructional explanations: effects of prompts based on the active-constructive-interactive framework.

    Roelle, Julian; Müller, Claudia; Roelle, Detlev; Berthold, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Although instructional explanations are commonly provided when learners are introduced to new content, they often fail because they are not integrated into effective learning activities. The recently introduced active-constructive-interactive framework posits an effectiveness hierarchy in which interactive learning activities are at the top; these are then followed by constructive and active learning activities, respectively. Against this background, we combined instructional explanations with different types of prompts that were designed to elicit these learning activities and tested the central predictions of the active-constructive-interactive framework. In Experiment 1, N = 83 students were randomly assigned to one of four combinations of instructional explanations and prompts. To test the active learning hypothesis, the learners received either (1) complete explanations and engaging prompts designed to elicit active activities or (2) explanations that were reduced by inferences and inference prompts designed to engage learners in constructing the withheld information. Furthermore, in order to explore how interactive learning activities can be elicited, we gave the learners who had difficulties in constructing the prompted inferences adapted remedial explanations with either (3) unspecific engaging prompts or (4) revision prompts. In support of the active learning hypothesis, we found that the learners who received reduced explanations and inference prompts outperformed the learners who received complete explanations and engaging prompts. Moreover, revision prompts were more effective in eliciting interactive learning activities than engaging prompts. In Experiment 2, N = 40 students were randomly assigned to either (1) a reduced explanations and inference prompts or (2) a reduced explanations and inference prompts plus adapted remedial explanations and revision prompts condition. In support of the constructive learning hypothesis, the learners who received

  4. Effects on Ion Cyclotron Emission of the Orbit Topology Changes from the Wave-Particle Interactions

    Hellsten, T.; Holmstroem, K.; Johnson, T.; Bergkvist, T.; Laxaback, M.

    2006-01-01

    It is known that non-relaxed distribution functions can give rise to excitation of magnetosonic waves by ion cyclotron interactions when the distribution function increases with respect to the perpendicular velocity. We have found that in a toroidal plasma also collisional relaxed distribution functions of central peaked high-energy ions can destabilise magnetosonic eigenmodes by ion cyclotron interactions, due to the change in localisation of the orbits establishing inverted distribution functions with respect to energy along the characteristics describing the cyclotron interactions. This can take place by interactions with barely co-passing and marginally trapped high-energy ions at the plasma boundary. The interactions are enhanced by tangential interactions, which can also prevent the interactions to reach the stable part of the characteristics where they interact with more deeply trapped orbits. (author)

  5. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities and kinetic energy released in matter of vitamins for photon interaction

    Shantappa, A.; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers, electron densities of some vitamins (Retinol, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic acid, Cobalamin, Phylloquinone and Flavonoids) composed of C, H, O, N, Co, P and S have been calculated for total and partial photon interactions by the direct method for energy range 1 keV-100 GeV by using WinXCOM and kinetic energy released in matter (Kerma) relative to air is calculated in energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. Change in effective atomic number and electron density with energy is calculated for all photon interactions. Variation of photon mass attenuation coefficients with energy are shown graphically only for total photon interaction. It is observed that change in mass attenuation coefficient with composition of different chemicals is very large below 100 keV and moderate between 100 keV and 10 MeV and negligible above 10 MeV. Behaviour of vitamins is almost indistinguishable except biotin and cobalamin because of large range of atomic numbers from 1(H) to 16 (S) and 1(H) to 27(Co) respectively. K a value shows a peak due to the photoelectric effect around K-absorption edge of high- Z constituent of compound for biotin and cobalamin.

  6. Influence of Three-square-well Interaction Potential on Isotope Effect Coefficient of High-TC Superconductors

    Udomsamuthirun, P.; Dokkaemklang, S.; Kumvongsa, C.; Maneeratanakul, S.

    2005-10-01

    In this research, the exact formula of the isotope effect coefficient of s wave and d-wave superconductor in weak-coupling limit are derived by using a three square- well interaction potential that pairing interaction consists of 3 parts : an attractive electron-phonon interaction, an attractive non-electron-phonon interaction , and a repulsive Coulomb interaction . op ac , w w and c w is the characteristic energy cutoff of the Debye phonon , non-phonon ,and Coulomb respectively and 2 / 1 ac M- a w , and c op , w w do not depend on isotope mass(M). We find that, in all case of consideration, the isotope coefficient converges to 0.5 at lower value of Coulomb coupling constant and larger values of phonon and non-phonon coupling constant

  7. Exploring the Mediating Effect of E-social Capital Between Community Members Interaction and Consumer Engagement

    Yan Bingsheng; Li Lihua; Sun Hongtao

    2017-01-01

    This article explored the effect of instrumental interaction and relational interaction on consumer engagement (community engagement and brand engagement) among community members. The mediating effect of E-social capital was investigated as well. The research results showed that: both instrumental interaction and interpersonal interaction promote the formation of E-social capital (online trust and online reciprocity); online trust plays a partial mediating role between community interaction (...

  8. Interactive effects of morphine and dopaminergic compounds on spatial working memory in rhesus monkeys

    Jian-Hong Wang; Joshua Dominie Rizak; Yan-Mei Chen; Liang Li; Xin-Tian Hu; Yuan-Ye Ma

    2013-01-01

    Opiates and dopamine (DA) play key roles in learning and memory in humans and animals.Although interactions between these neurotransmitters have been found,their functional roles remain to be fully elucidated,and their dysfunction may contribute to human diseases and addiction.Here we investigated the interactions of morphine and dopaminergic neurotransmitter systems with respect to learning and memory in rhesus monkeys by using the Wisconsin General Test Apparatus (WGTA) delayed-response task.Morphine and DA agonists (SKF-38393,apomorphine and bromocriptine) or DA antagonists (SKF-83566,haloperidol and sulpiride) were co-administered to the monkeys 30 min prior to the task.We found that dose-patterned co-administration of morphine with D1 or D2 antagonists or agonists reversed the impaired spatial working memory induced by morphine or the compounds alone.For example,morphine at 0.01 mg/kg impaired spatial working memory,while morphine (0.01 mg/kg) and apomorphine (0.01 or 0.06 mg/kg) co-treatment ameliorated this effect.Our findings suggest that the interactions between morphine and dopaminergic compounds influence spatial working memory in rhesus monkeys.A better understanding of these interactive relationships may provide insights into human addiction.

  9. Constraining the surface properties of effective Skyrme interactions

    Jodon, R.; Bender, M.; Bennaceur, K.; Meyer, J.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Deformation energy surfaces map how the total binding energy of a nuclear system depends on the geometrical properties of intrinsic configurations, thereby providing a powerful tool to interpret nuclear spectroscopy and large-amplitude collective-motion phenomena such as fission. The global behavior of the deformation energy is known to be directly connected to the surface properties of the effective interaction used for its calculation. Purpose: The precise control of surface properties during the parameter adjustment of an effective interaction is key to obtain a reliable and predictive description of nuclear properties. The most relevant indicator is the surface-energy coefficient asurf. There are several possibilities for its definition and estimation, which are not fully equivalent and require a computational effort that can differ by orders of magnitude. The purpose of this study is threefold: first, to identify a scheme for the determination of asurf that offers the best compromise between robustness, precision, and numerical efficiency; second, to analyze the correlation between values for asurf and the characteristic energies of the fission barrier of 240Pu; and third, to lay out an efficient and robust procedure for how the deformation properties of the Skyrme energy density functional (EDF) can be constrained during the parameter fit. Methods: There are several frequently used possibilities to define and calculate the surface energy coefficient asurf of effective interactions built for the purpose of self-consistent mean-field calculations. The most direct access is provided by the model system of semi-infinite nuclear matter, but asurf can also be extracted from the systematics of binding energies of finite nuclei. Calculations can be carried out either self-consistently [Hartree-Fock (HF)], which incorporates quantal shell effects, or in one of the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi (ETF) or modified Thomas-Fermi (MTF) approximations. The

  10. Remote recoil: a new wave mean interaction effect

    Bühler, Oliver; McIntyre, Michael E.

    2003-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of a fundamentally new wave mean or wave vortex interaction effect able to force persistent, cumulative change in mean flows in the absence of wave breaking or other kinds of wave dissipation. It is associated with the refraction of non-dissipating waves by inhomogeneous mean (vortical) flows. The effect is studied in detail in the simplest relevant model, the two-dimensional compressible flow equations with a generic polytropic equation of state. This includes the usual shallow-water equations as a special case. The refraction of a narrow, slowly varying wavetrain of small-amplitude gravity or sound waves obliquely incident on a single weak (low Froude or Mach number) vortex is studied in detail. It is shown that, concomitant with the changes in the waves' pseudomomentum due to the refraction, there is an equal and opposite recoil force that is felt, in effect, by the vortex core. This effective force is called a ‘remote recoil’ to stress that there is no need for the vortex core and wavetrain to overlap in physical space. There is an accompanying ‘far-field recoil’ that is still more remote, as in classical vortex-impulse problems. The remote-recoil effects are studied perturbatively using the wave amplitude and vortex weakness as small parameters. The nature of the remote recoil is demonstrated in various set-ups with wavetrains of finite or infinite length. The effective recoil force {bm R}_V on the vortex core is given by an expression resembling the classical Magnus force felt by moving cylinders with circulation. In the case of wavetrains of infinite length, an explicit formula for the scattering angle theta_* of waves passing a vortex at a distance is derived correct to second order in Froude or Mach number. To this order {bm R}_V {~} theta_*. The formula is cross-checked against numerical integrations of the ray-tracing equations. This work is part of an ongoing study of internal-gravity-wave dynamics in the

  11. Effects of Zn, macronutrients, and their interactions through foliar applications on winter wheat grain nutritional quality.

    Shaoxia Wang

    Full Text Available Although application of Zn combined with macronutrients (K, P, and N can be used to fortify wheat grain with Zn, little is known about their interactions when foliar application is employed or the influences of common soil fertility management practices (e.g. N and straw management on their efficiency. Therefore, the effects of foliar-applied Zn and N, P, or K on grain nutritional quality (especially Zn were investigated in wheat grown under different soil N rates at two sites with (Sanyuan or without (Yangling employing straw return. A 4-year-long field experiment was also conducted to evaluate the environmental stability of the foliar formulations. Across 6 site-years, foliar Zn application alone or combined with N, P, or K fertilizers resulted in 95.7%, 101%, 67.9% and 121% increases in grain Zn concentration, respectively. In terms of increasing grain Zn concentration, foliar-applied Zn positively interacted with N (at Sanyuan and K (at Yangling, but negatively interacted with P at any condition tested, suggesting depressive effects of foliarly-applied P on physiological availability of Zn. Although these interaction effects were the major factor that governing the efficiency of foliar-applied Zn combined with N, P, or K on grain Zn concentration, the magnitude of the increase/decrease in grain Zn (-3.96~5.71 mg kg-1 due to these interactions was much less than the average increases following Zn+K (31.3, Zn+P (18.7, and Zn+N (26.5 mg kg-1 treatments relative to that observed in foliar Zn-only treatment. The combined foliar application of Zn with N, P, or K did not cause any adverse impact on grain yield and other nutritional quality and in some cases slightly increased grain yield and macronutrient concentrations. Grain phytic acid:Zn molar ratios were respectively 52.0%, 53.1%, 43.4% and 63.5% lower in the foliar Zn, Zn+N, Zn+P and Zn+K treatments than in the control treatment. These effects were consistent over four years and across three

  12. Effects of Zn, macronutrients, and their interactions through foliar applications on winter wheat grain nutritional quality.

    Wang, Shaoxia; Li, Meng; Liu, Ke; Tian, Xiaohong; Li, Shuo; Chen, Yanlong; Jia, Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Although application of Zn combined with macronutrients (K, P, and N) can be used to fortify wheat grain with Zn, little is known about their interactions when foliar application is employed or the influences of common soil fertility management practices (e.g. N and straw management) on their efficiency. Therefore, the effects of foliar-applied Zn and N, P, or K on grain nutritional quality (especially Zn) were investigated in wheat grown under different soil N rates at two sites with (Sanyuan) or without (Yangling) employing straw return. A 4-year-long field experiment was also conducted to evaluate the environmental stability of the foliar formulations. Across 6 site-years, foliar Zn application alone or combined with N, P, or K fertilizers resulted in 95.7%, 101%, 67.9% and 121% increases in grain Zn concentration, respectively. In terms of increasing grain Zn concentration, foliar-applied Zn positively interacted with N (at Sanyuan) and K (at Yangling), but negatively interacted with P at any condition tested, suggesting depressive effects of foliarly-applied P on physiological availability of Zn. Although these interaction effects were the major factor that governing the efficiency of foliar-applied Zn combined with N, P, or K on grain Zn concentration, the magnitude of the increase/decrease in grain Zn (-3.96~5.71 mg kg-1) due to these interactions was much less than the average increases following Zn+K (31.3), Zn+P (18.7), and Zn+N (26.5 mg kg-1) treatments relative to that observed in foliar Zn-only treatment. The combined foliar application of Zn with N, P, or K did not cause any adverse impact on grain yield and other nutritional quality and in some cases slightly increased grain yield and macronutrient concentrations. Grain phytic acid:Zn molar ratios were respectively 52.0%, 53.1%, 43.4% and 63.5% lower in the foliar Zn, Zn+N, Zn+P and Zn+K treatments than in the control treatment. These effects were consistent over four years and across three soil N

  13. How do implicit effects of subliminal mere exposure become explicit? Mediating effects of social interaction

    Kawakami, Naoaki; Yoshida, Fujio

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the mere exposure effect under subliminal conditions is more likely to occur for implicit attitudes than for explicit attitudes. We tested whether the implicit effects of subliminal mere exposure could spill over to the explicit level through social interaction. Preliminary experiment replicated the findings that the subliminal mere exposure effect occurs only for implicit attitudes, and not for explicit attitudes. Main experiment showed that this implicit effec...

  14. Effects of visual priming on taste-odor interaction.

    Marije van Beilen

    Full Text Available Little is known about the influence of visual characteristics other than colour on flavor perception, and the complex interactions between more than two sensory modalities. This study focused on the effects of recognizability of visual (texture information on flavor perception of odorized sweet beverages. Participants rated the perceived sweetness of odorized sucrose solutions in the presence or absence of either a congruent or incongruent visual context. Odors were qualitatively reminiscent of sweet foods (strawberry and caramel or not (savoury. Visual context was either an image of the same sweet foods (figurative context or a visual texture derived from this product (non-figurative context. Textures were created using a texture synthesis method that preserved perceived food qualities while removing object information. Odor-taste combinations were rated sweeter within a figurative than a non-figurative context. This behaviour was exhibited for all odor-taste combinations, even in trials without images, indicating sustained priming by figurative visual context. A non-figurative context showed a transient sweetening effect. Sweetness was generally enhanced most by the strawberry odor. We conclude that the degree of recognizability of visual information (figurative versus non-figurative, influences flavor perception differently. Our results suggest that this visual context priming is mediated by separate sustained and transient processes that are differently evoked by figurative and non-figurative visual contexts. These components operate independent of the congruency of the image-odor-taste combinations.

  15. Effective interactions for valence-hole nuclei with modern meson-exchange potential models

    Hjort-Jensen, M.; Osnes, E.; Kuo, E.

    1991-10-01

    Within the framework of the folded-diagram theory, the authors have studied the effective interaction appropriate for hole-hole nuclei in the mass regions of 16 O and 40 Ca, using the Bonn and Paris potential models. To sum up the folded diagrams the renormalization procedure of Lee and Suzuki has been employed, using a so-called Q-box in which were included all one-body and two-body irreducible valence-linked diagrams through third order in perturbation theory. Discrepancies for the mass dependence of the effective interaction for several JT configurations with respect to empirically deduced mass dependencies is reported. The role of core polarization processes through third order were found to be one of the mechanisms behind these discrepancies. Compared to the results obtained with the Paris potential, more attraction is introduced by the Bonn potential for all matrix elements of concerns, a result which agrees well with previous findings for the particle-particle interaction in the same mass regions. A qualitative agreements with experimental data is obtained. 31 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs

  16. [Potential interaction effect on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder between mother's educational level and preschoolers' dietary pattern].

    Yan, S Q; Cao, H; Gu, C L; Gao, G P; Ni, L L; Tao, H H; Shao, T; Xu, Y Q; Tao, F B

    2018-04-10

    Objective: To explore the interaction effect between mother's educational level and preschoolers' dietary pattern on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods: In 2014, there were 16 439 children aged 3-6 years old from 91 kindergartens in Ma'anshan municipality of China. A semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and the 10-item Chinese version of the Conners' Abbreviated Symptom Questionnaire (C-ASQ) were administered to assess the usual dietary intake and symptoms on ADHD. Social-demographic information was collected through questionnaires. Unconditional logistic regression was used to analyze the multiplication interaction effect between mother's educational level and preschoolers' dietary pattern on ADHD. Excel software was used to analyze the additive interaction effect of mother's educational level and preschoolers'dietary pattern on ADHD. Results: Results showed that factors as: mother's low educational level[a OR =1.31 (1.13-1.52)], scores related to preschoolers in the top quintile of "food processing" [a OR =1.31 (1.16-1.48)] and "snack" [a OR =1.45 (1.29-1.63)]patterns showed greater odds while preschoolers in the top quintile of "vegetarian" [a OR =0.80 (0.71-0.90)]showed less odds for having ADHD symptoms. Both multiplication and additive interactions were observed between mothers with less education. The processed dietary patterns ( OR =1.17, 95% CI : 1.11-1.25), relative excess risk of interaction ( RERI ), attributable proportion ( AP ) and the interaction index ( SI ) appeared as 0.21, 0.13 and 1.47, respectively. Multiplication interaction was observed between levels of mother's low education and the snack dietary pattern ( OR =1.21, 95% CI : 1.14-1.29), with RERI , AP and SI as 0.49, 0.26 and 2.36, respectively. However, neither multiplication interaction or additive interaction was noticed between levels of mother's low education and the vegetarian dietary pattern ( OR =0.97, 95% CI : 0.92-1.03), with RERI , AP and SI as 0

  17. Ironic effects of racial bias during interracial interactions.

    Shelton, J Nicole; Richeson, Jennifer A; Salvatore, Jessica; Trawalter, Sophie

    2005-05-01

    Previous research has suggested that Blacks like White interaction partners who make an effort to appear unbiased more than those who do not. We tested the hypothesis that, ironically, Blacks perceive White interaction partners who are more racially biased more positively than less biased White partners, primarily because the former group must make more of an effort to control racial bias than the latter. White participants in this study completed the Implicit Association Test (IAT) as a measure of racial bias and then discussed race relations with either a White or a Black partner. Whites' IAT scores predicted how positively they were perceived by Black (but not White) interaction partners, and this relationship was mediated by Blacks' perceptions of how engaged the White participants were during the interaction. We discuss implications of the finding that Blacks may, ironically, prefer to interact with highly racially biased Whites, at least in short interactions.

  18. New parameterizations of the Gogny effective nuclear interaction; Nouvelles parametrisations de l'interaction nucleaire effective de Gogny

    Chappert, F

    2007-06-15

    The effective interaction between nucleons is the basic input to microscopic calculations in nuclear structure. One of the forms used since the 1970's is the phenomenological effective force proposed by D. Gogny. This force gives excellent results in nuclei at the mean-field approximation. The presence of contact terms does not allow, however, to use it for the description of beyond mean-field correlations present in nuclei. In this work, we investigate some extensions of the Gogny force, and especially a generalization in which the zero range density dependent term has been replaced by a finite range term. The parameters occurring in the analytical form of the force have been adjusted on symmetric infinite nuclear matter and neutron matter properties, and on some selected observables for stable nuclei, especially those related to pairing correlations. We present the method to include this kind of force in Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations and we analyze the results obtained for various nuclei. The new versions of the Gogny force allow us to reproduce nuclear structure properties with improved accuracy as compared to the former version. (author)

  19. Effect of attractive interactions between polymers on the effective force acting between colloids immersed in a polymer system: Analytic liquid-state theory.

    Chervanyov, A I

    2016-12-28

    By making use of the polymer reference interaction site model, we analytically study the effect of attractive interactions between polymers on the effective forces acting between colloids immersed in a polymer system. The performed theoretical analysis has no restrictions with respect to the polymer density and relative sizes of the colloids and polymers. The polymer mediated (PM) potential acting between colloids is shown to significantly depend on the strength and range of the polymer-polymer interactions. In the nano-particle limit, where the colloid radius is much smaller than the polymer gyration radius, the presence of attractive polymer-polymer interactions causes only quantitative changes to the PM potential. In the opposite limit of relatively large colloids, the polymer-polymer interactions revert the sign of the total effective force acting between colloids so that this force becomes attractive at sufficiently large polymer densities. With the objective to study an intricate interplay between the attractive PM forces and steric repulsion in different polymer density regimes, we calculate the second virial coefficient B of the total effective potential acting between colloids. The dependence of B on the polymer density is discussed in detail, revealing several novel features of the PM interactions caused by the presence of attractive polymer-polymer interactions.

  20. Assessment of seismic wave effects on soil-structure interaction

    Bernreuter, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    One of the most common hypotheses made for soil-structure interaction analyses is that the earthquake input motion is identical at all points beneath the structure. Several papers have recently shown that this assumption may be overly conservative and that the effect of wave passage is extremely important. These studies typically employ a relatively simple model, namely, the basemat is represented by a rectangular rigid foundation resting on top of the soil and connected to the soil by a continuously distributed set of soil springs. The seismic input is applied at the base of the soil springs and is assumed to be traveling at a constant wave velocity across the site. It ispossible to improve on the soil/structure model by use of finite element methods; however, little is known about how to model the input seismic energy and typically a simple travelling wave is used. In this paper, the author examines the available data to determine: (i) the appropriate wave velocity to use, and (ii) if the currently availble analytic models are adequate. (Auth.)

  1. Sleep and environmental context: interactive effects for memory.

    Cairney, Scott A; Durrant, Simon J; Musgrove, Hazel; Lewis, Penelope A

    2011-09-01

    Sleep after learning is often beneficial for memory. Reinstating an environmental context that was present at learning during subsequent retrieval also leads to superior declarative memory performance. This study examined how post-learning sleep, relative to wakefulness, impacts upon context-dependent memory effects. Thirty-two participants encoded word lists in each of two rooms (contexts), which were different in terms of size, odour and background music. Immediately after learning and following a night of sleep or a day of wakefulness, memory for all previously studied words was tested using a category-cued recall task in room one or two alone. Accordingly, a comparison could be made between words retrieved in an environmental context which was the same as, or different to, that of the learning phase. Memory performance was assessed by the difference between the number of words remembered at immediate and delayed retrieval. A 2 × 2 × 2 mixed ANOVA revealed an interaction between retrieval context (same/different to learning) and retention interval (sleep/wakefulness), which was driven by superior memory after sleep than after wake when learning and retrieval took place in different environmental contexts. Our findings suggest a sleep-related reduction in the extent to which context impacts upon retrieval. As such, these data provide initial support for the possibility that sleep dependent processes may promote a decontextualisation of recently formed declarative representations.

  2. Effects of azadirachtin on Rhodnius prolixus: immunity and trypanosoma interaction

    Patricia de Azambuja

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of azadirachtin, a tetranortriterpenoid from the neem tree Aradirachta indica J. on both immunity and Trypanosoma cruzi interaction within Rhodniusprolixus and other triatomines, were presented Given through a blood meal, azadirachtin affected the immune reactivity as shown by a significant reduction in numbers of hemocytes and consequently nodule formation follwing challenge with Enterobacter cloacae ß12, reduction in ability to produce antibacterial activities in the hemolymph when injected with bacteria, and decreased ability to destroy the infection caused by inoculation of E. cloacae cells. A single dose of azadirachtin was able to block the development of T. cruzi in R. prolixus if given through the meal at different intervals, together with, before or after parasite infection. Similary, these results were observed with different triatomine species and different strains of T. cruzi. Azadirachtin induced a permanent resistance of the vector against reinfection with T. cruzi. The significance of these data is discussed in relation to the general mode of azadirachtin action in insects.

  3. The Effect of Convective Overstability on Planet Disk Interactions

    Klahr, Hubert; Gomes, Aiara Lobo

    2016-10-01

    We run global two dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, using the PLUTO code and the planet-disk model of Uribe et al. 2011, to investigate the effect of the convective overstability (CO) on planet-disk interactions. First, we study the long-term evolution of planet-induced vortices. We found that the CO leads to smoother planetary gap edges, thus weaker planet-induced vortices. The main result was the observation of two generation of vortices, which can pose an explanation for the location of the vortex in the Oph IRS48 system. The lifetime of the primary vortices, as well as the birth time of the secondary vortices are shown to be highly dependent on the thermal relaxation timescale. Second, we study the long-term evolution of the migration of low mass planets and assess whether the CO can prevent the saturation of the horseshoe drag. We found that the disk parameters that favour slow inward or outward migration oppose the amplification of vortices, meaning that the CO does not seem to be a good mechanism to prevent the saturation of the horseshoe drag. On the other hand, we observed a planetary trap, caused by vortices formed in the horseshoe region. This trap may be an alternative mechanism to prevent the fast type I migration rates.

  4. Effect of nonlocal dispersion on self-interacting excitations

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Rasmussen, Kim; Gaididei, Yu.B.

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of self-interacting quasiparticles in 1Dsystems with long-range dispersive interactions isexpressed in terms of a nonlocal nonlinear Schrödingerequation. Two branches of stationary solutions are found.The new branch which contains a cusp soliton is shown to beunstable and blowup...

  5. Effective Factors in Interactions within Japanese EFL Classrooms

    Maftoon, Parviz; Ziafar, Meisam

    2013-01-01

    Classroom interactional patterns depend on some contextual, cultural and local factors in addition to the methodologies employed in the classroom. In order to delineate such factors, the focus of classroom interaction research needs to shift from the observables to the unobservables like teachers' and learners' psychological states and cultural…

  6. The Conditional Effects of Interracial Interactions on College Student Outcomes

    Bowman, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    Given the increasing racial diversity among American college students and society, it is critical to promote meaningful interracial interactions during college. Although a burgeoning literature demonstrates the link between interracial interactions and an array of student outcomes, some important issues have been largely overlooked. Most research…

  7. Influencing Academic Motivation: The Effects of Student-Faculty Interaction

    Trolian, Teniell L.; Jach, Elizabeth A.; Hanson, Jana M.; Pascarella, Ernest T.

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education, we examined the influence of student-faculty interactions on student academic motivation over 4 years of college. Results suggest that several forms of student-faculty interaction, such as quality of faculty contact, frequency of faculty contact, research with faculty, personal…

  8. Effect of depression on processing interactions in group psychotherapy.

    Slife, B D; Sasscer-Burgos, J; Froberg, W; Ellington, S

    1989-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to investigate the possibility of individual differences in the ability of inpatients to process interactions in group psychotherapy. The first was a pilot study conducted on groups of major depressive patients and matched normal subjects. Subjects were asked to give process comments after viewing simulations of typical group therapy interactions. These comments were later rated on the extent to which they reflected process qualities and accuracy. These data led to a more rigorous and extensive study that included more appropriate control groups as well as measures of potential confounding factors, such as simulation realism, verbal ability, and interaction comprehension. Results indicated that major depressives suffer from deficits in the ability to process group interactions, relative to three types of control groups, including normals. These differences in processing were not significantly positively correlated with any of the potential confounding factors. The implications for understanding interactional processing and group psychotherapy are discussed.

  9. Field tests on partial embedment effects (embedment effect tests on soil-structure interaction)

    Kurimoto, O.; Tsunoda, T.; Inoue, T.; Izumi, M.; Kusakabe, K.; Akino, K.

    1993-01-01

    A series of Model Tests of Embedment Effect on Reactor Buildings has been carried out by the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and lndustry (MITI) of Japan. The nuclear reactor buildings are partially embedded due to conditions for the construction or building arrangement in Japan. It is necessary to verify the partial embedment effects by experiments and analytical studies in order to incorporate the effects in the seismic design. Forced vibration tests, therefore, were performed using a model with several types of embedment. Correlated simulation analyses were also performed and the characteristics of partial embedment effects on soil-structure interaction were evaluated. (author)

  10. Effect of three body interaction in the Hamiltonian of the interacting bosons model

    Nunes, C.A.A.

    1987-01-01

    The interacting boson model algebra is analysed on the basis of group theory. Through the topological properties of the groups a geometry is associated and the fundamental state of the nucleus is obtained. Calculations were carried out for 102 Ru and 168 Er. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  11. Effective Field Theories and Strong Interactions. Final Technical Report

    Fleming, Sean

    2011-01-01

    The framework of Effective Field Theories (EFTs) allows us to describe strong interactions in terms of degrees of freedom relevant to the energy regimes of interest, in the most general way consistent with the symmetries of QCD. Observables are expanded systematically in powers of M lo /M hi , where M lo (M hi ) denotes a low-(high-)energy scale. This organizational principle is referred to as 'power counting'. Terms of increasing powers in the expansion parameter are referred to as leading order (LO), next-to-leading order (NLO), etc. Details of the QCD dynamics not included explicitly are encoded in interaction parameters, or 'low-energy constants' (LECs), which can in principle be calculated from an explicit solution of QCD - for example via lattice simulations- but can also be determined directly from experimental data. QCD has an intrinsic scale M QCD ≅ 1 GeV, at which the QCD coupling constant α s (M QCD ) becomes large and the dynamics becomes non-perturbative. As a consequence M QCD sets the scale for the masses of most hadrons, such as the nucleon mass m N ≅ 940 MeV. EFTs can roughly be divided into two categories: those that can be matched onto QCD in perturbation theory, which we call high-energy EFTs, and those that cannot be matched perturbatively, which we call low-energy EFTs. In high-energy EFTs, M QCD typically sets the low-energy scale, and all the dynamics associated with this scale reside in matrix elements of EFT operators. These non-perturbative matrix elements are the LECs and are also referred to as long-distance contributions. Each matrix element is multiplied by a short-distance coefficient, which contains the dynamics from the high scale M hi . Since M hi >> M QCD , α s (M hi ) hi ∼ M Q , the heavy-quark mass, and in addition to M QCD there are low scales associated with the typical relative momentum ∼ M Q v and energy ∼ M Q v 2 of the heavy quarks. Depending on the sizes of M Q and the heavy-quark velocity v these scales can

  12. Behavioral effects of ketamine and toxic interactions with psychostimulants

    Yamamoto Keiichi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anesthetic drug ketamine (KT has been reported to be an abused drug and fatal cases have been observed in polydrug users. In the present study, considering the possibility of KT-enhanced toxic effects of other drugs, and KT-induced promotion of an overdose without making the subject aware of the danger due to the attenuation of several painful subjective symptoms, the intraperitoneal (i.p. KT-induced alterations in behaviors and toxic interactions with popular co-abused drugs, the psychostimulants cocaine (COC and methamphetamine (MA, were examined in ICR mice. Results A single dose of KT caused hyperlocomotion in a low (30 mg/kg, i.p. dose group, and hypolocomotion followed by hyperlocomotion in a high (100 mg/kg, i.p. dose group. However, no behavioral alterations derived from enhanced stress-related depression or anxiety were observed in the forced swimming or the elevated plus-maze test. A single non-fatal dose of COC (30 mg/kg, i.p. or MA (4 mg/kg, i.p. caused hyperlocomotion, stress-related depression in swimming behaviors in the forced swimming test, and anxiety-related behavioral changes (preference for closed arms in the elevated plus-maze test. For the COC (30 mg/kg or MA (4 mg/kg groups of mice simultaneously co-treated with KT, the psychostimulant-induced hyperlocomotion was suppressed by the high dose KT, and the psychostimulant-induced behavioral alterations in the above tests were reversed by both low and high doses of KT. For the toxic dose COC (70 mg/kg, i.p.- or MA (15 mg/kg, i.p.-only group, mortality and severe seizures were observed in some animals. In the toxic dose psychostimulant-KT groups, KT attenuated the severity of seizures dose-dependently. Nevertheless, the mortality rate was significantly increased by co-treatment with the high dose KT. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that, in spite of the absence of stress-related depressive and anxiety-related behavioral alterations following a single

  13. Independent and Interactive Effects of Neighborhood Disadvantage and Social Network Characteristics on Problem Drinking after Treatment.

    Mericle, Amy A; Kaskutas, Lee A; Polcin, Doug L; Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J

    2018-01-01

    Socioecological approaches to public health problems like addiction emphasize the importance of person-environment interactions. Neighborhood and social network characteristics may influence the likelihood of relapse among individuals in recovery, but these factors have been understudied, particularly with respect to conceptualizing social network characteristics as moderators of neighborhood disadvantage. Drawing from a larger prospective study of individuals recruited from outpatient treatment (N=451) and interviewed 1, 3, 5, and 7 years later, the aim of this study was to examine the independent and interactive effects of neighborhood and social network characteristics on continued problem drinking after treatment. Models using generalized estimating equations controlling for demographic and other risk factors found the number of heavy drinkers in one's network increases risk of relapse, with the effects being significantly stronger among those living in disadvantaged neighborhoods than among those in non-disadvantaged neighborhoods. No independent effects were found for neighborhood disadvantage or for the number of network members supporting reduced drinking. Future research is needed to examine potential protective factors in neighborhoods which may offset socioeconomic disadvantage as well as to investigate the functions that network members serve in helping to improve long-term treatment outcomes.

  14. Independent and interactive effects of HIV infection, clinical stage ...

    children by healthcare workers. There was also ... This open-access article is distributed under. Creative .... modifiers. Both the unadjusted, adjusted and interaction models ..... worst survival probability compared with those who had other less.

  15. Determining the Effect of Interactive Invention Instructional Strategy ...

    First Lady

    females and 94 males from six colleges of education in South Western. Nigeria which ... learner variables such as gender stereotype in physics and lack of confidence .... strategies provide opportunities for students to work in small interactive.

  16. Effects due to spectator interaction in deep inelastic processes

    Smilga, A.V.

    1979-01-01

    The simplest diagrams describing interaction with the spectator in the e - π→e - + hadrons deep inelastic process are considered. The contribution of the final state interaction diagram to the structure function considerable in the Feynman gauge is suppressed under the temporal gauge choice in accordance with the results of the naive parton model. The expressin for the cross section of the process when large quark momentum is transferred to the spectator is derived

  17. Effect of crack-microcracks interaction on energy release rates

    Chudnovsky, A.; Wu, Shaofu

    1990-01-01

    The energy release rates associated with the main crack advancing into its surrounding damage zone, and the damage zone translation relative to the main crack, as well as the energy of interaction between the crack and the damage zone are analyzed. The displacement and stress fields for this crack-damage interaction problem are reconstructed by employing a semi-empirical stress analysis which involves experimental evaluation of the average microcrack density in the damage zone.

  18. Coulomb effects in the deuteron-nucleus interaction

    Kuz'michev, V.E.; Peresypkin, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    The authors develop a consistent theory for calculation of the potential of the deuteron interaction with the Coulomb field of a nucleus. They study the properties of this potential at large distances and give its explicit form at the deuteron-breakup threshold. In the limit of low energies they derive the potential, which includes intermediate off-energy-shell states, and explain the physical nature of its constants. The accuracy of the transition to the polarization interaction is estimated

  19. Suspensions of polymer-grafted nanoparticles with added polymers-Structure and effective pair-interactions.

    Chandran, Sivasurender; Saw, Shibu; Kandar, A K; Dasgupta, C; Sprung, M; Basu, J K

    2015-08-28

    We present the results of combined experimental and theoretical (molecular dynamics simulations and integral equation theory) studies of the structure and effective interactions of suspensions of polymer grafted nanoparticles (PGNPs) in the presence of linear polymers. Due to the absence of systematic experimental and theoretical studies of PGNPs, it is widely believed that the structure and effective interactions in such binary mixtures would be very similar to those of an analogous soft colloidal material-star polymers. In our study, polystyrene-grafted gold nanoparticles with functionality f = 70 were mixed with linear polystyrene (PS) of two different molecular weights for obtaining two PGNP:PS size ratios, ξ = 0.14 and 2.76 (where, ξ = Mg/Mm, Mg and Mm being the molecular weights of grafting and matrix polymers, respectively). The experimental structure factor of PGNPs could be modeled with an effective potential (Model-X), which has been found to be widely applicable for star polymers. Similarly, the structure factor of the blends with ξ = 0.14 could be modeled reasonably well, while the structure of blends with ξ = 2.76 could not be captured, especially for high density of added polymers. A model (Model-Y) for effective interactions between PGNPs in a melt of matrix polymers also failed to provide good agreement with the experimental data for samples with ξ = 2.76 and high density of added polymers. We tentatively attribute this anomaly in modeling the structure factor of blends with ξ = 2.76 to the questionable assumption of Model-X in describing the added polymers as star polymers with functionality 2, which gets manifested in both polymer-polymer and polymer-PGNP interactions especially at higher fractions of added polymers. The failure of Model-Y may be due to the neglect of possible many-body interactions among PGNPs mediated by matrix polymers when the fraction of added polymers is high. These observations point to the need for a new framework to

  20. THE REFLECTION EFFECT IN INTERACTING BINARIES OR IN PLANET-STAR SYSTEMS

    Budaj, J.

    2011-01-01

    There are many similarities between interacting binary stars and stars with a close-in giant extrasolar planet. The reflection effect is a well-known example. Although the generally accepted treatment of this effect in interacting binaries is successful in fitting light curves of eclipsing binaries, it is not very suitable for studying cold objects irradiated by hot objects or extrasolar planets. The aim of this paper is to develop a model of the reflection effect which could be easily incorporated into the present codes for modeling of interacting binaries so that these can be used to study the aforementioned objects. Our model of the reflection effect takes into account the reflection (scattering), heating, and heat redistribution over the surface of the irradiated object. The shape of the object is described by the non-spherical Roche potential expected for close objects. Limb and gravity darkening are included in the calculations of the light output from the system. The model also accounts for the orbital revolution and rotation of the exoplanet with appropriate Doppler shifts for the scattered and thermal radiation. Subsequently, light curves and/or spectra of several exoplanets have been modeled and the effects of the heat redistribution, limb darkening/brightening, (non-)gray albedo, and non-spherical shape have been studied. Recent observations of planet-to-star flux ratio of HD189733b, WASP12b, and WASP-19b at various phases were reproduced with very good accuracy. It was found that HD189733b has a low Bond albedo and intense heat redistribution, while WASP-19b has a low Bond albedo and low heat redistribution. The exact Roche geometries and temperature distributions over the surface of all 78 transiting extrasolar planets have been determined. Departures from the spherical shape may vary considerably but departures of about 1% in the radius are common within the sample. In some cases, these departures can reach 8%, 12%, or 14%, for WASP-33b, WASP-19b, and

  1. Copper interacts with nonylphenol to cancel the effect of nonylphenol on fish chemosensory behaviour.

    Ward, Ashley J W; Thistle, Maria; Ghandi, Khashayar; Currie, Suzanne

    2013-10-15

    The majority of ecotoxicological studies have been concerned with responses of organisms to a single contaminant. While this approach remains valid, the challenge now is to understand the way in which multiple contaminants and stressors interact to produce effects in study organisms. Here we take an integrated biological and physico-chemical approach to understand the effects of 4-nonylphenol and copper on fish (white perch, Morone americana) chemosensory behaviour. We show that a one hour exposure to 2 μg L(-1) nonylphenol removes chemosensory attraction to conspecific chemical cues, while exposure to 5 μg L(-1) copper for one hour had no significant effect on the fish's attraction to these cues. Further, we show that simultaneous exposure to both contaminants at the stated dosage and for the same duration has no significant effect on the chemosensory attraction of white perch to conspecific chemical cues suggesting that copper mediates the effect of nonylphenol on fish in this respect. Physico-chemical data show that copper ions bind to nonylphenol in water, providing a mechanistic explanation for this change in the effect of nonylphenol. Furthermore, the finding that the copper ions bind to the lone pair of O on the nonylphenol molecule offers the tantalising possibility that it is this region of the nonylphenol molecule that plays the key role in disrupting fish chemical communication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Two-Level Designs to Estimate All Main Effects and Two-Factor Interactions

    Eendebak, P.T.; Schoen, E.D.

    2017-01-01

    We study the design of two-level experiments with N runs and n factors large enough to estimate the interaction model, which contains all the main effects and all the two-factor interactions. Yet, an effect hierarchy assumption suggests that main effect estimation should be given more prominence

  3. Tables of density dependent effective interactions between 122 and 800 MeV

    Dortmans, P.J.; Amos, K.

    1996-01-01

    Coordinate space density dependent effective nucleon-nucleon interaction based upon half-off-shell t and g-matrices are presented. These interactions are based upon the Paris interactions and are presented over a range of energies. 5 refs., 8 tabs

  4. Collaborative Encoding and Memory Accuracy: Examining the Effects of Interactive Components of Co-Construction Processes

    Foley, Mary Ann; Fried, Adina Rachel; Cowan, Emily; Bays, Rebecca Brooke

    2014-01-01

    In 2 experiments, the effect of collaborative encoding on memory was examined by testing 2 interactive components of co-construction processes. One component focused on the nature of the interactive exchange between collaborators: As the partners worked together to create descriptions about ways to interact with familiar objects, constraints were…

  5. Who Is Controlling the Interaction? The Effect of Nonverbal Mirroring on Teacher-Student Rapport

    Jiang-yuan, Zhou; Wei, Guo

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of nonverbal mirroring on teacher-student rapport in one-on-one interactions. Nonverbal mirroring refers to the unconscious mimicry of the postures, mannerisms, facial expressions, and other behaviors of one's interaction partner in social interactions. In a within-subjects paradigm, students had four…

  6. The effects of whole-class interactive instruction with single display groupware for triangles

    Caballero, D.; van Riesen, Siswa; Alvarez, S.; Nussbaum, M.; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; Alario-Hoyos, C.

    2013-01-01

    Whole-class interactive instruction is an instructional approach in which all of the students in a class create knowledge together in an interactive way, mediated by the teacher. The current mixed-method study compared the effects of a specific implementation of whole-class interactive instruction,

  7. Kinematic Interaction and Rocking Effects on the Seismic Response of Viaducts on Pile Foundations

    Dezi, F.; Carbonari, S.; Leoni, G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is aimed at providing a contribution for a more accurate and effective design of bridges founded on piles. A numerical model is employed herein to determine the stresses and displacements in the piles taking into account soil-foundation-structure interaction. A 3D finite element approach is developed for piles and superstructure whereas the soil is assumed to be a Winkler-type medium. The method is applied to single piers representative for a class of bridges. Varying the soil layers characteristics and the pile spacing (from 3 to 5 diameters), bending and axial stresses along piles as well as the pier base shear are computed. A comparison with respect to a fixed-base model is provided. Special issues such as the contribution of the soil profile, of the local amplification and of the rocking at the foundation level are discussed. Soil-structure interaction is found to be essential for effective design of bridges especially for squat piers and soft soil

  8. Terminology report respect distance. The Use of the term respect distance in Posiva and SKB

    Lampinen, H.

    2007-09-01

    The term respect distance is used in some key publications of the Finnish Nuclear Waste Management Company, Posiva, and the Swedish Nuclear Waste Management Company, SKB (Svensk Kaernbrenslehantering). Posiva and SKB researchers use the same terms in their reports, and it is acknowledged that the terms used by both companies are not used in the same way, though the differences are often subtle. This report is a literature study of the term 'respect distance' and the terms immediately associated to it. Vital terms related to the respect distance and issues concerning the use of scale concepts in Posiva and SKB are gathered in the end of report. Posiva's respect distances consider the seismic, hydrological and mechanical properties of the deterministic deformation zones as important issues that constitute a risk for longterm safety. These requirements for respect distances are an interpretation of STUK's YVL 8.4 Guide. At present, Posiva's criteria regarding respect distances follow the instructions given in the Host Rock Classification system (HRC), whereas the size of a deformation zone to which respect distances are applied vary from the regional to local major and minor. This and other criteria that are given for respect distances may, however, change in the near future as Posiva's Rock Suitability Criteria (RSC) programme proceeds. SKB's considerations of respect distances acknowledge that the hydraulic and mechanical aspects of a deformation zone have an effect on the respect distance. However, the seismic risk is considered to overshadow the other effects on a regional scale. The respect distance defined for a deformation zone is coupled with the size of a fracture where secondary slip could occur. In the safety assessment it is assumed that this fracture cuts a deposition hole location. In SKB the respect distance is determined for regional and local major deformation zones. The trace length of such a zone is defined as being ≥ 3 km. For deformation zones

  9. Modular Interactive Tiles for Rehabilitation – Evidence and Effect

    Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2010-01-01

    years) in daily use in a hospital rehabilitation unit e.g. for cardiac patients. Also, the tiles were tested for performing physical rehabilitation of stroke patients both in hospital, rehabilitation centre and in their private home. In all test cases qualitative feedback indicate that the patients find......We developed modular interactive tiles to be used for playful physiotherapy, which is supposed to motivate patients to engage in and perform physical rehabilitation exercises. We report on evidence for elderly training. We tested the modular interactive tiles for an extensive period of time (4...... the playful use of modular interactive tiles engaging and motivating for them to perform the rehabilitation. Also, test data suggest that some playful exercises on the tiles demand an average heart rate of 75% and 86% of the maximum heart rate....

  10. Effect on cavity optomechanics of the interaction between a cavity field and a one-dimensional interacting bosonic gas

    Sun Qing; Hu Xinghua; Liu, W. M.; Xie, X. C.; Ji Anchun

    2011-01-01

    We investigate optomechanical coupling between one-dimensional interacting bosons and the electromagnetic field in a high-finesse optical cavity. We show that by tuning interatomic interactions, one can realize effective optomechanics with mechanical resonators ranging from side-mode excitations of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) to particle-hole excitations of a Tonks-Girardeau (TG) gas. We propose that this unique feature can be formulated to detect the BEC-TG gas crossover and measure the sine-Gordon transition continuously and nondestructively.

  11. Search for contact interactions and graviton effects in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Scheins, J.J.

    2001-09-01

    Neutral current events in deep inelastic scattering at HERA taken with the H1 detector are examined with respect to standard model expectations. The measured inclusive cross section dσ/dQ 2 for Q 2 >200 GeV 2 in reactions e ± p → e ± X is analysed in terms of contact interactions or graviton effects in combination with large extra dimensions. The total amount of analysed data corresponds to an integrated luminosity of L int =115 pb -1 . The comparison of all data sets to their corresponding standard model expectation shows no evidence for new phenomena. Therefore exclusion limits are derived for the mentioned physical scenarios beyond the standard model. The combination of all data sets leads to maximum sensitivity and significantly improved limits compared to earlier results of H1. (orig.) [de

  12. Restriction of Variance Interaction Effects and Their Importance for International Business Research

    Cortina, Jose M.; Köhler, Tine; Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    A recent Journal of International Business Studies editorial on interaction effects within and across levels highlighted the importance of and difficulty associated with justifying and reporting of such interaction effects. The purpose of this editorial is to describe a type of interaction...... hypothesis that is very common in international business (IB) research: the restricted variance (RV) hypothesis. Specifically, we describe the nature of an RV interaction and its evidentiary requirements. We also offer several IB examples involving interactions that could have been supported with RV...

  13. Effects of nonlocal dispersive interactions on self-trapping excitations

    Gaididei, Yu.B.; Mingaleev, S.F.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1997-01-01

    -site and intersite states. It is shown that for s sufficiently large all features of the model are qualitatively the same as in the NLS model with a nearest-neighbor interaction. For s less than some critical value s(cr), there is an interval of bistability where two stable stationary states exist at each excitation...... number N = Sigma(n)\\psi(n)\\(2). For cubic nonlinearity the bistability of on-site solitons may occur for dipole-dipole dispersive interaction (s = 3), while s(cr) for intersite solitons is close to 2.1. For increasing degree of nonlinearity sigma, s(cr) increases. The long-distance behavior...

  14. An attention-based effective neural model for drug-drug interactions extraction.

    Zheng, Wei; Lin, Hongfei; Luo, Ling; Zhao, Zhehuan; Li, Zhengguang; Zhang, Yijia; Yang, Zhihao; Wang, Jian

    2017-10-10

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) often bring unexpected side effects. The clinical recognition of DDIs is a crucial issue for both patient safety and healthcare cost control. However, although text-mining-based systems explore various methods to classify DDIs, the classification performance with regard to DDIs in long and complex sentences is still unsatisfactory. In this study, we propose an effective model that classifies DDIs from the literature by combining an attention mechanism and a recurrent neural network with long short-term memory (LSTM) units. In our approach, first, a candidate-drug-oriented input attention acting on word-embedding vectors automatically learns which words are more influential for a given drug pair. Next, the inputs merging the position- and POS-embedding vectors are passed to a bidirectional LSTM layer whose outputs at the last time step represent the high-level semantic information of the whole sentence. Finally, a softmax layer performs DDI classification. Experimental results from the DDIExtraction 2013 corpus show that our system performs the best with respect to detection and classification (84.0% and 77.3%, respectively) compared with other state-of-the-art methods. In particular, for the Medline-2013 dataset with long and complex sentences, our F-score far exceeds those of top-ranking systems by 12.6%. Our approach effectively improves the performance of DDI classification tasks. Experimental analysis demonstrates that our model performs better with respect to recognizing not only close-range but also long-range patterns among words, especially for long, complex and compound sentences.

  15. The tri-trophic interactions hypothesis: interactive effects of host plant quality, diet breadth and natural enemies on herbivores.

    Kailen A Mooney

    Full Text Available Several influential hypotheses in plant-herbivore and herbivore-predator interactions consider the interactive effects of plant quality, herbivore diet breadth, and predation on herbivore performance. Yet individually and collectively, these hypotheses fail to address the simultaneous influence of all three factors. Here we review existing hypotheses, and propose the tri-trophic interactions (TTI hypothesis to consolidate and integrate their predictions. The TTI hypothesis predicts that dietary specialist herbivores (as compared to generalists should escape predators and be competitively dominant due to faster growth rates, and that such differences should be greater on low quality (as compared to high quality host plants. To provide a preliminary test of these predictions, we conducted an empirical study comparing the effects of plant (Baccharis salicifolia quality and predators between a specialist (Uroleucon macolai and a generalist (Aphis gossypii aphid herbivore. Consistent with predictions, these three factors interactively determine herbivore performance in ways not addressed by existing hypotheses. Compared to the specialist, the generalist was less fecund, competitively inferior, and more sensitive to low plant quality. Correspondingly, predator effects were contingent upon plant quality only for the generalist. Contrary to predictions, predator effects were weaker for the generalist and on low-quality plants, likely due to density-dependent benefits provided to the generalist by mutualist ants. Because the TTI hypothesis predicts the superior performance of specialists, mutualist ants may be critical to A. gossypii persistence under competition from U. macolai. In summary, the integrative nature of the TTI hypothesis offers novel insight into the determinants of plant-herbivore and herbivore-predator interactions and the coexistence of specialist and generalist herbivores.

  16. Skype Synchronous Interaction Effectiveness in a Quantitative Management Science Course

    Strang, Kenneth David

    2012-01-01

    An experiment compared asynchronous versus synchronous instruction in an online quantitative course. Mann-Whitney U-tests, correlation, analysis of variance, t tests, and multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) were utilized to test the hypothesis that more high-quality online experiential learning interactions would increase grade.…

  17. Isotope effects in interstellar molecules by chemical hyperfine interaction

    Haberkorn, R.; Michel-Beyerle, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    If free radicals recombine on grain surfaces, not only the different masses of isotopes but also their differing nuclear spin moments (e.g. 12 C/ 13 C, 14 N/ 15 N, 17 O/ 18 O) may imply variations in the recombination probability due to hyperfine interaction. This mechanism has not been accounted for so far. (orig.) [de

  18. Towards effective implementation of interactive web-based extranet ...

    The infrastructure that allows such transactions to thrive and grow is an interactive web-based extranet system and not just a site for transactions. The infrastructure must be carefully planned and developed from the outset of Extranet modeling, particularly in a university environment. Tertiary institutions in Nigeria are faced ...

  19. Effects of Imagined Interactions and Rehearsal on Speaking Performance

    Choi, Charles W.; Honeycutt, James M.; Bodie, Graham D.

    2015-01-01

    Imagined interactions (IIs) constitute a type of social cognition that can reduce fear of communication. Through the mental preparation enabled by IIs, an individual can reduce disfluencies and mitigate the anxiety that arises from a speech. Study 1 indicated that rehearsal influences the reduction of silent pauses but not vocalized pauses. In…

  20. Effects of Sibling Structure and Interaction on Children's Categorization Style

    Cicirelli, Victor G.

    1973-01-01

    One hundred sixty sibling pairs from two child families were sampled for sibling interaction behaviors as they relate to measures of categorization style. The study provides additional evidence of the importance of a child's siblings to his cognitive development. (Editor/RK)

  1. Measurement of strong interaction effects in antiprotonic helium atoms

    Davies, J.D.; Gorringe, T.P.; Lowe, J.; Nelson, J.M.; Playfer, S.M.; Pyle, G.J.; Squier, G.T.A.

    1984-01-01

    The strong interaction shift and width for the 2 p level and the width for the 3d level have been measured for antiprotonic helium atoms. The results are compared with optical model calculations. The possible existence of strongly bound antiproton states in nuclei is discussed. (orig.)

  2. Additive Main Effects and Multiplicative Interaction Analysis of ...

    This work deals with modeling and examining the GxE interaction pattern of the multi-environment trials of 43 genotypes and eight environments from Southern Ethiopia coffee (Coffea Arabica L.) collections using a randomized complete block design (RCBD) with four replications. The work further attempts to predict yield ...

  3. Contrasting Expectations of Individuals and Collectivists: Achieving Effective Group Interaction.

    Waltman, John L.; Bush-Bacelis, Jean L.

    1995-01-01

    Techniques for training students of international business to understand collectivism and individualism, both as they affect classroom interaction and as they may affect intercultural relations in business, are presented. Tools are offered for adapting group projects given to individualists in individualist cultures to help them develop a…

  4. Confirmation of radiation pressure effects in laser--plasma interactions

    Attwood, D.T.; Sweeney, D.W.; Auerbach, J.M.; Lee, P.H.Y.

    1977-10-01

    Interferometric data resolved in 1μm and 15 psec confirms the dominant role of radiation pressure during high intensity laser-plasma interactions. Specifically observed manifestations include electron density profiles steepened to 1 μm scale length, clearly defined upper and lower density shelves, and small and large scale deformation of transverse isodensity surfaces

  5. Memory effect in expressed emotions during long term group interactions

    Gorbunov, R.; Barakova, E.I.; Rauterberg, M.; Ferrández Vicente, J.M.; Álvarez-Sánchez, J.R.; de la Paz López, F.; Toledo Moreo, J.; Adeli, H.

    2017-01-01

    Long-term interactions in groups can be monitored through games in which the participants need to show their social preferences by making choice to help or to use egoistic game strategy. In this paper we analyse the facial expressions of a group of isolated individuals (astronauts) during repeated

  6. Effects of multiple enzyme–substrate interactions in basic units of cellular signal processing

    Seaton, D D; Krishnan, J

    2012-01-01

    Covalent modification cycles are a ubiquitous feature of cellular signalling networks. In these systems, the interaction of an active enzyme with the unmodified form of its substrate is essential for signalling to occur. However, this interaction is not necessarily the only enzyme–substrate interaction possible. In this paper, we analyse the behaviour of a basic model of signalling in which additional, non-essential enzyme–substrate interactions are possible. These interactions include those between the inactive form of an enzyme and its substrate, and between the active form of an enzyme and its product. We find that these additional interactions can result in increased sensitivity and biphasic responses, respectively. The dynamics of the responses are also significantly altered by the presence of additional interactions. Finally, we evaluate the consequences of these interactions in two variations of our basic model, involving double modification of substrate and scaffold-mediated signalling, respectively. We conclude that the molecular details of protein–protein interactions are important in determining the signalling properties of enzymatic signalling pathways. (paper)

  7. Accelerator system for producing two-component beams for studies of interactive surface effects

    Kaminsky, M.; Das, S.K.; Ekern, R.; Hess, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    For studies of interactive surface effects caused by the simultaneous bombardment of targets by both chemically active and inactive ion species (e.g., D + and He + , respectively) a two beam component accelerator facility was placed in operation. One component, consisting of light ions (e.g., H, D, He) is accelerated by a 2-MV Van de Graaff accelerator which provides a mass analyzed and focussed beam for the energy range from approximately 100-keV to 2-MeV (for singly charged ions). The other component is a beam of light ions in the energy range from approximately 10-keV to 100-keV. This is furnished by a 100-kV dc accelerator system which provides a mass analyzed focussed beam. This beam is guided into the beam line of the Van de Graaff accelerator electrostatically, and with the aid of beam steerers it is made to be co-axial with the Van de Graaff generated beam. The angle of incidence becomes hereby a free parameter for the interaction of the mixed beams with a surface. For each beam component, current densities of 650 μA cm -2 on target can readily be obtained. In order to reduce carbon contamination of the irradiated targets significantly, stainless steel beam lines have been used together with a combination of turbomolecular pumps and ion-sublimation pumps.A total pressure of 2 to 3 x 10 -8 torr in the beam lines and of 2 x 10 -9 torr in the target chamber can be obtained readily. Experimental results on the surface damage of Ni bombarded simultaneously with He + and D + ions are presented. The importance of such studies of interactive surface effects for the controlled thermonuclear fusion program are discussed

  8. Gene by Environment Interaction and Resilience: Effects of Child Maltreatment and Serotonin, Corticotropin Releasing Hormone, Dopamine, and Oxytocin Genes

    Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2013-01-01

    In this investigation, gene-environment interaction effects in predicting resilience in adaptive functioning among maltreated and nonmaltreated low-income children (N = 595) were examined. A multi-component index of resilient functioning was derived and levels of resilient functioning were identified. Variants in four genes, 5-HTTLPR, CRHR1, DRD4 -521C/T, and OXTR, were investigated. In a series of ANCOVAs, child maltreatment demonstrated a strong negative main effect on children’s resilient functioning, whereas no main effects for any of the genotypes of the respective genes were found. However, gene-environment interactions involving genotypes of each of the respective genes and maltreatment status were obtained. For each respective gene, among children with a specific genotype, the relative advantage in resilient functioning of nonmaltreated compared to maltreated children was stronger than was the case for nonmaltreated and maltreated children with other genotypes of the respective gene. Across the four genes, a composite of the genotypes that more strongly differentiated resilient functioning between nonmaltreated and maltreated children provided further evidence of genetic variations influencing resilient functioning in nonmaltreated children, whereas genetic variation had a negligible effect on promoting resilience among maltreated children. Additional effects were observed for children based on the number of subtypes of maltreatment children experienced, as well as for abuse and neglect subgroups. Finally, maltreated and nonmaltreated children with high levels of resilience differed in their average number of differentiating genotypes. These results suggest that differential resilient outcomes are based on the interaction between genes and developmental experiences. PMID:22559122

  9. The interactive effect of cooling and hypoxia on forearm fatigue development.

    Lloyd, Alex; Hodder, Simon; Havenith, George

    2015-09-01

    To examine the effect of separate and combined exposure to hypoxia [normoxia (FIO2 = 0.21) vs. moderate altitude (FIO2 = 0.13)] and temperature [thermoneutral (22 °C) vs. cold (5 °C)] on muscle fatigue development in the forearm, after repeated low-resistance contractions. Eight males were exposed for 70 min to four separate conditions in a balanced order. Conditions were normoxic-thermoneutral (N), hypoxic-thermoneutral, normoxic-cold and hypoxic-cold. After 15-min seated rest, participants carried out intermittent dynamic forearm exercise at 15 % maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC) for eight consecutive, 5-min work bouts. Each bout was separated by 110 s rest during which MVC force was collected. When exposed to hypoxia and cold independently, the exercise protocol decreased MVC force of the finger flexors by 8.1 and 13.9 %, respectively, compared to thermoneutral normoxia. When hypoxia and cold were combined, the decrease in MVC force was 21.4 % more than thermoneutral normoxia, reflecting an additive effect and no interaction. EMG relative to force produced during MVC, increased by 2 and 1.2 μV per kg (36 and 23 % of N) for cold and hypoxia, respectively. When the stressors were combined the effect was additive, increasing to 3.1 μV per kg (56 % of N). When compared to exercise in thermoneutral normoxic conditions, both cold and hypoxia significantly reduce brief MVC force output. This effect appears to be of mechanical origin, not a failure in muscle fibre recruitment per se. Additionally, the reduction in force is greater when the stressors are combined, showing an additive effect.

  10. Physiological effects of climate warming on flowering plants and insect pollinators and potential consequences for their interactions

    Victoria L. SCAVEN, Nicole E. RAFFERTY

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Growing concern about the influence of climate change on flowering plants, pollinators, and the mutualistic interactions between them has led to a recent surge in research. Much of this research has addressed the consequences of warming for phenological and distributional shifts. In contrast, relatively little is known about the physiological responses of plants and insect pollinators to climate warming and, in particular, how these responses might affect plant-pollinator interactions. Here, we summarize the direct physiological effects of temperature on flowering plants and pollinating insects to highlight ways in which plant and pollinator responses could affect floral resources for pollinators, and pollination success for plants, respectively. We also consider the overall effects of these responses on plant-pollinator interaction networks. Plant responses to warming, which include altered flower, nectar, and pollen production, could modify floral resource availability and reproductive output of pollinating insects. Similarly, pollinator responses, such as altered foraging activity, body size, and life span, could affect patterns of pollen flow and pollination success of flowering plants. As a result, network structure could be altered as interactions are gained and lost, weakened and strengthened, even without the gain or loss of species or temporal overlap. Future research that addresses not only how plant and pollinator physiology are affected by warming but also how responses scale up to affect interactions and networks should allow us to better understand and predict the effects of climate change on this important ecosystem service [Current Zoolo­gy 59 (3: 418–426, 2013].

  11. Multiple stressor effects in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii--toward understanding mechanisms of interaction between effects of ultraviolet radiation and chemical pollutants.

    Korkaric, Muris; Behra, Renata; Fischer, Beat B; Junghans, Marion; Eggen, Rik I L

    2015-05-01

    The effects of chemical pollutants and environmental stressors, such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR), can interact when organisms are simultaneously exposed, resulting in higher (synergistic) or lower (antagonistic) multiple stressor effects than expected based on the effects of single stressors. Current understanding of interactive effects is limited due to a lack of mechanism-based multiple stressor studies. It has been hypothesized that effect interactions may generally occur if chemical and non-chemical stressors cause similar physiological effects in the organism. To test this hypothesis, we exposed the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to combinations of UVR and single chemicals displaying modes of action (MOA) similar or dissimilar to the impact of UVR on photosynthesis. Stressor interactions were analyzed based on the independent action model. Effect interactions were found to depend on the MOA of the chemicals, and also on their concentrations, the exposure time and the measured endpoint. Indeed, only chemicals assumed to cause effects on photosynthesis similar to UVR showed interactions with UVR on photosynthetic yield: synergistic in case of Cd(II) and paraquat and antagonistic in case of diuron. No interaction on photosynthesis was observed for S-metolachlor, which acts dissimilarly to UVR. However, combined effects of S-metolachlor and UVR on algal reproduction were synergistic, highlighting the importance of considering additional MOA of UVR. Possible mechanisms of stressor effect interactions are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct and indirect effects of a potential aquatic contaminant on grazer-algae interactions.

    Evans-White, Michelle A; Lamberti, Gary A

    2009-02-01

    Contaminants have direct, harmful effects across multiple ecological scales, including the individual, the community, and the ecosystem levels. Less, however, is known about how indirect effects of contaminants on consumer physiology or behavior might alter community interactions or ecosystem processes. We examined whether a potential aquatic contaminant, an ionic liquid, can indirectly alter benthic algal biomass and primary production through direct effects on herbivorous snails. Ionic liquids are nonvolatile organic salts being considered as an environmentally friendly potential replacement for volatile organic compounds in industry. In two greenhouse experiments, we factorially crossed four concentrations of 1-N-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (bmimBr; experiment 1: 0 or 10 mg/L; experiment 2: 0, 1, or 100 mg/L) with the presence or absence of the snail Physa acuta in aquatic mesocosms. Experimental results were weighted by their respective control (no bmimBr or P. acuta) and combined for statistical analysis. When both bmimBr and snails were present, chlorophyll a abundance and algal biovolume were higher than would be expected if both factors acted additively. In addition, snail growth rates, relative to those of controls, declined by 41 to 101% at 10 and 100 mg/L of bmimBr. Taken together, these two results suggest that snails were less efficient grazers in the presence of bmimBr, resulting in release of algae from the grazer control. Snails stimulated periphyton primary production in the absence, but not in the presence, of bmimBr, suggesting that bmimBr also can indirectly alter ecosystem function. These findings suggest that sublethal contaminant levels can negatively impact communities and ecosystem processes via complex interactions, and they provide baseline information regarding the potential effects of an emergent industrial chemical on aquatic systems.

  13. Effects of Interaction Imbalance in a Strongly Repulsive One-Dimensional Bose Gas

    Barfknecht, R. E.; Foerster, A.; Zinner, N. T.

    2018-05-01

    We calculate the spatial distributions and the dynamics of a few-body two-component strongly interacting Bose gas confined to an effectively one-dimensional trapping potential. We describe the densities for each component in the trap for different interaction and population imbalances. We calculate the time evolution of the system and show that, for a certain ratio of interactions, the minority population travels through the system as an effective wave packet.

  14. Effects of Heterogeneous Social Interactions on Flocking Dynamics

    Miguel, M. Carmen; Parley, Jack T.; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2018-02-01

    Social relationships characterize the interactions that occur within social species and may have an important impact on collective animal motion. Here, we consider a variation of the standard Vicsek model for collective motion in which interactions are mediated by an empirically motivated scale-free topology that represents a heterogeneous pattern of social contacts. We observe that the degree of order of the model is strongly affected by network heterogeneity: more heterogeneous networks show a more resilient ordered state, while less heterogeneity leads to a more fragile ordered state that can be destroyed by sufficient external noise. Our results challenge the previously accepted equivalence between the static Vicsek model and the equilibrium X Y model on the network of connections, and point towards a possible equivalence with models exhibiting a different symmetry.

  15. SOIL STRUCTURE INTERACTION EFFECTS ON MULTISTOREY R/C STRUCTURES

    Muberra ESER AYDEMIR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the behavior of multistorey structures considering soil structure interaction under earthquake excitation. For this purpose, sample 3, 6, 9 storey RC frames are designed based on Turkish Seismic Design Code and analyzed in time domain with incremental dynamic analysis. Strength reduction factors are investigated for generated sample plane frames for 64 different earthquake motions recorded on different site conditions such as rock, stiff soil, soft soil and very soft soil. According to the analysis result, strength reduction factors of sample buildings considering soil structure interaction are found to be almost always smaller than design strength reduction factors given in current seismic design codes, which cause an unsafe design and nonconservative design forces.

  16. [Transcultural prevention of alcohol-related disorders : effects of a culture- and migration-sensitive approach in elderly migrants with respect to attitudes and behavior: a cluster randomized controlled trial].

    Bermejo, Isaac; Frank, F; Komarahadi, F; Albicker, J; Ries, Z; Kriston, L; Härter, M

    2015-07-01

    For migrants who are older than 50, alcohol frequently becomes a problem. Simultaneously alcohol-related prevention measures only reach this group insufficiently. Therefore, a transcultural concept for preventing alcohol-related disorders in elderly (≥ 45 years) migrants has been developed. The transcultural concept, which consisted of a prevention event as well as a cultural and language-sensitive information booklet, was evaluated in a cluster-randomized controlled trial (n = 310 immigrants). As a control condition there was a prevention event with materials from Deutsche Hauptstelle für Suchtfragen (German Centre for Addiction Issues). Data were obtained before and after the event, as well as after 6 months. All materials were available both in German and in Russian, Italian, Spanish and Turkish. Directly after the event, as well as 6 months thereafter, the transcultural approach was rated significantly better than the general prevention event. 73.4 % of the participants read the cultural and migration-sensitive booklet, whereas only 21.2 % in the control condition (p = 0.0001). Furthermore, significantly more participants of the transcultural approach reported a reduced alcohol consumption (49.4 vs. 16.7 %; p = 0.004) after 6 months. The consideration of diversity with respect to cultural, migration-related, socio demographic und linguistic aspects improves the effectiveness of prevention measures.

  17. Effect of boron nitride coating on fiber-matrix interactions

    Singh, R.N.; Brun, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Coatings can modify fiber-matrix reactions and consequently interfacial bond strengths. Commercially available mullite, silicon carbide, and carbon fibers were coated with boron nitride via low pressure chemical vapor deposition and incorporated into a mullite matrix by hot-pressing. The influence of fiber-matrix interactions for uncoated fibers on fracture morphologies was studied. These observations are related to the measured values of interfacial shear strengths

  18. Effects of configuration interaction on photoabsorption spectra in the continuum

    Komninos, Yannis; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2004-01-01

    It is pointed out that the proper interpretation of a recently published experimental spectrum from the multilaser photoionization of Sr [Eichmann et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 233004 (2003)] must account for a radiative transition between two autoionizing states. The application of orthonormality selection rules and of configuration-interaction theory involving the continuous spectrum and the quasicontinuum of the upper part of Rydberg series explains quantitatively the appearance, the shape, and the variation of heights of the observed peaks of resonances

  19. Cytotoxic effects of TBBPA and its interactions with signalling pathways in mammalian cells

    Strack, S.; Sander, M.; Detzel, T.; Krug, H.F. [Forschungszentrum Kalsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Toxikologie und Genetik; Kuch, B. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Siedlungswasserbau und Wasserguetewirtschaft

    2004-09-15

    Toxic effects of TBBPA published so far have been recently reviewed by Birnbaum and Staskal The LC{sub 50} indicating the acute toxicity in vivo due to a single oral dose in mice and rats were higher than 4 to 5 g/kg, however, systematically long-term in vivo studies are missing. Weak estrogenic effects have been described by Meerts et al., demonstrating for TBBPA less pronounced activity than for other brominated bisphenols. The same group described competitive interactions in vitro with human transthyretin (TTR). In binding affinity assays they could demonstrate that TBBPA binds to TTR ten times more effectively than T{sub 4}. However, the available toxicological data are still extremely limited. For a comprehensive risk assessment valid data are insufficient. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible cytotoxic effects, and to gain insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms respectively the corresponding cellular signalling processes. This approach would allow to identify sensitive end-points of cellular toxicological responses. For these molecular toxicological investigations established cell lines should be used, in order to have a suitable model for appropriate toxicological studies.

  20. Thermal interaction effect on nucleation site distribution in subcooled boiling

    Zou, Ling; Jones, Barclay

    2012-01-01

    An experimental work on subcooled boiling of refrigerant, R134a, to examine nucleation site distributions on both copper and stainless steel heating surfaces was performed. In order to obtain high fidelity active nucleation site density and distribution data, a high-speed digital camera was utilized to record bubble emission images from a view normal to heating surfaces. Statistical analyses on nucleation site data were done and their statistical distributions were obtained. Those experimentally observed nucleation site distributions were compared to the random spatial Poisson distribution. The comparisons showed that, rather than purely random, active nucleation site distributions on boiling surfaces are relatively more uniform. Experimental results also showed that on the copper heating surface, nucleation site distributions are slightly more uniform than on the stainless steel surface. This was concluded as the results of thermal interactions between nucleation sites with different solid thermal conductivities. A two dimensional thermal interaction model was then developed to quantitatively examine the thermal interactions between nucleation sites. The results give a reasonable explanation to the experimental observation on nucleation site distributions.

  1. Membrane interactions and antimicrobial effects of inorganic nanoparticles

    Malekkhaiat Häffner, Sara; Malmsten, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between nanoparticles and biological membranes are attracting increasing attention in current nanomedicine, and play a key role both for nanotoxicology and for utilizing nanomaterials in diagnostics, drug delivery, functional biomaterials, as well as combinations of these, e.g., in t......Interactions between nanoparticles and biological membranes are attracting increasing attention in current nanomedicine, and play a key role both for nanotoxicology and for utilizing nanomaterials in diagnostics, drug delivery, functional biomaterials, as well as combinations of these, e.......g., in theranostics. In addition, there is considerable current interest in the use of nanomaterials as antimicrobial agents, motivated by increasing resistance development against conventional antibiotics. Here, various nanomaterials offer opportunities for triggered functionalites to combat challenging infections....... Although the performance in these diverse applications is governed by a complex interplay between the nanomaterial, the properties of included drugs (if any), and the biological system, nanoparticle-membrane interactions constitute a key initial step and play a key role for the subsequent biological...

  2. Exploring the Mediating Effect of E-social Capital Between Community Members Interaction and Consumer Engagement

    Yan Bingsheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explored the effect of instrumental interaction and relational interaction on consumer engagement (community engagement and brand engagement among community members. The mediating effect of E-social capital was investigated as well. The research results showed that: both instrumental interaction and interpersonal interaction promote the formation of E-social capital (online trust and online reciprocity; online trust plays a partial mediating role between community interaction (instrumental interaction, relational interaction and community engagement, but the influence of online reciprocity on community engagement is not significant; community engagement leads to brand engagement. The findings enrich the theories of brand community and consumer engagement and contribute to the virtual community management.

  3. Effect of caffeine -coconut products interactions on induction of ...

    The blood of each rat was collected by cardiac puncture while the liver of each rat was harvested and processed to examine several biochemical parameters, ie, total protein and RNA levels, protein/RNA ratios, and activities of alanine and aspartate amino transferase (ALT and AST, respectively). The results showed that ...

  4. Interactive effects between radiation and other factors on cancer risk among A-bomb survivors

    Akiba, Suminori

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews RERF cancer studies conducted to examine interactive effects between radiation and epidemiological risk factors, including smoking habits, occupation, dietary habits and OB/GYN history. Special emphasis is placed on a review of studies of interactive effects between cigarette smoking and radiation on lung cancer risk. Comments on these studies are made and proposals for future studies are presented. (author)

  5. Assessing the Effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Language Delayed Children: A Clinical Investigation

    Falkus, Gila; Tilley, Ciara; Thomas, Catherine; Hockey, Hannah; Kennedy, Anna; Arnold, Tina; Thorburn, Blair; Jones, Katie; Patel, Bhavika; Pimenta, Claire; Shah, Rena; Tweedie, Fiona; O'Brien, Felicity; Leahy, Ruth; Pring, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT) is widely used by speech and language therapists to improve the interactions between children with delayed language development and their parents/carers. Despite favourable reports of the therapy from clinicians, little evidence of its effectiveness is available. We investigated the effects of PCIT as…

  6. The interactive effects of temperature and moisture on nitrogen fixation in two temperate-arctic mosses

    Rousk, Kathrin; Pedersen, Pia Agerlund; Dyrnum, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    fixation in mosses under controlled conditions have rarely been investigated separately, rendering the interactive effects of the two climatic factors on N2 fixation unknown. Here, we tested the interactive effects of temperature and moisture on N2 fixation in the two most dominant moss species...

  7. The energy-economy-environment interaction and the rebound-effect

    Musters, A.P.A.

    1995-01-01

    This study examines the Energy-Economy-Environment (3-E) interaction ingeneral and the rebound-effect in particular. The rebound-effect can be defined as that part of the initially expected energy savings, resulting from energy efficiency improvements, that is lost because of the 3-E interaction. To

  8. Intermolecular Interactions and Cooperative Effects from Electronic Structure Calculations: An Effective Means for Developing Interaction Potentials for Condensed Phase Simulations

    Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2004-05-01

    The modeling of the macroscopic properties of homogeneous and inhomogeneous systems via atomistic simulations such as molecular dynamics (MD) or Monte Carlo (MC) techniques is based on the accurate description of the relevant solvent-solute and solvent-solvent intermolecular interactions. The total energy (U) of an n-body molecular system can be formally written as [1,2,3

  9. Respectful doubts on the new ICRP recommendations

    Diaz de la Cruz, F.

    1992-01-01

    The admiration and deference an International Organization, as ICRP, deserves not only by its altruistic mission but also by the eminent and distinguished scientists who work for it, in some way 'dazzles' to simple students of its theories and, in some way 'force' us to accept, sometimes without any critical, serious and previous meditation, its recommendations. But it is not the bad thing this kind of 'blindness' we have before the almighty ...ICRP dixit..., the worst thing is that non-specialist and non-specialized persons believe as 'dogmas' and 'axioms' the ICRP recommednations and make of them legal dispositions through standards and regulations. Standards an regulations which can frustate an industrial or any other type of peaceful nuclear activity due to the economic or the social reasons derived from ICRP recommendations. The inflexibility (weakened in the arguments but strengthened in the recommendations) of this influent Organism on the 'linearity without threshold' in the dose-effect relationship and the compromises of the International Labor Organization (ILO) with respect ICRP recommedations provole irrational, ilogical and non desirable answers. (author)

  10. Quantifying the molecular origins of opposite solvent effects on protein-protein interactions.

    Vincent Vagenende

    Full Text Available Although the nature of solvent-protein interactions is generally weak and non-specific, addition of cosolvents such as denaturants and osmolytes strengthens protein-protein interactions for some proteins, whereas it weakens protein-protein interactions for others. This is exemplified by the puzzling observation that addition of glycerol oppositely affects the association constants of two antibodies, D1.3 and D44.1, with lysozyme. To resolve this conundrum, we develop a methodology based on the thermodynamic principles of preferential interaction theory and the quantitative characterization of local protein solvation from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that changes of preferential solvent interactions at the protein-protein interface quantitatively account for the opposite effects of glycerol on the antibody-antigen association constants. Detailed characterization of local protein solvation in the free and associated protein states reveals how opposite solvent effects on protein-protein interactions depend on the extent of dewetting of the protein-protein contact region and on structural changes that alter cooperative solvent-protein interactions at the periphery of the protein-protein interface. These results demonstrate the direct relationship between macroscopic solvent effects on protein-protein interactions and atom-scale solvent-protein interactions, and establish a general methodology for predicting and understanding solvent effects on protein-protein interactions in diverse biological environments.

  11. Genotype by environment interaction effects in genetic evaluation of preweaning gain for Line 1 Hereford cattle from Miles City, Montana.

    MacNeil, M D; Cardoso, F F; Hay, E

    2017-09-01

    It has long been recognized that genotype × environment interaction potentially influences genetic evaluation of beef cattle. However, this recognition has largely been ignored in systems for national cattle evaluation. The objective of this investigation was to determine if direct and maternal genetic effects on preweaning gain would be reranked depending on an environmental gradient as determined by year effects. Data used were from the 76-yr selection experiment with the Line 1 Hereford cattle raised at Miles City, MT. The data comprised recorded phenotypes from 7,566 animals and an additional 1,862 ancestral records included in the pedigree. The presence of genotype × environment interaction was examined using reaction norms wherein year effects on preweaning gain were hypothesized to linearly influence the EBV. Estimates of heritability for direct and maternal effects, given the average environment, were 10 ± 2 and 26 ± 3%, respectively. In an environment that is characterized by the 5th (95th) percentile of the distribution of year effects, the corresponding estimates of heritability were 18 ± 3 (22 ± 3%) and 30 ± 3% (30 ± 3%), respectively. Rank correlations of direct and maternal EBV appropriate to the 5th and 95th percentiles of the year effects were 0.67 and 0.92, respectively. In the average environment, the genetic trends were 255 ± 1 g/yr for direct effects and 557 ± 3 g/yr for maternal effects. In the fifth percentile environment, the corresponding estimates of genetic trend were 271 ± 1 and 540 ± 3 g/yr, respectively, and in the 95th percentile environment, they were 236 ± 1 and 578 ± 3 g/yr, respectively. Linear genetic trends in environmental sensitivity were observed for both the direct (-8.06 × 10 ± 0.49 × 10) and maternal (8.72 × 10 ± 0.43 × 10) effects. Therefore, changing systems of national cattle evaluation to more fully account for potential genotype × environment interaction would improve the assessment of breeding

  12. Interactions of tetracationic porphyrins with DNA and their effects on DNA cleavage

    Lebedeva, Natalya Sh.; Yurina, Elena S.; Gubarev, Yury A.; Syrbu, Sergey A.

    2018-06-01

    The interaction of tetracationic porphyrins with DNA was studied using UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy and viscometry, and the particle sizes were determined. Аs cationic porphyrins, two isomer porphyrins, 3,3‧,3″,3‴-(5,10,15,20-Porphyrintetrayl)tetrakis(1-methylpyridinium) (TMPyP3) and 4,4‧,4″,4‴-(5,10,15,20-Porphyrintetrayl)tetrakis(1-methylpyridinium) (TMPyP4), were studied. They differ in the position of NCH3+ group in phenyl ring of the porphyrins and hence, in degree of freedom of rotation of the phenyl rings about the central macrocycle. It was found that intercalated complexes are formed at DNA/porphyrin molar ratios (R) of 2.2 and 3.9 for TMPyP3 и TMPyP4, respectively. Decreasing R up to 0.4 and 0.8 for TMPyP3 и TMPyP4, respectively, leads mainly to formation of outside complexes due to π-π stacking between the porphyrin chromophores interacting electrostatically with phosphate framework of DNA. Each type of the obtained complexes was characterized using Scatchard approach. It was ascertained that the affinity of TMPyP4 to DNA is stronger than TMPyP3, meanwhile the wedge effect of the latter is higher. The differences between the porphyrin isomers become more evident at irradiation of their complexes with DNA. It was established that irradiation of the intercalated complexes results in DNA fragmentation. In the case of TMPyP4, DNA fragments of different size are formed. The irradiation of the outside DNA/porphyrin complexes leads to cleavage of DNA (TMPyP3 and TMPyP4) and partial destruction of the complex due to photolysis of the porphyrin (TMPyP3).

  13. Effects of multiple modes interaction on the resistive wall mode instability

    Chen, Longxi; Lei, Wenqing; Ma, Zhiwei; Wu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    The effects of multiple modes interaction on the resistive wall mode (RWM) are studied in a slab geometry with and without plasma flow. The modes interaction can have a large effect on both the linear growth rate and the nonlinear saturation level of the RWM. We found that modes interaction can suppress the linear growth rate for the most unstable mode. The plasma flow can also help to control the growth of the RWM. The RWM can be stabilized completely by a plasma flow when considering the modes interaction. The effect of modes interaction on the RWM is stronger for the mode rational surface in the vacuum than that in the plasma. The modes interaction results in a substantially lowered saturation level for the most unstable RWM. (paper)

  14. NMR Study on the Interaction of Trehalose with Lactose and Its Effect on the Hydrogen Bond Interaction in Lactose

    Eric Morssing Vilén

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose, a well-known stress-protector of biomolecules, has been investigated for its effect on the mobility, hydration and hydrogen bond interaction of lactose using diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy and NMR of hydroxy protons. In ternary mixtures of trehalose, lactose and water, the two sugars have the same rate of diffusion. The chemical shifts, temperature coefficients, vicinal coupling constants and ROE of the hydroxy protons in trehalose, lactose and sucrose were measured for the disaccharides alone in water/acetone-d6 solutions as well as in mixtures. The data indicated that addition of trehalose did not change significantly the strength of the hydrogen bond interaction between GlcOH3 and GalO5' in lactose. Small upfield shifts were however measured for all hydroxy protons when the sugar concentration was increased. The chemical shift of the GlcOH3 signal in lactose showed less change, attributed to the spatial proximity to GalO5'. Chemical exchange between hydroxy protons of lactose and trehalose was observed in the ROESY NMR spectra. Similar effects were observed with sucrose indicating no specific effect of trehalose at the concentrations investigated (73 to 763 mg/mL and suggesting that it is the concentration of hydroxy groups more than the type of sugars which is guiding intermolecular interactions.

  15. Single-particle potential of the Λ hyperon in nuclear matter with chiral effective field theory NLO interactions including effects of Y N N three-baryon interactions

    Kohno, M.

    2018-03-01

    Adopting hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-nucleon-nucleon interactions parametrized in chiral effective field theory, single-particle potentials of the Λ and Σ hyperons are evaluated in symmetric nuclear matter and in pure neutron matter within the framework of lowest-order Bruckner theory. The chiral NLO interaction bears strong Λ N -Σ N coupling. Although the Λ potential is repulsive if the coupling is switched off, the Λ N -Σ N correlation brings about the attraction consistent with empirical data. The Σ potential is repulsive, which is also consistent with empirical information. The interesting result is that the Λ potential becomes shallower beyond normal density. This provides the possibility of solving the hyperon puzzle without introducing ad hoc assumptions. The effects of the Λ N N -Λ N N and Λ N N -Σ N N three-baryon forces are considered. These three-baryon forces are first reduced to normal-ordered effective two-baryon interactions in nuclear matter and then incorporated in the G -matrix equation. The repulsion from the Λ N N -Λ N N interaction is of the order of 5 MeV at normal density and becomes larger with increasing density. The effects of the Λ N N -Σ N N coupling compensate the repulsion at normal density. The net effect of the three-baryon interactions on the Λ single-particle potential is repulsive at higher densities.

  16. Interactive effects of prey and weather on golden eagle reproduction

    Steenhof, Karen; Kochert, Michael N.; McDonald, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    1. The reproduction of the golden eagle Aquila chrysaetos was studied in southwestern Idaho for 23 years, and the relationship between eagle reproduction and jackrabbit Lepus californicus abundance, weather factors, and their interactions, was modelled using general linear models. Backward elimination procedures were used to arrive at parsimonious models.2. The number of golden eagle pairs occupying nesting territories each year showed a significant decline through time that was unrelated to either annual rabbit abundance or winter severity. However, eagle hatching dates were significantly related to both winter severity and jackrabbit abundance. Eagles hatched earlier when jackrabbits were abundant, and they hatched later after severe winters.3. Jackrabbit abundance influenced the proportion of pairs that laid eggs, the proportion of pairs that were successful, mean brood size at fledging, and the number of young fledged per pair. Weather interacted with prey to influence eagle reproductive rates.4. Both jackrabbit abundance and winter severity were important in predicting the percentage of eagle pairs that laid eggs. Percentage laying was related positively to jackrabbit abundance and inversely related to winter severity.5. The variables most useful in predicting percentage of laying pairs successful were rabbit abundance and the number of extremely hot days during brood-rearing. The number of hot days and rabbit abundance were also significant in a model predicting eagle brood size at fledging. Both success and brood size were positively related to jackrabbit abundance and inversely related to the frequency of hot days in spring.6. Eagle reproduction was limited by rabbit abundance during approximately twothirds of the years studied. Weather influenced how severely eagle reproduction declined in those years.7. This study demonstrates that prey and weather can interact to limit a large raptor population's productivity. Smaller raptors could be affected more

  17. Interacting Effects Induced by Two Neighboring Pits Considering Relative Position Parameters and Pit Depth

    Yongfang Huang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For pre-corroded aluminum alloy 7075-T6, the interacting effects of two neighboring pits on the stress concentration are comprehensively analyzed by considering various relative position parameters (inclination angle θ and dimensionless spacing parameter λ and pit depth (d with the finite element method. According to the severity of the stress concentration, the critical corrosion regions, bearing high susceptibility to fatigue damage, are determined for intersecting and adjacent pits, respectively. A straightforward approach is accordingly proposed to conservatively estimate the combined stress concentration factor induced by two neighboring pits, and a concrete application example is presented. It is found that for intersecting pits, the normalized stress concentration factor Ktnor increases with the increase of θ and λ and always reaches its maximum at θ = 90°, yet for adjacent pits, Ktnor decreases with the increase of λ and the maximum value appears at a slight asymmetric location. The simulations reveal that Ktnor follows a linear and an exponential relationship with the dimensionless depth parameter Rd for intersecting and adjacent cases, respectively.

  18. Equality, self‐respect and voluntary separation

    Merry, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues that self‐respect constitutes an important value, and further, an important basis for equality. It also argues that under conditions of inequality‐producing segregation, voluntary separation in schooling may be more likely to provide the resources necessary for self‐respect. A

  19. Anomalous van der Waals-Casimir interactions on graphene: A concerted effect of temperature, retardation, and non-locality

    Ambrosetti, Alberto; Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi

    2018-04-01

    Dispersion forces play a major role in graphene, largely influencing adhesion of adsorbate moieties and stabilization of functional multilayered structures. However, the reliable prediction of dispersion interactions on graphene up to the relevant ˜10 nm scale is an extremely challenging task: in fact, electromagnetic retardation effects and the highly non-local character of π electrons can imply sizeable qualitative variations of the interaction with respect to known pairwise approaches. Here we address both issues, determining the finite-temperature van der Waals (vdW)-Casimir interaction for point-like and extended adsorbates on graphene, explicitly accounting for the non-local dielectric permittivity. We find that temperature, retardation, and non-locality play a crucial role in determining the actual vdW scaling laws and the stability of both atomic and larger molecular adsorbates. Our results highlight the importance of these effects for a proper description of systems of current high interest, such as graphene interacting with biomolecules, and self-assembly of complex nanoscale structures. Due to the generality of our approach and the observed non-locality of other 2D materials, our results suggest non-trivial vdW interactions from hexagonal mono-layered materials from group 14 of the periodic table, to transition metal dichalcogenides.

  20. Multiple stressor effects in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii – Toward understanding mechanisms of interaction between effects of ultraviolet radiation and chemical pollutants

    Korkaric, Muris [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Behra, Renata; Fischer, Beat B. [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Junghans, Marion [Swiss Center for Applied Ecotoxicology Eawag-EPFL, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Eggen, Rik I.L., E-mail: rik.eggen@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Systematic study of multiple stressor effects of UVR and chemicals in C. reinhardtii. • UVR and chemicals did not act independently on algal photosynthesis and reproduction. • Multiple stressor effects of UVR and chemicals depended on chemical MOA. • Synergistic effect interactions not limited to oxidative stress inducing chemicals. • Multiple MOAs of UVR may limit applicability of current prediction models. - Abstract: The effects of chemical pollutants and environmental stressors, such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR), can interact when organisms are simultaneously exposed, resulting in higher (synergistic) or lower (antagonistic) multiple stressor effects than expected based on the effects of single stressors. Current understanding of interactive effects is limited due to a lack of mechanism-based multiple stressor studies. It has been hypothesized that effect interactions may generally occur if chemical and non-chemical stressors cause similar physiological effects in the organism. To test this hypothesis, we exposed the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to combinations of UVR and single chemicals displaying modes of action (MOA) similar or dissimilar to the impact of UVR on photosynthesis. Stressor interactions were analyzed based on the independent action model. Effect interactions were found to depend on the MOA of the chemicals, and also on their concentrations, the exposure time and the measured endpoint. Indeed, only chemicals assumed to cause effects on photosynthesis similar to UVR showed interactions with UVR on photosynthetic yield: synergistic in case of Cd(II) and paraquat and antagonistic in case of diuron. No interaction on photosynthesis was observed for S-metolachlor, which acts dissimilarly to UVR. However, combined effects of S-metolachlor and UVR on algal reproduction were synergistic, highlighting the importance of considering additional MOA of UVR. Possible mechanisms of stressor effect interactions are

  1. Multiple stressor effects in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii – Toward understanding mechanisms of interaction between effects of ultraviolet radiation and chemical pollutants

    Korkaric, Muris; Behra, Renata; Fischer, Beat B.; Junghans, Marion; Eggen, Rik I.L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Systematic study of multiple stressor effects of UVR and chemicals in C. reinhardtii. • UVR and chemicals did not act independently on algal photosynthesis and reproduction. • Multiple stressor effects of UVR and chemicals depended on chemical MOA. • Synergistic effect interactions not limited to oxidative stress inducing chemicals. • Multiple MOAs of UVR may limit applicability of current prediction models. - Abstract: The effects of chemical pollutants and environmental stressors, such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR), can interact when organisms are simultaneously exposed, resulting in higher (synergistic) or lower (antagonistic) multiple stressor effects than expected based on the effects of single stressors. Current understanding of interactive effects is limited due to a lack of mechanism-based multiple stressor studies. It has been hypothesized that effect interactions may generally occur if chemical and non-chemical stressors cause similar physiological effects in the organism. To test this hypothesis, we exposed the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to combinations of UVR and single chemicals displaying modes of action (MOA) similar or dissimilar to the impact of UVR on photosynthesis. Stressor interactions were analyzed based on the independent action model. Effect interactions were found to depend on the MOA of the chemicals, and also on their concentrations, the exposure time and the measured endpoint. Indeed, only chemicals assumed to cause effects on photosynthesis similar to UVR showed interactions with UVR on photosynthetic yield: synergistic in case of Cd(II) and paraquat and antagonistic in case of diuron. No interaction on photosynthesis was observed for S-metolachlor, which acts dissimilarly to UVR. However, combined effects of S-metolachlor and UVR on algal reproduction were synergistic, highlighting the importance of considering additional MOA of UVR. Possible mechanisms of stressor effect interactions are

  2. Interaction Effects of Happiness and Physical Activity on Smoking Initiation.

    Torchyan, Armen A; BinSaeed, Abdulaziz A; Aleid, Yazeed S; Nagshbandi, Ahmed A; Almousa, Fahad; Papikyan, Satenik L; Gosadi, Ibrahim M

    2016-11-01

    Our aim was to assess the potential relationships among happiness, physical activity, and smoking initiation among undergraduate medical students in Saudi Arabia. We performed a cross-sectional study of randomly selected first- to fifth-year undergraduate medical students. Smoking initiation was defined as "ever trying smoking a cigarette, waterpipe, cigar/cigarillo, or other type of tobacco, even one or 2 puffs." The short scale Oxford Happiness Questionnaire was used to assess each student's happiness. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. Of the 406 students surveyed (208 boys, 198 girls), 86 (21.1%) had initiated smoking. We found an interaction between physical activity (PA) and happiness on smoking initiation (p-interaction = .012). Among boys with low levels of PA, lower levels of happiness were associated with a greater likelihood of smoking initiation (OR = 5.8, 95%CI = 1.9 - 17.5). Also, high levels of PA increased the chance of smoking initiation among male students with high levels of happiness (OR = 5.6, 95%CI = 2.1 - 14.5). Our results suggest that young men with low levels of happiness and low levels of PA, as well as high levels of PA and high levels of happiness, may be targeted as a priority population in tobacco control intervention programs.

  3. Interaction of vortices with ultrasound and the acoustic Faraday effect in type-II superconductors

    Dominguez, D.; Bulaevskii, L.; Ivlev, B.; Maley, M.; Bishop, A.R.

    1996-01-01

    We study the interaction of sound waves with vortices in type-II superconductors, taking into account pinning and electrodynamic forces between vortices and crystal displacements. We propose ultrasound techniques as a method for obtaining information about vortex dynamics. This is particularly appropiate at low temperatures where transport measurements are ineffective. The changes in sound velocity and attenuation due to vortices, can provide information on the elastic constants of the vortex system and on vortex dissipation, respectively. At low temperatures the Magnus force acting on vortices leads to the acoustic Faraday effect: there is a rotation of the polarization plane of tranverse sound waves propagating along the magnetic field. This effect is linear in the Magnus force and magnetic field in crystals with equivalent a and b axes for a field parallel to the c axis. We discuss how this effect can be measured by means of either pulse-echo techniques or standing sound waves. Also, we show that an ac electromagnetic field acting on the vortex system can generate ultrasound. We calculate the amplitude of the generated sound waves in the linear regime and compare with recent experiments. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  4. Choice of single-particle potential and the convergence of the effective interaction

    Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Osnes, E.; Muether, H.; Schmid, K.W.

    1990-02-01

    The convergence of the expansion for the effective interaction is studied considering as example the shell model for the nuclei 18 O and 18 F. In this work the effective interaction is computed through third order in the Brueckner G matrix, using both a harmonic-oscillator (HO) basis and a Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (BHF) basis. The significant differences in the convergence behavior of the effective interaction in these two cases are reported. The results indicate that the choice of the BHF single-particle potential facilitates the convergence of the effective interaction in low-orders of the expansion, whereas the HO results exhibit a non-convergent behavior. The implications for the HO approach are discussed. All calculations have been performed considering a modern version of the Bonn one-boson-exchange potential for the nucleon-nucleon interaction. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Consideration of pavement roughness effects on vehicle-pavement interaction

    Steyn, WJvdM

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available . In this paper the focus is on quantification of the pavement roughness effects on the calculated structural pavement life and the effects of surfacing maintenance on the moving dynamic tyre loads generated by vehicles. A simplified method for calculating... the moving dynamic tyre load population is used together with standard pavement response analysis methods to quantify the effects of pavement surfacing maintenance on roughness and structural pavement life. This method can be used as a pavement management...

  6. Effects of hypersonic field and anharmonic interactions on channelling radiation

    George, Juby; Pathak, Anand P; Goteti, L N S Prakash; Nagamani, G

    2007-01-01

    The effects of a hypersonic field on positron channelling radiation are considered. Anharmonic effects of the transverse potential induced by these longitudinal fields are incorporated and the wavefunction of the planar channelled positron is found by the solution of Dirac equation under the resonant influence of hypersound. An expression for the resonant frequency is estimated. The transition probabilities and the intensity of the channelling radiation are also calculated. It is found that the anharmonic effects change the spectral distributions considerably

  7. Clinical handover as an interactive event: informational and interactional communication strategies in effective shift-change handovers.

    Eggins, Suzanne; Slade, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Clinical handover -- the transfer between clinicians of responsibility and accountability for patients and their care (AMA 2006) -- is a pivotal and high-risk communicative event in hospital practice. Studies focusing on critical incidents, mortality, risk and patient harm in hospitals have highlighted ineffective communication -- including incomplete and unstructured clinical handovers -- as a major contributing factor (NSW Health 2005; ACSQHC 2010). In Australia, as internationally, Health Departments and hospital management have responded by introducing standardised handover communication protocols. This paper problematises one such protocol - the ISBAR tool - and argues that the narrow understanding of communication on which such protocols are based may seriously constrain their ability to shape effective handovers. Based on analysis of audio-recorded shift-change clinical handovers between medical staff we argue that handover communication must be conceptualised as inherently interactive and that attempts to describe, model and teach handover practice must recognise both informational and interactive communication strategies. By comparing the communicative performance of participants in authentic handover events we identify communication strategies that are more and less likely to lead to an effective handover and demonstrate the importance of focusing close up on communication to improve the quality and safety of healthcare interactions.

  8. Effects of Gogny type interactions on the nuclear flow

    Sebille, F.; De La Mota, V.; Jouault, B.; Schuck, P.

    1995-01-01

    A flow analysis on symmetric and asymmetric reactions from 100 to 400 MeV/n is performed in the framework of the semi-classical Landau-Vlasov approach. In this energy range our results present two different trends. At lower energies it is governed by the momentum dependence of the nuclear optical potential, whereas at higher energies its density dependence plays a crucial role leading to a rather pronounced sensitivity of the incompressibility modulus. The non-locality of the nuclear interaction is relevant for asymmetric colliding systems. With an incompressibility modulus in the vicinity of 200 MeV, an excellent quantitative description of the flow behavior with incident energy and impact parameter or the system mass is provided. (authors)., 26 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Pharmacodynamic drug interaction study: effect of sertraline on the ...

    The effect of sertraline on glibenclamide control of blood sugar level was determined in normoglycemic and alloxanised rats. Sertraline enhance the hypoglycaemic action in a non-dose dependent fashion in the normoglycaemic and alloxanised rats. Sertraline (40mg/Kg body weight) was more effective in the enhancement ...

  10. Interactions between zooplankton and crude oil: toxic effects and bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Rodrigo Almeda

    Full Text Available We conducted ship-, shore- and laboratory-based crude oil exposure experiments to investigate (1 the effects of crude oil (Louisiana light sweet oil on survival and bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in mesozooplankton communities, (2 the lethal effects of dispersant (Corexit 9500A and dispersant-treated oil on mesozooplankton, (3 the influence of UVB radiation/sunlight exposure on the toxicity of dispersed crude oil to mesozooplankton, and (4 the role of marine protozoans on the sublethal effects of crude oil and in the bioaccumulation of PAHs in the copepod Acartia tonsa. Mortality of mesozooplankton increased with increasing oil concentration following a sigmoid model with a median lethal concentration of 32.4 µl L(-1 in 16 h. At the ratio of dispersant to oil commonly used in the treatment of oil spills (i.e. 1∶20, dispersant (0.25 µl L(-1 and dispersant-treated oil were 2.3 and 3.4 times more toxic, respectively, than crude oil alone (5 µl L(-1 to mesozooplankton. UVB radiation increased the lethal effects of dispersed crude oil in mesozooplankton communities by 35%. We observed selective bioaccumulation of five PAHs, fluoranthene, phenanthrene, pyrene, chrysene and benzo[b]fluoranthene in both mesozooplankton communities and in the copepod A. tonsa. The presence of the protozoan Oxyrrhis marina reduced sublethal effects of oil on A. tonsa and was related to lower accumulations of PAHs in tissues and fecal pellets, suggesting that protozoa may be important in mitigating the harmful effects of crude oil exposure in copepods and the transfer of PAHs to higher trophic levels. Overall, our results indicate that the negative impact of oil spills on mesozooplankton may be increased by the use of chemical dispersant and UV radiation, but attenuated by crude oil-microbial food webs interactions, and that both mesozooplankton and protozoans may play an important role in fate of PAHs in marine environments.

  11. Developmentally Sensitive Interaction Effects of Genes and the Social Environment on Total and Subcortical Brain Volumes.

    Richards, Jennifer S; Arias Vásquez, Alejandro; Franke, Barbara; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Faraone, Stephen V; Buitelaar, Jan K; Hartman, Catharina A

    2016-01-01

    Smaller total brain and subcortical volumes have been linked to psychopathology including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Identifying mechanisms underlying these alterations, therefore, is of great importance. We investigated the role of gene-environment interactions (GxE) in interindividual variability of total gray matter (GM), caudate, and putamen volumes. Brain volumes were derived from structural magnetic resonance imaging scans in participants with (N = 312) and without ADHD (N = 437) from N = 402 families (age M = 17.00, SD = 3.60). GxE effects between DAT1, 5-HTT, and DRD4 and social environments (maternal expressed warmth and criticism; positive and deviant peer affiliation) as well as the possible moderating effect of age were examined using linear mixed modeling. We also tested whether findings depended on ADHD severity. Deviant peer affiliation was associated with lower caudate volume. Participants with low deviant peer affiliations had larger total GM volumes with increasing age. Likewise, developmentally sensitive GxE effects were found on total GM and putamen volume. For total GM, differential age effects were found for DAT1 9-repeat and HTTLPR L/L genotypes, depending on the amount of positive peer affiliation. For putamen volume, DRD4 7-repeat carriers and DAT1 10/10 homozygotes showed opposite age relations depending on positive peer affiliation and maternal criticism, respectively. All results were independent of ADHD severity. The presence of differential age-dependent GxE effects might explain the diverse and sometimes opposing results of environmental and genetic effects on brain volumes observed so far.

  12. Developmentally Sensitive Interaction Effects of Genes and the Social Environment on Total and Subcortical Brain Volumes.

    Jennifer S Richards

    Full Text Available Smaller total brain and subcortical volumes have been linked to psychopathology including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Identifying mechanisms underlying these alterations, therefore, is of great importance. We investigated the role of gene-environment interactions (GxE in interindividual variability of total gray matter (GM, caudate, and putamen volumes. Brain volumes were derived from structural magnetic resonance imaging scans in participants with (N = 312 and without ADHD (N = 437 from N = 402 families (age M = 17.00, SD = 3.60. GxE effects between DAT1, 5-HTT, and DRD4 and social environments (maternal expressed warmth and criticism; positive and deviant peer affiliation as well as the possible moderating effect of age were examined using linear mixed modeling. We also tested whether findings depended on ADHD severity. Deviant peer affiliation was associated with lower caudate volume. Participants with low deviant peer affiliations had larger total GM volumes with increasing age. Likewise, developmentally sensitive GxE effects were found on total GM and putamen volume. For total GM, differential age effects were found for DAT1 9-repeat and HTTLPR L/L genotypes, depending on the amount of positive peer affiliation. For putamen volume, DRD4 7-repeat carriers and DAT1 10/10 homozygotes showed opposite age relations depending on positive peer affiliation and maternal criticism, respectively. All results were independent of ADHD severity. The presence of differential age-dependent GxE effects might explain the diverse and sometimes opposing results of environmental and genetic effects on brain volumes observed so far.

  13. Interactions between Zooplankton and Crude Oil: Toxic Effects and Bioaccumulation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Almeda, Rodrigo; Wambaugh, Zoe; Wang, Zucheng; Hyatt, Cammie; Liu, Zhanfei; Buskey, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted ship-, shore- and laboratory-based crude oil exposure experiments to investigate (1) the effects of crude oil (Louisiana light sweet oil) on survival and bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in mesozooplankton communities, (2) the lethal effects of dispersant (Corexit 9500A) and dispersant-treated oil on mesozooplankton, (3) the influence of UVB radiation/sunlight exposure on the toxicity of dispersed crude oil to mesozooplankton, and (4) the role of marine protozoans on the sublethal effects of crude oil and in the bioaccumulation of PAHs in the copepod Acartia tonsa. Mortality of mesozooplankton increased with increasing oil concentration following a sigmoid model with a median lethal concentration of 32.4 µl L−1 in 16 h. At the ratio of dispersant to oil commonly used in the treatment of oil spills (i.e. 1∶20), dispersant (0.25 µl L−1) and dispersant- treated oil were 2.3 and 3.4 times more toxic, respectively, than crude oil alone (5 µl L−1) to mesozooplankton. UVB radiation increased the lethal effects of dispersed crude oil in mesozooplankton communities by 35%. We observed selective bioaccumulation of five PAHs, fluoranthene, phenanthrene, pyrene, chrysene and benzo[b]fluoranthene in both mesozooplankton communities and in the copepod A. tonsa. The presence of the protozoan Oxyrrhis marina reduced sublethal effects of oil on A. tonsa and was related to lower accumulations of PAHs in tissues and fecal pellets, suggesting that protozoa may be important in mitigating the harmful effects of crude oil exposure in copepods and the transfer of PAHs to higher trophic levels. Overall, our results indicate that the negative impact of oil spills on mesozooplankton may be increased by the use of chemical dispersant and UV radiation, but attenuated by crude oil-microbial food webs interactions, and that both mesozooplankton and protozoans may play an important role in fate of PAHs in marine environments. PMID:23840628

  14. Can we trust module-respect heuristics?

    Mo, Yuchang

    2013-01-01

    BDD (Binary Decision Diagrams) have proven to be a very efficient tool to assess Fault Trees. However, the size of BDD, and therefore the efficiency of the whole methodology, depends dramatically on the choice of variable ordering. The determination of the best variable ordering is intractable. Therefore, heuristics have been designed to select reasonably good variable orderings. One very important common feature for good static heuristics is to respect modules. In this paper, the notion of module-respect is studied in a systematic way. It is proved that under certain condition there always exists an optimal ordering that respects modules. This condition is that for each module there is always a smallest module BDD and each included module variable appears only once. On the other hand, it is shown that for the trees not satisfying the above sufficient condition the optimal orderings may not be able to be directly generated using module-respect heuristics, even when the shuffling strategy is used.

  15. Freedom of Expression, Deliberation, Autonomy and Respect

    Rostbøll, Christian F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper elaborates on the deliberative democracy argument for freedom of expression in terms of its relationship to different dimensions of autonomy. It engages the objection that Enlightenment theories pose a threat to cultures that reject autonomy and argues that autonomy-based democracy is not only compatible with but necessary for respect for cultural diversity. On the basis of an intersubjective epistemology, it argues that people cannot know how to live on mutually respectful terms w...

  16. Content Interactivity: The Effect of Higher Levels of Interactivity on Learner Performance Outcomes and Satisfaction in Web-Based Military Training

    Kenyon, Peggy L.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of content interactivity on performance outcomes and satisfaction has been studied by researchers who compared the results of Web-based and computer-based learning to classroom learning. Few scholars have compared the effects of the same content produced at different levels (low and high) of interactivity and the resulting effects. The…

  17. Romantic Relationship Satisfaction and Ambulatory Blood Pressure During Social Interactions: Specificity or Spillover Effects?

    Cornelius, Talea; Birk, Jeffrey L; Edmondson, Donald; Schwartz, Joseph E

    2018-05-08

    People in high-quality romantic relationships tend to have lower blood pressure (BP). People may experience lower BP specifically when interacting with romantic partners. This study parsed the effects of different types of social interactions on ambulatory BP (ABP) and tested whether romantic relationship satisfaction moderated these effects during interactions with partners in particular (specificity) or with others (spillover; e.g., friends, co-workers). Partnered participants (N = 594) were drawn from a larger study on BP and cardiovascular health (age = 46.5 ± 9.3; 57.4% female). Participants reported on romantic relationship satisfaction and completed 24-hr ABP monitoring. At each reading, participants reported whether they had a social interaction and with whom. Multilevel models accounted for nesting of data over time. Romantic relationship satisfaction significantly modified the effects of some social interactions on systolic and diastolic BP (SBP, DBP). Participants with high (+1 SD) relationship satisfaction had significantly lower SBP (-0.77 mmHg, p = .02) during partner interactions compared with no social interaction; low-satisfaction (-1 SD) participants had a nonsignificant 0.59 mmHg increase (p = .14). A similar pattern emerged for DBP. Relationship satisfaction also modified SBP response during friend interactions (elevated SBP for low-satisfaction participants) and DBP response during "other" interactions (elevated DBP for high-satisfaction participants). Participants with high levels of romantic relationship satisfaction experienced significantly lower BP during social interactions with their partner compared with situations without social interaction. Although there was some evidence for spillover to other types of relationships, effects were largely restricted to partner interactions.

  18. Role of antisymmetric spin-orbit component in effective interactions in the sd-shell

    Yoshinada, K.

    1981-10-01

    The antisymmetric spin-orbit interaction (ALS) proposed for sd-shell nuclei is investigated. It is shown that the centroid energy of the d sub(5/2) - d sub(3/2) interactions plays a crucial role in reproducing the excited band spectra of A = 18 - 24 nuclei. An empirical effective interaction without ALS component is proposed to reproduce the observed spectra of light sd-shell nuclei. (author)

  19. Interaction of dendritic cells with antigen-containing liposomes: effect of bilayer composition

    Foged, Camilla; Arigita, Carmen; Sundblad, Anne

    2004-01-01

    the interaction of negatively charged liposomes with both human and murine DCs. This increase could be blocked in human DCs by addition of the polysaccharide mannan indicating that uptake might be mediated by the mannose receptor. Cationic liposomes containing trimethyl ammonium propane interacted with a very...... high percentage of both DC types and could be detected in high amounts intracellularly. In conclusion, liposome bilayer composition has an important effect on interaction with DCs and might be critical for the vaccination outcome....

  20. Ombud's Corner: Respect in the workplace

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2014-01-01

    Launched in a previous issue of the Bulletin (see here), the 'Respect@CERN' campaign has triggered some rich and varied reactions, and contributions received from colleagues have covered a wide range of themes that extend from the basic “golden rule of treating others as you would have them treat you” to some very specific observations of respectful behaviour in the CERN context.   “To me, respect is the core of all relationships, all exchanges: we cannot work together and achieve results without it,” says one colleague, while another underlines the equally important dimension of projecting and preserving one’s own self-respect where “whether or not we sleep well at night depends on whether or not we feel that we have been true to ourselves that day”. Respect in the workplace is different from everyday respect in that it is based on an “earned privilege where each colleague has been selected for ...

  1. Biological Effects of Interaction between Radiation and Chemicals

    Hyun, Kyung Man; Han, Min; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Nili, Mohammad [Dawnesh Radiation Research Institute, Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    The organisms are exposed to natural radiations from cosmic or terrestrial origins. Radiation is known to cause cell death, mainly due to its ability to produce reactive oxygen species in cells. The combined action between radiation and various chemicals is a distinguishing feature of modern life. Mercury chloride is a widespread environmental pollutant that is known to have toxic effects. Synergistic effects of radiation and HgCl{sub 2} on human cells was previously reported. NAC is a well-known sulfhydryl-containing antioxidant whose role in radioprotection has been explored in several studies. There has been an increasing interest of studying the role of NAC as a radioprotective substance. The present study was designed not only to assess the synergistic effects between radiation and HgCl{sub 2}, but also to investigate protective effects of NAC on cells.

  2. Hyperon-nucleon interactions - a chiral effective field theory approach

    Polinder, H.; Haidenbauer, J.; Meissner, U.G.

    2006-01-01

    We construct the leading order hyperon–nucleon potential in chiral effective field theory. We show that a good description of the available data is possible and discuss briefly further improvements of this scheme

  3. Writing for Change — An Interactive Guide to Effective Writing ...

    In Writing for Change, you will learn the core skills of effective writing, how to write ... It is full of practical exercises and examples from the field of international development. ... Climate Change, Vulnerability, and Health in Colombia and Bolivia.

  4. Genetic dissection reveals effects of interaction between high ...

    2013-04-15

    Apr 15, 2013 ... Wheat quality is mainly influenced by protein and starch, which are responsible for ... Starch contains two components: amylose and amy- lopectin. .... (Voorrips 2002). The QTL analysis was performed and the main effect QTL.

  5. INTERACTION EFFECT OF SEASON Senna occid. CORRECTED. L.

    Dr. K.J. Umar

    Nigerian Journal of Basic and Applied Science (June, 2015), 23(1): 39-44 ... ABSTRACT: This study was aimed to assess the effect of season, habitat and leaf age on proximate ... most developing nations, for example in Nigeria, food.

  6. Determination of an effective scoring function for RNA-RNA interactions with a physics-based double-iterative method.

    Yan, Yumeng; Wen, Zeyu; Zhang, Di; Huang, Sheng-You

    2018-05-18

    RNA-RNA interactions play fundamental roles in gene and cell regulation. Therefore, accurate prediction of RNA-RNA interactions is critical to determine their complex structures and understand the molecular mechanism of the interactions. Here, we have developed a physics-based double-iterative strategy to determine the effective potentials for RNA-RNA interactions based on a training set of 97 diverse RNA-RNA complexes. The double-iterative strategy circumvented the reference state problem in knowledge-based scoring functions by updating the potentials through iteration and also overcame the decoy-dependent limitation in previous iterative methods by constructing the decoys iteratively. The derived scoring function, which is referred to as DITScoreRR, was evaluated on an RNA-RNA docking benchmark of 60 test cases and compared with three other scoring functions. It was shown that for bound docking, our scoring function DITScoreRR obtained the excellent success rates of 90% and 98.3% in binding mode predictions when the top 1 and 10 predictions were considered, compared to 63.3% and 71.7% for van der Waals interactions, 45.0% and 65.0% for ITScorePP, and 11.7% and 26.7% for ZDOCK 2.1, respectively. For unbound docking, DITScoreRR achieved the good success rates of 53.3% and 71.7% in binding mode predictions when the top 1 and 10 predictions were considered, compared to 13.3% and 28.3% for van der Waals interactions, 11.7% and 26.7% for our ITScorePP, and 3.3% and 6.7% for ZDOCK 2.1, respectively. DITScoreRR also performed significantly better in ranking decoys and obtained significantly higher score-RMSD correlations than the other three scoring functions. DITScoreRR will be of great value for the prediction and design of RNA structures and RNA-RNA complexes.

  7. Effect of genotype x environment interactions of grapevine hybrids characteristics

    Nikolić Dragan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Research in this paper was performed at two different locations: Radmilovac and Vršac in Serbia. Four new interspecific hybrids (9846, 9896, 19574 and 20506 which are intended for table consumption were used as a material. Grape yield per unit area, the properties of the bunch (bunch weight, bunch length, bunch width and number of berries in bunch, the properties of berry (berry weight, berry length and berry width, as well as the characteristic of grape quality (sugar content and total acids in the must were studied in selected hybrids. The highest yield per unit area in the localities Radmilovac and Vršac had a hybrid 9896 (14 998 kg/ha; 11 365 kg/ha. Analysis of variance results showed for the bunch weight, bunch width and number of berries in bunch, berry weight and berry length significant differences among the genotypes. Significant differences between investigated localities were determined for the bunch length and all the berry characters. The interaction between genotype and localities showed significant differences for bunch length, berry length and berry width. Since the genotypes in the initial yielding (third year after planting, they are showed satisfactory results in relation to the objectives of selection.

  8. Interactive effect of aging and local muscle heating on renal vasoconstriction during isometric handgrip.

    Kuipers, Nathan T; Sauder, Charity L; Kearney, Matthew L; Ray, Chester A

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the interactive effect of aging and forearm muscle heating on renal vascular conductance and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during ischemic isometric handgrip. A tube-lined, water-perfused sleeve was used to heat the forearm in 12 young (27 +/- 1 yr) and 9 older (63 +/- 1 yr) subjects. Ischemic isometric handgrip was performed before and after heating. Muscle temperature (intramuscular thermistor) was 34.3 +/- 0.2 and 38.7 +/- 0.1 degrees C during normothermia and heating, respectively. At rest, heating had no effect on renal blood velocity (Doppler ultrasound) or renal vascular conductance in either group (young, n = 12; older, n = 8). Heating compared with normothermia caused a significantly greater increase in renal vasoconstriction during exercise and postexercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) in both groups. However, the increase in renal vasoconstriction during heating was greater in the older compared with the young subjects (18 +/- 3 vs. 8 +/- 3%). During handgrip, heating elicited greater increases in MSNA responses in the older group (young, n = 12; older, n = 6), whereas no statistical difference was observed between groups during PEMI. In summary, aging augments renal vascular responses to ischemic isometric handgrip during heating of the exercising muscle. The greater renal vasoconstriction was associated with augmented MSNA in the older subjects.

  9. Effects of Strength of Accent on an L2 Interactive Lecture Listening Comprehension Test

    Ockey, Gary J.; Papageorgiou, Spiros; French, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a study which aimed to determine the effect of strength of accent on listening comprehension of interactive lectures. Test takers (N = 21,726) listened to an interactive lecture given by one of nine speakers and responded to six comprehension items. The test taker responses were analyzed with the Rasch computer program…

  10. Stability analysis of predator-prey interaction with a crowding effect ...

    The mathematical modeling of species interactions usually relies on competition models. However, it is known that species interactions may exhibit more complicated patterns with a crowding effect and this can be particularly important in benign environments. In this paper we discuss competition models with a crowding ...

  11. Short-Term Psychological Effects of Interactive Video Game Technology Exercise on Mood and Attention

    Russell, William D.; Newton, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Recent interest in interactive video game technology (IVGT) has spurred the notion that exercise from this technology may have meaningful physiological and psychological benefits for children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to examine the short-term psychological effects of interactive video game exercise in young adults and whether…

  12. Effects of Class Size and Attendance Policy on University Classroom Interaction in Taiwan

    Bai, Yin; Chang, Te-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Classroom interaction experience is one of the main parts of students' learning lives. However, surprisingly little research has investigated students' perceptions of classroom interaction with different attendance policies across different class sizes in the higher education system. To elucidate the effects of class size and attendance policy on…

  13. Early Exposures to Ecogenomics: Effects of Priming and Web Site Interactivity Among Adolescents

    Bos, Mark J.W.; Koolstra, Cees M.; Willems, J.T.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the context of public introductions to emerging technologies, this study examined effects of priming and Web site interactivity on adolescents’ attitude development and information processing. In a four (priming) by three (interactivity levels) experiment, participants (N = 273) were required to

  14. Early exposures to ecogenomics: Effects of priming and website interactivity among adolescents

    Bos, M.J.W.; Koolstra, C.M.; Willems, J.T.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    In the context of public introductions to emerging technologies, this study examined effects of priming and Web site interactivity on adolescents' attitude development and information processing. In a four (priming) by three (interactivity levels) experiment, participants (N = 273) were required to

  15. Early exposures to ecogenomics: Effects of priming and web site interactivity among adolescents

    Bos, M.J.W.; Koolstra, C.M.; Willems, J.T.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the context of public introductions to emerging technologies, this study examined effects of priming and Web site interactivity on adolescents' attitude development and information processing. In a four (priming) by three (interactivity levels) experiment, participants (N = 273) were required to

  16. Social Story Effectiveness on Social Interaction for Students with Autism: A Review of the Literature

    Karal, Muhammed A.; Wolfe, Pamela S.

    2018-01-01

    Social stories frequently have been used to improve the social interaction of students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This literature review examines the effectiveness of social story interventions on the social interactions of students with ASD including with whom, where, and what formats have been implemented, as well as the methodological…

  17. Effects of interaction imbalance in a strongly repulsive one-dimensional Bose gas

    Barfknecht, Rafael Emilio; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas; Foerster, Angela

    2018-01-01

    We calculate the spatial distributions and the dynamics of a few-body two-component strongly interacting Bose gas confined to an effectively one-dimensional trapping potential. We describe the densities for each component in the trap for different interaction and population imbalances. We calculate...

  18. Effect of frequency variation on electromagnetic pulse interaction with charges and plasma

    Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of frequency variation (chirp) in an electromagnetic (EM) pulse on the pulse interaction with a charged particle and plasma is studied. Various types of chirp and pulse envelopes are considered. In vacuum, a charged particle receives a kick in the polarization direction after interaction

  19. The Effects of an Intervention in Writing with Digital Interactive Books

    Curcic, Svjetlana; Johnstone, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an intervention in writing with digital interactive books. To improve the writing skills of seventh- and eighth-grade students with a learning disability in reading, we conducted a quasi-experimental study in which the students read interactive digital books (i-books), took notes, wrote summaries, and acted as…

  20. Floral biology and the effects of plant-pollinator interaction on ...

    Reproductive biology and patterns of plant-pollinator interaction are fundamental to gene flow, diversity and evolutionary success of plants. Consequently, we examined the magnitude of insect-plant interaction based on the dynamics of breeding systems and floral biology and their effects on pollination intensity, fruit and ...

  1. Autonomic nervous system mediated effects of food intake. Interaction between gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems.

    van Orshoven, N.P.

    2008-01-01

    The studies presented in this thesis focused on the autonomic nervous system mediated interactions between the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems in response to food intake and on potential consequences of failure of these interactions. The effects of food intake on cardiovascular

  2. Combined and interactive effects of global climatee change and toxicants on popuylations and communities

    Moe, S.R.; Schamphelaere, de K.A.C.; Clements, W.H.; Sorensen, T.; Brink, van den P.J.; Liess, M.

    2013-01-01

    Increased temperature and other environmental effects of global climate change (GCC) have documented impacts on many species (e.g., polar bears, amphibians, coral reefs) as well as on ecosystem processes and species interactions (e.g., the timing of predator-prey interactions). A challenge for

  3. The effects of the interaction of various oil types and rates on the ...

    Lentinus squarrosulus and Psathyrella atroumbonata, two edible indigenous mushroom species, were cultured in various different media supplemented with coconut, cotton, groundnut, butterfat, palm kernel and palm oil respectively, at 5 different rates. The interaction of the various oil types with different rates produced ...

  4. Global Change Effects on Plant-Soil Interactions

    Dam, Marie

    of this dissertation has been to determine how soil food web structure and function is affected when the quantity and quality of plant input is altered under global change. By studying the abundance and composition of soil organisms, particularly those in the rhizosphere, closely associated with living plants, we...... (Paper III). Furthermore, by way of meta-analysis, the role of organisms in global change effects on ecosystem function is modelled (Paper IV). Among CO2, warming and summer drought, CO2 is the factor most consistently impacting soil organisms. CO2 increases abundance of microorganisms and nematodes...... suggest that not only the global change effects on established ecosystems, but also the global change effects on plant community composition as well as land use management may determine the composition and function of soil food webs in the future....

  5. Radioisotope studies of some effects and interactions of trace contaminants

    1976-01-01

    The coordinated programme of ''isotopic tracer-aided studies of the biological side-effects of foreign chemical residues in food and agriculture'', initiated in 1973, had involved the participation of 12 scientists from 10 countries. Pesticide residues, toxic metals, atmospheric sulphur dioxide were studied, and the use of radiotracer techniques as monitoring tools for existing contaminant levels or for their biological effects. The programme had been successful in the development and application of selected labelled substrate techniques. Specific aspects studied were the effects of environmental contaminants at the molecular level of the cell nucleus, the development and significance of radioimmunoassay procedure for trace contaminants, action and joint action of toxic elements, and the radiometric analysis of cholinesterase as an index of exposure to organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides. Ten papers were presented and 12 coordinated investigations discussed. A number of recommendations were made

  6. Spin effect on parametric interactions of waves in magnetoplasmas

    Shahid, M.; Melrose, D. B.; Jamil, M.; Murtaza, G.

    2012-01-01

    The parametric decay instability of upper hybrid wave into low-frequency electromagnetic Shear Alfvén wave and Ordinary mode radiation (O-mode) has been investigated in an electron-ion plasma immersed in the uniform external magnetic field. Incorporating quantum effect due to electron spin, the fluid model has been used to investigate the linear and nonlinear response of the plasma species for three-wave coupling in a magnetoplasma. It is shown that the spin of electrons has considerable effect on the parametric decay of upper hybrid wave into Ordinary mode radiation (O-mode) and Shear Alfvén wave even in classical regime.

  7. Freedom of Expression, Deliberation, Autonomy and Respect

    Rostbøll, Christian F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper elaborates on the deliberative democracy argument for freedom of expression in terms of its relationship to different dimensions of autonomy. It engages the objection that Enlightenment theories pose a threat to cultures that reject autonomy and argues that autonomy-based democracy...... is not only compatible with but necessary for respect for cultural diversity. On the basis of an intersubjective epistemology, it argues that people cannot know how to live on mutually respectful terms without engaging in public deliberation and develop some degree of personal autonomy. While freedom...... of expression is indispensable for deliberation and autonomy, this does not mean that people have no obligations regarding how they speak to each other. The moral insights provided by deliberation depend on the participants in the process treating one another with respect. The argument is related to the Danish...

  8. Effect of Soil Types and Phosphorus Fertilizer Interaction on the ...

    A pot experiment was conducted to examine the effect of soil types and phosphorus fertilizer application on maize (variety DMR-L-SR) growth and yield in the rain forest zone of Nigeria. This was done at the Teaching and Research Farm, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso. The experimental treatments ...

  9. Drug-drug interaction may explain failed antibiotic effectiveness - an ...

    The in vivo effect of co-administration of the NSAIDs (acetyl salicylic acid (ASA), piroxicam, indomethacin and paracetamol) with ciprofloxacin against Staphylococcus aureus in Swiss mice, rendered neutropenic by pre-treatment with cyclophosphamide, was evaluated using animal model. Using the murine thigh model, ...

  10. interactive effect of cowpea variety, dose and exposure time

    ACSS

    variety (V), exposure time (T) and dose (D) on the tolerance of C. maculatus to both plant materials. The effect ... laboratories and institutions of higher education in several West .... Each value is the mean±S.E of 20 cowpea seeds. Means ...

  11. Effective field theory and weak non-leptonic interactions

    Miller, R.D.C.

    1982-06-01

    The techniques of Ovrut and Schnitzer (1981) are used to calculate the finite decoupling renormalisation constants resulting from heavy fermion decoupling in a non-abelian gauge theory exhibiting broken flavour symmetry. The results of this calculation are applied to realistic, massive QCD. The decoupling information may be absorbed into renormalisation group (R.G.) invariants. Working in the Landau gauge R.G. invariants are derived for the running coupling constants and running quark masses of effective QCD in the modified minimal subtraction scheme (for effective QCD with 3 to 8 flavours). This work is then applied to the major part of the thesis; a complete derivation of the effective weak non-leptonic sector of the standard model (SU(3)/sub c/ x SU(2) x U(1)), that is the construction of all effective weak non-leptonic Hamiltonians resulting from the standard model when all quark generations above the third along with the W and Z are explicitily decoupled. The form of decoupling in the work of Gilman and Wise (1979) has been adopted. The weak non-leptonic sector naturally decomposes into flavour changing and flavour conserving sectors relative to anomalous dimension calculations. The flavour changing sector further decomposes into penguin free and penguin generating sectors. Individual analyses of these three sectors are given. All sectors are analysed uniformly, based upon a standard model with n generations

  12. interactive effect of cowpea variety, dose and exposure time

    ACSS

    Callosobruchus maculatus has for years remained a serious menace in cowpea in Sub-Sahara Africa. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of genotypic cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) varieties, time and dose on C. maculatus exposed to powders of Piper guineense and Eugenia aromatica.

  13. Persistence Heterogeneity Testing in Panels with Interactive Fixed Effects

    Ergemen, Yunus Emre; Velasco, Carlos

    We consider large N,T panel data models with fixed effects, a common factor allowing for cross-section dependence, and persistent data and shocks, which are assumed fractionally integrated. In a basic setup, the main interest is on the fractional parameter of the idiosyncratic component, which...

  14. Effect of alcohol and kolanut interaction on biochemical indices of ...

    The status of neuronal gene expression was monitored through assessment of these parameters. The results showed that alcohol-kolanut co-administration decreased brain total protein, DNA, RNA levels and protein/RNA ratios, and inhibited gene expression. These effects, in turn, inhibited DNA transcription, MRNA ...

  15. Interactive effect of dietary protein level and zilpaterol hydrochloride ...

    Bonsmara type steers were used to determine the effect of dietary zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) in combination with different dietary crude protein (CP) levels (100, 120 and 140 g CP/kg) on growth performance and meat quality. Treatment groups (T) consisted of 12 steers each. T1 – 100 g CP/kg + 0.15 mg ZH/kg live weight ...

  16. Effects of second neighbor interactions on skyrmion lattices in chiral magnets

    Oliveira, E A S; Silva, R L; Silva, R C; Pereira, A R

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the influences of the second neighbor interactions on a skyrmion lattice in two-dimensional chiral magnets. Such a system contains the exchange and the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya for the spin interactions and therefore, we analyse three situations: firstly, the second neighbor interaction is present only in the exchange coupling; secondly, it is present only in the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya coupling. Finally, the second neighbor interactions are present in both exchange and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya couplings. We show that such effects cause important modifications to the helical and skyrmion phases when an external magnetic field is applied. (paper)

  17. Creating a culture of mutual respect.

    Kaplan, Kathryn; Mestel, Pamela; Feldman, David L

    2010-04-01

    The Joint Commission mandates that hospitals seeking accreditation have a process to define and address disruptive behavior. Leaders at Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, took the initiative to create a code of mutual respect that not only requires respectful behavior, but also encourages sensitivity and awareness to the causes of frustration that often lead to inappropriate behavior. Steps to implementing the code included selecting code advocates, setting up a system for mediating disputes, tracking and addressing operational system issues, providing training for personnel, developing a formal accountability process, and measuring the results. Copyright 2010 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Context-dependent planktivory: interacting effects of turbidity and predation risk on adaptive foraging

    Pangle, Kevin L.; Malinich, Timothy D.; Bunnell, David B.; DeVries, Dennis R.; Ludsin, Stuart A.

    2012-01-01

    By shaping species interactions, adaptive phenotypic plasticity can profoundly influence ecosystems. Predicting such outcomes has proven difficult, however, owing in part to the dependence of plasticity on the environmental context. Of particular relevance are environmental factors that affect sensory performance in organisms in ways that alter the tradeoffs associated with adaptive phenotypic responses. We explored the influence of turbidity, which simultaneously and differentially affects the sensory performance of consumers at multiple trophic levels, on the indirect effect of a top predator (piscivorous fish) on a basal prey resource (zooplankton) that is mediated through changes in the plastic foraging behavior of an intermediate consumer (zooplanktivorous fish). We first generated theoretical predictions of the adaptive foraging response of a zooplanktivore across wide gradients of turbidity and predation risk by a piscivore. Our model predicted that predation risk can change the negative relationship between intermediate consumer foraging and turbidity into a humped-shaped (unimodal) one in which foraging is low in both clear and highly turbid conditions due to foraging-related risk and visual constraints, respectively. Consequently, the positive trait-mediated indirect effect (TMIE) of the top predator on the basal resource is predicted to peak at low turbidity and decline thereafter until it reaches an asymptote of zero at intermediate turbidity levels (when foraging equals that which is predicted when the top predator is absent). We used field observations and a laboratory experiment to test our model predictions. In support, we found humped-shaped relationships between planktivory and turbidity for several zooplanktivorous fishes from diverse freshwater ecosystems with predation risk. Further, our experiment demonstrated that predation risk reduced zooplanktivory by yellow perch (Perca flavescens) at a low turbidity, but had no effect on consumption at

  19. Dilution effects on combined magnetic and electric dipole interactions: A study of ferromagnetic cobalt nanoparticles with tuneable interactions

    Hod, M.; Dobroserdova, A.; Samin, S.; Dobbrow, C.; Schmidt, A. M.; Gottlieb, M.; Kantorovich, S.

    2017-08-01

    Improved understanding of complex interactions between nanoparticles will facilitate the control over the ensuing self-assembled structures. In this work, we consider the dynamic changes occurring upon dilution in the self-assembly of a system of ferromagnetic cobalt nanoparticles that combine magnetic, electric, and steric interactions. The systems examined here vary in the strength of the magnetic dipole interactions and the amount of point charges per particle. Scattering techniques are employed for the characterization of the self-assembly aggregates, and zeta-potential measurements are employed for the estimation of surface charges. Our experiments show that for particles with relatively small initial number of surface electric dipoles, an increase in particle concentration results in an increase in diffusion coefficients; whereas for particles with relatively high number of surface dipoles, no effect is observed upon concentration changes. We attribute these changes to a shift in the adsorption/desorption equilibrium of the tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) molecules on the particle surface. We put forward an explanation, based on the combination of two theoretical models. One predicts that the growing concentration of electric dipoles, stemming from the addition of tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as co-surfactant during particle synthesis, on the surface of the particles results in the overall repulsive interaction. Secondly, using density functional theory, we explain that the observed behaviour of the diffusion coefficient can be treated as a result of the concentration dependent nanoparticle self-assembly: additional repulsion leads to the reduction in self-assembled aggregate size despite the shorter average interparticle distances, and as such provides the growth of the diffusion coefficient.

  20. Double jeopardy: interaction effects of marital and poverty status on the risk of mortality.

    Smith, K R; Waitzman, N J

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the hypothesis that marital and poverty status interact in their effects on mortality risks beyond their main effects. This study examines the epidemiological bases for applying an additive rather than a multiplicative specification when testing for interaction between two discrete risk factors. We specifically predict that risks associated with being nonmarried and with being poor interact to produce mortality risks that are greater than each risk acting independently. The analysis is based on men and women who were ages 25-74 during the 1971-1975 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I (NHANES I) and who were traced successfully in the NHANES I Epidemiologic Follow-Up Study in 1982-1984. Overall, being both poor and nonmarried places nonelderly (ages 25-64) men, but not women, at risk of mortality greater than that expected from the main effects. This study shows that for all-cause mortality, marital and poverty status interact for men but less so for women; these findings exist when interaction is assessed with either a multiplicative or an additive standard. This difference is most pronounced for poor, widowed men and (to a lesser degree) poor, divorced men. For violent/accidental deaths among men, the interaction effects are large on the basis of an additive model. Weak main and interaction effects were detected for the elderly (age 65+).

  1. Cloud-radiation interactions - Effects of cirrus optical thickness feedbacks

    Somerville, Richard C. J.; Iacobellis, Sam

    1987-01-01

    The paper is concerned with a cloud-radiation feedback mechanism which may be an important component of the climate changes expected from increased atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other trace greenhouse gases. A major result of the study is that cirrus cloud optical thickness feedbacks may indeed tend to increase the surface warming due to trace gas increases. However, the positive feedback from cirrus appears to be generally weaker than the negative effects due to lower clouds. The results just confirm those of earlier research indicating that the net effect of cloud optical thickness feedbacks may be a negative feedback which may substantially (by a factor of about 2) reduce the surface warming due to the doubling of CO2, even in the presence of cirrus clouds.

  2. Phenomenological theory of synergistic effects in plasma-wall interaction

    Itoh, N.; Hasebe, Y.

    1986-01-01

    A phenomenological theory for synergistic effects under multi-species particle bombardement has been developed. The theory is based on a model in which two free-energy minima are assumed to be overcome under actions of radiation for a process to be completed. The synergistic factor, the ratio of the yield of the process under irradiation with two species of particles to the summation of the yields of the process under irradiation with each of two component species, is obtained as a function of the beam flux for several parameters relevant to thermodynamic and radiation-enhanced processes. The criterion for the synergistic effect is obtained. The theory has been shown to be able to explain the yield-flux relation obtained by Haasz et al. for hydrogen-induced methane formation from graphite. (orig.)

  3. Effect of citric acid on noncovalent interactions in biopolymer jellies

    Kuanyzhbek Musabekov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of citric acid on the formation of gels based on gelatine, melon pulp and sugar has been studied. It is found that the structuring of gelatin the presence of melon pulp is due to hydrogen bonds between the amino acids of gelatin and pectin melon by hydrogen bonds. It is shown that the structuring of gelatin and gelatin – melon pulp depends on the concentration of sugar. The addition of acid in the pectin-gelatin composition reduces the pH, the solubility of pectin and accelerates the formation of jelly. This is due to the fact that in the presence of citric acid reduced the degree of dissociation of galacturonic acid. The intensity of the effect of citric acid on the structure in the presence of melon pulp could be explained by the formation of hydrogen bonds between pectin and citric acid.

  4. Effectiveness of counteraggression strategies in reducing interactive aggression by males.

    Kimble, C E; Fitz, D; Onorad, J R

    1977-04-01

    Studies on techniques of reducing aggression have typically examined passive, matching, and punitive strategies of counteraggression and have been remarkably inconsistent in their findings. This research was designed to resolve the contradictory results by reconceptuallzing the strategies in terms of counteraggression/aggression (cA/A) ratios. We predicted that the norm of reciprocity and the tendency to exploit weakness would make a cA/A ratio of less than but close to 1.0 (matching) most effective in reducing aggression. Ten cA/A ratios were used. One hundred male subjects set punishment level set by their opponent (a confederate) on 25 trials, and, on 13 losing trials, received punishment. The most effective cA/A ratios for reducing aggression were the lowest ones. Lower cA/A ratios reduced aggression and ratios greater than 1.0 increased aggresion. Contrary to the results of previous studies, the matching strategy was ineffective in reducing aggresion.

  5. Strong delayed interactive effects of metal exposure and warming

    Debecker, Sara; Dinh, Khuong Van; Stoks, Robby

    2017-01-01

    ’ ranges could lead to an important underestimation of the risks. We addressed all three mechanisms by studying effects of larval exposure to zinc and warming before, during, and after metamorphosis in Ischnura elegans damselflies from high- and lowlatitude populations. By integrating these mechanisms...... into a single study, we could identify two novel patterns. First, during exposure zinc did not affect survival, whereas it induced mild to moderate postexposure mortality in the larval stage and at metamorphosis, and very strongly reduced adult lifespan. This severe delayed effect across metamorphosis...... was especially remarkable in high-latitude animals, as they appeared almost insensitive to zinc during the larval stage. Second, the well-known synergism between metals and warming was manifested not only during the larval stage but also after metamorphosis, yet notably only in low-latitude damselflies...

  6. Respect for autonomy and technological risks

    Asveld, L.

    2008-01-01

    Technological developments can undermine the autonomy of the individual. Autonomy is one's ability to make and act upon decisions according to one's own moral framework. Respect for autonomy dictates that risks should not be imposed on the individual without her consent. Technological developments

  7. [Respect of patient's dignity in the hospital].

    Duguet, A-M

    2010-12-01

    Every code of ethics of health professionals in France considers the respect of dignity as a fundamental duty. The French 2002 Law on patient rights says that the person has the right to respect of dignity and of private life. After a presentation of the articles of ethics codes regarding dignity, this paper presents recommendations to deliver medical care in situations where dignity might be endangered such as for patients hospitalized in psychiatric services without consent, or for medical examination of prisoners or medical care to vulnerable patients unable to express their will, especially in palliative care or at the end of life. Respect of dignity after death is illustrated by the reflection conducted by the Espace Ethique de l'AP-HP (Paris area hospitals) and in the Chart of the mortuary yard. A survey of the patients' letters of complaint received by the emergency service of the Toulouse University Hospital showed that, in five years, there were 188 letters and 18 pointed out infringements to the dignity of the person. The health professional team is now aware of this obligation, and in the accreditation of the hospitals, the respect of dignity is one of the indicators of the quality of medical care.

  8. Nurturing the Respectful Community through Practical Life

    Bettmann, Joen

    2015-01-01

    Joen Bettmann's depiction of practical life exercises as character-building reveals how caring, careful, and independent work leads to higher self-esteem, more concern for others, better understanding for academic learning, and a self-nurturing, respectful classroom community. Particular aspects of movement and silence exercises bring out what…

  9. Effect of irradiation on the interaction between hydroxyzine and hexobarbital

    Nowakowska, E.; Wojciak, Z.; Godlewski, J.; Kozaryn, I.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of hydroxyzine (20 mg/kg, i.p.) on hypnotic activity and pharmacokinetics of hexobarbital (100 mg/kg, i.p.) in rats irradiated with X-rays (6 Gy) was studied. Hydroxyzine caused statistically significant prolongation of hexobarbital-induced sleep. It is in agreement with pharmacokinetical changes - prolonged biological half-life time and increased hexobarbital level in the brain tissue. (author)

  10. Three-dimensional quantum electrodynamics as an effective interaction

    Abdalla, E.; Carvalho Filho, F.M. de

    1995-10-01

    We obtain a Quantum Electrodynamics in 2 + 1 dimensions by applying a Kaluza-Klein type method of dimensional reduction to Quantum Electrodynamics in 3 + 1 dimensions rendering the model more realistic to application in solid-state systems, invariant under translations in one direction. We show that the model obtained leads to an effective action exhibiting an interesting phase structure and that the generated Chern-Simons term survives only in the broken phase. (author). 20 refs

  11. Soil-structure interaction effects on high level waste tanks

    Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.; Heymsfeld, E.

    1991-01-01

    High Level Waste Tanks consist of steel tanks located in concrete vaults which are usually completely embedded in the soil. Many of these tanks are old and were designed to seismic standards which are not compatible with current requirements. The objective if this paper is to develop simple methods of modeling SSI effects for such structures and to obtain solutions for a range of parameters that can be used to identify significant aspects of the problem

  12. Nonlinear effects in interactions of swift ions with solids

    Crawford, O.H.; Dorado, J.J.; Flores, F.

    1994-01-01

    The passage of a swift charged particle through a solid gives rise to a wake of induced electron density behind the particle. It is calculated for a proton penetrating an electron gas having the density of the valence electrons in gold, assuming linear response of the medium. The induced potential associated with the wake is responsible for the energy loss of the particle, and for many effects that have captured recent interest. These include, among others, vicinage effects on swift ion clusters, emission of electrons from bombarded solids, forces on swift ions near a surface, and energy shifts in electronic states of channeled ions. Furthermore, the wake has a determining influence on the spatial distribution, and character, of energy deposition in the medium. Previous theoretical studies of these phenomena have employed a linear wake, i.e., one that is proportional to the charge of the projectile, eZ. However, in most experiments that measure these effects, the conditions are such that the wake must include higher-order terms in Z. The purpose of this study is to analyze the nonlinear wake, to understand how the linear results must be revised

  13. Interactivity effects in social media marketing on brand engagement: an investigation of underlying mechanisms

    Antheunis, M.L.; van Noort, G.; Eisend, M.; Langner, T.

    2011-01-01

    Although, SNS advertising spending increases, research on SNS campaigning is still underexposed. First, this study aims to investigate the effect of SNS campaign interactivity on the receivers brand engagement, taking four underlying mechanisms into account (brand identification, campaign

  14. Vector Susceptibility of QCD Vacuum from an Effective Quark-Quark Interaction

    ZONG Hong-Shi; QI Shi; CHEN Wei; WU Xiao-Hua

    2003-01-01

    .A new approach for calculating vacuum susceptibilities from an effective quark-quark interaction model is derived. As a special case, the vector vacuum susceptibility is calculated. A comparison with the results of the previous approaches is given.

  15. Seismic Analysis of Intake Towers Considering Multiple-Support Excitation and Soil-Structure Interaction Effects

    Vidot, Aidcer

    2004-01-01

    .... The other effect examined is the soil-structure interaction. First, a direct approach based on a finite element model of the tower, bridge, and dam with the earthquake motion applied at the bedrock is used...

  16. Effect of electrostatic Interactions on the Percolation Concentration of Fibrillar ß-Lactoglobuline Gels

    Veerman, C.; Ruis, H.G.M.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Linden, van der E.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of electrostatic interactions on the critical percolation concentration (cp) of fibrillar -lactoglobulin gels at pH 2 was investigated using rheological measurements, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and performing conversion experiments. A decreasing cp with increasing ionic

  17. Modeling the Effect of Fluid-Structure Interaction on the Impact Dynamics of Pressurized Tank Cars

    2009-11-13

    This paper presents a computational framework that : analyzes the effect of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) on the : impact dynamics of pressurized commodity tank cars using the : nonlinear dynamic finite element code ABAQUS/Explicit. : There exist...

  18. Testing for constant nonparametric effects in general semiparametric regression models with interactions

    Wei, Jiawei; Carroll, Raymond J.; Maity, Arnab

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of testing for a constant nonparametric effect in a general semi-parametric regression model when there is the potential for interaction between the parametrically and nonparametrically modeled variables. The work

  19. Effect of interaction between seed size and sowing depth of cashew ...

    Effect of interaction between seed size and sowing depth of cashew Anacardium occidentale (L) on seedlings emergence and height under treatment with organic and inorganic fertilizer in Gidan-Waya, Southern Guinea Savanna, Nigeria.

  20. Interactive Effect of Air-Water Ratio and Temperature on the Air ...

    Windows User

    KEYWORDS: Interactive effect, air-water ratio, temperature, volatile organic compounds, removal efficiency. [Received ... The rate of mass transfer of a VOC from wastewater to the ... where ΔHo is heat of evaporation of 1 mole of component.

  1. [Effects of functional interactions between nonhomologous insulators Wari and Su(Hw)].

    Erokhin, M M; Georgiev, P G; Chetverina, D A

    2010-01-01

    Insulators are regulatory DNA elements restricting gene activation by enhancers. Interactions between insulators can lead to both insulation and activation of promoters by enhancers. In this work, we analyzed the effects of interaction of two Drosophila insulators, Wari and Su(Hw). The functional interaction between these insulators was found to enhance the activity of the Su(Hw) insulator only, but not of the Wari insulator. This suggests that the formation of a chromatin loop between interacting insulators is not a key factor for enhancement of insulation, which is in disagreement with the main idea of structural models. In addition, the effect of interaction between Wari and Su(Hw) depends on a distance between them and on the position in the system relative to other regulatory elements.

  2. Structure of neutron star crusts from new Skyrme effective interactions constrained by chiral effective field theory

    Lim, Yeunhwan; Holt, Jeremy W.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the structure of neutron star crusts, including the crust-core boundary, based on new Skyrme mean field models constrained by the bulk-matter equation of state from chiral effective field theory and the ground-state energies of doubly-magic nuclei. Nuclear pasta phases are studied using both the liquid drop model as well as the Thomas-Fermi approximation. We compare the energy per nucleon for each geometry (spherical nuclei, cylindrical nuclei, nuclear slabs, cylindrical holes, and spherical holes) to obtain the ground state phase as a function of density. We find that the size of the Wigner-Seitz cell depends strongly on the model parameters, especially the coefficients of the density gradient interaction terms. We employ also the thermodynamic instability method to check the validity of the numerical solutions based on energy comparisons.

  3. Theoretical derivation of the interaction effects with expansion effects to bubbly two-phase flows

    Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto; Cazarez-Candia, Octavio; Vazquez, Alejandro

    2004-01-01

    This paper was concerned with a theoretical closure relationships derivation to describe the hydrodynamic interaction in a dilute dispersion of gas bubbles in a continuos liquid phase with bubble radius variation due to expansion effects. The starting point in the present study was the three-dimensional transient averaged transport equations. The closure relationships were formulated as an associated problem for the deviation around averaging values of the local variables. The derivations were based on the concentric cell approach and taking in account compressibility of the gas phase. The closure relationships for the dyad product of velocity spatial deviations, virtual mass and the difference between the intrinsic and interface averages of the pressure on the continuous phase side were developed. In this work a new term, which is a function of the squared radial velocity, into the closure for the dyad product of velocity spatial deviation was founded

  4. An Investigation of the Interaction Effects of Acute Self-Esteem and Perceived Competence on Conformity.

    1978-12-22

    a demonstration of the interaction effects of acute self - esteem and perceived competence. Acute self - esteem manipulations (high, low or no) were...On the basis of previous research on conformity it was predicted that subjects who were subjected to acute self - esteem manipulations and perceived...role in conformity. The main effect of self - esteem and the interaction of self - esteem and perceived competence did not prove significant. Results were

  5. Interactive Effect of Motivation, Job Satisfaction, and Job Performance Causal Circular Studies on Sharia Financial Institutions

    Sinaulan; Noor; wildan

    2017-01-01

    Research aims to confirm and test the interactive effect of motivation, job satisfaction, and job performance. This study applied to employees of Sharia Financial Institutions in Jakarta. The number of respondents is 70 employees with randomly selected samples stratified. Research analysis data using multiple indicators within analyzed using structural equation model. The results showed that there was a positive interactive effect motivation on job performance and job performance on motivatio...

  6. Soil-structure interaction effects on the reliability evaluation of reactor containments

    Pires, J.; Hwang, H.; Reich, M.

    1986-01-01

    The probability-based method for the seismic reliability assessment of nuclear structures, which has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is extended to include the effects of soil-structure interaction. A reinforced concrete containment building is analyzed in order to examine soil-structure interaction effects on: (1) structural fragilities; (2) floor response spectra statistics; and (3) correlation coefficients for total acceleration responses at specified structural locations

  7. Quasi-particles and effective mean field in strongly interacting matter

    Levai, P.; Ko, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a quasi-particle model of strongly interacting quark-gluon matter and explore the possible connection to an effective field theoretical description consisting of a scalar σ field by introducing a dynamically generated mass, M(σ), and a self-consistently determined interaction term, B(σ). We display a possible connection between the two types of effective description, using the Friedberg-Lee model.

  8. Effects of the ρ - ω mixing interaction in relativistic models

    Menezes, D.P.; Providencia, C.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the ρ-ω mixing term in infinite nuclear matter and in finite nuclei are investigated with the non-linear Walecka model in a Thomas-Fermi approximation. For infinite nuclear matter the influence of the mixing term in the binding energy calculated with the NL3 and TM1 parametrizations can be neglected. Its influence on the symmetry energy is only felt for the TM1 with a unrealistically large value for the mixing term strength. For finite nuclei the contribution of the isospin mixing term is very large as compared with the expected value to solve the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly

  9. Effect of groundwater on soil-structure interaction

    Xu, J.; Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Kassir, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents results of a parametric study performed to investigate the effect of pore water in saturated soils on the response of nuclear containment structures to seismic motions. The technique employed uses frequency domain algorithm which incorporates impedances for both dry and saturated soils into an SSI model. A frequency domain time history analysis is carried out using the computer code CARES for a typical PWR containment structure. Structural responses presented in terms of floor response spectra indicate that considering the presence of the pore water in soils could benefit the design of massive nuclear containment structures

  10. Nonlocal plasticity effects on interaction of different size voids

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2004-01-01

    A nonlocal elastic-plastic material model is used to show that the rate of void growth is significantly reduced when the voids are small enough to be comparable with a characteristic material length. For a very small void in the material between much larger voids the competition between...... dimensional array of spherical voids. It is shown that the high growth rate of very small voids predicted by conventional plasticity theory is not realistic when the effect of a characteristic length, dependent on the dislocation structure, is accounted for. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  11. Analysis of dimensionality effect on shock wave boundary layer interaction in laminar hypersonic flows

    John, Bibin; Surendranath, Srikanth; Natarajan, Ganesh; Kulkarni, Vinayak

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Leading edge bluntness based separation control has been analysed numerically for 2D and axi-symmetric flows. • Differential growth of entropy layer in the streamwise direction in these cases leads to different interaction with respective boundary layers. • Separation control is found possible for planar flows beyond a critical radius called as equivalent radius. • No equivalent radius has been noticed in axi-symmertric flows in the present studies due to thin entropy layer and lack of favourable pressure gradient. - Abstract: Present investigations are centered on passive control of shock wave boundary layer interaction (SWBLI) for double cone and double wedge configurations with leading edge bluntness. This study seeks the differences in the flow physics of SWBLI in case of two dimensional (2D) and axisymmetric flow fields. In-house developed second order accurate finite-volume 2D axisymmetric compressible flow solver is employed for these studies. It is observed that the idea of leading edge bluntness offers reduction in separation bubble for 2D flow fields, whereas it leads to enhanced separation zone in case of axisymmetric flow fields. Relevant flow physics is well explored herein using wall pressure profile and relative thicknesses of boundary layer and entropy layer. Thicker entropy layer and stronger favorable pressure gradient are found responsible for the possibility of separation control in case of 2D flow fields. Thin entropy layer due to three dimensional relieving effect and its swallowing by the boundary layer are attributed for higher separation bubble size in case of cone with range of radii under consideration.

  12. Effects of copper on invertebrate–sediment interactions

    Hunting, E.R.; Mulder, C.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Breure, A.M.; Admiraal, W.

    2013-01-01

    Toxicants potentially decouple links between biodiversity and ecosystem processes. This study aimed to evaluate how toxicants affect invertebrate bioturbation and decomposition. Effects of copper on functionally distinct macrofaunal species (Asellus aquaticus and Tubifex spp.), decomposition (release of dissolved organic carbon, DOC) and Average Metabolic Response (AMR) and Community Metabolic Diversity (CMD) of bacteria were determined in 5-day microcosm experiments. Bioturbation was assessed as sediment redox potential (Eh) profiles. Concentration–response curves of the functional parameters DOC, and the faunal mediated AMR and CMD in the presence of Tubifex spp. depended on Tubifex spp. survival, i.e. similar EC 50 values for both endpoints. In contrast, functional parameters in the presence of A. aquaticus were more sensitive than survival. Sediment Eh-profiles showed that reduced decomposition was caused by reduced sediment reworking by A. aquaticus at sub-lethal copper concentrations. These observations hint at a decoupling of invertebrate community structure and ecosystem functioning upon stress. -- Highlights: •We compared invertebrate survival and functional responses to copper amendment. •Differential functional responses depending on invertebrate species. •Reduced functional responses with A. aquaticus at sub-lethal copper concentrations. •Sub-lethal copper concentrations reduced the bioturbating activities of A. aquaticus. •Stress decouples invertebrate community structure and ecosystem functioning. -- Sub-lethal copper concentrations reduced the bioturbating activities of A. aquaticus and invertebrate effects on decomposition, bacterial activity and community metabolic diversity

  13. Quantitative analysis of TALE-DNA interactions suggests polarity effects.

    Meckler, Joshua F; Bhakta, Mital S; Kim, Moon-Soo; Ovadia, Robert; Habrian, Chris H; Zykovich, Artem; Yu, Abigail; Lockwood, Sarah H; Morbitzer, Robert; Elsäesser, Janett; Lahaye, Thomas; Segal, David J; Baldwin, Enoch P

    2013-04-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) have revolutionized the field of genome engineering. We present here a systematic assessment of TALE DNA recognition, using quantitative electrophoretic mobility shift assays and reporter gene activation assays. Within TALE proteins, tandem 34-amino acid repeats recognize one base pair each and direct sequence-specific DNA binding through repeat variable di-residues (RVDs). We found that RVD choice can affect affinity by four orders of magnitude, with the relative RVD contribution in the order NG > HD ≈ NN > NI > NK. The NN repeat preferred the base G over A, whereas the NK repeat bound G with 10(3)-fold lower affinity. We compared AvrBs3, a naturally occurring TALE that recognizes its target using some atypical RVD-base combinations, with a designed TALE that precisely matches 'standard' RVDs with the target bases. This comparison revealed unexpected differences in sensitivity to substitutions of the invariant 5'-T. Another surprising observation was that base mismatches at the 5' end of the target site had more disruptive effects on affinity than those at the 3' end, particularly in designed TALEs. These results provide evidence that TALE-DNA recognition exhibits a hitherto un-described polarity effect, in which the N-terminal repeats contribute more to affinity than C-terminal ones.

  14. Assessment of seismic wave effects on soil-structure interaction

    Bernreuter, D.L.

    1977-03-01

    It is normally assumed in the seismic analysis of structures that the free-field motion which is used as input is the same for all points on a given level beneath the foundation mat. This represents a simplification, as not all particles of soil describe the same motion simultaneously. As the foundation mat of the structure is rigid in the horizontal direction, it will tend to average the ground motion. Abandoning the assumption of the uniformity of the input motion may lead to a reduction of the translational motion which a foundation mat will experience, as the displacement components will cancel each other to a certain extent. This is of considerable interest for the design of nuclear power plants which are very stiff, large structures. To investigate these effects, the extremely complex phenomenon of the passage of a seismic wave has to be simplified considerably. It is the purpose of this paper to determine if wave passage effects can be determined from the simplified analyses currently used

  15. Temperature effects on interaction of positive ions with plastic detectors

    Mendoza Anaya, D.

    1992-01-01

    The range of heavy charged particles in matter is dependent mainly on two groups of parameters, one related to the particle characteristics (charge z, mass m, energy E) and the other characterized by the stopping medium (charge z, density ρ). Those two groups are enough to describe the particle energy lost, which is related to the residual range. Research on charge particles registration using solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD), probe that environmental parameters affect the stabilization and formation of the tracks. One of those, is the temperature detector which shows an important effect during the irradiation on the characteristics of the tracks produced. In order to study the dependence of track geometry as a function of irradiation temperature, some SSNTD (CR 39 type) were irradiated with α particles and fission fragments. Results of this work show the existence of irradiation temperature effect on the track geometry. It is observed a reduction of length and diameters, as temperature increases. For low irradiation temperatures, there is a reduction of the track geometry, as compared with environmental temperature. (Author)

  16. Management effect on bird and arthropod interaction in suburban woodlands

    2011-01-01

    Background Experiments from a range of ecosystems have shown that insectivorous birds are important in controlling the populations of their invertebrate prey. Here, we report on a large field experiment testing the hypothesis that management for enhancing recreational values in suburban woodlands affects the intensity of bird predation on canopy-living arthropods. Bird exclosures were used in two types of management (understory clearance and dense understory) at two foraging heights in oak Quercus robur canopies and the experiment was replicated at two sites. Results The biomass and abundance of arthropods were high on net-enclosed branches but strongly reduced on control branches in both types of management. In woods with dense understory, the effect of bird predation on arthropod abundance was about twice as high as in woods with understory clearance. The effect of bird predation on arthropod biomass was not significantly affected by management. Conclusions Our data provide experimental evidence to support the idea that bird predation on arthropods can be affected by forest management. We suggest that the mechanism is twofold: reduction of bird abundance and shift of foraging behaviour. In urban woodlands, there may be a management trade-off between enhancing recreational values and promoting bird predation rates on arthropods. PMID:21362174

  17. Soil Structure Interaction Effect on High Rise and Low Rise Buildings

    Divya Pathak; PAresh H. SHAH

    2000-01-01

    Effect of supporting soil on the response of structure has been analyzed in the present study. A low rise (G+ 5 storey) and a high rise (G+12 storey) building has been taken for the analysis. For both type of buildings, the response of building with and without consideration of soil structure interaction effect has been compared.Without interaction case is the case in which ends of the structure are assumed to be fixed while in interaction case, structure is assumed to be...

  18. Detecting treatment-subgroup interactions in clustered data with generalized linear mixed-effects model trees.

    Fokkema, M; Smits, N; Zeileis, A; Hothorn, T; Kelderman, H

    2017-10-25

    Identification of subgroups of patients for whom treatment A is more effective than treatment B, and vice versa, is of key importance to the development of personalized medicine. Tree-based algorithms are helpful tools for the detection of such interactions, but none of the available algorithms allow for taking into account clustered or nested dataset structures, which are particularly common in psychological research. Therefore, we propose the generalized linear mixed-effects model tree (GLMM tree) algorithm, which allows for the detection of treatment-subgroup interactions, while accounting for the clustered structure of a dataset. The algorithm uses model-based recursive partitioning to detect treatment-subgroup interactions, and a GLMM to estimate the random-effects parameters. In a simulation study, GLMM trees show higher accuracy in recovering treatment-subgroup interactions, higher predictive accuracy, and lower type II error rates than linear-model-based recursive partitioning and mixed-effects regression trees. Also, GLMM trees show somewhat higher predictive accuracy than linear mixed-effects models with pre-specified interaction effects, on average. We illustrate the application of GLMM trees on an individual patient-level data meta-analysis on treatments for depression. We conclude that GLMM trees are a promising exploratory tool for the detection of treatment-subgroup interactions in clustered datasets.

  19. Materazzi effect and the strategic use of anger in competitive interactions

    Gneezy, U.; Imas, A.

    2014-01-01

    We propose that individuals use anger strategically in interactions. We first show that in some environments angering people makes them more effective in competitions, whereas in others, anger makes them less effective. We then show that individuals anticipate these effects and strategically use the

  20. Freedom of Expression, Deliberation, Autonomy, and Respect

    Rostbøll, Christian Fogh

    for freedom of expression in terms of its relationship to different dimensions of autonomy. In response to the objection that Enlightenment theories pose a threat to cultures that reject autonomy, it is argued that autonomy-based democracy is not only compatible with but necessary for respect for cultural......The strongest versions of the democracy argument for freedom of expression rely on the deliberative conception of democracy. Deliberative democracy entails both an ideal of political autonomy and of autonomous preference formation. This paper elaborates the deliberative democracy argument...... diversity. On the basis of an intersubjective epistemology, I argue that citizens cannot know how to live on mutually respectful terms without engaging in public deliberation. Moreover, to be successful deliberation must foster some degree of personal autonomy, at least the ability to distinguish what...